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Sample records for candidate structured rnas

  1. Identification of candidate structured RNAs in the marine organism 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'

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    Schwalbach Michael S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic sequence data are proving to be a vast resource for the discovery of biological components. Yet analysis of this data to identify functional RNAs lags behind efforts to characterize protein diversity. The genome of 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique' HTCC 1062 is the closest match for approximately 20% of marine metagenomic sequence reads. It is also small, contains little non-coding DNA, and has strikingly low GC content. Results To aid the discovery of RNA motifs within the marine metagenome we exploited the genomic properties of 'Cand. P. ubique' by targeting our search to long intergenic regions (IGRs with relatively high GC content. Analysis of known RNAs (rRNA, tRNA, riboswitches etc. shows that structured RNAs are significantly enriched in such IGRs. To identify additional candidate structured RNAs, we examined other IGRs with similar characteristics from 'Cand. P. ubique' using comparative genomics approaches in conjunction with marine metagenomic data. Employing this strategy, we discovered four candidate structured RNAs including a new riboswitch class as well as three additional likely cis-regulatory elements that precede genes encoding ribosomal proteins S2 and S12, and the cytoplasmic protein component of the signal recognition particle. We also describe four additional potential RNA motifs with few or no examples occurring outside the metagenomic data. Conclusion This work begins the process of identifying functional RNA motifs present in the metagenomic data and illustrates how existing completed genomes may be used to aid in this task.

  2. Structural analysis of aligned RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Björn

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge about classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is growing very fast and it is mainly the structure which is the common characteristic property shared by members of the same class. For correct characterization of such classes it is therefore of great importance to analyse the structural features in great detail. In this manuscript I present RNAlishapes which combines various secondary structure analysis methods, such as suboptimal folding and shape abstraction, with a comparative approach known as RNA alignment folding. RNAlishapes makes use of an extended thermodynamic model and covariance scoring, which allows to reward covariation of paired bases. Applying the algorithm to a set of bacterial trp-operon leaders using shape abstraction it was able to identify the two alternating conformations of this attenuator. Besides providing in-depth analysis methods for aligned RNAs, the tool also shows a fairly well prediction accuracy. Therefore, RNAlishapes provides the community with a powerful tool for structural analysis of classes of RNAs and is also a reasonable method for consensus structure prediction based on sequence alignments. RNAlishapes is available for online use and download at http://rna.cyanolab.de. PMID:17020924

  3. Tackling Structures of Long Noncoding RNAs

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    Irina V. Novikova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available RNAs are important catalytic machines and regulators at every level of gene expression. A new class of RNAs has emerged called long non-coding RNAs, providing new insights into evolution, development and disease. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs predominantly found in higher eukaryotes, have been implicated in the regulation of transcription factors, chromatin-remodeling, hormone receptors and many other processes. The structural versatility of RNA allows it to perform various functions, ranging from precise protein recognition to catalysis and metabolite sensing. While major housekeeping RNA molecules have long been the focus of structural studies, lncRNAs remain the least characterized class, both structurally and functionally. Here, we review common methodologies used to tackle RNA structure, emphasizing their potential application to lncRNAs. When considering the complexity of lncRNAs and lack of knowledge of their structure, chemical probing appears to be an indispensable tool, with few restrictions in terms of size, quantity and heterogeneity of the RNA molecule. Probing is not constrained to in vitro analysis and can be adapted to high-throughput sequencing platforms. Significant efforts have been applied to develop new in vivo chemical probing reagents, new library construction protocols for sequencing platforms and improved RNA prediction software based on the experimental evidence.

  4. Identification of novel and candidate miRNAs in rice by high throughput sequencing

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    Zhang Weixiong

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNA-guided gene silencing at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels has emerged as an important mode of gene regulation in plants and animals. Thus far, conventional sequencing of small RNA libraries from rice led to the identification of most of the conserved miRNAs. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries is an effective approach to uncover rare and lineage- and/or species-specific microRNAs (miRNAs in any organism. Results In order to identify new miRNAs and possibly abiotic-stress regulated small RNAs in rice, three small RNA libraries were constructed from control rice seedlings and seedlings exposed to drought or salt stress, and then subjected to pyrosequencing. A total of 58,781, 43,003 and 80,990 unique genome-matching small RNAs were obtained from the control, drought and salt stress libraries, respectively. Sequence analysis confirmed the expression of most of the conserved miRNAs in rice. Importantly, 23 new miRNAs mostly each derived from a unique locus in rice genome were identified. Six of the new miRNAs are conserved in other monocots. Additionally, we identified 40 candidate miRNAs. Allowing not more than 3 mis-matches between a miRNA and its target mRNA, we predicted 20 targets for 9 of the new miRNAs. Conclusion Deep sequencing proved to be an effective strategy that allowed the discovery of 23 low-abundance new miRNAs and 40 candidate miRNAs in rice.

  5. Genome-wide discovery and verification of novel structured RNAs in Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Carret, Celine; Kyes, Sue;

    2008-01-01

    ncRNAs in P. falciparum and are not represented in any RNA databases. We provide supporting evidence for purifying selection acting on the experimentally verified ncRNAs by comparing the nucleotide substitutions in the predicted ncRNA candidate structures in P. falciparum with the closely related...

  6. Enumerating secondary structures and structural moieties for circular RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative characterization of the relationship between molecular sequence and structure is essential to improve our understanding of how function emerges. This particular genotype-phenotype map has been often studied in the context of RNA sequences, with the folded configurations standing as a proxy for the phenotype. Here, we count the secondary structures of circular RNAs of length $n$ and calculate the asymptotic distributions of different structural moieties, such as stems or hairpin loops, by means of symbolic combinatorics. Circular RNAs differ in essential ways from their linear counterparts. From the mathematical viewpoint, the enumeration of the corresponding secondary structures demands the use of combinatorial techniques additional to those used for linear RNAs. The asymptotic number of secondary structures for circular RNAs grows as $a^nn^{-5/2}$, with a depending on particular constraints applied to the secondary structure. The abundance of any structural moiety is normally distributed in th...

  7. Structured RNAs that evade or confound exonucleases: function follows form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M; Eiler, Daniel; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2016-02-01

    Cells contain powerful RNA decay machinery to eliminate unneeded RNA from the cell, and this process is an important and regulated part of controlling gene expression. However, certain structured RNAs have been found that can robustly resist degradation and extend the lifetime of an RNA. In this review, we present three RNA structures that use a specific three-dimensional fold to provide protection from RNA degradation, and discuss how the recently-solved structures of these RNAs explain their function. Specifically, we describe the Xrn1-resistant RNAs from arthropod-borne flaviviruses, exosome-resistant long non-coding RNAs associated with lung cancer metastasis and found in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and tRNA-like sequences occurring in certain plant viruses. These three structures reveal three different mechanisms to protect RNAs from decay and suggest RNA structure-based nuclease resistance may be a widespread mechanism of regulation. PMID:26797676

  8. Effects of GWAS-associated genetic variants on lncRNAs within IBD and T1D candidate loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Aashiq H; Kaur, Simranjeet; Brorsson, Caroline A;

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are a new class of non-coding RNAs that are at the crosshairs in many human diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular disorders, inflammatory and autoimmune disease like Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Nearly 90% of the phenotype-associated single......, we systemically identified all annotated IBD and T1D loci-associated lncRNAs, and mapped nominally significant GWAS/ImmunoChip SNPs for IBD and T1D within these lncRNAs. Additionally, we identified tissue-specific cis-eQTLs, and strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) signals associated with these SNPs....... We explored sequence and structure based attributes of these lncRNAs, and also predicted the structural effects of mapped SNPs within them. We also identified lncRNAs in IBD and T1D that are under recent positive selection. Our analysis identified putative lncRNA secondary structure-disruptive SNPs...

  9. Describing the structural robustness landscape of bacterial small RNAs

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    Rodrigo Guillermo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential role of RNA molecules as gene expression regulators has led to a new perspective on the intracellular control and genome organization. Because secondary structures are crucial for their regulatory role, we sought to investigate their robustness to mutations and environmental changes. Results Here, we dissected the structural robustness landscape of the small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs encoded in the genome of the bacterium Escherichia coli. We found that bacterial sncRNAs are not significantly robust to both mutational and environmental perturbations when compared against artificial, unbiased sequences. However, we found that, on average, bacterial sncRNAs tend to be significantly plastic, and that mutational and environmental robustness strongly correlate. We further found that, on average, epistasis in bacterial sncRNAs is significantly antagonistic, and positively correlates with plasticity. Moreover, the evolution of robustness is likely dependent upon the environmental stability of the cell, with more fluctuating environments leading to the emergence and fixation of more robust molecules. Mutational robustness also appears to be correlated with structural functionality and complexity. Conclusion Our study provides a deep characterization of the structural robustness landscape of bacterial sncRNAs, suggesting that evolvability could be evolved as a consequence of selection for more plastic molecules. It also supports that environmental fluctuations could promote mutational robustness. As a result, plasticity emerges to link robustness, functionality and evolvability.

  10. Alu element-containing RNAs maintain nucleolar structure and function.

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    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Seiler, Jeanette; Németh, Attila; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-11-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a key role in organizing the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By combining fluorescence microscopy and RNA deep-sequencing-based analysis, we found that RNA polymerase II transcripts originating from intronic Alu elements (aluRNAs) were enriched in the nucleolus. Antisense-oligo-mediated depletion of aluRNAs or drug-induced inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity disrupted nucleolar structure and impaired RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription of rRNA genes. In contrast, overexpression of a prototypic aluRNA sequence increased both nucleolus size and levels of pre-rRNA, suggesting a functional link between aluRNA, nucleolus integrity and pre-rRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we show that aluRNAs interact with nucleolin and target ectopic genomic loci to the nucleolus. Our study suggests an aluRNA-based mechanism that links RNA polymerase I and II activities and modulates nucleolar structure and rRNA production.

  11. Computational prediction of candidate miRNAs and their targets from the completed Linum ussitatissimum genome and EST database

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    Tiffanie Y. Moss

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Flax is an important agronomic crop grown for its fiber (linen and oil (linseed oil. In spite of many thousands of years of breeding some fiber varieties have been shown to rapidly respond to environmental stress with heritable changes to its genome. Many miRNAs appear to be induced by abiotic or biotic conditions experienced through the plant life cycle. Computational miRNA analysis of the flax genome provides a foundation for subsequent research on miRNA function in Linum usitatissimum and may also provide novel insight into any regulatory role the RNAi pathway may play in generating adaptive structural variation in response to environmental stress. Here a bioinformatics approach is used to screen for miRNAs previously identified in other plant species, as well as to predict putative miRNAs unique to a particular species which may not have been identified as they are less abundant or dependent upon a specific set of environmental conditions. Twelve miRNA genes were identified in flax on the basis of unique pre-miRNA positions with structural homology to plant pre-miRNAs and complete sequence homology to published plant miRNAs. These miRNAs were found to belong to 7 miRNA families, with an additional 2 matches corresponding to as yet unnamed poplar miRNAs and a parologous miRNA with partial sequence homology to mtr-miR4414b. An additional 649 novel and distinct flax miRNA genes were identified to form from canonical hairpin structures and to have putative targets among the ~30,000 flax Unigenes.

  12. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob H;

    2014-01-01

    Laurasiatheria (pig, cow, dolphin, horse, cat, dog, hedgehog). CONCLUSIONS: We have obtained one of the most comprehensive annotations for structured ncRNAs of a mammalian genome, which is likely to play central roles in both health modelling and production. The core annotation is available in Ensembl 70 and the...

  13. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob Hull;

    2014-01-01

    for Laurasiatheria (pig, cow, dolphin, horse, cat, dog, hedgehog). CONCLUSIONS: We have obtained one of the most comprehensive annotations for structured ncRNAs of a mammalian genome, which is likely to play central roles in both health modelling and production. The core annotation is available in Ensembl 70...

  14. CASE via MS: Ranking Structure Candidates by Mass Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Kerber, Adalbert; Meringer, Markus; Rücker, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Two important tasks in computer-aided structure elucidation (CASE) are the generation of candidate structures from a given molecular formula, and the ranking of structure candidates according to compatibility with an experimental spectrum. Candidate ranking with respect to electron impact mass spectra is based on virtual fragmentation of a candidate structure and comparison of the fragments’ isotope distributions against the spectrum of the unknown compound, whence a structure–spectrum compat...

  15. The structure and function of catalytic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Before the discovery of ribozymes,RNA had been proposed to function as a catalyst,based on the discovery that RNA folded into high-ordered structures as protein did.This hypothesis was confirmed in the 1980s,after the discovery of Tetrahymena group I intron and RNase P ribozyme.There have been about ten ribozymes identified during the past thirty years,as well as the fact that ribosomes function as ribozymes.Advances have been made in understanding the structures and functions of ribozymes,with numerous crystal structures resolved in the past years.Here we review the structure-function relationship of both small and large ribozymes,especially the structural basis of their catalysis.

  16. The structure and function of catalytic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU QiJia; HUANG Lin; ZHANG Yi

    2009-01-01

    Before the discovery of ribozymes, RNA had been proposed to function as a catalyst, based on the discovery that RNA folded into high-ordered structures as protein did. This hypothesis was confirmed in the 1980s, after the discovery of Tetrahymena group I intron and RNase P ribozyme. There have been about ten ribozymes identified during the past thirty years, as well as the fact that ribosomes function as ribozymes. Advances have been made in understanding the structures and functions of ribozymes, with numerous crystal structures resolved in the past years. Here we review the structure-function re-lationship of both small and large ribozymes, especially the structural basis of their catalysis.

  17. Alu element-containing RNAs maintain nucleolar structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Seiler, Jeanette; Németh, Attila; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-11-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a key role in organizing the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By combining fluorescence microscopy and RNA deep-sequencing-based analysis, we found that RNA polymerase II transcripts originating from intronic Alu elements (aluRNAs) were enriched in the nucleolus. Antisense-oligo-mediated depletion of aluRNAs or drug-induced inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity disrupted nucleolar structure and impaired RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription of rRNA genes. In contrast, overexpression of a prototypic aluRNA sequence increased both nucleolus size and levels of pre-rRNA, suggesting a functional link between aluRNA, nucleolus integrity and pre-rRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we show that aluRNAs interact with nucleolin and target ectopic genomic loci to the nucleolus. Our study suggests an aluRNA-based mechanism that links RNA polymerase I and II activities and modulates nucleolar structure and rRNA production. PMID:26464461

  18. Structured RNAs in the ENCODE selected regions of the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Washietl, Stefan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Korbel, Jan O;

    2007-01-01

    several thousand candidate structures (corresponding to approximately 2.7% of the ENCODE regions). EvoFold has its highest sensitivity in highly conserved and relatively AU-rich regions, while RNAz favors slightly GC-rich regions, resulting in a relatively small overlap between methods. Comparison...... with the GENCODE annotation points to functional RNAs in all genomic contexts, with a slightly increased density in 3'-UTRs. While we estimate a significant false discovery rate of approximately 50%-70% many of the predictions can be further substantiated by additional criteria: 248 loci are predicted by both RNAz...

  19. Comparing the three-dimensional structures of Dicistroviridae IGR IRES RNAs with other viral RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-02-01

    The intergenic region (IGR) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs do not require any of the canonical translation initiation factors to recruit the ribosome to the viral RNA, they eliminate the need for initiator tRNA, and they begin translation from the A-site. The function of these IRESs depends on a specific three-dimensional folded RNA structure. Thus, a complete understanding of the mechanisms of action of these IRESs requires that we understand their structure in detail. Recently, the structures of both domains of the IGR IRES RNAs were solved by X-ray crystallography, providing the first glimpse into an entire IRES RNA structure. Here, I present an analysis of these structures, emphasizing how the structures explain many aspects of IGR IRES function, discussing how these structures have similarities to motifs found in other viral RNAs, and illustrating how these structures give rise to new mechanistic hypotheses. PMID:18672012

  20. A genome-wide survey of highly expressed non-coding RNAs and biological validation of selected candidates in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

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    Keunsub Lee

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that has the natural ability of delivering and integrating a piece of its own DNA into plant genome. Although bacterial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have been shown to regulate various biological processes including virulence, we have limited knowledge of how Agrobacterium ncRNAs regulate this unique inter-Kingdom gene transfer. Using whole transcriptome sequencing and an ncRNA search algorithm developed for this work, we identified 475 highly expressed candidate ncRNAs from A. tumefaciens C58, including 101 trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs, 354 antisense RNAs (asRNAs, 20 5' untranslated region (UTR leaders including a RNA thermosensor and 6 riboswitches. Moreover, transcription start site (TSS mapping analysis revealed that about 51% of the mapped mRNAs have 5' UTRs longer than 60 nt, suggesting that numerous cis-acting regulatory elements might be encoded in the A. tumefaciens genome. Eighteen asRNAs were found on the complementary strands of virA, virB, virC, virD, and virE operons. Fifteen ncRNAs were induced and 7 were suppressed by the Agrobacterium virulence (vir gene inducer acetosyringone (AS, a phenolic compound secreted by the plants. Interestingly, fourteen of the AS-induced ncRNAs have putative vir box sequences in the upstream regions. We experimentally validated expression of 36 ncRNAs using Northern blot and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends analyses. We show functional relevance of two 5' UTR elements: a RNA thermonsensor (C1_109596F that may regulate translation of the major cold shock protein cspA, and a thi-box riboswitch (C1_2541934R that may transcriptionally regulate a thiamine biosynthesis operon, thiCOGG. Further studies on ncRNAs functions in this bacterium may provide insights and strategies that can be used to better manage pathogenic bacteria for plants and to improve Agrobacterum-mediated plant transformation.

  1. HD-RNAS: An automated hierarchical database of RNA structures

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    Shubhra Sankar eRay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the important goals of most biological investigations is to classify and organize the experimental findings so that they are readily useful for deriving generalized rules. Although there is a huge amount of information on RNA structures in PDB, there are redundant files, ambiguous synthetic sequences etc. Moreover, a systematic hierarchical organization, reflecting RNA classification, is missing in PDB. In this investigation, we have classified all the available RNA crystal structures from PDB through a programmatic approach. Hence, it would be now a simple assignment to regularly update the classification as and when new structures are released. The classification can further determine (i a non-redundant set of RNA structures and (ii if available, a set of structures of identical sequence and function, which can highlight structural polymorphism, ligand-induced conformational alterations etc. Presently, we have classified the available structures (2095 PDB entries having RNA chain longer than 9 nucleotides solved by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy into nine functional classes. The structures of same function and same source are mostly seen to be similar with subtle differences depending on their functional complexation. The web-server is available online at http://www.saha.ac.in/biop/www/HD-RNAS.html and is updated regularly.

  2. Structural and evolutionary analysis of the two chimpanzee alpha-globin mRNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhaber, S A; Begley, K A

    1983-01-01

    Two distinct alpha-globin mRNAs were detected in chimpanzee reticulocyte mRNA using a primer extension assay. DNA copies of these two mRNAs were cloned in the bacterial plasmid pBR322, and their sequence was determined. The two alpha-globin mRNAs have obvious structural homology to the two human alpha-globin mRNAs, alpha 1 and alpha 2. Comparison of the two chimpanzee alpha-globin mRNAs to each other and to their corresponding human counterparts revealed evidence of a recent gene conversion i...

  3. Fisher: a program for the detection of H/ACA snoRNAs using MFE secondary structure prediction and comparative genomics – assessment and update

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    Tamas Ivica

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The H/ACA family of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs plays a central role in guiding the pseudouridylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA. In an effort to systematically identify the complete set of rRNA-modifying H/ACA snoRNAs from the genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a program – Fisher – and previously presented several candidate snoRNAs based on our analysis 1. Findings In this report, we provide a brief update of this work, which was aborted after the publication of experimentally-identified snoRNAs 2 identical to candidates we had identified bioinformatically using Fisher. Our motivation for revisiting this work is to report on the status of the candidate snoRNAs described in 1, and secondly, to report that a modified version of Fisher together with the available multiple yeast genome sequences was able to correctly identify several H/ACA snoRNAs for modification sites not identified by the snoGPS program 3. While we are no longer developing Fisher, we briefly consider the merits of the Fisher algorithm relative to snoGPS, which may be of use for workers considering pursuing a similar search strategy for the identification of small RNAs. The modified source code for Fisher is made available as supplementary material. Conclusion Our results confirm the validity of using minimum free energy (MFE secondary structure prediction to guide comparative genomic screening for RNA families with few sequence constraints.

  4. Comparing the three-dimensional structures of Dicistroviridae IGR IRES RNAs with other viral RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    The intergenic region (IGR) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs do not require any of the canonical translation initiation factors to recruit the ribosome to the viral RNA, they eliminate the need for initiator tRNA, and they begin translation from the A-site. The function of these IRESs depends on a specific three-dimensional folded RNA structure. Thus, a complete understanding of the mechanisms of action of these IRESs requires that we understand their structure in detail. Recently, th...

  5. Expression Profiling and Structural Characterization of MicroRNAs in Adipose Tissues of Hibernating Ground Squirrels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Wei Wu; Kyle K. Biggar; Kenneth B. Storey

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are important in regulating metabolic stress. In this study, we determined the expression and structural characteristics of 20 miRNAs in brown (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) during torpor in thirteen-lined ground squirrels. Using a modified stem-loop technique, we found that during torpor, expression of six miRNAs including let-7a, let-7b, miR-107, miR-150, miR-222 and miR-31 was significantly downregulated in WAT (P < 0.05), which was 16%–54% of euthermic non-torpid control squirrels, whereas expression of three miRNAs including miR-143, miR-200a and miR-519d was found to be upregulated by 1.32–2.34-fold. Similarly, expression of more miRNAs was downregulated in BAT during torpor. We detected reduced expression of 6 miRNAs including miR-103a, miR- 107, miR-125b, miR-21, miR-221 and miR-31 (48%–70% of control), while only expression of miR-138 was significantly upregulated (2.91 ± 0.8-fold of the control, P <0.05). Interestingly, miRNAs found to be downregulated in WAT during torpor were similar to those dysregulated in obese humans for increased adipogenesis, whereas miRNAs with altered expression in BAT during torpor were linked to mitochondrial b-oxidation. miRPath target prediction analysis showed that miRNAs downregulated in both WAT and BAT were associated with the regulation of mitogen- activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, while the miRNAs upregulated in WAT were linked to transforming growth factor b (TGFb) signaling. Compared to mouse sequences, no unique nucleotide substitutions within the stem-loop region were discovered for the associated pre-miRNAs for the miRNAs used in this study, suggesting no structure-influenced changes in pre-miRNA processing efficiency in the squirrel. As well, the expression of miRNA processing enzyme Dicer remained unchanged in both tissues during torpor. Overall, our findings suggest that changes of miRNA expression in adipose tissues may be linked to

  6. Expression Profiling and Structural Characterization of MicroRNAs in Adipose Tissues of Hibernating Ground Squirrels

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    Cheng-Wei Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that are important in regulating metabolic stress. In this study, we determined the expression and structural characteristics of 20 miRNAs in brown (BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT during torpor in thirteen-lined ground squirrels. Using a modified stem-loop technique, we found that during torpor, expression of six miRNAs including let-7a, let-7b, miR-107, miR-150, miR-222 and miR-31 was significantly downregulated in WAT (P < 0.05, which was 16%–54% of euthermic non-torpid control squirrels, whereas expression of three miRNAs including miR-143, miR-200a and miR-519d was found to be upregulated by 1.32–2.34-fold. Similarly, expression of more miRNAs was downregulated in BAT during torpor. We detected reduced expression of 6 miRNAs including miR-103a, miR-107, miR-125b, miR-21, miR-221 and miR-31 (48%–70% of control, while only expression of miR-138 was significantly upregulated (2.91 ± 0.8-fold of the control, P < 0.05. Interestingly, miRNAs found to be downregulated in WAT during torpor were similar to those dysregulated in obese humans for increased adipogenesis, whereas miRNAs with altered expression in BAT during torpor were linked to mitochondrial β-oxidation. miRPath target prediction analysis showed that miRNAs downregulated in both WAT and BAT were associated with the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, while the miRNAs upregulated in WAT were linked to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ signaling. Compared to mouse sequences, no unique nucleotide substitutions within the stem-loop region were discovered for the associated pre-miRNAs for the miRNAs used in this study, suggesting no structure-influenced changes in pre-miRNA processing efficiency in the squirrel. As well, the expression of miRNA processing enzyme Dicer remained unchanged in both tissues during torpor. Overall, our findings suggest that changes of miRNA expression in adipose tissues may

  7. RScan: fast searching structural similarities for structured RNAs in large databases

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    Liu Guo-Ping

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many RNAs have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures instead of primary sequences. Recently, there are an increasing number of methods being developed with focus on the structural alignments for finding conserved secondary structures as well as common structural motifs in pair-wise or multiple sequences. A challenging task is to search similar structures quickly for structured RNA sequences in large genomic databases since existing methods are too slow to be used in large databases. Results An implementation of a fast structural alignment algorithm, RScan, is proposed to fulfill the task. RScan is developed by levering the advantages of both hashing algorithms and local alignment algorithms. In our experiment, on the average, the times for searching a tRNA and an rRNA in the randomized A. pernix genome are only 256 seconds and 832 seconds respectively by using RScan, but need 3,178 seconds and 8,951 seconds respectively by using an existing method RSEARCH. Remarkably, RScan can handle large database queries, taking less than 4 minutes for searching similar structures for a microRNA precursor in human chromosome 21. Conclusion These results indicate that RScan is a preferable choice for real-life application of searching structural similarities for structured RNAs in large databases. RScan software is freely available at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/member/cxue/rscan/RScan.htm.

  8. Biogenesis and Mechanism of Action of Small Non-Coding RNAs: Insights from the Point of View of Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marina C.; Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Enguita, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs are dominant in the genomic output of the higher organisms being not simply occasional transcripts with idiosyncratic functions, but constituting an extensive regulatory network. Among all the species of non-coding RNAs, small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs, siRNAs and piRNAs) have been shown to be in the core of the regulatory machinery of all the genomic output in eukaryotic cells. Small non-coding RNAs are produced by several pathways containing specialized enzymes that process RNA transcripts. The mechanism of action of these molecules is also ensured by a group of effector proteins that are commonly engaged within high molecular weight protein-RNA complexes. In the last decade, the contribution of structural biology has been essential to the dissection of the molecular mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and function of small non-coding RNAs. PMID:22949860

  9. Self containment, a property of modular RNA structures, distinguishes microRNAs.

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    Miler T Lee

    Full Text Available RNA molecules will tend to adopt a folded conformation through the pairing of bases on a single strand; the resulting so-called secondary structure is critical to the function of many types of RNA. The secondary structure of a particular substring of functional RNA may depend on its surrounding sequence. Yet, some RNAs such as microRNAs retain their specific structures during biogenesis, which involves extraction of the substructure from a larger structural context, while other functional RNAs may be composed of a fusion of independent substructures. Such observations raise the question of whether particular functional RNA substructures may be selected for invariance of secondary structure to their surrounding nucleotide context. We define the property of self containment to be the tendency for an RNA sequence to robustly adopt the same optimal secondary structure regardless of whether it exists in isolation or is a substring of a longer sequence of arbitrary nucleotide content. We measured degree of self containment using a scoring method we call the self-containment index and found that miRNA stem loops exhibit high self containment, consistent with the requirement for structural invariance imposed by the miRNA biogenesis pathway, while most other structured RNAs do not. Further analysis revealed a trend toward higher self containment among clustered and conserved miRNAs, suggesting that high self containment may be a characteristic of novel miRNAs acquiring new genomic contexts. We found that miRNAs display significantly enhanced self containment compared to other functional RNAs, but we also found a trend toward natural selection for self containment in most functional RNA classes. We suggest that self containment arises out of selection for robustness against perturbations, invariance during biogenesis, and modular composition of structural function. Analysis of self containment will be important for both annotation and design of functional

  10. MASTR: multiple alignment and structure prediction of non-coding RNAs using simulated annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Stinus; Gardner, Paul P; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    multiple alignment of RNA sequences. Using Markov chain Monte Carlo in a simulated annealing framework, the algorithm MASTR (Multiple Alignment of STructural RNAs) iteratively improves both sequence alignment and structure prediction for a set of RNA sequences. This is done by minimizing a combined cost...

  11. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2011-01-01

    upon some of the concepts in current methods that have been applied in genomic screens for de novo RNA structures in searches for novel ncRNA genes and regulatory RNA structure on mRNAs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies and how they can complement each other....

  12. Computational prediction of candidate miRNAs and their targets from the completed Linum ussitatissimum genome and EST database

    OpenAIRE

    Tiffanie Y. Moss; Cullis, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Flax is an important agronomic crop grown for its fiber (linen) and oil (linseed oil). In spite of many thousands of years of breeding some fiber varieties have been shown to rapidly respond to environmental stress with heritable changes to its genome. Many miRNAs appear to be induced by abiotic or biotic conditions experienced through the plant life cycle. Computational miRNA analysis of the flax genome provides a foundation for subsequent research on miRNA function in Linum usitatissimum an...

  13. Conserved miRNAs are candidate post-transcriptional regulators of developmental arrest in free-living and parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rina; Chang, Zisong; Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Langnick, Claudia; Li, Na; Chen, Wei; Brattig, Norbert; Dieterich, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Animal development is complex yet surprisingly robust. Animals may develop alternative phenotypes conditional on environmental changes. Under unfavorable conditions, Caenorhabditis elegans larvae enter the dauer stage, a developmentally arrested, long-lived, and stress-resistant state. Dauer larvae of free-living nematodes and infective larvae of parasitic nematodes share many traits including a conserved endocrine signaling module (DA/DAF-12), which is essential for the formation of dauer and infective larvae. We speculated that conserved post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism might also be involved in executing the dauer and infective larvae fate. We used an unbiased sequencing strategy to characterize the microRNA (miRNA) gene complement in C. elegans, Pristionchus pacificus, and Strongyloides ratti. Our study raised the number of described miRNA genes to 257 for C. elegans, tripled the known gene set for P. pacificus to 362 miRNAs, and is the first to describe miRNAs in a Strongyloides parasite. Moreover, we found a limited core set of 24 conserved miRNA families in all three species. Interestingly, our estimated expression fold changes between dauer versus nondauer stages and infective larvae versus free-living stages reveal that despite the speed of miRNA gene set evolution in nematodes, homologous gene families with conserved "dauer-infective" expression signatures are present. These findings suggest that common post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are at work and that the same miRNA families play important roles in developmental arrest and long-term survival in free-living and parasitic nematodes.

  14. Expression profiling and structural characterization of microRNAs in adipose tissues of hibernating ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei; Biggar, Kyle K; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are important in regulating metabolic stress. In this study, we determined the expression and structural characteristics of 20 miRNAs in brown (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) during torpor in thirteen-lined ground squirrels. Using a modified stem-loop technique, we found that during torpor, expression of six miRNAs including let-7a, let-7b, miR-107, miR-150, miR-222 and miR-31 was significantly downregulated in WAT (Pstructure-influenced changes in pre-miRNA processing efficiency in the squirrel. As well, the expression of miRNA processing enzyme Dicer remained unchanged in both tissues during torpor. Overall, our findings suggest that changes of miRNA expression in adipose tissues may be linked to distinct biological roles in WAT and BAT during hibernation and may involve the regulation of signaling cascades.

  15. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and mRNAs

  16. Structure and evolution of barley powdery mildew effector candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Carsten

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein effectors of pathogenicity are instrumental in modulating host immunity and disease resistance. The powdery mildew pathogen of grasses Blumeria graminis causes one of the most important diseases of cereal crops. B. graminis is an obligate biotrophic pathogen and as such has an absolute requirement to suppress or avoid host immunity if it is to survive and cause disease. Results Here we characterise a superfamily predicted to be the full complement of Candidates for Secreted Effector Proteins (CSEPs in the fungal barley powdery mildew parasite B. graminis f.sp. hordei. The 491 genes encoding these proteins constitute over 7% of this pathogen’s annotated genes and most were grouped into 72 families of up to 59 members. They were predominantly expressed in the intracellular feeding structures called haustoria, and proteins specifically associated with the haustoria were identified by large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomics. There are two major types of effector families: one comprises shorter proteins (100–150 amino acids, with a high relative expression level in the haustoria and evidence of extensive diversifying selection between paralogs; the second type consists of longer proteins (300–400 amino acids, with lower levels of differential expression and evidence of purifying selection between paralogs. An analysis of the predicted protein structures underscores their overall similarity to known fungal effectors, but also highlights unexpected structural affinities to ribonucleases throughout the entire effector super-family. Candidate effector genes belonging to the same family are loosely clustered in the genome and are associated with repetitive DNA derived from retro-transposons. Conclusions We employed the full complement of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses as well as structural prediction methods to identify and characterize the members of the CSEPs superfamily in B. graminis f

  17. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  18. Computational RNomics:Structure identification and functional prediction of non-coding RNAs in silico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome contains varying numbers of non-coding RNA(ncRNA) genes."Computational RNomics" takes a multidisciplinary approach,like information science,to resolve the structure and function of ncRNAs.Here,we review the main issues in "Computational RNomics" of data storage and management,ncRNA gene identification and characterization,ncRNA target identification and functional prediction,and we summarize the main methods and current content of "computational RNomics".

  19. LocARNA-P: Accurate boundary prediction and improved detection of structural RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Will, Sebastian; Joshi, Tejal; Hofacker, Ivo L.;

    2012-01-01

    from AUC 0.71 to AUC 0.87, significantly reduces the cost of successive analysis steps. The ready-to-use software tool LocARNA-P produces structure-based multiple RNA alignments with associated columnwise STARs and predicts ncRNA boundaries. We provide additional results, a web server for Loc...... on sequence and structure similarity; we refer to these structure-based alignment reliabilities as STARs. The columnwise STARs of alignments, or STAR profiles, provide a versatile tool for the manual and automatic analysis of ncRNAs. In particular, we improve the boundary prediction of the widely...

  20. The structures of nonprotein-coding RNAs that drive internal ribosome entry site function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are RNA sequences that can recruit the translation machinery independent of the 5' end of the messenger RNA. IRESs are found in both viral and cellular RNAs and are important for regulating gene expression. There is great diversity in the mechanisms used by IRESs to recruit the ribosome and this is reflected in a variety of RNA sequences that function as IRESs. The ability of an RNA sequence to function as an IRES is conferred by structures operating at multiple levels from primary sequence through higher-order three-dimensional structures within dynamic ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). When these diverse structures are compared, some trends are apparent, but overall it is not possible to find universal rules to describe IRES structure and mechanism. Clearly, many different sequences and structures have evolved to perform the function of recruiting, positioning, and activating a ribosome without using the canonical cap-dependent mechanism. However, as our understanding of the specific sequences, structures, and mechanisms behind IRES function improves, more common features may emerge to link these diverse RNAs. PMID:22215521

  1. Secondary structures of rRNAs from all three domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton S Petrov

    Full Text Available Accurate secondary structures are important for understanding ribosomes, which are extremely large and highly complex. Using 3D structures of ribosomes as input, we have revised and corrected traditional secondary (2° structures of rRNAs. We identify helices by specific geometric and molecular interaction criteria, not by co-variation. The structural approach allows us to incorporate non-canonical base pairs on parity with Watson-Crick base pairs. The resulting rRNA 2° structures are up-to-date and consistent with three-dimensional structures, and are information-rich. These 2° structures are relatively simple to understand and are amenable to reproduction and modification by end-users. The 2° structures made available here broadly sample the phylogenetic tree and are mapped with a variety of data related to molecular interactions and geometry, phylogeny and evolution. We have generated 2° structures for both large subunit (LSU 23S/28S and small subunit (SSU 16S/18S rRNAs of Escherichia coli, Thermus thermophilus, Haloarcula marismortui (LSU rRNA only, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens. We provide high-resolution editable versions of the 2° structures in several file formats. For the SSU rRNA, the 2° structures use an intuitive representation of the central pseudoknot where base triples are presented as pairs of base pairs. Both LSU and SSU secondary maps are available (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RibosomeGallery. Mapping of data onto 2° structures was performed on the RiboVision server (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RiboVision.

  2. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-04-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function.

  3. Unique Gene-Silencing and Structural Properties of 2;#8242;-Fluoro-Modified siRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoharan, Muthiah; Akinc, Akin; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Qin, June; Hadwiger, Philipp; John, Matthias; Mills, Kathy; Charisse, Klaus; Maier, Martin A.; Nechev, Lubomir; Greene, Emily M.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Rozners, Eriks; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Egli, Martin (Binghamton); (Alnylam Pharm.); (Vanderbilt)

    2015-10-15

    With little or no negative impact on the activity of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), regardless of the number of modifications or the positions within the strand, the 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) modification is unique. Furthermore, the 2'-F-modified siRNA (see crystal structure) was thermodynamically more stable and more nuclease-resistant than the parent siRNA, and produced no immunostimulatory response.

  4. Identification of Candidate Target Cyp Genes for microRNAs Whose Expression Is Altered by PCN and TCPOBOP, Representative Ligands of PXR and CAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Nozomu; Kataoka, Hiromi; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Kugawa, Fumihiko

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in mRNA post-transcriptional regulation. The deregulation of miRNAs affects the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors, all of which are important in regulating drug metabolism. miRNA expression can be altered by several endogenous or exogenous agents, such as steroid hormones, carcinogens, and therapeutic drugs. However, it is unclear whether hepatic miRNA expression is regulated by nuclear receptors, such as pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), which are indispensable for the expression of the CYPs. Here we investigated the effects of the mouse PXR and CAR ligands pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile (PCN) and 1,4-bis[(3,5-dichloropyridin-2-yl)oxy]benzene (TCPOBOP) on hepatic miRNA expression in mice. We found that the expression of 9 miRNAs was increased (>2-fold) and of 4 miRNAs was decreased (>50%) in response to PCN, while TCPOBOP treatment led to the up-regulation of 8 miRNAs and down-regulation of 6 miRNAs. Using several miRNA target prediction algorithms, we found that the predicted target genes included several lesser known Cyp genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1b1, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c38, Cyp2u1, Cyp4a12a/b, Cyp4v3, Cyp17a1, Cyp39a1, and Cyp51). We analyzed the expression of these genes in response to PCN and TCPOBOP and found changes in their mRNA levels, some of which were negatively correlated with the expression of their corresponding miRNAs, suggesting that miRNAs may play a role in regulating Cyp enzyme expression. Further studies will be required to fully elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms that contribute to modulating CYP expression.

  5. Identification of Candidate Target Cyp Genes for microRNAs Whose Expression Is Altered by PCN and TCPOBOP, Representative Ligands of PXR and CAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Nozomu; Kataoka, Hiromi; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Kugawa, Fumihiko

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in mRNA post-transcriptional regulation. The deregulation of miRNAs affects the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors, all of which are important in regulating drug metabolism. miRNA expression can be altered by several endogenous or exogenous agents, such as steroid hormones, carcinogens, and therapeutic drugs. However, it is unclear whether hepatic miRNA expression is regulated by nuclear receptors, such as pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), which are indispensable for the expression of the CYPs. Here we investigated the effects of the mouse PXR and CAR ligands pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile (PCN) and 1,4-bis[(3,5-dichloropyridin-2-yl)oxy]benzene (TCPOBOP) on hepatic miRNA expression in mice. We found that the expression of 9 miRNAs was increased (>2-fold) and of 4 miRNAs was decreased (>50%) in response to PCN, while TCPOBOP treatment led to the up-regulation of 8 miRNAs and down-regulation of 6 miRNAs. Using several miRNA target prediction algorithms, we found that the predicted target genes included several lesser known Cyp genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1b1, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c38, Cyp2u1, Cyp4a12a/b, Cyp4v3, Cyp17a1, Cyp39a1, and Cyp51). We analyzed the expression of these genes in response to PCN and TCPOBOP and found changes in their mRNA levels, some of which were negatively correlated with the expression of their corresponding miRNAs, suggesting that miRNAs may play a role in regulating Cyp enzyme expression. Further studies will be required to fully elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms that contribute to modulating CYP expression. PMID:27237601

  6. Specific structural probing of plasmid-coded ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, C; Rosendahl, G; Dam, M;

    1991-01-01

    The preferred method for construction and in vivo expression of mutagenised Escherichia coli ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) is via high copy number plasmids. Transcription of wild-type rRNA from the seven chromosomal rrn operons in strains harbouring plasmid-coded mutant rRNAs leads to a heterogeneous...

  7. De novo prediction of structured RNAs from genomic sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Þórarinsson, Elfar;

    2010-01-01

    Growing recognition of the numerous, diverse and important roles played by non-coding RNA in all organisms motivates better elucidation of these cellular components. Comparative genomics is a powerful tool for this task and is arguably preferable to any high-throughput experimental technology...... currently available, because evolutionary conservation highlights functionally important regions. Conserved secondary structure, rather than primary sequence, is the hallmark of many functionally important RNAs, because compensatory substitutions in base-paired regions preserve structure. Unfortunately......, such substitutions also obscure sequence identity and confound alignment algorithms, which complicates analysis greatly. This paper surveys recent computational advances in this difficult arena, which have enabled genome-scale prediction of cross-species conserved RNA elements. These predictions...

  8. Structure and kinematics of candidate double-barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, A V; Chavushyan, V H

    2003-01-01

    Results of optical and NIR spectral and photometric observations of a sample of candidate double-barred galaxies are presented. Velocity fields and velocity dispersion maps of stars and ionized gas, continuum and emission-line images were constructed from integral-field spectroscopy observations carried out at the 6m telescope (BTA) of SAO RAS, with the MPFS spectrograph and the scanning Fabry-Perot Interferometer. NGC2681 was also observed with long-slit spectrograph of the BTA. Optical and NIR images were obtained at the BTA and at the 2.1m telescope (OAN, M\\'exico). High-resolution images were retrieved from the HST data archive. Morphological and kinematic features of all 13 sample objects are described in detail. Attention is focused on the interpretation of observed non-circular motions of gas and stars in circumnuclear (one kiloparsec- scale) regions. We have shown first of all that these motions are caused by a gravitational potential of large-scale bar. NGC3368 and NGC3786 have nuclear bars only, the...

  9. Identifying cancer-causing noncoding RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Sage, Carlos Karel

    2008-01-01

    To circumvent the dependency on prediction models, we developed a microRNA-screen-based assay to establish links between cellular phenotypes and microRNAs (miRNAs). To this end, a miRNA expression library (miR-Lib) was built consisting of 300 annotated miRNAs and around 100 candidate miRNAs. These m

  10. Computational identification of four spliceosomal snRNAs from the deep-branching eukaryote Giardia intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Sylvia Chen

    Full Text Available RNAs processing other RNAs is very general in eukaryotes, but is not clear to what extent it is ancestral to eukaryotes. Here we focus on pre-mRNA splicing, one of the most important RNA-processing mechanisms in eukaryotes. In most eukaryotes splicing is predominantly catalysed by the major spliceosome complex, which consists of five uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs and over 200 proteins in humans. Three major spliceosomal introns have been found experimentally in Giardia; one Giardia U-snRNA (U5 and a number of spliceosomal proteins have also been identified. However, because of the low sequence similarity between the Giardia ncRNAs and those of other eukaryotes, the other U-snRNAs of Giardia had not been found. Using two computational methods, candidates for Giardia U1, U2, U4 and U6 snRNAs were identified in this study and shown by RT-PCR to be expressed. We found that identifying a U2 candidate helped identify U6 and U4 based on interactions between them. Secondary structural modelling of the Giardia U-snRNA candidates revealed typical features of eukaryotic U-snRNAs. We demonstrate a successful approach to combine computational and experimental methods to identify expected ncRNAs in a highly divergent protist genome. Our findings reinforce the conclusion that spliceosomal small-nuclear RNAs existed in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes.

  11. Corrosion mechanisms of candidate structural materials for supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lefu ZHANG; Fawen ZHU; Rui TANG

    2009-01-01

    Nickel-based alloys, austenitic stainless steel, ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel are presently considered to be the candidate structural or fuel-cladding materials for supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), one of the promising generation IV reactor for large-scale electric power production. However, corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of these candidate alloys still remain to be a major problem in the selection of nuclear fuel cladding and other structural materials, such as water rod. Survey of literature and experimental results reveal that the general corrosion mechanism of those candidate materials exhibits quite complicated mechanism in high-temperature and high-pressure supercritical water. Formation of a stable protective oxide film is the key to the best corrosion-resistant alloys. This paper focuses on the mechanism of corrosion oxide film breakdown for SCWR candidate materials.

  12. Crystal structures of complexes containing domains from two viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs bound to the 70S ribosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jianyu; Korostelev, Andrei; Costantino, David A.; Donohue, John P.; Noller, Harry F.; Kieft, Jeffrey S. (UCSC); (Colorado)

    2011-08-24

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are elements of viral or cellular mRNAs that bypass steps of canonical eukaryotic cap-dependent translation initiation. Understanding of the structural basis of IRES mechanisms is limited, partially due to a lack of high-resolution structures of IRES RNAs bound to their cellular targets. Prompted by the universal phylogenetic conservation of the ribosomal P site, we solved the crystal structures of proposed P site binding domains from two intergenic region IRES RNAs bound to bacterial 70S ribosomes. The structures show that these IRES domains nearly perfectly mimic a tRNA-mRNA interaction. However, there are clear differences in the global shape and position of this IRES domain in the intersubunit space compared to those of tRNA, supporting a mechanism for IRES action that invokes hybrid state mimicry to drive a noncanonical mode of translocation. These structures suggest how relatively small structured RNAs can manipulate complex biological machines.

  13. miRNA expression profiling of the murine TH-MYCN neuroblastoma model reveals similarities with human tumors and identifies novel candidate miRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Terrile

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs are small molecules which regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally and aberrant expression of several miRNAs is associated with neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Amplification of the MYCN transcription factor characterizes the most clinically aggressive subtype of this disease, and although alteration of p53 signaling is not commonly found in primary tumors, deregulation of proteins involved in this pathway frequently arise in recurrent disease after pharmacological treatment. TH-MYCN is a well-characterized transgenic model of MYCN-driven neuroblastoma which recapitulates many clinicopathologic features of the human disease. Here, we evaluate the dysregulation of miRNAs in tumors from TH-MYCN mice that are either wild-type (TH-MYCN or deficient (TH-MYCN/p53ER(TAM for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the expression of 591 miRNAs in control (adrenal and neuroblastoma tumor tissues derived from either TH-MYCN or TH-MYCN/p53ER(TAM mice, respectively wild-type or deficient in p53. Comparing miRNA expression in tumor and control samples, we identified 159 differentially expressed miRNAs. Using data previously obtained from human neuroblastoma samples, we performed a comparison of miRNA expression between murine and human tumors to assess the concordance between murine and human expression data. Notably, the miR-17-5p-92 oncogenic polycistronic cluster, which is over-expressed in human MYCN amplified tumors, was over-expressed in mouse tumors. Moreover, analyzing miRNAs expression in a mouse model (TH-MYCN/p53ER(TAM possessing a transgenic p53 allele that drives the expression of an inactive protein, we identified miR-125b-3p and miR-676 as directly or indirectly regulated by the level of functional p53. SIGNIFICANCE: Our study represents the first miRNA profiling of an important mouse model of neuroblastoma. Similarities and

  14. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  15. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  16. MaturePred: efficient identification of microRNAs within novel plant pre-miRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a set of short (19∼24 nt non-coding RNAs that play significant roles as posttranscriptional regulators in animals and plants. The ab initio prediction methods show excellent performance for discovering new pre-miRNAs. While most of these methods can distinguish real pre-miRNAs from pseudo pre-miRNAs, few can predict the positions of miRNAs. Among the existing methods that can also predict the miRNA positions, most of them are designed for mammalian miRNAs, including human and mouse. Minority of methods can predict the positions of plant miRNAs. Accurate prediction of the miRNA positions remains a challenge, especially for plant miRNAs. This motivates us to develop MaturePred, a machine learning method based on support vector machine, to predict the positions of plant miRNAs for the new plant pre-miRNA candidates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A miRNA:miRNA* duplex is regarded as a whole to capture the binding characteristics of miRNAs. We extract the position-specific features, the energy related features, the structure related features, and stability related features from real/pseudo miRNA:miRNA* duplexes. A set of informative features are selected to improve the prediction accuracy. Two-stage sample selection algorithm is proposed to combat the serious imbalance problem between real and pseudo miRNA:miRNA* duplexes. The prediction method, MaturePred, can accurately predict plant miRNAs and achieve higher prediction accuracy compared with the existing methods. Further, we trained a prediction model with animal data to predict animal miRNAs. The model also achieves higher prediction performance. It further confirms the efficiency of our miRNA prediction method. CONCLUSIONS: The superior performance of the proposed prediction model can be attributed to the extracted features of plant miRNAs and miRNA*s, the selected training dataset, and the carefully selected features. The web service of MaturePred, the

  17. Changes in microRNAs expression are involved in age-related atrial structural remodeling and atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guo-jun; GAN Tian-yi; TANG Bao-peng; CHEN Zu-heng; Mahemuti Ailiman; ZHOU Xian-hui; JIANG Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Small noncoding microRNAs regulate gene expression in cardiac development and disease and have been implicated in the aging process and in the regulation of extracellular matrix proteins.However,their role in age-related cardiac remodeling and atrial fibrillation (AF) was not well understood.The present study was designed to decipher molecular mechanisms underlying age-related atrial structural remodeling and AF.Methods Three groups of dogs were studied:adult and aged dogs in sinus rhythm and with persistent AF induced by rapid atrial pacing.The expressions of microRNAs were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.Pathohistological and ultrastructural changes were tested by light and electron microscopy.Apoptosis index of myocytes was detected by TUNEL.Results Samples of atrial tissue showed the abnormal pathohistological and ultrastructural changes,the accelerated fibrosis,and apoptosis with aging and/or in AF dogs.Compared to the adult group,the expressions of microRNAs-21 and -29 were significantly increased,whereas the expressions of microRNAs-1 and-133 showed obvious downregulation tendency in the aged group.Compared to the aged group,the expressions of microRNAs-1,-21,and-29 was significantly increased in the old group in AF; contrastingly,the expressions of microRNA-133 showed obvious downregulation tendency.Conclusion These multiple aberrantly expressed microRNAs may be responsible for modulating the transition from adaptation to pathological atrial remodeling with aging and/or in AF.

  18. A coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs: predicting 3D structure, stability and salt effect

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2014-01-01

    To bridge the gap between the sequences and 3-dimensional (3D) structures of RNAs, some computational models have been proposed for predicting RNA 3D structures. However, the existed models seldom consider the conditions departing from the room/body temperature and high salt (1M NaCl), and thus generally hardly predict the thermodynamics and salt effect. In this study, we propose a coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs to predict 3D structures, stability and salt effect. Combined with Monte Carlo simulated annealing algorithm and a coarse-grained force field, the model folds 46 tested RNAs (less than or equal to 45 nt) including pseudoknots into their native-like structures from their sequences, with an overall mean RMSD of 3.5 {\\AA} and an overall minimum RMSD of 1.9 {\\AA} from the experimental structures. For 30 RNA hairpins, the present model also gives the reliable predictions for the stability and salt effect with the mean deviation ~ 1.0 degrees Celsius of melting temperatures, as compared wi...

  19. A three-dimensional measurement method based on mesh candidates assisted with structured light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, Wenming; Li, Haibin; Liu, Bin

    2009-07-01

    Rendering three-dimensional information of a scene from optical measurement is very important for a wide variety of applications such as robot navigation, rapid prototyping, medical imaging, industrial inspection, etc. In this paper, a new 3D measurement method based on mesh candidate with structured light illuminating is proposed. The vision sensor consists of two CCD cameras and a DLP projector. The measurement system combines the technology of binocular stereo vision and structured light, so as to simplify the process of acquiring depth information using mesh candidates. The measurement method is based on mesh candidates which represent the potential depth in the three dimensional scene. First the mesh grid was created along the direction of axes in world coordinate system, and the nodes were considered as depth candidates on the surface of object. Then each group of the mesh nodes varying along z axis were mapped to the captured image planes of both cameras. At last, according to the similarity measure of the corresponding pixel pairs, the depth of the object surface can be obtained. The matching process is between the pixels in both camera planes corresponding to the spatial mesh candidates. Aided by the structured light pattern, the accuracy of measurement system improved. Appending the periodic sawtooth pattern on the scene by structured light made measurement easier, while the computational cost did not increased since the projector had no need to be calibrated. The 3DS MAX and Matlab software were used to simulate measurement system and reconstruct the surface of the object. After the positioned cameras have been calibrated using Matlab calibration toolbox, the projector is used to project structured light pattern on the scene. Indicated by experimental results, the mesh-candidate-based method is obviously superior in computation and accuracy. Compared with traditional methods based on image matching, our method has several advantages: (1) the complex

  20. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  1. Identification of microRNAs in wild soybean (Glycine soja).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Hu, Zheng; Zhang, Hui

    2009-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene silencing by directing target mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. Currently, hundreds of miRNAs have been identified in plants, but no report has been published of wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb). We constructed a small-RNA library consisting of 2 880 sequences with high quality, in which 1 347 were 19-24 nt in length. By utilizing the miRNA, Rfam and domesticated soybean expressed sequence tag database, we have analyzed and predicted the secondary structure of these small RNAs. As a result, 15 conserved miRNA candidates belonging to eight different families and nine novel miRNA candidates comprising eight families were identified in wild soybean seedlings. All these miRNA candidates were validated by northern blot and the novel candidates expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Furthermore, putative target genes were predicted for novel miRNA candidates and two of them were verified by 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends experiments. These results provided useful information for miRNA research in wild soybean and plants.

  2. Identification of MicroRNAs in Wild Soybean (Glycine soja)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Chen; Zheng Hu; Hui Zhang

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene silencing by directing target mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. Currently, hundreds of miRNAs have been identified in plants, but no report has been published of wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb). We constructed a small-RNA library consisting of 2 880 sequences with high quality,in which 1 347 were 19-24 nt in length. By utilizing the miRNA, Rfam and domesticated soybean expressed sequence tag database, we have analyzed and predicted the secondary structure of these small RNAs. As a result, 15 conserved miRNA candidates belonging to eight different families and nine novel miRNA candidates comprising eight families were identified in wild soybean seedlings. All these miRNA candidates were validated by northern blot and the novel candidates expressed In a tissue-specific manner. Furthermore, putative target genes were predicted for novel miRNA candidates and two of them were verified by 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends experiments. These results provided useful information for miRNA research in wild soybean and plants.

  3. Surface states and bulk electronic structure in the candidate type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno, F. Y.; Tamai, A.; Wu, Q. S.; Cucchi, I.; Barreteau, C.; A. de la Torre; Walker, S. McKeown; Riccò, S; Wang, Z.; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M.; Shi, M. (Mimi); Plumb, N. C.; Giannini, E; Soluyanov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report angle-resolved photoemission experiments identifying an arc-like surface state connecting the bulk electron and hole pockets of the candidate type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2. This surface state can be isolated clearly on one of two distinct surface terminations observed experimentally, which we associate with the in-equivalent top and bottom surfaces of the non-centrosymmetric crystal structure. We further use the identification of the two different surfaces to clarify the number of bul...

  4. Associating schizophrenia, long non-coding RNAs and neurostructural dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eMerelo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component. But the exact nature and functional role of this genetic component in the pathophysiology of this mental illness remains a mystery. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a recently discovered family of molecules that regulate gene transcription through a variety of means. Consequently, lncRNAs could help us bring together apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia; namely, genomic deficiencies on one side and neuroimaging, as well as postmortem results on the other. In fact, the most consistent finding in schizophrenia is decreased brain size together with enlarged ventricles. This anomaly appears to originate from shorter and less ramified dendrites and axons. But a decrease in neuronal arborizations cannot explain the complex pathophysiology of this psychotic disorder; however, dynamic changes in neuronal structure present throughout life could. It is well recognized that the structure of developing neurons is extremely plastic. This structural plasticity was thought to stop with brain development. However, breakthrough discoveries have shown that neuronal structure retains some degree of plasticity throughout life. What the neuroscientific field is still trying to understand is how these dynamic changes are regulated and lncRNAs represent promising candidates to fill this knowledge gap. Here, we present evidence that associates specific lncRNAs with schizophrenia. We then discuss the potential role of lncRNAs in neurostructural dynamics. Finally, we explain how dynamic neurostructural modifications present throughout life could, in theory, reconcile apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia.

  5. Identification of RNA sequences and structures involved in site-specific cleavage of IGF-II mRNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, E L; Sussenbach, J S; Holthuizen, P E

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region (UTR), rendering an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb consisting of the 3'-UTR sequence and the poly(A) tail. Previously, it was established that two widely separated elements in the 3'-UTR (elements I and II), that can form a duplex structure, are necessary and sufficient for cleavage. To furth...

  6. Crystal structures of complexes containing domains from two viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs bound to the 70S ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianyu; Korostelev, Andrei; Costantino, David A; Donohue, John P; Noller, Harry F; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2011-02-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are elements of viral or cellular mRNAs that bypass steps of canonical eukaryotic cap-dependent translation initiation. Understanding of the structural basis of IRES mechanisms is limited, partially due to a lack of high-resolution structures of IRES RNAs bound to their cellular targets. Prompted by the universal phylogenetic conservation of the ribosomal P site, we solved the crystal structures of proposed P site binding domains from two intergenic region IRES RNAs bound to bacterial 70S ribosomes. The structures show that these IRES domains nearly perfectly mimic a tRNA • mRNA interaction. However, there are clear differences in the global shape and position of this IRES domain in the intersubunit space compared to those of tRNA, supporting a mechanism for IRES action that invokes hybrid state mimicry to drive a noncanonical mode of translocation. These structures suggest how relatively small structured RNAs can manipulate complex biological machines. PMID:21245352

  7. Rapid discovery of peptide capture candidates with demonstrated specificity for structurally similar toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    Peptides have emerged as viable alternatives to antibodies for molecular-based sensing due to their similarity in recognition ability despite their relative structural simplicity. Various methods for peptide capture reagent discovery exist, including phage display, yeast display, and bacterial display. One of the primary advantages of peptide discovery by bacterial display technology is the speed to candidate peptide capture agent, due to both rapid growth of bacteria and direct utilization of the sorted cells displaying each individual peptide for the subsequent round of biopanning. We have previously isolated peptide affinity reagents towards protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis using a commercially available automated magnetic sorting platform with improved enrichment as compared to manual magnetic sorting. In this work, we focus on adapting our automated biopanning method to a more challenging sort, to demonstrate the specificity possible with peptide capture agents. This was achieved using non-toxic, recombinant variants of ricin and abrin, RiVax and abrax, respectively, which are structurally similar Type II ribosomal inactivating proteins with significant sequence homology. After only two rounds of biopanning, enrichment of peptide capture candidates binding abrax but not RiVax was achieved as demonstrated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) studies. Further sorting optimization included negative sorting against RiVax, proper selection of autoMACS programs for specific sorting rounds, and using freshly made buffer and freshly thawed protein target for each round of biopanning for continued enrichment over all four rounds. Most of the resulting candidates from biopanning for abrax binding peptides were able to bind abrax but not RiVax, demonstrating that short peptide sequences can be highly specific even at this early discovery stage.

  8. Structure and interactions of a malarial vaccine candidate, AMA1, form the parasite plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), a merozoite surface protein found in all species of Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites, is a strong candidate for inclusion in a malarial vaccine. Recombinant AMA1 protected against P. fragile in monkeys and P. chabaudi adami in mice. P. falciparum AMA1 which has a 62-kDa ectodomain consisting of three disulphide-stabilised domains, is a target of antibodies that inhibit merozoite invasion in vitro. Here we describe the solution structure of domain III (14 kDa), determined by NMR on 15N- and 13C/15N-labelled samples. It has a well-defined disulphide-stabilised core interrupted by a disordered loop, and both the N- and C-terminal regions of the molecule are unstructured. The structured region includes all three disulphide bonds. Naturally-occurring mutations across 11 different P falciparum strains that are located far apart in the sequence cluster around the disulphide core in the 3D structure of domain III, suggesting that this region contains the major epitopes recognised by neutralising antibodies. Consistent with this, the disulphide-bond stabilised conformation of the ectodomain was essential for protection, as the antigen was not an effective vaccine after reduction and alkylation. Peptides have been found by phage display that bind to AMA1 and block merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. We have investigated their solution structures and interaction with full-length AMA1 ectodomain in an effort to understand the structure-function relationships of this important vaccine candidate

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of genes encoding vaccine candidate antigens of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenet Stella M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major concern in malaria vaccine development is genetic polymorphisms typically observed among Plasmodium isolates in different geographical areas across the world. Highly polymorphic regions have been observed in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antigenic surface proteins such as Circumsporozoite protein (CSP, Duffy-binding protein (DBP, Merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1, Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 and Thrombospondin related anonymous protein (TRAP. Methods Genetic variability was assessed in important polymorphic regions of various vaccine candidate antigens in P. vivax among 106 isolates from the Amazon Region of Loreto, Peru. In addition, genetic diversity determined in Peruvian isolates was compared to population studies from various geographical locations worldwide. Results The structured diversity found in P. vivax populations did not show a geographic pattern and haplotypes from all gene candidates were distributed worldwide. In addition, evidence of balancing selection was found in polymorphic regions of the trap, dbp and ama-1 genes. Conclusions It is important to have a good representation of the haplotypes circulating worldwide when implementing a vaccine, regardless of the geographic region of deployment since selective pressure plays an important role in structuring antigen diversity.

  10. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  11. Inforna 2.0: A Platform for the Sequence-Based Design of Small Molecules Targeting Structured RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D; Winkelsas, Audrey M; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Southern, Mark; Fallahi, Mohammad; Childs-Disney, Jessica L

    2016-06-17

    The development of small molecules that target RNA is challenging yet, if successful, could advance the development of chemical probes to study RNA function or precision therapeutics to treat RNA-mediated disease. Previously, we described Inforna, an approach that can mine motifs (secondary structures) within target RNAs, which is deduced from the RNA sequence, and compare them to a database of known RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. Output generated by Inforna includes the motif found in both the database and the desired RNA target, lead small molecules for that target, and other related meta-data. Lead small molecules can then be tested for binding and affecting cellular (dys)function. Herein, we describe Inforna 2.0, which incorporates all known RNA motif-small molecule binding partners reported in the scientific literature, a chemical similarity searching feature, and an improved user interface and is freely available via an online web server. By incorporation of interactions identified by other laboratories, the database has been doubled, containing 1936 RNA motif-small molecule interactions, including 244 unique small molecules and 1331 motifs. Interestingly, chemotype analysis of the compounds that bind RNA in the database reveals features in small molecule chemotypes that are privileged for binding. Further, this updated database expanded the number of cellular RNAs to which lead compounds can be identified.

  12. Mechanical properties data of candidate alloys for earth penetrator structural components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Den Avyle, J A

    1978-04-01

    Loading modes imposed on earth penetrators during impact and subsurface travel include high rate axial compressive stresses and possibly large tensile bending stresses caused by off-axis impacts or collisions with hard sub-surface objects. These modes require that case structural alloys possess a high yield strength to prevent yielding under compressive loads and also possess high fracture toughness to resist fracture under tensile loading at stress concentrations. Tensile data were generated at intermediate strain rates (epsilon less than 300 sec/sup -1/) between 219 and 344/sup 0/K for four candidate steels (9-4-20, maraging 250, HY-180, and D6AC). In general, yield strengths varied less than 10 percent over the ranges of strain rate and temperature tested. Charpy impact energy measurements on 9-4-20 showed a 10 percent decrease in toughness at low temperatures for samples subjected to a simulated heat-shrink fitting procedure. Additional fracture toughness tests (K/sub IC/) were conducted on 9-4-20 with varied tempering treatments and on two forged billets of HY-180. Strength and toughness data for several candidate alloys gathered from the literature are presented, and recommendations are made for trade-offs in strength versus toughness.

  13. Evidence of novel fine-scale structural variation at autism spectrum disorder candidate loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedges Dale J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD represent a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by a core set of social-communicative and behavioral impairments. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, acting primarily via the GABA receptors (GABR. Multiple lines of evidence, including altered GABA and GABA receptor expression in autistic patients, indicate that the GABAergic system may be involved in the etiology of autism. Methods As copy number variations (CNVs, particularly rare and de novo CNVs, have now been implicated in ASD risk, we examined the GABA receptors and genes in related pathways for structural variation that may be associated with autism. We further extended our candidate gene set to include 19 genes and regions that had either been directly implicated in the autism literature or were directly related (via function or ancestry to these primary candidates. For the high resolution CNV screen we employed custom-designed 244 k comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays. Collectively, our probes spanned a total of 11 Mb of GABA-related and additional candidate regions with a density of approximately one probe every 200 nucleotides, allowing a theoretical resolution for detection of CNVs of approximately 1 kb or greater on average. One hundred and sixty-eight autism cases and 149 control individuals were screened for structural variants. Prioritized CNV events were confirmed using quantitative PCR, and confirmed loci were evaluated on an additional set of 170 cases and 170 control individuals that were not included in the original discovery set. Loci that remained interesting were subsequently screened via quantitative PCR on an additional set of 755 cases and 1,809 unaffected family members. Results Results include rare deletions in autistic individuals at JAKMIP1, NRXN1, Neuroligin4Y, OXTR, and ABAT. Common insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected at several

  14. Profiling microRNAs in lung tissue from pigs infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podolska Agnieszka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-protein-coding genes that play a crucial regulatory role in mammalian development and disease. Whereas a large number of miRNAs have been annotated at the structural level during the latest years, functional annotation is sparse. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP causes serious lung infections in pigs. Severe damage to the lungs, in many cases deadly, is caused by toxins released by the bacterium and to some degree by host mediated tissue damage. However, understanding of the role of microRNAs in the course of this infectious disease in porcine is still very limited. Results In this study, the RNA extracted from visually unaffected and necrotic tissue from pigs infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was subjected to small RNA deep sequencing. We identified 169 conserved and 11 candidate novel microRNAs in the pig. Of these, 17 were significantly up-regulated in the necrotic sample and 12 were down-regulated. The expression analysis of a number of candidates revealed microRNAs of potential importance in the innate immune response. MiR-155, a known key player in inflammation, was found expressed in both samples. Moreover, miR-664-5p, miR-451 and miR-15a appear as very promising candidates for microRNAs involved in response to pathogen infection. Conclusions This is the first study revealing significant differences in composition and expression profiles of miRNAs in lungs infected with a bacterial pathogen. Our results extend annotation of microRNA in pig and provide insight into the role of a number of microRNAs in regulation of bacteria induced immune and inflammatory response in porcine lung.

  15. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  16. Global patterns of abundance, diversity and community structure of the Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim F Farag

    Full Text Available We investigated the global patterns of abundance, diversity, and community structure of members of the Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8. Our aim was to identify the putative ecological role(s played by members of this poorly characterized bacterial lineages in various ecosystems. Analysis of near full-length 16S rRNA genes identified four classes and eight orders within the Aminicenantes. Within 3,134 datasets comprising ∼1.8 billion high throughput-generated partial 16S rRNA genes, 47,351 Aminicenantes-affiliated sequences were identified in 913 datasets. The Aminicenantes exhibited the highest relative abundance in hydrocarbon-impacted environments, followed by marine habitats (especially hydrothermal vents and coral-associated microbiome samples, and aquatic, non-marine habitats (especially in terrestrial springs and groundwater samples. While the overall abundance of the Aminicenantes was higher in low oxygen tension as well as non-saline and low salinity habitats, it was encountered in a wide range of oxygen tension, salinities, and temperatures. Analysis of the community structure of the Aminicenantes showed distinct patterns across various datasets that appear to be, mostly, driven by habitat variations rather than prevalent environmental parameters. We argue that the detection of the Aminicenantes across environmental extremes and the observed distinct community structure patterns reflect a high level of intraphylum metabolic diversity and adaptive capabilities that enable its survival and growth in a wide range of habitats and environmental conditions.

  17. Higher order structural effects stabilizing the reverse watson-crick guanine-cytosine base pair in functional RNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2013-10-10

    The G:C reverse Watson-Crick (W:W trans) base pair, also known as Levitt base pair in the context of tRNAs, is a structurally and functionally important base pair that contributes to tertiary interactions joining distant domains in functional RNA molecules and also participates in metabolite binding in riboswitches. We previously indicated that the isolated G:C W:W trans base pair is a rather unstable geometry, and that dicationic metal binding to the Guanine base or posttranscriptional modification of the Guanine can increase its stability. Herein, we extend our survey and report on other H-bonding interactions that can increase the stability of this base pair. To this aim, we performed a bioinformatics search of the PDB to locate all the occurencies of G:C trans base pairs. Interestingly, 66% of the G:C trans base pairs in the PDB are engaged in additional H-bonding interactions with other bases, the RNA backbone or structured water molecules. High level quantum mechanical calculations on a data set of representative crystal structures were performed to shed light on the structural stability and energetics of the various crystallographic motifs. This analysis was extended to the binding of the preQ1 metabolite to a preQ1-II riboswitch. 2013 The Author(s).

  18. Brain expressed microRNAs implicated in schizophrenia etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Line; Lindow, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    Protein encoding genes have long been the major targets for research in schizophrenia genetics. However, with the identification of regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) as important in brain development and function, miRNAs genes have emerged as candidates for schizophrenia-associated genetic factors...

  19. Computational Characterization of Exogenous MicroRNAs that Can Be Transferred into Human Circulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Shu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have been long considered synthesized endogenously until very recent discoveries showing that human can absorb dietary microRNAs from animal and plant origins while the mechanism remains unknown. Compelling evidences of microRNAs from rice, milk, and honeysuckle transported to human blood and tissues have created a high volume of interests in the fundamental questions that which and how exogenous microRNAs can be transferred into human circulation and possibly exert functions in humans. Here we present an integrated genomics and computational analysis to study the potential deciding features of transportable microRNAs. Specifically, we analyzed all publicly available microRNAs, a total of 34,612 from 194 species, with 1,102 features derived from the microRNA sequence and structure. Through in-depth bioinformatics analysis, 8 groups of discriminative features have been used to characterize human circulating microRNAs and infer the likelihood that a microRNA will get transferred into human circulation. For example, 345 dietary microRNAs have been predicted as highly transportable candidates where 117 of them have identical sequences with their homologs in human and 73 are known to be associated with exosomes. Through a milk feeding experiment, we have validated 9 cow-milk microRNAs in human plasma using microRNA-sequencing analysis, including the top ranked microRNAs such as bta-miR-487b, miR-181b, and miR-421. The implications in health-related processes have been illustrated in the functional analysis. This work demonstrates the data-driven computational analysis is highly promising to study novel molecular characteristics of transportable microRNAs while bypassing the complex mechanistic details.

  20. Secondary structure models of the 3′ untranslated regions of diverse R2 RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUSCHAK, AMY M.; MATHEWS, DAVID H.; BIBILLO, ARKADIUSZ; SPINELLI, SHERRY L.; CHILDS, JESSICA L.; EICKBUSH, THOMAS H.; TURNER, DOUGLAS H.

    2004-01-01

    The RNA structure of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the R2 retrotransposable element is recognized by the R2-encoded reverse transcriptase in a reaction called target primed reverse transcription (TPRT). To provide insight into structure–function relationships important for TPRT, we have created alignments that reveal the secondary structure for 22 Drosophila and five silkmoth 3′ UTR R2 sequences. In addition, free energy minimization has been used to predict the secondary structure for the 3′ UTR R2 RNA of Forficula auricularia. The predicted structures for Bombyx mori and F. auricularia are consistent with chemical modification data obtained with β-ethoxy-α-ketobutyraldehyde (kethoxal), dimethyl sulfate, and 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate. The structures appear to have common helices that are likely important for function. PMID:15146081

  1. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of candidate structural materials in supercritical pressurized water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, Hwanil, E-mail: hwanil.je@gmail.com; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-15

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW) was investigated for the candidate structural steels of advanced fusion and fission nuclear system, which are SUS316L austenitic steel, F82H ferritic–martensitic steel and SOC-16 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel. In order to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC with those materials, slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out at 773 K, under a pressure of 25 MPa of SCPW with deaerated condition. High temperature tensile test in vacuum at 773 K was also performed to compare the deformation and fracture behavior between corrosive environment of SCPW and non-corrosive environment. Although SUS316L showed a change in the fracture mode in the deaerated SCPW from an entire ductile fracture at higher strain rate to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture at lower one, the fracture mode of ODS steel and F82H was not changed in the tested strain rate range. Both the IGSCC and TGSCC were observed in SUS316L. And F82H steel suffered from much severer oxidation than SUS316L and SOC-16.

  2. Structural characterization of the mechanosensitive channel candidate MCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Shigematsu

    Full Text Available Mechanosensing in plants is thought to be governed by sensory complexes containing a Ca²⁺-permeable, mechanosensitive channel. The plasma membrane protein MCA1 and its paralog MCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana are involved in mechanical stress-induced Ca²⁺ influx and are thus considered as candidates for such channels or their regulators. Both MCA1 and MCA2 were functionally expressed in Sf9 cells using a baculovirus system in order to elucidate their molecular natures. Because of the abundance of protein in these cells, MCA2 was chosen for purification. Purified MCA2 in a detergent-solubilized state formed a tetramer, which was confirmed by chemical cross-linking. Single-particle analysis of cryo-electron microscope images was performed to depict the overall shape of the purified protein. The three-dimensional structure of MCA2 was reconstructed at a resolution of 26 Å from 5,500 particles and appears to comprise a small transmembrane region and large cytoplasmic region.

  3. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-04-26

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs.

  4. Structure-activity relationship analysis of cytotoxic cyanoguanidines: selection of CHS 828 as candidate drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullbo Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-(6-(4-chlorophenoxyhexyl-N'-cyano-N''-4-pyridyl guanidine (CHS 828 is the first candidate drug from a novel group of anti-tumour agents – the pyridyl cyanoguanidines, shown to be potent compounds interfering with cellular metabolism (inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and NF-κB signalling. Substituted cyanoguanidines are also found in anti-hypertensive agents such as the potassium channel opener pinacidil (N-cyano-N'-(4-pyridyl-N''-(1,2,2-trimethylpropylguanidine and histamine-II receptor antagonists (e.g. cimetidine, N-cyano-N'-methyl-N''-[2-[[(5-methylimidazol-4-yl]methyl]thio]ethylguanidine. In animal studies, CHS 828 has shown very promising activity, and phase I and II studies resulted in further development of a with a water soluble prodrug. Findings To study the structural requirements for cyanoguanidine cytotoxicity a set of 19 analogues were synthesized. The cytotoxic effects were then studied in ten cell lines selected for different origins and mechanisms of resistance, using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA. The compounds showed varying cytotoxic activity even though the dose-response curves for some analogues were very shallow. Pinacidil and cimetidine were found to be non-toxic in all ten cell lines. Starting with cyanoguanidine as the crucial core it was shown that 4-pyridyl substitution was more efficient than was 3-pyridyl substitution. The 4-pyridyl cyanoguanidine moiety should be linked by an alkyl chain, optimally a hexyl, heptyl or octyl chain, to a bulky end group. The exact composition of this end group did not seem to be of crucial importance; when the end group was a mono-substituted phenyl ring it was shown that the preferred position was 4-substitution, followed by 3- and, finally, 2-substitution as the least active. Whether the substituent was a chloro, nitro or methoxy substituent seemed to be of minor importance. Finally, the activity patterns in the

  5. Trash or Treasure: extracellular microRNAs and cell-to-cell communication

    OpenAIRE

    Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Hagiwara, Keitaro; Tominaga, Naoomi; Katsuda, Takeshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Circulating RNAs in human body fluids are promising candidates for diagnostic purposes. However, the biological significance of circulating RNAs remains elusive. Recently, small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), were isolated from multiple human body fluids, and these “circulating miRNAs” have been implicated as novel disease biomarkers. Concurrently, miRNAs were also identified in the extracellular space associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are small membrane vesicles secre...

  6. U7 snRNAs: A Computational Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mania Marz; Axel Mosig; B(a)rbel M.R. Stadler; Peter F. Stadler

    2007-01-01

    U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) sequences have been described only for a handful of animal species in the past. Here we describe a computational search for func- tional U7 snRNA genes throughout vertebrates including the upstream sequence elements characteristic for snRNAs transcribed by polymerase Ⅱ. Based on the results of this search, we discuss the high variability of U7 snRNAs in both se- quence and structure, and report on an attempt to find U7 snRNA sequences in basal deuterostomes and non-drosophilids insect genomes based on a combination of sequence, structure, and promoter features. Due to the extremely short se- quence and the high variability in both sequence and structure, no unambiguous candidates were found. These results cast doubt on putative U7 homologs in even more distant organisms that are reported in the most recent release of the Rfam database.

  7. Determining the cognitive structures of science teacher candidates on “evolution” through word association test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu ÖNEL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to determine the conceptual comprehension of science teacher candidates on evolution. As part of this target, the Word Association Test was applied. This study was conducted with the participation of 146 teacher candidates studying in the Department of Science Education. Of the 146 teacher candidates, 89 mostly wrote the words; “evolution” (f=43, “Darwin” (f=36, and “ape” (f=10 as primary concepts in the word association test. This result illustrated that when the word “evolution” was pronounced, 61% of teacher candidates firstly remembered these three words as primary concepts. This study has demonstrated once more that there are misunderstandings and missing data on the evolutionary theory despite the past 156 years from the emergence of this theory.

  8. Experimental identification and analysis of macronuclear non-coding RNAs from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg; Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    expressed during vegetative growth or sexual reorganization. In order to get an overview of medium-sized (40-500¿nt) RNAs expressed from the Tetrahymena genome, we created a size-fractionated cDNA library from macronuclear RNA and analyzed 80 RNAs, most of which were previously unknown. The most abundant......The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is an important eukaryotic model organism that has been used in pioneering studies of general phenomena, such as ribozymes, telomeres, chromatin structure and genome reorganization. Recent work has shown that Tetrahymena has many classes of small RNA molecules...... domain of ribosomal RNA. Of particular interest, we detected two methylations in the 5'-end of U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) that has an unusual structure in Tetrahymena. Further, we found a candidate for the first U8 outside metazoans, and an unusual U14 candidate. In addition, a number of candidates...

  9. DASHR: database of small human noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yuk Yee; Kuksa, Pavel P; Amlie-Wolf, Alexandre; Valladares, Otto; Ungar, Lyle H; Kannan, Sampath; Gregory, Brian D; Wang, Li-San

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are highly abundant RNAs, typically database provides searchable, unified annotation, and expression information for full sncRNA transcripts and mature RNA products derived from these larger RNAs. Here, we present the Database of small human noncoding RNAs (DASHR). DASHR contains the most comprehensive information to date on human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products. DASHR provides a simple user interface for researchers to view sequence and secondary structure, compare expression levels, and evidence of specific processing across all sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products in various human tissues. DASHR annotation and expression data covers all major classes of sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting (piRNAs), small nuclear, nucleolar, cytoplasmic (sn-, sno-, scRNAs, respectively), transfer (tRNAs), and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Currently, DASHR (v1.0) integrates 187 smRNA high-throughput sequencing (smRNA-seq) datasets with over 2.5 billion reads and annotation data from multiple public sources. DASHR contains annotations for ∼ 48,000 human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products, 82% of which are expressed in one or more of the curated tissues. DASHR is available at http://lisanwanglab.org/DASHR.

  10. Bioinformatics analysis suggests base modifications of tRNAs and miRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hailing

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modifications of RNA bases have been found in some mRNAs and non-coding RNAs including rRNAs, tRNAs, and snRNAs, where modified bases are important for RNA function. Little is known about RNA base modifications in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results In the current work, we carried out a bioinformatics analysis of RNA base modifications in tRNAs and miRNAs using large numbers of cDNA sequences of small RNAs (sRNAs generated with the 454 technology and the massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS method. We looked for sRNAs that map to the genome sequence with one-base mismatch (OMM, which indicate candidate modified nucleotides. We obtained 1,187 sites with possible RNA base modifications supported by both 454 and MPSS sequences. Seven hundred and three of these sites were within tRNA loci. Nucleotide substitutions were frequently located in the T arm (substitutions from A to U or G, upstream of the D arm (from G to C, U, or A, and downstream of the D arm (from G to U. The positions of major substitution sites corresponded with the following known RNA base modifications in tRNAs: N1-methyladenosine (m1A, N2-methylguanosine (m2G, and N2-N2-methylguanosine (m22G. Conclusion These results indicate that our bioinformatics method successfully detected modified nucleotides in tRNAs. Using this method, we also found 147 substitution sites in miRNA loci. As with tRNAs, substitutions from A to U or G and from G to C, U, or A were common, suggesting that base modifications might be similar in tRNAs and miRNAs. We suggest that miRNAs contain modified bases and such modifications might be important for miRNA maturation and/or function.

  11. Alu-directed transcriptional regulation of some novel miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xi W

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite many studies on the biogenesis, molecular structure and biological functions of microRNAs, little is known about the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms controlling the spatiotemporal expression pattern of human miRNA gene loci. Several lines of experimental results have indicated that both polymerase II (Pol-II and polymerase III (Pol-III may be involved in transcribing miRNAs. Here, we assessed the genomic evidence for Alu-directed transcriptional regulation of some novel miRNA genes in humans. Our data demonstrate that the expression of these Alu-related miRNAs may be modulated by Pol-III. Results We present a comprehensive exploration of the Alu-directed transcriptional regulation of some new miRNAs. Using a new computational approach, a variety of Alu-related sequences from multiple sources were pooled and filtered to obtain a subset containing Alu elements and characterized miRNA genes for which there is clear evidence of full-length transcription (embedded in EST. We systematically demonstrated that 73 miRNAs including five known ones may be transcribed by Pol-III through Alu or MIR. Among the new miRNAs, 33 were determined by high-throughput Solexa sequencing. Real-time TaqMan PCR and Northern blotting verified that three newly identified miRNAs could be induced to co-express with their upstream Alu transcripts by heat shock or cycloheximide. Conclusion Through genomic analysis, Solexa sequencing and experimental validation, we have identified candidate sequences for Alu-related miRNAs, and have found that the transcription of these miRNAs could be governed by Pol-III. Thus, this study may elucidate the mechanisms by which the expression of a class of small RNAs may be regulated by their upstream repeat elements.

  12. Identification and characterization of new plant microRNAs using EST analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Hong ZHANG; Xiao Ping PAN; Qing Lian WANG; George P.COBB; Todd A.ANDERSON

    2005-01-01

    Seventy-five previously known plant microRNAs (miRNAs) were classified into 14 families according to their gene sequence identity. A total of 18,694 plant expressed sequence tags (EST) were found in the GenBank EST databases by comparing all previously known Arabidopsis miRNAs to GenBank's plant EST databases with BLAST algorithms. After removing the EST sequences with high numbers (more than 2) of mismatched nucleotides, a total of 812 EST contigs were identified. After predicting and scoring the RNA secondary structure of the 812 EST sequences using mFold software, 338 new potential miRNAs were identified in 60 plant species, miRNAs are widespread. Some microRNAs may highly conserve in the plant kingdom, and they may have the same ancestor in very early evolution. There is no nucleotide substitution in most miRNAs among many plant species. Some of the new identified potential miRNAs may be induced and regulated by environmental biotic and abiotic stresses. Some may be preferentially expressed in specific tissues, and are regulated by developmental switching. These findings suggest that EST analysis is a good alternative strategy for identifying new miRNA candidates, their targets, and other genes. A large number of miRNAs exist in different plant species and play important roles in plant developmental switching and plant responses to environmental abiotic and biotic stresses as well as signal transduction. Environmental stresses and developmental switching may be the signals for synthesis and regulation of miRNAs in plants. A model for miRNA induction and expression, and gene regulation by miRNA is hypothesized.

  13. Inner Structure of Protostellar Collapse Candidate B335 Derived from Millimeter-Wave Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Daniel W. A.; Wilner, David J.; Myers, Philip C.; Tafalla, Mario; Mardones, Diego

    2003-02-01

    We present a study of the density structure of the protostellar collapse candidate B335 using continuum observations from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer made at wavelengths of 1.2 and 3.0 mm. We analyze these data, which probe spatial scales from 5000 to 500 AU, directly in the visibility domain by comparison with synthetic observations constructed from models that assume different physical conditions. This approach allows for much more stringent constraints to be derived from the data than from analysis of images. A single radial power law in density provides a good description of the data, with a best-fit power-law density index p=1.65+/-0.05. Through simulations, we quantify the sensitivity of this result to various model uncertainties, including assumptions of temperature distribution, outer boundary, dust opacity spectral index, and an unresolved central component. The largest uncertainty comes from the unknown presence of a centralized point source. The maximal point source, with 1.2 mm flux of F=12+/-7 mJy, reduces the power-law density index to p=1.47+/-0.07. The remaining sources of systematic uncertainty, of which the most important is the radial dependence of the temperature distribution, likely contribute a total uncertainty at the level of δpcrude model of the outflow as a hollow bipolar cone of constant opening angle improves the fit and leaves the resulting density power-law index unchanged. These results conform well to the generic paradigm of isolated, low-mass star formation, which predicts a power-law density index close to p=1.5 for an inner region of gravitational free fall onto the protostar. However, the standard inside-out collapse model does not fit the data as successfully as a simple p=1.5 power law, because of the relative shallowness of the predicted density profile just within the infall radius. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG

  14. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the western world for both men and women. Lung cancer appears to be a perfect candidate for a screening program, since it is the number one cancer killer, it has a long preclinical phase, curative treatment for the minority of patients who are diagnosed early and a target population at risk (smokers and it is also a major economic burden. The earliest approaches to identifying cancer markers were based on preliminary clinical or pathological observations, although molecular biology is a strong candidate for occupying a place among the set of methods. In search of markers, several alterations, such as mutations, loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite instability, DNA methylation, mitochondrial DNA mutations, viral DNA, modified expression of mRNA, miRNA and proteins, and structurally altered proteins have all been analysed. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small RNA molecules, about 19-25 nucleotides long and encoded in genomes of plants, animals, fungi and viruses. It has been reported that miRNAs may have multiple functions in lung development and that aberrant expression of miRNAs could induce lung tumorigenesis. We review here the role of miRNAs in lung tumorigenesis and also as a novel type of biomarker.-----------------------------------Cite this article as:Silva J, Garcia V, Lopez-Gonzalez A, Provencio M. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:010111. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0101.11

  15. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paydar Ima

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are small (~22 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate cell movement, specification, and development. Expression of miRNAs is highly regulated, both spatially and temporally. Based on direct cloning, sequence conservation, and predicted secondary structures, a large number of miRNAs have been identified in higher eukaryotic genomes but whether these RNAs are simply a subset of a much larger number of noncoding RNA families is unknown. This is especially true in zebrafish where genome sequencing and annotation is not yet complete. Results We analyzed the zebrafish genome to identify the number and location of proven and predicted miRNAs resulting in the identification of 35 new miRNAs. We then grouped all 415 zebrafish miRNAs into families based on seed sequence identity as a means to identify possible functional redundancy. Based on genomic location and expression analysis, we also identified those miRNAs that are likely to be encoded as part of polycistronic transcripts. Lastly, as a resource, we compiled existing zebrafish miRNA expression data and, where possible, listed all experimentally proven mRNA targets. Conclusion Current analysis indicates the zebrafish genome encodes 415 miRNAs which can be grouped into 44 families. The largest of these families (the miR-430 family contains 72 members largely clustered in two main locations along chromosome 4. Thus far, most zebrafish miRNAs exhibit tissue specific patterns of expression.

  16. Role of miRNAs and siRNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2012-02-01

    Small, non-coding RNAs are a distinct class of regulatory RNAs in plants and animals that control a variety of biological processes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved through a series of pathways. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences, resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNAs. siRNAs have a similar structure, function, and biogenesis as miRNAs but are derived from long double-stranded RNAs and can often direct DNA methylation at target sequences. Besides their roles in growth and development and maintenance of genome integrity, small RNAs are also important components in plant stress responses. One way in which plants respond to environmental stress is by modifying their gene expression through the activity of small RNAs. Thus, understanding how small RNAs regulate gene expression will enable researchers to explore the role of small RNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses. This review focuses on the regulatory roles of plant small RNAs in the adaptive response to stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cerchia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signalling proteins involved in cell growth and differentiation represent attractive candidate targets for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy since they can act as oncogenes. Because of their high specificity and low immunogeneicity, using artificial small noncoding RNA (ncRNAs as therapeutics has recently become a highly promising and rapidly expanding field of interest. Indeed, ncRNAs may either interfere with RNA transcription, stability, translation or directly hamper the function of the targets by binding to their surface. The recent finding that the expression of several genes is under the control of small single-stranded regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, makes these genes as appropriate targets for ncRNA gene silencing. Furthermore, another class of small ncRNA, aptamers, act as high-affinity ligands and potential antagonists of disease-associated proteins. We will review here the recent and innovative methods that have been developed and the possible applications of ncRNAs as inhibitors or tracers in cancer medicine.

  18. microRNAs and Endometrial Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Henry H; Dior, Uri P; Kogan, Liron; Revel, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation requires a reciprocal interaction between the blastocyst and endometrium and is associated with complex regulatory mechanisms. Since their discovery, microRNAs became prominent candidates providing missing links for many biological pathways. In recent years, microRNAs were implicated as one of the important players in regulation of various biological and physiological endometrial related processes. This chapter aims to present recent knowledge pertaining to the diverse aspects of microRNAs in the embryo-endometrial relationship. We will focus on the role of microRNAs in decidualization and their part in natural and stimulated cycles. Next, we will present recent studies deliberating the role of microRNAs in recurrent pregnancy loss and in the important phenomenon of recurrent implantation failure. Lastly, demonstrating an important aspect of embryo implantation and invasion, we will outline few microRNA related shared pathways of implantation and carcinogenesis. PMID:26662990

  19. Higher-order structure in the 3'-terminal domain VI of the 23 S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, R A; Christensen, A; Douthwaite, S

    1984-01-01

    ribosomes of flowering plants. The structure of domain VI within the eubacterial RNAs was probed with chemical reagents in order to establish the degree of stacking and/or accessibility of each adenosine, cytidine and guanosine residue; the double-helical segments were localized with the cobra venom...... level of structural conservation has occurred throughout the RNA domain during the evolution of the Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria although the thermophile was generally more stable at base-pairs adjacent to the terminal loops....

  20. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  1. Structural origination of charge transfer complex nanostructures: Excellent candidate for field emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shreyasi; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Worldwide strategies for amalgamating rationally controlled one-dimensional organic nanowires are of fundamental importance for their applications in flexible, cheaper and lighter electronics. In this work we have fabricated large-area, ordered CuTCNQ (copper-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) nano architecture arrays over flexible conducting substrate and discussed the rational growth and integration of nanostructures. Here we adopted the organic solid phase reaction (VLS) technique for the growth of organic hierarchies and investigated how field emission properties changes by tuning the nanostructures morphology i.e., by varying length, diameter, alignment and orientation over flexible substrate. The CuTCNQ nanowires with optimized geometry exhibit excellent high field emission performance with low turn-on and threshold field values. The result strongly indicate that CuTCNQ nanowires on flexible carbon cloth substrate are promising candidates for constructing cold cathode based emission display devices, vacuum nanoelectronics, and etc.

  2. miRNAs in brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan, E-mail: johan.jakobsson@med.lu.se

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  3. The Candidate Cluster and Protocluster Catalog (CCPC) of Spectroscopically Identified Structures Spanning 2.74 < z < 3.71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, J. R.; McGaugh, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a search methodology to identify galaxy protoclusters at z\\gt 2.74 and implemented it on a sample of ˜14,000 galaxies with previously measured redshifts. The results of this search are recorded in the Candidate Cluster and Protocluster Catalog (CCPC). The catalog contains 12 clusters that are highly significant overdensities ({δ }{gal}\\gt 7), 6 of which were previously known. We also identify another 31 candidate protoclusters (including four previously identified structures) of lower overdensities. CCPC systems vary over a wide range of physical sizes and shapes, from small, compact groups to large, extended, and filamentary collections of galaxies. This variety persists in the range from z = 3.71 to z = 2.74. These structures exist as galaxy overdensities ({δ }{gal}) with a mean value of 2, similar to the values found for other protoclusters in the literature. The median number of galaxies for CCPC systems is 11. Virial mass estimates are large for these redshifts, with 13 cases apparently having M\\gt {10}15 {M}⊙ . If these systems are virialized, such masses would pose a challenge to ΛCDM.

  4. The candidate cluster and protocluster catalog (CCPC) of spectroscopically identified structures spanning $2.74 < z < 3.71$

    CERN Document Server

    Franck, J R

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a search methodology to identify galaxy protoclusters at $z>2.74$, and implemented it on a sample of $\\sim$14,000 galaxies with previously measured redshifts. The results of this search are recorded in the Candidate Cluster and Protocluster Catalog (CCPC). The catalog contains 12 clusters that are highly significant overdensities ($\\delta_{gal}>7$), 6 of which are previously known. We also identify another 31 candidate protoclusters (including 4 previously identified structures) of lower overdensity. CCPC systems vary over a wide range of physical sizes and shapes, from small, compact groups to large, extended, and filamentary collections of galaxies. This variety persists over the range from $z=3.71$ to $z=2.74$. These structures exist as galaxy overdensities ($\\delta_{gal}$) with a mean value of 2, similar to the values found for other protoclusters in the literature. The median number of galaxies for CCPC systems is 11. Virial mass estimates are large for these redshifts, with thirteen ca...

  5. Deep sequencing discovery of novel and conserved microRNAs in trifoliate orange (Citrus trifoliata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huaping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a critical role in post-transcriptional gene regulation and have been shown to control many genes involved in various biological and metabolic processes. There have been extensive studies to discover miRNAs and analyze their functions in model plant species, such as Arabidopsis and rice. Deep sequencing technologies have facilitated identification of species-specific or lowly expressed as well as conserved or highly expressed miRNAs in plants. Results In this research, we used Solexa sequencing to discover new microRNAs in trifoliate orange (Citrus trifoliata which is an important rootstock of citrus. A total of 13,106,753 reads representing 4,876,395 distinct sequences were obtained from a short RNA library generated from small RNA extracted from C. trifoliata flower and fruit tissues. Based on sequence similarity and hairpin structure prediction, we found that 156,639 reads representing 63 sequences from 42 highly conserved miRNA families, have perfect matches to known miRNAs. We also identified 10 novel miRNA candidates whose precursors were all potentially generated from citrus ESTs. In addition, five miRNA* sequences were also sequenced. These sequences had not been earlier described in other plant species and accumulation of the 10 novel miRNAs were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. Potential target genes were predicted for most conserved and novel miRNAs. Moreover, four target genes including one encoding IRX12 copper ion binding/oxidoreductase and three genes encoding NB-LRR disease resistance protein have been experimentally verified by detection of the miRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage in C. trifoliata. Conclusion Deep sequencing of short RNAs from C. trifoliata flowers and fruits identified 10 new potential miRNAs and 42 highly conserved miRNA families, indicating that specific miRNAs exist in C. trifoliata. These results show that regulatory miRNAs exist in agronomically important trifoliate orange

  6. Atypical RNAs in the coelacanth transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Anne; Doose, Gero; Tafer, Hakim; Robinson, Mark; Saha, Nil Ratan; Gerdol, Marco; Canapa, Adriana; Hoffmann, Steve; Amemiya, Chris T; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-09-01

    Circular and apparently trans-spliced RNAs have recently been reported as abundant types of transcripts in mammalian transcriptome data. Both types of non-colinear RNAs are also abundant in RNA-seq of different tissue from both the African and the Indonesian coelacanth. We observe more than 8,000 lincRNAs with normal gene structure and several thousands of circularized and trans-spliced products, showing that such atypical RNAs form a substantial contribution to the transcriptome. Surprisingly, the majority of the circularizing and trans-connecting splice junctions are unique to atypical forms, that is, are not used in normal isoforms.

  7. Recombination structure and genetic relatedness among members of the family Bromoviridae based on their RNAs 1 and 2 sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, Moncef

    2009-06-01

    In determining putative recombination events and their evolution rates in the RNAs 1 and 2 of currently the known members of the family Bromoviridae, a detailed study comprising 107 accessions retrieved from the international databases, has been carried out by using RECCO and RDP v3.31beta algorithms. These programs allowed the detection of potential recombination sites in all the five virus genera composing the family Bromoviridae with various degrees of consistency. The RNAs 1 and 2 showed inferred phylogenies fully congruent and clearly delineated five clusters representing the five studied virus genera. In this respect, we proposed to classify the Ilarviruses in three distinct subgroups instead of 10 as mentioned in several reports of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses where its suggestions were based on antigenic differences. Moreover, we confirmed that Alfalfa mosaic virus should be considered as a component of the Ilarvirus genus instead of being the unique representative of Alfamovirus genus. In addition, Pelargonium zonate spot and Olive latent 2 viruses fully deserve their affiliation to the family Bromoviridae. PMID:19255837

  8. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene M F; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype-phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies.

  9. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene M F; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype-phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies. PMID:24736736

  10. Deep sequencing reveals as-yet-undiscovered small RNAs in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano Reiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Escherichia coli, approximately 100 regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs have been identified experimentally and many more have been predicted by various methods. To provide a comprehensive overview of sRNAs, we analysed the low-molecular-weight RNAs (E. coli with deep sequencing, because the regulatory RNAs in bacteria are usually 50-200 nt in length. Results We discovered 229 novel candidate sRNAs (≥ 50 nt with computational or experimental evidence of transcription initiation. Among them, the expression of seven intergenic sRNAs and three cis-antisense sRNAs was detected by northern blot analysis. Interestingly, five novel sRNAs are expressed from prophage regions and we note that these sRNAs have several specific characteristics. Furthermore, we conducted an evolutionary conservation analysis of the candidate sRNAs and summarised the data among closely related bacterial strains. Conclusions This comprehensive screen for E. coli sRNAs using a deep sequencing approach has shown that many as-yet-undiscovered sRNAs are potentially encoded in the E. coli genome. We constructed the Escherichia coli Small RNA Browser (ECSBrowser; http://rna.iab.keio.ac.jp/, which integrates the data for previously identified sRNAs and the novel sRNAs found in this study.

  11. Exosome-delivered microRNAs of “chromosome 19 microRNA cluster” as immunomodulators in pregnancy and tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullerdiek Jörn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural rearrangements of chromosomal band 19q13 are a non-random cytogenetic abnormality in thyroid adenomas and adenomatous goiters and lead to an expression of miRNAs of the chromosome 19 microRNA cluster C19MC. Normally, expression of these miRNAs is silenced except for embryonic stem cells and the placenta where they represent the majority of miRNAs not only in the trophoblast but also in exosomes derived from it. Presentation of the hypothesis We have advanced the hypothesis that as part of the feto-maternal communication miRNAs of C19MC serve immunomodulatory functions in the placenta and confer a growth advantage to thyroid nodules by protecting them against autoimmune attacks. More precisely, the exosomes containing these miRNAs may specifically target immune cells in their local environment as well as systemically by transferring their cargo to recipient cells. Within these target cells the transferred miRNAs can interact with mRNAs of the recipient cells thereby suppressing their immune-specific functions. Testing the hypothesis Experiments used to demonstrate the immunomodulatory capacity of placenta-derived exosomes can be modified by transfecting the target cells with those miRNAs of C19MC represented in placental exosomes. Implications of the hypothesis Mimics of C19MC-derived miRNAs might develop to useful drug candidates for the treatment of autoimmune disease as e.g. rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren’s syndrome and for the prevention of transplant rejection. In case of tumor entities with elevated expression of C19MC miRNAs these miRNAs may be interesting targets for treatment with appropriate antagonists.

  12. Event-horizon-scale structure in the supermassive black hole candidate at the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Doeleman, Sheperd; Rogers, Alan E E; Plambeck, Richard; Freund, Robert; Tilanus, Remo P J; Friberg, Per; Ziurys, Lucy M; Moran, James M; Corey, Brian; Young, Ken H; Smythe, Daniel L; Titus, Michael; Marrone, Daniel P; Cappallo, Roger J; Bock, Douglas C J; Bower, Geoffrey C; Chamberlin, Richard; Davis, Gary R; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Lamb, James; Maness, Holly; Niell, Arthur E; Roy, Alan; Strittmatter, Peter; Werthimer, Daniel; Whitney, Alan R; Woody, David

    2008-01-01

    The cores of most galaxies are thought to harbour supermassive black holes, which power galactic nuclei by converting the gravitational energy of accreting matter into radiation (ref 1). Sagittarius A*, the compact source of radio, infrared and X-ray emission at the centre of the Milky Way, is the closest example of this phenomenon, with an estimated black hole mass that is 4 million times that of the Sun (refs. 2,3). A long-standing astronomical goal is to resolve structures in the innermost accretion flow surrounding Sgr A* where strong gravitational fields will distort the appearance of radiation emitted near the black hole. Radio observations at wavelengths of 3.5 mm and 7 mm have detected intrinsic structure in Sgr A*, but the spatial resolution of observations at these wavelengths is limited by interstellar scattering (refs. 4-7). Here we report observations at a wavelength of 1.3 mm that set a size of 37 (+16, -10; 3-sigma) microarcseconds on the intrinsic diameter of Sgr A*. This is less than the expe...

  13. Effects of surface condition on the corrosion of candidate structural materials in a simulated HTGR-GT environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment was used to study the effects of surface finish conditions on the subsequent elevated-temperature corrosion behavior of key candidate structural materials. The environment contained helium with 500 μatm H2/50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH4/2O at 9000C with total test exposure durations of 3000 hours. Specimens with lapped, grit-blasted, pickled, and preoxidized surface conditions were studied. Materials tested included two cast superalloys, IN 100 and IN 713LC; one centrifugally cast high-temperature alloy, HK 40 one oxice-dispersion-strengthened alloy, Inconel MA 754; and three wrought high-temperature alloys, Hastelloy Alloy X, Inconel Alloy 617, and Alloy 800H

  14. Structural Bacterial Molecules as Potential Candidates for an Evolution of the Classical Concept of Probiotics12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Michele; Vaira, Giuseppina; Calo, Girolamo; Papini, Francesco; Holton, John; Vaira, Dino

    2011-01-01

    A large number of experimental and clinical studies published in recent years have demonstrated the beneficial role of probiotic bacteria in the health of the host. However, because the different receptors of the innate immune system can recognize only specific bacterial molecular patterns, knowledge of the role played by individual probiotic molecular patterns is essential to move from the current confused era of live probiotic bacteria to the era of the pharmacobiotic strategies. This article reviews the current knowledge on the probiotic activities of bacterial structural molecules (nucleic acids and surface molecules), which represent the fundamental basis to set up experimental and clinical studies in this emerging field with very promising and potentially invaluable future prospects. PMID:22332079

  15. Brain expressed microRNAs implicated in schizophrenia etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Line; Lindow, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    Protein encoding genes have long been the major targets for research in schizophrenia genetics. However, with the identification of regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) as important in brain development and function, miRNAs genes have emerged as candidates for schizophrenia-associated genetic factors....... Indeed, the growing understanding of the regulatory properties and pleiotropic effects that miRNA have on molecular and cellular mechanisms, suggests that alterations in the interactions between miRNAs and their mRNA targets may contribute to phenotypic variation....

  16. Genome-wide discovery of small RNAs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Miotto

    Full Text Available Only few small RNAs (sRNAs have been characterized in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and their role in regulatory networks is still poorly understood. Here we report a genome-wide characterization of sRNAs in M. tuberculosis integrating experimental and computational analyses. Global RNA-seq analysis of exponentially growing cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv had previously identified 1373 sRNA species. In the present report we show that 258 (19% of these were also identified by microarray expression. This set included 22 intergenic sRNAs, 84 sRNAs mapping within 5'/3' UTRs, and 152 antisense sRNAs. Analysis of promoter and terminator consensus sequences identified sigma A promoter consensus sequences for 121 sRNAs (47%, terminator consensus motifs for 22 sRNAs (8.5%, and both motifs for 35 sRNAs (14%. Additionally, 20/23 candidates were visualized by Northern blot analysis and 5' end mapping by primer extension confirmed the RNA-seq data. We also used a computational approach utilizing functional enrichment to identify the pathways targeted by sRNA regulation. We found that antisense sRNAs preferentially regulated transcription of membrane-bound proteins. Genes putatively regulated by novel cis-encoded sRNAs were enriched for two-component systems and for functional pathways involved in hydrogen transport on the membrane.

  17. A novel candidate compound with urethane structure for anticancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Atsuko; Isama, Kazuo; Tanimura, Susumu; Kohno, Michiaki; Yamori, Takao

    2007-08-01

    Diethyl-4,4'-methylenebis(N-phenylcarbamate) (MDU) is a urethane compound that we originally synthesized, along with three other compounds, to investigate how polyurethane is hydrolysed. We tested the four compounds for cytotoxicity in two Chinese hamster cell lines (CHL and V79) and a human cancer cell line (HeLa S3). MDU showed the strongest cytotoxicity in all the cell lines with an IC50 of around 0.1 microg/ml. We further investigated MDU for its ability to induce chromosome aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei (MN) in CHL cells. MDU induced around 100% polyploid cells at 0.5 microg/ml after 24- and 48-h treatment in the CA test and a significantly increased frequency of micronuclei, polynuclear cells, and mitotic cells in the MN test, suggesting that it may induce numerical CAs. MDU's ability to cause mitotic arrest in CHL cells was greater than that of taxol and colchicine. Based on a COMPARE analysis using JFCR39, a panel of cancer cell lines, we predicted MDU to be a tubulin inhibitor. We confirmed this possibility in nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells as well as in HT1080 cells, in which MDU exhibited the activity to inhibit tubulin polymerization. MDU is simpler in structure than existing anticancer drugs taxol and vincristine and can be synthesized relatively easily. Here we offer MDU as a potential new type of anticancer drug, stable even at room temperature, and inexpensive. PMID:17691911

  18. Regulatory RNAs in prokaryotes: here, there and everywhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narberhaus, Franz; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    A recent meeting on 'Regulatory RNAs in prokaryotes' reflected the growing interest in this research topic. Almost 200 scientists met to discuss the identification, structure, function and mechanistic details of regulatory RNAs in bacteria and archaea. The topics included small regulatory RNAs, riboswitches, RNA thermosensors and CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) elements.

  19. Two closely linked rice U14 boxC/D snoRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By analysis of the conserved elements in yeast U14 boxC/D snoRNA, the conserved elements in rice U14 boxC/D snoRNA have been speculated. Through computer search of the international rice genome database, two rice U14 snoRNA gene candidates are obtained. These two putative U14 snoRNA genes are closely linked on rice chromosome 2. The coding sequences of these two snoRNAs exhibit the hallmark structure of boxC/D antisense snoRNA. They both have conserved boxC and boxD sequences and a 14nt-long complement to the sequence between 414nt and 427nt of rice 18S rRNA (according to GenBank accession no. X00755). The experimental evidence shows that these two snoRNAs are involved in the methylation of the complementary sequence of rice 18S rRNA. The existence and localization of these two snoRNAs are proved by RT-PCR and Northern blot. Further analysis shows that both of the newly found rice snoRNAs have high homology with maize U14 snoRNA, and they are named rice U14.1 snoRNA and U14.2 snoRNA respectively. The gene sequence encoding these two snoRNAs has been deposited in the GenBank database under accession number of AF332622.

  20. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Suki; Czech, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage-either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE) in the 5'- and 3'-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification. PMID:26797637

  1. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki Albers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification.

  2. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Suki; Czech, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE) in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification. PMID:26797637

  3. Alternative modelling of brittle structures in a sub-area of the SKB candidate area at Forsmark, eastern Sweden.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askling, Per; Tiren, Sven A.; Beckholmen, Monica; Straeng, Thomas (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    One way to test the confidence of a presented model is to construct an alternative model. Such work is cognitive process of skill acquisition and also a process of understanding data in the sense of sorting and classifying data. This is of particular interest for the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) in their technical review of SKB's on-going site investigation programme for potential repository sites. In this study, an alternative brittle deformation model of a selected part of the SKB candidate area in eastern Sweden was constructed. The input data set was obtained from SKB's database SICADA and is a selected set of data from five cored boreholes drilled from two drill-sites and comprises geophysical borehole logs, geological core-logs, hydrological logs (PFL; Posiva Flow Log) and borehole deviation measurements. Statistical cluster analysis applied on the geophysical borehole data were used to obtain the locations of bedrock with contrasting physical characteristics similar to those of brittle deformation zones. The cluster analysis is an objective procedure, contrasting with SKB's more subjective approach to the single-hole interpretation. Thus some differences are expected which could illustrate the effect of methodology that includes subjective 'expert judgement.' and indicate the possibility of alternative interpretations. The information about brittle structures in the geological boreholes logs was sorted and classification was made according to character of the structures (all fractures, open fractures, partly open fractures, frequency, orientate on/identification of fracture sets, sections of crush rock, and alteration). A separate study was performed to relate rock alteration with structures. The resolution applied in the fracture statistics is one metre, i.e. all studied entities were expressed per metre borehole length. All clusters were structurally characterized by the fractures inside the clusters (orientation and

  4. Structural, phylogenetic and docking studies of D-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA, a candidate schizophrenia gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a neurodegenerative disorder that occurs worldwide and can be difficult to diagnose. It is the foremost neurological disorder leading to suicide among patients in both developed and underdeveloped countries. D-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA, also known as G72, is directly implicated in the glutamateric hypothesis of schizophrenia. It activates D-amino acid oxidase, which oxidizes D-serine, leading to modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Methods MODELLER (9v10 was utilized to generate three dimensional structures of the DAOA candidate gene. The HOPE server was used for mutational analysis. The Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA5 tool was utilized to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the candidate gene DAOA. AutoDock was used for protein-ligand docking and Gramm-X and PatchDock for protein-protein docking. Results A suitable template (1ZCA was selected by employing BLASTp on the basis of 33% query coverage, 27% identity and E-value 4.9. The Rampage evaluation tool showed 91.1% favored region, 4.9% allowed region and 4.1% outlier region in DAOA. ERRAT demonstrated that the predicted model had a 50.909% quality factor. Mutational analysis of DAOA revealed significant effects on hydrogen bonding and correct folding of the DAOA protein, which in turn affect protein conformation. Ciona was inferred as the outgroup. Tetrapods were in their appropriate clusters with bifurcations. Human amino acid sequences are conserved, with chimpanzee and gorilla showing more than 80% homology and bootstrap value based on 1000 replications. Molecular docking analysis was employed to elucidate the binding mode of the reported ligand complex for DAOA. The docking experiment demonstrated that DAOA is involved in major amino acid interactions: the residues that interact most strongly with the ligand C28H28N3O5PS2 are polar but uncharged (Gln36, Asn38, Thr 122 and non-polar hydrophobic (Ile119, Ser171

  5. Trash or Treasure: extracellular microRNAs and cell-to-cell communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi eKosaka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating RNAs in human body fluids are promising candidates for diagnostic purposes. However, the biological significance of circulating RNAs remains elusive. Recently, small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, were isolated from multiple human body fluids, and these circulating miRNAs have been implicated as novel disease biomarkers. Concurrently, miRNAs were also identified in the extracellular space associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs, which are small membrane vesicles secreted from various types of cells. The function of these secreted miRNAs has been revealed in several papers. Circulating miRNAs have been experimentally found to be associated with EVs, however, other types of extracellular miRNAs were also described. This review discusses studies related to extracellular miRNAs, including circulating miRNAs and secreted miRNAs, to highlight the importance of studying not only secreted miRNAs but also circulating miRNAs to determine the contribution of extracellular miRNAs especially in cancer development.

  6. The dyslexia candidate locus on 2p12 is associated with general cognitive ability and white matter structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Scerri

    Full Text Available Independent studies have shown that candidate genes for dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI impact upon reading/language-specific traits in the general population. To further explore the effect of disorder-associated genes on cognitive functions, we investigated whether they play a role in broader cognitive traits. We tested a panel of dyslexia and SLI genetic risk factors for association with two measures of general cognitive abilities, or IQ, (verbal and non-verbal in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC cohort (N>5,000. Only the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus showed statistically significant association (minimum P = 0.00009 which was further supported by independent replications following analysis in four other cohorts. In addition, a fifth independent sample showed association between the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus and white matter structure in the posterior part of the corpus callosum and cingulum, connecting large parts of the cortex in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that this locus, originally identified as being associated with dyslexia, is likely to harbour genetic variants associated with general cognitive abilities by influencing white matter structure in localised neuronal regions.

  7. VFV as a New Effective CYP51 Structure-Derived Drug Candidate for Chagas Disease and Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepesheva, Galina I; Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Rachakonda, Girish; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pomel, Sébastien; Cojean, Sandrine; Nde, Pius N; Nes, W David; Locuson, Charles W; Calcutt, M Wade; Waterman, Michael R; Daniels, J Scott; Loiseau, Philippe M; Villalta, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Sterol 14α-demethylases (CYP51) are the enzymes essential for sterol biosynthesis. They serve as clinical targets for antifungal azoles and are considered as targets for treatment of human Trypanosomatidae infections. Recently, we have shown that VNI, a potent and selective inhibitor of trypanosomal CYP51 that we identified and structurally characterized in complex with the enzyme, can cure the acute and chronic forms of Chagas disease. The purpose of this work was to apply the CYP51 structure/function for further development of the VNI scaffold. As anticipated, VFV (R)-N-(1-(3,4'-difluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl)-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)benzamide, the derivative designed to fill the deepest portion of the CYP51 substrate-binding cavity, reveals a broader antiprotozoan spectrum of action. It has stronger antiparasitic activity in cellular experiments, cures the experimental Chagas disease with 100% efficacy, and suppresses visceral leishmaniasis by 89% (vs 60% for VNI). Oral bioavailability, low off-target activity, favorable pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution characterize VFV as a promising new drug candidate. PMID:25883390

  8. HA03 as an Iranian Candidate Concealed Antigen for Vaccination against Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum: Comparative Structural and In silico Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades researchers had focused on developing a vaccine against tick based on protective antigen. Recombinant vaccines based on concealed antigen from Boophilus microplus have been developed in Australia and Cuba by the name of TICKGARD and GAVAC (De La Fuente and Kocan, 2006. Further studies on this antigen have shown some extent of protection against other species (De Vos et al., 2001. In Iran most important species is Hyalomma anatolicum and limited information about its control are available. This paper reports structural and polymorphic analysis of HA03 as an Iranian candidate concealed antigen of H. a. anatolicum deposited in Gen-Bank .(Aghaeipour et al. GQ228820. The comparison between this antigen and other mid gut concealed antigen that their characteristics are available in GenBank showed there are high rate of similarity between them. The HA03 amino acid sequence had a homology of around 89%, 64%, 56% with HA98, BM86, BM95 respectively. Potential of MHC class I and II binding region indicated a considerable variation between BM86 antigen and its efficiency against Iranian H. a. anatolicum. In addition, predicted major of hydrophobisity and similarity in N-glycosylation besides large amount of cystein and seven EGF like regions presented in protein structure revealed that value of HA03 as a new protective antigen and the necessity of the development, BM86 homolog of H. a. anatolicum HA03 based recombinant vaccine.

  9. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesnitsky, Alice; Wolin, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA) are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA), some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs' packaging determinants differ from the viral genome's, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA) species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs-if any-have remained elusive. PMID:27548206

  10. Identification and characterization of noncoding small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 2 strain D39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A; Sham, Lok-To; Feig, Andrew L; Winkler, Malcolm E

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, and R. Bruckner, Mol. Microbiol. 66:110-126, 2007) that are positively controlled by the CiaR response regulator. We characterized 3 of these 14 sRNAs: Spd-sr17 (144 nucleotides [nt]; decreased in stationary phase), Spd-sr37 (80 nt; strongly expressed in all growth phases), and CcnA (93 nt; induced by competence stimulatory peptide). Spd-sr17 and CcnA likely fold into structures containing single-stranded regions between hairpin structures, whereas Spd-sr37 forms a base-paired structure. Primer extension mapping and ectopic expression in deletion/insertion mutants confirmed the independent expression of the three sRNAs. Microarray analyses indicated that insertion/deletion mutants in spd-sr37 and ccnA exerted strong cis-acting effects on the transcription of adjacent genes, indicating that these sRNA regions are also cotranscribed in operons. Deletion or overexpression of the three sRNAs did not cause changes in growth, certain stress responses, global transcription, or virulence. Constitutive ectopic expression of CcnA reversed some phenotypes of D39 Delta ciaR mutants, but attempts to link CcnA to -E to comC as a target were inconclusive in ciaR(+) strains. These results show that S. pneumoniae, which lacks known RNA chaperones, expresses numerous sRNAs, but three of these sRNAs do not strongly affect common phenotypes or transcription patterns. PMID:19854910

  11. Identification and characterization of noncoding small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 2 strain D39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A; Sham, Lok-To; Feig, Andrew L; Winkler, Malcolm E

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, and R. Bruckner, Mol. Microbiol. 66:110-126, 2007) that are positively controlled by the CiaR response regulator. We characterized 3 of these 14 sRNAs: Spd-sr17 (144 nucleotides [nt]; decreased in stationary phase), Spd-sr37 (80 nt; strongly expressed in all growth phases), and CcnA (93 nt; induced by competence stimulatory peptide). Spd-sr17 and CcnA likely fold into structures containing single-stranded regions between hairpin structures, whereas Spd-sr37 forms a base-paired structure. Primer extension mapping and ectopic expression in deletion/insertion mutants confirmed the independent expression of the three sRNAs. Microarray analyses indicated that insertion/deletion mutants in spd-sr37 and ccnA exerted strong cis-acting effects on the transcription of adjacent genes, indicating that these sRNA regions are also cotranscribed in operons. Deletion or overexpression of the three sRNAs did not cause changes in growth, certain stress responses, global transcription, or virulence. Constitutive ectopic expression of CcnA reversed some phenotypes of D39 Delta ciaR mutants, but attempts to link CcnA to -E to comC as a target were inconclusive in ciaR(+) strains. These results show that S. pneumoniae, which lacks known RNA chaperones, expresses numerous sRNAs, but three of these sRNAs do not strongly affect common phenotypes or transcription patterns.

  12. Network of microRNAs-mRNAs Interactions in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Naderi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. MicroRNAs are small RNA molecules that regulate the expression of certain genes through interaction with mRNA targets and are mainly involved in human cancer. This study was conducted to make the network of miRNAs-mRNAs interactions in pancreatic cancer as the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Methods. 56 miRNAs that were exclusively expressed and 1176 genes that were downregulated or silenced in pancreas cancer were extracted from beforehand investigations. MiRNA–mRNA interactions data analysis and related networks were explored using MAGIA tool and Cytoscape 3 software. Functional annotations of candidate genes in pancreatic cancer were identified by DAVID annotation tool. Results. This network is made of 217 nodes for mRNA, 15 nodes for miRNA, and 241 edges that show 241 regulations between 15 miRNAs and 217 target genes. The miR-24 was the most significantly powerful miRNA that regulated series of important genes. ACVR2B, GFRA1, and MTHFR were significant target genes were that downregulated. Conclusion. Although the collected previous data seems to be a treasure trove, there was no study simultaneous to analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs interaction. Network of miRNA-mRNA interactions will help to corroborate experimental remarks and could be used to refine miRNA target predictions for developing new therapeutic approaches.

  13. Primary and secondary structures of Tetrahymena and aphid 5.8S rRNAs: structural features of 5.8S rRNA which interacts with the 28S rRNA containing the hidden break.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, H.; H. Ishikawa

    1982-01-01

    The Tetrahymena 5.8S rRNA is 154 nucleotides long, the shortest so far reported except for the split 5.8S rRNAs of Diptera (m5.8S plus 2S rRNA). In this molecule several nucleotides are deleted in the helix e (GC-rich stem) region. Upon constructing the secondary structure in accordance with "burp-gun" model, the Tetrahymena 5.8S rRNA forms a wide-open "muzzle" of the terminal regions due to both extra nucleotides and several unpaired bases. The aphid 5.8S rRNA consists of 161 nucleotides and...

  14. In Vitro Evolution of Allergy Vaccine Candidates, with Maintained Structure, but Reduced B Cell and T Cell Activation Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Adedoyin, Justus; Rhyner, Claudio; Neimert-Andersson, Theresa; Grundström, Jeanette; Berndt, Kurt D.; Crameri, Reto; Grönlund, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Allergy and asthma to cat (Felis domesticus) affects about 10% of the population in affluent countries. Immediate allergic symptoms are primarily mediated via IgE antibodies binding to B cell epitopes, whereas late phase inflammatory reactions are mediated via activated T cell recognition of allergen-specific T cell epitopes. Allergen-specific immunotherapy relieves symptoms and is the only treatment inducing a long-lasting protection by induction of protective immune responses. The aim of this study was to produce an allergy vaccine designed with the combined features of attenuated T cell activation, reduced anaphylactic properties, retained molecular integrity and induction of efficient IgE blocking IgG antibodies for safer and efficacious treatment of patients with allergy and asthma to cat. The template gene coding for rFel d 1 was used to introduce random mutations, which was subsequently expressed in large phage libraries. Despite accumulated mutations by up to 7 rounds of iterative error-prone PCR and biopanning, surface topology and structure was essentially maintained using IgE-antibodies from cat allergic patients for phage enrichment. Four candidates were isolated, displaying similar or lower IgE binding, reduced anaphylactic activity as measured by their capacity to induce basophil degranulation and, importantly, a significantly lower T cell reactivity in lymphoproliferative assays compared to the original rFel d 1. In addition, all mutants showed ability to induce blocking antibodies in immunized mice.The approach presented here provides a straightforward procedure to generate a novel type of allergy vaccines for safer and efficacious treatment of allergic patients. PMID:21931754

  15. In vitro evolution of allergy vaccine candidates, with maintained structure, but reduced B cell and T cell activation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ola B; Adedoyin, Justus; Rhyner, Claudio; Neimert-Andersson, Theresa; Grundström, Jeanette; Berndt, Kurt D; Crameri, Reto; Grönlund, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Allergy and asthma to cat (Felis domesticus) affects about 10% of the population in affluent countries. Immediate allergic symptoms are primarily mediated via IgE antibodies binding to B cell epitopes, whereas late phase inflammatory reactions are mediated via activated T cell recognition of allergen-specific T cell epitopes. Allergen-specific immunotherapy relieves symptoms and is the only treatment inducing a long-lasting protection by induction of protective immune responses. The aim of this study was to produce an allergy vaccine designed with the combined features of attenuated T cell activation, reduced anaphylactic properties, retained molecular integrity and induction of efficient IgE blocking IgG antibodies for safer and efficacious treatment of patients with allergy and asthma to cat. The template gene coding for rFel d 1 was used to introduce random mutations, which was subsequently expressed in large phage libraries. Despite accumulated mutations by up to 7 rounds of iterative error-prone PCR and biopanning, surface topology and structure was essentially maintained using IgE-antibodies from cat allergic patients for phage enrichment. Four candidates were isolated, displaying similar or lower IgE binding, reduced anaphylactic activity as measured by their capacity to induce basophil degranulation and, importantly, a significantly lower T cell reactivity in lymphoproliferative assays compared to the original rFel d 1. In addition, all mutants showed ability to induce blocking antibodies in immunized mice.The approach presented here provides a straightforward procedure to generate a novel type of allergy vaccines for safer and efficacious treatment of allergic patients.

  16. In vitro evolution of allergy vaccine candidates, with maintained structure, but reduced B cell and T cell activation capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola B Nilsson

    Full Text Available Allergy and asthma to cat (Felis domesticus affects about 10% of the population in affluent countries. Immediate allergic symptoms are primarily mediated via IgE antibodies binding to B cell epitopes, whereas late phase inflammatory reactions are mediated via activated T cell recognition of allergen-specific T cell epitopes. Allergen-specific immunotherapy relieves symptoms and is the only treatment inducing a long-lasting protection by induction of protective immune responses. The aim of this study was to produce an allergy vaccine designed with the combined features of attenuated T cell activation, reduced anaphylactic properties, retained molecular integrity and induction of efficient IgE blocking IgG antibodies for safer and efficacious treatment of patients with allergy and asthma to cat. The template gene coding for rFel d 1 was used to introduce random mutations, which was subsequently expressed in large phage libraries. Despite accumulated mutations by up to 7 rounds of iterative error-prone PCR and biopanning, surface topology and structure was essentially maintained using IgE-antibodies from cat allergic patients for phage enrichment. Four candidates were isolated, displaying similar or lower IgE binding, reduced anaphylactic activity as measured by their capacity to induce basophil degranulation and, importantly, a significantly lower T cell reactivity in lymphoproliferative assays compared to the original rFel d 1. In addition, all mutants showed ability to induce blocking antibodies in immunized mice.The approach presented here provides a straightforward procedure to generate a novel type of allergy vaccines for safer and efficacious treatment of allergic patients.

  17. Accumulation of long-lived mRNAs associated with germination in embryos during seed development of rice

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, Naoto; Ono, Hanako; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Highlight Long-lived mRNAs stored in dry seed are translated after imbibition for germination. We report accumulation of long-lived mRNAs in developing rice embryos and candidates of the mRNAs required for germination.

  18. The presence, role and clinical use of spermatozoal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, Meritxell; Selvaraju, Sellappan; Sendler, Edward; Diamond, Michael P; Krawetz, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spermatozoa are highly differentiated, transcriptionally inert cells characterized by a compact nucleus with minimal cytoplasm. Nevertheless they contain a suite of unique RNAs that are delivered to oocyte upon fertilization. They are likely integrated as part of many different processes including genome recognition, consolidation-confrontation, early embryonic development and epigenetic transgenerational inherence. Spermatozoal RNAs also provide a window into the developmental history of each sperm thereby providing biomarkers of fertility and pregnancy outcome which are being intensely studied. METHODS Literature searches were performed to review the majority of spermatozoal RNA studies that described potential functions and clinical applications with emphasis on Next-Generation Sequencing. Human, mouse, bovine and stallion were compared as their distribution and composition of spermatozoal RNAs, using these techniques, have been described. RESULTS Comparisons highlighted the complexity of the population of spermatozoal RNAs that comprises rRNA, mRNA and both large and small non-coding RNAs. RNA-seq analysis has revealed that only a fraction of the larger RNAs retain their structure. While rRNAs are the most abundant and are highly fragmented, ensuring a translationally quiescent state, other RNAs including some mRNAs retain their functional potential, thereby increasing the opportunity for regulatory interactions. Abundant small non-coding RNAs retained in spermatozoa include miRNAs and piRNAs. Some, like miR-34c are essential to the early embryo development required for the first cellular division. Others like the piRNAs are likely part of the genomic dance of confrontation and consolidation. Other non-coding spermatozoal RNAs include transposable elements, annotated lnc-RNAs, intronic retained elements, exonic elements, chromatin-associated RNAs, small-nuclear ILF3/NF30 associated RNAs, quiescent RNAs, mse-tRNAs and YRNAs. Some non-coding RNAs are

  19. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Telesnitsky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA, some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs’ packaging determinants differ from the viral genome’s, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs—if any—have remained elusive.

  20. Identification of miRNAs contributing to neuroblastoma chemoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Ayers

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Based on the initial miRNA findings, this study elucidates the dys-regulation of four miRNAs in three separate NB chemoresistant cell line models, spanning two cell lines (SH-SY5Y and UKF-NB-3 and two chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin and etoposide. These miRNAs may thus be possibly linked to chemoresistance induction in NB. Such miRNAs are good candidates to be novel drug targets for future miRNA based therapies against aggressive tumours that are not responding to conventional chemotherapy.

  1. MicroRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules that are unable to translate into proteins are classified as non-coding RNA. Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes include highly abundant and functionally important RNAs such as transfer RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), siRNAs, snRNAs, exRNAs and piRNAs. The number of ncRNAs encoded within the human genome is unknown; however, recent transcriptomic and bioinformatic studies suggest the existence of thousands of ncRNAs. Furthermore, small ncRNAs, including miRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), play an imperative role in the regulation of gene expression of numerous biological and pathological processes. Investigation into the expression and function of small RNA in cancer cells has contributed to gaining a greater understanding of the roles of small RNAs in carcinogenesis. The present review is aimed primarily to discuss the importance of the expression and functions of these small RNAs in carcinogenesis. These studies may provide useful information for future therapies in cancer.

  2. Identifying microRNAs and transcript targets in Jatropha seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Galli

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs, or miRNAs, are endogenously encoded small RNAs that play a key role in diverse plant biological processes. Jatropha curcas L. has received significant attention as a potential oilseed crop for the production of renewable oil. Here, a sRNA library of mature seeds and three mRNA libraries from three different seed development stages were generated by deep sequencing to identify and characterize the miRNAs and pre-miRNAs of J. curcas. Computational analysis was used for the identification of 180 conserved miRNAs and 41 precursors (pre-miRNAs as well as 16 novel pre-miRNAs. The predicted miRNA target genes are involved in a broad range of physiological functions, including cellular structure, nuclear function, translation, transport, hormone synthesis, defense, and lipid metabolism. Some pre-miRNA and miRNA targets vary in abundance between the three stages of seed development. A search for sequences that produce siRNA was performed, and the results indicated that J. curcas siRNAs play a role in nuclear functions, transport, catalytic processes and disease resistance. This study presents the first large scale identification of J. curcas miRNAs and their targets in mature seeds based on deep sequencing, and it contributes to a functional understanding of these miRNAs.

  3. Disease onset and aging in the world of circular RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Circular ribonucleic acids (circRNAs) are non-coding RNAs of approximately 100 nucleotides in length with thousands of members in mammalian cells. The presence of circRNAs is believed to be even greater than that of messenger RNAs. Identification of circRNAs occurred approximately 37 years ago with the subsequent demonstration that covalent bonds are necessary for the unique circular structure of these ribonucleic acids. However, present understanding of the complex biological role of circRNAs remains limited and requires further elucidation. CircRNAs may impact aging, multiple disorders, function as biomarkers, and are able to regulate gene expression by acting as effective microRNA (miRNA) sponges. New work suggests that circRNAs are vital for the modulation of cellular senescence and programmed cell death pathways such as apoptosis. These non-coding RNAs can control cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation, and cellular survival impacting disorders linked to aging, cardiovascular disease, and atherosclerosis through pathways that involve cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21), and mammalian forkhead transcription factors. In addition, circRNAs can oversee cellular metabolism and disorders such as diabetes mellitus through the regulation of insulin signaling as well as limit tumor progression through Wnt signaling and β-catenin pathways. Further understanding of the biology of circRNAs offers great promise for the targeting of novel strategies against a wide spectrum of disease entities. PMID:27642518

  4. Identification and characterization of small RNAs in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xu

    Full Text Available The term RNA silencing (RNA interference, RNAi describes a set of mechanisms that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs are two major types of RNAi-associated small RNAs (smRNAs found in most eukaryotic organisms. Despite the presence of a plethora of non-coding RNAs longer than 50-nucleotide (nt in length in various species of Archaea, little is known about smRNAs in archaea that resemble the 20-24-nt long smRNAs found in eukaryotes, which have been implicated in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Here, we report the finding of a large number of smRNAs approximatelly 20-nt in length, including phased smRNAs and potential miRNAs, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus p2 (Ssp2 based on deep sequencing. The expression of some of the miRNA candidates in Ssp2 was confirmed. Consistent with the Ssp2 hyperthermophilic properties, we found that higher temperatures more efficiently induced the production of the miRNA candidates in an in vitro system using the putative foldback precursor transcripts incubated with Ssp2 extract. Although we initially predicted putative target genes of some miRNA candidates, further analysis mapped the cleavage sites downstream of the miRNA candidate complementary regions, similar to those involved in plant miRNA-mediated TAS transcript cleavage. We also identified smRNAs from clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR loci, which play important roles in prokaryotic microbial defense systems. Archaea represent a unique life form next to Bacteria and Eukarya, and our results may provide a useful resource for further in-depth study on the regulation and evolution of smRNAs in this special organism.

  5. "Why Are You Doing This?" Questions on Purpose, Structure, and Outcomes in Participatory Action Research Engaging Youth and Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Anne; Jones, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Our article is based on a study of our integration of social foundations coursework with filmmaking and participatory action research, bringing teacher candidates and middle and high school students together. The project was carried out in partnership between an urban university and two nearby public schools within a Midwestern city known for high…

  6. Synthetic RNAs Mimicking Structural Domains in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genome Elicit a Broad Innate Immune Response in Porcine Cells Triggered by RIG-I and TLR Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Belén Borrego; Miguel Rodríguez-Pulido; Concepción Revilla; Belén Álvarez; Francisco Sobrino; Javier Domínguez; Margarita Sáiz

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viral infections. Exploiting innate responses for antiviral, therapeutic and vaccine adjuvation strategies is being extensively explored. We have previously described, the ability of small in vitro RNA transcripts, mimicking the sequence and structure of different domains in the non-coding regions of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome (ncRNAs), to trigger a potent and rapid innate immune response. These synthetic non-in...

  7. Fitness Landscapes of Functional RNAs

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    Ádám Kun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of fitness landscapes, a map between genotype and fitness, was proposed more than 80 years ago. For most of this time data was only available for a few alleles, and thus we had only a restricted view of the whole fitness landscape. Recently, advances in genetics and molecular biology allow a more detailed view of them. Here we review experimental and theoretical studies of fitness landscapes of functional RNAs, especially aptamers and ribozymes. We find that RNA structures can be divided into critical structures, connecting structures, neutral structures and forbidden structures. Such characterisation, coupled with theoretical sequence-to-structure predictions, allows us to construct the whole fitness landscape. Fitness landscapes then can be used to study evolution, and in our case the development of the RNA world.

  8. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaykumar Gopal

    Full Text Available A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  9. Isolation, characterization, and structure analysis of a non-TIR-NBS-LRR encoding candidate gene from MYMIV-resistant Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Soumitra; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2012-11-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of Vigna mungo caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is still a major threat in the crop production. A candidate disease resistance (R) gene, CYR1 that co-segregates with MYMIV-resistant populations of V. mungo has been isolated. CYR1 coded in silico translated protein sequence comprised of 1,176 amino acids with coiled coil structure at the N-terminus, central nucleotide binding site (NBS) and C-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRR) that belongs to non-TIR-NBS-LRR subfamily of plant R genes. CYR1 transcript was unambiguously expressed during incompatible plant virus interactions. A putative promoter-like sequence present upstream of this candidate gene perhaps regulates its expression. Enhanced transcript level upon MYMIV infection suggests involvement of this candidate gene in conferring resistance against the virus. In silico constructed 3D models of NBS and LRR regions of this candidate protein and MYMIV-coat protein (CP) revealed that CYR1-LRR forms an active pocket and successively interacts with MYMIV-CP during docking, like that of receptor-ligand interaction; indicating a critical role of CYR1 as signalling molecule to protect V. mungo plants from MYMIV. This suggests involvement of CYR1 in recognizing MYMIV-effector molecule thus contributing to incompatible interaction. This study is the first stride to understand molecular mechanism of MYMIV resistance.

  10. Inferring noncoding RNA families and classes by means of genome-scale structure-based clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Will

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The RFAM database defines families of ncRNAs by means of sequence similarities that are sufficient to establish homology. In some cases, such as microRNAs and box H/ACA snoRNAs, functional commonalities define classes of RNAs that are characterized by structural similarities, and typically consist of multiple RNA families. Recent advances in high-throughput transcriptomics and comparative genomics have produced very large sets of putative noncoding RNAs and regulatory RNA signals. For many of them, evidence for stabilizing selection acting on their secondary structures has been derived, and at least approximate models of their structures have been computed. The overwhelming majority of these hypothetical RNAs cannot be assigned to established families or classes. We present here a structure-based clustering approach that is capable of extracting putative RNA classes from genome-wide surveys for structured RNAs. The LocARNA (local alignment of RNA tool implements a novel variant of the Sankoff algorithm that is sufficiently fast to deal with several thousand candidate sequences. The method is also robust against false positive predictions, i.e., a contamination of the input data with unstructured or nonconserved sequences. We have successfully tested the LocARNA-based clustering approach on the sequences of the RFAM-seed alignments. Furthermore, we have applied it to a previously published set of 3,332 predicted structured elements in the Ciona intestinalis genome (Missal K, Rose D, Stadler PF (2005 Noncoding RNAs in Ciona intestinalis. Bioinformatics 21 (Supplement 2: i77-i78. In addition to recovering, e.g., tRNAs as a structure-based class, the method identifies several RNA families, including microRNA and snoRNA candidates, and suggests several novel classes of ncRNAs for which to date no representative has been experimentally characterized.

  11. The Dyslexia Candidate Locus on 2p12 Is Associated with General Cognitive Ability and White Matter Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Scerri, Thomas S.; Fahimeh Darki; Newbury, Dianne F; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Myriam Peyrard-Janvid; Hans Matsson; Ang, Qi W.; Pennell, Craig E.; Susan Ring; John Stein; Andrew P. Morris; Monaco, Anthony P.; Juha Kere; Talcott, Joel B; Torkel Klingberg

    2012-01-01

    Independent studies have shown that candidate genes for dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI) impact upon reading/language-specific traits in the general population. To further explore the effect of disorder-associated genes on cognitive functions, we investigated whether they play a role in broader cognitive traits. We tested a panel of dyslexia and SLI genetic risk factors for association with two measures of general cognitive abilities, or IQ, (verbal and non-verbal) in the Avon ...

  12. Riboswitch RNAs: using RNA to sense cellular metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Henkin, Tina M.

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that undergo a shift in structure in response to binding of a regulatory molecule. These elements are encoded within the transcript they regulate, and act in cis to control expression of the coding sequence(s) within that transcript; their function is therefore distinct from that of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that act in trans to regulate the activity of other RNA transcripts. Riboswitch RNAs control a broad range of genes in bacterial species, including those...

  13. Double layer structure-based virtual screening reveals 3'-Hydroxy-A-Naphthoflavone as novel inhibitor candidate of human acetylcholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichsan, Mochammad; Pangastuti, Ardini; Habibi, Mohammad Wildan; Juliana, Kartika

    2016-03-01

    One of the most effective target for Alzheimer's disease's (AD) treatment is the inhibition of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) eventhough it has many side effects. So that, this study was aimed to discover a new candidate of hAChE's inhibitor that has more negative binding affinity than existing drugs. hAChE's 3D model used in this study has a good quality according to its number of residues in most favoured regions (92%), three bad contacts, >50 ERRAT's score (85,870) and successfully passed the VERIFY 3D threshold (>80%). Based on the first layer of SBVS againts more than 12.180.630 ligands, we discovered 11.806 hits and then we found 359 hits from the second layer of SBVS. Based on our previous steps, we found that 3'-Hydroxy-a-Naphthoflavone was the only one candidate, that directly interacted with Trp286 via hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions and also has the most negative binding affinity (-10,6 kcal/mol) and also has more negative than existing hAChE's inhibitors, such as tacrine, donepezil, etc. 3'-Hydroxy-a-Naphthoflavone is the best candidate of hAChE's inhibitor based on its binding affinity (-10,6 kcal/mol) that is more negative than existing hAChE's inhibitors, such as tacrine, donepezil, etc.

  14. Insights in microRNAs biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargalionis, Antonios N; Basdra, Efthimia K

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs, that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Recent studies now predict that numerous miRNA molecules regulate a large proportion of the human transcriptome, thus creating a whole new research field that utilizes their potential impact on gene expression in favor of diagnosis, prognosis and drug development. MiRNAs are generated from transcription of respective genes into primary structures that usually follow a two-step maturation process in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm. Active miRNA folds downregulate protein expression either via direct repression of targeted messenger RNA (mRNA) or mRNA cleavage. They are critical factors that control human development and organogenesis and reemerge as key-molecules that profoundly influence adult cells and tissues under stress-responsive conditions. Therefore, several miRNAs exhibit dysregulated functions in almost all aspects of human pathology such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, genetic and neurodegenerative diseases, forming tissue-specific molecular profiles that further define salient pathologic features. The present article offers an overview on miRNAs biogenesis and functional processes, major aspects of their participation in human development and milestones regarding their contribution in human diseases. Furthermore, their utility as extracellular biomarkers and the rationale behind miRNA inhibition or miRNA delivery are being discussed.

  15. Testing of the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for a soluble biomarker reflecting structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic literature search on 5 candidate biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syversen, Silje W; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Désirée;

    2009-01-01

    and the importance of each individual criterion; (2) overall strength of evidence in support of each of the 5 candidate biomarkers as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and identification of omissions to the criteria set. RESULTS: The search identified 111 articles. The strength...... metalloprotease (MMP-3), urine C-telopeptide of types I and II collagen (U-CTX-I and U CTX-II), focusing on the 14 OMERACT 8 criteria. Two electronic voting exercises were conducted to address: (1) strength of evidence for each biomarker as reflecting structural damage according to each individual criterion...

  16. Identification of Small RNAs in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Andrew; Joachimiak, Marcin; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Bender, Kelly

    2010-05-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of facilitating the removal of toxic metals such as uranium from contaminated sites via reduction. As such, it is essential to understand the intricate regulatory cascades involved in how D. vulgaris and its relatives respond to stressors in such sites. One approach is the identification and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs); molecules ranging in size from 20-200 nucleotides that predominantly affect gene regulation by binding to complementary mRNA in an anti-sense fashion and therefore provide an immediate regulatory response. To identify sRNAs in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not possess an annotated hfq gene, RNA was pooled from stationary and exponential phases, nitrate exposure, and biofilm conditions. The subsequent RNA was size fractionated, modified, and converted to cDNA for high throughput transcriptomic deep sequencing. A computational approach to identify sRNAs via the alignment of seven separate Desulfovibrio genomes was also performed. From the deep sequencing analysis, 2,296 reads between 20 and 250 nt were identified with expression above genome background. Analysis of those reads limited the number of candidates to ~;;87 intergenic, while ~;;140 appeared to be antisense to annotated open reading frames (ORFs). Further BLAST analysis of the intergenic candidates and other Desulfovibrio genomes indicated that eight candidates were likely portions of ORFs not previously annotated in the D. vulgaris genome. Comparison of the intergenic and antisense data sets to the bioinformatical predicted candidates, resulted in ~;;54 common candidates. Current approaches using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR are being used toverify expression of the candidates and to further develop the role these sRNAs play in D. vulgaris regulation.

  17. MicroRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devaux, Yvan; Stammet, Pascal; Friberg, Hans;

    2015-01-01

    cardiac arrest would allow subsequent health care delivery to be tailored to individual patients. However, currently available predictive methods and biomarkers lack sufficient accuracy and therefore cannot be generally recommended in clinical practice. MicroRNAs have recently emerged as potential......Despite advances in resuscitation medicine, including target temperature management as part of post-cardiac arrest care, many patients will have a poor neurological outcome, most often resulting in death. It is a commonly held belief that the ability to prognosticate outcome at an early stage after...... biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases. While the biomarker value of microRNAs for myocardial infarction or heart failure has been extensively studied, less attention has been devoted to their prognostic value after cardiac arrest. This review highlights the recent discoveries suggesting that microRNAs may...

  18. Expression of microRNAs in Horse Plasma and Their Characteristic Nucleotide Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Hwang, Seungwoo; Yu, Hee Jeong; Oh, Dayoung; Choi, Yu Jung; Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Yongbaek; Ryu, Doug-Young

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in blood plasma are stable under high levels of ribonuclease activity and could function in tissue-to-tissue communication, suggesting that they may have distinctive structural characteristics compared with non-circulating miRNAs. In this study, the expression of miRNAs in horse plasma and their characteristic nucleotide composition were examined and compared with non-plasma miRNAs. Highly expressed plasma miRNA species were not part of the abundant group of miRNAs in non-plasma tissues, except for the eca-let-7 family. eca-miR-486-5p, -92a, and -21 were among the most abundant plasma miRNAs, and their human orthologs also belong to the most abundant group of miRNAs in human plasma. Uracil and guanine were the most common nucleotides of both plasma and non-plasma miRNAs. Cytosine was the least common in plasma and non-plasma miRNAs, although levels were higher in plasma miRNAs. Plasma miRNAs also showed higher expression levels of miRNAs containing adenine and cytosine repeats, compared with non-plasma miRNAs. These observations indicate that miRNAs in the plasma have a unique nucleotide composition. PMID:26731407

  19. Expression of microRNAs in Horse Plasma and Their Characteristic Nucleotide Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwoo Lee

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs in blood plasma are stable under high levels of ribonuclease activity and could function in tissue-to-tissue communication, suggesting that they may have distinctive structural characteristics compared with non-circulating miRNAs. In this study, the expression of miRNAs in horse plasma and their characteristic nucleotide composition were examined and compared with non-plasma miRNAs. Highly expressed plasma miRNA species were not part of the abundant group of miRNAs in non-plasma tissues, except for the eca-let-7 family. eca-miR-486-5p, -92a, and -21 were among the most abundant plasma miRNAs, and their human orthologs also belong to the most abundant group of miRNAs in human plasma. Uracil and guanine were the most common nucleotides of both plasma and non-plasma miRNAs. Cytosine was the least common in plasma and non-plasma miRNAs, although levels were higher in plasma miRNAs. Plasma miRNAs also showed higher expression levels of miRNAs containing adenine and cytosine repeats, compared with non-plasma miRNAs. These observations indicate that miRNAs in the plasma have a unique nucleotide composition.

  20. Genes for 7S RNAs can replace the gene for 4.5S RNA in growth of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S

    1991-01-01

    4.5S RNAs of eubacteria and 7S RNAs of archaebacteria and eukaryotes exist in a hairpin conformation. The apex of this hairpin displays structural and sequence similarities among both 4.5S and 7S RNAs. Furthermore, a hyphenated sequence of 16 nucleotides is conserved in all eubacterial 4.5S RNAs...

  1. Micro-RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taipaleenmäki, H.; Hokland, L. B.; Chen, Li;

    2012-01-01

    Osteoblast differentiation and bone formation (osteogenesis) are regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Recently, a novel class of regulatory factors termed microRNAs has been identified as playing an important role in the regulation of many aspects of osteoblast biology...... including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism and apoptosis. Also, preliminary data from animal disease models suggest that targeting miRNAs in bone can be a novel approach to increase bone mass. This review highlights the current knowledge of microRNA biology and their role in bone formation and...

  2. Identification of CRISPR and riboswitch related RNAs among novel noncoding RNAs of the euryarchaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpousis Agamemnon J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noncoding RNA (ncRNA has been recognized as an important regulator of gene expression networks in Bacteria and Eucaryota. Little is known about ncRNA in thermococcal archaea except for the eukaryotic-like C/D and H/ACA modification guide RNAs. Results Using a combination of in silico and experimental approaches, we identified and characterized novel P. abyssi ncRNAs transcribed from 12 intergenic regions, ten of which are conserved throughout the Thermococcales. Several of them accumulate in the late-exponential phase of growth. Analysis of the genomic context and sequence conservation amongst related thermococcal species revealed two novel P. abyssi ncRNA families. The CRISPR family is comprised of crRNAs expressed from two of the four P. abyssi CRISPR cassettes. The 5'UTR derived family includes four conserved ncRNAs, two of which have features similar to known bacterial riboswitches. Several of the novel ncRNAs have sequence similarities to orphan OrfB transposase elements. Based on RNA secondary structure predictions and experimental results, we show that three of the twelve ncRNAs include Kink-turn RNA motifs, arguing for a biological role of these ncRNAs in the cell. Furthermore, our results show that several of the ncRNAs are subjected to processing events by enzymes that remain to be identified and characterized. Conclusions This work proposes a revised annotation of CRISPR loci in P. abyssi and expands our knowledge of ncRNAs in the Thermococcales, thus providing a starting point for studies needed to elucidate their biological function.

  3. The new world of RNAs

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    Danyella Barbosa Dogini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major developments that resulted from the human genome sequencing projects was a better understanding of the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. NcRNAs are divided into several different categories according to size and function; however, one shared feature is that they are not translated into proteins. In this review, we will discuss relevant aspects of ncRNAs, focusing on two main types: i microRNAs, which negatively regulate gene expression either by translational repression or target mRNA degradation, and ii small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, which are involved in the biological process of RNA interference (RNAi. Our knowledge regarding these two types of ncRNAs has increased dramatically over the past decade, and they have a great potential to become therapeutic alternatives for a variety of human conditions.

  4. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

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    Herington Adrian C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS, which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL. Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2. Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis, as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading

  5. Genome-wide identification and characterization of novel lncRNAs in Populus under nitrogen deficiency.

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    Chen, Min; Wang, Chenlu; Bao, Hai; Chen, Hui; Wang, Yanwei

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified as important regulatory factors of gene expression in eukaryotic species, such as Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa. However, the systematic identification of potential lncRNAs in trees is comparatively rare. In particular, the characteristics, expression, and regulatory roles of lncRNAs in trees under nutrient stress remain largely unknown. A genome-wide strategy was used in this investigation to identify and characterize novel and low-nitrogen (N)-responsive lncRNAs in Populus tomentosa; 388 unique lncRNA candidates belonging to 380 gene loci were detected and only seven lncRNAs were found to belong to seven conserved non-coding RNA families indicating the majority of P. tomentosa lncRNAs are species-specific. In total, 126 lncRNAs were significantly altered under low-N stress; 8 were repressed, and 118 were induced. Furthermore, 9 and 5 lncRNAs were detected as precursors of 11 known and 14 novel Populus miRNAs, respectively, whereas 4 lncRNAs were targeted by 29 miRNAs belonging to 5 families, including 22 conserved and 7 non-conserved miRNAs. In addition, 15 antisense lncRNAs were identified to be generated from opposite strands of 14 corresponding protein-coding genes. In total, 111 protein-coding genes with regions complementary to 38 lncRNAs were also predicted with some lncRNAs corresponding to multiple genes and vice versa, and their functions were annotated, which further demonstrated the complex regulatory relationship between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in plants. Moreover, an interaction network among lncRNAs, miRNAs, and mRNAs was investigated. These findings enrich our understanding of lncRNAs in Populus, expand the methods of miRNA identification. Our results present the first global characterization of lncRNAs and their potential target genes in response to nitrogen stress in trees, which provides more information on low-nutrition adaptation mechanisms in woody plants

  6. Profiling of microRNA-mRNA reveals roles of microRNAs in cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ding; ZHANG You-yi; GUO Yan-li; LI Zi-jian; GENG Li

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in women.This study was designed to explore the expression profiles of microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs and the gene regulation network in cervical tumorigenesis and to find candidate molecular markers and key tumorigenic genes in cervical cancer.Methods miRNAs and mRNAs expression microarrays were used to detect the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs in normal and cancer cervical tissues.TargetScan 5.0 database (UK) was used to predict the target genes of the miRNAs,analyze their intersection with differentially expressed mRNAs and negatively correlate the intersection with miRNAs.Bioinformatic approaches were used to analyze functions and pathways of the target genes and establish miRNA-gene network.Results Twenty-nine miRNAs and 2036 mRNAs were differentially expressed in normal and cervical tumor tissues.Among them,13 miRNAs and 754 mRNAs were up-regulated in cervical tumor tissues and 16 miRNAs and 1282 RNA were down-regulated.The 327 target genes negatively related to miRNAs in the intersection were involved in functions and signal pathways.Down-regulated miRNAs targeted genes and up-regulated miRNAs targeted genes were involved in 415 and 163 functions,respectively,and in 37 and 17 significant pathways,respectively (P <0.05,false discovery rate (FDR) <0.05).We constructed the miRNAs-gene network and found that hsa-miR-15a,hsa-miR-106b and hsa-miR-20b were key nodes in the network.Conclusions The differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs in cervical cancer and related miRNA-gene network have been identified.They play important roles in cervical tumorigenesis and are involved in many important biological functions and signal transduction pathways.These findings lay a foundation for research on the molecular mechanism of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer.

  7. Regulation of Skeletal Muscle by microRNAs.

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    Diniz, Gabriela Placoná; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs highly conserved across species. miRNAs regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally by base pairing to complementary sequences mainly in the 3'-untranslated region of their target mRNAs to induce mRNA cleavage and translational repression. Thousands of miRNAs have been identified in human and their function has been linked to the regulation of both physiological and pathological processes. The skeletal muscle is the largest human organ responsible for locomotion, posture, and body metabolism. Several conditions such as aging, immobilization, exercise, and diet are associated with alterations in skeletal muscle structure and function. The genetic and molecular pathways that regulate muscle development, function, and regeneration as well as muscular disease have been well established in past decades. In recent years, numerous studies have underlined the importance of miRNAs in the control of skeletal muscle development and function, through its effects on several biological pathways critical for skeletal muscle homeostasis. Furthermore, it has become clear that alteration of the expression of many miRNAs or genetic mutations of miRNA genes is associated with changes on myogenesis and on progression of several skeletal muscle diseases. The present review provides an overview of the current studies and recent progress in elucidating the complex role exerted by miRNAs on skeletal muscle physiology and pathology. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1279-1294, 2016. PMID:27347893

  8. Micro RNAs and Short-interfering RNAs in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramanjulu Sunkar; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing can occur either at the transcriptional level or post-transcriptional level or both. Many instances of sequence-specific silencing requires small RNAs that can be divided into two major classes: microRNAs (miRNAs) and short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). miRNAs function in post-transcriptional gene silencing by guiding mRNA degradation or translational repression. Endogenous siRNAs are more diverse in plants than in animals and can direct post-transcriptional gene silencing through mRNA degradation or transcriptional gene silencing by triggering DNA methylation and histone modifications. This review discusses recent advances in the field of small RNA-guided gene silencing in plants including rice.

  9. Deep sequencing of virus-infected cells reveals HIV-encoded small RNAs.

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    Schopman, Nick C T; Willemsen, Marcel; Liu, Ying Poi; Bradley, Ted; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Berkhout, Ben; Haasnoot, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Small virus-derived interfering RNAs (viRNAs) play an important role in antiviral defence in plants, insects and nematodes by triggering the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The role of RNAi as an antiviral defence mechanism in mammalian cells has been obscure due to the lack of viRNA detection. Although viRNAs from different mammalian viruses have recently been identified, their functions and possible impact on viral replication remain unknown. To identify viRNAs derived from HIV-1, we used the extremely sensitive SOLiD(TM) 3 Plus System to analyse viRNA accumulation in HIV-1-infected T lymphocytes. We detected numerous small RNAs that correspond to the HIV-1 RNA genome. The majority of these sequences have a positive polarity (98.1%) and could be derived from miRNAs encoded by structured segments of the HIV-1 RNA genome (vmiRNAs). A small portion of the viRNAs is of negative polarity and most of them are encoded within the 3'-UTR, which may represent viral siRNAs (vsiRNAs). The identified vsiRNAs can potently repress HIV-1 production, whereas suppression of the vsiRNAs by antagomirs stimulate virus production. These results suggest that HIV-1 triggers the production of vsiRNAs and vmiRNAs to modulate cellular and/or viral gene expression. PMID:21911362

  10. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants.

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    Larriba, Eduardo; del Mazo, Jesús

    2016-03-25

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed.

  11. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants

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    Eduardo Larriba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed.

  12. Clusters of internally primed transcripts reveal novel long noncoding RNAs.

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    Masaaki Furuno

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are increasingly being recognized as having important regulatory roles. Although much recent attention has focused on tiny 22- to 25-nucleotide microRNAs, several functional ncRNAs are orders of magnitude larger in size. Examples of such macro ncRNAs include Xist and Air, which in mouse are 18 and 108 kilobases (Kb, respectively. We surveyed the 102,801 FANTOM3 mouse cDNA clones and found that Air and Xist were present not as single, full-length transcripts but as a cluster of multiple, shorter cDNAs, which were unspliced, had little coding potential, and were most likely primed from internal adenine-rich regions within longer parental transcripts. We therefore conducted a genome-wide search for regional clusters of such cDNAs to find novel macro ncRNA candidates. Sixty-six regions were identified, each of which mapped outside known protein-coding loci and which had a mean length of 92 Kb. We detected several known long ncRNAs within these regions, supporting the basic rationale of our approach. In silico analysis showed that many regions had evidence of imprinting and/or antisense transcription. These regions were significantly associated with microRNAs and transcripts from the central nervous system. We selected eight novel regions for experimental validation by northern blot and RT-PCR and found that the majority represent previously unrecognized noncoding transcripts that are at least 10 Kb in size and predominantly localized in the nucleus. Taken together, the data not only identify multiple new ncRNAs but also suggest the existence of many more macro ncRNAs like Xist and Air.

  13. Structural stability at high pressure, electronic, and magnetic properties of BaFZnAs: A new candidate of host material of diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi-Juan, Chen; Zheng, Deng; Xian-Cheng, Wang; Shao-Min, Feng; Zhen, Yuan; Si-Jia, Zhang; Qing-Qing, Liu; Chang-Qing, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The layered semiconductor BaFZnAs with the tetragonal ZrCuSiAs-type structure has been successfully synthesized. Both the in-situ high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction and the high-pressure Raman scattering measurements demonstrate that the structure of BaFZnAs is stable under pressure up to 17.5 GPa at room temperature. The resistivity and the magnetic susceptibility data show that BaFZnAs is a non-magnetic semiconductor. BaFZnAs is recommended as a candidate of the host material of diluted magnetic semiconductor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and Project of Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  14. Genome-wide identification and functional analysis of long noncoding RNAs involved in the response to graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuli; Zhou, Xuefeng; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhuo, Yizhou; Zhu, Siting; Zhao, Yunli; Wang, Dayong

    2016-09-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are defined as noncoding RNAs having at least 200 nucleotides, can potentially regulate various biological processes. However, the roles of lncRNAs in regulating cellular response to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are still unclear. Using Hiseq 2000 sequencing technique, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify lncRNAs involved in the control of toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) using in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans assay system. HiSeq 2000 sequencing, followed by quantitative analysis, identified only 34 dysregulated lncRNAs in GO exposed nematodes. Bioinformatics analysis implies the biological processes and signaling pathways mediated by candidate lncRNAs involved in the control of GO toxicity. A lncRNAs-miRNAs network possibly involved in the control of GO toxicity was further raised. Moreover, we identified the shared lncRNAs based on the molecular regulation basis for chemical surface modifications and/or genetic mutations in reducing GO toxicity. We further provide direct evidence that these shared lncRNAs, linc-37 and linc-14, were involved in the control of chemical surface modifications and genetic mutations in reducing GO toxicity. linc-37 binding to transcriptional factor FOXO/DAF-16 might be important for the control of GO toxicity. Our whole-genome identification and functional analysis of lncRNAs highlights the important roles of lncRNAs based molecular mechanisms for cellular responses to ENMs in organisms. PMID:27348851

  15. Genome-wide identification and functional analysis of long noncoding RNAs involved in the response to graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuli; Zhou, Xuefeng; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhuo, Yizhou; Zhu, Siting; Zhao, Yunli; Wang, Dayong

    2016-09-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are defined as noncoding RNAs having at least 200 nucleotides, can potentially regulate various biological processes. However, the roles of lncRNAs in regulating cellular response to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are still unclear. Using Hiseq 2000 sequencing technique, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify lncRNAs involved in the control of toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) using in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans assay system. HiSeq 2000 sequencing, followed by quantitative analysis, identified only 34 dysregulated lncRNAs in GO exposed nematodes. Bioinformatics analysis implies the biological processes and signaling pathways mediated by candidate lncRNAs involved in the control of GO toxicity. A lncRNAs-miRNAs network possibly involved in the control of GO toxicity was further raised. Moreover, we identified the shared lncRNAs based on the molecular regulation basis for chemical surface modifications and/or genetic mutations in reducing GO toxicity. We further provide direct evidence that these shared lncRNAs, linc-37 and linc-14, were involved in the control of chemical surface modifications and genetic mutations in reducing GO toxicity. linc-37 binding to transcriptional factor FOXO/DAF-16 might be important for the control of GO toxicity. Our whole-genome identification and functional analysis of lncRNAs highlights the important roles of lncRNAs based molecular mechanisms for cellular responses to ENMs in organisms.

  16. Identification and Characterization of MicroRNAs in Macaca fascicularis by EST Analysis

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    Hao Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which repress gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. In this study, an expressed sequence tag (EST-based combined method was applied for the detection of miRNAs in Macaca fascicularis which is used as a model animal extensively in medical experiments, particularly those involved with neuroscience and disease. Initially, previously known miRNA sequences from metazoans were used to blast with the EST databases of Macaca fascicularis, and then a range of filtering criteria was conducted to remove some pseudo ones. At last a total of 8 novel conserved miRNAs were identified; their functions were further predicted and analyzed. Together, our study provides insight into miRNAs and their functions in Macaca fascicularis, indicating that the EST analysis is an efficient and affordable alternative approach for identifying novel miRNA candidates.

  17. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; ZHOU Hui

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) hold a central place In protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein, thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules. In recent years, however, various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond par-ticipating in protein synthesis. When suffering from certain nutritional stresses, tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged, and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression, so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses. In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells, the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs. On the other hand, this retrograde action effectively re-duces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation. Quite recently, various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense. Under certain physiological or environmental stresses, they are specifically cleaved into fragments of differ-ent lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm. These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon. Instead, a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced, which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression. Inves-tigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier, which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic informa-tion.

  18. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs(tRNAs) hold a central place in protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein,thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules.In recent years,however,various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond participating in protein synthesis.When suffering from certain nutritional stresses,tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged,and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression,so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses.In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells,the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs.On the other hand,this retrograde action effectively reduces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation.Quite recently,various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense.Under certain physiological or environmental stresses,they are specifically cleaved into fragments of different lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm.These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon.Instead,a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced,which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression.Investigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier,which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic information.

  19. Use of miRNAs as Biomarkers in Sepsis

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    Raluca Dumache

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the most common causes of death in critical patients. Severe generalized inflammation, infections, and severe physiological imbalances significantly decrease the survival rate with more than 50%. Moreover, monitoring, evaluation, and therapy management often become extremely difficult for the clinician in this type of patients. Current methods of diagnosing sepsis vary based especially on the determination of biochemical-humoral markers, such as cytokines, components of the complement, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory compounds. Recent studies highlight the use of new biomarkers for sepsis, namely, miRNAs. miRNAs belong to a class of small, noncoding RNAs with an approximate content of 19–23 nucleotides. Following biochemical and physiological imbalances, the expression of miRNAs in blood or other body fluids changes significantly. Moreover, its stability, specificity, and selectivity make miRNAs ideal candidates for sepsis biomarkers. In conclusion, we can affirm that stable species of circulating miRNAs represent potential biomarkers for monitoring the evolution of sepsis.

  20. Structure-Guided Lead Optimization of Triazolopyrimidine-Ring Substituents Identifies Potent Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors with Clinical Candidate Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coteron, Jose M.; Marco, Maria; Esquivias, Jorge; Deng, Xiaoyi; White, Karen L.; White, John; Koltun, Maria; El Mazouni, Farah; Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Katneni, Kasiram; Bhamidipati, Ravi; Shackleford, David M.; Angulo-Barturen, Inigo; Ferrer, Santiago B.; Jimenez-Diaz, Maria Belen; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Charman, William N.; Bathurst, Ian; Floyd, David; Matthews, David; Burrows, Jeremy N.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Charman, Susan A.; Phillips, Margaret A. (UWASH); (MMV, Switzerland); (GSK); (Monash); (UW); (UTSMC)

    2012-02-27

    Drug therapy is the mainstay of antimalarial therapy, yet current drugs are threatened by the development of resistance. In an effort to identify new potential antimalarials, we have undertaken a lead optimization program around our previously identified triazolopyrimidine-based series of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) inhibitors. The X-ray structure of PfDHODH was used to inform the medicinal chemistry program allowing the identification of a potent and selective inhibitor (DSM265) that acts through DHODH inhibition to kill both sensitive and drug resistant strains of the parasite. This compound has similar potency to chloroquine in the humanized SCID mouse P. falciparum model, can be synthesized by a simple route, and rodent pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated it has excellent oral bioavailability, a long half-life and low clearance. These studies have identified the first candidate in the triazolopyrimidine series to meet previously established progression criteria for efficacy and ADME properties, justifying further development of this compound toward clinical candidate status.

  1. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris by high-throughput sequencing

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    Peláez Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenously encoded small RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. MiRNAs play essential roles in almost all plant biological processes. Currently, few miRNAs have been identified in the model food legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies have allowed the identification of conserved and novel miRNAs in many plant species. Here, we used Illumina's sequencing by synthesis (SBS technology to identify and characterize the miRNA population of Phaseolus vulgaris. Results Small RNA libraries were generated from roots, flowers, leaves, and seedlings of P. vulgaris. Based on similarity to previously reported plant miRNAs,114 miRNAs belonging to 33 conserved miRNA families were identified. Stem-loop precursors and target gene sequences for several conserved common bean miRNAs were determined from publicly available databases. Less conserved miRNA families and species-specific common bean miRNA isoforms were also characterized. Moreover, novel miRNAs based on the small RNAs were found and their potential precursors were predicted. In addition, new target candidates for novel and conserved miRNAs were proposed. Finally, we studied organ-specific miRNA family expression levels through miRNA read frequencies. Conclusions This work represents the first massive-scale RNA sequencing study performed in Phaseolus vulgaris to identify and characterize its miRNA population. It significantly increases the number of miRNAs, precursors, and targets identified in this agronomically important species. The miRNA expression analysis provides a foundation for understanding common bean miRNA organ-specific expression patterns. The present study offers an expanded picture of P. vulgaris miRNAs in relation to those of other legumes.

  2. Identification and profiling of conserved and novel microRNAs from Chinese Qinchuan bovine longissimus thoracis

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    Sun Jiajie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a family of ~22 nucleotide small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by fully or partially binding to their complementary sequences. Recently, a large number of miRNAs and their expression patterns have been identified in various species. However, to date no miRNAs have been reported to modulate muscle development in beef cattle. Results Total RNAs from the Chinese Qinchuan bovine longissimus thoracis at fetal and adult stages were used to construct small RNA libraries for Solexa SBS technology sequencing. A total of 15,454,182 clean reads were obtained from the fetal bovine library and 13,558,164 clean reads from the adult bovine library. In total, 521 miRNAs including 104 novel miRNA candidates were identified. Furthermore, the nucleotide bias, base edit and family of the known miRNAs were also analyzed. Based on stem-loop qPCR, 25 high-read miRNAs were detected, and the results showed that bta-miRNA-206, miRNA-1, miRNA-133, miRNAn12, and miRNAn17 were highly expressed in muscle-related tissue or organs, suggesting that these miRNAs may play a role in the development of bovine muscle tissues. Conclusions This study confirmed the authenticity of 417 known miRNAs, discovered 104 novel miRNAs in bos taurus, and identified five muscle-specific miRNAs. The identification of novel miRNAs significantly expanded the repertoire of bovine miRNAs and could contribute to further studies on the muscle development of cattle.

  3. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Wang, Wang-Xia; Rajeev, Bernard W

    2008-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are the culmination of many different genetic and environmental influences. Prior studies have shown that RNAs are pathologically altered during the inexorable course of some NDs. Recent evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be a contributing factor in neurodegeneration. miRNAs are brain-enriched, small ( approximately 22 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs that participate in mRNA translational regulation. Although discovered in the framework of worm development, miRNAs are now appreciated to play a dynamic role in many mammalian brain-related biochemical pathways, including neuroplasticity and stress responses. Research about miRNAs in the context of neurodegeneration is accumulating rapidly, and the goal of this review is to provide perspective for these new data that may be helpful to specialists in either field. An overview is provided about the normal functions for miRNAs, including some of the newer concepts related to the human brain. Recently published studies pertaining to the roles of miRNAs in NDs--including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and triplet repeat disorders-are described. Finally, a discussion is included with theoretical syntheses and possible future directions in exploring the nexus between miRNA and ND research.

  4. Long noncoding RNAs regulate adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Goff, Loyal A; Trapnell, Cole; Alexander, Ryan; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Sauvageau, Martin; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Kelley, David R; Hendrickson, David G; Yuan, Bingbing; Kellis, Manolis; Lodish, Harvey F; Rinn, John L

    2013-02-26

    The prevalence of obesity has led to a surge of interest in understanding the detailed mechanisms underlying adipocyte development. Many protein-coding genes, mRNAs, and microRNAs have been implicated in adipocyte development, but the global expression patterns and functional contributions of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during adipogenesis have not been explored. Here we profiled the transcriptome of primary brown and white adipocytes, preadipocytes, and cultured adipocytes and identified 175 lncRNAs that are specifically regulated during adipogenesis. Many lncRNAs are adipose-enriched, strongly induced during adipogenesis, and bound at their promoters by key transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα). RNAi-mediated loss of function screens identified functional lncRNAs with varying impact on adipogenesis. Collectively, we have identified numerous lncRNAs that are functionally required for proper adipogenesis.

  5. CCD photometry of globular cluster core structure. 2: U-band profiles for 15 candidate collapsed-core clusters

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    Lugger, Phyllis M.; Cohn, Haldan N.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1995-01-01

    We present U-band CCD surface brightness profiles for 15 of the 21 globular clusters that have been identified as having collapsed cores by Djorgovski & King (1986). Fourteen of the clusters were observed with the Cerro Tololo 4 m telescope; NGC 7078 was observed with the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6 m telescope (CFHT). We have fitted the profiles with seeing-convolved power laws, both with and without cores, to assess the evidence for central power-law structure and to place upper limits on core radius r(sub c). We find nine of the clusters (NGC 5946, NGC 6284, NGC 6293, NGC 6325, NGC 6342, NGC 6558, NGC 6624, NGC 6681, and NGC 7078) to have unresolved cores, with upper limits r(sub c) less than or = 1.9 arcsecs. Three of the clusters (NGC 6453, NGC 6522, and NGC 7099) have marginally resolved cores, with upper limits in the range 2.7 arcsecs less than or = r(sub c) less than or = 3.4 arcsecs. The remaining three clusters (NGC 6355, NGC 6397, and NGC 6752) have resolved cores. Of the latter three clusters, NGC 6355 and NGC 6752 are consistent with single-mass King model structure. The median cluster distances are 9.2 kpc for those with unresolved cores, 7.2 kpc for those with marginally resolved cores, and 4.1 kpc for those with resolved cores. The 13 clusters that do not resemble single-mass King models have central power-law structure with surface brightness slopes in the range of d ln S/d ln r = -0.6 to -0.8. These slopes are consistent with the models of Grabhorn et al. (1992) for clusters evolving beyond core collapse. The models include a centrally concentrated population of nonluminous remnants with masses in the range 1.2-1.4 solar mass, thus providing evidence for significant neutron star populations in most of our cluster sample. This finding is consistent with the observation of centrally concentrated low-mass X-ray binary and millisecond pulsar populations in several clusters.

  6. Discovery of putative small non-coding RNAs from the obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Woolfit

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis is an endosymbiotic bacterium that induces a wide range of effects in its insect hosts, including manipulation of reproduction and protection against pathogens. Little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-Wolbachia interaction, though it is likely to be mediated via the secretion of proteins or other factors. There is an increasing amount of evidence that bacteria regulate many cellular processes, including secretion of virulence factors, using small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, but sRNAs have not previously been described from Wolbachia. We have used two independent approaches, one based on comparative genomics and the other using RNA-Seq data generated for gene expression studies, to identify candidate sRNAs in Wolbachia. We experimentally characterized the expression of one of these candidates in four Wolbachia strains, and showed that it is differentially regulated in different host tissues and sexes. Given the roles played by sRNAs in other host-associated bacteria, the conservation of the candidate sRNAs between different Wolbachia strains, and the sex- and tissue-specific differential regulation we have identified, we hypothesise that sRNAs may play a significant role in the biology of Wolbachia, and in particular in its interactions with its host.

  7. UV and X-ray structural studies of a 101-residue long Tat protein from a HIV-1 primary isolate and of its mutated, detoxified, vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Marine; Mayol, Katia; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Bussat, Marie-Claire; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Verrier, Bernard; Beck, Alain; Haser, Richard; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    The 101-residue long Tat protein of primary isolate 133 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), wt-Tat(133) displays a high transactivation activity in vitro, whereas the mutant thereof, STLA-Tat(133), a vaccine candidate for HIV-1, has none. These two proteins were chemically synthesized and their biological activity was validated. Their structural properties were characterized using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence emission, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. SAXS studies revealed that both proteins were extended and belong to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins. CD measurements showed that wt-Tat(133) or STLA-Tat(133) underwent limited structural rearrangements when complexed with specific fragments of antibodies. Crystallization trials have been performed on the two forms, assuming that the Tat(133) proteins might have a better propensity to fold in supersaturated conditions, and small crystals have been obtained. These results suggest that biologically active Tat protein is natively unfolded and requires only a limited gain of structure for its function.

  8. Promoter-associated RNAs and promoter-targeted RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing-Xue; Ma, Jin-Xia

    2012-09-01

    The world of RNAs is much more complex than previously thought, and has rapidly emerged as one of the most actively researched topics in the life sciences. Recently, two findings in this field were reported and given special attention: promoter-associated RNAs (paRNAs), a novel class of RNAs with numerous potential functions; and promoter-targeted RNA-induced transcriptional gene regulation, a new regulatory mechanism to control transcription. In this review, we summarize the studies in these two areas, and outline the current understanding with respect to the potential biological functions of paRNAs, and the molecular mechanisms of promoter-targeted RNA-induced transcriptional gene silencing and activation. Additionally, we seek to integrate these two areas, as paRNAs may have potential biological links with promoter-targeted RNA-induced transcriptional gene regulation. Finally, we will discuss the significance of identifying paRNAs and the possible use of promoter-targeted RNAs in gene regulation and therapy.

  9. microRNAs- powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Cong; LIU YuFei; HE Lin

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally, miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio-logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression.miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu-lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a now dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  10. microRNAs-powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally. miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio- logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression. miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu- lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a new dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  11. MicroRNAs in obesity-associated disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abente, Eugenio J; Subramanian, Murugan; Ramachandran, Vimal; Najafi-Shoushtari, S Hani

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of a worldwide obesity epidemic has dramatically increased the prevalence of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, predisposing individuals to a greater risk for the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, type II diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Current available pharmacological interventions combined with diet and exercise-based managements are still poorly effective for weight management, likely in part due to an incomplete understanding of regulatory mechanisms and pathways contributing to the systemic metabolic abnormalities under disturbed energy homeostasis. MicroRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression, have been increasingly described to influence shifts in metabolic pathways under various obesity-related disease settings. Here we review recent discoveries of the mechanistic role that microRNAs play in regulating metabolic functions in liver and adipose tissues involved in obesity associated disorders, and briefly discusses the potential candidates that are being pursued as viable therapeutic targets.

  12. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean–rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27271618

  13. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27271618

  14. Identification and Characterization of Novel Small RNAs in Rickettsia prowazekii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Casey L. C.; Narra, Hema P.; Sahni, Abha; Rojas, Mark; Khanipov, Kamil; Patel, Jignesh; Shah, Riya; Fofanov, Yuriy; Sahni, Sanjeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates a critically important role for bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) as post-transcriptional regulators of physiology, metabolism, stress/adaptive responses, and virulence, but the roles of sRNAs in pathogenic Rickettsia species remain poorly understood. Here, we report on the identification of both novel and well-known bacterial sRNAs in Rickettsia prowazekii, known to cause epidemic typhus in humans. RNA sequencing of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs), the preferred targets during human rickettsioses, infected with R. prowazekii revealed the presence of 35 trans-acting and 23 cis-acting sRNAs, respectively. Of these, expression of two trans-acting (Rp_sR17 and Rp_sR60) and one cis-acting (Rp_sR47) novel sRNAs and four well-characterized bacterial sRNAs (RNaseP_bact_a, α-tmRNA, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA) was further confirmed by Northern blot or RT-PCR analyses. The transcriptional start sites of five novel rickettsial sRNAs and 6S RNA were next determined using 5′ RLM-RACE yielding evidence for their independent biogenesis in R. prowazekii. Finally, computational approaches were employed to determine the secondary structures and potential mRNA targets of novel sRNAs. Together, these results establish the presence and expression of sRNAs in R. prowazekii during host cell infection and suggest potential functional roles for these important post-transcriptional regulators in rickettsial biology and pathogenesis. PMID:27375581

  15. Circulating microRNAs: Novel biomarkers for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process, involving a variety of changes in gene expression and physiological structure change. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules. Recent innovation in miRNAs profiling technology have shed new light on the pathology of esophageal carcinoma (EC), and also heralded great potential for exploring novel biomarkers for both EC diagnosis and treatment. Frequent dysregulation of miRNA in malignancy highlights the study of molecular...

  16. Computational identification and analysis of novel sugarcane microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiebaut Flávia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA-regulation of gene expression plays a key role in the development and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Deep sequencing analyses accelerate the process of small RNA discovery in many plants and expand our understanding of miRNA-regulated processes. We therefore undertook small RNA sequencing of sugarcane miRNAs in order to understand their complexity and to explore their role in sugarcane biology. Results A bioinformatics search was carried out to discover novel miRNAs that can be regulated in sugarcane plants submitted to drought and salt stresses, and under pathogen infection. By means of the presence of miRNA precursors in the related sorghum genome, we identified 623 candidates of new mature miRNAs in sugarcane. Of these, 44 were classified as high confidence miRNAs. The biological function of the new miRNAs candidates was assessed by analyzing their putative targets. The set of bona fide sugarcane miRNA includes those likely targeting serine/threonine kinases, Myb and zinc finger proteins. Additionally, a MADS-box transcription factor and an RPP2B protein, which act in development and disease resistant processes, could be regulated by cleavage (21-nt-species and DNA methylation (24-nt-species, respectively. Conclusions A large scale investigation of sRNA in sugarcane using a computational approach has identified a substantial number of new miRNAs and provides detailed genotype-tissue-culture miRNA expression profiles. Comparative analysis between monocots was valuable to clarify aspects about conservation of miRNA and their targets in a plant whose genome has not yet been sequenced. Our findings contribute to knowledge of miRNA roles in regulatory pathways in the complex, polyploidy sugarcane genome.

  17. RECOVERY OF THE CANDIDATE PROTOPLANET HD 100546 b WITH GEMINI/NICI AND DETECTION OF ADDITIONAL (PLANET-INDUCED?) DISK STRUCTURE AT SMALL SEPARATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, Thayne; Kudo, Tomoyuki [NAOJ, Subaru Telescope, 650 N' Aohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogashin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinijuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Honda, Mitsuhiko [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka 259-1293 (Japan); Brandt, Timothy D. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Grady, Carol [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA96002 (United States); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 7 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Janson, Markus [Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kuzuhara, Masayuki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); McElwain, Michael W. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Follette, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Hashimoto, Jun [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Henning, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Morino, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Jun [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kwon, Jungmi; Mede, Kyle, E-mail: currie@naoj.org [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-01

    We report the first independent, second epoch (re-)detection of a directly imaged protoplanet candidate. Using L' high-contrast imaging of HD 100546 taken with the Near-Infrared Coronagraph and Imager on Gemini South, we recover ''HD 100546 b'' with a position and brightness consistent with the original Very Large Telescope/NAos-COnica detection from Quanz et al., although data obtained after 2013 will be required to decisively demonstrate common proper motion. HD 100546 b may be spatially resolved, up to ≈12-13 AU in diameter, and is embedded in a finger of thermal IR-bright, polarized emission extending inward to at least 0.''3. Standard hot-start models imply a mass of ≈15 M{sub J} . However, if HD 100546 b is newly formed or made visible by a circumplanetary disk, both of which are plausible, its mass is significantly lower (e.g., 1-7 M{sub J} ). Additionally, we discover a thermal IR-bright disk feature, possibly a spiral density wave, at roughly the same angular separation as HD 100546 b but 90° away. Our interpretation of this feature as a spiral arm is not decisive, but modeling analyses using spiral density wave theory implies a wave launching point exterior to ≈0.''45 embedded within the visible disk structure: plausibly evidence for a second, hitherto unseen, wide-separation planet. With one confirmed protoplanet candidate and evidence for one to two others, HD 100546 is an important evolutionary precursor to intermediate-mass stars with multiple super-Jovian planets at moderate/wide separations like HR 8799.

  18. Non-Protein Coding RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Nils G; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    This book assembles chapters from experts in the Biophysics of RNA to provide a broadly accessible snapshot of the current status of this rapidly expanding field. The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the discoverers of RNA interference, highlighting just one example of a large number of non-protein coding RNAs. Because non-protein coding RNAs outnumber protein coding genes in mammals and other higher eukaryotes, it is now thought that the complexity of organisms is correlated with the fraction of their genome that encodes non-protein coding RNAs. Essential biological processes as diverse as cell differentiation, suppression of infecting viruses and parasitic transposons, higher-level organization of eukaryotic chromosomes, and gene expression itself are found to largely be directed by non-protein coding RNAs. The biophysical study of these RNAs employs X-ray crystallography, NMR, ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, optical tweezers, cryo-electron microscopy, and ot...

  19. MicroRNAs in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushati, Natascha; Cohen, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in diverse cellular and developmental processes. Many miRNAs are expressed specifically in the central nervous system, where they have roles in differentiation, neuronal survival, and potentially also in plasticity and learning. The absence of miRNAs in a variety of specific postmitotic neurons can lead to progressive loss of these neurons and behavioral defects reminiscent of the phenotypes seen in the pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review recent studies which provide a link between miRNA function and neurodegeneration. We also discuss evidence which might suggest involvement of miRNAs in the emergence or progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. MicroRNAs in Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara; Geiger, Julian; Madsen, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have within the past decade emerged as key regulators of metabolic homeostasis. Major tissues in intermediary metabolism important during development of the metabolic syndrome, such as β-cells, liver, skeletal and heart muscle as well as adipose tissue have all been shown...... roles in cholesterol and lipid metabolism, whereas miR-103 and -107 regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity. In muscle tissue a defined number of miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, mir-206) control myofiber type switch and induce myogenic differentiation programs. Similarly, in adipose tissue a defined number of mi......RNAs control white to brown adipocyte conversion or differention (miR-365, miR-133, miR-455). The discovery of circulating miRNAs in exosomes emphasizes their importance as both endocrine signaling molecules and potentially disease markers. Their dysregulation in metabolic diseases, such as obesity, type 2...

  1. Identification of small RNAs in late developmental stage of rice anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Tomoaki; Kaneko, Fumi; Kazama, Tomohiko; Suwabe, Keita; Suzuki, Go; Makino, Amane; Mae, Tadahiko; Endo, Makoto; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Watanabe, Masao

    2008-06-01

    Small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) are known as repressors of gene expression. There are many plant proteins involved in small RNA-mediated gene silencing, such as Dicer ribonucleases and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, most of these proteins have been reported to be absent in the late developmental stage of the plant male gamete, pollen. In order to clarify the existence of the small RNAs during maturation of pollen, we cloned and sequenced small RNAs from rice anthers including tricellular pollen. From fifty six candidates of small RNAs, we identified two known miRNAs (miR166 and miR167), eight potential miRNAs, and ten putative heterochromatic siRNAs (hc-siRNAs). RNA gel blot analyses clearly showed that miR166 and miR167 were accumulated in the uninuclear pollen stage of anther development and remained until the tricellular pollen stage. Our cloning and RNA gel blot analyses of small RNAs led us to propose a possible function of small RNA-mediated gene regulation for the development of male gametes in rice.

  2. Overview of MicroRNAs in Cardiac Hypertrophy, Fibrosis, and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Liew, Oi Wah; Richards, Arthur Mark; Chen, Yei-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in modulating the gene expression in almost all biological events. In the past decade, the involvement of miRNAs in various cardiovascular disorders has been explored in numerous in vitro and in vivo studies. In this paper, studies focused upon the discovery of miRNAs, their target genes, and functionality are reviewed. The selected miRNAs discussed herein have regulatory effects on target gene expression as demonstrated by miRNA/3' end untranslated region (3'UTR) interaction assay and/or gain/loss-of-function approaches. The listed miRNA entities are categorized according to the biological relevance of their target genes in relation to three cardiovascular pathologies, namely cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and apoptosis. Furthermore, comparison across 86 studies identified several candidate miRNAs that might be of particular importance in the ontogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as they modulate the expression of clusters of target genes involved in the progression of multiple adverse cardiovascular events. This review illustrates the involvement of miRNAs in diverse biological signaling pathways and provides an overview of current understanding of, and progress of research into, of the roles of miRNAs in cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:27213331

  3. Overview of MicroRNAs in Cardiac Hypertrophy, Fibrosis, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in modulating the gene expression in almost all biological events. In the past decade, the involvement of miRNAs in various cardiovascular disorders has been explored in numerous in vitro and in vivo studies. In this paper, studies focused upon the discovery of miRNAs, their target genes, and functionality are reviewed. The selected miRNAs discussed herein have regulatory effects on target gene expression as demonstrated by miRNA/3′ end untranslated region (3′UTR interaction assay and/or gain/loss-of-function approaches. The listed miRNA entities are categorized according to the biological relevance of their target genes in relation to three cardiovascular pathologies, namely cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and apoptosis. Furthermore, comparison across 86 studies identified several candidate miRNAs that might be of particular importance in the ontogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as they modulate the expression of clusters of target genes involved in the progression of multiple adverse cardiovascular events. This review illustrates the involvement of miRNAs in diverse biological signaling pathways and provides an overview of current understanding of, and progress of research into, of the roles of miRNAs in cardiovascular health and disease.

  4. Evaluating the Stability of mRNAs and Noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayupe, Ana Carolina; Reis, Eduardo M

    2017-01-01

    Changes in RNA stability have an important impact in the gene expression regulation. Different methods based on the transcription blockage with RNA polymerase inhibitors or metabolic labeling of newly synthesized RNAs have been developed to evaluate RNA decay rates in cultured cell. Combined with techniques to measure transcript abundance genome-wide, these methods have been used to reveal novel features of the eukaryotic transcriptome. The stability of protein-coding mRNAs is in general closely associated to the physiological function of their encoded proteins, with short-lived mRNAs being significantly enriched among regulatory genes whereas genes associated with housekeeping functions are predominantly stable. Likewise, the stability of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) seems to reflect their functional role in the cell. Thus, investigating RNA stability can provide insights regarding the function of yet uncharacterized regulatory ncRNAs. In this chapter, we discuss the methodologies currently used to estimate RNA decay and outline an experimental protocol for genome-wide estimation of RNA stability of protein-coding and lncRNAs. This protocol details the transcriptional blockage of cultured cells with actinomycin D, followed by RNA isolation at different time points, the determination of transcript abundance by qPCR/DNA oligoarray hybridization, and the calculation of individual transcript half-lives. PMID:27662875

  5. Wheat Hybridization and Polyploidization Results in Deregulation of Small RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Kenan-Eichler, Michal; Leshkowitz, Dena; Tal, Lior; Noor, Elad; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Feldman, Moshe; Levy, Avraham A.

    2011-01-01

    Speciation via interspecific or intergeneric hybridization and polyploidization triggers genomic responses involving genetic and epigenetic alterations. Such modifications may be induced by small RNAs, which affect key cellular processes, including gene expression, chromatin structure, cytosine methylation and transposable element (TE) activity. To date, the role of small RNAs in the context of wide hybridization and polyploidization has received little attention. In this work, we performed h...

  6. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Qian

    Full Text Available We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  7. Undetected antisense tRNAs in mitochondrial genomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seligmann Hervé

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothesis that both mitochondrial (mt complementary DNA strands of tRNA genes code for tRNAs (sense-antisense coding is explored. This could explain why mt tRNA mutations are 6.5 times more frequently pathogenic than in other mt sequences. Antisense tRNA expression is plausible because tRNA punctuation signals mt sense RNA maturation: both sense and antisense tRNAs form secondary structures potentially signalling processing. Sense RNA maturation processes by default 11 antisense tRNAs neighbouring sense genes. If antisense tRNAs are expressed, processed antisense tRNAs should have adapted more for translational activity than unprocessed ones. Four tRNA properties are examined: antisense tRNA 5' and 3' end processing by sense RNA maturation and its accuracy, cloverleaf stability and misacylation potential. Results Processed antisense tRNAs align better with standard tRNA sequences with the same cognate than unprocessed antisense tRNAs, suggesting less misacylations. Misacylation increases with cloverleaf fragility and processing inaccuracy. Cloverleaf fragility, misacylation and processing accuracy of antisense tRNAs decrease with genome-wide usage of their predicted cognate amino acid. Conclusions These properties correlate as if they adaptively coevolved for translational activity by some antisense tRNAs, and to avoid such activity by other antisense tRNAs. Analyses also suggest previously unsuspected particularities of aminoacylation specificity in mt tRNAs: combinations of competition between tRNAs on tRNA synthetases with competition between tRNA synthetases on tRNAs determine specificities of tRNA amino acylations. The latter analyses show that alignment methods used to detect tRNA cognates yield relatively robust results, even when they apparently fail to detect the tRNA's cognate amino acid and indicate high misacylation potential. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Juergen Brosius, Dr Anthony M Poole and

  8. Synthetic RNAs Mimicking Structural Domains in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genome Elicit a Broad Innate Immune Response in Porcine Cells Triggered by RIG-I and TLR Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Borrego

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viral infections. Exploiting innate responses for antiviral, therapeutic and vaccine adjuvation strategies is being extensively explored. We have previously described, the ability of small in vitro RNA transcripts, mimicking the sequence and structure of different domains in the non-coding regions of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV genome (ncRNAs, to trigger a potent and rapid innate immune response. These synthetic non-infectious molecules have proved to have a broad-range antiviral activity and to enhance the immunogenicity of an FMD inactivated vaccine in mice. Here, we have studied the involvement of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs in the ncRNA-induced innate response and analyzed the antiviral and cytokine profiles elicited in swine cultured cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs.

  9. Synthetic RNAs Mimicking Structural Domains in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genome Elicit a Broad Innate Immune Response in Porcine Cells Triggered by RIG-I and TLR Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Belén; Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; Revilla, Concepción; Álvarez, Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Domínguez, Javier; Sáiz, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viral infections. Exploiting innate responses for antiviral, therapeutic and vaccine adjuvation strategies is being extensively explored. We have previously described, the ability of small in vitro RNA transcripts, mimicking the sequence and structure of different domains in the non-coding regions of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome (ncRNAs), to trigger a potent and rapid innate immune response. These synthetic non-infectious molecules have proved to have a broad-range antiviral activity and to enhance the immunogenicity of an FMD inactivated vaccine in mice. Here, we have studied the involvement of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the ncRNA-induced innate response and analyzed the antiviral and cytokine profiles elicited in swine cultured cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PMID:26193305

  10. Unexpected Diversity of Chloroplast Noncoding RNAs as Revealed by Deep Sequencing of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotto, Amber M; Schmitz, Robert J; Fei, Zhangjun; Ecker, Joseph R; Stern, David B

    2011-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are widely expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Eukaryotic ncRNAs are commonly micro- and small-interfering RNAs (18-25 nt) involved in posttranscriptional gene silencing, whereas prokaryotic ncRNAs vary in size and are involved in various aspects of gene regulation. Given the prokaryotic origin of organelles, the presence of ncRNAs might be expected; however, the full spectrum of organellar ncRNAs has not been determined systematically. Here, strand-specific RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify 107 candidate ncRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts, primarily encoded opposite protein-coding and tRNA genes. Forty-eight ncRNAs were shown to accumulate by RNA gel blot as discrete transcripts in wild-type (WT) plants and/or the pnp1-1 mutant, which lacks the chloroplast ribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (cpPNPase). Ninety-eight percent of the ncRNAs detected by RNA gel blot had different transcript patterns between WT and pnp1-1, suggesting cpPNPase has a significant role in chloroplast ncRNA biogenesis and accumulation. Analysis of materials deficient for other major chloroplast ribonucleases, RNase R, RNase E, and RNase J, showed differential effects on ncRNA accumulation and/or form, suggesting specificity in RNase-ncRNA interactions. 5' end mapping demonstrates that some ncRNAs are transcribed from dedicated promoters, whereas others result from transcriptional read-through. Finally, correlations between accumulation of some ncRNAs and the symmetrically transcribed sense RNA are consistent with a role in RNA stability. Overall, our data suggest that this extensive population of ncRNAs has the potential to underpin a previously underappreciated regulatory mode in the chloroplast.

  11. A computational strategy for the search of regulatory small RNAs in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ciro C.; Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Witney, Adam A.; Gould, Kate A.; Langford, Paul R.; Bazzolli, Denise M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) play important roles in gene regulation and are frequently connected to the expression of virulence factors in diverse bacteria. Only a few sRNAs have been described for Pasteurellaceae pathogens and no in-depth analysis of sRNAs has been described for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, responsible for considerable losses in the swine industry. To search for sRNAs in A. pleuropneumoniae, we developed a strategy for the computational analysis of the bacterial genome by using four algorithms with different approaches, followed by experimental validation. The coding strand and expression of 17 out of 23 RNA candidates were confirmed by Northern blotting, RT-PCR, and RNA sequencing. Among them, two are likely riboswitches, three are housekeeping regulatory RNAs, two are the widely studied GcvB and 6S sRNAs, and 10 are putative novel trans-acting sRNAs, never before described for any bacteria. The latter group has several potential mRNA targets, many of which are involved with virulence, stress resistance, or metabolism, and connect the sRNAs in a complex gene regulatory network. The sRNAs identified are well conserved among the Pasteurellaceae that are evolutionarily closer to A. pleuropneumoniae and/or share the same host. Our results show that the combination of newly developed computational programs can be successfully utilized for the discovery of novel sRNAs and indicate an intricate system of gene regulation through sRNAs in A. pleuropneumoniae and in other Pasteurellaceae, thus providing clues for novel aspects of virulence that will be explored in further studies. PMID:27402897

  12. Loa loa and Onchocerca ochengi miRNAs detected in host circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritten, Lucienne; O'Neill, Maeghan; Nutting, Chuck; Wanji, Samuel; Njouendoui, Abdel; Fombad, Fanny; Kengne-Ouaffo, Jonas; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    A combination of deep-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis enabled identification of twenty-two microRNA candidates of potential nematode origin in plasma from Loa loa-infected baboons and a further ten from the plasma of an Onchocerca ochengi-infected cow. The obtained data were compared to results from previous work on miRNA candidates from Dirofilaria immitis and O. volvulus found in host circulating blood, to examine the species specificity of the released miRNA. None of the miRNA candidates was found to be present in all four host-parasite scenarios and most of them were specific to only one of them. Eight candidate miRNAs were found to be identical in the full sequence in at least two different infections, while nine candidate miRNAs were found to be similar but not identical in at least four filarial species.

  13. Loa loa and Onchocerca ochengi miRNAs detected in host circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritten, Lucienne; O'Neill, Maeghan; Nutting, Chuck; Wanji, Samuel; Njouendoui, Abdel; Fombad, Fanny; Kengne-Ouaffo, Jonas; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    A combination of deep-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis enabled identification of twenty-two microRNA candidates of potential nematode origin in plasma from Loa loa-infected baboons and a further ten from the plasma of an Onchocerca ochengi-infected cow. The obtained data were compared to results from previous work on miRNA candidates from Dirofilaria immitis and O. volvulus found in host circulating blood, to examine the species specificity of the released miRNA. None of the miRNA candidates was found to be present in all four host-parasite scenarios and most of them were specific to only one of them. Eight candidate miRNAs were found to be identical in the full sequence in at least two different infections, while nine candidate miRNAs were found to be similar but not identical in at least four filarial species. PMID:25461483

  14. Stable intronic sequence RNAs (sisRNAs): a new layer of gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ismail; Tay, Mandy Li-Ian; Pek, Jun Wei

    2016-09-01

    Upon splicing, introns are rapidly degraded. Hence, RNAs derived from introns are commonly deemed as junk sequences. However, the discoveries of intronic-derived small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), small Cajal body associated RNAs (scaRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) suggested otherwise. These non-coding RNAs are shown to play various roles in gene regulation. In this review, we highlight another class of intron-derived RNAs known as stable intronic sequence RNAs (sisRNAs). sisRNAs have been observed since the 1980 s; however, we are only beginning to understand their biological significance. Recent studies have shown or suggested that sisRNAs regulate their own host's gene expression, function as molecular sinks or sponges, and regulate protein translation. We propose that sisRNAs function as an additional layer of gene regulation in the cells. PMID:27147469

  15. Effects of a range of machined and ground surface finishes on the simulated reactor helium corrosion of several candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the corrosion behavior of several candidate reactor structural alloys in a simulated advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environment over a range of lathe-machined and centerless-ground surface finishes. The helium environment contained 50 Pa H2/5 Pa CO/5 Pa CH4/2O (500 μatm H2/50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH4/2O) at 9000C for a total exposure of 3000 h. The test alloys included two vacuum-cast superalloys (IN 100 and IN 713LC); a centrifugally cast austenitic alloy (HK 40); three wrought high-temperature alloys (Alloy 800H, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 617); and a nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy (Inconel MA 754). Surface finish variations did not affect the simulated advanced-HTGR corrosion behavior of these materials. Under these conditions, the availability of reactant gaseous impurities controls the kinetics of the observed gas-metal interactions. Variations in the near-surface activities and mobilities of reactive solute elements, such as chromium, which might be expected to be affected by changes in surface finish, do not seem to greatly influence corrosion in this simulated advanced HTGR environment. 18 figures, 4 tables

  16. microRNAs in Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Jason E; Nguyen, Giang Huong; Fujita, Mayumi; Florell, Scott R; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Krueger, Gerald G; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2016-02-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition resulting from a complex interplay among the immune system, keratinocytes, susceptibility genes, and environmental factors. However, the pathogenesis of psoriasis is not completely elucidated. microRNAs represent a promising class of small, noncoding RNA molecules that function to regulate gene expression. Although microRNA research in psoriasis and dermatology is still relatively new, evidence is rapidly accumulating for the role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and other chronic inflammatory conditions. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of what is known about microRNAs and their role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  17. Sno/scaRNAbase: a curated database for small nucleolar RNAs and cajal body-specific RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Tao; Hua, Xia; Tang, Lisha; Wu, Weilin

    2007-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) are named for their subcellular localization within nucleoli and Cajal bodies (conserved subnuclear organelles present in the nucleoplasm), respectively. They have been found to play important roles in rRNA, tRNA, snRNAs, and even mRNA modification and processing. All snoRNAs fall in two categories, box C/D snoRNAs and box H/ACA snoRNAs, according to their distinct sequence and secondary structure features. Box C/D snoRNAs and box H/ACA snoRNAs mainly function in guiding 2'-O-ribose methylation and pseudouridilation, respectively. ScaRNAs possess both box C/D snoRNA and box H/ACA snoRNA sequence motif features, but guide snRNA modifications that are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Here we present a Web-based sno/scaRNA database, called sno/scaRNAbase, to facilitate the sno/scaRNA research in terms of providing a more comprehensive knowledge base. Covering 1979 records derived from 85 organisms for the first time, sno/scaRNAbase is not only dedicated to filling gaps between existing organism-specific sno/scaRNA databases that are focused on different sno/scaRNA aspects, but also provides sno/scaRNA scientists with an opportunity to adopt a unified nomenclature for sno/scaRNAs. Derived from a systematic literature curation and annotation effort, the sno/scaRNAbase provides an easy-to-use gateway to important sno/scaRNA features such as sequence motifs, possible functions, homologues, secondary structures, genomics organization, sno/scaRNA gene's chromosome location, and more. Approximate searches, in addition to accurate and straightforward searches, make the database search more flexible. A BLAST search engine is implemented to enable blast of query sequences against all sno/scaRNAbase sequences. Thus our sno/scaRNAbase serves as a more uniform and friendly platform for sno/scaRNA research. The database is free available at http://gene.fudan.sh.cn/snoRNAbase.nsf. PMID:17099227

  18. MicroRNAs associated with the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingrong; Xiao, Bo; Ma, Xinting; Qu, Mingjuan; Li, Yanmin; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Zhou, Juhua

    2016-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is not only an autoimmune disease in which autoreactive immune cells against myelin damage axons and nerves in the central nervous system, but also a neurodegenerative disease, in which progressive loss of structure and function of neurons occurs. The mechanisms of MS pathogenesis have not been fully understood. It has been reported that miRNAs may play a critical role in MS pathogenesis. In this review, we have extensively discussed the alterations in the expression of miRNAs detected in patients with MS. The dysregulated miRNAs have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of MS. We suggest that such dysregulated miRNAs may potentially be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of MS, to discover new therapeutic targets for MS treatment, and to predict prognostic markers in responses to MS treatment. PMID:27235360

  19. Identification and expression profiling of Vigna mungo microRNAs from leaf small RNA transcriptome by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujay; Kundu, Anirban; Pal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several conserved and species-specific miRNAs have been characterized to date, predominantly from the plant species whose genome is well characterized. However, information on the variability of these regulatory RNAs in economically important but genetically less characterized crop species are limited. Vigna mungo is an important grain legume, which is grown primarily for its protein-rich edible seeds. miRNAs from this species have not been identified to date due to lack of genome sequence information. To identify miRNAs from V. mungo, a small RNA library was constructed from young leaves. High-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatic analysis of the small RNA reads led to the identification of 66 miRNA loci represented by 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 19 families and eight non-conserved miRNAs belonging to seven families. Besides, 13 novel miRNA candidates in V. mungo were also identified. Expression patterns of selected conserved, non-conserved, and novel miRNA candidates have been demonstrated in leaf, stem, and root tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and potential target genes were predicted for most of the conserved miRNAs. This information offers genomic resources for better understanding of miRNA mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  20. Identification and expression profiling of Vigna mungo microRNAs from leaf small RNA transcriptome by deep sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sujay Paul; Anirban Kundu; Amita Pal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several conserved and species-specific miRNAs have been characterized to date, predominantly from the plant species whose genome is well characterized. However, information on the variability of these regulatory RNAs in economically important but genetically less characterized crop species are limited. Vigna mungo is an important grain legume, which is grown primarily for its protein-rich edible seeds. miRNAs from this species have not been identified to date due to lack of genome sequence information. To identify miRNAs from V. mungo, a small RNA library was constructed from young leaves. High-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformat-ic analysis of the small RNA reads led to the identification of 66 miRNA loci represented by 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 19 families and eight non-conserved miRNAs belonging to seven families. Besides, 13 novel miRNA candidates in V. mungo were also identified. Expression patterns of selected conserved, non-conserved, and novel miRNA candidates have been demonstrated in leaf, stem, and root tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and potential target genes were predicted for most of the conserved miRNAs. This information offers genomic resour-ces for better understanding of miRNA mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  1. Identification and expression profiling of Vigna mungo microRNAs from leaf small RNA transcriptome by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujay; Kundu, Anirban; Pal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several conserved and species-specific miRNAs have been characterized to date, predominantly from the plant species whose genome is well characterized. However, information on the variability of these regulatory RNAs in economically important but genetically less characterized crop species are limited. Vigna mungo is an important grain legume, which is grown primarily for its protein-rich edible seeds. miRNAs from this species have not been identified to date due to lack of genome sequence information. To identify miRNAs from V. mungo, a small RNA library was constructed from young leaves. High-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatic analysis of the small RNA reads led to the identification of 66 miRNA loci represented by 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 19 families and eight non-conserved miRNAs belonging to seven families. Besides, 13 novel miRNA candidates in V. mungo were also identified. Expression patterns of selected conserved, non-conserved, and novel miRNA candidates have been demonstrated in leaf, stem, and root tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and potential target genes were predicted for most of the conserved miRNAs. This information offers genomic resources for better understanding of miRNA mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation. PMID:24138283

  2. The fragmented mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean E Feagin

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial genome in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is most unusual. Over half the genome is composed of the genes for three classic mitochondrial proteins: cytochrome oxidase subunits I and III and apocytochrome b. The remainder encodes numerous small RNAs, ranging in size from 23 to 190 nt. Previous analysis revealed that some of these transcripts have significant sequence identity with highly conserved regions of large and small subunit rRNAs, and can form the expected secondary structures. However, these rRNA fragments are not encoded in linear order; instead, they are intermixed with one another and the protein coding genes, and are coded on both strands of the genome. This unorthodox arrangement hindered the identification of transcripts corresponding to other regions of rRNA that are highly conserved and/or are known to participate directly in protein synthesis.The identification of 14 additional small mitochondrial transcripts from P. falciparum and the assignment of 27 small RNAs (12 SSU RNAs totaling 804 nt, 15 LSU RNAs totaling 1233 nt to specific regions of rRNA are supported by multiple lines of evidence. The regions now represented are highly similar to those of the small but contiguous mitochondrial rRNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans. The P. falciparum rRNA fragments cluster on the interfaces of the two ribosomal subunits in the three-dimensional structure of the ribosome.All of the rRNA fragments are now presumed to have been identified with experimental methods, and nearly all of these have been mapped onto the SSU and LSU rRNAs. Conversely, all regions of the rRNAs that are known to be directly associated with protein synthesis have been identified in the P. falciparum mitochondrial genome and RNA transcripts. The fragmentation of the rRNA in the P. falciparum mitochondrion is the most extreme example of any rRNA fragmentation discovered.

  3. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity. PMID:27376738

  4. Long noncoding RNAs and neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma is a disease that affects infants and despite intense multimodal therapy, high-risk patients have low survival rates (neuroblastoma have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarises where we are with regards to lncRNAs in neuroblastoma. The known mechanistic roles of lncRNAs during neuroblastoma pathogenesis are discussed, as well as the relationship between lncRNA expression and the differentiation capacity of neuroblastoma cells. We speculate about the use of some of these lncRNAs, such as those mapping to the 6p22 hotspot, as biomarkers for neuroblastoma prognosis and treatment. This novel way of thinking about both neuroblastoma and lncRNAs brings a new perspective to the prognosis and treatment of high-risk patients.

  5. Uridylation and adenylation of RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, JianBo; Song, Jun; Mo, BeiXin; Chen, XueMei

    2015-11-01

    The posttranscriptional addition of nontemplated nucleotides to the 3' ends of RNA molecules can have a significant impact on their stability and biological function. It has been recently discovered that nontemplated addition of uridine or adenosine to the 3' ends of RNAs occurs in different organisms ranging from algae to humans, and on different kinds of RNAs, such as histone mRNAs, mRNA fragments, U6 snRNA, mature small RNAs and their precursors etc. These modifications may lead to different outcomes, such as increasing RNA decay, promoting or inhibiting RNA processing, or changing RNA activity. Growing pieces of evidence have revealed that such modifications can be RNA sequence-specific and subjected to temporal or spatial regulation in development. RNA tailing and its outcomes have been associated with human diseases such as cancer. Here, we review recent developments in RNA uridylation and adenylation and discuss the future prospects in this research area. PMID:26563174

  6. [MicroRNAs in neurobiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Yukio

    2008-12-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as a new regulatory factor of gene expression. They mediate translational repression or degradation of their target mRNAs by RNA interference (RNAi). The expression of each microRNA is tightly regulated in a development- and cell-specific manner by various mechanisms such as blockade of let-7 family expression by Lin-28 or RNA editing. They also act as regulatory switches for development, organogenesis, and cellular differentiation or for controlling distinct functions that are required for the maintenance of each tissue and cell subtypes. The abundant expression of microRNAs as well as the exclusive expression of certain microRNAs in the central nervous system highlights their biological importance at all stages of neural development and in postmitotic and differentiated neurons. Further, some microRNAs, such as miRNA-134, and miRNA-132 are localized and are synthesized in part at synaptic sites in dendrites to regulate synaptic formation and plasticity. In addition to the imparting of basic knowledge about the biogenesis and mechanism of action of microRNAs, this review focuses on the recent advances in microRNA studies in neurobiology, including the expression pattern of microRNAs in the mammalian brain, the role of microRNAs in neural differentiation and maturation, formation and plasticity of synaptic connections, and maintenance of neural function such as the synthesis of the neurotransmitters in selected neurons. Finally, the possible connection between microRNA dysfunction and neurological diseases, and future implications for diagnosis, and treatment of defects in human brain development and neurodegenerative diseases are discussed.

  7. Toehold-initiated rolling circle amplification for visualizing individual microRNAs in situ in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ruijie; Tang, Longhua; Tian, Qianqian; Wang, Ying; Lin, Lei; Li, Jinghong

    2014-02-24

    The ability to quantitate and visualize microRNAs (miRNAs) in situ in single cells would greatly facilitate the elucidation of miRNA-mediated regulatory circuits and their disease associations. A toehold-initiated strand-displacement process was used to initiate rolling circle amplification of specific miRNAs, an approach that achieves both stringent recognition and in situ amplification of the target miRNA. This assay, termed toehold-initiated rolling circle amplification (TIRCA), can be utilized to identify miRNAs at physiological temperature with high specificity and to visualize individual miRNAs in situ in single cells within 3 h. TIRCA is a competitive candidate technique for in situ miRNA imaging and may help us to understand the role of miRNAs in cellular processes and human diseases in more detail.

  8. Panning for Long Noncoding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of high-throughput approaches has revealed widespread transcription of the human genome, leading to a new appreciation of transcription regulation, especially from noncoding regions. Distinct from most coding and small noncoding RNAs, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are generally expressed at low levels, are less conserved and lack protein-coding capacity. These intrinsic features of lncRNAs have not only hampered their full annotation in the past several years, but have also generated controversy concerning whether many or most of these lncRNAs are simply the result of transcriptional noise. Here, we assess these intrinsic features that have challenged lncRNA discovery and further summarize recent progress in lncRNA discovery with integrated methodologies, from which new lessons and insights can be derived to achieve better characterization of lncRNA expression regulation. Full annotation of lncRNA repertoires and the implications of such annotation will provide a fundamental basis for comprehensive understanding of pervasive functions of lncRNAs in biological regulation.

  9. Identification and Characterization of MicroRNAs and Their Targets in Grapevine ( Vitis vinifera)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of newly identified, small, non-coding RNAs that play vital roles in regulation. Based on miRNAs unique features of expression pattern, evolutionary conservation, secondary structure and genetic requirements for biogenesis, computational predication strategy is adopted to predicate the novel miRNAs. In this research, potential miRNAs and their targets in grapevine (Vitis vinifera) were predicted. We used previously known plant miRNAs against grapevine genome sequence databases to search for potential miRNAs. A total of 81 potential miRNAs were detected following a range of strict filtering criteria. Using these potential miRNA sequences, we could further blast the mRNA database to find the potential targets in this species. Comparative analysis of miRNAs in grapevine and other species reveals that miRNAs exhibit an evolutional conservation, the number and function of miRNAs must have significantly expanded during the evolution of land plants. Furthermore divergence made versatile functions of miRNAs feasible. Cluster of miRNAs likely represents an ancient expression mechanism. Predicted target genes include not only transcription factors but also genes implicated in floral development, signal transduction, diseases and stress response. Till now, little is known about experimental or computational identification of miRNA in grapevine species. Increased knowledge of the biological mechanisms of the grapevine will allow targeted approaches to increase the quality of fruit and reduce the impact of parasites together with stress, which could enable a sustainable, environmentally-sound, farming policy.

  10. microRNAs as neuroregulators, biomarkers and therapeutic agents in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Indranil; Patil, Ketan S; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2016-02-01

    The last decade has experienced the emergence of microRNAs as a key molecular tool for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Although the focus has mostly been on cancer, neurodegenerative diseases present an exciting, yet less explored, platform for microRNA research. Several studies have highlighted the significance of microRNAs in neurogenesis and neurodegeneration, and pre-clinical studies have shown the potential of microRNAs as biomarkers. Despite this, no bona fide microRNAs have been identified as true diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for neurodegenerative disease. This is mainly due to the lack of precisely defined patient cohorts and the variability within and between individual cohorts. However, the discovery that microRNAs exist as stable molecules at detectable levels in body fluids has opened up new avenues for microRNAs as potential biomarker candidates. Furthermore, technological developments in microRNA biology have contributed to the possible design of microRNA-mediated disease intervention strategies. The combination of these advancements, with the availability of well-defined longitudinal patient cohort, promises to not only assist in developing invaluable diagnostic tools for clinicians, but also to increase our overall understanding of the underlying heterogeneity of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of the existing knowledge of microRNAs in neurodegeneration and provide a perspective of the applicability of microRNAs as a basis for future therapeutic intervention strategies.

  11. MicroRNAs as a diagnostic tool for heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckbach, Ludwig T; Grabmaier, Ulrich; Clauss, Sebastian; Wakili, Reza

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, which are directly involved in the regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression. Their biological function represents a repression of protein expression of the targeted messenger-RNA(s). Expression of several miRNAs is somehow tissue-specific or cell-specific and their expression pattern can reflect an underlying pathophysiological condition. Beyond this biological function their role as potential biomarkers has been emerged in the past years. This was based on the fact that miRNAs can be detected in blood samples (serum or plasma) in a surprisingly stable form, by contrast to mRNAs. This fact made miRNAs interesting candidates for biomarkers providing information with respect to a potentially ongoing pathophysiological condition and could thereby have an impact on specific treatment strategies in patients. In this review we try to provide an overview of the potential role of miRNAs as a diagnostic tool in atrial fibrillation and heart failure patients taken different methodological aspects and distinct type of patients into account. PMID:26852213

  12. Computational Prediction of MicroRNAs from Toxoplasma gondii Potentially Regulating the Hosts’ Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muserref Duygu Sacar; Caner Bagc; Jens Allmer

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were discovered two decades ago, yet there is still a great need for further studies elucidating their genesis and targeting in different phyla. Since experimental discovery and validation of miRNAs is difficult, computational predictions are indispensable and today most computational approaches employ machine learning. Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite residing within the cells of its hosts like human, uses miRNAs for its post-transcriptional gene reg-ulation. It may also regulate its hosts’ gene expression, which has been shown in brain cancer. Since previous studies have shown that overexpressed miRNAs within the host are causal for disease onset, we hypothesized that T. gondii could export miRNAs into its host cell. We computationally predicted all hairpins from the genome of T. gondii and used mouse and human models to filter possible candidates. These were then further compared to known miRNAs in human and rodents and their expression was examined for T. gondii grown in mouse and human hosts, respectively. We found that among the millions of potential hairpins in T. gondii, only a few thousand pass filtering using a human or mouse model and that even fewer of those are expressed. Since they are expressed and differentially expressed in rodents and human, we suggest that there is a chance that T. gondii may export miRNAs into its hosts for direct regulation.

  13. Computational prediction of microRNAs from Toxoplasma gondii potentially regulating the hosts' gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saçar, Müşerref Duygu; Bağcı, Caner; Allmer, Jens

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were discovered two decades ago, yet there is still a great need for further studies elucidating their genesis and targeting in different phyla. Since experimental discovery and validation of miRNAs is difficult, computational predictions are indispensable and today most computational approaches employ machine learning. Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite residing within the cells of its hosts like human, uses miRNAs for its post-transcriptional gene regulation. It may also regulate its hosts' gene expression, which has been shown in brain cancer. Since previous studies have shown that overexpressed miRNAs within the host are causal for disease onset, we hypothesized that T. gondii could export miRNAs into its host cell. We computationally predicted all hairpins from the genome of T. gondii and used mouse and human models to filter possible candidates. These were then further compared to known miRNAs in human and rodents and their expression was examined for T. gondii grown in mouse and human hosts, respectively. We found that among the millions of potential hairpins in T. gondii, only a few thousand pass filtering using a human or mouse model and that even fewer of those are expressed. Since they are expressed and differentially expressed in rodents and human, we suggest that there is a chance that T. gondii may export miRNAs into its hosts for direct regulation.

  14. Expression Profiling of Circulating MicroRNAs in Canine Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghong Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that have shown promise as noninvasive biomarkers in cardiac disease. This study was undertaken to investigate the miRNA expression profile in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD. 277 miRNAs were quantified using RT-qPCR from six normal dogs (American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Stage A, six dogs with MMVD mild to moderate cardiac enlargement (ACVIM Stage B1/B2 and six dogs with MMVD and congestive heart failure (ACVIM Stage C/D. Eleven miRNAs were differentially expressed (False Discovery Rate < 0.05. Dogs in Stage B1/B2 or C/D had four upregulated miRNAs, including three cfa-let-7/cfa-miR-98 family members, while seven others were downregulated, compared to Stage A. Expression of six of the 11 miRNAs also were significantly different between dogs in Stage C/D and those in Stage B1/B2. The expression changes were greater as disease severity increased. These miRNAs may be candidates for novel biomarkers and may provide insights into genetic regulatory pathways in canine MMVD.

  15. Long Noncoding RNAs, Chromatin, and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Caley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the genome of a multicellular organism can orchestrate the differentiation of trillions of cells and many organs, all from a single fertilized egg, is the subject of intense study. Different cell types can be defined by the networks of genes they express. This differential expression is regulated at the epigenetic level by chromatin modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, which interact with structural and enzymatic proteins, resulting in the activation or silencing of any given gene. While detailed mechanisms are emerging on the role of different chromatin modifications and how these functions are effected at the molecular level, it is still unclear how their deposition across the epigenomic landscape is regulated in different cells. A raft of recent evidence is accumulating that implicates long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in these processes. Most genomes studied to date undergo widespread transcription, the majority of which is not translated into proteins. In this review, we will describe recent work suggesting that lncRNAs are more than transcriptional "noise", but instead play a functional role by acting as tethers and guides to bind proteins responsible for modifying chromatin and mediating their deposition at specific genomic locations. We suggest that lncRNAs are at the heart of developmental regulation, determining the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell type, and that they provide a means to integrate external differentiation cues with dynamic nuclear responses through the regulation of a metastable epigenome. Better characterization of the lncRNA-protein "interactome" may eventually lead to a new molecular toolkit, allowing researchers and clinicians to modulate the genome at the epigenetic level to treat conditions such as cancer.

  16. Progress and Current Challenges in Modeling Large RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarowthu, Srinivas

    2016-02-27

    Recent breakthroughs in next-generation sequencing technologies have led to the discovery of several classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). It is now apparent that RNA molecules are not only just carriers of genetic information but also key players in many cellular processes. While there has been a rapid increase in the number of ncRNA sequences deposited in various databases over the past decade, the biological functions of these ncRNAs are largely not well understood. Similar to proteins, RNA molecules carry out a function by forming specific three-dimensional structures. Understanding the function of a particular RNA therefore requires a detailed knowledge of its structure. However, determining experimental structures of RNA is extremely challenging. In fact, RNA-only structures represent just 1% of the total structures deposited in the PDB. Thus, computational methods that predict three-dimensional RNA structures are in high demand. Computational models can provide valuable insights into structure-function relationships in ncRNAs and can aid in the development of functional hypotheses and experimental designs. In recent years, a set of diverse RNA structure prediction tools have become available, which differ in computational time, input data and accuracy. This review discusses the recent progress and challenges in RNA structure prediction methods.

  17. Evidence for small RNAs homologous to effector-encoding genes and transposable elements in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

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    Ramesh R Vetukuri

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans is the oomycete pathogen responsible for the devastating late blight disease on potato and tomato. There is presently an intense research focus on the role(s of effectors in promoting late blight disease development. However, little is known about how they are regulated, or how diversity in their expression may be generated among different isolates. Here we present data from investigation of RNA silencing processes, characterized by non-coding small RNA molecules (sRNA of 19-40 nt. From deep sequencing of sRNAs we have identified sRNAs matching numerous RxLR and Crinkler (CRN effector protein genes in two isolates differing in pathogenicity. Effector gene-derived sRNAs were present in both isolates, but exhibited marked differences in abundance, especially for CRN effectors. Small RNAs in P. infestans grouped into three clear size classes of 21, 25/26 and 32 nt. Small RNAs from all size classes mapped to RxLR effector genes, but notably 21 nt sRNAs were the predominant size class mapping to CRN effector genes. Some effector genes, such as PiAvr3a, to which sRNAs were found, also exhibited differences in transcript accumulation between the two isolates. The P. infestans genome is rich in transposable elements, and the majority of sRNAs of all size classes mapped to these sequences, predominantly to long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons. RNA silencing of Dicer and Argonaute genes provided evidence that generation of 21 nt sRNAs is Dicer-dependent, while accumulation of longer sRNAs was impacted by silencing of Argonaute genes. Additionally, we identified six microRNA (miRNA candidates from our sequencing data, their precursor sequences from the genome sequence, and target mRNAs. These miRNA candidates have features characteristic of both plant and metazoan miRNAs.

  18. Identification of novel and differentially expressed MicroRNAs of dairy goat mammary gland tissues using solexa sequencing and bioinformatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Ji

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small, noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in various biological processes. Although most microRNAs expression profiles studies have been performed in humans or rodents, relatively limited knowledge also exists in other mammalian species. The identification of the full repertoire of microRNAs expressed in the lactating mammary gland of Capra hircus would significantly increase our understanding of the physiology of lactating mammary glands. In this study, two libraries were constructed using the lactating mammary gland tissues of Laoshan dairy goats (Capra hircus during peak and late lactation. Solexa high-throughput sequencing technique and bioinformatics were used to determine the abundance and differential expression of the microRNAs between peak and late lactation. As a result, 19,044,002 and 7,385,833 clean reads were obtained, respectively, and 1,113 conserved known microRNAs and 31 potential novel microRNA candidates were identified. A total of 697 conserved microRNAs were significantly differentially expressed with a P-value<0.01, 272 microRNAs were up-regulated and 425 microRNAs were down-regulated during peak lactation. The results were validated using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. 762,557 annotated mRNA transcripts were predicted as putative target gene candidates. The GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis suggested that differentially expressed microRNAs were involved in mammary gland physiology, including signal transduction, and cell-cell and cell-extracellular communications. This study provided the first global of the microRNA in Capra hircus and expanded the repertoire of microRNAs. Our results have great significance and value for the elucidation of complex regulatory networks between microRNAs and mRNAs and for the study of mammary gland physiology and lactation.

  19. Higher order structure in the 3'-minor domain of small subunit ribosomal RNAs from a gram negative bacterium, a gram positive bacterium and a eukaryote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1983-01-01

    of additional higher order structure in the renatured free RNA. It can be concluded that a high level of conservation of higher order structure has occurred during the evolution of the gram negative and gram positive eubacteria and the eukaryote in both the double helical regions and the "unstructured" regions...

  20. Clinical implications of microRNAs in human glioblastoma

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    Masahiro eMizoguchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is one of the most common and dismal brain tumors in adults. Further elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of GBM is mandatory to improve the overall survival of patients. A novel small non-coding RNA molecule, microRNA (miRNA, appears to represent one of the most attractive target molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of various types of tumors. Recent global analyses have revealed that several miRNAs are clinically implicated in GBM, with some reports indicating the association of miRNA dysregulation with acquired temozolomide (TMZ resistance. More recent studies have revealed that miRNAs could play a role in cancer stem cell (CSC properties, contributing to treatment resistance. In addition, greater impact might be expected from miRNA-targeted therapies based on tumor-derived exosomes that contain numerous functional miRNAs, which could be transferred between tumor cells and surrounding structures. Tumor-derived miRNAs are now considered to be a novel molecular mechanism promoting the progression of GBM. Establishment of miRNA-targeted therapies based on miRNA dysregulation of CSCs could provide effective therapeutic strategies for TMZ-resistant GBM. Recent progress has revealed that miRNAs are not only putative biological markers for diagnosis, but also one of the most promising targets for GBM treatment. Herein, we summarize the translational aspects of miRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  1. MicroRNAs profiling in murine models of acute and chronic asthma: a relationship with mRNAs targets.

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    Nancy Garbacki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: miRNAs are now recognized as key regulator elements in gene expression. Although they have been associated with a number of human diseases, their implication in acute and chronic asthma and their association with lung remodelling have never been thoroughly investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to establish a miRNAs expression profile in lung tissue, mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin mimicking acute, intermediate and chronic human asthma. Levels of lung miRNAs were profiled by microarray and in silico analyses were performed to identify potential mRNA targets and to point out signalling pathways and biological processes regulated by miRNA-dependent mechanisms. Fifty-eight, 66 and 75 miRNAs were found to be significantly modulated at short-, intermediate- and long-term challenge, respectively. Inverse correlation with the expression of potential mRNA targets identified mmu-miR-146b, -223, -29b, -29c, -483, -574-5p, -672 and -690 as the best candidates for an active implication in asthma pathogenesis. A functional validation assay was performed by cotransfecting in human lung fibroblasts (WI26 synthetic miRNAs and engineered expression constructs containing the coding sequence of luciferase upstream of the 3'UTR of various potential mRNA targets. The bioinformatics analysis identified miRNA-linked regulation of several signalling pathways, as matrix metalloproteinases, inflammatory response and TGF-β signalling, and biological processes, including apoptosis and inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study highlights that specific miRNAs are likely to be involved in asthma disease and could represent a valuable resource both for biological makers identification and for unveiling mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of asthma.

  2. Detection of small RNAs in Bordetella pertussis and identification of a novel repeated genetic element

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    Wulbrecht Bérénice

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small bacterial RNAs (sRNAs have been shown to participate in the regulation of gene expression and have been identified in numerous prokaryotic species. Some of them are involved in the regulation of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. So far, little is known about sRNAs in Bordetella, and only very few sRNAs have been identified in the genome of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Results An in silico approach was used to predict sRNAs genes in intergenic regions of the B. pertussis genome. The genome sequences of B. pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis, Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella avium were compared using a Blast, and significant hits were analyzed using RNAz. Twenty-three candidate regions were obtained, including regions encoding the already documented 6S RNA, and the GCVT and FMN riboswitches. The existence of sRNAs was verified by Northern blot analyses, and transcripts were detected for 13 out of the 20 additional candidates. These new sRNAs were named Bordetella pertussis RNAs, bpr. The expression of 4 of them differed between the early, exponential and late growth phases, and one of them, bprJ2, was found to be under the control of BvgA/BvgS two-component regulatory system of Bordetella virulence. A phylogenetic study of the bprJ sequence revealed a novel, so far undocumented repeat of ~90 bp, found in numerous copies in the Bordetella genomes and in that of other Betaproteobacteria. This repeat exhibits certain features of mobile elements. Conclusion We shown here that B. pertussis, like other pathogens, expresses sRNAs, and that the expression of one of them is controlled by the BvgA/BvgS system, similarly to most virulence genes, suggesting that it is involved in virulence of B. pertussis.

  3. Search for MicroRNAs Expressed by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens in Infected Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Yuki; Finethy, Ryan; Saka, Hector A.; Xet-Mull, Ana M.; Sisk, Dana M.; Smith, Kristen L. Jurcic; Lee, Sunhee; Coers, Jörn; Valdivia, Raphael H.; Tobin, David M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are expressed by all multicellular organisms and play a critical role as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Moreover, different microRNA species are known to influence the progression of a range of different diseases, including cancer and microbial infections. A number of different human viruses also encode microRNAs that can attenuate cellular innate immune responses and promote viral replication, and a fungal pathogen that infects plants has recently been shown to express microRNAs in infected cells that repress host cell immune responses and promote fungal pathogenesis. Here, we have used deep sequencing of total expressed small RNAs, as well as small RNAs associated with the cellular RNA-induced silencing complex RISC, to search for microRNAs that are potentially expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens and translocated into infected animal cells. In the case of Legionella and Chlamydia and the two mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, we failed to detect any bacterial small RNAs that had the characteristics expected for authentic microRNAs, although large numbers of small RNAs of bacterial origin could be recovered. However, a third mycobacterial species, M. marinum, did express an ∼23-nt small RNA that was bound by RISC and derived from an RNA stem-loop with the characteristics expected for a pre-microRNA. While intracellular expression of this candidate bacterial microRNA was too low to effectively repress target mRNA species in infected cultured cells in vitro, artificial overexpression of this potential bacterial pre-microRNA did result in the efficient repression of a target mRNA. This bacterial small RNA therefore represents the first candidate microRNA of bacterial origin. PMID:25184567

  4. Search for microRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens in infected mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Furuse

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are expressed by all multicellular organisms and play a critical role as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Moreover, different microRNA species are known to influence the progression of a range of different diseases, including cancer and microbial infections. A number of different human viruses also encode microRNAs that can attenuate cellular innate immune responses and promote viral replication, and a fungal pathogen that infects plants has recently been shown to express microRNAs in infected cells that repress host cell immune responses and promote fungal pathogenesis. Here, we have used deep sequencing of total expressed small RNAs, as well as small RNAs associated with the cellular RNA-induced silencing complex RISC, to search for microRNAs that are potentially expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens and translocated into infected animal cells. In the case of Legionella and Chlamydia and the two mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, we failed to detect any bacterial small RNAs that had the characteristics expected for authentic microRNAs, although large numbers of small RNAs of bacterial origin could be recovered. However, a third mycobacterial species, M. marinum, did express an ∼ 23-nt small RNA that was bound by RISC and derived from an RNA stem-loop with the characteristics expected for a pre-microRNA. While intracellular expression of this candidate bacterial microRNA was too low to effectively repress target mRNA species in infected cultured cells in vitro, artificial overexpression of this potential bacterial pre-microRNA did result in the efficient repression of a target mRNA. This bacterial small RNA therefore represents the first candidate microRNA of bacterial origin.

  5. The interplay of long non-coding RNAs and MYC in cancer

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    Michael J. Hamilton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a class of RNA molecules that are changing how researchers view eukaryotic gene regulation. Once considered to be non-functional products of low-level aberrant transcription from non-coding regions of the genome, lncRNAs are now viewed as important epigenetic regulators and several lncRNAs have now been demonstrated to be critical players in the development and/or maintenance of cancer. Similarly, the emerging variety of interactions between lncRNAs and MYC, a well-known oncogenic transcription factor linked to most types of cancer, have caught the attention of many biomedical researchers. Investigations exploring the dynamic interactions between lncRNAs and MYC, referred to as the lncRNA-MYC network, have proven to be especially complex. Genome-wide studies have shown that MYC transcriptionally regulates many lncRNA genes. Conversely, recent reports identified lncRNAs that regulate MYC expression both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. These findings are of particular interest because they suggest roles of lncRNAs as regulators of MYC oncogenic functions and the possibility that targeting lncRNAs could represent a novel avenue to cancer treatment. Here, we briefly review the current understanding of how lncRNAs regulate chromatin structure and gene transcription, and then focus on the new developments in the emerging field exploring the lncRNA-MYC network in cancer.

  6. Bioinformatic identification of microRNAs and their target genes from Solanum tuberosum expressed sequence tags

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene post-transcriptional expression in plants and animals. Low levels of some miRNAs and time- and tissue-specific expression patterns lead to the difficulty for experimental identification of miRNAs. Here we present a bioinformatic approach for expressed sequence tags (ESTs) prediction of novel miRNAs as well as their targets in Solanum tuberosum. We blasted the databases of S. Tuberosum ESTs to search for potential miRNAs, using previously known miRNA sequences from Arabidopsis, rice and other plant species. By analyzing parameters of plant precursors, including secondary structure, stem length and conservation of miRNAs, and following a variety of filtering criteria, a total of 22 potential miRNAs were detected. Using the newly identified miRNA sequences, we were able to further blast the S. Tuberosum mRNA database and detected 75 potential targets of miRNAs in S. Tuberosum. According to the mRNA annotations provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/), most of the miRNA target genes were predicted to encode transcription factors that regulate cell growth and development, signaling, and metabolism.

  7. Transcriptome-wide identification and characterization of microRNAs from castor bean (Ricinus communis L..

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    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenously encoded small RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and play essential roles in numerous developmental and physiological processes. Currently, little information on the transcriptome and tissue-specific expression of miRNAs is available in the model non-edible oilseed crop castor bean (Ricinus communis L., one of the most important non-edible oilseed crops cultivated worldwide. Recent advances in sequencing technologies have allowed the identification of conserved and novel miRNAs in many plant species. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing technologies to identify and characterize the miRNAs in castor bean. RESULTS: Five small RNA libraries were constructed for deep sequencing from root tips, leaves, developing seeds (at the initial stage, seed1; and at the fast oil accumulation stage, seed2 and endosperms in castor bean. High-throughput sequencing generated a large number of sequence reads of small RNAs in this study. In total, 86 conserved miRNAs were identified, including 63 known and 23 newly identified. Sixteen miRNA isoform variants in length were found from the conserved miRNAs of castor bean. MiRNAs displayed diverse organ-specific expression levels among five libraries. Combined with criteria for miRNA annotation and a RT-PCR approach, 72 novel miRNAs and their potential precursors were annotated and 20 miRNAs newly identified were validated. In addition, new target candidates for miRNAs newly identified in this study were proposed. CONCLUSIONS: The current study presents the first high-throughput small RNA sequencing study performed in castor bean to identify its miRNA population. It characterizes and increases the number of miRNAs and their isoforms identified in castor bean. The miRNA expression analysis provides a foundation for understanding castor bean miRNA organ-specific expression patterns. The present study offers an expanded picture of miRNAs for castor

  8. Regulatory RNAs in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, Matthias; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory RNAs play versatile roles in bacteria in the coordination of gene expression during various physiological processes, especially during stress adaptation. Photosynthetic bacteria use sunlight as their major energy source. Therefore, they are particularly vulnerable to the damaging effects of excess light or UV irradiation. In addition, like all bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria must adapt to limiting nutrient concentrations and abiotic and biotic stress factors. Transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of potential regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) in model cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and in environmentally relevant genera such as Trichodesmium, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Some sRNAs have been shown to actually contain μORFs and encode short proteins. Examples include the 40-amino-acid product of the sml0013 gene, which encodes the NdhP subunit of the NDH1 complex. In contrast, the functional characterization of the non-coding sRNA PsrR1 revealed that the 131 nt long sRNA controls photosynthetic functions by targeting multiple mRNAs, providing a paradigm for sRNA functions in photosynthetic bacteria. We suggest that actuatons comprise a new class of genetic elements in which an sRNA gene is inserted upstream of a coding region to modify or enable transcription of that region.

  9. Exploring the Secrets of Long Noncoding RNAs

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    Mingyang Quan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing has revealed that the majority of RNAs have no capacity to encode protein. Among these non-coding transcripts, recent work has focused on the roles of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs of >200 nucleotides. Although many of their attributes, such as patterns of expression, remain largely unknown, lncRNAs have key functions in transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic gene regulation; Also, new work indicates their functions in scaffolding ribonuclear protein complexes. In plants, genome-wide identification of lncRNAs has been conducted in several species, including Zea mays, and recent research showed that lncRNAs regulate flowering time in the photoperiod pathway, and function in nodulation. In this review, we discuss the basic mechanisms by which lncRNAs regulate key cellular processes, using the large body of knowledge on animal and yeast lncRNAs to illustrate the significance of emerging work on lncRNAs in plants.

  10. Discovery of porcine microRNAs and profiling from skeletal muscle tissues during development.

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    Ting-Hua Huang

    Full Text Available MiRNAs (microRNAs play critical roles in many important biological processes such as growth and development in mammals. In this study, we identified hundreds of porcine miRNA candidates through in silico prediction and analyzed their expression in developing skeletal muscle using microarray. Microarray screening using RNA samples prepared from a 33-day whole embryo and an extra embryo membrane validated 296 of the predicted candidates. Comparative expression profiling across samples of longissimus muscle collected from 33-day and 65-day post-gestation fetuses, as well as adult pigs, identified 140 differentially expressed miRNAs amongst the age groups investigated. The differentially expressed miRNAs showed seven distinctive types of expression patterns, suggesting possible involvement in certain biological processes. Five of the differentially expressed miRNAs were validated using real-time PCR. In silico analysis of the miRNA-mRNA interaction sites suggested that the potential mRNA targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs may play important roles in muscle growth and development.

  11. Phloem small RNAs, nutrient stress responses, and systemic mobility

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    Kehr Julia

    2010-04-01

    the observation that miR395 and miR399 are phloem-mobile in grafting experiments we conclude that translocatable miRNAs might be candidates for information-transmitting molecules, but that grafting experiments alone are not sufficient to convincingly assign a signaling function.

  12. Global transcriptional start site mapping using differential RNA sequencing reveals novel antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Maureen K; Bischler, Thorsten; Eisenbart, Sara K; Förstner, Konrad U; Zhang, Aixia; Herbig, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Sharma, Cynthia M; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    While the model organism Escherichia coli has been the subject of intense study for decades, the full complement of its RNAs is only now being examined. Here we describe a survey of the E. coli transcriptome carried out using a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach, which can distinguish between primary and processed transcripts, and an automated prediction algorithm for transcriptional start sites (TSS). With the criterion of expression under at least one of three growth conditions examined, we predicted 14,868 TSS candidates, including 5,574 internal to annotated genes (iTSS) and 5,495 TSS corresponding to potential antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We examined expression of 14 candidate asRNAs by Northern analysis using RNA from wild-type E. coli and from strains defective for RNases III and E, two RNases reported to be involved in asRNA processing. Interestingly, nine asRNAs detected as distinct bands by Northern analysis were differentially affected by the rnc and rne mutations. We also compared our asRNA candidates with previously published asRNA annotations from RNA-seq data and discuss the challenges associated with these cross-comparisons. Our global transcriptional start site map represents a valuable resource for identification of transcription start sites, promoters, and novel transcripts in E. coli and is easily accessible, together with the cDNA coverage plots, in an online genome browser.

  13. Involvement of microRNAs in physiological and pathological processes in the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegova Eva; Petrek Martin; Tomankova Tereza

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To date, at least 900 different microRNA (miRNA) genes have been discovered in the human genome. These short, single-stranded RNA molecules originate from larger precursor molecules that fold to produce hairpin structures, which are subsequently processed by ribonucleases Drosha/Pasha and Dicer to form mature miRNAs. MiRNAs play role in the posttranscriptional regulation of about one third of human genes, mainly via degradation of target mRNAs. Whereas the target mRNAs are often invo...

  14. Targeting of microRNAs for therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    miRNAs (microRNAs) comprise a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally repress gene expression by base-pairing with their target mRNAs. Recent evidence has shown that miRNAs play important roles in a wide variety of human diseases, such as viral infections, cancer...... and cardiovascular diseases, and thus miRNAs have rapidly emerged as potential targets for therapeutics. LNAs (locked nucleic acids) comprise a class of bicyclic conformational analogues of RNA, which exhibit high binding affinity to complementary RNA molecules and high stability in blood and tissues in vivo. Recent...

  15. An efficient method for the prediction of deleterious multiple-point mutations in the secondary structure of RNAs using suboptimal folding solutions

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    Barash Danny

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNAmute is an interactive Java application which, given an RNA sequence, calculates the secondary structure of all single point mutations and organizes them into categories according to their similarity to the predicted structure of the wild type. The secondary structure predictions are performed using the Vienna RNA package. A more efficient implementation of RNAmute is needed, however, to extend from the case of single point mutations to the general case of multiple point mutations, which may often be desired for computational predictions alongside mutagenesis experiments. But analyzing multiple point mutations, a process that requires traversing all possible mutations, becomes highly expensive since the running time is O(nm for a sequence of length n with m-point mutations. Using Vienna's RNAsubopt, we present a method that selects only those mutations, based on stability considerations, which are likely to be conformational rearranging. The approach is best examined using the dot plot representation for RNA secondary structure. Results Using RNAsubopt, the suboptimal solutions for a given wild-type sequence are calculated once. Then, specific mutations are selected that are most likely to cause a conformational rearrangement. For an RNA sequence of about 100 nts and 3-point mutations (n = 100, m = 3, for example, the proposed method reduces the running time from several hours or even days to several minutes, thus enabling the practical application of RNAmute to the analysis of multiple-point mutations. Conclusion A highly efficient addition to RNAmute that is as user friendly as the original application but that facilitates the practical analysis of multiple-point mutations is presented. Such an extension can now be exploited prior to site-directed mutagenesis experiments by virologists, for example, who investigate the change of function in an RNA virus via mutations that disrupt important motifs in its secondary

  16. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-08-15

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. PMID:27450756

  17. Identification and comparison of microRNAs from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues from two porcine breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yi; Xi, Qian-Yun; Xiong, Yuan-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Long; Cheng, Xiao; Shu, Gang; Wang, Song-Bo; Wang, Li-Na; Gao, Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Tong; Jiang, Qing-Yan; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Yong-Liang

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small regulatory RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Although an increasing number of porcine miRNAs recently have been identified, research has yet to identify the full repertoire of miRNAs in pig skeletal and adipose tissues and their differences between breeds. We extracted small RNA from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues of Landrace and Lantang pigs, and the expression of a total of 184 known porcine miRNAs (113 from Solexa sequencing and 171 from miRNA chip hybridization) as well as 521 novel miRNA candidates was detected. Moreover, 20 miRNAs were selected randomly from the 184 miRNAs and analysed by quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the aforementioned results. In the skeletal muscle tissues, 21 miRNAs were up-regulated in Lantang and another 33 were highly expressed in Landrace pigs. In the adipose tissues, 25 miRNAs were down-regulated in Lantang and another 23 were lowly expressed in Landrace pigs. miRNA divergence between tissues was also detected in this study. Ten miRNAs were highly expressed in the skeletal muscle tissue in comparison with adipose tissue, and another 10 miRNAs exhibited the opposite expression profile. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of the miRNAs in muscle and adipose tissues, the 10 miRNAs with the most divergent expression profiles were functionally categorized using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. Most of the miRNAs strongly corresponded to myogenesis and adipogenesis processes. In addition, 84 of the 521 miRNA candidates were potentially porcine-specific miRNAs. This study adds new valuable information to comparative miRNA profiles of skeletal muscle and adipose tissues in porcine species. The great diversity of miRNA composition and expression levels both between breeds and between tissues suggests that a complex regulatory network exists in porcine subcutaneous fat development.

  18. Analysis of epigenetic effects (microRNAs) in former employees of Wismut; Analyse epigenetischer Effekte (mikro RNAs) in ehemaligen Wismutbeschaeftigten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnen, Georg; Bruening, Thomas; Weber, D.G.

    2014-05-15

    Aim of the study was the development and establishment of an oligonucleotide microarray for expression analysis of microRNAs (miRNAs) in whole blood of former uranium miners. To identify possible biomarkers of radiation exposure, samples of high- and low-exposed miners were screened with microarrays that carried 703 human miRNA probes. To that end, 60 RNA samples of the project ''Creation of a biological sample and data collection of occupationally radiation-exposed workers (German Uranium Miners Biobank) - a pilot study'' (3607S04532) were analysed and potential biomarkers verified by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). During the initial screening, mirRNA-548d-5p, showing a significantly altered expression between low- and high-exposed miners, was identified as a possible biomarker candidate. Verification by qRT-PCR confirmed the difference in expression, however, the result was not statistically significant.

  19. New roles for ‘old’ microRNAs in nervous system function and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eHartl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, microRNAs became prominent candidates providing missing links on how to explain the developmental and phenotypical variation within one species or among different species. In addition, microRNAs were implicated in diseases such as neurodegeneration and cancer. More recently, the regulation of animal behavior was shown to be influenced by microRNAs. In spite of their numerous functions, only a few microRNAs were discovered by using classic genetic approaches. Due to the very mild or redundant phenotypes of most microRNAs or their genomic location within introns of other genes many regulatory microRNAs were missed. In this review, we focus on three microRNAs first identified in a forward genetic screen in invertebrates for their essential function in animal development, namely bantam, let-7 and miR-279. All three are essential for survival, are not located in introns of other genes, and are highly conserved among species. We highlight their important functions in the nervous system and discuss their emerging roles, especially during nervous system disease and behavior.

  20. Comparative Expression Dynamics of Intergenic Long Noncoding RNAs in the Genus Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Kevin G; Machado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been annotated in eukaryotic genomes, but comparative transcriptomic approaches are necessary to understand their biological impact and evolution. To facilitate such comparative studies in Drosophila, we identified and characterized lncRNAs in a second Drosophilid-the evolutionary model Drosophila pseudoobscura Using RNA-Seq and computational filtering of protein-coding potential, we identified 1,589 intergenic lncRNA loci in D. pseudoobscura We surveyed multiple sex-specific developmental stages and found, like in Drosophila melanogaster, increasingly prolific lncRNA expression through male development and an overrepresentation of lncRNAs in the testes. Other trends seen in D. melanogaster, like reduced pupal expression, were not observed. Nonrandom distributions of female-biased and non-testis-specific male-biased lncRNAs between the X chromosome and autosomes are consistent with selection-based models of gene trafficking to optimize genomic location of sex-biased genes. The numerous testis-specific lncRNAs, however, are randomly distributed between the X and autosomes, and we cannot reject the hypothesis that many of these are likely to be spurious transcripts. Finally, using annotated lncRNAs in both species, we identified 134 putative lncRNA homologs between D. pseudoobscura and D. melanogaster and find that many have conserved developmental expression dynamics, making them ideal candidates for future functional analyses. PMID:27189981

  1. Identification and Characterization of Cyprinid Herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3 Encoded MicroRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen H Donohoe

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Some viruses encode their own miRNAs and these are increasingly being recognized as important modulators of viral and host gene expression. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3 is a highly pathogenic agent that causes acute mass mortalities in carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio and koi (Cyprinus carpio koi worldwide. Here, bioinformatic analyses of the CyHV-3 genome suggested the presence of non-conserved precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA genes. Deep sequencing of small RNA fractions prepared from in vitro CyHV-3 infections led to the identification of potential miRNAs and miRNA-offset RNAs (moRNAs derived from some bioinformatically predicted pre-miRNAs. DNA microarray hybridization analysis, Northern blotting and stem-loop RT-qPCR were then used to definitively confirm that CyHV-3 expresses two pre-miRNAs during infection in vitro. The evidence also suggested the presence of an additional four high-probability and two putative viral pre-miRNAs. MiRNAs from the two confirmed pre-miRNAs were also detected in gill tissue from CyHV-3-infected carp. We also present evidence that one confirmed miRNA can regulate the expression of a putative CyHV-3-encoded dUTPase. Candidate homologues of some CyHV-3 pre-miRNAs were identified in CyHV-1 and CyHV-2. This is the first report of miRNA and moRNA genes encoded by members of the Alloherpesviridae family, a group distantly related to the Herpesviridae family. The discovery of these novel CyHV-3 genes may help further our understanding of the biology of this economically important virus and their encoded miRNAs may have potential as biomarkers for the diagnosis of latent CyHV-3.

  2. Abundant primary piRNAs, endo-siRNAs, and microRNAs in a Drosophila ovary cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lau, N.C.; Robine, N.; Martin, R.; Chung, W.J.; Niki, Y.; Berezikov, E.; Lai, E.C

    2009-01-01

    Piwi proteins, a subclass of Argonaute-family proteins, carry approximately 24-30-nt Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that mediate gonadal defense against transposable elements (TEs). We analyzed the Drosophila ovary somatic sheet (OSS) cell line and found that it expresses miRNAs, endogenous small in

  3. Changes in circulating microRNAs after radiochemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are easily accessible and have already proven to be useful as prognostic markers in cancer patients. However, their origin and function in the circulation is still under discussion. In the present study we analyzed changes in the miRNAs in blood plasma of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients in response to radiochemotherapy and compared them to the changes in a cell culture model of primary HNSCC cells undergoing simulated anti-cancer therapy. MiRNA-profiles were analyzed by qRT-PCR arrays in paired blood plasma samples of HNSCC patients before therapy and after two days of treatment. Candidate miRNAs were validated by single qRT-PCR assays. An in vitro radiochemotherapy model using primary HNSCC cell cultures was established to test the possible tumor origin of the circulating miRNAs. Microarray analysis was performed on primary HNSCC cell cultures followed by validation of deregulated miRNAs via qRT-PCR. Unsupervised clustering of the expression profiles using the six most regulated miRNAs (miR-425-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-106b-5p, miR-590-5p, miR-574-3p, miR-885-3p) significantly (p = 0.012) separated plasma samples collected prior to treatment from plasma samples collected after two days of radiochemotherapy. MiRNA profiling of primary HNSCC cell cultures treated in vitro with radiochemotherapy revealed differentially expressed miRNAs that were also observed to be therapy-responsive in blood plasma of the patients (miR-425-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-106b-5p, miR-93-5p) and are therefore likely to stem from the tumor. Of these candidate marker miRNAs we were able to validate by qRT-PCR a deregulation of eight plasma miRNAs as well as miR-425-5p and miR-93-5p in primary HNSCC cultures after radiochemotherapy. Changes in the abundance of circulating miRNAs during radiochemotherapy reflect the therapy response of primary HNSCC cells after an in vitro treatment. Therefore, the responsive miRNAs (miR-425-5p, miR-93-5p) may represent

  4. MicroRNAs in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeff P Bruce; Fei-Fei Liu

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) provide insight into both the biology and clinical behavior of many human cancers, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The dysregulation of miRNAs in NPC results in a variety of tumor-promoting effects. Furthermore, several miRNAs are prognostic markers for NPC. In addition to celular miRNAs, NPC samples also often contain miRNAs encoded by Epstein-Barr virus, and these miRNAs may impact NPC biology by targeting both celular and viral genes. Given their numerous putative roles in NPC development and progression, a thorough understanding of the impact of miRNA dysregulation in NPC is expected to shed light on useful biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the clinical management of this disease. In this review, we describe the efforts to date to identify and characterize such miRNAs in the context of NPC.

  5. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) engineering - On how microRNA-based silencing methods have affected current plant silencing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablok, Gaurav; Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L; Hassan, Mehedi; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; López, Camilo

    2011-03-18

    In recent years, endogenous microRNAs have been described as important regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) represent a recently developed miRNA-based strategy to silence endogenous genes. amiRNAs can be created by exchanging the miRNA/miRNA(∗) sequence within a miRNA precursor with a sequence designed to match the target gene, this is possible as long as the secondary RNA structure of the precursor is kept intact. In this review, we summarize the basic methodologies to design amiRNAs and detail their applications in plants genetic functional studies as well as their potential for crops genetic improvement. PMID:21329663

  6. Teaching "Candide": A Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Theodore E. D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two different approaches to teaching Voltaire's "Candide", one deriving meaning from the textual fabric or "inside" of the story and the other focusing on the author's "external" intent in writing the story, are presented and compared. (MSE)

  7. The defective RNAs of Closteroviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir eMawassi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The family Closteroviridae consists of two genera, Closterovirus and Ampelovirus with monopartite genomes transmitted respectively by aphids and mealybugs and the Crinivirus with bipartite genomes transmitted by whiteflies. The Closteroviridae consists of more than thirty virus species, which differ considerably in their phytopathological significance. Some, like Beet yellows virus (BYV and Citrus tristeza virus (CTV were associated for many decades with their respective hosts, sugar beets and citrus. Others, like the grapevine leafroll-associated ampeloviruses 1, and 3 were also associated with their grapevine hosts for long periods; however difficulties in virus isolation hampered their molecular characterization. The majority of the recently identified Closteroviridae were probably associated with their vegetative propagated host plants for long periods and only detected through the considerable advances in dsRNA isolation and sequencing of PCR amplified replicons. Molecular characterization of CTV and several other Closteroviridae revealed that, in addition to genomic and subgenomic RNAs, infected plants contain several different subviral defective RNAs (dRNAs. The roles and biological functions of dRNAs associated with Closteroviridae remain terra incognita.

  8. Non-Coding RNAs in Retinal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hindges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal development is dependent on an accurately functioning network of transcriptional and translational regulators. Among the diverse classes of molecules involved, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play a significant role. Members of this family are present in the cell as transcripts, but are not translated into proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small ncRNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators. During the last decade, they have been implicated in a variety of biological processes, including the development of the nervous system. On the other hand, long-ncRNAs (lncRNAs represent a different class of ncRNAs that act mainly through processes involving chromatin remodeling and epigenetic mechanisms. The visual system is a prominent model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying neurogenesis or circuit formation and function, including the differentiation of retinal progenitor cells to generate the seven principal cell classes in the retina, pathfinding decisions of retinal ganglion cell axons in order to establish the correct connectivity from the eye to the brain proper, and activity-dependent mechanisms for the functionality of visual circuits. Recent findings have associated ncRNAs in several of these processes and uncovered a new level of complexity for the existing regulatory mechanisms. This review summarizes and highlights the impact of ncRNAs during the development of the vertebrate visual system, with a specific focus on the role of miRNAs and a synopsis regarding recent findings on lncRNAs in the retina.

  9. Studying microRNAs in lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluiver, Joost; Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; van den Berg, Anke

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in development, differentiation, homeostasis, and also in diseases such as lymphoma. This chapter describes methods to study the role of miRNAs in lymphoma. First, we describe a multiplex RT reaction followed by qPCR that can be used to determine differential

  10. Gene function analysis by artificial microRNAs in Physcomitrella patens.

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~21 nt long small RNAs transcribed from endogenous MIR genes which form precursor RNAs with a characteristic hairpin structure. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNA. Artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) can be generated by exchanging the miRNA/miRNA sequence of endogenous MIR precursor genes, while maintaining the general pattern of matches and mismatches in the foldback. Thus, for functional gene analysis amiRNAs can be designed to target any gene of interest. During the last decade the moss Physcomitrella patens emerged as a model plant for functional gene analysis based on its unique ability to integrate DNA into the nuclear genome by homologous recombination which allows for the generation of targeted gene knockout mutants. In addition to this, we developed a protocol to express amiRNAs in P. patens that has particular advantages over the generation of knockout mutants and might be used to speed up reverse genetics approaches in this model species.

  11. Discovering novel microRNAs and age-related nonlinear changes in rat brains using deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lanxuan; Sun, Yubai; Wu, Jinfeng; Yan, Siyu; Deng, Zhenglu; Wang, Jun; Liao, Shenke; Yin, Dazhong; Li, Guolin

    2015-02-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of brain aging remains a significant challenge for biogerontologists. The discovery of gene regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) has added a new dimension for examining this process; however, the full complement of miRNAs involved in brain aging is still not known. In this study, miRNA profiles of young, adult, and old rats were obtained to evaluate molecular changes during aging. High-throughput deep sequencing revealed 547 known and 171 candidate novel miRNAs that were differentially expressed among groups. Unexpectedly, miRNA expression did not decline progressively with advancing age; moreover, genes targeted by age-associated miRNAs were predicted to be involved in biological processes linked to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying brain aging and a resource for future studies on age-related brain disorders.

  12. Are circulating microRNAs peripheral biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Subodh; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by memory loss, multiple cognitive abnormalities and intellectual impairments. Currently, there are no drugs or agents that can delay and/or prevent the progression of disease in elderly individuals, and there are no peripheral biomarkers that can detect AD early in its pathogenesis. Research has focused on identifying biomarkers for AD so that treatment can be begun as soon as possible in order to restrict or prevent intellectual impairments, memory loss, and other cognitive abnormalities that are associated with the disease. One such potential biomarker is microRNAs that are found in circulatory biofluids, such as blood and blood components, serum and plasma. Blood and blood components are primary sources where miRNAs are released in either cell-free form and then bind to protein components, or are in an encapsulated form with microvesicle particles. Exosomal miRNAs are known to be stable in biofluids and can be detected by high throughput techniques, like microarray and RNA sequencing. In AD brain, enriched miRNAs encapsulated with exosomes crosses the blood brain barrier and secreted in the CSF and blood circulations. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified miRNAs in the blood, serum, plasma, exosomes, cerebral spinal fluids, and extracellular fluids as potential biomarkers of AD. Recent research has revealed only six miRNAs - miR-9, miR-125b, miR-146a, miR-181c, let-7g-5p, and miR-191-5p - that were reported by multiple investigators. Some studies analyzed the diagnostic potential of these six miRNAs through receiver operating curve analysis which indicates the significant area-under-curve values in different biofluid samples. miR-191-5p was found to have the maximum area-under-curve value (0.95) only in plasma and serum samples while smaller area-under-curve values were found for miR-125, miR-181c, miR-191-5p, miR-146a, and miR-9. This article shortlisted the

  13. Long non-coding RNAs in cancer drug resistance development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    The presence or emergence of chemoresistance in tumor cells is a major burden in cancer therapy. While drug resistance is a multifactorial phenomenon arising from altered membrane transport of drugs, altered drug metabolism, altered DNA repair, reduced apoptosis rate and alterations of drug metabolism, it can also be linked to genetic and epigenetic factors. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important regulatory roles in many aspects of genome function including gene transcription, splicing, and epigenetics as well as biological processes involved in cell cycle, cell differentiation, development, and pluripotency. As such, it may not be surprising that some lncRNAs have been recently linked to carcinogenesis and drug resistance/sensitivity. Research is accelerating to decipher the exact molecular mechanism of lncRNA-regulated drug resistance and its therapeutic implications. In this article, we will review the structure, biogenesis, and mode of action of lncRNAs. Then, the involvement of lncRNAs in drug resistance will be discussed in detail. PMID:27427176

  14. Transfection of small RNAs globally perturbs gene regulation by endogenous microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Aly A; Betel, Doron; Miller, Martin L;

    2009-01-01

    Transfection of small RNAs (such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs)) into cells typically lowers expression of many genes. Unexpectedly, increased expression of genes also occurs. We investigated whether this upregulation results from a saturation effect--that is, competition...... among the transfected small RNAs and the endogenous pool of miRNAs for the intracellular machinery that processes small RNAs. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed genome-wide transcript responses from 151 published transfection experiments in seven different human cell types. We show that targets...... of endogenous miRNAs are expressed at significantly higher levels after transfection, consistent with impaired effectiveness of endogenous miRNA repression. This effect exhibited concentration and temporal dependence. Notably, the profile of endogenous miRNAs can be largely inferred by correlating miRNA sites...

  15. Targeting non-coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas technology is a challenge yet worth accepting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly eBasak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18-24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field.

  16. Circulating MicroRNAs in Plasma of Hepatitis B e Antigen Positive Children Reveal Liver-Specific Target Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Jacobsen, Kari Stougaard; Mirza, Aashiq Hussain;

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Hepatitis B e antigen positive (HBeAg-positive) children are at high risk of severe complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis. Liver damage is caused by the host immune response to infected hepatocytes, and we hypothesise that specific microRNAs play a role...... with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and in healthy controls, candidate microRNAs with aberrant plasma expressions in HBeAg-positive children were identified. MicroRNAs targeting liver-specific genes were selected based on bioinformatics analysis and validated by qRT-PCR using plasma samples from 34 HBe...

  17. The Tumor Cytosol miRNAs, Fluid miRNAs and Exosome miRNAs in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eQin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review is to provide an update on the progress of microRNAs (miRNAs as potential biomarkers for lung cancer. miRNAs are single-stranded, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression and show tissue-specific signatures. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA expression patterns represent the in vivo status in physiology and disease. Moreover, miRNAs are stable in serum and other clinically convenient and available tissue sources, so they are being developed as biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. Cancer is currently the primary driver of the field, but miRNA biomarkers are being developed for many other diseases such as cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. Here we examine the framework and scope of the miRNA landscape as it specifically relates to the translation of miRNA expression patterns/signatures into biomarkers for developing diagnostics for lung cancer. We focus on examining tumor cytosol miRNAs, fluid miRNAs, and exosome miRNAs in lung cancer, the connections among these miRNAs, and the potential of miRNA biomarkers for the development of diagnostics. In lung cancer, miRNAs have been studied in both cell populations and in the circulation. However, a major challenge is to develop biomarkers to monitor cancer development and to identify circulating miRNAs that are linked to cancer stage. Importantly, the fact that miRNAs can be successfully harvested from biological fluids allows for the development of biofluid biopsies, in which miRNAs as circulating biomarkers can be captured and analyzed ex vivo. Our hope is that these minimally invasive entities provide a window to the in vivo milieu of the patients without the need for costly, complex invasive procedures, rapidly moving miRNAs from research to the clinic.

  18. [Screening of bone-related microRNAs in serum of patients with osteogenesis imperfect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqiang; Lu, Yanqin; Ren, Xiuzhi; Wang, Yanzhou; Li, Zhiliang; Xu, Chao; Han, Jinxiang

    2012-10-01

    We screened differential expression bone-related microRNAs (miRNAs) in serum of patients with osteogenesis imperfect (OI). First, we selected the reference gene (s) fit for quantitative detection of serum miRNAs by using geNorm and several other programmes. Then real-time fluorescent quntitative PCR was used to detect the expression level of bone-related miRNAs gained by means of miRanda, Targetscan and Pictar softwares caculation and reading literature. Then, the results were analyzed with the matched t test. All 6 candidate reference genes had a stable expression level in serum of healthy controls and patients with different characters, and the optimal number of reference genes is 4 (miR-16, let-7a, snRNAU6, miR-92a) after Pairwise Variations analysis (V4/5 = 0.133 < 0.15). For validating the universality of expression stability, we detected the relative expression value of miR-16, let-7a, snRNAU6 and miR-92a in another 8 healthy controls and 16 patients with OI and the result revealed that the expression of 4 genes remained stable (M < 1.5). After measuring serum levels of more than 100 bone-related miRNAs in patients with real-time qPCR, 11 miRNAs showed differential expression, and bioinformatic analysis suggested these altered expressional mioRNAs had possibilities to participate in the process of OI. So the experiment indicated that there existed many differential expression bone-related miRNAs in serum of patients with OI, and these miRNAs had potentials to be promising biomarkers for serologic tests and diagnosis of OI. PMID:23311139

  19. microRNAs: Implications for air pollution research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardim, Melanie J., E-mail: melaniejardim@gmail.com [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the current understanding on the role of microRNAs in mediating genetic responses to air pollutants and to contemplate on how these responses ultimately control susceptibility to ambient air pollution. Morbidity and mortality attributable to air pollution continues to be a growing public health concern worldwide. Despite several studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain elusive. In the last several years, special attention has been given to the role of epigenetics in mediating, not only genetic and physiological responses to certain environmental insults, but also in regulating underlying susceptibility to environmental stressors. Epigenetic mechanisms control the expression of gene products, both basally and as a response to a perturbation, without affecting the sequence of DNA itself. These mechanisms include structural regulation of the chromatin structure, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, and post-transcriptional gene regulation, such as microRNA mediated repression of gene expression. microRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that have been quickly established as key regulators of gene expression. As such, miRNAs have been found to control several cellular processes including apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation. More recently, research has emerged suggesting that changes in the expression of some miRNAs may be critical for mediating biological, and ultimately physiological, responses to air pollutants. Although the study of microRNAs, and epigenetics as a whole, has come quite far in the field of cancer, the understanding of how these mechanisms regulate gene-environment interactions to environmental exposures in everyday life is unclear. This article does not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the US EPA.

  20. Characterisation and expression of microRNAs in developing wings of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathjen Tina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterflies are an excellent system for studies of adaptive convergent and divergent phenotypic traits. Wing colour patterns are used as signals to both predators and potential mates and are inherited in a Mendelian manner. The underlying genetic mechanisms of pattern formation have been studied for many years and shed light on broad issues, such as the repeatability of evolution. In Heliconius melpomene, the yellow hindwing bar is controlled by the HmYb locus. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that have key roles in many biological processes, including development. miRNAs could act as regulators of genes involved in wing development, patterning and pigmentation. For this reason we characterised miRNAs in developing butterfly wings and examined differences in their expression between colour pattern races. Results We sequenced small RNA libraries from two colour pattern races and detected 142 Heliconius miRNAs with homology to others found in miRBase. Several highly abundant miRNAs were differentially represented in the libraries between colour pattern races. These candidates were tested further using Northern blots, showing that differences in expression were primarily due to developmental stage rather than colour pattern. Assembly of sequenced reads to the HmYb region identified hme-miR-193 and hme-miR-2788; located 2380 bp apart in an intergenic region. These two miRNAs are expressed in wings and show an upregulation between 24 and 72 hours post-pupation, indicating a potential role in butterfly wing development. A search for miRNAs in all available H. melpomene BAC sequences (~ 2.5 Mb did not reveal any other miRNAs and no novel miRNAs were predicted. Conclusions Here we describe the first butterfly miRNAs and characterise their expression in developing wings. Some show differences in expression across developing pupal stages and may have important functions in

  1. LncRNAs in Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shanshan Hu; Ge Shan

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are critical regulatory factors in essentially all forms of life. Stem cells occupy a special position in cell biology and Biomedicine, and emerging results show that multiple ncRNAs play essential roles in stem cells. We discuss some of the known ncRNAs in stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, adult stem cells, and cancer stem cells with a focus on long ncRNAs. Roles and functional mechanisms of these lncRNAs are summa...

  2. MicroRNAs in tumor stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochen Hu; Junqiang Yang; Ruijie Yang; Ruina Yang; Xinshuai Wang; Shegan Gao

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that are believed to have a significant role in tumori-genesis and cancer metastasis. Cancer stem cel s play a major role in tumor recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Research has shown that miRNAs can promote or inhibit the stemness of cancer stem cel s and regulate the dif erentiation and self-renewal of cancer stem cel s. In this article, the phenotype and regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in cancer stem cel s wil be described, together with an explanation of their potential role in tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Translation Inhibition of Capped and Uncapped Viral RNAs Mediated by Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, Jorge M; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2003-05-01

    ABSTRACT Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases that remove specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of the large rRNA and arrest protein synthesis at the translocation step. In addition to their enzymatic activity, RIPs have been reputed to be potent antiviral agents against many plant, animal, and human viruses. We recently showed that pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), an RIP from pokeweed, inhibits translation in cell extracts by binding to the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNA and viral RNAs and depurinating these RNAs at multiple sites downstream of the cap structure. In this study, we examined the activity of three different RIPs against capped and uncapped viral RNAs. PAP, Mirabilis expansa RIP (ME1), and the Saponaria officinalis RIP (saporin) depurinated the capped Tobacco mosaic virus and Brome mosaic virus RNAs, but did not depurinate the uncapped luciferase RNA, indicating that other type I RIPs besides PAP can distinguish between capped and uncapped RNAs. We did not detect depurination of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs at multiple sites by PAP or ME1. Because AMV RNAs are capped, these results indicate that recognition of the cap structure alone is not sufficient for depurination of the RNA at multiple sites throughout its sequence. Furthermore, PAP did not cause detectable depurination of uncapped RNAs from Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV), and uncapped RNA containing poliovirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). However, in vitro translation experiments showed that PAP inhibited translation of AMV, TBSV, SPMV RNAs, and poliovirus IRES dependent translation. These results demonstrate that PAP does not depurinate every capped RNA and that PAP can inhibit translation of uncapped viral RNAs in vitro without causing detectable depurination at multiple sites. Thus, the cap structure is not the only determinant for inhibition of translation by PAP. PMID:18942981

  4. Identification and conformational analysis of putative microRNAs in Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shruthi Sureshan, C; Habeeb, S K M

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs, evolutionarily conserved endogenous non-coding RNAs that regulate their target mRNA expression by either inactivating or degrading mRNA genes; thus playing an important role in the growth and development of an organism. Maruca vitrata is an insect pest of leguminous plants like pigeon pea, cowpea and mung bean and is pantropical. In this study, we perform BLAST on all known miRNAs against the transcriptome data of M. vitrata and thirteen miRNAs were identified. These miRNAs were characterised and their target genes were identified using TargetScan and were functionally annotated using FlyBase. The importance of the structure of pre-miRNA in the Drosha activity led to study the backbone torsion angles of predicted pre-miRNAs (mvi-miR-9751, mvi-miR-649-3p, mvi-miR-4057 and mvi-miR-1271) to identify various nucleotide triplets that contribute to the variation of torsion angle values at various structural motifs of a pre-miRNA.

  5. Identification and conformational analysis of putative microRNAs in Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shruthi Sureshan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small RNAs, evolutionarily conserved endogenous non-coding RNAs that regulate their target mRNA expression by either inactivating or degrading mRNA genes; thus playing an important role in the growth and development of an organism. Maruca vitrata is an insect pest of leguminous plants like pigeon pea, cowpea and mung bean and is pantropical. In this study, we perform BLAST on all known miRNAs against the transcriptome data of M. vitrata and thirteen miRNAs were identified. These miRNAs were characterised and their target genes were identified using TargetScan and were functionally annotated using FlyBase. The importance of the structure of pre-miRNA in the Drosha activity led to study the backbone torsion angles of predicted pre-miRNAs (mvi-miR-9751, mvi-miR-649-3p, mvi-miR-4057 and mvi-miR-1271 to identify various nucleotide triplets that contribute to the variation of torsion angle values at various structural motifs of a pre-miRNA.

  6. Identification of mRNA-like non-coding RNAs and validation of a mighty one named MAR in Panax ginseng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meizhen Wang; Bin Wu; Chao Chen; Shanfa Lu

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non‐coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play significant roles in plants. However, little is known about lncRNAs in Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, an economical y significant medicinal plant species. A total of 3,688 mRNA‐like non‐coding RNAs (mlncRNAs), a class of lncRNAs, were identified in P. ginseng. Approximately 40%of the identified mlncRNAs were processed into smal RNAs, implying their regulatory roles via smal RNA‐mediated mechanisms. Eleven miRNA‐generating mlncRNAs also pro-duced siRNAs, suggesting the coordinated production of miRNAs and siRNAs in P. ginseng. The mlncRNA‐derived smal RNAs might be 21‐, 22‐, or 24‐nt phased and could be generated from both or only one strand of mlncRNAs, or from super long hairpin structures. A ful‐length mlncRNA, termed MAR (multiple‐function‐associated mlncRNA), was cloned. It gener-ated the most abundant siRNAs. The MAR siRNAs were predominantly 24‐nt and some of them were distributed in a phased pattern. A total of 228 targets were predicted for 71 MAR siRNAs. Degradome sequencing validated 68 predicted targets involved in diverse metabolic pathways, suggesting the significance of MAR in P. ginseng. Consistently, MAR was detected in al tissues analyzed and responded to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment. It sheds light on the function of mlncRNAs in plants.

  7. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in the zoonotic fluke Fasciolopsis buski.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Hu, Wei; Li, Juan; He, Jun-Jun; Ai, Lin; Chen, Jia-Xu

    2016-06-01

    Fasciolopsis buski is a food-borne zoonotic parasite which is transmitted by aquatic plants, with pigs and humans as the definitive hosts. The objective of the present study was to characterize the microRNA (miRNA) profiles of this parasite by Solexa deep sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. Approximately 12 million high-quality reads were obtained from adult F. buski. A total of 286 miRNA candidates were found and 24 miRNA candidates were conserved miRNAs in the miRBase database. Three novel miRNAs were identified and confirmed by stem-loop reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The miRNAs found in the present study belong to 13 families whose members showed high bias. The guanine (G) was the dominant nucleotide at the beginning and middle of the conserved miRNAs, particularly at the positions of 2nd, 6th, and 13th. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the miRNA profiles of F. buski, which would lay a foundation for further functional studies of miRNAs of F. buski.

  8. MicroRNAs in Salivary Exosome as Potential Biomarkers of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Machida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether salivary exosomal miRNAs could be identified as aging biomarkers. Fifteen young healthy volunteers (median age, 21.0 years and 13 old individuals (median age, 66.0 years were recruited. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected, salivary exosomes were isolated, and total RNA was extracted. In a microarray, 242 miRNAs were commonly detected in these two mixed samples. Based on the cut-off values of 2- or 0.5-fold changes (FC and regulatory power for aging process, six candidate miRNAs (miR-24-3p, miR-371a-5p, miR-3175, miR-3162-5p, miR-671-5p, and miR-4667-5p were selected. After comparing each total RNA obtained by the 15 young and 13 old individuals to validate the FC values using quantitative real-time PCR, miR-24-3p was identified as a novel candidate aging biomarker. This pilot study suggested that salivary exosomal miRNAs could be identified as candidate aging biomarkers. To confirm whether miR-24-3p in salivary exosomes are suitable biomarkers of aging, further validation research is required.

  9. Prediction of microRNAs associated with human diseases based on weighted k most similar neighbors.

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    Ping Xuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of human disease-related microRNAs (disease miRNAs is important for further investigating their involvement in the pathogenesis of diseases. More experimentally validated miRNA-disease associations have been accumulated recently. On the basis of these associations, it is essential to predict disease miRNAs for various human diseases. It is useful in providing reliable disease miRNA candidates for subsequent experimental studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: It is known that miRNAs with similar functions are often associated with similar diseases and vice versa. Therefore, the functional similarity of two miRNAs has been successfully estimated by measuring the semantic similarity of their associated diseases. To effectively predict disease miRNAs, we calculated the functional similarity by incorporating the information content of disease terms and phenotype similarity between diseases. Furthermore, the members of miRNA family or cluster are assigned higher weight since they are more probably associated with similar diseases. A new prediction method, HDMP, based on weighted k most similar neighbors is presented for predicting disease miRNAs. Experiments validated that HDMP achieved significantly higher prediction performance than existing methods. In addition, the case studies examining prostatic neoplasms, breast neoplasms, and lung neoplasms, showed that HDMP can uncover potential disease miRNA candidates. CONCLUSIONS: The superior performance of HDMP can be attributed to the accurate measurement of miRNA functional similarity, the weight assignment based on miRNA family or cluster, and the effective prediction based on weighted k most similar neighbors. The online prediction and analysis tool is freely available at http://nclab.hit.edu.cn/hdmpred.

  10. Primary and Presidential Candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at primary and presidential candidates in 2008 and 2012. Evidence suggests that voters are less influenced by candidates’ color, gender, or religious observation than previously. Conversely, markers of difference remain salient in the imaginations of pollsters and journalists...

  11. Identification of novel miRNAs and miRNA dependent developmental shifts of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Shuhua Zhan

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small, endogenous RNAs of 20 approximately 25 nucleotides, processed from stem-loop regions of longer RNA precursors. Plant miRNAs act as negative regulators of target mRNAs predominately by slicing target transcripts, and a number of miRNAs play important roles in development. We analyzed a number of published datasets from Arabidopsis thaliana to characterize novel miRNAs, novel miRNA targets, and miRNA-regulated developmental changes in gene expression. These data include microarray profiling data and small RNA (sRNA deep sequencing data derived from miRNA biogenesis/transport mutants, microarray profiling data of mRNAs in a developmental series, and computational predictions of conserved genomic stem-loop structures. Our conservative analyses identified five novel mature miRNAs and seven miRNA targets, including one novel target gene. Two complementary miRNAs that target distinct mRNAs were encoded by one gene. We found that genes targeted by known miRNAs, and genes up-regulated or down-regulated in miRNA mutant inflorescences, are highly expressed in the wild type inflorescence. In addition, transcripts upregulated within the mutant inflorescences were abundant in wild type leaves and shoot meristems and low in pollen and seed. Downregulated transcripts were abundant in wild type pollen and seed and low in shoot meristems, roots and leaves. Thus, disrupting miRNA function causes the inflorescence transcriptome to resemble the leaf and meristem and to differ from pollen and seed. Applications of our computational approach to other species and the use of more liberal criteria than reported here will further expand the number of identified miRNAs and miRNA targets. Our findings suggest that miRNAs have a global role in promoting vegetative to reproductive transitions in A. thaliana.

  12. Circulating MicroRNAs as Promising Biomarkers in Forensic Body Fluids Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumache, Raluca; Ciocan, Veronica; Muresan, Camelia; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Enache, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, DNA molecular analysis has become an important tool in forensic investigations. Currently, it is possible to genotype all types of biological traces or micro-traces containing nucleated cells if they are not entirely destroyed, chemically or bacterial. The DNA profiling is based on the short tandem repeats (STR) and aids in human identification from biological samples, but due to the recent advances in molecular genetics, other biomarkers have been proposed to be used in forensic identifications, such as: messenger RNA(mRNA), microRNA (miRNA), and DNA methylation. MicroRNAs are part of a class of small, non-coding RNAs that contain 19 - 23 nucleotides. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of biochemical mechanisms, cell proliferation and other cellular mechanisms in the human body. The level of microRNAs in blood and other body fluids (urine, saliva, sweat) increases as a consequence of altered pathophysiological mechanisms and tissue insult. Moreover, the stability and specificity of microRNAs make them ideal candidates for circulating biomarkers in forensic bioanalytical procedures. In this review, we want to present a brief overview of biogenesis, functions, and applications of miRNAs in the identification of forensic body fluids. PMID:26554231

  13. Comparative characterization of microRNAs from the liver flukes Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min-Jun; Ai, Lin; Fu, Jing-Hua; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Liu, Qing-You; Chen, Mu-Xin; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression at the post-transcription level. The present study specifically explored and compared the miRNA expression profiles of F. gigantica and F. hepatica using an integrated sequencing and bioinformatics platform and quantitative real-time PCR. Nineteen and 16 miRNA candidates were identified from F. gigantica and F. hepatica, respectively. The two parasites shared 11 miRNAs, with 8 also showing similarity to miRNAs of Schistosoma japonicum. Another 8 miRNAs were identified as F. gigantica-specific and 5 as F. hepatica-specific, most of which were novel. Predicted target analysis with 11465 mRNA and EST sequences of F. hepatica and F. gigantica revealed that all of the miRNAs had more than one target, ranging from 2 to 398 with an average of 51 targets. Some functions of the predicted targets were only found in F. gigantica, such as "transcription regulator", while some others were only found in F. hepatica, such as "reproduction" and "response to stimulus", indicating the different metabolism and gene regulation patterns of the two parasites. The present study represents the first global comparative characterization of miRNA expression profiles of F. gigantica and F. hepatica, which has provided novel valuable resources for a better understanding of the two zoonotic trematodes.

  14. Identification of conserved microRNAs and their targets in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jihong; Zhang, Hongyuan; Ding, Yi

    2013-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of non-protein coding small RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in plants and animals. Although thousands of miRNAs were identified in many plant species, only 3 miRNAs have been reported in Lotus Japonicus, a model legume plant. In this study, 80 potential miRNA candidates were identified in 28 ESTs and 52 GSSs of L. japonicus using a homology-based computational analysis. A total of 735 miRNA targets were predicted and some of them encoded transcription factors as well as genes that function in stress response, signal transduction, methylation and others. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that miR156a, miR160a and miR399a participated in seed germination of L. japonicus. GO and KEGG analysis suggested that the predicted miRNAs might target genes involved in lipid, nitrogen, starch sucrose metabolism and signal transduction.

  15. Differential expression of long non-coding RNAs in hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Tian-Ping; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Huai-Ping; Cui, Xian-Wei; Tian, Zhao-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common complication of premature birth that seriously affects the survival rate and quality of life among preterm neonates. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in many human diseases. However, the role of lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of BPD remains poorly understood. Here, we exposed neonatal C57BL/6J mice to 95% concentrations of ambient oxygen and established a mouse lung injury model that mimicked human BPD. Next, we compared lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles between BPD and normal lung tissues using a high-throughput mouse lncRNA + mRNA array system. Compared with the control group, 882 lncRNAs were upregulated, and 887 lncRNAs were downregulated in BPD lung tissues. We validated some candidate BPD-associated lncRNAs by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in eight pairs of BPD and normal lung tissues. Gene ontology, pathway and bioinformatics analyses revealed that a downregulated lncRNA, namely AK033210, associated with tenascin C may be involved in the pathogenesis of BPD. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to reveal differential lncRNA expression in BPD, which provides a foundation for further understanding of the molecular mechanism of BPD development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27137150

  16. Transcriptional analysis of Deinococcus radiodurans reveals novel small RNAs that are differentially expressed under ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Contreras, Lydia M

    2015-03-01

    Small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) are posttranscriptional regulators that have been identified in multiple species and shown to play essential roles in responsive mechanisms to environmental stresses. The natural ability of specific bacteria to resist high levels of radiation has been of high interest to mechanistic studies of DNA repair and biomolecular protection. Deinococcus radiodurans is a model extremophile for radiation studies that can survive doses of ionizing radiation of >12,000 Gy, 3,000 times higher than for most vertebrates. Few studies have investigated posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms of this organism that could be relevant in its general gene regulatory patterns. In this study, we identified 199 potential sRNA candidates in D. radiodurans by whole-transcriptome deep sequencing analysis and confirmed the expression of 41 sRNAs by Northern blotting and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). A total of 8 confirmed sRNAs showed differential expression during recovery after acute ionizing radiation (15 kGy). We have also found and confirmed 7 sRNAs in Deinococcus geothermalis, a closely related radioresistant species. The identification of several novel sRNAs in Deinococcus bacteria raises important questions about the evolution and nature of global gene regulation in radioresistance.

  17. Transcriptome/Degradome-wide discovery of microRNAs and transcript targets in two Paulownia australis genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Suyan; Fan, Guoqiang; Xu, Enkai; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of the miRNAs that have been identified in model plants are well characterized, but till now, no reports have previously been published concerning miRNAs in Paulownia australis. In order to investigate miRNA-guided transcript target regulation in P. australis, small RNA libraries from two P. australis (diploids, PA2; and autotetraploids, PA4) genotypes were subjected to Solexa sequencing. As a result, 10,691,271 (PA2) and 10,712,733 (PA4) clean reads were obtained, and 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 15 families, and 31 potential novel miRNAs candidates were identified. Compared with their expression levels in the PA2 plants, 26 miRNAs were up-regulated and 15 miRNAs were down-regulated in the PA4 plants. The relative expressions of 12 miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Using the degradome approach, 53 transcript targets were identified and annotated based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. These targets were associated with development, stimulus response, metabolism, signaling transduction and biological regulation. Among them, 11 targets, including TCP transcription factors, auxin response factors, squamosa promoter-binding-like proteins, scarecrow-like proteins, L-type lectin-domain containing receptor kinases and zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein, cleaved by four known miRNA family and two potentially novel miRNAs were found to be involved in regulating plant development, biotic and abiotic stresses. The findings will be helpful to facilitate studies on the functions of miRNAs and their transcript targets in Paulownia. PMID:25198709

  18. Transcriptome/Degradome-wide discovery of microRNAs and transcript targets in two Paulownia australis genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Niu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are involved in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of the miRNAs that have been identified in model plants are well characterized, but till now, no reports have previously been published concerning miRNAs in Paulownia australis. In order to investigate miRNA-guided transcript target regulation in P. australis, small RNA libraries from two P. australis (diploids, PA2; and autotetraploids, PA4 genotypes were subjected to Solexa sequencing. As a result, 10,691,271 (PA2 and 10,712,733 (PA4 clean reads were obtained, and 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 15 families, and 31 potential novel miRNAs candidates were identified. Compared with their expression levels in the PA2 plants, 26 miRNAs were up-regulated and 15 miRNAs were down-regulated in the PA4 plants. The relative expressions of 12 miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Using the degradome approach, 53 transcript targets were identified and annotated based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. These targets were associated with development, stimulus response, metabolism, signaling transduction and biological regulation. Among them, 11 targets, including TCP transcription factors, auxin response factors, squamosa promoter-binding-like proteins, scarecrow-like proteins, L-type lectin-domain containing receptor kinases and zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein, cleaved by four known miRNA family and two potentially novel miRNAs were found to be involved in regulating plant development, biotic and abiotic stresses. The findings will be helpful to facilitate studies on the functions of miRNAs and their transcript targets in Paulownia.

  19. Comparative transcriptome profiling of dairy goat microRNAs from dry period and peak lactation mammary gland tissues.

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    Zhuanjian Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that serve as important post-transcriptional gene expression regulators by targeting messenger RNAs for post-transcriptional endonucleolytic cleavage or translational inhibition. miRNAs play important roles in many biological processes. Extensive high-throughput sequencing studies of miRNAs have been performed in several animal models. However, little is known about the diversity of these regulatory RNAs in goat (Capra hircus, which is one of the most important agricultural animals and the oldest domesticated species raised worldwide. Goats have long been used for their milk, meat, hair (including cashmere, and skins throughout much of the world. RESULTS: In this study, two small RNA libraries were constructed based on dry period and peak lactation dairy goat mammary gland tissues and sequenced using the Illumina-Solexa high-throughput sequencing technology. A total of 346 conserved and 95 novel miRNAs were identified in the dairy goat. miRNAs expression was confirmed by qRT-PCR in nine tissues and in the mammary gland during different stages of lactation. In addition, several candidate miRNAs that may be involved in mammary gland development and lactation were found by comparing the miRNA expression profiles in different tissues and developmental stages of the mammary gland. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals the first miRNAs profile related to the biology of the mammary gland in the dairy goat. The characterization of these miRNAs could contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of lactation physiology and mammary gland development in the dairy goat.

  20. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

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    Tadayoshi Kagiya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described.

  1. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiya, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides) RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described. PMID:27529224

  2. MicroRNAs in renal fibrosis

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    Arthur Chi-Kong Chung

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous short noncoding RNAs that regulate most of important cellular processes by inhibiting gene expression through the post-transcriptional repression of their target mRNAs. . In kidneys, miRNAs have been associated in renal development, homeostasis, and physiological functions. Results from clinical and experimental animal studies demonstrate that miRNAs play essential roles in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases. Chronic kidney diseases (CKD is characterized by renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β is recognized as a major mediator of renal fibrosis because it is able to stimulate the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins to impair normal kidney function. Recently, emerging evidence demonstrate the relationship between TGF-β signaling and miRNAs expression during renal diseases. TGF-β regulates expression of several microRNAs, such as miR-21, miR-192, miR-200, miR-433, and miR-29. MiR-21, miR-192, and miR-433 which are positively induced by TGF-β signaling play a pathological role in kidney diseases. In contrast, members in both miR-29 and miR-200 families which are inhibited by TGF-β signaling protect kidneys from renal fibrosis by suppressing the deposition of extracellular matrix and preventing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, respectively. Clinically, the presence of miRNAs in blood and urine has been examined to be early biomarkers for detecting renal diseases. From experimental animal studies of CKD, targeting microRNAs also provides evidence about therapeutic potential of miRNAs during renal diseases. Now, it comes to the stage to examine the exact mechanisms of miRNAs during the initiation and progression of renal diseases. Therefore, determining the function of miRNAs in renal fibrosis may facilitate the development of both early diagnosis and treatment of renal diseases.

  3. CncRNAs: RNAs with both coding and non-coding roles in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Karuna; Ephrussi, Anne

    2016-04-15

    RNAs are known to regulate diverse biological processes, either as protein-encoding molecules or as non-coding RNAs. However, a third class that comprises RNAs endowed with both protein coding and non-coding functions has recently emerged. Such bi-functional 'coding and non-coding RNAs' (cncRNAs) have been shown to play important roles in distinct developmental processes in plants and animals. Here, we discuss key examples of cncRNAs and review their roles, regulation and mechanisms of action during development. PMID:27095489

  4. AFLP genome scan to detect genetic structure and candidate loci under selection for local adaptation of the invasive weed Mikania micrantha.

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    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available Why some species become successful invaders is an important issue in invasive biology. However, limited genomic resources make it very difficult for identifying candidate genes involved in invasiveness. Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae, one of the world's most invasive weeds, has adapted rapidly in response to novel environments since its introduction to southern China. In its genome, we expect to find outlier loci under selection for local adaptation, critical to dissecting the molecular mechanisms of invasiveness. An explorative amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP genome scan was used to detect candidate loci under selection in 28 M. micrantha populations across its entire introduced range in southern China. We also estimated population genetic parameters, bottleneck signatures, and linkage disequilibrium. In binary characters, such as presence or absence of AFLP bands, if all four character combinations are present, it is referred to as a character incompatibility. Since character incompatibility is deemed to be rare in populations with extensive asexual reproduction, a character incompatibility analysis was also performed in order to infer the predominant mating system in the introduced M. micrantha populations. Out of 483 AFLP loci examined using stringent significance criteria, 14 highly credible outlier loci were identified by Dfdist and Bayescan. Moreover, remarkable genetic variation, multiple introductions, substantial bottlenecks and character compatibility were found to occur in M. micrantha. Thus local adaptation at the genome level indeed exists in M. micrantha, and may represent a major evolutionary mechanism of successful invasion. Interactions between genetic diversity, multiple introductions, and reproductive modes contribute to increase the capacity of adaptive evolution.

  5. Computational identification of microRNAs in the strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) genome sequence and validation of their precise sequences by miR-RACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Li, Aying; Liu, Hong; Wen, Xicheng; Zhao, Mizhen; Korir, Nadira Bilkish; Korir, Nicholas Kibet; Wang, Chen; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-02-15

    In plants, microRNAs (miRNAs) play significant roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation and have been found to control many genes involved in different biological and metabolic processes. Extensive studies were carried out to discover miRNAs and analyze their functions in model plant species, such as in Arabidopsis and rice that have been reported. In this research, we used bioinformatics to predict microRNAs in an important strawberry rootstock cultivar to discover and validate precise sequences of microRNAs in strawberry. By adopting a range of filtering criteria, we obtained 59 potential miRNAs belonging to 40 miRNA families from the Fragaria vesca genome. Using two specific 5' and 3' miRNA RACE PCR reactions and a sequence-directed cloning method, we accurately determined 34 precise sequences of candidate miRNAs, while six other sequences exhibited some minor divergence in their termini nucleotides, and 19 miRNAs that could not be cloned owing to expression abundance may be too low or these mirRNAs predicted could not be existing in strawberry. Potential target genes were further predicted for the miRNAs above. The expression of the 16 miRNAs unreported and having exact sequences and their targets by experiment could be detected in different tissues of strawberry ranging from roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits by qRT-PCR and some of them showed differential expression in various tissues. The functional analysis of 16 miRNAs and their targets was carried out. Finally, we conclude that there are 34 mirRNAs in strawberry and their targets play vital roles not only in growth and development, but also in diverse physiological processes. These results show that regulatory miRNAs exist in agronomically important strawberry and might have an important function in strawberry growth and development. PMID:24333854

  6. microRNAs and Cardiovascular Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Koh

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality attributable largely to structural changes in the heart and with associated cardiac dysfunction. Remodeling is defined as alteration of the mass, dimensions, or shape of the heart (termed cardiac or ventricular remodeling) and vessels (vascular remodeling) in response to hemodynamic load and/or cardiovascular injury in association with neurohormonal activation. Remodeling may be described as physiologic or pathologic; alternatively, remodeling may be classified as adaptive or maladaptive. The importance of remodeling as a pathogenic mechanism has been controversial because factors leading to remodeling as well as the remodeling itself may be major determinants of patients' prognosis. The basic mechanisms of cardiovascular remodeling, and especially the roles of microRNAs in HF progression and vascular diseases, will be reviewed here.

  7. Abundant primary piRNAs, endo-siRNAs, and microRNAs in a Drosophila ovary cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Nelson C; Robine, Nicolas; Martin, Raquel; Chung, Wei-Jen; Niki, Yuzo; Berezikov, Eugene; Lai, Eric C

    2009-10-01

    Piwi proteins, a subclass of Argonaute-family proteins, carry approximately 24-30-nt Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that mediate gonadal defense against transposable elements (TEs). We analyzed the Drosophila ovary somatic sheet (OSS) cell line and found that it expresses miRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), and piRNAs in abundance. In contrast to intact gonads, which contain mixtures of germline and somatic cell types that express different Piwi-class proteins, OSS cells are a homogenous somatic cell population that expresses only PIWI and primary piRNAs. Detailed examination of its TE-derived piRNAs and endo-siRNAs revealed aspects of TE defense that do not rely upon ping-pong amplification. In particular, we provide evidence that a subset of piRNA master clusters, including flamenco, are specifically expressed in OSS and ovarian follicle cells. These data indicate that the restriction of certain TEs in somatic gonadal cells is largely mediated by a primary piRNA pathway. PMID:19541914

  8. A comprehensive genome-wide study on tissue-specific and abiotic stress-specific miRNAs in Triticum aestivum.

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    Ritu Pandey

    Full Text Available Productivity of wheat crop is largely dependent on its growth and development that, in turn, is mainly regulated by environmental conditions, including abiotic stress factors. miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression networks involved in diverse aspects of development and stress responses in plants. Using high-throughput sequencing of eight small RNA libraries prepared from diverse abiotic stresses and tissues, we identified 47 known miRNAs belonging to 20 families, 49 true novel and 1030 candidate novel miRNAs. Digital gene expression analysis revealed that 257 miRNAs exhibited tissue-specific expression and 74 were associated with abiotic stresses. Putative target genes were predicted for miRNAs identified in this study and their grouping into functional categories indicated that the putative targets were involved in diverse biological processes. RLM-RACE of predicted targets of three known miRNAs (miR156, miR160 and miR164 confirmed their mRNA cleavage, thus indicating their regulation at post-transcriptional level by the corresponding miRNAs. Mapping of the sequenced data onto the wheat progenitors and closely related monocots revealed a large number of evolutionary conserved miRNAs. Additional expression profiling of some of these miRNAs in other abiotic stresses underline their involvement in multiple stresses. Our findings provide valuable resource for an improved understanding of the role of miRNAs in stress tolerance as well as plant development.

  9. A genome-wide survey for prion-regulated miRNAs associated with cholesterol homeostasis

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    Montag Judith

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prion diseases are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPc into a pathogenic isoform (PrPSc. It is known that neurodegeneration is often accompanied by the disturbance of cholesterol homeostasis. We have recently identified a set of genes that were upregulated after prion infection of N2a neuronal cells (Bach et al., 2009. Results We have now used ultra-deep sequencing technology to profile all microRNAs (miRNA that could be associated with this effect in these N2a cells. Using stringent filters and normalization strategies we identified a small set of miRNAs that were up- or downregulated upon prion infection. Using bioinformatic tools we predicted whether the downregulated miRNAs could target mRNAs that have been previously identified to enhance cholesterol synthesis in these cells. Application of this joint profiling approach revealed that nine miRNAs potentially target cholesterol-related genes. Four of those miRNAs are localized in a miRNA-dense cluster on the mouse X-chromosome. Among these, twofold downregulation of mmu-miR-351 and mmu-miR-542-5p was confirmed by qRT-PCR. The same miRNAs were predicted as putative regulators of the sterol regulatory element-binding factor 2 (Srebf2, the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr or the IPP isomerase. Conclusions The results demonstrate that joined profiling by ultra-deep sequencing is highly valuable to identify candidate miRNAs involved in prion-induced dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

  10. Tissular and soluble miRNAs for diagnostic and therapy improvement in digestive tract cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica; Albulescu, Lucian; Tanase, Cristiana

    2011-01-01

    Digestive cancers (e.g., gastric, colorectal, pancreatic or hepatocarcinoma) are among the most frequently reported cancers in the world, and are characterized by invasivity, metastatic potential and poor outcomes. This group includes some of the most critical cancers (among them, are those ranked second to forth in cancer-related mortality) and, despite all sustained efforts, they maintain a profile of low survival rates and lack successful therapies. Discovery of biomarkers that improve disease characterization may make optimized or personalized therapy possible. Novel biomarkers are expected to provide, hopefully, less-invasive or noninvasive diagnostic tools that make possible earlier detection of disease. Also, they may provide a more reliable selection instrument in the drug discovery process. miRNAs, short noncoding RNAs, have emerged in the last few years as significant regulators of cellular activities, controlling protein expression at the post-transcriptional level, with a significant implication in pathology in general and, of most relevance, in cancers. Deregulation of miRNA expression levels and some genetic alterations were demonstrated in various cancers, including digestive cancers. Investigations in tissue samples have provided a considerable amount of knowledge, identifying altered expressions of miRNAs associated with tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Overexpression of some tumor-inducing or tumor-promoting miRNAs was demonstrated, as well as the downregulation of tumor-suppressor miRNAs. Both individual miRNAs, as well as sets of multiple miRNAs, were set up as candidate biomarkers for diagnostics or monitoring, offering relevant insights into tumorigenic mechanisms. Circulating miRNAs were demonstrated as valuable instruments in tumor diagnosis and the prognosis of digestive cancers (affecting the esophagus, stomach, intestine, colorectum, liver and pancreas), and are being investigated thoroughly in order to generate and validate less

  11. Antiviral activity of salivary microRNAs for ophthalmic herpes zoster

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    Irmak M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ophthalmic herpes zoster is a common ocular infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV. Viral mRNA transcripts play a major role in the replicative cycle of the virus and current antiviral agents have little effect in preventing and treating the complications. Therapeutic use of saliva for certain painful ocular diseases such as ophthalmic herpes zoster is a well-known public practice in our region. We thought that antiviral activity of saliva may stem from salivary microvesicles and we aimed to look for molecules with antiviral activity in these vesicles. As a possible candidate for antiviral activity, salivary microvesicles contain at least 20 microRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs, which suppress the translation of target mRNAs. miRNAs not only participate in maintenance of normal cell functions, but are also involved in host–virus interactions and limit the replication of certain virus types. Thus, miRNA gene therapy by targeting mRNAs required for VZV survival may find a niche in the treatment of ophthalmic herpes zoster. But, how could salivary microvesicles reach into the corneal cells to demonstrate their antiviral activity. We suggest that human salivary microvesicles can be effective carriers of miRNA for corneal cells, because they contain a molecular machinery for vesicle trafficking and fusion allowing them to be endocytosed by target cells. After binding to the plasma membrane, microvesicles seem to enter into the corneal cells through the clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In the cytosol, human salivary miRNAs base-pair with specific viral mRNAs and inhibit their translation, thus limiting the replication of the virus.

  12. MicroRNAs - Biology and clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kannan Ranganathan; Vaishnavi Sivasankar

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a highly conserved group of small, non-coding RNA molecules, which are 19-25 nucleotides in size. Previously thought to be evolutionary debris with no evident function, these small RNAs have been found to control gene expression primarily by silencing the gene. MicroRNAs are critical to cell physiology and development. They are also implicated in pathological processes such as autoimmune diseases, viral infections and carcinogenesis.

  13. MicroRNAs in Common Human Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding RNA molecules that have attracted tremendous attention from the biological and biomedical research communities over the past decade. With over 1900 miRNAs discovered in humans to date, many of them have already been implicated in common human disorders. Facilitated by high-throughput genomics and bioinformatics in conjunction with traditional molecular biology techniques and animal models, miRNA research is now positioned to make the transiti...

  14. Gene expression regulators--MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fang; YIN Q. James

    2005-01-01

    A large class of non-coding RNAs found in small molecule RNAs are closely associated with the regulation of gene expression, which are called microRNA (miRNA). MiRNAs are coded in intergenic or intronic regions and can be formed into foldback hairpin RNAs. These transcripts are cleaved by Dicer, generating mature miRNAs that can silence their target genes in different modes of action. Now, research on small molecule RNAs has gotten breakthrough advance in biology. To discover miRNA genes and their target genes has become hot topics in RNA research. This review attempts to look back the history of miRNA discovery, to introduce the methods of screening miRNAs, to localize miRNA loci in genome, to seek miRNA target genes and the biological function, and to discuss the working mechanisms of miRNAs. Finally, we will discuss the potential important roles of miRNAs in modulating the genesis, development, growth, and differentiation of organisms. Thus, it can be predicted that a complete understanding of miRNA functions will bring us some new concepts, approaches and strategies for the study of living beings.

  15. Recovery of the Candidate Protoplanet HD 100546 b with Gemini/NICI and Detection of Additional (Planet-Induced?) Disk Structure at Small Separations

    CERN Document Server

    Currie, Thayne; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Brandt, Timothy D; Grady, Carol; Fukagawa, Misato; Burrows, Adam; Janson, Markus; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; McElwain, Michael W; Follette, Katherine; Hashimoto, Jun; Henning, Thomas; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; Mede, Kyle; Morino, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Gene; Suenaga, Takuya; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Wisniewski, John; Tamura, Motohide

    2014-01-01

    We report the first independent, second-epoch (re-)detection of a directly-imaged protoplanet candidate. Using $L^\\prime$ high-contrast imaging of HD 100546 taken with the Near-Infrared Coronagraph and Imager (NICI) on Gemini South, we recover `HD 100546 b' with a position and brightness consistent with the original VLT/NaCo detection from Quanz et al, although data obtained after 2013 will be required to decisively demonstrate common proper motion. HD 100546 b may be spatially resolved, up to $\\approx$ 12-13 AU in diameter, and is embedded in a finger of thermal IR bright, polarized emission extending inwards to at least 0.3". Standard hot-start models imply a mass of $\\approx$ 15 $M_{J}$. But if HD 100546 b is newly formed or made visible by a circumplanetary disk, both of which are plausible, its mass is significantly lower (e.g. 1--7 $M_{J}$). Additionally, we discover a thermal IR-bright disk feature, possibly a spiral density wave, at roughly the same angular separation as HD 100546 b but 90 degrees awa...

  16. New microRNAs from mouse and human

    OpenAIRE

    Lagos-Quintana, M.; Rauhut, R; Meyer, J.; Borkhardt, A.; Tuschl, T.

    2003-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a new class of noncoding RNAs encoded in the genomes of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. MicroRNAs regulate translation and stability of target mRNAs based on (partial) sequence complementarity. Although the number of newly identified miRNAs is still increasing, target mRNAs of animal miRNAs remain to be identified. Here we describe 31 novel miRNAs that were identified by cloning from mouse tissues and the human Saos-2 cell line. Fifty-three percent of all ...

  17. Small RNAs meet their targets: When methylation defends miRNAs from uridylation

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Guodong; Chen, Xuemei; Yu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs are incorporated into Argonaute protein-containing complexes to guide the silencing of target RNAs in both animals and plants. The abundance of endogenous small RNAs is precisely controlled at multiple levels including transcription, processing and Argonaute loading. In addition to these processes, 3′ end modification of small RNAs, the topic of a research area that has rapidly evolved over the last several years, adds another layer of regulation of their abundance, diversity and f...

  18. Recovery act. Characterizing structural controls of EGS-candidate and conventional geothermal reservoirs in the Great Basin. Developing successful exploration strategies in extended terranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulds, James [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-06-25

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the structural controls of geothermal systems within the Great Basin and adjacent regions. Our main objectives were to: 1) Produce a catalogue of favorable structural environments and models for geothermal systems. 2) Improve site-specific targeting of geothermal resources through detailed studies of representative sites, which included innovative techniques of slip tendency analysis of faults and 3D modeling. 3) Compare and contrast the structural controls and models in different tectonic settings. 4) Synthesize data and develop methodologies for enhancement of exploration strategies for conventional and EGS systems, reduction in the risk of drilling non-productive wells, and selecting the best EGS sites.

  19. Next-generation sequencing of 100 candidate genes in young victims of suspected sudden cardiac death with structural abnormalities of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, C L; Christiansen, S L; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura;

    2016-01-01

    -two cases had non-diagnostic structural cardiac abnormalities and 20 cases, diagnosed with a cardiomyopathy post-mortem (ARVC = 14, HCM = 6), served as comparators. Fifteen (29 %) of the deceased individuals with non-diagnostic findings had variants with likely functional effects based on conservation......BACKGROUND: In sudden, unexpected, non-traumatic death in young individuals, structural abnormalities of the heart are frequently identified at autopsy. However, the findings may be unspecific and cause of death may remain unclear. A significant proportion of these cases are most likely caused...... with non-diagnostic structural abnormalities of the heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: We screened 72 suspected SCD cases (

  20. Defective RNAs of Citrus tristeza virus analogous to Crinivirus genomic RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The family Closteroviridae includes the genera Closterovirus and Ampelovirus with monopartite genomes and the genus Crinivirus with bipartite genomes. Plants infected with the Closterovirus, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), often contain one or more populations of defective RNAs (dRNAs). Although most dRNAs are comparatively small (2-5 kb) consisting of the genomic RNA termini with large internal deletions, we recently characterized large dRNAs of ∼12 kb that retained the open reading frames (ORFs) 1a plus 1b. These were self-replicating RNAs and appeared to be analogous to the genomic RNA 1 of the bipartite criniviruses. The present report describes the finding of an additional group of large dRNAs (LdRNAs) that retained all or most of the 10 3' ORFs and appeared to be analogous to genomic RNA 2 of criniviruses. Isolates associated with LdRNAs were found associated with double-recombinant dRNAs (DR-dRNAs) of various sizes (1.7 to 5.1 kb) that comprised the two termini and a noncontiguous internal sequence from ORF2. The genetic and epidemiological implications of the architectural identities of LdRNAs and DR dRNAs and their apparent analogy with the genomic RNA 2 of criniviruses are discussed

  1. Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several RNAs, including rRNAs, snRNAs, snoRNAs, and some mRNAs, are known to be localized at specific sites in a cell. Although methods have been established to visualize RNAs in a living cell, no large-scale visual screening of localized RNAs has been performed. In this study, we constructed a genomic library in which random genomic fragments were inserted downstream of U1A-tag sequences under a GAL1 promoter. In a living yeast cell, transcribed U1A-tagged RNAs were visualized by U1A-GFP that binds the RNA sequence of the U1A-tag. In this screening, many RNAs showed nuclear signals. Since the nuclear signals of some RNAs were not seen when the U1A-tag was connected to the 3' ends of the RNAs, it is suggested that their nuclear signals correspond to nascent transcripts on GAL1 promoter plasmids. Using this screening method, we successfully identified two novel localized mRNAs, CSR2 and DAL81, which showed bud-tip localization

  2. Genome wide identification of chilling responsive microRNAs in Prunus persica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat Abdelali

    2012-09-01

    species. Several conserved and non-conserved miRNAs and miRNA-regulated genes co-localize with Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs for chilling requirement (CR-QTL and bloom date (BD-QTL. Conclusions In this work, we identified a large set of conserved and non-conserved miRNAs and describe their evolutionary footprint in angiosperm lineages. Several of these miRNAs were induced in winter buds and co-localized with QTLs for chilling requirement and bloom date thus making their gene targets potential candidates for mediating plant responses to cold stress. Several peach homologs of genes participating in the regulation of vernalization in Arabidopsis were identified as differentially expressed miRNAs targets, potentially linking these gene activities to cold responses in peach dormant buds. The non-conserved miRNAs may regulate cellular, physiological or developmental processes specific to peach and/or other tree species.

  3. Targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs with multimodal synthetic small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Duc Duy; Staedel, Cathy; Zehnacker, Laura; Benhida, Rachid; Darfeuille, Fabien; Duca, Maria

    2014-03-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered category of small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs are aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers and revealed to be oncogenic and to play a pivotal role in initiation and progression of these pathologies. It is now clear that the inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs, defined as blocking their biosynthesis or their function, could find an application in the therapy of different types of cancer in which these miRNAs are implicated. Here we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new small-molecule RNA ligands targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs. In this work we focused our attention on miR-372 and miR-373 that are implicated in the tumorigenesis of different types of cancer such as gastric cancer. These two oncogenic miRNAs are overexpressed in gastric cancer cells starting from their precursors pre-miR-372 and pre-miR-373, two stem-loop structured RNAs that lead to mature miRNAs after cleavage by the enzyme Dicer. The small molecules described herein consist of the conjugation of two RNA binding motives, i.e., the aminoglycoside neomycin and different natural and artificial nucleobases, in order to obtain RNA ligands with increased affinity and selectivity compared to that of parent compounds. After the synthesis of this new series of RNA ligands, we demonstrated that they are able to inhibit the production of the oncogenic miRNA-372 and -373 by binding their pre-miRNAs and inhibiting the processing by Dicer. Moreover, we proved that some of these compounds bear anti-proliferative activity toward gastric cancer cells and that this activity is likely linked to a decrease in the production of targeted miRNAs. To date, only few examples of small molecules targeting oncogenic miRNAs have been reported, and such inhibitors could be extremely useful for the development of new anticancer therapeutic

  4. Non-canonical roles of tRNAs and tRNA mimics in bacterial cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Assaf; Elgamal, Sara; Rajkovic, Andrei; Ibba, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are the macromolecules that transfer activated amino acids from aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to the ribosome, where they are used for the mRNA guided synthesis of proteins. Transfer RNAs are ancient molecules, perhaps even predating the existence of the translation machinery. Albeit old, these molecules are tremendously conserved, a characteristic that is well illustrated by the fact that some bacterial tRNAs are efficient and specific substrates of eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and ribosomes. Considering their ancient origin and high structural conservation, it is not surprising that tRNAs have been hijacked during evolution for functions outside of translation. These roles beyond translation include synthetic, regulatory and information functions within the cell. Here we provide an overview of the non-canonical roles of tRNAs and their mimics in bacteria, and discuss some of the common themes that arise when comparing these different functions.

  5. Discovery of replicating circular RNAs by RNA-seq and computational algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixiang; Qi, Shuishui; Tang, Nan; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Shanshan; Zhu, Pengfei; Ma, Lin; Cheng, Jinping; Xu, Yun; Lu, Meiguang; Wang, Hongqing; Ding, Shou-Wei; Li, Shifang; Wu, Qingfa

    2014-12-01

    Replicating circular RNAs are independent plant pathogens known as viroids, or act to modulate the pathogenesis of plant and animal viruses as their satellite RNAs. The rate of discovery of these subviral pathogens was low over the past 40 years because the classical approaches are technical demanding and time-consuming. We previously described an approach for homology-independent discovery of replicating circular RNAs by analysing the total small RNA populations from samples of diseased tissues with a computational program known as progressive filtering of overlapping small RNAs (PFOR). However, PFOR written in PERL language is extremely slow and is unable to discover those subviral pathogens that do not trigger in vivo accumulation of extensively overlapping small RNAs. Moreover, PFOR is yet to identify a new viroid capable of initiating independent infection. Here we report the development of PFOR2 that adopted parallel programming in the C++ language and was 3 to 8 times faster than PFOR. A new computational program was further developed and incorporated into PFOR2 to allow the identification of circular RNAs by deep sequencing of long RNAs instead of small RNAs. PFOR2 analysis of the small RNA libraries from grapevine and apple plants led to the discovery of Grapevine latent viroid (GLVd) and Apple hammerhead viroid-like RNA (AHVd-like RNA), respectively. GLVd was proposed as a new species in the genus Apscaviroid, because it contained the typical structural elements found in this group of viroids and initiated independent infection in grapevine seedlings. AHVd-like RNA encoded a biologically active hammerhead ribozyme in both polarities, and was not specifically associated with any of the viruses found in apple plants. We propose that these computational algorithms have the potential to discover novel circular RNAs in plants, invertebrates and vertebrates regardless of whether they replicate and/or induce the in vivo accumulation of small RNAs.

  6. Identification and characterization of microRNAs from Entamoeba histolytica HM1-IMSS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín Mar-Aguilar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amebiasis, a disease that is a major source of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of non-coding RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expression and protein translation in animals. Genome-wide identification of miRNAs is a critical step to facilitating our understanding of genome organization, genome biology, evolution, and post-transcriptional regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced a small RNA library prepared from a culture of trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica Strain HM1-IMSS using a deep DNA sequencing approach. Deep sequencing yielded 16 million high-quality short sequence reads containing a total of 5 million non-redundant sequence reads. Based on a bioinformatics pipeline, we found that only 0.5% of these non-redundant small RNA reads were a perfect match with the drafted E. histolytica genome. We did not find miRNA homologs in plant or animal miRNAs. We discovered 199 new potential Entamoeba histolytica miRNAs. The expression and sequence of these Ehi-miRNAs were further validated through microarray by µParaflo Microfluidic Biochip Technology. Ten potential miRNAs were additionally confirmed by real time RT-PCR analysis. Prediction of target genes matched 32 known genes and 34 hypothetical genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that there is a number of regulatory miRNAs in Entamoeba histolytica. The collection of miRNAs in this parasite could be used as a new platform to study genomic structure, gene regulation and networks, development, and host-parasite interactions.

  7. Involvement of microRNAs in physiological and pathological processes in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriegova Eva

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To date, at least 900 different microRNA (miRNA genes have been discovered in the human genome. These short, single-stranded RNA molecules originate from larger precursor molecules that fold to produce hairpin structures, which are subsequently processed by ribonucleases Drosha/Pasha and Dicer to form mature miRNAs. MiRNAs play role in the posttranscriptional regulation of about one third of human genes, mainly via degradation of target mRNAs. Whereas the target mRNAs are often involved in the regulation of diverse physiological processes ranging from developmental timing to apoptosis, miRNAs have a strong potential to regulate fundamental biological processes also in the lung compartment. However, the knowledge of the role of miRNAs in physiological and pathological conditions in the lung is still limited. This review, therefore, summarizes current knowledge of the mechanism, function of miRNAs and their contribution to lung development and homeostasis. Besides the involvement of miRNAs in pulmonary physiological conditions, there is evidence that abnormal miRNA expression may lead to pathological processes and development of various pulmonary diseases. Next, the review describes current state-of-art on the miRNA expression profiles in smoking-related diseases including lung cancerogenesis, in immune system mediated pulmonary diseases and fibrotic processes in the lung. From the current research it is evident that miRNAs may play role in the posttranscriptional regulation of key genes in human pulmonary diseases. Further studies are, therefore, necessary to explore miRNA expression profiles and their association with target mRNAs in human pulmonary diseases.

  8. The relationship between transcription initiation RNAs and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Ryan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs are nuclear localized 18 nucleotide RNAs derived from sequences immediately downstream of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII transcription start sites. Previous reports have shown that tiRNAs are intimately correlated with gene expression, RNA polymerase II binding and behaviors, and epigenetic marks associated with transcription initiation, but not elongation. Results In the present work, we show that tiRNAs are commonly found at genomic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF binding sites in human and mouse, and that CTCF sites that colocalize with RNAPII are highly enriched for tiRNAs. To directly investigate the relationship between tiRNAs and CTCF we examined tiRNAs originating near the intronic CTCF binding site in the human tumor suppressor gene, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene, also known as CDKN1A. Inhibition of CTCF-proximal tiRNAs resulted in increased CTCF localization and increased p21 expression, while overexpression of CTCF-proximal tiRNA mimics decreased CTCF localization and p21 expression. We also found that tiRNA-regulated CTCF binding influences the levels of trimethylated H3K27 at the alternate upstream p21 promoter, and affects the levels of alternate p21 (p21alt transcripts. Extending these studies to another randomly selected locus with conserved CTCF binding we found that depletion of tiRNA alters nucleosome density proximal to sites of tiRNA biogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that tiRNAs modulate local epigenetic structure, which in turn regulates CTCF localization.

  9. Discovery of replicating circular RNAs by RNA-seq and computational algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiang Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Replicating circular RNAs are independent plant pathogens known as viroids, or act to modulate the pathogenesis of plant and animal viruses as their satellite RNAs. The rate of discovery of these subviral pathogens was low over the past 40 years because the classical approaches are technical demanding and time-consuming. We previously described an approach for homology-independent discovery of replicating circular RNAs by analysing the total small RNA populations from samples of diseased tissues with a computational program known as progressive filtering of overlapping small RNAs (PFOR. However, PFOR written in PERL language is extremely slow and is unable to discover those subviral pathogens that do not trigger in vivo accumulation of extensively overlapping small RNAs. Moreover, PFOR is yet to identify a new viroid capable of initiating independent infection. Here we report the development of PFOR2 that adopted parallel programming in the C++ language and was 3 to 8 times faster than PFOR. A new computational program was further developed and incorporated into PFOR2 to allow the identification of circular RNAs by deep sequencing of long RNAs instead of small RNAs. PFOR2 analysis of the small RNA libraries from grapevine and apple plants led to the discovery of Grapevine latent viroid (GLVd and Apple hammerhead viroid-like RNA (AHVd-like RNA, respectively. GLVd was proposed as a new species in the genus Apscaviroid, because it contained the typical structural elements found in this group of viroids and initiated independent infection in grapevine seedlings. AHVd-like RNA encoded a biologically active hammerhead ribozyme in both polarities, and was not specifically associated with any of the viruses found in apple plants. We propose that these computational algorithms have the potential to discover novel circular RNAs in plants, invertebrates and vertebrates regardless of whether they replicate and/or induce the in vivo accumulation of small

  10. Discovery of replicating circular RNAs by RNA-seq and computational algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixiang; Qi, Shuishui; Tang, Nan; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Shanshan; Zhu, Pengfei; Ma, Lin; Cheng, Jinping; Xu, Yun; Lu, Meiguang; Wang, Hongqing; Ding, Shou-Wei; Li, Shifang; Wu, Qingfa

    2014-12-01

    Replicating circular RNAs are independent plant pathogens known as viroids, or act to modulate the pathogenesis of plant and animal viruses as their satellite RNAs. The rate of discovery of these subviral pathogens was low over the past 40 years because the classical approaches are technical demanding and time-consuming. We previously described an approach for homology-independent discovery of replicating circular RNAs by analysing the total small RNA populations from samples of diseased tissues with a computational program known as progressive filtering of overlapping small RNAs (PFOR). However, PFOR written in PERL language is extremely slow and is unable to discover those subviral pathogens that do not trigger in vivo accumulation of extensively overlapping small RNAs. Moreover, PFOR is yet to identify a new viroid capable of initiating independent infection. Here we report the development of PFOR2 that adopted parallel programming in the C++ language and was 3 to 8 times faster than PFOR. A new computational program was further developed and incorporated into PFOR2 to allow the identification of circular RNAs by deep sequencing of long RNAs instead of small RNAs. PFOR2 analysis of the small RNA libraries from grapevine and apple plants led to the discovery of Grapevine latent viroid (GLVd) and Apple hammerhead viroid-like RNA (AHVd-like RNA), respectively. GLVd was proposed as a new species in the genus Apscaviroid, because it contained the typical structural elements found in this group of viroids and initiated independent infection in grapevine seedlings. AHVd-like RNA encoded a biologically active hammerhead ribozyme in both polarities, and was not specifically associated with any of the viruses found in apple plants. We propose that these computational algorithms have the potential to discover novel circular RNAs in plants, invertebrates and vertebrates regardless of whether they replicate and/or induce the in vivo accumulation of small RNAs. PMID:25503469

  11. Enhanced mucosal immune responses induced by a combined candidate mucosal vaccine based on Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus structural proteins linked to tuftsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gao

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV and Hepatitis E virus (HEV are the most common causes of infectious hepatitis. These viruses are spread largely by the fecal-oral route and lead to clinically important disease in developing countries. To evaluate the potential of targeting hepatitis A and E infection simultaneously, a combined mucosal candidate vaccine was developed with the partial open reading frame 2 (ORF2 sequence (aa 368-607 of HEV (HE-ORF2 and partial virus protein 1 (VP1 sequence (aa 1-198 of HAV (HA-VP1, which included the viral neutralization epitopes. Tuftsin is an immunostimulatory peptide which can enhance the immunogenicity of a protein by targeting it to macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we developed a novel combined protein vaccine by conjugating tuftsin to HE-ORF2 and HA-VP1 and used synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs as the adjuvant. Subsequent experiments in BALB/c mice demonstrated that tuftsin enhanced the serum-specific IgG and IgA antibodies against HEV and HAV at the intestinal, vaginal and pulmonary interface when delivered intranasally. Moreover, mice from the intranasally immunized tuftsin group (HE-ORF2-tuftsin + HA-VP1-tuftsin + CpG showed higher levels of IFN-γ-secreting splenocytes (Th1 response and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells than those of the no-tuftsin group (HE-ORF2 + HA-VP1 + CpG. Thus, the tuftsin group generated stronger humoral and cellular immune responses compared with the no-tuftsin group. Moreover, enhanced responses to the combined protein vaccine were obtained by intranasal immunization compared with intramuscular injection. By integrating HE-ORF2, HA-VP1 and tuftsin in a vaccine, this study validated an important concept for further development of a combined mucosal vaccine against hepatitis A and E infection.

  12. MicroRNAs Form Triplexes with Double Stranded DNA at Sequence-Specific Binding Sites; a Eukaryotic Mechanism via which microRNAs Could Directly Alter Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Paugh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are important regulators of gene expression, acting primarily by binding to sequence-specific locations on already transcribed messenger RNAs (mRNA and typically down-regulating their stability or translation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs may also play a role in up-regulating mRNA transcription levels, although a definitive mechanism has not been established. Double-helical DNA is capable of forming triple-helical structures through Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen interactions in the major groove of the duplex, and we show physical evidence (i.e., NMR, FRET, SPR that purine or pyrimidine-rich microRNAs of appropriate length and sequence form triple-helical structures with purine-rich sequences of duplex DNA, and identify microRNA sequences that favor triplex formation. We developed an algorithm (Trident to search genome-wide for potential triplex-forming sites and show that several mammalian and non-mammalian genomes are enriched for strong microRNA triplex binding sites. We show that those genes containing sequences favoring microRNA triplex formation are markedly enriched (3.3 fold, p<2.2 × 10(-16 for genes whose expression is positively correlated with expression of microRNAs targeting triplex binding sequences. This work has thus revealed a new mechanism by which microRNAs could interact with gene promoter regions to modify gene transcription.

  13. Long noncoding RNAs: Lessons from genomic imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been a great resource for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional-based gene regulation by long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). In this article, I overview the functional role of intergenic lncRNAs (H19, IPW, and MEG3), antisense lncRNAs (Kcnq1ot1, Airn, Nespas, Ube3a-ATS), and enhancer lncRNAs (IG-DMR eRNAs) to understand the diverse mechanisms being employed by them in cis and/or trans to regulate the parent-of-origin-specific expression of target genes. Recent evidence suggests that some of the lncRNAs regulate imprinting by promoting intra-chromosomal higher-order chromatin compartmentalization, affecting replication timing and subnuclear positioning. Whereas others act via transcriptional occlusion or transcriptional collision-based mechanisms. By establishing genomic imprinting of target genes, the lncRNAs play a critical role in important biological functions, such as placental and embryonic growth, pluripotency maintenance, cell differentiation, and neural-related functions such as synaptic development and plasticity. An emerging consensus from the recent evidence is that the imprinted lncRNAs fine-tune gene expression of the protein-coding genes to maintain their dosage in cell. Hence, lncRNAs from imprinted clusters offer insights into their mode of action, and these mechanisms have been the basis for uncovering the mode of action of lncRNAs in several other biological contexts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26004516

  14. Identification and functional analysis of miRNAs in developing kernels of a viviparous mutant in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiping; Ding; Jian; Gao; Mao; Luo; Hua; Peng; Haijian; Lin; Guangsheng; Yuan; Yaou; Shen; Maojun; Zhao; Guangtang; Pan; Zhiming; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Given the important roles of miRNAs in post-transcriptional gene regulation, identification of differentially expressed miRNAs will facilitate the elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying kernel development. In this study, we constructed a small RNA library to comprehensively represent the full complement of individual small RNAs and to characterize miRNA expression profiles in pooled ears of maize(Zea mays L.) at 10, 15,20, 22, 25 and 30 days after pollination(DAP). At least 21 miRNAs were differentially expressed. The differential expression of three of these miRNAs, i.e., miR528a, miR167a and miR160b, at each stage was verified by qRT-PCR. The results indicated that these miRNAs might be involved in kernel development. In addition, the predicted functions of target genes indicated that most of the target genes are involved in signal transduction and cell communication pathways, particularly the auxin signaling pathway. The expression of candidate germination-associated miRNAs was analyzed by hybridization to a maize genome microarray, and revealed differential expression of genes involved in plant hormone signaling pathways. This finding suggests that phytohormones play a critical role in the development of maize kernels. We found that in combination with other miRNAs, miR528a regulated a putative laccase, a Ring-H2 zinc finger protein and a MADS box-like protein, whereas miR167a and miR160b regulated multiple target genes,including ARF(auxin response factor), a member of the B3 transcription factor family. All three miRNAs are important for ear germination, development and physiology. The small RNA transcriptomes and mRNA obtained in this study will help us gain a betterunderstanding of the expression and function of small RNAs in the development of maize kernel.

  15. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  16. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...

  17. Identification of miRNAs Potentially Involved in Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politano, Gianfranco; Inghilleri, Simona; Morbini, Patrizia; Calabrese, Fiorella; Benso, Alfredo; Savino, Alessandro; Cova, Emanuela; Zampieri, Davide; Meloni, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS), the main clinical phenotype of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that epigenetic regulation of microRNAs might play a role in its development. In this paper we present the application of a complex computational pipeline to perform enrichment analysis of miRNAs in pathways applied to the study of BOS. The analysis considered the full set of miRNAs annotated in miRBase (version 21), and applied a sequence of filtering approaches and statistical analyses to reduce this set and to score the candidate miRNAs according to their potential involvement in BOS development. Dysregulation of two of the selected candidate miRNAs–miR-34a and miR-21 –was clearly shown in in-situ hybridization (ISH) on five explanted human BOS lungs and on a rat model of acute and chronic lung rejection, thus definitely identifying miR-34a and miR-21 as pathogenic factors in BOS and confirming the effectiveness of the computational pipeline. PMID:27564214

  18. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis: Candidates for room temperature methane and hydrogen gas sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motaung, D.E., E-mail: dmotaung@csir.co.za [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Mhlongo, G.H., E-mail: gmhlongo@csir.co.za [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Kortidis, I. [Transparent Conductive Materials Lab, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 100N. Plastira str., Vassilika Vouton, 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Nkosi, S.S., E-mail: skosi@csir.co.za [CSIR-National Laser Centre, 626 Meiring Naude Rd, Brummeria, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Private Bag X3, Johannesburg 2030 (South Africa); Malgas, G.F.; Mwakikunga, B.W.; Ray, S.Sinha [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Kiriakidis, G., E-mail: kiriakid@iesl.forth.gr [Transparent Conductive Materials Lab, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 100N. Plastira str., Vassilika Vouton, 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University of Crete, Department of Physics, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-08-15

    We report on the synthesis of ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition times. The surface morphology, crystal structure and the cross-sectional analysis of the prepared ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO films are polycrystalline in nature. Structural analysis exploiting cross-sectional TEM profile showed that the films composed of nano-particles and columnar structures growing perpendicular to the substrate. AFM revealed that the columnar structures have a higher surface roughness as compared to the nanoparticles. The effect of ZnO crystallite size and crystallinity on the gas sensing performance of hydrogen and methane gases was also evaluated. Sensing film based on ZnO nanoparticles has numerous advantages in terms of its reliability and high sensitivity. These sensing materials revealed an improved response to methane and hydrogen gases at room temperature due to their high surface area, indicating their possible application as a gas sensor.

  19. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis: Candidates for room temperature methane and hydrogen gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaung, D. E.; Mhlongo, G. H.; Kortidis, I.; Nkosi, S. S.; Malgas, G. F.; Mwakikunga, B. W.; Ray, S. Sinha; Kiriakidis, G.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition times. The surface morphology, crystal structure and the cross-sectional analysis of the prepared ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO films are polycrystalline in nature. Structural analysis exploiting cross-sectional TEM profile showed that the films composed of nano-particles and columnar structures growing perpendicular to the substrate. AFM revealed that the columnar structures have a higher surface roughness as compared to the nanoparticles. The effect of ZnO crystallite size and crystallinity on the gas sensing performance of hydrogen and methane gases was also evaluated. Sensing film based on ZnO nanoparticles has numerous advantages in terms of its reliability and high sensitivity. These sensing materials revealed an improved response to methane and hydrogen gases at room temperature due to their high surface area, indicating their possible application as a gas sensor.

  20. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis: Candidates for room temperature methane and hydrogen gas sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the synthesis of ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition times. The surface morphology, crystal structure and the cross-sectional analysis of the prepared ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO films are polycrystalline in nature. Structural analysis exploiting cross-sectional TEM profile showed that the films composed of nano-particles and columnar structures growing perpendicular to the substrate. AFM revealed that the columnar structures have a higher surface roughness as compared to the nanoparticles. The effect of ZnO crystallite size and crystallinity on the gas sensing performance of hydrogen and methane gases was also evaluated. Sensing film based on ZnO nanoparticles has numerous advantages in terms of its reliability and high sensitivity. These sensing materials revealed an improved response to methane and hydrogen gases at room temperature due to their high surface area, indicating their possible application as a gas sensor.

  1. The Role of MicroRNAs as Predictors of Response to Tamoxifen Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina G. Egeland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine therapy is a key treatment strategy to control or eradicate hormone-responsive breast cancer. However, resistance to endocrine therapy leads to breast cancer relapse. The recent extension of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment up to 10 years actualizes the need for identifying biological markers that may be used to monitor predictors of treatment response. MicroRNAs are promising biomarkers that may fill the gap between preclinical knowledge and clinical observations regarding endocrine resistance. MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by posttranscriptional repression or degradation of mRNA, most often leading to gene silencing. MicroRNAs have been identified directly in the primary tumor, but also in the circulation of breast cancer patients. The few available studies investigating microRNA in patients suggest that seven microRNAs (miR-10a, miR-26, miR-30c, miR-126a, miR-210, miR-342 and miR-519a play a role in tamoxifen resistance. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA reveals that these seven microRNAs interact more readily with estrogen receptor (ER-independent pathways than ER-related signaling pathways. Some of these pathways are targetable (e.g., PIK3CA, suggesting that microRNAs as biomarkers of endocrine resistance may have clinical value. Validation of the role of these candidate microRNAs in large prospective studies is warranted.

  2. Reciprocal regulation of miRNAs and piRNAs in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, W W; Yang, W; Xuan, J; Gupta, S; Krylov, S N; Ma, X; Yang, Q; Yang, B B

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are two classes of small noncoding RNAs, both of which play roles in regulating tissue development. It is unknown whether these distinct classes of noncoding RNAs can regulate one another. Here we show that ectopic expression of miR-17 inhibited mouse fertility and early embryonic development. Specifically, we found that the piRNA amplification loop was repressed by miR-17-5p, leading to increased levels of transposition mutagenesis. This occurred by suppressing the amplification loop of piRNAs with an identical 5' sequence and by targeting Mili/Miwi2, an essential component of the piRNA amplification loop, and the DNA methyltransferase, Dnmt3a. We also found that increased levels of piRNAs could compete with miRNAs for target binding, resulting in increased expression of Dnmt3a and Mili. Increased Dnmt3a levels could in turn block miR-17-5p expression, while increased Mili expression could accelerate piRNA amplification and inhibit transposon generation, favoring embryonic development. We report for the first time the reciprocal regulation between miRNAs and piRNAs in mouse embryonic development. PMID:26990662

  3. Genome-wide identification of non-coding RNAs interacted with microRNAs in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuyu eYe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of RNA species interacting with microRNAs (miRNAs form a complex gene regulation network and play vital roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide identification of endogenous target mimics (eTMs for miRNAs and phased-siRNA-producing loci (PHAS in soybean with a focus on those involved in lipid metabolism. The results showed that a large number of eTMs and PHAS genes could be found in soybean. Additionally, we found that lipid metabolism related genes were potentially regulated by 28 miRNAs, and nine of them were potentially further regulated by a number of eTMs with expression evidence. Thirty-three miRNAs were found to trigger production of phasiRNAs from 49 PHAS genes, which were able to target lipid metabolism related genes. Degradome data supported miRNA- and/or phasiRNA-mediated cleavage of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Most eTMs for miRNAs involved in lipid metabolism and phasiRNAs targeting lipid metabolism related genes showed a tissue-specific expression pattern. Our bioinformatical evidences suggested that lipid metabolism in soybean is potentially regulated by a complex non-coding network, including miRNAs, eTMs and phasiRNAs, and the results extended our knowledge on functions of non-coding RNAs.

  4. Dysregulated microRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pierre; de Strooper, Bart

    2010-09-01

    The complexity of the nervous system arises in part, from the large diversity of neural cell types that support the architecture of neuronal circuits. Recent studies have highlighted microRNAs as important players in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and therefore the phenotype of neural cells. A link between microRNAs and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease is becoming increasingly evident. Here, we discuss microRNAs in neurodegeneration, from the fruit fly and mouse utilized as experimental models to dysregulated microRNAs in human neurodegenerative disorders. We propose that studying microRNAs and their mRNA targets in the context of neurodegeneration will significantly contribute to the identification of proteins important for neuronal function and might reveal underlying molecular networks that drive these diseases.

  5. Targeting microRNAs in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huangming; Sun, Lei; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-10-01

    Obesity is a serious health problem worldwide associated with an increased risk of life-threatening diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and certain types of cancer. Fundamental for the development of novel therapeutics for obesity and its associated metabolic syndromes is an understanding of the regulation of fat cell development. Recent computational and experimental studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a role in metabolic tissue development, lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. In addition, many miRNAs are dysregulated in metabolic tissues from obese animals and humans, which potentially contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated complications. In this review we summarize the current state of understanding of the roles of miRNAs in metabolic tissues under normal development and obese conditions, and discuss the potential use of miRNAs as therapeutic targets.

  6. Identification and Analysis of Differentially-Expressed microRNAs in Japanese Encephalitis Virus-Infected PK-15 Cells with Deep Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhan Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, a mosquito-borne Flavivirus, causes acute viral encephalitis with high morbidity and mortality in humans and animals. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that are important modulators of the intricate host-pathogen interaction networks. However, our knowledge of the changes that occur in miRNAs in host cells after JEV infection is still limited. To understand the molecular pathogenesis of JEV at the level of posttranscriptional regulation, we used Illumina deep sequencing to sequence two small RNA libraries prepared from PK-15 cells before and after JEV infection. We identified 522 and 427 miRNAs in the infected and uninfected cells, respectively. Overall, 132 miRNAs were expressed significantly differently after challenge with JEV: 78 were upregulated and 54 downregulated. The sequencing results for selected miRNAs were confirmed with RT-qPCR. GO analysis of the host target genes revealed that these dysregulated miRNAs are involved in complex cellular pathways, including the metabolic pathway, inflammatory response and immune response. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the comparative expression of miRNAs in PK-15 cells after JEV infection. Our findings will underpin further studies of miRNAs’ roles in JEV replication and identify potential candidates for antiviral therapies against JEV.

  7. Characterizing ammonia emissions from swine farms in eastern North Carolina: Reduction of emissions from water-holding structures at two candidate superior technologies for waste treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Viney P.; Arya, S. Pal; Rumsey, Ian C.; Kim, D.-S.; Bajwa, K. S.; Williams, C. M.

    Program OPEN (Odor, Pathogens, and Emissions of Nitrogen) was an integrated study of the emissions of ammonia (NH 3), odor and odorants, and pathogens from potential environmentally superior technologies (ESTs) for swine facilities in eastern North Carolina. This paper, as part of program OPEN, focuses on quantifying emissions of NH 3 from water-holding structures at two of the best ESTs and compares them with the projected emissions from two conventional lagoon and spray technologies (LSTs). The evaluated ESTs are: (1) Super Soils at Goshen Ridge; and (2) Environmental Technologies at Red Hill. The water-holding structures for these two ESTs contained no conventional anaerobic lagoon. A dynamic flow-through chamber was used to measure NH 3 fluxes from the water-holding structures at both the ESTs and at the conventional LST farms. In order to compare the emissions from the water-holding structures at the ESTs with those from the lagoons at the conventional sites under similar conditions, a statistical-observational model for lagoon NH 3 emissions was used. A mass-balance approach was used to quantify the emissions. All emissions were normalized by nitrogen-excretion rates. The percentage reductions relative to the conventional lagoons were calculated for the two ESTs. Results showed substantial reductions in NH 3 emissions at both ESTs. Super Soils had reductions of 94.7% for the warm season and 99.0% for the cool season. Environmental Technologies had slightly larger reductions of 99.4% and 99.98% for the cool and warm season, respectively. As a result of such large reductions in ammonia emissions, both technologies meet the criteria to be classified as ESTs for ammonia emissions.

  8. Fermi arc electronic structure and Chern numbers in the type-II Weyl semimetal candidate MoxW1 -xTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Ishida, Yukiaki; Pan, Xingchen; Yu, Peng; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Zheng, Hao; Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Guoqing; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Yun; Bian, Guang; Huang, Shin-Ming; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Mou, Daixiang; Huang, Lunan; Song, You; Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Guanghou; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Yao, Nan; Rault, Julien E.; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Kondo, Takeshi; Kaminski, Adam; Lin, Hsin; Liu, Zheng; Song, Fengqi; Shin, Shik; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals can give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that MoxW1 -xTe2 may realize such a type-II Weyl fermion. Here, we first show theoretically that it is crucial to access the band structure above the Fermi level ɛF to show a Weyl semimetal in MoxW1 -xTe2 . Then, we study MoxW1 -xTe2 by pump-probe ARPES and we directly access the band structure >0.2 eV above ɛF in experiment. By comparing our results with ab initio calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. We propose that a future study of MoxW1 -xTe2 by pump-probe ARPES may directly pinpoint the Fermi arc. Our work sets the stage for the experimental discovery of the first type-II Weyl semimetal in MoxW1 -xTe2 .

  9. A glance at subgenomic flavivirus RNAs and microRNAs in flavivirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavia, Lorena; Mosimann, Ana Luiza Pamplona; Aoki, Mateus Nóbrega; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2016-01-01

    The family Flaviviridae comprises a wide variety of viruses that are distributed worldwide, some of which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. There are neither vaccines nor antivirals for most flavivirus infections, reinforcing the importance of research on different aspects of the viral life cycle. During infection, cytoplasmic accumulation of RNA fragments mainly originating from the 3' UTRs, which have been designated subgenomic flavivirus RNAs (sfRNAs), has been detected. It has been shown that eukaryotic exoribonucleases are involved in viral sfRNA production. Additionally, viral and human small RNAs (sRNAs) have also been found in flavivirus-infected cells, especially microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs were first described in eukaryotic cells and in a mature and functional state present as single-stranded 18-24 nt RNA fragments. Their main function is the repression of translation through base pairing with cellular mRNAs, besides other functions, such as mRNA degradation. Canonical miRNA biogenesis involves Drosha and Dicer, however miRNA can also be generated by alternative pathways. In the case of flaviviruses, alternative pathways have been suggested. Both sfRNAs and miRNAs are involved in viral infection and host cell response modulation, representing interesting targets of antiviral strategies. In this review, we focus on the generation and function of viral sfRNAs, sRNAs and miRNAs in West Nile, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis and yellow fever infections, as well as their roles in viral replication, translation and cell immune response evasion. We also give an overview regarding other flaviviruses and the generation of cellular miRNAs during infection. PMID:27233361

  10. Global discovery of erythroid long noncoding RNAs reveals novel regulators of red cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Shi, Jiahai; Park, Staphany S; Gromatzky, Austin A; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-23

    Erythropoiesis is regulated at multiple levels to ensure the proper generation of mature red cells under multiple physiological conditions. To probe the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to this process, we examined >1 billion RNA-seq reads of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA from differentiating mouse fetal liver red blood cells and identified 655 lncRNA genes including not only intergenic, antisense, and intronic but also pseudogene and enhancer loci. More than 100 of these genes are previously unrecognized and highly erythroid specific. By integrating genome-wide surveys of chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and tissue expression patterns, we identify multiple lncRNAs that are dynamically expressed during erythropoiesis, show epigenetic regulation, and are targeted by key erythroid transcription factors GATA1, TAL1, or KLF1. We focus on 12 such candidates and find that they are nuclear-localized and exhibit complex developmental expression patterns. Depleting them severely impaired erythrocyte maturation, inhibiting cell size reduction and subsequent enucleation. One of them, alncRNA-EC7, is transcribed from an enhancer and is specifically needed for activation of the neighboring gene encoding BAND 3. Our study provides an annotated catalog of erythroid lncRNAs, readily available through an online resource, and shows that diverse types of lncRNAs participate in the regulatory circuitry underlying erythropoiesis.

  11. Potential role of differentially expressed lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchuan; Tian, Lili; Ma, Penghua; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Kai; GuanchaoWang; Liu, Hongchen; Xu, Baohua

    2015-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently attracted more attention about the role in a broad range of biological processes and complex cancers. We aimed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs that play an important role in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Microarray data GSE25099 consisting of 57 samples from patients with OSCC and 22 normal samples were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and lncRNAs were identified between OSCC samples and control using samr package in R and noncoder software. Co-expression network was constructed for lncRNAs and candidate target DEGs, followed by functional and pathway enrichment analysis using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tool. OSCC-related genes were screened by Genetic-Association-DB-Database analysis, and then protein-protein interaction (PPI) network construction of OSCC-related and co-expressed genes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there were 998 DEGs and 160 differentially expressed lncRNAs between OSCC and normal control. We found LOC100130547, FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 targeted most of DEGs. Predicted targets-related functional annotation showed significant changes in inflammation-related functions and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. By further conducting PPI network with lncRNA co-expressed DEGs, we found that OSCC-associated genes including MMP1 (matrix metallopeptidase), MMP3, MMP9, PLAU (plasminogen activator, urokinase) and IL8 (interleukin 8) were targeted by FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1. Our results indicate that lncRNAs FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 may responsible for progression and metastasis of OSCC via targeting MMP1, MMP3, MMP9, PLAU and IL8 which are key regulators of tumorigenesis. PMID:26276270

  12. Comparative Profiling of MicroRNAs in Male and Female Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chang-Chun; Xu, Min-Jun; Chen, Yi-Zhou; Tao, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-08-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus is an ectoparasite of medical and veterinary significance, which can transmit a number of pathogens including Babesia canis, Ehrlichia canis, and Rickettsia conorii. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as regulators in sex differentiation in dioecious species. We here investigated and compared the miRNA profiles of male and female adults of R. sanguineus by combining Solexa deep sequencing with bioinformatics platform and quantitative real-time PCR. A total of 11.88 and 16.09 million raw reads were obtained from male and female R. sanguineus, respectively. By mapping to the reference genome, 59 and 76 miRNA candidates from the female and male parasite were obtained, with 19 of each consistent with known Ixodes scapularis miRNAs deposited in the miRBase database. Besides, 51 miRNAs were shared by the two genders, and 8 and 25 were female and male specific, respectively. The number of predicted targets of the identified miRNAs ranged from 1 to 383 with an average of 176. Functional analysis showed that a number of predicted targets corresponded to transcription, splicing, and translation factors, elongation factors, and growth factors which were essential for the development of the parasite. Enrichment analysis revealed that some functions of the predicted targets were higher in female than in male, such as antioxidant and electron carrier. The present study firstly described the global profiling of miRNAs in male and female R. sanguineus and identified a number of gender-specific miRNAs, which are likely to participate in the sex differentiation/maintenance process and provide novel resources for better understanding of the biology of the parasite, and may further lead to effective control of the parasite and diseases it causes.

  13. Most microRNAs in the single-cell alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are produced by Dicer-like 3-mediated cleavage of introns and untranslated regions of coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Adrian A; Santos, Bruno A C M; Hnatova, Silvia; Bassett, Andrew R; Molnar, Attila; Chung, Betty Y; Baulcombe, David C

    2016-04-01

    We describe here a forward genetic screen to investigate the biogenesis, mode of action, and biological function of miRNA-mediated RNA silencing in the model algal species,Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Among the mutants from this screen, there were three atDicer-like 3that failed to produce both miRNAs and siRNAs and others affecting diverse post-biogenesis stages of miRNA-mediated silencing. The DCL3-dependent siRNAs fell into several classes including transposon- and repeat-derived siRNAs as in higher plants. The DCL3-dependent miRNAs differ from those of higher plants, however, in that many of them are derived from mRNAs or from the introns of pre-mRNAs. Transcriptome analysis of the wild-type anddcl3mutant strains revealed a further difference from higher plants in that the sRNAs are rarely negative switches of mRNA accumulation. The few transcripts that were more abundant indcl3mutant strains than in wild-type cells were not due to sRNA-targeted RNA degradation but to direct DCL3 cleavage of miRNA and siRNA precursor structures embedded in the untranslated (and translated) regions of the mRNAs. Our analysis reveals that the miRNA-mediated RNA silencing inC. reinhardtiidiffers from that of higher plants and informs about the evolution and function of this pathway in eukaryotes. PMID:26968199

  14. Homology-based annotation of non-coding RNAs in the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santana Clara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomes are trematode parasites of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are considered the most important of the human helminth parasites in terms of morbidity and mortality. Draft genome sequences are now available for Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Non-coding RNA (ncRNA plays a crucial role in gene expression regulation, cellular function and defense, homeostasis, and pathogenesis. The genome-wide annotation of ncRNAs is a non-trivial task unless well-annotated genomes of closely related species are already available. Results A homology search for structured ncRNA in the genome of S. mansoni resulted in 23 types of ncRNAs with conserved primary and secondary structure. Among these, we identified rRNA, snRNA, SL RNA, SRP, tRNAs and RNase P, and also possibly MRP and 7SK RNAs. In addition, we confirmed five miRNAs that have recently been reported in S. japonicum and found two additional homologs of known miRNAs. The tRNA complement of S. mansoni is comparable to that of the free-living planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, although for some amino acids differences of more than a factor of two are observed: Leu, Ser, and His are overrepresented, while Cys, Meth, and Ile are underrepresented in S. mansoni. On the other hand, the number of tRNAs in the genome of S. japonicum is reduced by more than a factor of four. Both schistosomes have a complete set of minor spliceosomal snRNAs. Several ncRNAs that are expected to exist in the S. mansoni genome were not found, among them the telomerase RNA, vault RNAs, and Y RNAs. Conclusion The ncRNA sequences and structures presented here represent the most complete dataset of ncRNA from any lophotrochozoan reported so far. This data set provides an important reference for further analysis of the genomes of schistosomes and indeed eukaryotic genomes at large.

  15. In-depth sequencing of the siRNAs associated with peach latent mosaic viroid infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perreault Jean-Pierre

    2010-02-01

    -represented, although these regions are not necessarily forming sufficiently long double-stranded structures to satisfy Dicer-like criteria for substrate specificity. Importantly, this large library of siRNAs gave several hints as to the components of the involved silencing machinery.

  16. Unoccupied electronic structure and signatures of topological Fermi arcs in the Weyl semimetal candidate Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$

    OpenAIRE

    Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Ishida, Yukiaki; Pan, Xingchen; Yu, Peng; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Guoqing; Chang, Tay-Rong; WU, YUN; Bian, Guang; Zheng, Hao; Huang, Shin-Ming; Lee, Chi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Weyl semimetals have sparked intense research interest, but experimental work has been limited to the TaAs family of compounds. Recently, a number of theoretical works have predicted that compounds in the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series are Weyl semimetals. Such proposals are particularly exciting because Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ has a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure well-suited to many transport experiments, while WTe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ have already been the subject of numerous proposals for...

  17. MicroRNAs located in the Hox gene clusters are implicated in huntington's disease pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hoss

    2014-02-01

    biomarkers for human diseases and given their relationship to disease expression, these miRNAs are biomarker candidates in HD.

  18. Abundant and dynamically expressed miRNAs, piRNAs, and other small RNAs in the vertebrate Xenopus tropicalis

    OpenAIRE

    Armisen, Javier; Gilchrist, Michael J; Wilczynska, Anna; Standart, Nancy; Miska, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. Here we used high-throughput sequencing to determine small RNA populations in the germline and soma of the African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis. We identified a number of miRNAs that were expressed in the female germline. miRNA expression profiling revealed that miR-202-5p is an oocyte-enriched miRNA. We identified two novel miRNAs that were expressed in the soma. In addition, we sequenced large num...

  19. MicroRNAs in Rice Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrich, Patricia; San Segundo, Blanca

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short regulatory non-coding RNAs that guide gene silencing in most eukaryotes. They regulate gene expression by triggering sequence-specific cleavage or translational repression of target transcripts. Plant miRNAs are known to play important roles in a wide range of developmental processes. Increasing evidence also supports that the modulation of miRNA levels plays an important role in reprogramming plant responses to abiotic stress (drought, cold, salinity and nutrient deficiency) and biotic stress (antibacterial resistance). Most of these studies were carried out in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. During the last years, the adoption of high-throughput sequencing technologies has significantly contributed to uncover multiple miRNAs while allowing miRNA profiling in plants. However, although a plethora of rice miRNAs have been shown to be regulated by pathogen infection, the biological function remains largely unknown for most of them. In this review, we summarize our current understanding on the contribution of miRNAs to rice immunity and discuss their potential applications in rice biotechnology. A better understanding of the miRNA species controlling rice immunity may lead to practical biotechnological applications leading to the development of appropriate strategies for rice protection. PMID:26897721

  20. MicroRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, Eunsung; Mouradian, M Maral

    2010-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. During the last decade, considerable advances have been made in our understanding the biogenesis of miRNAs, the molecular mechanisms by which they regulate gene expression and their functional role in various physiological situations. miRNAs are abundant in the brain where they have crucial roles in development and synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence from postmortem brain analyses and animal model studies has begun to suggest that miRNA dysfunction contributes to neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we discuss several examples of investigations demonstrating the role of miRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders. As the expression of disease-causing genes is regulated by certain miRNA(s), changes in these miRNAs could lead to the accumulation of disease-causing proteins, and subsequently to neuronal dysfunction and death. Detailed understanding of these mechanisms can provide potential new therapeutic approaches to slow down or halt the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. microRNAs and ceRNAs: RNA networks in pathogenesis of cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangqian Su; Jiadi Xing; Zaozao Wang; Lei Chen; Ming Cui; Beihai Jiang

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous,single-stranded non-coding RNAs of 20-23 nucleotides in length,functioning as negative regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level.The dysregulation of miRNAs has been demonstrated to play critical roles in tumorigenesis,either through inhibiting tumor suppressor genes or activating oncogenes inappropriately.Besides their promising clinical applications in cancer diagnosis and treatment,recent studies have uncovered that miRNAs could act as a regulatory language,through which messenger RNAs,transcribed pseudogenes,and long noncoding RNAs crosstalk with each other and form a novel regulatory network.RNA transcripts involved in this network have been termed as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs),since they influence each other's level by competing for the same pool of miRNAs through miRNA response elements (MREs) on their target transcripts.The discovery of miRNA-ceRNA network not only provides the possibility of an additional level of post-transcriptional regulation,but also dictates a reassessment of the existing regulatory pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression.

  2. Classification of ncRNAs using position and size information in deep sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Florian; Zimmer, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play important roles in various cellular functions in all clades of life. With next-generation sequencing techniques, it has become possible to study ncRNAs in a high-throughput manner and by using specialized algorithms ncRNA classes such as miRNAs can be detected in deep sequencing data. Typically, such methods are targeted to a certain class of ncRNA. Many methods rely on RNA secondary structure prediction, which is not always accurate and not all ncRNA classes are characterized by a common secondary structure. Unbiased classification methods for ncRNAs could be important to improve accuracy and to detect new ncRNA classes in sequencing data. Results: Here, we present a scoring system called ALPS (alignment of pattern matrices score) that only uses primary information from a deep sequencing experiment, i.e. the relative positions and lengths of reads, to classify ncRNAs. ALPS makes no further assumptions, e.g. about common structural properties in the ncRNA class and is nevertheless able to identify ncRNA classes with high accuracy. Since ALPS is not designed to recognize a certain class of ncRNA, it can be used to detect novel ncRNA classes, as long as these unknown ncRNAs have a characteristic pattern of deep sequencing read lengths and positions. We evaluate our scoring system on publicly available deep sequencing data and show that it is able to classify known ncRNAs with high sensitivity and specificity. Availability: Calculated pattern matrices of the datasets hESC and EB are available at the project web site http://www.bio.ifi.lmu.de/ALPS. An implementation of the described method is available upon request from the authors. Contact: florian.erhard@bio.ifi.lmu.de PMID:20823303

  3. Comparative profiling of microRNAs in male and female adults of Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min-Jun; Fu, Jing-Hua; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Lin, Rui-Qing; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2013-03-01

    Ascaris nematodes, which cause ascariasis in humans and pigs, are among the most important nematodes from both health and economic perspectives. microRNA (miRNA) is now recognized as key regulator of gene expression at posttranscription level. The public availability of the genome and transcripts of Ascaris suum provides powerful resources for the research of miRNA profiles of the parasite. Therefore, we investigated and compared the miRNA profiles of male and female adult A. suum using Solexa deep sequencing combined with bioinformatic analysis and stem-loop reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Deep sequencing of small RNAs yielded 11.71 and 11.72 million raw reads from male and female adults of A. suum, respectively. Analysis showed that the noncoding RNA of the two genders, including tRNA, rRNA, snRNA, and snoRNA, were similar. By mapping to the A. suum genome, we obtained 494 and 505 miRNA candidates from the female and male parasite, respectively, and 87 and 82 of miRNA candidates were consistent with A. suum miRNAs deposited in the miRBase database. Among the miRNA candidates, 154 were shared by the two genders, and 340 and 351 were female and male specific with their target numbers ranged from one to thousands, respectively. Functional prediction revealed a set of elongation factors, heat shock proteins, and growth factors from the targets of gender-specific miRNAs, which were essential for the development of the parasite. Moreover, major sperm protein and nematode sperm cell motility protein were found in targets of the male-specific miRNAs. Ovarian message protein was found in targets of the female-specific miRNAs. Enrichment analysis revealed significant differences among Gene Ontology terms of miRNA targets of the two genders, such as electron carrier and biological adhesion process. The regulating functions of gender-specific miRNAs was therefore not only related to the fundamental functions of cells but also were essential to the germ

  4. Solution structure of a Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1/MSP 1 chimeric protein vaccine candidate (PfCP-2.9 for malaria

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    Jin Changwen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Plasmodium falciparum chimeric protein PfCP-2.9 is a promising asexual-stage malaria vaccine evaluated in clinical trials. This chimeric protein consists of two cysteine-rich domains: domain III of the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1 [III] and the C-terminal region of the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1-19. It has been reported that the fusion of these two antigens enhanced their immunogenicity and antibody-mediated inhibition of parasite growth in vitro. Methods The 15N-labeled and 13C/15N-labeled PfCP-2.9 was produced in Pichia pastoris for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR structure analysis. The chemical shift assignments of PfCP-2.9 were compared with those previously reported for the individual domains (i.e., PfAMA-1(III or PfMSP 1-19. The two-dimensional spectra and transverse relaxation rates (R2 of the PfMSP1-19 alone were compared with that of the PfCP-2.9. Results Confident backbone assignments were obtained for 122 out of 241 residues of PfCP-2.9. The assigned residues in PfCP-2.9 were very similar to those previously reported for the individual domains. The conformation of the PfMSP1-19 in different constructs is essentially the same. Comparison of transverse relaxation rates (R2 strongly suggests no weak interaction between the domains. Conclusions These data indicate that the fusion of AMA-1(III and MSP1-19 as chimeric protein did not change their structures, supporting the use of the chimeric protein as a potential malaria vaccine.

  5. Possible involvement of miRNAs in tropism of Parvovirus B19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarlou, Azadeh; AkhavanRahnama, Mahshid; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud; Arefian, Ehsan; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) is one of the most important pathogens that targets erythroid lineage. Many factors were mentioned for restriction to erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Previous studies showed that in non-permissive cells VP1 and VP2 (structural proteins) mRNAs were detected but could not translate to proteins. A bioinformatics study showed that this inhibition might be due to specific microRNAs (miRNAs) present in non-permissive cells but not in permissive EPCs. To confirm the hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of miRNAs on VP expression. CD34(+) HSCs were separated from cord blood. Then, CD34(+) cells were treated with differentiation medium to obtain CD36(+) EPCs. To evaluate the effect of miRNAs on VP expression in MCF7 and HEK-293 cell lines (non-permissive cells) and CD36(+) EPCs, dual luciferase assay was performed in presence of shRNAs against Dicer and Drosha to disrupt miRNA biogenesis. QRT-PCR was performed to check down-regulation of Dicer and Drosha after transfection. All measurements were done in triplicate. Data means were compared using one-way ANOVAs. MicroRNA prediction was done by the online microRNA prediction tools. No significant difference was shown in luciferase activity of CD36(+) EPCs after co-transfection with shRNAs, while it was significant in non-permissive cells. Our study revealed that miRNAs may be involved in inhibition of VP expression in non-permissive cells, although further studies are required to demonstrate which miRNAs exactly are involved in regulation of PVB19 replication. PMID:26878856

  6. Identification of three novel noncoding RNAs from Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hualiang; ZHOU Hui; XIAO Zhendong; ZENG Xianfen; CHEN Junyu; ZHENG Tao; QU Lianghu

    2006-01-01

    Three novel small noncoding RNAs were identified from the conserved intronic regions of D. melanogaster by using comparative genomics method and molecular biology approach. One is a novel snoRNA in a combinated way, which displays structural features typical of C/D box snoRNA family and possesses a 10-nt-long rRNA antisense element for guiding the 2′-O-methylation of the D. melanogaster 28S rRNA at C2673. The other two are miRNAs whose predicted precursors adopt a stemloop structure characteristic of known miRNA. The two miRNAs genes appear to have ubiquitous expression profiles with ~23-nt RNA transcripts detected by Northern blotting. Our study revealed 396multi-species intronic conserved sequences (MCIS)that nested in the introns with a length from 100 to 500 bp. In addition to small RNA coding, the MCIS might function as cis-acting elements involved in gene transcription or post-transcriptional processing.

  7. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  8. [Progress of research on microRNAs of parasites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing-Xin; Zhou, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Zhong-Xi; Fan, Hong-Jie; Yao, Huo-Chun

    2013-04-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small molecules of non-coding RNA, a class size of about 21-25 nt widespread in eukaryotes, resulting from single-stranded RNA precursors with the size of 70-90 bases of a hairpin structure generated after dicer enzyme processing. They play an important role in eukaryotic gene regulation, widely involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, development, metabolism, apoptosis and other physiological activities. miRNA extensively involved in the physiological and metabolic processes of the parasite development process, but the key miRNA relevant to parasite invasion of a host still lacks reports. This paper summarizes the miRNA analytical methods and the progress on its researches in parasitology.

  9. Identification of intermediate-size non-coding RNAs involved in the UV-induced DNA damage response in C. elegans.

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    Aqian Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A network of DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms functions coordinately to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. The Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER pathway is known to function in the response to UV-induced DNA damage. Although numbers of coding genes and miRNAs have been identified and reported to participate in UV-induced DNA damage response (UV-DDR, the precise role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in UV-DDR remains largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq to discover intermediate-size (70-500 nt ncRNAs (is-ncRNAs in C. elegans, using the strains of L4 larvae of wild-type (N2, UV-irradiated (N2/UV100 and NER-deficient mutant (xpa-1, and 450 novel non-coding transcripts were initially identified. A customized microarray assay was then applied to examine the expression profiles of both novel transcripts and known is-ncRNAs, and 57 UV-DDR-related is-ncRNA candidates showed expression variations at different levels between UV irradiated strains and non- irradiated strains. The top ranked is-ncRNA candidates with expression differences were further validated by qRT-PCR analysis, of them, 8 novel is-ncRNAs were significantly up-regulated after UV irradiation. Knockdown of two novel is-ncRNAs, ncRNA317 and ncRNA415, by RNA interference, resulted in higher UV sensitivity and significantly decreased expression of NER-related genes in C. elegans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The discovery of above two novel is-ncRNAs in this study indicated the functional roles of is-ncRNAs in the regulation of UV-DDR network, and aided our understanding of the significance of ncRNA involvement in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

  10. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs.

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    Mingyu Yang

    Full Text Available The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is one of the world's most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity.

  11. Genome Wide Identification and Functional Prediction of Long Non-Coding RNAs Responsive to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Infection in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Raj Kumar; Megha, Swati; Basu, Urmila; Rahman, Muhammad H.; Kav, Nat N. V.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum affects canola production worldwide. Emerging evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of gene expression in plants, in response to both abiotic and biotic stress. So far, identification of lncRNAs has been limited to a few model plant species, and their roles in mediating responses to biotic stresses are yet to be characterized in Brassica napus. The present study reports the identification of novel lncRNAs responsive to S. sclerotiorum infection in B. napus at two time points after infection (24 hpi and 48 hpi) using a stranded RNA-Sequencing technique and a detection pipeline for lncRNAs. Of the total 3,181 lncRNA candidates, 2,821 lncRNAs were intergenic, 111 were natural antisense transcripts, 76 possessed exonic overlap with the reference coding transcripts while the remaining 173 represented novel lnc- isoforms. Forty one lncRNAs were identified as the precursors for microRNAs (miRNAs) including miR156, miR169 and miR394, with significant roles in mediating plant responses to fungal phytopathogens. A total of 931 differentially expressed lncRNAs were identified in response to S. sclerotiorum infection and the expression of 12 such lncRNAs was further validated using qRT-PCR. B. napus antisense lncRNA, TCONS_00000966, having 90% overlap with a plant defensin gene, showed significant induction at both infection stages, suggesting its involvement in the transcriptional regulation of defense responsive genes under S. sclerotiorum infection. Additionally, nine lncRNAs showed overlap with cis-regulatory regions of differentially expressed genes of B. napus. Quantitative RT-PCR verification of a set of S. sclerotiorum responsive sense/antisense transcript pairs revealed contrasting expression patterns, supporting the hypothesis that steric clashes of transcriptional machinery may lead to inactivation of sense promoter. Our findings highlight the potential

  12. MicroRNAs in mantle cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Simon; Geisler, Christian; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. New treatment modalities, including intensive induction regimens with immunochemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, have improved survival. However, many patients still relapse, and there is a need...... for novel therapeutic strategies. Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in MCL. Comparisons of tumor samples from patients with MCL with their normal counterparts (naive B-cells) have identified differentially expressed miRNAs with roles in cellular growth...

  13. MicroRNAs in the Hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meister, Björn; Herzer, Silke; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules are abundantly expressed in tissue-specific and regional patterns and have been suggested as potential biomarkers, disease modulators and drug targets. The central nervous system is a prominent site of miRNA expression. Within the brain, several miRNAs are expressed and/or enriched in the region...... of the hypothalamus and miRNAs have recently been shown to be important regulators of hypothalamic control functions. The aim of this review is to summarize some of the current knowledge regarding the expression and role of miRNAs in the hypothalamus....

  14. Highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions as promising optical clock candidates for probing variations of the fine-structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    Transitions among the first three low-lying states in the highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions are found to be strongly forbidden with wavelengths in the optical regime. By determining their energy levels, lifetimes, and other spectroscopic properties that are decisive quantities for estimating dominant systematics due to stray electromagnetic interactions in an experiment, we demonstrate that it can be possible to measure frequencies of the lowest forbidden transitions below a 10-19 precision level in the above ions, and hence, they seem to be suitable for frequency standards. We employ a sophisticated relativistic coupled cluster method to carry out calculations of these properties of the above states involving 4 f - and 5 s -core orbitals. We also found, by estimating their relativistic sensitivity coefficients, that these clock transitions can be highly sensitive to the tiny drift in the fine-structure constant αe. Consequently, a clock based on one of these ions, particularly Pt+17, could be used for corroborating the hypothesis of temporal and spatial variation in αe.

  15. Comparative Analysis of MicroRNAs between Sporophyte and Gametophyte of Porphyra yezoensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linwen He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyra yezoensis Ueda is an intertidal marine red algae that has received increasing attention as a model organism owing to its important role in biological research and the agronomic industry. The two generations of Porphyra yezoensis, the sporophyte and the gametophyte, have the same genome but show great differences in many aspects, including structural features, habitat, and gene expression. To identify miRNAs and their probable roles in P. yezoensis development, we constructed and sequenced libraries of small RNA from P. yezoensis sporophytes and gametophytes. The sequencing data were analyzed, and 14 miRNAs were identified, with only one common to these two samples. Our results show that P. yezoensis has a complex small RNA processing system containing novel miRNAs that have no identifiable homolog in other organisms. These miRNAs might have important regulatory roles in development of the different generations of P. yezoensis.

  16. The Menu of Features that Define Primary MicroRNAs and Enable De Novo Design of MicroRNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenwen; Bartel, David P

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs processed from stem-loop regions of primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs), with the choice of stem loops for initial processing largely determining what becomes a miRNA. To identify sequence and structural features influencing this choice, we determined cleavage efficiencies of >50,000 variants of three human pri-miRNAs, focusing on the regions intractable to previous high-throughput analyses. Our analyses revealed a mismatched motif in the basal stem region, a preference for maintaining or improving base pairing throughout the remainder of the stem, and a narrow stem-length preference of 35 ± 1 base pairs. Incorporating these features with previously identified features, including three primary-sequence motifs, yielded a unifying model defining mammalian pri-miRNAs in which motifs help orient processing and increase efficiency, with the presence of more motifs compensating for structural defects. This model enables generation of artificial pri-miRNAs, designed de novo, without reference to any natural sequence yet processed more efficiently than natural pri-miRNAs. PMID:26412306

  17. MicroRNAs in skeletal muscle and their regulation with exercise, ageing and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn eZacharewicz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle makes up approximately 40% of the total body mass, providing structural support and enabling the body to maintain posture, to control motor movements and to store energy. It therefore plays a vital role in whole body metabolism. Skeletal muscle displays remarkable plasticity and is able to alter its size, structure and function in response to various stimuli; an essential quality for healthy living across the lifespan. Exercise is an important stimulator of extracellular and intracellular stress signals that promote positive adaptations in skeletal muscle. These adaptations are controlled by changes in gene transcription and protein translation, with many of these molecules identified as potential therapeutic targets to pharmacologically improve muscle quality in patient groups too ill to exercise. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are recently identified regulators of numerous gene networks and pathways and mainly exert their effect by binding to their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs, resulting in mRNA degradation or preventing protein translation. The role of exercise as a regulatory stimulus of skeletal muscle miRNAs is now starting to be investigated. This review highlights our current understanding of the regulation of skeletal muscle miRNAs with exercise and disease as well as how they may control skeletal muscle health.

  18. deepBase v2.0: identification, expression, evolution and function of small RNAs, LncRNAs and circular RNAs from deep-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Sun, Wen-Ju; Liu, Shun; Wang, Ze-Lin; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (e.g. miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (e.g. lincRNAs and circRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of various cellular processes. However, only a very small fraction of these enigmatic RNAs have been well functionally characterized. In this study, we describe deepBase v2.0 (http://biocenter.sysu.edu.cn/deepBase/), an updated platform, to decode evolution, expression patterns and functions of diverse ncRNAs across 19 species. deepBase v2.0 has been updated to provide the most comprehensive collection of ncRNA-derived small RNAs generated from 588 sRNA-Seq datasets. Moreover, we developed a pipeline named lncSeeker to identify 176 680 high-confidence lncRNAs from 14 species. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of various ncRNAs were profiled. We identified approximately 24 280 primate-specific, 5193 rodent-specific lncRNAs, and 55 highly conserved lncRNA orthologs between human and zebrafish. We annotated 14 867 human circRNAs, 1260 of which are orthologous to mouse circRNAs. By combining expression profiles and functional genomic annotations, we developed lncFunction web-server to predict the function of lncRNAs based on protein-lncRNA co-expression networks. This study is expected to provide considerable resources to facilitate future experimental studies and to uncover ncRNA functions. PMID:26590255

  19. deepBase v2.0: identification, expression, evolution and function of small RNAs, LncRNAs and circular RNAs from deep-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Sun, Wen-Ju; Liu, Shun; Wang, Ze-Lin; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (e.g. miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (e.g. lincRNAs and circRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of various cellular processes. However, only a very small fraction of these enigmatic RNAs have been well functionally characterized. In this study, we describe deepBase v2.0 (http://biocenter.sysu.edu.cn/deepBase/), an updated platform, to decode evolution, expression patterns and functions of diverse ncRNAs across 19 species. deepBase v2.0 has been updated to provide the most comprehensive collection of ncRNA-derived small RNAs generated from 588 sRNA-Seq datasets. Moreover, we developed a pipeline named lncSeeker to identify 176 680 high-confidence lncRNAs from 14 species. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of various ncRNAs were profiled. We identified approximately 24 280 primate-specific, 5193 rodent-specific lncRNAs, and 55 highly conserved lncRNA orthologs between human and zebrafish. We annotated 14 867 human circRNAs, 1260 of which are orthologous to mouse circRNAs. By combining expression profiles and functional genomic annotations, we developed lncFunction web-server to predict the function of lncRNAs based on protein-lncRNA co-expression networks. This study is expected to provide considerable resources to facilitate future experimental studies and to uncover ncRNA functions.

  20. Identification of microprocessor-dependent cancer cells allows screening for growth-sustaining micro-RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, D; Chvalova, K; Rousselet, G

    2012-04-19

    Micro-RNAs are deregulated in cancer cells, and some are either tumor suppressive or oncogenic. In addition, a link has been established between decreased expression of micro-RNAs and transformation, and several proteins of the RNA interference pathway have been shown to be haploinsufficient tumor suppressors. Oncogenic micro-RNAs (oncomiRs) could represent new therapeutic targets, and their identification is therefore crucial. However, structural and functional redundancy between micro-RNAs hampers approaches relying on individual micro-RNA inhibition. We reasoned that in cancer cells that depend on oncomiRs, impairing the micro-RNA pathway could lead to growth perturbation rather than increased tumorigenesis. Identifying such cells could allow functional analyses of individual micro-RNAs by complementation of the phenotypes observed upon global micro-RNA inhibition. Therefore, we developed episomal vectors coding for small hairpin RNAs targeting either Drosha or DGCR8, the two components of the microprocessor, the nuclear micro-RNA maturation complex. We identified cancer cell lines in which both vectors induced colony growth arrest. We then screened for individual micro-RNAs complementing this growth arrest, and identified miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20a and miR-27b as major growth-sustaining micro-RNAs. However, the effect of miR-19a and miR-19b was only transient. In addition, embryonic stem cell-derived micro-RNAs with miR-20a seeds were much less efficient than miR-20a in sustaining cancer cell growth, a finding that contrasted with results obtained in stem cells. Finally, we showed that the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10, a shared target of miR-19 and miR-20, was functionally involved in the growth arrest induced by microprocessor inhibition. We conclude that our approach allowed to identify microprocessor-dependent cancer cells, which could be used to screen for growth-sustaining micro-RNAs. This complementation screen

  1. Genome-wide identification of Schistosoma japonicum microRNAs using a deep-sequencing approach.

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    Jian Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent and serious parasitic diseases worldwide. Schistosoma japonicum is one of important pathogens of this disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of non-coding RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expression and protein translation in animals. Genome-wide identification of miRNAs in a given organism is a critical step to facilitating our understanding of genome organization, genome biology, evolution, and posttranscriptional regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two small RNA libraries prepared from different stages of the life cycle of S. japonicum, immature schistosomula and mature pairing adults, through a deep DNA sequencing approach, which yielded approximately 12 million high-quality short sequence reads containing a total of approximately 2 million non-redundant tags. Based on a bioinformatics pipeline, we identified 176 new S. japonicum miRNAs, of which some exhibited a differential pattern of expression between the two stages. Although 21 S. japonicum miRNAs are orthologs of known miRNAs within the metazoans, some nucleotides at many positions of Schistosoma miRNAs, such as miR-8, let-7, miR-10, miR-31, miR-92, miR-124, and miR-125, are indeed significantly distinct from other bilaterian orthologs. In addition, both miR-71 and some miR-2 family members in tandem are found to be clustered in a reversal direction model on two genomic loci, and two pairs of novel S. japonicum miRNAs were derived from sense and antisense DNA strands at the same genomic loci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The collection of S. japonicum miRNAs could be used as a new platform to study the genomic structure, gene regulation and networks, evolutionary processes, development, and host-parasite interactions. Some S. japonicum miRNAs and their clusters could represent the ancestral forms of the conserved orthologues and a model for the genesis of novel miRNAs.

  2. Mechanisms of MicroRNAs in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Andreas; Weber, Christian

    2016-05-23

    The maladaptation of endothelial cells to disturbed flow at arterial bifurcations increases permeability for lipoproteins. Additional injury by chemically modified lipoproteins disrupts the continuous repair of maladapted endothelial cells and triggers intimal macrophage accumulation. Macrophages remove modified lipoproteins from the extracellular space until the cholesterol overload leads to macrophage death and insufficient efferocytosis. This macrophage failure promotes the progression to advanced lesions by formation of a lipid-rich necrotic core, which may rupture and cause myocardial infarction and stroke. In this article, we summarize the fundamental roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of endothelial maladaptation and macrophage failure during atherosclerosis. We describe how miRNAs coordinate the mutual interaction between chronic endothelial repair and endothelial senescence and mechanistically link the regulation of macrophage cholesterol homeostasis with defective efferocytosis. Lastly, we discuss how miRNAs may challenge and extend current theories about atherosclerosis. PMID:27193456

  3. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  4. MicroRNAs in cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Carlsen, Anting L; Christiansen, Kasper M;

    2014-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic cardiac condition associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization, primarily a result of perturbations in cardiac ion channels, which predisposes individuals to life-threatening arrhythmias. Using DNA screening and sequencing methods, over 700 different...... LQTS-causing mutations have been identified in 13 genes worldwide. Despite this, the genetic cause of 30-50% of LQTS is presently unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼ 22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding complementary sequences within...... cardiovascular diseases. MiR-1 and MiR-133A are the most abundant miRNAs in the heart and have both been reported to regulate cardiac ion channels. We hypothesized that, as a consequence of their role in regulating cardiac ion channels, genetic variation in the genes which encode MiR-1 and MiR-133A might explain...

  5. 线虫中影响化学传感器结构与功能的遗传位点及其可能对应的microRNA的生物信息学分析%Computational analysis of genetic loci required for amphid structure and functions and their possibly corresponding microRNAs in C. elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡亚欧; 孙阳; 叶波平; 王大勇

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the important roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating amphid structure and function,we performed a computational analysis for the genetic loci required for the sensory perception and their possibly Corresponding miRNAs in C. elegans. Methods Total 55 genetic loci required for the amphid structure and function were selected. Sequence alignment was combined with E value evaluation to investigate and identify the possible corresponding miRNAs. Results Total 30 genes among the 55 genetic loci selected have their possible corresponding regulatory miRNA(s), and identified genes participate in the regulation of almost all aspects of amphid structure and function. In addition, our data suggest that both the amphid structure and the amphid functions might be regulated by a series of network signaling pathways. Moreover, the distribution of miRNAs along the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of these 30 genes exhibits different patterns. Conclusion We present the possible miRNA-mediated signaling pathways involved in the regulation of chemosensation and thermosensation by controlling the corresponding sensory neuron and interneuron functions. Our work will be useful for better understanding of the miRNA-mediated control of the chemotaxis and thermotaxis in C. elegans.%目的 为了系统评价microRNA(miRNA)在调控化学传感器结构和功能方面的重要作用,我们进行了线虫中有关影响化学传感器结构与功能的遗传位点以及和其可能对应的miRNA的生物信息学分析.方法 我们选择了55个与化学传感器结构与功能相关的遗传位点,并且进一步通过评价序列比对后的E值等手段来分析和确认其可能对应的miRNA.结果 在55个遗传位点中,我们发现其中30个遗传位点存在与其可能对应的miRNA.这些所鉴定的基因在功能上几乎涵盖了化学传感器结构和功能调控的诸多方面.而且,我们的数据还表明化学传感器结构和功能可能受到一系

  6. Reference genes for real-time PCR quantification of microRNAs and messenger RNAs in rat models of hepatotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María N Lardizábal

    Full Text Available Hepatotoxicity is associated with major changes in liver gene expression induced by xenobiotic exposure. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is critical for its clinical diagnosis and treatment. MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression that control mRNA stability and translation, during normal development and pathology. The canonical technique to measure gene transcript levels is Real-Time qPCR, which has been successfully modified to determine the levels of microRNAs as well. However, in order to obtain accurate data in a multi-step method like RT-qPCR, the normalization with endogenous, stably expressed reference genes is mandatory. Since the expression stability of candidate reference genes varies greatly depending on experimental factors, the aim of our study was to identify a combination of genes for optimal normalization of microRNA and mRNA qPCR expression data in experimental models of acute hepatotoxicity. Rats were treated with four traditional hepatotoxins: acetaminophen, carbon tetrachloride, D-galactosamine and thioacetamide, and the liver expression levels of two groups of candidate reference genes, one for microRNA and the other for mRNA normalization, were determined by RT-qPCR in compliance with the MIQE guidelines. In the present study, we report that traditional reference genes such as U6 spliceosomal RNA, Beta Actin and Glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase altered their expression in response to classic hepatotoxins and therefore cannot be used as reference genes in hepatotoxicity studies. Stability rankings of candidate reference genes, considering only those that did not alter their expression, were determined using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software packages. The potential candidates whose measurements were stable were further tested in different combinations to find the optimal set of reference genes that accurately determine mRNA and miRNA levels. Finally, the combination of MicroRNA-16/5S Ribosomal RNA and

  7. miRNAs:small changes,widespread effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam EV Linsen; Bastiaan BJ Tops; Edwin Cuppen

    2008-01-01

    @@ MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endog enously encoded small RNA molecules that can bind to cognate messenger RNAs,thereby impairing protein expression,miRNAs are transcribed from the genome as long precursor molecules that are processed via multiple steps into their mature form of~22 nt.

  8. Circadian changes in long noncoding RNAs in the pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coon, Steven L; Munson, Peter J; Cherukuri, Praveen F;

    2012-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a broad range of biological roles, including regulation of expression of genes and chromosomes. Here, we present evidence that lncRNAs are involved in vertebrate circadian biology. Differential night/day expression of 112 lncRNAs (0.3 to >50 kb) occurs in the ra...

  9. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs To and From Plants

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    Lu eHan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs. sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing (HIGS system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs.

  10. New drug candidates in tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begüm Evranos Aksöz

    2014-12-01

    makes them quit the treatment. From these problems emerges the need for development of effective new drugs, with smaller duration of therapy, less side effects and without the problem of resistance. After a long period such as 40 years, a new drug molecule bedaquiline was approved in December 2012 by FDA while the drug was in phase II research. Bedaquiline will be used in multidrug resistant tuberculosis therapy. When the chemical structures of bedaquilline and other candidate drugs were examined, the structures such as diarylquinoline, oxazolidinone, nitroimidazole, ethylenediamine drew attention. These common structures will be directive in designing new molecules. In this review, bedaquiline and other candidate drug molecules such as sutezolide, linezolide, PA-824, delamanide, rifapentine, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, BTZ-043, TBA-354, CPZEN-45, DC-159a, Q201, SQ-609, SQ-641 were mentioned.

  11. MicroRNAs Form Triplexes with Double Stranded DNA at Sequence-Specific Binding Sites; a Eukaryotic Mechanism via which microRNAs Could Directly Alter Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugh, Steven W; Coss, David R; Bao, Ju; Laudermilk, Lucas T; Grace, Christy R; Ferreira, Antonio M; Waddell, M Brett; Ridout, Granger; Naeve, Deanna; Leuze, Michael; LoCascio, Philip F; Panetta, John C; Wilkinson, Mark R; Pui, Ching-Hon; Naeve, Clayton W; Uberbacher, Edward C; Bonten, Erik J; Evans, William E

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs are important regulators of gene expression, acting primarily by binding to sequence-specific locations on already transcribed messenger RNAs (mRNA) and typically down-regulating their stability or translation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs may also play a role in up-regulating mRNA transcription levels, although a definitive mechanism has not been established. Double-helical DNA is capable of forming triple-helical structures through Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen interactions in the major groove of the duplex, and we show physical evidence (i.e., NMR, FRET, SPR) that purine or pyrimidine-rich microRNAs of appropriate length and sequence form triple-helical structures with purine-rich sequences of duplex DNA, and identify microRNA sequences that favor triplex formation. We developed an algorithm (Trident) to search genome-wide for potential triplex-forming sites and show that several mammalian and non-mammalian genomes are enriched for strong microRNA triplex binding sites. We show that those genes containing sequences favoring microRNA triplex formation are markedly enriched (3.3 fold, ptriplex binding sequences. This work has thus revealed a new mechanism by which microRNAs could interact with gene promoter regions to modify gene transcription. PMID:26844769

  12. Utility of MicroRNAs and siRNAs in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sacnite del Mar Díaz-González; Jessica Deas; Odelia Benítez-Boijseauneau; Claudia Gómez-Cerón; Victor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales; Mauricio Rodríguez-Dorantes; Carlos Pérez-Plasencia; Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs and siRNAs belong to a family of small noncoding RNAs which bind through partial sequence complementarity to 3′-UTR regions of mRNA from target genes, resulting in the regulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs have become an attractive target for genetic and pharmacological modulation due to the critical function of their target proteins in several signaling pathways, and their expression profiles have been found to be altered in various cancers. A promising technology platform for s...

  13. MicroRNAs in Ewing Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    PaulJedlicka; LayneDylla

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged recently as important regulators of gene expression in the cell. Frequently dysregulated in cancer, microRNAs have shed new light on molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis, and have generated substantial interest as biomarkers, and novel therapeutic agents and targets. Recently, a number of studies have examined microRNA biology in Ewing Sarcoma. Findings indicate that alterations in microRNA expression in Ewing Sarcoma are widespread, involve both EWS/Ets oncogenic fusion...

  14. Accumulation of long-lived mRNAs associated with germination in embryos during seed development of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Naoto; Ono, Hanako; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki

    2015-07-01

    Mature dry seeds contain translatable mRNAs called long-lived mRNAs. Early studies have shown that protein synthesis during the initial phase of seed germination occurs from long-lived mRNAs, without de novo transcription. However, the gene expression systems that generate long-lived mRNAs in seeds are not well understood. To examine the accumulation of long-lived mRNAs in developing rice embryos, germination tests using the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (Act D) were performed with the Japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Although over 70% of embryos at 10 days after flowering (DAF) germinated in the absence of the inhibitor, germination was remarkably impaired in embryos treated with Act D. In contrast, more than 70% of embryos at 20, 25, 30 and 40 DAF germinated in the presence of Act D. The same results were obtained when another cultivar, Koshihikari, was used, indicating that the long-lived mRNAs required for germination predominantly accumulate in embryos between 10 and 20 DAF during seed development. RNA-Seq identified 529 long-lived mRNA candidates, encoding proteins such as ABA, calcium ion and phospholipid signalling-related proteins, and HSP DNA J, increased from 10 to 20 DAF and were highly abundant in 40 DAF embryos of Nipponbare and Koshihikari. We also revealed that these long-lived mRNA candidates are clearly up-regulated in 10 DAF germinating embryos after imbibition, suggesting that the accumulation of these mRNAs in embryos is indispensable for the induction of germination. The findings presented here may facilitate in overcoming irregular seed germination or producing more vigorous seedlings. PMID:25941326

  15. Accumulation of long-lived mRNAs associated with germination in embryos during seed development of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Naoto; Ono, Hanako; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki

    2015-07-01

    Mature dry seeds contain translatable mRNAs called long-lived mRNAs. Early studies have shown that protein synthesis during the initial phase of seed germination occurs from long-lived mRNAs, without de novo transcription. However, the gene expression systems that generate long-lived mRNAs in seeds are not well understood. To examine the accumulation of long-lived mRNAs in developing rice embryos, germination tests using the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (Act D) were performed with the Japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Although over 70% of embryos at 10 days after flowering (DAF) germinated in the absence of the inhibitor, germination was remarkably impaired in embryos treated with Act D. In contrast, more than 70% of embryos at 20, 25, 30 and 40 DAF germinated in the presence of Act D. The same results were obtained when another cultivar, Koshihikari, was used, indicating that the long-lived mRNAs required for germination predominantly accumulate in embryos between 10 and 20 DAF during seed development. RNA-Seq identified 529 long-lived mRNA candidates, encoding proteins such as ABA, calcium ion and phospholipid signalling-related proteins, and HSP DNA J, increased from 10 to 20 DAF and were highly abundant in 40 DAF embryos of Nipponbare and Koshihikari. We also revealed that these long-lived mRNA candidates are clearly up-regulated in 10 DAF germinating embryos after imbibition, suggesting that the accumulation of these mRNAs in embryos is indispensable for the induction of germination. The findings presented here may facilitate in overcoming irregular seed germination or producing more vigorous seedlings.

  16. Cloning and expression of new microRNAs from zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Steiner, Florian A.; Berezikov, Eugene; de Bruijn, Ewart; Van de Belt, Jose; Verheul, Mark; Cuppen, Edwin; Ronald H A Plasterk

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in development and regulate the expression of many animal genes by post-transcriptional gene silencing. Here we describe the cloning and expression of new miRNAs from zebrafish. By high-throughput sequencing of small-RNA cDNA libraries from 5-day-old zebrafish larvae and adult zebrafish brain we found 139 known miRNAs and 66 new miRNAs. For 65 known miRNAs and for 11 new miRNAs we also cloned the miRNA star sequence. We analyzed the temporal and spati...

  17. Association of MicroRNAs with Antibody Response to Mycoplasma bovis in Beef Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Eduardo; Cai, Guohong; Kuehn, Larry A; Register, Karen B; McDaneld, Tara G; Neill, John D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected in the summer were ELISA-negative for anti-M. bovis. By the fall, eight animals were seropositive for IgG (positive group), while eight remained negative (negative group). By spring, all animals in both groups were seropositive. MicroRNAs were extracted from sera and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq next-generation sequencer. A total of 1,374,697 sequences mapped to microRNAs in the bovine genome. Of these, 82% of the sequences corresponded to 27 microRNAs, each represented by a minimum of 10,000 sequences. There was a statistically significant interaction between ELISA response and season for bta-miR-24-3p (P = 0.0268). All sera collected at the initial summer had a similar number of copies of this microRNA (P = 0.773). In the fall, the positive group had an increased number of copies when compared to the negative group (P = 0.021), and this grew more significant by the following spring (P = 0.0001). There were 21 microRNAs associated (P< 0.05) with season. These microRNAs could be evaluated further as candidates to potentially improve productivity in cattle. The microRNAs bta-let-7b, bta-miR- 24-3p, bta-miR- 92a, and bta-miR-423-5p, were significatly associated with ELISA status (P< 0.05). These microRNAs have been recognized as playing a role in the host defense against bacteria in humans, mice, and dairy cattle. Further studies are needed to establish if these microRNAs could be used as diagnostic marker or indicator of exposure, or whether intervention strategies could be developed as an alternative to antibiotics for controlling disease due to M. bovis. PMID:27537842

  18. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum.

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    Jianqin Li

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3' RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8 and 5 are negatively correlated (r<-0.8. The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum.

  19. Association of MicroRNAs with Antibody Response to Mycoplasma bovis in Beef Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Eduardo; Cai, Guohong; Kuehn, Larry A; Register, Karen B; McDaneld, Tara G; Neill, John D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected in the summer were ELISA-negative for anti-M. bovis. By the fall, eight animals were seropositive for IgG (positive group), while eight remained negative (negative group). By spring, all animals in both groups were seropositive. MicroRNAs were extracted from sera and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq next-generation sequencer. A total of 1,374,697 sequences mapped to microRNAs in the bovine genome. Of these, 82% of the sequences corresponded to 27 microRNAs, each represented by a minimum of 10,000 sequences. There was a statistically significant interaction between ELISA response and season for bta-miR-24-3p (P = 0.0268). All sera collected at the initial summer had a similar number of copies of this microRNA (P = 0.773). In the fall, the positive group had an increased number of copies when compared to the negative group (P = 0.021), and this grew more significant by the following spring (P = 0.0001). There were 21 microRNAs associated (P< 0.05) with season. These microRNAs could be evaluated further as candidates to potentially improve productivity in cattle. The microRNAs bta-let-7b, bta-miR- 24-3p, bta-miR- 92a, and bta-miR-423-5p, were significatly associated with ELISA status (P< 0.05). These microRNAs have been recognized as playing a role in the host defense against bacteria in humans, mice, and dairy cattle. Further studies are needed to establish if these microRNAs could be used as diagnostic marker or indicator of exposure, or whether intervention strategies could be developed as an alternative to antibiotics for controlling disease due to M. bovis.

  20. microRNAs and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lifeng; Tan, Eng King; Zeng, Li

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that through imperfect base-pairing with complementary sequences of target mRNA molecules, typically cleave target mRNA, causing subsequent degradation or translation inhibition. Although an increasing number of studies have identified misregulated miRNAs in the neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which suggests that alterations in the miRNA regulatory pathway could contribute to disease pathogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological implications of misregulated miRNA expression and the regulation of the key genes involved in NDDs remain largely unknown. In this chapter, we provide evidence of the function and regulation of miRNAs and their association with the neurological events in NDDs. This will help improve our understanding of how miRNAs govern the biological functions of key pathogenic genes in these diseases, which potentially regulate several pathways involved in the progression of neurodegeneration. Additionally, given the growing interest in the therapeutic potential of miRNAs, we discuss current clinical challenges to developing miRNA-based therapeutics for NDDs.

  1. Pseudouridines in spliceosomal snRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew T. Yu; Junhui Ge; Yi-Tao Yu

    2011-01-01

    Spliceosomal RNAs are a family of small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) that are essential for pre-mRNA splicing.All vertebrate spliceosomal snRNAs are extensively pseudouridylated after transcription.Pseudouridines in spliceosomal snRNAs are generally clustered in regions that are functionally important during splicing.Many of these modified nucleotides are conserved across species lines.Recent studies have demonstrated that spliceosomal snRNA pseudouridylation is catalyzed by two different mechanisms:an RNA-dependent mechanism and an RNA-independent mechanism.The functions of the pseudouridines in spliceosomal snRNAs (U2 snRNA in particular) have also been extensively studied.Experimental data indicate that virtually all pseudouridines in U2 snRNA are functionally important.Besides the currently known pseudouridines (constitutive modifications),recent work has also indicated that pseudouridylation can be induced at novel positions under stress conditions,thus strongly suggesting that pseudouridylation is also a regulatory modification.

  2. MicroRNAs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Eisa; Eftekhari, Rahil; Oraei, Mona; Gharib, Alvand; Bidad, Katayoon

    2015-04-01

    The role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the development of rheumatic diseases has been an interesting field of research over the past decades all around the world. Research on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been active and ongoing, and investigations have attempted to use miRNAs as biomarkers in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. This review focuses on experimental researches in the field of miRNAs and RA to present the data available up to this date and includes researches searched by keywords "microRNA" and "rheumatoid arthritis" in PubMed from 2008 to January 2015. All references were also searched for related papers. miRNAs are shown to act as proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory agents in diverse cell types, and their role seems to be regulatory in most instances. Researchers have evaluated miRNAs in patients compared to controls or have investigated their role by overexpressing or silencing them. Multiple targets have been identified in vivo, in vitro, or in silico, and the researches still continue to show their efficacy in clinical settings. PMID:25736037

  3. In silico prediction and qPCR validation of novel sRNAs in Propionibacterium acnes KPA171202

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    Praveen P. Balgir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium acnes is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, opportunistic pathogen known to be involved in a wide variety of diseases ranging from mild acne to prostate cancer. Bacterial small non-coding RNAs are novel regulators of gene expression and are known to be involved in, virulence, pathogenesis, stress tolerance and adaptation to environmental changes in bacteria. The present study was undertaken keeping in view the lack of predicted sRNAs of P. acnes KPA171202 in databases. This report represents the first attempt to identify sRNAs in P. acnes KPA171202. A total of eight potential candidate sRNAs were predicted using SIPHT, one was found to have a Rfam homolog and seven were novel. Out of these seven predicted sRNAs, five were validated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing. The expression of these sRNAs was quantified in different growth phases by qPCR (quantitative PCR. They were found to be expressed in both exponential and stationary stages of growth but with maximum expression in stationary phase which points to a regulatory role for them. Further investigation of their targets and regulatory functions is in progress.

  4. Evidence for large complex networks of plant short silencing RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel MacLean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In plants and animals there are many classes of short RNAs that carry out a wide range of functions within the cell; short silencing RNAs (ssRNAs of 21-25 nucleotides in length are produced from double-stranded RNA precursors by the protein Dicer and guide nucleases and other proteins to their RNA targets through base pairing interactions. The consequence of this process is degradation of the targeted RNA, suppression of its translation or initiation of secondary ssRNA production. The secondary ssRNAs in turn could then initiate further layers of ssRNA production to form extensive cascades and networks of interacting RNA [1]. Previous empirical analysis in plants established the existence of small secondary ssRNA cascade [2], in which a single instance of this event occurred but it was not known whether there are other more extensive networks of secondary sRNA production. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a network by predicting targets of ssRNA populations obtained from high-throughput sequencing experiments. The topology of the network shows it to have power law connectivity distribution, to be dissortative, highly clustered and composed of multiple components. We also identify protein families, PPR and ULP1, that act as hubs within the network. Comparison of the repetition of genomic sub-sequences of ssRNA length between Arabidopsis and E.coli suggest that the network structure is made possible by the underlying repetitiveness in the genome sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together our results provide good evidence for the existence of a large, robust ssRNA interaction network with distinct regulatory function. Such a network could have a massive effect on the regulation of gene expression via mediation of transcript levels.

  5. Differentially expressed wound healing-related microRNAs in the human diabetic cornea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A Funari

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are powerful gene expression regulators, but their corneal repertoire and potential changes in corneal diseases remain unknown. Our purpose was to identify miRNAs altered in the human diabetic cornea by microarray analysis, and to examine their effects on wound healing in cultured telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC in vitro. Total RNA was extracted from age-matched human autopsy normal (n=6 and diabetic (n=6 central corneas, Flash Tag end-labeled, and hybridized to Affymetrix® GeneChip® miRNA Arrays. Select miRNAs associated with diabetic cornea were validated by quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR and by in situ hybridization (ISH in independent samples. HCEC were transfected with human pre-miR™miRNA precursors (h-miR or their inhibitors (antagomirs using Lipofectamine 2000. Confluent transfected cultures were scratch-wounded with P200 pipette tip. Wound closure was monitored by digital photography. Expression of signaling proteins was detected by immunostaining and Western blot. Using microarrays, 29 miRNAs were identified as differentially expressed in diabetic samples. Two miRNA candidates showing the highest fold increased in expression in the diabetic cornea were confirmed by Q-PCR and further characterized. HCEC transfection with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 significantly retarded wound closure, but their respective antagomirs significantly enhanced wound healing vs. controls. Cells treated with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 had decreased p-p38 and p-EGFR staining, but these increased over control levels close to the wound edge upon antagomir treatment. In conclusion, several miRNAs with increased expression in human diabetic central corneas were found. Two such miRNAs inhibited cultured corneal epithelial cell wound healing. Dysregulation of miRNA expression in human diabetic cornea may be an important mediator of abnormal wound healing.

  6. Identification of reference genes for relative quantification of circulating microRNAs in bovine serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seon Bae

    Full Text Available Circulating microRNAs in body fluids have been implicated as promising biomarkers for physiopathology disorders. Currently, the expression levels of circulating microRNAs are estimated by reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Use of appropriate reference microRNAs for normalization is critical for accurate microRNA expression analysis. However, no study has systematically investigated reference genes for evaluating circulating microRNA expression in cattle. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of appropriate reference microRNAs for use in the normalization of circulating microRNA levels in bovine serum. We evaluated the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in bovine serum by using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Data were analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper statistical algorithms. The results consistently showed that a combination of miR-93 and miR-127 provided the most stably expressed reference. The suitability of these microRNAs was validated, and even when compared among different genders or breeds, the combination of miR-93 and miR-127 was ranked as the most stable microRNA reference. Therefore, we conclude that this combination is the optimal endogenous reference for reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-based detection of microRNAs in bovine serum. The data presented in this study are crucial to successful biomarker discovery and validation for the diagnosis of physiopathological conditions in cattle.

  7. New neurons in aging brains: molecular control by small non-coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn eSchouten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a process that continues in the adult and also aging brain. It generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. This phenomenon is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, in the hippocampus. With age, the hippocampus and particularly the dentate gyrus are affected. For instance, adult neurogenesis is decreased with aging, in both the number of proliferating cells as well as their neuronal differentiation, while in parallel an age-associated decline in cognitive performance is often seen. Surprisingly, the synaptogenic potential of adult-born neurons appears unaffected by aging. Therefore, although proliferation, differentiation, survival and synaptogenesis of adult-born new neurons in the dentate gyrus are closely related to each other, they appear differentially regulated with aging. In this review we discuss the crucial role of a novel class of recently discovered regulators of gene expression, i.e. the small non-coding RNAs, in the development of adult neurogenesis from neural stem cells to functionally integrated neurons. In particular, a subgroup of the small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs, fine-tune many events during adult neurogenesis progression. Moreover, multiple small non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed in the aged hippocampus. This makes small non-coding RNAs appealing candidates to orchestrate, and possibly correct or prevent, the functional alterations in adult neurogenesis and cognition associated with aging. Finally, we briefly summarize observations that link changes in circulating levels of steroid hormones with alterations in adult neurogenesis and subsequent vulnerability to psychopathology in advanced age, and discuss a possible role of microRNAs in stress-associated alterations in adult neurogenesis during aging.

  8. Annotating animal mitochondrial tRNAs: A new scoring scheme and an empirical evaluation of four methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, Stacia K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2003-12-31

    Identification of transfer RNAs in animal mitochondrial genomes is important for many areas of genome analysis including phylogenetic reconstruction, understanding inheritance of disease, and identifying forensic materials. Animal mitochondrial tRNAs differ from the canonical tRNAs in both their secondary structure and level of conservation of nucleotide sequence and therefore, conventional tRNA or general RNA searching software cannot be used for identification and custom methods are required. Here we present the results of an experimental analysis of four different methods tested on a large dataset consisting of 5,720 tRNAs extracted from the entire set of complete animal mitochondrial genomes in GenBank. Methods were evaluated based on number of false negatives and false positives. Additionally, we present a new scoring scheme customized for animal mitochondrial tRNAs.

  9. Reference genes for real-time PCR quantification of messenger RNAs and microRNAs in mouse model of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Matoušková

    Full Text Available Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression ofquinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of

  10. Reference Genes for Real-Time PCR Quantification of Messenger RNAs and MicroRNAs in Mouse Model of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Hanušová, Veronika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG)-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of MSG mice

  11. Flavonoids: prospective drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Zanatta, Leila; Alberton, Elga Heloisa; Figueiredo, Maria Santos Reis Bonorino; Folador, Poliane; Damazio, Rosangela Guollo; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent developments related to the chemistry and medicinal properties of flavonoids. Major flavonoids that show well categorized structures and well defined structure function-relationships are: flavans, flavanones, flavones, flavanonols, flavonols, catechins, anthocyanidins and isoflavone. The biological properties of flavonoids include antioxidant, anti-inflamatory, antitumoral, antiviral and antibacterial, as well as a direct cytoprotective effect on coronary and vascular systems, the pancreas and the liver. These characteristics place them among the most attractive natural substances available to enrich the current therapy options.

  12. SARS coronavirus nsp1 protein induces template-dependent endonucleolytic cleavage of mRNAs: viral mRNAs are resistant to nsp1-induced RNA cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Huang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available SARS coronavirus (SCoV nonstructural protein (nsp 1, a potent inhibitor of host gene expression, possesses a unique mode of action: it binds to 40S ribosomes to inactivate their translation functions and induces host mRNA degradation. Our previous study demonstrated that nsp1 induces RNA modification near the 5'-end of a reporter mRNA having a short 5' untranslated region and RNA cleavage in the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES region of a dicistronic RNA template, but not in those IRES elements from hepatitis C or cricket paralysis viruses. By using primarily cell-free, in vitro translation systems, the present study revealed that the nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage mainly near the 5' untranslated region of capped mRNA templates. Experiments using dicistronic mRNAs carrying different IRESes showed that nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage within the ribosome loading region of type I and type II picornavirus IRES elements, but not that of classical swine fever virus IRES, which is characterized as a hepatitis C virus-like IRES. The nsp1-induced RNA cleavage of template mRNAs exhibited no apparent preference for a specific nucleotide sequence at the RNA cleavage sites. Remarkably, SCoV mRNAs, which have a 5' cap structure and 3' poly A tail like those of typical host mRNAs, were not susceptible to nsp1-mediated RNA cleavage and importantly, the presence of the 5'-end leader sequence protected the SCoV mRNAs from nsp1-induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage. The escape of viral mRNAs from nsp1-induced RNA cleavage may be an important strategy by which the virus circumvents the action of nsp1 leading to the efficient accumulation of viral mRNAs and viral proteins during infection.

  13. Electoral Systems and Candidate Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazan, Reuven Y.; Voerman, Gerrit

    2006-01-01

    Electoral systems at the national level and candidate selection methods at the party level are connected, maybe not causally but they do influence each other. More precisely, the electoral system constrains and conditions the parties' menu of choices concerning candidate selection. Moreover, in ligh

  14. Non-coding RNAs: Classification, Biology and Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Sonja; Kretz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-standing principles of molecular biology is that DNA acts as a template for transcription of messenger RNAs, which serve as blueprints for protein translation. A rapidly growing number of exceptions to this rule have been reported over the past decades: they include long known classes of RNAs involved in translation such as transfer RNAs and ribosomal RNAs, small nuclear RNAs involved in splicing events, and small nucleolar RNAs mainly involved in the modification of other small RNAs, such as ribosomal RNAs and transfer RNAs. More recently, several classes of short regulatory non-coding RNAs, including piwi-associated RNAs, endogenous short-interfering RNAs and microRNAs have been discovered in mammals, which act as key regulators of gene expression in many different cellular pathways and systems. Additionally, the human genome encodes several thousand long non-protein coding RNAs >200 nucleotides in length, some of which play crucial roles in a variety of biological processes such as epigenetic control of chromatin, promoter-specific gene regulation, mRNA stability, X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting. In this chapter, we will introduce several classes of short and long non-coding RNAs, describe their diverse roles in mammalian gene regulation and give examples for known modes of action. PMID:27573892

  15. Back to Water: Signature of Adaptive Evolution in Cetacean Mitochondrial tRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelli, Stefano; Peruffo, Antonella; Patarnello, Tomaso; Cozzi, Bruno; Negrisolo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrion is the power plant of the eukaryotic cell, and tRNAs are the fundamental components of its translational machinery. In the present paper, the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was investigated in the Cetacea, a clade of Cetartiodactyla that retuned to water and thus had to adapt its metabolism to a different medium than that of its mainland ancestors. Our analysis focussed on identifying the factors that influenced the evolution of Cetacea tRNA double-helix elements, which play a pivotal role in the formation of the secondary and tertiary structures of each tRNA and consequently manipulate the whole translation machinery of the mitochondrion. Our analyses showed that the substitution pathways in the stems of different tRNAs were influenced by various factors, determining a molecular evolution that was unique to each of the 22 tRNAs. Our data suggested that the composition, AT-skew, and GC-skew of the tRNA stems were the main factors influencing the substitution process. In particular, the range of variation and the fluctuation of these parameters affected the fate of single tRNAs. Strong heterogeneity was observed among the different species of Cetacea. Finally, it appears that the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was also shaped by the environments in which the Cetacean taxa differentiated. This latter effect was particularly evident in toothed whales that either live in freshwater or are deep divers. PMID:27336480

  16. siRNAmod: A database of experimentally validated chemically modified siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Showkat Ahmad; Thakur, Anamika; Qureshi, Abid; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology has vast potential for functional genomics and development of therapeutics. However, it faces many obstacles predominantly instability of siRNAs due to nuclease digestion and subsequently biologically short half-life. Chemical modifications in siRNAs provide means to overcome these shortcomings and improve their stability and potency. Despite enormous utility bioinformatics resource of these chemically modified siRNAs (cm-siRNAs) is lacking. Therefore, we have developed siRNAmod, a specialized databank for chemically modified siRNAs. Currently, our repository contains a total of 4894 chemically modified-siRNA sequences, comprising 128 unique chemical modifications on different positions with various permutations and combinations. It incorporates important information on siRNA sequence, chemical modification, their number and respective position, structure, simplified molecular input line entry system canonical (SMILES), efficacy of modified siRNA, target gene, cell line, experimental methods, reference etc. It is developed and hosted using Linux Apache MySQL PHP (LAMP) software bundle. Standard user-friendly browse, search facility and analysis tools are also integrated. It would assist in understanding the effect of chemical modifications and further development of stable and efficacious siRNAs for research as well as therapeutics. siRNAmod is freely available at: http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/sirnamod. PMID:26818131

  17. Identification of novel miRNAs from drought tolerant rice variety Nagina 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutum, Roseeta Devi; Kumar, Santosh; Balyan, Sonia; Kansal, Shivani; Mathur, Saloni; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate a spectrum of developmental and biochemical processes in plants and animals. Thus, knowledge of the entire miRNome is essential to understand the complete regulatory schema of any organism. The current study attempts to unravel yet undiscovered miRNA genes in rice. Analysis of small RNA libraries from various tissues of drought-tolerant 'aus' rice variety Nagina 22 (N22) identified 71 novel miRNAs. These were validated based on precursor hairpin structure, small RNA mapping pattern, 'star' sequence, conservation and identification of targets based on degradome data. While some novel miRNAs were conserved in other monocots and dicots, most appear to be lineage-specific. They were segregated into two different classes based on the closeness to the classical miRNA definition. Interestingly, evidence of a miRNA-like cleavage was found even for miRNAs that lie beyond the classical definition. Several novel miRNAs displayed tissue-enriched and/or drought responsive expression. Generation and analysis of the degradome data from N22 along with publicly available degradome identified several high confidence targets implicated in regulation of fundamental processes such as flowering and stress response. Thus, discovery of these novel miRNAs considerably expands the dimension of the miRNA-mediated regulation in rice. PMID:27499088

  18. Cas6 is an endoribonuclease that generates guide RNAs for invader defense in prokaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carte, Jason; Wang, Ruiying; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P. (FSU); (Georgia)

    2010-11-09

    An RNA-based gene silencing pathway that protects bacteria and archaea from viruses and other genome invaders is hypothesized to arise from guide RNAs encoded by CRISPR loci and proteins encoded by the cas genes. CRISPR loci contain multiple short invader-derived sequences separated by short repeats. The presence of virus-specific sequences within CRISPR loci of prokaryotic genomes confers resistance against corresponding viruses. The CRISPR loci are transcribed as long RNAs that must be processed to smaller guide RNAs. Here we identified Pyrococcus furiosus Cas6 as a novel endoribonuclease that cleaves CRISPR RNAs within the repeat sequences to release individual invader targeting RNAs. Cas6 interacts with a specific sequence motif in the 5{prime} region of the CRISPR repeat element and cleaves at a defined site within the 3{prime} region of the repeat. The 1.8 angstrom crystal structure of the enzyme reveals two ferredoxin-like folds that are also found in other RNA-binding proteins. The predicted active site of the enzyme is similar to that of tRNA splicing endonucleases, and concordantly, Cas6 activity is metal-independent. cas6 is one of the most widely distributed CRISPR-associated genes. Our findings indicate that Cas6 functions in the generation of CRISPR-derived guide RNAs in numerous bacteria and archaea.

  19. Back to Water: Signature of Adaptive Evolution in Cetacean Mitochondrial tRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patarnello, Tomaso; Cozzi, Bruno; Negrisolo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrion is the power plant of the eukaryotic cell, and tRNAs are the fundamental components of its translational machinery. In the present paper, the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was investigated in the Cetacea, a clade of Cetartiodactyla that retuned to water and thus had to adapt its metabolism to a different medium than that of its mainland ancestors. Our analysis focussed on identifying the factors that influenced the evolution of Cetacea tRNA double-helix elements, which play a pivotal role in the formation of the secondary and tertiary structures of each tRNA and consequently manipulate the whole translation machinery of the mitochondrion. Our analyses showed that the substitution pathways in the stems of different tRNAs were influenced by various factors, determining a molecular evolution that was unique to each of the 22 tRNAs. Our data suggested that the composition, AT-skew, and GC-skew of the tRNA stems were the main factors influencing the substitution process. In particular, the range of variation and the fluctuation of these parameters affected the fate of single tRNAs. Strong heterogeneity was observed among the different species of Cetacea. Finally, it appears that the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was also shaped by the environments in which the Cetacean taxa differentiated. This latter effect was particularly evident in toothed whales that either live in freshwater or are deep divers. PMID:27336480

  20. Immune modulatory function of abundant immune-related microRNAs in microvesicles from bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi; Chen, Xi; Yu, Jianxiong; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Li, Liang

    2013-03-01

    Colostrum provides essential nutrients and immunologically active factors that are beneficial to newborns. Our previous work demonstrated that milk contains large amounts of miRNA that is largely stored in milk-derived microvesicles (MVs). In the present study, we found that the MVs from colostrum contain significantly higher levels of several immune-related miRNAs. We hypothesized that the colostrum MVs may transfer the immune-related miRNAs into cells, which contribute to its immune modulatory feature. We isolated colostrum MVs by ultracentrifugation and demonstrated several immune modulation features associated with miRNAs. We also provide evidence that the physical structure of milk-derived MVs is essential for transfer miRNAs and following immune modulation effect. Moreover, we found that colostrum powder-derived MVs also contains higher levels of immune-related miRNAs that display similar immune modulation effects. Taken together, these results show that MV-containing immunerelated miRNAs may be a novel mechanism by which colostrum modulates body immune response. PMID:23483481

  1. The potential of circulating extracellular small RNAs (smexRNA) in veterinary diagnostics-Identifying biomarker signatures by multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie, Spornraft; Benedikt, Kirchner; Pfaffl, Michael W; Irmgard, Riedmaier

    2015-09-01

    Worldwide growth and performance-enhancing substances are used in cattle husbandry to increase productivity. In certain countries however e.g., in the EU, these practices are forbidden to prevent the consumers from potential health risks of substance residues in food. To maximize economic profit, 'black sheep' among farmers might circumvent the detection methods used in routine controls, which highlights the need for an innovative and reliable detection method. Transcriptomics is a promising new approach in the discovery of veterinary medicine biomarkers and also a missing puzzle piece, as up to date, metabolomics and proteomics are paramount. Due to increased stability and easy sampling, circulating extracellular small RNAs (smexRNAs) in bovine plasma were small RNA-sequenced and their potential to serve as biomarker candidates was evaluated using multivariate data analysis tools. After running the data evaluation pipeline, the proportion of miRNAs (microRNAs) and piRNAs (PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNAs) on the total sequenced reads was calculated. Additionally, top 10 signatures were compared which revealed that the readcount data sets were highly affected by the most abundant miRNA and piRNA profiles. To evaluate the discriminative power of multivariate data analyses to identify animals after veterinary drug application on the basis of smexRNAs, OPLS-DA was performed. In summary, the quality of miRNA models using all mapped reads for both treatment groups (animals treated with steroid hormones or the β-agonist clenbuterol) is predominant to those generated with combined data sets or piRNAs alone. Using multivariate projection methodologies like OPLS-DA have proven the best potential to generate discriminative miRNA models, supported by small RNA-Seq data. Based on the presented comparative OPLS-DA, miRNAs are the favorable smexRNA biomarker candidates in the research field of veterinary drug abuse.

  2. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and MicroRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscopo, Paola; Albani, Diego; Castellano, Anna E.; Forloni, Gianluigi; Confaloni, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) includes a spectrum of disorders characterized by changes of personality and social behavior and, often, a gradual and progressive language dysfunction. In the last years, several efforts have been fulfilled in identifying both genetic mutations and pathological proteins associated with FTLD. The molecular bases undergoing the onset and progression of the disease remain still unknown. Recent literature prompts an involvement of RNA metabolism in FTLD, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs). Dysregulation of miRNAs in several disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, and increasing importance of circulating miRNAs in different pathologies has suggested to implement the study of their possible application as biological markers and new therapeutic targets; moreover, miRNA-based therapy is becoming a powerful tool to deepen the function of a gene, the mechanism of a disease, and validate therapeutic targets. Regarding FTLD, different studies showed that miRNAs are playing an important role. For example, several reports have evaluated miRNA regulation of the progranulin gene suggesting that it is under their control, as described for miR-29b, miR-107, and miR-659. More recently, it has been demonstrated that TMEM106B gene, which protein is elevated in FTLD-TDP brains, is repressed by miR-132/212 cluster; this post-transcriptional mechanism increases intracellular levels of progranulin, affecting its pathways. These findings if confirmed could suggest that these microRNAs have a role as potential targets for some related-FTLD genes. In this review, we focus on the emerging roles of the miRNAs in the pathogenesis of FTLD. PMID:26903860

  3. Progress and Prospects of Long Noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most frequently occurring cancers with poor prognosis, and novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for HCC are urgently required. With the advance of high-resolution microarrays and massively parallel sequencing technology, lncRNAs are suggested to play critical roles in the tumorigenesis and development of human HCC. To date, dysregulation of many HCC-related lncRNAs such as HULC, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and H19 have been identified. From transcriptional “noise” to indispensable elements, lncRNAs may re-write the central dogma. Also, lncRNAs found in body fluids have demonstrated their utility as fluid-based noninvasive markers for clinical use and as therapeutic targets for HCC. Even though several lncRNAs have been characterized, the underlying mechanisms of their contribution to HCC remain unknown, and many important questions about lncRNAs need resolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism in HCC-related lncRNAs will provide a rationale for novel effective lncRNA-based targeted therapies. In this review, we highlight the emerging roles of lncRNAs in HCC, and discuss their potential clinical applications as biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment of HCC.

  4. Identification of Zinc Deficiency-Responsive MicroRNAs in Brassica juncea Roots by Small RNA Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Dong-qing; ZHANG Yuan; MA Jin-hu; LI Yu-long; and XU Jin

    2013-01-01

    The importance of zinc (Zn) as a micronutrient essential for plant growth and development is becoming increasingly apparent. Much of the world’s soil is Zn-deficient, and soil-based Zn deficiency is often accompanied by Zn deficiency in human populations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of plant gene expression at the level of translation. Many miRNAs involved in the modulation of heavy metal toxicity responses in plants have been identiifed;however, the role of miRNAs in the plant Zn deifciency response is almost completely unknown. Using high-throughput Solexa sequencing, we identiifed several miRNAs that respond to Zn deifciency in Brassica juncea roots. At least 21 conserved candidate miRNA families, and 101 individual members within those families, were identiifed in both the control and the Zn-deifcient B. juncea roots. Among this, 15 miRNAs from 9 miRNA families were differentially expressed in the control and Zn-deifcient plants. Of the 15 differentially expressed miRNAs, 13 were up-regulated in the Zn-deifcient B. juncea roots, and only two, miR399b and miR845a, were down-regulated. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that these miRNAs were involved in modulating phytohormone response, plant growth and development, and abiotic stress responses in B. juncea roots. These data help to lay the foundation for further understanding of miRNA function in the regulation of the plant Zn deifciency response and its impact on plant growth and development.

  5. Repertoire of bovine miRNA and miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs expressed upon viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A Glazov

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and other types of small regulatory RNAs play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Several distinct classes of small regulatory RNAs have been discovered in recent years. To extend the repertoire of small RNAs characterized in mammals and to examine relationship between host miRNA expression and viral infection we used Illumina's ultrahigh throughput sequencing approach. We sequenced three small RNA libraries prepared from cell line derived from the adult bovine kidney under normal conditions and upon infection of the cell line with Bovine herpesvirus 1. We used a bioinformatics approach to distinguish authentic mature miRNA sequences from other classes of small RNAs and short RNA fragments represented in the sequencing data. Using this approach we detected 219 out of 356 known bovine miRNAs and 115 respective miRNA* sequences. In addition we identified five new bovine orthologs of known mammalian miRNAs and discovered 268 new cow miRNAs many of which are not identifiable in other mammalian genomes and thus might be specific to the ruminant lineage. In addition we found seven new bovine mirtron candidates. We also discovered 10 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA loci that give rise to small RNA with possible miRNA-like function. Results presented in this study extend our knowledge of the biology and evolution of small regulatory RNAs in mammals and illuminate mechanisms of small RNA biogenesis and function. New miRNA sequences and the original sequencing data have been submitted to miRNA repository (miRBase and NCBI GEO archive respectively. We envisage that these resources will facilitate functional annotation of the bovine genome and promote further functional and comparative genomics studies of small regulatory RNA in mammals.

  6. Identification of miRNAs Responsive to Botrytis cinerea in Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. by High-Throughput Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqiu Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall., one of the world’s most important ornamental plants, is highly susceptible to Botrytis cinerea, and improving resistance to this pathogenic fungus is a problem yet to be solved. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an essential role in resistance to B. cinerea, but until now, no studies have been reported concerning miRNAs induction in P. lactiflora. Here, we constructed and sequenced two small RNA (sRNA libraries from two B. cinerea-infected P. lactiflora cultivars (“Zifengyu” and “Dafugui” with significantly different levels of resistance to B. cinerea, using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. From the raw reads generated, 4,592,881 and 5,809,796 sRNAs were obtained, and 280 and 306 miRNAs were identified from “Zifengyu” and “Dafugui”, respectively. A total of 237 conserved and 7 novel sequences of miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cultivars, and we predicted and annotated their potential target genes. Subsequently, 7 differentially expressed candidate miRNAs were screened according to their target genes annotated in KEGG pathways, and the expression patterns of miRNAs and corresponding target genes were elucidated. We found that miR5254, miR165a-3p, miR3897-3p and miR6450a might be involved in the P. lactiflora response to B. cinerea infection. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for resistance to B. cinerea in P. lactiflora.

  7. Identification of Echinococcus granulosus microRNAs and their expression in different life cycle stages and parasite genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucher, M; Prada, L; Mourglia-Ettlin, G; Dematteis, S; Camicia, F; Asurmendi, S; Rosenzvit, M

    2011-03-01

    The aetiological agent of cystic hydatid disease, the platyhelminth parasite Echinococcus granulosus, undergoes a series of metamorphic events during its complex life cycle. One of its developmental stages, the protoscolex, shows a remarkable degree of heterogeneous morphogenesis, being able to develop either into the vesicular or strobilar direction. Another level of complexity is added by the existence of genotypes or strains that differ in the range of intermediate hosts where they can develop and form fertile cysts. These features make E. granulosus an interesting model for developmental studies. Hence, we focused on the study of the regulation of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs), one of the key mechanisms that control development in metazoans and plants and which has not been analysed in E. granulosus yet. In this study, we cloned 38 distinct miRNAs, including four candidate new miRNAs that seem to be specific to Echinococcus spp. Thirty-four cloned sequences were orthologous to miRNAs already described in other organisms and were grouped in 16 metazoan miRNA families, some of them known for their role in the development of other organisms. The expression of some of the cloned miRNAs differs according to the parasite life cycle stage analysed, showing differential developmental expression. We did not detect differences in the expression of the analysed miRNAs between protoscoleces of two parasite genotypes. This work sets the scene for the study of gene regulation mediated by miRNAs in E. granulosus and provides a new approach to study the molecules involved in its developmental plasticity and intermediate host specificity. Understanding the developmental processes of E. granulosus may help to find new strategies for the control of cystic hydatid disease, caused by the metacestode stage of the parasite.

  8. MicroRNA-like small RNAs prediction in the development of Antrodia cinnamomea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Liang Lin

    Full Text Available Antrodia cinnamomea, a precious, host-specific brown-rot fungus that has been used as a folk medicine in Taiwan for centuries is known to have diverse bioactive compounds with potent pharmaceutical activity. In this study, different fermentation states of A. cinnamomea (wild-type fruiting bodies and liquid cultured mycelium were sequenced using the next-generation sequencing (NGS technique. A 45.58 Mb genome encoding 6,522 predicted genes was obtained. High quality reads were assembled into a total of 13,109 unigenes. Using a previously constructed pipeline to search for microRNAs (miRNAs, we then identified 4 predicted conserved miRNA and 63 novel predicted miRNA-like small RNA (milRNA candidates. Target prediction revealed several interesting proteins involved in tri-terpenoid synthesis, mating type recognition, chemical or physical sensory protein and transporters predicted to be regulated by the miRNAs and milRNAs.

  9. Psmir: a database of potential associations between small molecules and miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanlin; Wang, Jing; Dai, Enyu; Yang, Feng; Chen, Xiaowen; Wang, Shuyuan; Yu, Xuexin; Liu, Dianming; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-13

    miRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of many essential biological processes, and their dysregulation has been validated in almost all human cancers. Restoring aberrantly expressed miRNAs might be a novel therapeutics. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that small molecular compounds can affect miRNA expression. Thus, prediction of associations between small molecules and miRNAs is important for investigation of miRNA-targeted drugs. Here, we analyzed 39 miRNA-perturbed gene expression profiles, and then calculated the similarity of transcription responses between miRNA perturbation and drug treatment to predict drug-miRNA associations. At the significance level of 0.05, we obtained 6501 candidate associations between 1295 small molecules and 25 miRNAs, which included 624 FDA approved drugs. Finally, we constructed the Psmir database to store all potential associations and the related materials. In a word, Psmir served as a valuable resource for dissecting the biological significance in small molecules' effects on miRNA expression, which will facilitate developing novel potential therapeutic targets or treatments for human cancers. Psmir is supported by all major browsers, and is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/Psmir/.

  10. Identification of conserved and novel microRNAs in Catharanthus roseus by deep sequencing and computational prediction of their potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Pravin; Ghosliya, Dolly; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-10

    MicroRNAs are small endogenous non-coding RNAs of ~19-24 nucleotides and perform regulatory roles in many plant processes. To identify miRNAs involved in regulatory networks controlling diverse biological processes including secondary metabolism in Catharanthus roseus, an important medicinal plant, we employed deep sequencing of small RNA from leaf tissue. A total of 88 potential miRNAs comprising of 81 conserved miRNAs belonging to 35 families and seven novel miRNAs were identified. Precursors for 16 conserved and seven novel cro-miRNAs were identified, and their stem-loop hairpin structures were predicted. Selected cro-miRNAs were analyzed by stem-loop qRT-PCR and differential expression patterns were observed in different vegetative tissues of C. roseus. Targets were predicted for conserved and novel cro-miRNAs, which were found to be involved in diverse biological role(s) including secondary metabolism. Our study enriches available resources and information regarding miRNAs and their potential targets for better understanding of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in plants. PMID:25445288

  11. The regulatory epicenter of miRNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashwani Jha; Mrigaya Mehra; Ravi Shankar

    2011-09-01

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with average length of ∼21 bp. miRNA formation seems to be dependent upon multiple factors besides Drosha and Dicer, in a tissue/stage-specific manner, with interplay of several specific binding factors. In the present study, we have investigated transcription factor binding sites in and around the genomic sequences of precursor miRNAs and RNA-binding protein (RBP) sites in miRNA precursor sequences, analysed and tested in comprehensive manner. Here, we report that miRNA precursor regions are positionally enriched for binding of transcription factors as well as RBPs around the 3′ end of mature miRNA region in 5′ arm. The pattern and distribution of such regulatory sites appears to be a characteristic of precursor miRNA sequences when compared with non-miRNA sequences as negative dataset and tested statistically. When compared with 1 kb upstreamregions, a sudden sharp peak for binding sites arises in the enriched zone near the mature miRNA region. An expression-data-based correlation analysis was performed between such miRNAs and their corresponding transcription factors and RBPs for this region. Some specific groups of binding factors and associated miRNAs were identified. We also identified some of the overrepresented transcription factors and associated miRNAs with high expression correlation values which could be useful in cancer-related studies. The highly correlated groups were found to host experimentally validated composite regulatory modules, in which Lmo2-GATA1 appeared as the predominant one. For many of RBP–miRNAs associations, co-expression similarity was also evident among the associated miRNA common to given RBPs, supporting the Regulon model, suggesting a common role and common control of these miRNAs by the associated RBPs. Based on our findings, we propose that the observed characteristic distribution of regulatory sites in precursor miRNA sequence regions could be critical inmiRNA transcription, processing

  12. MicroRNAs in Cardiometabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs with critical functions in multiple physiological and pathological processes. An explosion of reports on the discovery and characterization of different miRNA species and their involvement in almost every aspect of cardiac biology and diseases has established an exciting new dimension in gene regulation networks for cardiac development and pathogenesis. CONTENT: Alterations in the metabolic control of lipid and glucose homeostasis predispose an individual to develop cardiometabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Work over the last years has suggested that miRNAs play an important role in regulating these physiological processes. Besides a cell-specific transcription factor profile, cell-specific miRNA-regulated gene expression is integral to cell fate and activation decisions. Thus, the cell types involved in atherosclerosis, vascular disease, and its myocardial sequelae may be differentially regulated by distinct miRNAs, thereby controlling highly complex processes, for example, smooth muscle cell phenotype and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells or macrophages. The recent advancements in using miRNAs as circulating biomarkers or therapeutic modalities, will hopefully be able to provide a strong basis for future research to further expand our insights into miRNA function in cardiovascular biology. SUMMARY: MiRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. They are potent modulators of diverse biological processes and pathologies. Recent findings demonstrated the importance of miRNAs in the vasculature and the orchestration of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. MiRNA networks represent an additional layer of regulation for gene expression that absorbs perturbations and ensures the robustness of biological systems. A detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mi

  13. Resveratrol, MicroRNAs, Inflammation, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmerina Tili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAs that regulate the expression of many target genes posttranscriptionally and are thus implicated in a wide array of cellular and developmental processes. The expression of miR-155 or miR-21 is upregulated during the course of the inflammatory response, but these microRNAs are also considered oncogenes due to their upregulation of expression in several types of tumors. Furthermore, it is now well established that inflammation is associated with the induction or the aggravation of nearly 25% of cancers. Therefore, the above microRNAs are thought to link inflammation and cancer. Recently, resveratrol (trans-3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene, a natural polyphenol with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties, currently at the stage of preclinical studies for human cancer prevention, has been shown to induce the expression of miR-663, a tumor-suppressor and anti-inflammatory microRNA, while downregulating miR-155 and miR-21. In this paper we will discuss how the use of resveratrol in therapeutics may benefit from the preanalyses on the status of expression of miR-155 or miR-21 as well as of TGFβ1. In addition, we will discuss how resveratrol activity might possibly be enhanced by simultaneously manipulating the levels of its key target microRNAs, such as miR-663.

  14. piRNAs and Their Functions in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Zhiren; Tan, Yunlong; Chen, Xiangning; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are the non-coding RNAs with 24–32 nucleotides (nt). They exhibit stark differences in length, expression pattern, abundance, and genomic organization when compared to micro-RNAs (miRNAs). There are hundreds of thousands unique piRNA sequences in each species. Numerous piRNAs have been identified and deposited in public databases. Since the piRNAs were originally discovered and well-studied in the germline, a few other studies have reported the presence of piRNAs in somatic cells including neurons. This paper reviewed the common features, biogenesis, functions, and distributions of piRNAs and summarized their specific functions in the brain. This review may provide new insights and research direction for brain disorders. PMID:27512315

  15. Systematic identification of long noncoding RNAs expressed during zebrafish embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Andrea; Valen, Eivind; Lin, Michael F.;

    2012-01-01

    vertebrate embryogenesis has been elusive. To identify lncRNAs with potential functions in vertebrate embryogenesis, we performed a time series of RNA-Seq experiments at eight stages during early zebrafish development. We reconstructed 56,535 high-confidence transcripts in 28,912 loci, recovering the vast...... overlapping lncRNAs, and precursors for small RNAs (sRNAs). Zebrafish lncRNAs share many of the characteristics of their mammalian counterparts: relatively short length, low exon number, low expression, and conservation levels comparable to introns. Subsets of lncRNAs carry chromatin signatures characteristic...... of genes with developmental functions. The temporal expression profile of lncRNAs revealed two novel properties: lncRNAs are expressed in narrower time windows than protein-coding genes and are specifically enriched in early-stage embryos. In addition, several lncRNAs show tissue-specific expression...

  16. Deep sequencing of Brachypodium small RNAs at the global genome level identifies microRNAs involved in cold stress response

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    Chong Kang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small RNAs having large-scale regulatory effects on plant development and stress responses. Extensive studies of miRNAs have only been performed in a few model plants. Although miRNAs are proved to be involved in plant cold stress responses, little is known for winter-habit monocots. Brachypodium distachyon, with close evolutionary relationship to cool-season cereals, has recently emerged as a novel model plant. There are few reports of Brachypodium miRNAs. Results High-throughput sequencing and whole-genome-wide data mining led to the identification of 27 conserved miRNAs, as well as 129 predicted miRNAs in Brachypodium. For multiple-member conserved miRNA families, their sizes in Brachypodium were much smaller than those in rice and Populus. The genome organization of miR395 family in Brachypodium was quite different from that in rice. The expression of 3 conserved miRNAs and 25 predicted miRNAs showed significant changes in response to cold stress. Among these miRNAs, some were cold-induced and some were cold-suppressed, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated under cold stress condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that Brachypodium miRNAs are composed of a set of conserved miRNAs and a large proportion of non-conserved miRNAs with low expression levels. Both kinds of miRNAs were involved in cold stress response, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated, implying an important role for cold-induced miRNAs. The different size and genome organization of miRNA families in Brachypodium and rice suggest that the frequency of duplication events or the selection pressure on duplicated miRNAs are different between these two closely related plant species.

  17. Clinical Candidate VT-1161's Antiparasitic Effect In Vitro, Activity in a Murine Model of Chagas Disease, and Structural Characterization in Complex with the Target Enzyme CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, William J; Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; da Gama Jaen Batista, Denise; da Silva, Cristiane F; Nefertiti, Aline S G; Rachakonda, Girish; Schotzinger, Robert J; Villalta, Fernando; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2016-02-01

    A novel antifungal drug candidate, the 1-tetrazole-based agent VT-1161 [(R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-{5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-yl}propan-2-ol], which is currently in two phase 2b antifungal clinical trials, was found to be a tight-binding ligand (apparent dissociation constant [Kd], 24 nM) and a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, VT-1161 revealed a high level of antiparasitic activity against amastigotes of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi in cellular experiments (50% effective concentration, 2.5 nM) and was active in vivo, causing >99.8% suppression of peak parasitemia in a mouse model of infection with the naturally drug-resistant Y strain of the parasite. The data strongly support the potential utility of VT-1161 in the treatment of Chagas disease. The structural characterization of T. cruzi CYP51 in complex with VT-1161 provides insights into the molecular basis for the compound's inhibitory potency and paves the way for the further rational development of this novel, tetrazole-based inhibitory chemotype both for antiprotozoan chemotherapy and for antifungal chemotherapy. PMID:26643331

  18. Saturation mapping of QTL regions and identification of putative candidate genes for drought tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T T; Klueva, N; Chamareck, V; Aarti, A; Magpantay, G; Millena, A C M; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T

    2004-08-01

    We have developed 85 new markers (50 RFLPs, 5 SSRs, 12 DD cDNAs, 9 ESTs, 8 HSP-encoding cDNAs and one BSA-derived AFLP marker) for saturation mapping of QTL regions for drought tolerance in rice, in our efforts to identify putative candidate genes. Thirteen of the markers were localized in the close vicinity of the targeted QTL regions. Fifteen of the additional markers mapped, respectively, inside one QTL region controlling osmotic adjustment on chromosome 3 ( oa3.1) and 14 regions that affect root traits on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12. Differential display was used to identify more putative candidate genes and to saturate the QTL regions of the genetic map. Eleven of the isolated cDNA clones were found to be derived from drought-inducible genes. Two of them were unique and did not match any genes in the GenBank, while nine were highly similar to cDNAs encoding known proteins, including a DnaJ-related protein, a zinc-finger protein, a protease inhibitor, a glutathione-S-transferase, a DNA recombinase, and a protease. Twelve new cDNA fragments were mapped onto the genetic linkage map; seven of these mapped inside, or in close proximity to, the targeted QTL regions determining root thickness and osmotic adjustment capacity. The gene I12A1, which codes for a UDP-glucose 4-epimerase homolog, was identified as a putative target gene within the prt7.1/brt7.1 QTL region, as it is involved in the cell wall biogenesis pathway and hence may be implicated in modulating the ability of rice roots to penetrate further into the substratum when exposed to drought conditions. RNAs encoding elongation factor 1beta, a DnaJ-related protein, and a homolog of wheat zinc-finger protein were more prominently induced in the leaves of IR62266 (the lowland rice parent of the mapping materials used) than in those of CT9993 (the upland rice parent) under drought conditions. Homologs of 18S ribosomal RNA, and mRNAs for a multiple-stress induced zinc-finger protein, a protease

  19. Prediction and characterization of small non-coding RNAs related to secondary metabolites in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

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    Wei-Bing Liu

    Full Text Available Saccharopolyspora erythraea produces a large number of secondary metabolites with biological activities, including erythromycin. Elucidation of the mechanisms through which the production of these secondary metabolites is regulated may help to identify new strategies for improved biosynthesis of erythromycin. In this paper, we describe the systematic prediction and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs in S. erythraea, with the aim to elucidate sRNA-mediated regulation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In silico and deep-sequencing technologies were applied to predict sRNAs in S. erythraea. Six hundred and forty-seven potential sRNA loci were identified, of which 382 cis-encoded antisense RNA are complementary to protein-coding regions and 265 predicted transcripts are located in intergenic regions. Six candidate sRNAs (sernc292, sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, sernc361, and sernc389 belong to four gene clusters (tpc3, pke, pks6, and nrps5 that are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Deep-sequencing data showed that the expression of all sRNAs in the strain HL3168 E3 (E3 was higher than that in NRRL23338 (M, except for sernc292 and sernc361 expression. The relative expression of six sRNAs in strain M and E3 were validated by qRT-PCR at three different time points (24, 48, and 72 h. The results showed that, at each time point, the transcription levels of sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 were higher in E3 than in M, with the largest difference observed at 72 h, whereas no signals for sernc292 and sernc361 were detected. sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 probably regulate iron transport, terpene metabolism, geosmin synthesis, and polyketide biosynthesis, respectively. The major significance of this study is the successful prediction and identification of sRNAs in genomic regions close to the secondary metabolism-related genes in S. erythraea. A better understanding of the sRNA-target interaction would help to

  20. Discovery of MicroRNAs associated with myogenesis by deep sequencing of serial developmental skeletal muscles in pigs.

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    Xinhua Hou

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short, single-stranded non-coding RNAs that repress their target genes by binding their 3' UTRs. These RNAs play critical roles in myogenesis. To gain knowledge about miRNAs involved in the regulation of myogenesis, porcine longissimus muscles were collected from 18 developmental stages (33-, 40-, 45-, 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, 70-, 75-, 80-, 85-, 90-, 95-, 100- and 105-day post-gestation fetuses, 0 and 10-day postnatal piglets and adult pigs to identify miRNAs using Solexa sequencing technology. We detected 197 known miRNAs and 78 novel miRNAs according to comparison with known miRNAs in the miRBase (release 17.0 database. Moreover, variations in sequence length and single nucleotide polymorphisms were also observed in 110 known miRNAs. Expression analysis of the 11 most abundant miRNAs were conducted using quantitative PCR (qPCR in eleven tissues (longissimus muscles, leg muscles, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, small intestine and colon, and the results revealed that ssc-miR-378, ssc-miR-1 and ssc-miR-206 were abundantly expressed in skeletal muscles. During skeletal muscle development, the expression level of ssc-miR-378 was low at 33 days post-coitus (dpc, increased at 65 and 90 dpc, peaked at postnatal day 0, and finally declined and maintained a comparatively stable level. This expression profile suggested that ssc-miR-378 was a new candidate miRNA for myogenesis and participated in skeletal muscle development in pigs. Target prediction and KEGG pathway analysis suggested that bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1, both of which were relevant to proliferation and differentiation, might be the potential targets of miR-378. Luciferase activities of report vectors containing the 3'UTR of porcine BMP2 or MAPK1 were downregulated by miR-378, which suggested that miR-378 probably regulated myogenesis though the regulation of these two genes.

  1. Identification of microRNAs linked to regulators of muscle protein synthesis and regeneration in young and old skeletal muscle.

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    Evelyn Zacharewicz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the course of ageing there is a natural and progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass. The onset and progression of age-related muscle wasting is associated with an attenuated activation of Akt-mTOR signalling and muscle protein synthesis in response to anabolic stimuli such as resistance exercise. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are novel and important post-transcriptional regulators of numerous cellular processes. The role of miRNAs in the regulation of muscle protein synthesis following resistance exercise is poorly understood. This study investigated the changes in skeletal muscle miRNA expression following an acute bout of resistance exercise in young and old subjects with a focus on the miRNA species predicted to target Akt-mTOR signalling. RESULTS: Ten young (24.2±0.9 years and 10 old (66.6±1.1 years males completed an acute resistance exercise bout known to maximise muscle protein synthesis, with muscle biopsies collected before and 2 hours after exercise. We screened the expression of 754 miRNAs in the muscle biopsies and found 26 miRNAs to be regulated with age, exercise or a combination of both factors. Nine of these miRNAs are highly predicted to regulate targets within the Akt-mTOR signalling pathway and 5 miRNAs have validated binding sites within the 3' UTRs of several members of the Akt-mTOR signalling pathway. The miR-99/100 family of miRNAs notably emerged as potentially important regulators of skeletal muscle mass in young and old subjects. CONCLUSION: This study has identified several miRNAs that were regulated with age or with a single bout of resistance exercise. Some of these miRNAs were predicted to influence Akt-mTOR signalling, and therefore potentially skeletal muscle mass. These miRNAs should be considered as candidate targets for in vivo modulation.

  2. Extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Marc R; Andrew White, K

    2007-08-01

    The analysis of viral RNA is a fundamental aspect of plant RNA virus research. Studies that focus on viral RNAs often involve virus infections of plant protoplasts (see UNITS 16D.1-16D.4). Protoplast offer the advantage of simultaneous initiation of infections, which allows for superior temporal and quantitative analyses of viral RNAs. The efficient isolation of intact viral RNA is key to any such investigations. This unit describes two basic protocols for extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts. An approach for preparing double-stranded viral RNA from total RNA pools is also provided. The viral RNA prepared by using these techniques can be used for further analyses such as primer extension, reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting.

  3. A New Strategy for Identification of Highly Conserved microRNAs in Non-Model Insect, Spodoptera litura

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    Guohua Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The indigenous small non-coding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, are important regulators of gene expression and many of them are evolutionarily conserved. Whether stem-loop RT-PCR, as a sensitive method, could be utilized to clone conserved miRNAs from non-model insects lacks information. Here, three miRNAs, sli-miR-14, sli-miR-2a and sli-bantam, were cloned from Spodoptera litura by stem-loop RT-PCR. Two groups of primers were designed, and one of them performed especially well and proved stable. The sequences of two highly conserved miRNAs, sli-miR-14 and sli-miR-2a were identical to those in Drosophila melanogaster. To validate the reliability of this strategy, pre-miR-14 and pre-miR-2a in S. litura as representatives were given as well; this shared high homology with those in D. melanogaster and Bombyx mori, and both mature sequences of sli-miR-14 and sli-miR-2a in their precursors shared 100% identity to the results shown by stem-loop RT-PCR. Moreover, expression patterns of these miRNAs were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR. Sli-miR-14 and sli-miR-2a could be detected successfully and their expression patterns showed similar characteristics with those in model insects, further suggesting stem-loop RT-PCR technology can be used for identification of highly conserved miRNAs in non-model insects. These results provide a simplified and efficient strategy for studying the structure and function of highly conserved miRNAs, especially some critical miRNAs in non-model insects.

  4. The nuclear 5S RNAs from chicken, rat and man. U5 RNAs are encoded by multiple genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, A; Gallinaro, H; Lazar, E; Jacob, M; Branlant, C

    1981-02-25

    Preparations of chicken, rat and human nuclear 5S RNA contain two sets of molecules. The set with the lowest electrophoretic mobility (5Sa) contains RNAs identical or closely related to ribosomal 5S RNA from the corresponding animal species. In HeLa cells and rat brain, we only detected an RNA identical to the ribosomal 5S RNA. In hen brain and liver, we found other species differing by a limited number of substitutions. The results suggest that mutated 5S genes may be expressed differently according to the cell type. The set with the highest mobility corresponds to U5 RNA. In both rat brain and HeLa cells, U5 RNA was found to be composed of 4 and 5 different molecules respectively (U5A, U5B1-4) differing by a small number of substitutions or insertions. In hen brain, no U5B was detected but U5A' differing from U5A by the absence of the 3'-terminal adenosine. All the U5 RNAs contain the same set of modified nucleotides. They also have the same secondary structure which consists of two hairpins joined together by a 17 nucleotide long single-stranded region. The 3' half of the molecule has a compact conformation. Together, the results suggest that U5 RNAs are transcribed from a multigene family and that mutated genes may be expressed as far as secondary structure is conserved. The conformation of U5 RNA is likely to be related to its function and it is of interest to mention that several similarities of structure are found between U5 and U1A RNA.

  5. MicroRNAs in cancers and neurodegenerative disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs which function as endogenous silencers of various target genes. miRNAs are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and playing important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation during mammalian development. Links between miRNAs and the initiation and progression of human diseases including cancer are becoming increasingly apparent. Recent studies have revealed that some miRNAs such as miR-9, miR-29 family, and miR-34 family are di...

  6. Research of the relationship between radiotherapy and microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Yang; Ximing Xu; Yanrong Hao

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous short non-coding RNAs, and play a pivotal role in regulating a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis, both of which are cellular responses to radiation treatment. In response to radiation, multiple miRNAs show altered expression, which act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Recent evidence has also shown that some miRNAs have radiotherapy sensitization or radiation resistance role in malignant tumors. This review focuses on analysis of these characteristics and mechanisms of miRNAs, and will provide some insight into the therapeutic application of radiation.

  7. Long noncoding RNAs and Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are typically defined as transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. lncRNAs can regulate gene expression at epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. Recent studies have shown that lncRNAs are involved in many neurological diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions, and genetic disorders. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease, which accounts for >80% of dementia in elderly subjects. In this review, we will highlight recent studies investigating the role of lncRNAs in Alzheimer’s disease and focus on some specific lncRNAs that may underlie Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology and therefore could be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27418812

  8. Micromanagement of the immune system by microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey F; Zhou, Beiyan; Liu, Gwen; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2008-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNAs that are thought to control gene expression by targeting mRNAs for degradation or translational repression. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNA-mediated gene regulation represents a fundamental layer of genetic programmes at the post-transcriptional level and has diverse functional roles in animals. Here, we provide an overview of the mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, with specific focus on the role of miRNAs in regulating the development of immune cells and in modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.

  9. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola ePiscopo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD includes a spectrum of disorders characterized by changes of personality and social behaviour and, often, a gradual and progressive language dysfunction. In the last years, several efforts have been fulfilled in identifying both genetic mutations and pathological proteins associated with FTLD. The molecular bases undergoing the onset and progression of the disease remain still unknown. Recent literature prompts an involvement of RNA metabolism in FTLD, particularly miRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNAs in several disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, and increasing importance of circulating miRNAs in different pathologies has suggested to implement the study of their possible application as biological markers and new therapeutic targets; moreover, miRNA-based therapy is becoming a powerful tool to deepen the function of a gene, the mechanism of a disease, and validate therapeutic targets. Regarding FTLD, different studies showed that miRNAs are playing an important role. For example, several reports have evaluated miRNA regulation of the progranulin gene suggesting that it is under their control, as described for miR-29b, miR-107 and miR-659. More recently, it has been demonstrated that TMEM106B gene, which protein is elevated in FTLD-TDP brains, is repressed by miR-132/212 cluster; this post-transcriptional mechanism increases intracellular levels of progranulin, affecting its pathways. These findings if confirmed could suggest that these microRNAs have a role as potential targets for some related-FTLD genes. In this review, we focus on the emerging roles of the miRNAs in the pathogenesis of FTLD.

  10. Isolation of circulating microRNAs from microvesicles found in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, John F; Cassidy, Pamela B; Pfeffer, Lawrence M; Boucher, Kenneth M; Hawkes, Jason E; Pfeffer, Susan R; Kopelovich, Levy; Leachman, Sancy A

    2014-01-01

    Intact miRNAs can be isolated from the circulation in significant quantities despite the presence of extremely high levels of RNase activity. The remarkable stability of circulating miRNAs makes them excellent candidates for biomarkers in diagnostic applications as well as therapeutic targets in a variety of disease states including melanoma. Circulating RNA molecules are resistant to degradation by RNases because they are encapsulated in membrane-bound microvesicles. We describe a convenient method for the use of ExoQuick, a proprietary resin developed by Systems Biosciences (Mountain View, CA), whereby microvesicles can be purified under gentle conditions using readily available laboratory equipment. This protocol allows for isolation all microvesicles, regardless of their origin, and provides a convenient method for identifying potential cancer-specific biomarkers from biological fluids including serum and plasma. PMID:24259003

  11. Analysis of epigenetic effects (microRNAs) in former employees of Wismut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of the study was the development and establishment of an oligonucleotide microarray for expression analysis of microRNAs (miRNAs) in whole blood of former uranium miners. To identify possible biomarkers of radiation exposure, samples of high- and low-exposed miners were screened with microarrays that carried 703 human miRNA probes. To that end, 60 RNA samples of the project ''Creation of a biological sample and data collection of occupationally radiation-exposed workers (German Uranium Miners Biobank) - a pilot study'' (3607S04532) were analysed and potential biomarkers verified by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). During the initial screening, mirRNA-548d-5p, showing a significantly altered expression between low- and high-exposed miners, was identified as a possible biomarker candidate. Verification by qRT-PCR confirmed the difference in expression, however, the result was not statistically significant.

  12. Optimized methods for extracting circulating small RNAs from long-term stored equine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Lucia; Fouché, Nathalie; Leeb, Tosso; Gerber, Vincent; Pacholewska, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Circulating miRNAs in body fluids, particularly serum, are promising candidates for future routine biomarker profiling in various pathologic conditions in human and veterinary medicine. However, reliable standardized methods for miRNA extraction from equine serum and fresh or archived whole blood are sorely lacking. We systematically compared various miRNA extraction methods from serum and whole blood after short and long-term storage without addition of RNA stabilizing additives prior to freezing. Time of storage at room temperature prior to freezing did not affect miRNA quality in serum. Furthermore, we showed that miRNA of NGS-sufficient quality can be recovered from blood samples after >10 years of storage at -80 °C. This allows retrospective analyses of miRNAs from archived samples. PMID:27356979

  13. Identification and Characterization of Erysiphe necator-Responsive MicroRNAs in Chinese Wild Vitis pseudoreticulata by High-Throughput Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lijuan; Weng, Kai; Ma, Hui; Xiang, Gaoqing; Li, Zhiqian; Wang, Yuejin; Liu, Guotian; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine powdery mildew is one of the most damaging fungal diseases. Therefore, a precise understanding of the grapevine disease resistance system becomes a subject of significant importance. Plant microRNAs(miRNAs) have been implicated to play regulatory roles in plant biotic stress responses. In this study, high-throughput sequencing and miRDeep-P were employed to identify miRNAs in Chinese wild Vitis pseudoreticulata leaves following inoculation with Erysiphe necator. Altogether, 126 previously identified microRNAs and 124 novel candidates of miRNA genes were detected. Among them, 43 conserved miRNAs belong to 20 families and 23 non-conserved but previously-known miRNAs belong to 15 families. Following E. necator inoculation, 119 miRNAs were down-regulated and 131 were up-regulated. Furthermore, the expression changes occurring in 32 miRNAs were significant. The expression patterns of some miRNAs were validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. A total of 485 target genes were predicted and categorized by Gene Ontology (GO). In addition, 14 vvi-miRNAs were screened with 36 targets which may be involved in powdery mildew resistance in grape. Highly accumulated vvi-NewmiR2118 was detected from accession “Baihe-35-1,” whose targets were mostly NBS-LRR resistance genes. It was down-regulated rapidly and strongly in “Baihe-35-1” leaves after inoculated with E. necator, indicating its involvement in grape powdery mildew resistance. Finally, the study verified interaction between vvi-NewmiR2118 and RPP13 by histochemical staining and GUS fluorescence quantitative assay. PMID:27303408

  14. Identification and characterization of microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Heng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs such as small interfering RNA (siRNA, microRNA and other small RNA transcripts are derived from distinct loci in the genome and play critical roles in RNA-mediated gene silencing mechanisms in plants and metazoa. They are approximately 22 nucleotides long; regulate mRNA stability through perfect or imperfect match to the targets. The biological activities of sncRNAs have been related to many biological events, from resistance to microbe infections to cellular differentiation. The development of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma japonicum parasite includes multiple steps of morphological alterations and biological differentiations, which provide a unique model for studies on the functions of small RNAs. Characterization of the genome-wide transcription of the sncRNAs will be a major step in understanding of the parasite biology. The objective of this study is to investigate the transcriptional profile and potential function of the small non-coding RNAs in the development of S. japanicum. Results The endogenous siRNAs were found mainly derived from transposable elements (TE or transposons and the natural antisense transcripts (NAT. In contrast to other organisms, the TE-derived siRNAs in S. japonicum were more predominant than other sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs. Further, there were distinct length and 3'end variations in the sncRNAs, which were associated with the developmental differentiation of the parasite. Among the identified miRNA transcripts, there were 38 unique to S. japonicum and 16 that belonged to 13 miRNA families are common to other metazoan lineages. These miRNAs were either ubiquitously expressed, or they exhibited specific expression patterns related to the developmental stages or sex. Genes that encoded miRNAs are mainly located in clusters within the genome of S. japonicum. However, genes within one cluster could be differentially transcribed, which suggested

  15. Noncoding microRNAs: small RNAs play a big role in regulation of ADME?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ming Yu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There are considerable interindividual variations in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME in humans, which may lead to undesired drug effects in pharmacotherapy. Some of the mechanistic causes are known, e.g., genetic polymorphism, inhibition and induction of ADME enzymes and transporters, while others such as posttranscriptional regulation of ADME genes are under active study. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of small, noncoding RNAs that control posttranscriptional expression of target genes. More than 1000 miRNAs have been identified in the human genome, which may regulate thousands of protein-coding genes. Some miRNAs directly or indirectly control the expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes, ATP-binding cassette or solute carrier transporters and/or nuclear receptors. Consequently, intervention of miRNA epigenetic signaling may alter ADME gene expression, change the capacity of drug metabolism and transport, and influence the sensitivity of cells to xenobiotics. In addition, the expression of some ADME regulatory miRNAs is significantly changed in cells following the exposure to a given drug, and the consequent changes in ADME gene expression might result in distinct ADME properties and drug response. In this review, we summarized recent findings on the role of noncoding miRNAs in epigenetic regulation of ADME genes and discussed the potential impact on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

  16. Transcription start site associated RNAs (TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous in all domains of life.

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    Livia S Zaramela

    Full Text Available A plethora of non-coding RNAs has been discovered using high-resolution transcriptomics tools, indicating that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation is much more complex than previously appreciated. Small RNAs associated with transcription start sites of annotated coding regions (TSSaRNAs are pervasive in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Here, we provide evidence for existence of TSSaRNAs in several archaeal transcriptomes including: Halobacterium salinarum, Pyrococcus furiosus, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Sulfolobus solfataricus. We validated TSSaRNAs from the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by deep sequencing two independent small-RNA enriched (RNA-seq and a primary-transcript enriched (dRNA-seq strand-specific libraries. We identified 652 transcripts, of which 179 were shown to be primary transcripts (∼7% of the annotated genome. Distinct growth-associated expression patterns between TSSaRNAs and their cognate genes were observed, indicating a possible role in environmental responses that may result from RNA polymerase with varying pausing rhythms. This work shows that TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous across all domains of life.

  17. Spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs of Tetrahymena thermophila and some possible snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1991-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the full set of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs; U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6) from the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. With the exception of U4 snRNA, the sizes of the T. thermophila snRNAs are closely similar to their metazoan homologues. The T...... organisms. Furthermore, secondary structures closely similar to phylogenetically proven models can be inferred from the T. thermophila data. Analysis of the snRNA sequences identifies three potential snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions, all of which are consistent with available phylogenetic data. Two...

  18. Detection of piRNAs in whitespotted bamboo shark liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingrong; Ge, Yinghua; Cheng, Dandan; Nie, Zuoming; Lv, Zhengbing

    2016-09-15

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26 to 31-nt small non-coding RNAs that have been reported mostly in germ-line cells and cancer cells. However, the presence of piRNAs in the whitespotted bamboo shark liver has not yet been reported. In a previous study of microRNAs in shark liver, some piRNAs were detected from small RNAs sequenced by Solexa technology. A total of 4857 piRNAs were predicted and found in shark liver. We further selected 17 piRNAs with high and significantly differential expression between normal and regenerative liver tissues for subsequent verification by Northern blotting. Ten piRNAs were further identified, and six of these were matched to known piRNAs in piRNABank. The actual expression of six known and four novel piRNAs was validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a total of 401 target genes of the 10 piRNAs were predicted by miRanda. Through GO and pathway function analyses, only five piRNAs could be annotated with eighteen GO annotations. The results indicated that the identified piRNAs are involved in many important biological responses, including immune inflammation, cell-specific differentiation and development, and angiogenesis. This manuscript provides the first identification of piRNAs in the liver of whitespotted bamboo shark using Solexa technology as well as further elucidation of the regulatory role of piRNAs in whitespotted bamboo shark liver. These findings may provide a useful resource and may facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies against liver damage. PMID:27267405

  19. Nuclear safety in EU candidate countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-01

    Nuclear safety in the candidate countries to the European Union is a major issue that needs to be addressed in the framework of the enlargement process. Therefore WENRA members considered it was their duty to offer their technical assistance to their Governments and the European Union Institutions. They decided to express their collective opinion on nuclear safety in those candidate countries having at least one nuclear power plant: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. The report is structured as follows: A foreword including background information, structure of the report and the methodology used, General conclusions of WENRA members reflecting their collective opinion, For each candidate country, an executive summary, a chapter on the status of the regulatory regime and regulatory body, and a chapter on the nuclear power plant safety status. Two annexes are added to address the generic safety characteristics and safety issues for RBMK and VVER plants. The report does not cover radiation protection and decommissioning issues, while safety aspects of spent fuel and radioactive waste management are only covered as regards on-site provisions. In order to produce this report, WENRA used different means: For the chapters on the regulatory regimes and regulatory bodies, experts from WENRA did the work. For the chapters on nuclear power plant safety status, experts from WENRA and from French and German technical support organisations did the work. Taking into account the contents of these chapters, WENRA has formulated its general conclusions in this report.

  20. Regulatory Mechanisms of the Molecular Pathways in Fibrosis Induced by MicroRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui; Zheng, Si-Dao; Wu, Hong-Jin; Chen, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) play critical roles in the fibrotic process in different organs. We summarized the latest research progress on the roles and mechanisms of miRNAs in the regulation of the molecular signaling pathways involved in fibrosis. Data Sources: Papers published in English from January 2010 to August 2015 were selected from the PubMed and Web of Science databases using the search terms “microRNA”, “miR”, “transforming growth factor β”, “tgf β”, “mitogen-activated protein kinase”, “mapk”, “integrin”, “p38”, “c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase”, “jnk”, “extracellular signal-regulated kinase”, “erk”, and “fibrosis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the regulatory effects of miRNAs on molecular signaling pathways involved in the fibrosis. Results: Recent evidence has shown that miRNAs are involved in regulating fibrosis by targeting different substrates in the molecular processes that drive fibrosis, such as immune cell sensitization, effector cell activation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Moreover, several important molecular signaling pathways involve in fibrosis, such as the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and the integrin pathway are regulated by miRNAs. Third, regulation of the fibrotic pathways induced by miRNAs is found in many other tissues in addition to the heart, lung, liver, and kidney. Interestingly, the actions of many drugs on the human body are also induced by miRNAs. It is encouraging that the fibrotic process can be blocked or reversed by targeting specific miRNAs and their signaling pathways, thereby protecting the structures and functions of different organs. Conclusions: miRNAs not only regulate molecular signaling pathways in fibrosis but also serve as potential targets of novel therapeutic interventions for fibrosing diseases. PMID:27647197

  1. Abberent expression of oncogenic and tumor-suppressive microRNAs and their target genes in human adenocarcinoma alveolar basal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Tafsiri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The significant differential expression level of these miRNAs made them as candidate biomarkers in NSCLC tumor tissues of patients. Perhaps Bcl-2 down-regulation and Akt-3 up-regulation can be linked with survival signals in A549 cell line. We can conclude that Bcl-2 and Akt-3 might be therapeutic targets to inhibit cell proliferation in NSCLC.

  2. De novo transcriptome sequencing reveals a considerable bias in the incidence of simple sequence repeats towards the downstream of 'Pre-miRNAs' of black pepper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Joy

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing has an advantageon transformational development of species with limited available sequence data as it helps to decode the genome and transcriptome. We carried out the de novo sequencing using illuminaHiSeq™ 2000 to generate the first leaf transcriptome of black pepper (Piper nigrum L., an important spice variety native to South India and also grown in other tropical regions. Despite the economic and biochemical importance of pepper, a scientifically rigorous study at the molecular level is far from complete due to lack of sufficient sequence information and cytological complexity of its genome. The 55 million raw reads obtained, when assembled using Trinity program generated 2,23,386 contigs and 1,28,157 unigenes. Reports suggest that the repeat-rich genomic regions give rise to small non-coding functional RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are the most abundant type of non-coding regulatory RNAs. In spite of the widespread research on miRNAs, little is known about the hair-pin precursors of miRNAs bearing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs. We used the array of transcripts generated, for the in silico prediction and detection of '43 pre-miRNA candidates bearing different types of SSR motifs'. The analysis identified 3913 different types of SSR motifs with an average of one SSR per 3.04 MB of thetranscriptome. About 0.033% of the transcriptome constituted 'pre-miRNA candidates bearing SSRs'. The abundance, type and distribution of SSR motifs studied across the hair-pin miRNA precursors, showed a significant bias in the position of SSRs towards the downstream of predicted 'pre-miRNA candidates'. The catalogue of transcripts identified, together with the demonstration of reliable existence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors, permits future opportunities for understanding the genetic mechanism of black pepper and likely functions of 'tandem repeats' in miRNAs.

  3. Identification and profiling of conserved and novel microRNAs in Laodelphax striatellus in response to rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Min Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules that play important roles in various biological processes. This study examined microRNA profiles of Laodelphax striatellus using the small RNA libraries derived from virus free (VF and rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV infected (RB insects. A total of 59 mature miRNAs (46 miRNA families were identified as conserved insect miRNAs in both VF and RB libraries. Among these conserved miRNAs, 24 were derived from the two arms of 12 miRNA precursors. Nine conserved L. striatellus miRNAs were up-regulated and 12 were down-regulated in response to RBSDV infection. In addition, a total of 20 potential novel miRNA candidates were predicted in the VF and RB libraries. The miRNA transcriptome profiles and the identification of L. striatellus miRNAs differentially expressed in response to RBSDV infection will contribute to future studies to elucidate the complex miRNA-mediated regulatory network activated by pathogen challenge in insect vectors.

  4. The potential of circulating extracellular small RNAs (smexRNA in veterinary diagnostics—Identifying biomarker signatures by multivariate data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spornraft Melanie

    2015-09-01

    After running the data evaluation pipeline, the proportion of miRNAs (microRNAs and piRNAs (PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNAs on the total sequenced reads was calculated. Additionally, top 10 signatures were compared which revealed that the readcount data sets were highly affected by the most abundant miRNA and piRNA profiles. To evaluate the discriminative power of multivariate data analyses to identify animals after veterinary drug application on the basis of smexRNAs, OPLS-DA was performed. In summary, the quality of miRNA models using all mapped reads for both treatment groups (animals treated with steroid hormones or the β-agonist clenbuterol is predominant to those generated with combined data sets or piRNAs alone. Using multivariate projection methodologies like OPLS-DA have proven the best potential to generate discriminative miRNA models, supported by small RNA-Seq data. Based on the presented comparative OPLS-DA, miRNAs are the favorable smexRNA biomarker candidates in the research field of veterinary drug abuse.

  5. Identification of novel growth phase- and media-dependent small non-coding RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes M49 using intergenic tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patenge Nadja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have attracted attention as a new class of gene regulators in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Genome-wide screening methods have been successfully applied in Gram-negative bacteria to identify sRNA regulators. Many sRNAs are well characterized, including their target mRNAs and mode of action. In comparison, little is known about sRNAs in Gram-positive pathogens. In this study, we identified novel sRNAs in the exclusively human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes M49 (Group A Streptococcus, GAS M49, employing a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. GAS is an important pathogen that causes diseases ranging from mild superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes of the naso-pharynx, to severe toxic and invasive diseases. Results We identified 55 putative sRNAs in GAS M49 that were expressed during growth. Of these, 42 were novel. Some of the newly-identified sRNAs belonged to one of the common non-coding RNA families described in the Rfam database. Comparison of the results of our screen with the outcome of two recently published bioinformatics tools showed a low level of overlap between putative sRNA genes. Previously, 40 potential sRNAs have been reported to be expressed in a GAS M1T1 serotype, as detected by a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. Our screen detected 12 putative sRNA genes that were expressed in both strains. Twenty sRNA candidates appeared to be regulated in a medium-dependent fashion, while eight sRNA genes were regulated throughout growth in chemically defined medium. Expression of candidate genes was verified by reverse transcriptase-qPCR. For a subset of sRNAs, the transcriptional start was determined by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR analysis. Conclusions In accord with the results of previous studies, we found little overlap between different screening methods, which underlines the fact that a comprehensive analysis of sRNAs

  6. Cross-packaging of genetically distinct mouse and primate retroviral RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaballah Soumeya

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is unique from other retroviruses in having multiple viral promoters, which can be regulated by hormones in a tissue specific manner. This unique property has lead to increased interest in studying MMTV replication with the hope of developing MMTV based vectors for human gene therapy. However, it has recently been reported that related as well as unrelated retroviruses can cross-package each other's genome raising safety concerns towards the use of candidate retroviral vectors for human gene therapy. Therefore, using a trans complementation assay, we looked at the ability of MMTV RNA to be cross-packaged and propagated by an unrelated primate Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV that has intracellular assembly process similar to that of MMTV. Results Our results revealed that MMTV and MPMV RNAs could be cross-packaged by the heterologous virus particles reciprocally suggesting that pseudotyping between two genetically distinct retroviruses can take place at the RNA level. However, the cross-packaged RNAs could not be propagated further indicating a block at post-packaging events in the retroviral life cycle. To further confirm that the specificity of cross-packaging was conferred by the packaging sequences (ψ, we cloned the packaging sequences of these viruses on expression plasmids that generated non-viral RNAs. Test of these non-viral RNAs confirmed that the reciprocal cross-packaging was primarily due to the recognition of ψ by the heterologous virus proteins. Conclusion The results presented in this study strongly argue that MPMV and MMTV are promiscuous in their ability to cross-package each other's genome suggesting potential RNA-protein interactions among divergent retroviral RNAs proposing that these interactions are more complicated than originally thought. Furthermore, these observations raise the possibility that MMTV and MPMV genomes could also co-package providing substrates for

  7. Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cytoplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farooq Rashid; Abdullah Shah; Ge Shan

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from eukaryotic genome are important regulators in different aspects of cellular events. Cytoplasm is the residence and the site of action for many lncRNAs. The cytoplasmic lncRNAs play indispensable roles with multiple molecular mechanisms in animal and human cells. In this review, we mainly talk about functions and the underlying mechanisms of lncRNAs in the cytoplasm. We highlight relatively well-studied examples of cytoplasmic lncRNAs for their roles in modulating mRNA stability, regulating mRNA translation, serving as competing endogenous RNAs, functioning as precursors of microRNAs, and mediating protein modifications. We also elaborate the perspectives of cytoplasmic lncRNA studies.

  8. The mitochondrial genome encodes abundant small noncoding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seungil Ro; Hsiu-Yen Ma; Chanjae Park; Nicole Ortogero; Rui Song; Grant W Hennig; Huili Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs identified thus far are all encoded by the nuclear genome.Here,we report that the murine and human mitochondriai genomes encode thousands of small noncoding RNAs,which are predominantly derived from the sense transcripts of the mitochondrial genes (host genes),and we termed these small RNAs mitochondrial genome-encoded small RNAs (mitosRNAs).DICER inactivation affected,but did not completely abolish mitosRNA production.MitosRNAs appear to be products of currently unidentified mitochondrial ribonucleases.Overexpression of mitosRNAs enhanced expression levels of their host genes in vitro,and dysregulated mitosRNA expression was generally associated with aberrant mitochondrial gene expression in vivo.Our data demonstrate that in addition to 37 known mitochondrial genes,the mammalian mitochondrial genome also encodes abundant mitosRNAs,which may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial gene expression in the cell.

  9. An annotated history of container candidate material selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper documents events in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project that have influenced the selection of metals and alloys proposed for fabrication of waste package containers for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The time period from 1981 to 1988 is covered in this annotated history. The history traces the candidate materials that have been considered at different stages of site characterization planning activities. At present, six candidate materials are considered and described in the 1988 Consultation Draft of the NNWSI Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The six materials are grouped into two alloy families, copper-base materials and iron to nickel-base materials with an austenitic structure. The three austenitic candidates resulted from a 1983 survey of a longer list of candidate materials; the other three candidates resulted from a special request from DOE in 1984 to evaluate copper and copper-base alloys. 24 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Deregulated microRNAs in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetatos, Leonidas; Vartholomatos, George

    2012-02-15

    MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAS involved in gene expression regulation under physiological and pathological situations. They bind to mRNA of target genes and are potential regulators of gene expression at a post-transcription level through the RNA interference pathway. They are estimated to represent 1% to 2% of the known eukaryotic genome, and it has been demonstrated that they are involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, metabolism disorders, and heart disease. MicroRNAs are known to act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes in cancer biology. The authors describe the current knowledge on microRNA involvement in regulatory pathways that characterize multiple myeloma pathogenesis gained from in vitro and in vivo studies. These small molecules interact with important factors such as p53, SOCS1, IGF-1, IGF-1R, vascular endothelial growth factor, NF-κB, and others. As such, microRNAs represent an attractive therapeutic target in the context of multiple myeloma interfering with the myeloma regulatory networks. Further studies are needed to better understand their role in myelomagenesis and their therapeutic potential.

  11. Small RNAs tell big stories in Whistler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seila, Amy C; Sharp, Phillip A

    2008-06-01

    The Keystone Symposium on RNAi, microRNA and non-coding RNA convened on March 25-30 at Whistler Resort in Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. Researchers with backgrounds in different biochemical disciplines came together to exchange ideas on short RNAs and their roles in a host of biological processes.

  12. MicroRNAs in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong Y Park; James Helm; Domenico Coppola; Donghwa Kim; Mokenge Malafa; Seung Joon Kim

    2011-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a lethal cancer for which the only chance of long-term survival belongs to the patient with localized disease in whom a potentially curative resection can be done.Therefore,biomarkers for early detection and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed.miRNAs are a recently discovered class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs of about 22 nucleotides that have gained attention for their role in downregulation of mRNA expression at the posttranscriptional level.miRNAs regulate proteins involved in critical cellular processes such as differentiation,proliferation,and apoptosis.Evidence suggests that deregulated miRNA expression is involved in carcinogenesis at many sites,including the pancreas.Aberrant expression of miRNAs may upregulate the expression of oncogenes or downregulate the expression of tumor suppressor genes,as well as play a role in other mechanisms of carcinogenesis.The purpose of this review is to summarize our knowledge of deregulated miRNA expression in pancreatic cancer and discuss the implication for potential translation of this knowledge into clinical practice.

  13. MicroRNAs horizon in retinoblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mirakholi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the retinoblastoma research, it is of great interest to identify molecular markers associated with the genetics of tumorigenesis. microRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play a regulatory role in many crucial cellular pathways such as differentiation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. A body of evidences showed dysregulation of miRNAs in tumor biology and many diseases. They potentially play a significant role in tumorigenesis processes and have been the subject of research in many types of cancers including retinal tumorigenesis. miRNA expression profiling was found to be associated with tumor development, progression and treatment. These associations demonstrate the putative applications of miRNAs in monitoring of different aspect of tumors consisting diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic. Herein, we review the current literature concerning to the study of miRNA target recognition, function to tumorigenesis and treatment in retinoblastoma. Identification the specific miRNA biomarkers associated with retinoblastoma cancer may help to establish new therapeutic approaches for salvage affected eyes in patients.

  14. The miRacle in Pancreatic Cancer by miRNAs: Tiny Angels or Devils in Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawa, Zuhair; Haque, Inamul; Ghosh, Arnab; Banerjee, Snigdha; Harris, LaCoiya; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive malignancy with increasing incidence and high mortality. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment of patients with PDAC. Because of the late presentation of the disease, about 20 percent of patients are candidates for this treatment. The average survival of resected patients is between 12 and 20 months, with a high probability of relapse. Standard chemo and radiation therapies do not offer significant improvement of the survival of these patients. Furthermore, novel treatment options aimed at targeting oncogenes or growth factors in pancreatic cancer have proved unsuccessful. Thereby, identifying new biomarkers that can detect early stages of this disease is of critical importance. Among these biomarkers, microRNAs (miRNAs) have supplied a profitable recourse and become an attractive focus of research in PDAC. MiRNAs regulate many genes involved in the development of PDAC through mRNA degradation or translation inhibition. The possibility of intervention in the molecular mechanisms of miRNAs regulation could begin a new generation of PDAC therapies. This review summarizes the reports describing miRNAs involvement in cellular processes involving pancreatic carcinogenesis and their utility in diagnosis, survival and therapeutic potential in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27240340

  15. High-throughput sequencing reveals differential regulation of miRNAs in fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant Beckmannia syzigachne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lang; Wang, Zhaoyun; Cai, Jia; Gao, Haitao; Zhao, Hongwei; Dong, Liyao

    2016-01-01

    Non-target site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is an increasing concern for weed control. The majority of previous studies have focused on metabolic resistance mechanisms of NTSR, but no research exists on gene regulation mechanisms behind herbicide resistance, such as microRNA (miRNA). Here, we identified 3 American sloughgrass (Beckmannia syzigachne Steud.) populations containing fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant plants. We then constructed small RNA libraries and subjected them to deep sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Forty known and 36 potentially novel, predicted miRNAs were successfully identified. Of these, we identified 3 conserved, predicted candidate NTSR-determinant miRNAs and their potential corresponding target genes, as well as 4 novel potential miRNAs with high count. Target gene prediction and annotation indicated that these 7 differentially expressed miRNAs potentially play a role in regulating specific stress-responsive genes, very likely related to herbicide resistance. Expression profiles were determined with quantitative real-time PCR. The present study is a novel, large-scale characterization of weed miRNAs. The results should further our understanding of miRNA expression profiles associated with herbicide resistance, allowing for the development of more effective weed management strategies. PMID:27353151

  16. High-throughput sequencing reveals differential regulation of miRNAs in fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant Beckmannia syzigachne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lang; Wang, Zhaoyun; Cai, Jia; Gao, Haitao; Zhao, Hongwei; Dong, Liyao

    2016-01-01

    Non-target site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is an increasing concern for weed control. The majority of previous studies have focused on metabolic resistance mechanisms of NTSR, but no research exists on gene regulation mechanisms behind herbicide resistance, such as microRNA (miRNA). Here, we identified 3 American sloughgrass (Beckmannia syzigachne Steud.) populations containing fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant plants. We then constructed small RNA libraries and subjected them to deep sequencing and bioinformatics analyses. Forty known and 36 potentially novel, predicted miRNAs were successfully identified. Of these, we identified 3 conserved, predicted candidate NTSR-determinant miRNAs and their potential corresponding target genes, as well as 4 novel potential miRNAs with high count. Target gene prediction and annotation indicated that these 7 differentially expressed miRNAs potentially play a role in regulating specific stress-responsive genes, very likely related to herbicide resistance. Expression profiles were determined with quantitative real-time PCR. The present study is a novel, large-scale characterization of weed miRNAs. The results should further our understanding of miRNA expression profiles associated with herbicide resistance, allowing for the development of more effective weed management strategies. PMID:27353151

  17. Molecular call and response: the physiology of bacterial small RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Gregory R.; Vanderpool, Carin K.

    2011-01-01

    The vital role of bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) in cellular regulation is now well-established. Although many diverse mechanisms by which sRNAs effect changes in gene expression have been thoroughly described, comparatively less is known about their biological roles and effects on cell physiology. Nevertheless, for some sRNAs, insight has been gained into the intricate regulatory interplay that is required to sense external environmental and internal metabolic cues and turn them into physiolog...

  18. The role of microRNAs in bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ENOKIDA, HIDEKI; YOSHINO, HIROFUMI; Matsushita, Ryosuke; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of muscle invasive BC is poor, and recurrence is common after radical surgery or chemotherapy. Therefore, new diagnostic methods and treatment modalities are critical. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small noncoding RNAs, regulate the expression of protein-coding genes by repressing translation or cleaving RNA transcripts in a sequence-specific manner. miRNAs ...

  19. MicroRNAs in multiple myeloma and related bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Marco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non coding RNAs aberrantly expressed in solid and hematopoietic malignancies where they play a pivotal function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Recent reports have unveiled a central role of miRNAs in multiple myeloma onset and progression and preclinical findings are progressively disclosing their potential therapeutic value as drugs or targets. In this review, we provide the basic insights of miRNA biology and function, showing how these m...

  20. Identification of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR analysis of microRNAs and mRNAs in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassol, Daniela; Cruz, Fernanda P; Espindola, Kauê; Mangeon, Amanda; Müller, Caroline; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Corrêa, Régis L; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is one of the most powerful and sensitive techniques to the study of gene expression. Several factors influence RT-qPCR performance though, including the stability of the reference genes used for data normalization. While the selection of appropriate reference genes is crucial for accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, no suitable reference genes have been previously identified in castor bean under drought stress. In this study, the expression stability of eleven mRNAs, thirteen microRNAs (miRNAs) and one small nuclear RNA were analyzed in roots and leaves across different levels of water deficit. Three different algorithms were employed to analyze the RT-qPCR data, and the resulting outputs were merged using a non-weighted unsupervised rank aggregation method. Our analysis indicated that the Elongation factor 1-beta (EF1B), Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and ADP-ribosylation factor (ADP) ranked as the best candidates across diverse samples submitted to different levels of drought conditions. EF1B and Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and EF1B and SKP1/ASK-interacting protein 16 (SKIP16) were found as the most suitable reference genes for expression analysis in roots and leaves, respectively. In addition, miRNAs miR168, miR160 and miR397 were selected as optimal reference genes across all tissues and treatments. miR168 and miR156 were recommended as reference for roots, while miR168 and miR160 were recommended for leaves. Together, our results constitute the first attempt to identify and validate the most suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in castor bean under drought stress.

  1. Identification of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR analysis of microRNAs and mRNAs in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassol, Daniela; Cruz, Fernanda P; Espindola, Kauê; Mangeon, Amanda; Müller, Caroline; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Corrêa, Régis L; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is one of the most powerful and sensitive techniques to the study of gene expression. Several factors influence RT-qPCR performance though, including the stability of the reference genes used for data normalization. While the selection of appropriate reference genes is crucial for accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, no suitable reference genes have been previously identified in castor bean under drought stress. In this study, the expression stability of eleven mRNAs, thirteen microRNAs (miRNAs) and one small nuclear RNA were analyzed in roots and leaves across different levels of water deficit. Three different algorithms were employed to analyze the RT-qPCR data, and the resulting outputs were merged using a non-weighted unsupervised rank aggregation method. Our analysis indicated that the Elongation factor 1-beta (EF1B), Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and ADP-ribosylation factor (ADP) ranked as the best candidates across diverse samples submitted to different levels of drought conditions. EF1B and Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and EF1B and SKP1/ASK-interacting protein 16 (SKIP16) were found as the most suitable reference genes for expression analysis in roots and leaves, respectively. In addition, miRNAs miR168, miR160 and miR397 were selected as optimal reference genes across all tissues and treatments. miR168 and miR156 were recommended as reference for roots, while miR168 and miR160 were recommended for leaves. Together, our results constitute the first attempt to identify and validate the most suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in castor bean under drought stress. PMID:27156134

  2. A heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is present in the axons of primary sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschrafi, Armaz; Kar, Amar N; Gale, Jenna R; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Vargas, Jose Noberto S; Sales, Naomi; Wilson, Gabriel; Tompkins, Miranda; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are enriched in subcellular regions of high energy consumption, such as axons and pre-synaptic nerve endings. Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial maintenance in these distal structural/functional domains of the neuron depends on the "in-situ" translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs. In support of this notion, we recently provided evidence for the axonal targeting of several nuclear-encoded mRNAs, such as cytochrome c oxidase, subunit 4 (COXIV) and ATP synthase, H+ transporting and mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C1 (ATP5G1). Furthermore, we showed that axonal trafficking and local translation of these mRNAs plays a critical role in the generation of axonal ATP. Using a global gene expression analysis, this study identified a highly diverse population of nuclear-encoded mRNAs that were enriched in the axon and presynaptic nerve terminals. Among this population of mRNAs, fi