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Sample records for candidate reference material

  1. Characterization of nanoparticles as candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the characterization of three different nanoparticles (silica, silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) as candidate reference material. We focus our analysis on the size distribution of those particles as measured by different microscopy techniques. (author)

  2. Characterization of nanoparticles as candidate reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins Ferreira, E.H.; Robertis, E. de; Landi, S.M.; Gouvea, C.P.; Archanjo, B.S.; Almeida, C.A.; Araujo, J.R. de; Kuznetsov, O.; Achete, C.A., E-mail: smlandi@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    We report the characterization of three different nanoparticles (silica, silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) as candidate reference material. We focus our analysis on the size distribution of those particles as measured by different microscopy techniques. (author)

  3. Recent production of candidate reference materials at IRMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, G.N.; Pauwels, J.; Le Guern, L.; Schimmel, H.; Trapmann, S. [Commission of the European Communities, Geel (Belgium). Joint Research Centre

    2001-06-01

    In the execution of its mission to promote a common European measurement system in support of EU policies, IRMM's Reference Materials Unit is currently involved in preparation of proficiency-testing samples and candidate reference materials. Recent work related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cows, genetically modified organisms, and a variety of environmental materials is described. (orig.)

  4. Homogeneity study of candidate reference material in fish matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A material is perfectly homogeneous with respect to a given characteristic, or composition, if there is no difference between the values obtained from one part to another. Homogeneity is usually evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). However, the requirement that populations of data to be processed must have a normal distribution and equal variances greatly limits the use of this statistical tool. A more suitable test for assessing the homogeneity of RMs, known as sufficient homogeneity, was proposed by Fearn and Thompson. In this work, we evaluate the performance of the two statistical treatments for assessing homogeneity of methylmercury (MeHg) in candidate reference material of fish tissue

  5. Element content and particle size characterization of a mussel candidate reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A., E-mail: emoreira@ipen.b, E-mail: mbvascon@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro do Reator de Pesquisas; Santos, Rafaela G. dos; Martinelli, Jose R., E-mail: jroberto@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Materiais

    2011-07-01

    The use of certified reference materials is an important tool in the quality assurance of analytical measurements. To assure reliability on recently prepared powder reference materials, not only the characterization of the property values of interest and their corresponding uncertainties, but also physical properties such as the particle size distribution must be well evaluated. Narrow particle size distributions are preferable than larger ones; as different size particles may have different analyte content. Due to this fact, the segregation of the coarse and the fine particles in a bottle may lead to inhomogeneity of the reference material, which should be avoided. In this study the element content as well as the particle size distribution of a mussel candidate reference material produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP was investigated. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis was applied to the determination of 15 elements in seven fractions of the material with different particle size distributions. Subsamples of the materials were irradiated simultaneously with elemental standards at the IEA-R1 research nuclear reactor and the induced gamma ray energies were measured in a hyperpure germanium detector. Three vials of the candidate reference material and three coarser fractions, collected during the preparation, were analyzed by Laser Diffraction Particle Analysis to determine the particle size distribution. Differences on element content were detected for fractions with different particle size distribution, indicating the importance of particle size control for biological reference materials. From the particle size analysis, Gaussian particle size distribution was observed for the candidate reference material with mean particle size {mu} = 94.6 {+-} 0.8 {mu}m. (author)

  6. Analysis of candidate micro-reference materials of lichen and algae by SRXRF and PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two micro-analysis techniques, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and macro-proton induced X-ray emission (macro-PIXE), were used in a homogeneity test of two candidate reference materials (RMs), lichen IAEA-338 and algae IAEA-413 (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA), in the present work. The two candidate RMs had good homogeneity with the minimum sampling mass of 10 mg required for micro-analytical nuclear techniques. The elemental content in the RMs was also determined by macro-PIXE. The relative homogeneity factors HE of elements in the RMs were estimated on the base of our macro-PIXE results

  7. Certification of a new biological reference material - Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) and homogeneity study by NAA on this and other candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the laboratory's participation in the interlaboratory comparison run where the laboratory applied neutron activation analysis aimed at certification of the candidate reference material. Data evaluation and statistical treatment steps are discussed. The report also describes homogeneity study on the reference material and provides details of the analytical procedures

  8. A feasibility study for producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for the polyether ionophore salinomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rosana Gomes; Monteiro, Mychelle Alves; Pereira, Mararlene Ulberg; da Costa, Rafaela Pinto; Spisso, Bernardete Ferraz; Calado, Veronica

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for salinomycin. Preservation techniques investigated were freeze-drying and spray drying dehydration. Homogeneity and stability studies of the produced batches were conducted according to ISO Guides 34 and 35. The results showed that all produced batches were homogeneous and both freeze-drying and spray drying techniques were suitable for matrix dehydrating, ensuring the material stability. In order to preserve the material integrity, it must be transported within the temperature range of -20 up to 25°C. The results constitute an important step towards the development of an egg matrix reference material for salinomycin is possible. PMID:27216677

  9. Value determination of ZrO2 in-house reference material (RM) candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value determination of zirconium oxide in-house reference materials (RM) candidate has been done by referring to ISO:35-2006 standard. The raw material of RM was 4 kg of ZrO2, Merck, that was dried at 90°C for 2×6 hours in a closed room. The samples were crushed with stainless steel (SS) pestle to pass ≤ 200 mesh sieve, homogenized in a homogenizer for 3×6 hours to obtain the powdered, dried and homogenous samples. The gravimetric method was performed to test the moisture content, while XRF and AAS methods were used to test the homogeneity and stability of samples candidates. Reference material (RM) candidates of ZrO2 powder were put into polyethylene bottles, each weighing 100 g. Samples were distributed to 10 testing laboratories that have been accredited for testing the composition of the oxide contents and loss of ignition (LOI) using variety of analytical methods that have been validated such as AAS, XRF, NAA, and UV-Vis. The testing results of oxide content and loss of ignition parameters from various laboratories were analyzed using statistical methods. The testing data of oxide concentration in zirconium oxide RM candidates obtained from various laboratories were ZrO2: 97.7334 ± 0.0016%, HfO2: 1.7329 ± 0.0024%, SiO2: 30.1224 ± 0.0053%, Al2O3: 0.0245 ± 0.0015%, TiO2: 0.0153 ± 0.0006%, Fe2O3: 0.0068 ± 0.0005%, CdO: 3.1798 ± 0.00006 ppm, and the LOI results was = 0.0217 ± 0.00022%. (author)

  10. Candidate BCR reference materials for arsenic and selenium determinations in human serum and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pilot production of candidate reference materials for the quality assurance and statistical control of methods to determine toxic trace elements in biological samples is described. In the initial phase the project concerns a lyophilized human blood material containing Cd and Pb, a lyophilized human urine material containing As, Cd, Co and Cr, and a liquid human serum material with Al, Se and Zn at three different levels, representative of environmental and occupational exposure. The homogeneity and stability of the pilot batches were investigated by determining Al and Zn in serum, As in urine, Cd and Pb in blood at the medium level. The pilot batches produced were deemed to be homogeneous with respect to all the trace elements tested, and there was no indication of thermal instability except that the arsenic levels decreased significantly with time at 200 deg., 370 deg. and 450 deg. C. Thirty-two laboratories from 12 different countries participated in an intercomparison round organized to test the suitability of the reference material and validate the methodological approaches for certification purposes. Focusing on the neutron activation results, the outcome of this first intercomparison exercise demonstrates that the comparability of the calibration standards needs improvement. Therefore, for the certification round stronger efforts will be undertaken to document the spiked concentrations and to reduce their uncertainties, and the laboratories will be required to meet defined quality criteria for the checking and documentation of traceability. (author)

  11. Short-term stability test for thorium soil candidate a reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clain, Almir F.; Fonseca, Adelaide M.G.; Dantas, Vanessa V.D.B.; Braganca, Maura J.C.; Souza, Poliana S., E-mail: almir@ird.gov.br, E-mail: adelaide@ird.gov.br, E-mail: vanessa@ird.gov.br, E-mail: maura@ird.gov.br, E-mail: poliana@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work describes a methodology to determine the soil short-term stability after the steps of production in laboratory. The short-term stability of the soil is an essential property to be determined in order to producing a reference material. The soil is a candidate of reference material for chemical analysis of thorium with metrological traceability to be used in environmental analysis, equipment calibration, validation methods, and quality control. A material is considered stable in a certain temperature if the property of interest does not change with time, considering the analytical random fluctuations. Due to this, the angular coefficient from the graphic of Th concentration versus elapsed time must be near to zero. The analytical determinations of thorium concentration were performed by Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis. The slopes and their uncertainties were obtained from the regression lines at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, with control temperature of -20 deg C. From the obtained data a t-test was applied. In both temperatures the calculated t-value was lower than the critical value, so we can conclude with 95% confidence level that no significant changes happened during the period studied concerning thorium concentration in soil at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, showing stability at these temperatures. (author)

  12. Short-term stability test for thorium soil candidate a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a methodology to determine the soil short-term stability after the steps of production in laboratory. The short-term stability of the soil is an essential property to be determined in order to producing a reference material. The soil is a candidate of reference material for chemical analysis of thorium with metrological traceability to be used in environmental analysis, equipment calibration, validation methods, and quality control. A material is considered stable in a certain temperature if the property of interest does not change with time, considering the analytical random fluctuations. Due to this, the angular coefficient from the graphic of Th concentration versus elapsed time must be near to zero. The analytical determinations of thorium concentration were performed by Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis. The slopes and their uncertainties were obtained from the regression lines at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, with control temperature of -20 deg C. From the obtained data a t-test was applied. In both temperatures the calculated t-value was lower than the critical value, so we can conclude with 95% confidence level that no significant changes happened during the period studied concerning thorium concentration in soil at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, showing stability at these temperatures. (author)

  13. Provisional Assessment of Candidate High-Temperature Thermal Conductivity Reference Materials in the EMRP “Thermo” Project

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, J.; Morrell, R; T. Fry; Gnaniah, S.; Gohil, D.; Dawson, A.; Hameury, J.; Koenen, Alain; Hammerschmidt, U.; Turzó-András, E.; Strnad, R.; Blahut, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the provisional assessment of a short list of four candidate high-temperature thermal conductivity reference materials in a European research project, “Thermo.” These four candidate materials are low-density calcium silicate, amorphous silica, high-density calcium silicate, and exfoliated vermiculite. Based on initial tests on material composition and microstructure changes, dimensional stability, mechanical stability, chemical stability and uniformity, the best two can...

  14. Application of INAA complementary gamma ray photopeaks to homogeneity study of candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization and certification of reference materials, RMs, is a complex task involving many steps. One of them is the homogeneity testing to assure that key property values will not present variation among RM bottles. Good precision is the most important figure of merit of an analytical technique to allow it to be used in the homogeneity testing of candidate RMs. Due to its inherent characteristics, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, INAA, is an analytical technique of choice for homogeneity testing. Problems with sample digestion and contamination from reagents are not an issue in INAA, as solid samples are analyzed directly. For element determination via INAA, the activity of a suitable gamma ray decay photopeak for an element is chosen and it is compared to the activity of a standard of the element. An interesting possibility is the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks (for the elements that present them) to confirm the homogeneity test results for an element. In this study, an investigation of the use of the complementary gamma ray photopeaks of 110mAg, 82Br, 60Co, 134Cs, 152Eu, 59Fe, 140La, 233Pa (for Th determination), 46Sc and 75Se radionuclides was undertaken in the between bottle homogeneity study of a mussel candidate RM under preparation at IPEN - CNEN/SP. Although some photopeaks led to biased element content results, the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks proved to be helpful in supporting homogeneity study conclusions of new RMs. (author)

  15. Assessment of commutability for candidate certified reference material ERM-BB130 "chloramphenicol in pork".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleny, Reinhard; Emteborg, Håkan; Schimmel, Heinz

    2010-10-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP), an effective antibiotic against many microorganisms, is meanwhile banned in the EU for treatment of food-producing animals due to adverse health effects. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) is currently developing a certified reference material (CRM) for CAP in pork, intended for validation and method performance verifications of analytical methods. The material will be certified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and has a target CAP level around the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 microg/kg. To prove that the material can be applied as a quality control tool for screening methods, a commutability study was conducted, involving five commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and one biosensor assay (BiaCore kit). Meat homogenates (cryo-milled wet tissue) with CAP concentrations around the MRPL and the candidate CRM (lyophilised powder) were measured by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS as well as the six screening methods. Pairwise method comparisons of results obtained for the two sample types showed that the CRM can successfully be applied as quality control (QC) sample to all six screening methods. The study suggests that ERM-BB130 is sufficiently commutable with the investigated assays and that laboratories applying one of the investigated kits therefore benefit from using ERM-BB130 to demonstrate the correctness of their results. However, differences among the assays were observed, either in the abundance of bias between screening and confirmatory LC and GC methods, the repeatability of test results, or goodness of fit between the methods. PMID:20665007

  16. Preparation and evaluation of the homogeneity of milk as a candidate reference material for carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot project was initiated to study the feasibility of preparing milk as a candidate reference material for 14C near environmental levels. Two materials, MK-B at natural level of 14C and MK-C4 at an elevated level, have been prepared from pasteurized 2% dairy milk. MK-C4 was spiked with an appropriate amount of 14C-methylated casein tracer to achieve the elevated level. Several samples from MK-B and MK-C4 have been analyzed to test the homogeneity of these materials for the distribution of 14C. The samples were combusted in oxygen under 20 atmospheres pressure using a Parr bomb. The 14C concentrations were determined by liquid scintillation counting using Carbo-Sorb/Permafluor E+ cocktail. The results indicate that these materials are homogeneous with respect to 14C concentration even in sub-sample sizes of 0.25 g of the freeze-dried material. The precision of our 14C measurements, as expressed by the % relative standard deviation, is within 5%. The accuracy has been tested by analyzing replicate samples of the IAEA 14C quality assurance materials, C-3 (cellulose) and C-6 (ANU sucrose) and found to be within 3%. The lower limits of detection are 0.08, 0.05 and 0.02 Bq.g-1 of carbon for 20 ml of liquid scintillation mixture (Carbo-Sorb/Permafluor E+ = ∼0.67) loaded with up to 0.4g of carbon from the sample and counted for 3 cycles of 60, 180 and 1000 min each, respectively. Our measurements of 14C specific activities of MK-B and MK-C4 are 0.26 ± 0.01 and 15.3 ± 0.4 Bq.g-1 of carbon, respectively. (author)

  17. Production of candidate natural matrix reference materials for micro-analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneity is considered to be the most vital prerequisite for a certified reference material (CRM); more stringent requirements exist for the analysis of small subsamples. Many of the natural matrix CRMs are prepared from bulk samples by grinding and milling them to a certain particle size, which is expected to provide a more homogenous material; however recommended sample sizes for biological and environmental reference materials are found to be more than 100 mg. Since the milling of materials is costly and has some drawbacks, natural materials that already occur as small particles such as air particulate matter, certain sediments, and cellular biological materials may form the basis of the required reference materials. The nature of these materials, i.e. naturally occurring particles, may provide ideal model reference material. We describe here the production of the materials and preliminary tests, the evaluation for the micro-analytical techniques

  18. A study on homogeneity of the IAEA candidate reference materials for microanalysis and analytical support in the certification of these materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a study on homogeneity of new IAEA candidate reference materials: IAEA 338 Lichen and IAEA 413 Algae in small (ca.10 mg) samples as well as some data contributing to certification of these materials are presented. (author)

  19. Determination of butoxyacetic acid (biomarker of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether exposure) in human urine candidate reference material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sperlingova, I.; Dabrowská, L.; Stránský, V.; Duskova, S.; Kučera, Jan; Tvrdíková, M.; Tichý, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 397, č. 2 (2010), s. 433-438. ISSN 1618-2642. [12th International Symposium on Biological and Environmental Reference Materials Keble Coll. Oxford, 07.07.2009-10.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Candidate reference material * Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether * Metabolite Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.841, year: 2010

  20. Development of a candidate certified reference material of cypermethrin in green tea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A cypermethrin CRM in green tea was developed. ► Using two isotope dilution mass spectrometry techniques for characterization. ► Certified value of 148 μg kg−1 with expanded uncertainty of ±9.2%. ► Support quality assurance of pesticide residue analysis in tea to testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the preparation of a candidate certified reference material (CRM) of cypermethrin in green tea, GLHK-11-01a according to the requirements of ISO Guide 34 and 35. Certification of the material was performed using a newly developed isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) approach, with gas chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (GC–HRMS) and gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (GC–MS/MS). Statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA) showed excellent agreement of the analytical data sets generated from the two mass spectrometric detections. The characterization methods have also been satisfactorily applied in an Asia-Pacific Metrology Program (APMP) interlaboratory comparison study. Both the GC–HRIDMS and GC–IDMS/MS methods proved to be sufficiently reliable and accurate for certification purpose. The certified value of cypermethrin in dry mass fraction was 148 μg kg−1 and the associated expanded uncertainty was 14 μg kg−1. The uncertainty budget was evaluated from sample in homogeneity, long-term and short-term stability and variability in the characterization procedure. GLHK-11-01a is primarily developed to support the local and wider testing community on need basis in quality assurance work and in seeking accreditation.

  1. Assessment of Commutability for Candidate Certified Reference Material ERM-BB130 "Chloramphenicol in Pork"

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleny, Reinhard; EMTEBORG Per; Schimmel, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP), an effective antibiotic against many microorganisms, is meanwhile banned in the EU for treatment of food-producing animals due to adverse health effects. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) is currently developing a certified reference material (CRM) for CAP in pork, intended for validation and method performance verifications of analytical methods. The material will be certified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) a...

  2. Two spruce shoot candidate reference materials from the German environmental specimen bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new materials are introduced that might serve as useful aids for the harmonisation of analytical results. Spruce shoots, cryogenically homogenized and characterized for 50 elements from two sampling sites of the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) are presented as possible third generation reference materials that might also act as calibrating materials in speciation analysis. (author)

  3. Determination of cadmium, lead and zinc in a candidate reference materials using isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing demands placed on analytical laboratories to ensure the reliability of their results, due to the introduction of systems of quality and to the increasing use of metrology in chemical measurements has led most laboratories to validate their methodologies and to control them statistically. One of the techniques used most often for these purposes is based on the use of reference materials. The proper use of these materials means that laboratory results may be traced to the International System of Units, analytical methodologies can be validated, instruments calibrated and chemical measurements harmonized. One of the biggest challenges in developing reference materials is that of certifying their properties, a process that has been defined as assigning a concentration value that is as close as possible to the true value together with its uncertainty. Organizations that produce reference materials use several options for their certification process, and among these is the use of a primary method. Among the primary methods recognized by the International Office of Weights and Measures is the Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry technique. The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, through its Reference Materials Program, has prepared a reference material of clam tissue, which has been chemically defined by different analytical methodologies applied in different national and international laboratories. This work describes the methodology developed with the CIEMAT for determining the elements lead, cadmium and zinc in the clam tissue reference material using the primary technique of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry. The calculation is described for obtaining the spike amounts to be added to the sample and the procedure is explained for carrying out the isotopic exchange. The isotopic relationships 204Pb/205Pb, 111Cd/114Cd and 66Zn/67Zn were determined in an atomic emission spectrometer with a plasma source with the following characteristics: plasma ionization

  4. Homogeneity study on biological candidate reference materials: the role of neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniel P.; Moreira, Edson G., E-mail: dsilva.pereira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis (INAA) is a mature nuclear analytical technique able to accurately determine chemical elements without the need of sample digestion and, hence, without the associated problems of analyte loss or contamination. This feature, along with its potentiality use as a primary method of analysis, makes it an important tool for the characterization of new references materials and in the assessment of their homogeneity status. In this study, the ability of the comparative method of INAA for the within-bottle homogeneity of K, Mg, Mn and V in a mussel reference material was investigated. Method parameters, such as irradiation time, sample decay time and distance from sample to the detector were varied in order to allow element determination in subsamples of different sample masses in duplicate. Sample masses were in the range of 1 to 250 mg and the limitations of the detection limit for small sample masses and dead time distortions for large sample masses were investigated. (author)

  5. Homogeneity study on biological candidate reference materials: the role of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis (INAA) is a mature nuclear analytical technique able to accurately determine chemical elements without the need of sample digestion and, hence, without the associated problems of analyte loss or contamination. This feature, along with its potentiality use as a primary method of analysis, makes it an important tool for the characterization of new references materials and in the assessment of their homogeneity status. In this study, the ability of the comparative method of INAA for the within-bottle homogeneity of K, Mg, Mn and V in a mussel reference material was investigated. Method parameters, such as irradiation time, sample decay time and distance from sample to the detector were varied in order to allow element determination in subsamples of different sample masses in duplicate. Sample masses were in the range of 1 to 250 mg and the limitations of the detection limit for small sample masses and dead time distortions for large sample masses were investigated. (author)

  6. Candidate coffee reference material for element content: production and certification schemes adopted at CENA/USP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a fundamental role in analytical chemistry establishing the traceability of measurement results and assuring accuracy and reliability. In spite of the huge importance of measurements in the food sector, Brazil does not produce CRMs to supply the demand. Consequently the acquisition of CRMs depends on imports at high costs. The coffee sector needs CRMs, however there is no material that represents the coffee composition. Since 1998, the Laboratorio de Radioisotopos (LRi) of CENA/USP has been involved in analysis of coffee. During this period, knowledge has been accumulated about several aspects of coffee, such as system of cultivation, elemental composition, homogeneity of the material, possible contaminants and physical properties of beans. Concomitantly, LRi has concentrated efforts in the field of metrology in chemistry, and now all this expertise is being used as the basis for the production of a coffee certified reference material (CRM) for inorganic element content. The scheme developed for the preparation and certification of coffee RM relies on the ISO Guides 34 and 35. The approaches for selection, collection and preparation of the material, moisture determination method, homogeneity testing, certification and long-term stability testing are discussed and a time frame for the expected accomplishments is provided. (author)

  7. Candidate coffee reference material for element content: production and certification schemes adopted at CENA/USP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliaferro, Fabio Sileno; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Radioisotopos], e-mail: fabiotag@cena.usp.br, e-mail: lis@cena.usp.br, e-mail: mabacchi@cena.usp.br, e-mail: ejfranca@cena.usp.br; Bode, Peter; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.], e-mail: P.Bode@iri.tudelft.nl

    2003-07-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a fundamental role in analytical chemistry establishing the traceability of measurement results and assuring accuracy and reliability. In spite of the huge importance of measurements in the food sector, Brazil does not produce CRMs to supply the demand. Consequently the acquisition of CRMs depends on imports at high costs. The coffee sector needs CRMs, however there is no material that represents the coffee composition. Since 1998, the Laboratorio de Radioisotopos (LRi) of CENA/USP has been involved in analysis of coffee. During this period, knowledge has been accumulated about several aspects of coffee, such as system of cultivation, elemental composition, homogeneity of the material, possible contaminants and physical properties of beans. Concomitantly, LRi has concentrated efforts in the field of metrology in chemistry, and now all this expertise is being used as the basis for the production of a coffee certified reference material (CRM) for inorganic element content. The scheme developed for the preparation and certification of coffee RM relies on the ISO Guides 34 and 35. The approaches for selection, collection and preparation of the material, moisture determination method, homogeneity testing, certification and long-term stability testing are discussed and a time frame for the expected accomplishments is provided. (author)

  8. Testing the homogeneity of candidate reference materials by solid sampling - AAS and INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessity to quantify a natural material's homogeneity with respect to its elemental distribution prior to chemical analysis of a given aliquot is emphasised. Available instruments and methods to obtain the relevant information are described. Additionally the calculation of element specific, relative homogeneity factors, HE, and of a minimum sample mass M5% to achieve 5% precision on a 95% confidence level is given. Especially, in the production and certification of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) this characteristic information should be determined in order to provide the user with additional inherent properties of the CRM to enable more economical use of the expensive material and to evaluate further systematic bias of the applied analytical technique. (author)

  9. Quality assessment of organic coffee beans for the preparation of a candidate reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A random sampling was carried out in the coffee beans collected for the preparation of the organic green coffee reference material in view of assessing the homogeneity and the presence of soil as impurity. Fifteen samples were taken for the between-sample homogeneity evaluation. One of the samples was selected and 10 test portions withdrawn for the within-sample homogeneity evaluation. Br, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, K, Na, Rb, Sc and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The F-test demonstrated that the material is homogeneous for Ca, Co, Cs, K and Sc, but not homogeneous for Br, Fe, Na, Rb and Zn. Results of terrigenous elements suggested negligible soil contamination in the raw material. (author)

  10. Preparation of candidate reference materials for the determination of phosphorus containing flame retardants in styrene-based polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Urpi Bertran, Raquel; Latza, Andreas; Andörfer-Lang, Katrin; Hügelschäffer, Claudia; Pöhlein, Manfred; Puchta, Ralph; Placht, Christian; Maid, Harald; Bauer, Walter; van Eldik, Rudi

    2015-04-01

    Candidate reference materials (RM) for the analysis of phosphorus-based flame retardants in styrene-based polymers were prepared using a self-made mini-extruder. Due to legal requirements of the current restriction for the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, focus now is placed on phosphorus-based flame retardants instead of the brominated kind. Newly developed analytical methods for the first-mentioned substances also require RMs similar to industrial samples for validation and verification purposes. Hence, the prepared candidate RMs contained resorcinol-bis-(diphenyl phosphate), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate), triphenyl phosphate and triphenyl phosphine oxide as phosphorus-based flame retardants. Blends of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-co-butadiene-co-styrene as well as blends of high-impact polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide were chosen as carrier polymers. Homogeneity and thermal stability of the candidate RMs were investigated. Results showed that the candidate RMs were comparable to the available industrial materials. Measurements by ICP/OES, FTIR and NMR confirmed the expected concentrations of the flame retardants and proved that analyte loss and degradation, respectively, was below the uncertainty of measurement during the extrusion process. Thus, the candidate RMs were found to be suitable for laboratory use. PMID:25410641

  11. Development of a candidate reference material for adventitious virus detection in vaccine and biologicals manufacturing by deep sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Edward T Mee; Preston, Mark D.; Minor, Philip D.; ,; Huang, Xuening; Nguyen, Jenny; Wall, David; Hargrove, Stacey; Fu, Thomas; Xu, George; Li, Li; Cote, Colette; Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Background Unbiased deep sequencing offers the potential for improved adventitious virus screening in vaccines and biotherapeutics. Successful implementation of such assays will require appropriate control materials to confirm assay performance and sensitivity. Methods A common reference material containing 25 target viruses was produced and 16 laboratories were invited to process it using their preferred adventitious virus detection assay. Results Fifteen laboratories returned results, obtai...

  12. Development of a candidate reference material for adventitious virus detection in vaccine and biologicals manufacturing by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Edward T.; Preston, Mark D.; Minor, Philip D.; Schepelmann, Silke; Huang, Xuening; Nguyen, Jenny; Wall, David; Hargrove, Stacey; Fu, Thomas; Xu, George; Li, Li; Cote, Colette; Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin; Hewlett, Indira; Simonyan, Vahan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Alin, Voskanian-Kordi; Mermod, Nicolas; Hill, Christiane; Ottenwälder, Birgit; Richter, Daniel C.; Tehrani, Arman; Jacqueline, Weber-Lehmann; Cassart, Jean-Pol; Letellier, Carine; Vandeputte, Olivier; Ruelle, Jean-Louis; Deyati, Avisek; La Neve, Fabio; Modena, Chiara; Mee, Edward; Schepelmann, Silke; Preston, Mark; Minor, Philip; Eloit, Marc; Muth, Erika; Lamamy, Arnaud; Jagorel, Florence; Cheval, Justine; Anscombe, Catherine; Misra, Raju; Wooldridge, David; Gharbia, Saheer; Rose, Graham; Ng, Siemon H.S.; Charlebois, Robert L.; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; Mallet, Laurent; Dorange, Fabien; Chiu, Charles; Naccache, Samia; Kellam, Paul; van der Hoek, Lia; Cotten, Matt; Mitchell, Christine; Baier, Brian S.; Sun, Wenping; Malicki, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unbiased deep sequencing offers the potential for improved adventitious virus screening in vaccines and biotherapeutics. Successful implementation of such assays will require appropriate control materials to confirm assay performance and sensitivity. Methods A common reference material containing 25 target viruses was produced and 16 laboratories were invited to process it using their preferred adventitious virus detection assay. Results Fifteen laboratories returned results, obtained using a wide range of wet-lab and informatics methods. Six of 25 target viruses were detected by all laboratories, with the remaining viruses detected by 4–14 laboratories. Six non-target viruses were detected by three or more laboratories. Conclusion The study demonstrated that a wide range of methods are currently used for adventitious virus detection screening in biological products by deep sequencing and that they can yield significantly different results. This underscores the need for common reference materials to ensure satisfactory assay performance and enable comparisons between laboratories. PMID:26709640

  13. Validation of a liquid chromatographic method for determination of related substances in a candidate certified reference material of captopril

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the validation of a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography method (RP-HPLC with diode array detection (DAD for determination of related substances (impurities from organic synthesis and degradation products of captopril according to the Brazilian Pharmacopeia IV. The aim of this study was to guarantee the method accuracy for quantification of related substances, an essential requisite to determine, using the mass balance approach, the captopril content in the first Brazilian certified reference material (CRM of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, developed by Inmetro. The captopril instability in solution is discussed and the captopril content determined by mass balance is compared to the results from titration and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC.Este artigo descreve a validação de método de cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência em fase reversa (CLAE-RP com detector de fotodiodos (DAD para determinação de substâncias relacionadas (impurezas orgânicas de síntese e produtos de degradação de captopril segundo Farmacopéia Brasileira IV ed. Este estudo teve como objetivo garantir que o método é capaz de quantificar com exatidão o teor de substâncias relacionadas, um requisito essencial para que o teor de captopril seja determinado por balanço de massa no primeiro material de referência certificado (MRC de fármacos brasileiro, o qual foi desenvolvido pelo Inmetro. A instabilidade do captopril em solução é discutida em detalhes e o teor de captopril determinado por balanço de massa é comparado com aqueles obtidos por titulação e por calorimetria exploratória diferencial (DSC.

  14. Assessment of homogeneity of candidate reference material at the nanogram level and investigation on representativeness of single particle analysis using electron probe X ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particulate samples of a candidate reference material are evaluated on their homogeneity from bottle to bottle using electron probe X ray microanalysis technique. The evaluation on the homogeneity is done by the utilization of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics to the processing of the quantitative electron probe X ray microanalysis data. Due to a limitation, existing even in computer controlled electron probe X ray microanalysis, in terms of analysis time and expenses, the number of particles analyzed is much smaller compared to that in the sample. Therefore, it is investigated whether this technique provides representative analysis results for the characteristics of the sample, even though a very small portion of the sample is really analyzed. Furthermore, the required number of particles for the analysis, to insure a certain level of reproducibility, e.g. 5% relative standard deviation, is determined by the application of the Ingamells sampling theory. (author)

  15. Use of neutron activation analysis and LC-ICP-MS in the development of candidate reference materials for As species determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (As) is widely found in marine organisms, mainly as organic arsenical compounds. With the introduction of regulations for As species in foodstuffs and for environmental control, it has become more important to quantify the amount of arsenic species present. To address this concern new reference materials (RMs) for validation and quality assurance of As speciation measurements are being developed, including a tuna fish tissue and a robalo liver tissue. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is used in this work as a proven analytical tool for As determinations and for validating the As mass fraction determined by liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) in extracts of the candidate RMs and other fish samples including certified RMs. Various methods for the extraction of water-soluble As species were evaluated. The best results were acquired after methanol/acetone/water extraction yielding in 93 % extractable As in the tuna RM. This procedure was used for the LC-ICP-MS studies. The results demonstrate that INAA can account for 100 % of the distribution of As species in analytical processes. It complements LC-ICP-MS for the validation of the characterization of As species in the development of RMs for such species. Excellent agreement of measured results in certified RMs with the reported values confirms the validity of the applied procedures. (author)

  16. Micro-homogeneity of candidate reference materials: Results from an intercomparison study for the Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) has made available two single cell algae materials IAEA-392 and IAEA-393 as well as an urban dust IAEA-396 to study their use for analytical sample sizes in the milligram range and below. Micro-analytical techniques such as PIXE and μ-PIXE, solid sampling AAS, scanning electron microprobe X-ray analysis and INAA were applied to the determination of trace elements on the basis of μg to mg amounts of the selected materials. The comparability of the mean values as well as the reproducibility of successive measurements is being evaluated in order to compare relative homogeneity factors for many elements in the investigated materials. From the reported results it seems that the algae materials IAEA-392 and IAEA-393 are extremely homogeneous biological materials for a number of elements with an extraordinary sharp particle size distribution below 10 μm. A similar situation seems to hold for the urban dust material IAEA-396 which had been air-jet milled to a particle size distribution around 4 μm. The introduction of these materials as CRMs with very small amounts needed to determine the certified concentrations will help to meet the needs of micro-analytical techniques for natural matrix reference materials. (author)

  17. Scattering Properties of Candidate Planetary Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.; Hapke, B. W.; Hale, A. S.; Piatek, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The laboratory investigation of the scattering properties of candidate planetary regolith materials is an important technique for understanding the physical properties of a planetary regolith. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Collaborative study on the determination of trace elements in two candidate reference materials: Tea Leaves (INCT-TL-1) and Mixed Polish Herbs (INCT-MPH-2). Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of two new polish candidate reference materials is described. The consecutive steps involved collection of appropriately large quantities of Tea Leaves (INCT-TL-1) and Mixed Polish Herbs (INCT-MPH-2) respectively, comminution, sieving, homogenization, preliminary homogeneity testing, distribution into containers, final homogeneity testing, and radiation sterilization followed microbiological investigation. methods of determination of moisture content were established and various approaches to the determination of particle size distribution were investigated. Worldwide interlaboratory comparison was organised in which 109 laboratories from 19 countries participated. Laboratory averages from all participants (over 1400 results for each of the materials for over 70 elements) are presented. The method of data evaluation is briefly outlined and preliminary strategy of certification which be the subject of final report(s) published at a later date is announced. (author)

  19. Nuclear measurements and reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the progress of the JRC programs on nuclear data, nuclear metrology, nuclear reference materials and non-nuclear reference materials. Budget restrictions and personnel difficulties were encountered during 1987. Fission properties of 235U as a function of neutron energy and of the resonances can be successfully described on the basis of a three exit channel fission model. Double differential neutron emission cross-sections were accomplished on 7Li and were started for the tritium production cross-section of 9Be. Reference materials of uranium minerals and ores were prepared. Special nuclear targets were prepared. A batch of 250 g of Pu02 was characterized in view of certification as reference material for the elemental assay of plutonium

  20. Transuranium reference measurements and reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 30 years of its existence, the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements has been involved in numerous high-accuracy investigations of mainly nuclear properties of elements important for the nuclear fuel cycle and for application of relevant radionuclides. This paper reports that these studies were made possible by the availability of particle accelerators (150-MeV electron linear accelerator; 3.7- and 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerators) as neutron sources and the use of specialized laboratories for the preparation, characterization, and manipulation of radioactive samples. Examples of investigations with plutonium and neptunium are capture and fission cross sections of 239Pu at very low energies, spontaneous fission fragment mass and energy distributions of 242Pu at very low energies, spontaneous fission fragment mass and energy distributions of 242Pu, alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectra of 237Np, half-life of 241Pu, use of 237Np in reactor neutron dosimetry, preparation and characterization of plutonium oxide reference materials for nondestructive analysis, and demonstration of the potential of synthetic isotope mixtures for analytical control of the nuclear fuel cycle

  1. Development studies of captopril certified reference material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the studies performed with the candidate Certified Reference Material (CRM of captopril, the first CRM of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API in Brazil, including determination of impurities (organic, inorganic and volatiles, homogeneity testing, short- and long-term stability studies, calculation of captopril content using the mass balance approach, and estimation of the associated measurement uncertainty.Este artigo descreve os estudos realizados com o candidato a Material de Referência Certificado (MRC de captopril, primeiro MRC de fármacos no Brasil, incluindo a determinação de impurezas (orgânicas, inorgânicas e voláteis, testes de homogeneidade, testes de estabilidade de curta e longa duração, cálculo do teor de captopril por balanço de massa e estimativa da incerteza de medição associada ao valor certificado.

  2. Corrosion resistance of candidate transportation container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy is currently remediating several sites that have been contaminated over the years with hazardous, mixed waste and radioactive materials. Regulatory guidelines require strict compliance demonstrating public safety during remediation and the transport of these hazardous, mixed waste and radioactive materials. The compatibility of the metallic transportation containers with the contents they are designed to transport is an ultimate concern that must be satisfied to ensure public safety. The transportation issue is inherently complicated due to the complex, varied, and unknown composition of the hazardous, mixed and radioactive waste that is being, considered for transport by the DOE facilities. Never before have the interactions between the waste being transported and the materials that comprise the transportation packages been more important. Therefore, evaluation of material performance when subjected to a simulated waste will ensure that all regulatory issues and requirements for transportation of hazardous, mixed, and radioactive wastes are satisfied. The tasks encompassed by this study include defining criteria for candidate material selection, defining a test matrix that will provide pertinent information on the material compatibility with the waste stimulant, and evaluation of material performance when subjected to a stimulant waste. Our goal is to provide package design engineers with a choice of materials which exhibit enhanced performance upon exposure to hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste that is similar in composition to the waste stimulant used in this study. Due to the fact that there are many other possible waste compositions, additional work needs to be done to broaden our materials compatibility/waste stream data base

  3. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Mirtich, Michael; Difilippo, Frank; Hotes, Deborah; Labed, Richard; Dever, Terese; Kussmaul, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for Kapton solar array blanket protection, graphite epoxy structural member protection, and high temperature radiators was performed in an RF plasma asher. Ashing rates for Kapton were correlated with rates measured on STS-8 to determine the exposure time equivalent to one year in low Earth orbit (LEO) at a constant density space station orbital flux. Protective coatings on Kapton from Tekmat, Andus Corporation, and LeRC were evaluated in the plasma asher and mass loss rates per unit area were measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface but ion beam sputter deposited samples of SiO2 and SiO2 with 8% polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) showed no evidence of degradation after 47 hours of exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite epoxy structural members. Mica appears to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen but only offers some limited protection as a paint because the paint vehicles evaluated to date were not resistant to atomic oxygen. Four materials were selected for evaluation as candidate radiator materials: stainless steel, copper, niobium-1% zirconium, and titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium. These materials were surface textured by various means to improve their emittance. Emittances as high as 0.93 at 2.5 microns for stainless steel and 0.89 at 2.5 microns for Nb-1 Zr were obtained from surface texturing. There were no significant changes in emittance after asher exposure.

  4. 40 CFR 1042.910 - Reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reference as prescribed in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Anyone may inspect copies at the U.S. EPA, Air... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference materials. 1042.910 Section... Other Reference Information § 1042.910 Reference materials. Documents listed in this section have...

  5. Canister filling materials -- Design requirements and evaluation of candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB has been evaluating a copper/steel canister for use in the disposal of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Once the canister is breached by corrosion, it is possible that the void volume inside the canister might fill with water. Water inside the canister would moderate the energy of the neutrons emitted by spontaneous fission in the fuel. It the space in the canister between and around the fuel pins is occupied by canister filling materials, the potential for criticality is avoided. The authors have developed a set of design requirements for canister filling material for the case where it is to be used alone, with no credit for burnup of the fuel or other measures, such as the use of neutron absorbers. Requirements were divided into three classes: essential requirements, desirable features, and undesirable features. The essential requirements are that the material fill at least 60% of the original void space, that the solubility of the filling material be less than 100 mg/l in pure water or expected repository waters at 50 C, and that the material not compact under its own weight by more than 10%. In this paper they review the reasons for these requirements, the desirable and undesirable features, and evaluate 11 candidate materials with respect to the design requirements and features. The candidate materials are glass beads, lead shot, copper spheres, sand, olivine, hematite, magnetite, crushed rock, bentonite, other clays, and concrete. Emphasis is placed on the determination of whether further work is needed to eliminate uncertainties in the evaluation of the ability of a particular filling material to be successfully used under actual conditions, and on the ability to predict the long-term performance of the material under the repository conditions

  6. Bisphenol A polycarbonate as a reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.; Williams, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Test methods require reference materials to standardize and maintain quality control. Various materials have been evaluated as possible reference materials, including a sample of bisphenol A polycarbonate without additives. Screening tests for relative toxicity under various experimental conditions were performed using male mice exposed to pyrolysis effluents over a 200-800 C temperature range. It was found that the bisphenol A polycarbonate served as a suitable reference material as it is available in large quantities, and does not significantly change with time.

  7. 40 CFR 1043.100 - Reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Anyone may inspect copies at the U.S. EPA, Air and Radiation... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference materials. 1043.100 Section... § 1043.100 Reference materials. Documents listed in this section have been incorporated by reference...

  8. An annotated history of container candidate material selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper documents events in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project that have influenced the selection of metals and alloys proposed for fabrication of waste package containers for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The time period from 1981 to 1988 is covered in this annotated history. The history traces the candidate materials that have been considered at different stages of site characterization planning activities. At present, six candidate materials are considered and described in the 1988 Consultation Draft of the NNWSI Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The six materials are grouped into two alloy families, copper-base materials and iron to nickel-base materials with an austenitic structure. The three austenitic candidates resulted from a 1983 survey of a longer list of candidate materials; the other three candidates resulted from a special request from DOE in 1984 to evaluate copper and copper-base alloys. 24 refs., 2 tabs

  9. A routine chromium determination in biological materials; application to various reference materials and standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination limit under standard working conditions of chromium in biological materials is discussed. Neutron activation analysis and atomic spectrometry have been described for some analytical experiences with NBS SRM 1577 reference material. The chromium determination is a part of a larger multi-element scheme for the determination of 12 elements in biological materials

  10. Survey of reference materials. V. 2: Environmentally related reference materials for trace elements, nuclides and microcontaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report presently contains over 250 reference materials with trace element and organic contaminant information on fuel, geological and mineral, anthropogenic disposal, soil reference and miscellaneous reference materials. Not included in the current report is information on most biological and environmental reference materials with trace element, stable isotope, radioisotope and organic contaminant information. 8 refs, tabs

  11. 40 CFR 86.1 - Reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. To enforce any edition other than that specified in this section, a... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference materials. 86.1 Section 86.1... EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES § 86.1 Reference materials. Link to an...

  12. Candidate materials to prevent brittle fracture - (186)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For heavy transport or dual purpose casks, selecting the appropriate materials for the body is a key decision. To get a Type B(U) approval, it is necessary to demonstrate that the mechanical strength of the material is good enough at temperature as low as -40 C so as to prevent the cask from any risk of brittle fracture in regulatory accident conditions. Different methods are available to provide such a demonstration and can lead to different choices. It should be noted also that the material compositions given by national or international standards display relatively wide tolerances and therefore are not necessarily sufficient to guarantee a required toughness. It is therefore necessary to specify to the fabricator the minimum value for toughness, and to verify it. This paper gives an overview of the different methods and materials that are used in several countries. Although the safety is strongly linked to the choice of the material, it is shown that many other parameters are important, such as the design, the fabrication process (multi layer, cast or forged body), the welding material and process, the ability to detect flaws, and the measured and/or calculated stress level, including stress concentration, in particular when bolts are used. The paper will show that relying exclusively on high toughness at low temperature does not necessarily deliver the maximum safety as compared with other choices. It follows that differences in approaches to licensing by different competent authorities may bias the choice of material depending on the country of application, even though B(U) licenses are meant to guarantee unilaterally a uniform minimum level of safety

  13. Reference materials for microanalytical nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses some issues concerning reference materials required for microanalysis including physical and chemical properties of the sample matrix and homogeneity of the chemical composition. It gives some examples of the mst common standards used. Further the paper gives background information about the Micro- and Trace Analysis Center of the University of Antwerp, Belgium and discusses recent results of the Center in microanalysis of reference materials

  14. 49 CFR 171.7 - Reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sections in which the material is referenced. Source and name of material 49 CFR reference American.../publications.com; AAR Manual of Standards and Recommended Practices, Section C—Part III, Specifications for..., AND DEFINITIONS Applicability, General Requirements, and North American Shipments § 171.7...

  15. Preliminary cleaning tests on candidate materials for APS beamline and front end UHV components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative cleaning tests have been done on four candidate materials for use in APS beamline and front-end vacuum components. These materials are 304 SS, 304L SS, OFHC copper, and Glidcop* (Cu-Al2O3)- Samples of each material were prepared and cleaned using two different methods. After cleaning, the sample surfaces were analyzed using ESCA (Electron Spectography for Chemical Analysis). Uncleaned samples were used as a reference. The cleaning methods and surface analysis results are further discussed

  16. Reference materials and representative test materials: the nanotechnology case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increasing number of chemical, physical and biological tests are performed on manufactured nanomaterials for scientific and regulatory purposes. Existing test guidelines and measurement methods are not always directly applicable to or relevant for nanomaterials. Therefore, it is necessary to verify the use of the existing methods with nanomaterials, thereby identifying where modifications are needed, and where new methods need to be developed and validated. Efforts for verification, development and validation of methods as well as quality assurance of (routine) test results significantly benefit from the availability of suitable test and reference materials. This paper provides an overview of the existing types of reference materials and introduces a new class of test materials for which the term ‘representative test material’ is proposed. The three generic concepts of certified reference material, reference material(non-certified) and representative test material constitute a comprehensive system of benchmarks that can be used by all measurement and testing communities, regardless of their specific discipline. This paper illustrates this system with examples from the field of nanomaterials, including reference materials and representative test materials developed at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, in particular at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), and at the Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP).

  17. Development of solid radium-226 reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-226 reference materials having a matrix similar to soil or tailings samples are not available in sufficient quantity for use by remedial-action contractors to calibrate their laboratory gamma-ray spectrometers. Such reference materials are needed to provide uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial-action contractors. A task, therefore, was undertaken to prepare about 200 pounds each of three different concentrations of radium-226 reference materials by diluting tailings with high-purity silica. Target values for radium-226 content were 50, 15, and 5 pCi/g. The radium-226 content of the reference materials was measured by C.W. Sill of EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, using a high- resolution alpha spectrometry technique standardized with National Bureau of Standards (NBS) standard 4961. A summary of this technique is provided in Appendix A of this report. An independent measurement of the radium-226 content was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix), Grand Junction, Colorado, using a high-resolution Ge(Li) detector, which was calibrated using the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) 100-A Series standards. The Ge(Li) detector has also been used to determine the radium-226 content in the calibration models at the Grand Junction facility; these models are used by remedial-action contractors for calibration of borehole logging gamma-ray probes. 8 references, 12 tables

  18. Certified reference materials for organic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discusses the requirements for certified reference materials (CRMs) to be used in measurements of residues of pesticides in food and environmental samples. It deals with the types of CRMs, matrix selection, sample preparation and representativeness. It also discusses CRM validity period and gives some examples of CRM preparation

  19. AQCS 1989 - Intercomparison runs reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) programme provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (Agency) is to assist laboratories engaged in the analysis of nuclear, environmental, biological, and materials of marine origin for radionuclide, major, minor and trace elements, as well as stable isotopes using atomic and nuclear analytical techniques, to check the quality of their work. Reference Materials available are listed by origin and by analyte giving referenced values and confidence intervals. Only materials, which have one or more properties sufficiently well established from statistical evaluation of previous interlaboratory comparison studies are included. Existing Reference Materials may be updated for previously referenced constituents or properties according to the results of the Agency's Co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) in these fields or according to recently published literature values. They are supplied with a reference sheet stating relevant parameters and properties of the material and can be used as secondary standards for quality control assurance within a laboratory, for checking analytical methods and/or instrumentation or for training purposes. 4 tabs

  20. Tests of candidate materials for particle bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhenium metal hot frits and zirconium carbide-coated fuel particles appear suitable for use in flowing hydrogen to at least 2000 K, based on previous tests. Recent tests on alternate candidate cooled particle and frit materials are described. Silicon carbide-coated particles began to react with rhenium frit material at 1600 K, forming a molten silicide at 2000 K. Silicon carbide was extensively attacked by hydrogen at 2066 K for 30 minutes, losing 3.25% of its weight. Vitrous carbon was also rapidly attacked by hydrogen at 2123 K, losing 10% of its weight in two minutes. Long term material tests on candidate materials for closed cycle helium cooled particle bed fuel elements are also described. Surface imperfections were found on the surface of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles after ninety days exposure to flowing (∼500 ppM) impure helium at 1143 K. The imperfections were superficial and did not affect particle strength

  1. BCR certified reference materials for reactor neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of reference materials intended for use as activation or fission monitors for neutron fluence rate measurements has been prepared by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Certification has been carried out by expert European laboratories and distribution of the certified reference materials (CRMs) is through the BCR programme of the Commission. The list (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys, where aluminium is chosen as a suitable matrix for reducing the neutron self-shielding effect. Newly certified materials are IRMM-530R Al-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0-standardization, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01-1%Co). Two others, in the process of certification are Al-0.1%Ag and Al-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements. Other candidate reference materials currently being certified are two uranium-doped glass intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. (author)

  2. AQCS 1990. Intercomparison runs, reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) programme provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (Agency) is to assist laboratories engaged in the analysis of nuclear, environmental, biological, and materials of marine origin for radionuclide, major, minor and trace elements, as well as stable isotopes using atomic and nuclear analytical techniques, to check the quality of their work. Such a control is necessary since results of analytical activities may be the basis upon which economic, administrative, medical or legal decisions are taken; they must, therefore, be documented to be sufficiently reliable. The Agency has instituted the AQCS-programme which for 1990 will involve distributing samples for Intercomparison Runs and Reference Materials in a way similar to that of previous years. The Agency's Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) programme provides mainly three types of materials: materials which can be used in analytical laboratories working in the fields of nuclear technology and isotope hydrology. These include uranium ore Reference Materials and other substances of interest for nuclear fuel technology as well as stable isotope Reference Materials for mass spectrometric determination of isotope ratios in natural waters; materials with known content of uranium, thorium and/or transuranium elements or fission products for the determination of environmental radioactivity or control of nuclear safety; materials for use in the determination of stable trace elements in environmental, biomedical and marine research. Radiochemical methods such as neutron activation or isotope dilution analysis are often used in the determination of such trace elements and constitute an important contribution of nuclear techniques to applied science. Tabs

  3. Neutron activation analysis of reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance is pointed out of neutron activation analysis in the preparation of reference materials, and studies are reported conducted recently by UJV. Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been used in testing homogeneity and in determining 28 elements in newly prepared reference standards of coal fly ash designated ENO, EOP and ECH. For accuracy testing, the same method was used in the analysis of NBS SRM-1633a Trace Elements in Coal Fly Ash and IAEA CRM Soil-5 and RM Soil-7. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis was used in determining Cd, Cu, Mn, Mo, and Zn in biological materials NBS SRM-1577 Bovine Liver, Bowen's Kale and in IAEA RM Milk Powder A-11 and Animal Muscle H-4. In all instances very good precision and accuracy of neutron activation analysis results were shown. (author)

  4. AQCS intercomparison runs, reference materials 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Analytical Quality Control Services programme provided by the IAEA is to assist laboratories engaged in the analysis of nuclear, environmental, biological, and materials of marine origin for radionuclide, major, minor and trace elements, as well as stable isotopes using atomic and nuclear analytical techniques, to check the quality of their work. The determination of accuracy requires special procedures such as analysis to be carried out by as many different and independent methods, analysts and techniques as possible, control analysis with reference materials and participation in interlaboratory comparison studies. This document gives details of the specimens and samples which the IAEA intends to distribute in 1991. Tabs

  5. Natural matrix radioactivity standards and reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the precise definition of Natural Matrix Standard (NMS) and Natural Matrix Reference Material (NMRM) remain somewhat unclear, few doubt their extreme usefulness in virtually all programs involving measurements of radioacitivity. Rigorous quality assurance/quality control is difficult, if not impossible, particularly in studies requiring radiochemical/radiometric analyses of environmental matrices, when lacking good NMSs and NMRMs. A fairly comprehensive range of these materials is now available internationally, at a reasonable cost. Progress on the National Bureau of Standards NMS program as well as EML's Quality Assessment Program are discussed. In addition 99Tc in vegetation is presented as a specific example of the methodology of preparing a NMRM. (orig.)

  6. Reference and testing materials available from the Materials Characterization Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major responsibility of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is to acquire and distribute reference and testing materials endorsed by DOE, for use in research and development in nuclear waste management. MCC standard materials provide a common basis for data obtained in waste repository development work, thereby assisting in developing a defensible database of known accuracy and precision. Homogeneity of standard materials is of particular importance. MCC emphasizes homogeneity of composition and physical characteristics of the standard materials, using statistical methods in sampling procedures and evaluation of analytical data. Two classifications of standard materials are available from the MCC. Approved Reference Materials (ARMs) are intended as standard reference and calibration materials [similar to the SRMs of the US National Bureau of Standards (NBS)], for field calibration of MCC standard test methods. Each ARM is characterized by MCC and other laboratories such as NBS to a high level of accuracy and precision. Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) are used as common testing materials, representing specific formulations of typical waste forms. Most ATMs are radioactive materials, for which characterization has been conducted on shielded analytical instruments at PNL. More than ten different ATMs (borosilicate glass and spent fuel) are in the MCC inventory. These materials are available without charged, in reasonable amounts, to DOE programs. Other users pay pro-rated production costs. The materials normally are supplied in the form in which they were produced, e.g., glass as-cast bars. In some cases the MCC can supply special specimen forms, e.g., crushed powders or shaped monoliths

  7. Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1990-12-01

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project`s high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250{degree}C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project's high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250 degree C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab

  9. Characteristics study of bentonite as candidate of buffer materials for radioactive waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature studies on bentonite characteristic of, as candidate for radioactive waste disposal system, have been conducted. Several information have been obtained from references, which would be contributed on performance assessment of engineered barrier. The functions bentonite includes the buffering of chemical and physical behavior, i.e. swelling property, self sealing, hydraulic conductivities and gas permeability. This paper also presented long-term stability of bentonite in natural condition related to the illitisazation, which could change its buffering capacities. These information, showed that bentonite was satisfied to be used for candidate of buffer materials in radioactive waste disposal system. (author)

  10. Oxygen-Diffused Titanium as a Candidate Brake Rotor Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are one of several candidate materials for the next generation of truck disk brake rotors. Despite their advantages of lightweight relative to cast iron and good strength and corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are unlikely to be satisfactory brake rotor materials unless their friction and wear behavior can be significantly improved. In this study, a surface engineering process oxygen diffusion was applied to titanium rotors and has shown very encouraging results. The oxygen diffused Ti-6Al-4V (OD-Ti) was tested on a sub-scale brake tester against a flat block of commercial brake lining material and benchmarked against several other Ti-based materials, including untreated Ti-6Al-4V, ceramic particle-reinforced Ti composites (MMCs), and a thermal-spray-coated Ti alloy. With respect to friction, the OD-Ti outperformed all other candidate materials under the imposed test conditions with the friction coefficient remaining within a desirable range of 0.35-0.50, even under the harshest conditions when the disk surface temperature reached nearly 600 C. In addition, the OD-Ti showed significantly improved wear-resistance over the non-treated one and was even better than the Ti-based composite materials.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs

  12. Development and use of reference materials and quality control materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current knowledge is summarized on correct use of commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) and reference materials (RMs). Acknowledged are also the limitations and restrictions analysts have to face if they want to apply quality control. The concept of in-house RMs or quality control materials (QCMs) is advocated to supplement the use of CRMs for quality control purposes. On hand advice on how to select, prepare, characterize and use these QCMs is given from the experts' perspective. Several scenarios are described to make this concept widely applicable to: advanced laboratories with CRMs with validated analytical techniques available, laboratories with less experience and facilities, as well as cases were labile compounds and unstable matrices are involved. Each scenario considers different approaches to overcome the lack of appropriate CRMs and advise on the preparation of QCMs, which might fit the particular purpose

  13. Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept. The objective of the proposed research was to investigate degradation of materials in the supercritical water environment (SCW). First, representative alloys from the important classes of candidate materials were studied for their corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance in supercritical water. These included ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Ni-base alloys. Corrosion and SCC tests were conducted at various temperatures and exposure times, as well as in various water chemistries. Second, emerging plasma surface modification and grain boundary engineering technologies were applied to modify the near surface chemistry, microstructure, and stress-state of the alloys prior to corrosion testing. Third, the effect of irradiation on corrosion and SCC of alloys in the as-received and modified/engineered conditions were examined by irradiating samples using high-energy protons and then exposing them to SCW

  14. Developing Potential New Reference Materials for Light Isotopes in Foodstuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Russell; Van Hale, Robert; Clarke, Dianne; Abrahim, Aiman; Resch, Christian; Mayr, Leopold; Cannavan, Andrew; Gröning, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of subtle variations in stable isotope ratios provide the means for verifying food integrity in numerous ways. Adulterants usually have different isotopic composition so their presence in a food is readily detectable. Stable isotope measurements can also be used to determine the region of production of the food. In most cases the ability of stable isotope measurements to verify, or otherwise reject, the authenticity of the food is greatly enhanced by comparison of a result to a reference database. The more high-quality data in the database, the more statistical power is afforded by the comparison. A serious weakness at present is the lack of reference materials in food matrices available to the community. Thus researchers have to rely on in-house standards for calibration and quality assurance. The result is that there are numerous datasets published that may be internally consistent but it is exceedingly difficult to combine these datasets into a cohesive database. This is particularly important for measurements of the hydrogen isotopes. Here we present a survey of the stable isotope (^2H, ^13C and ^15N) composition of 12 Reference Materials from the International Atomic Energy Agency catalogue. All but one of these materials are plant matter and have been developed as reference materials for other applications such as radionuclide or trace element measurements. Thus they have been verified as suitable materials in terms of stability and homogeneity for those tests. The purpose of this work is to ascertain if they are similarly suitable as stable isotope reference materials. The results from our survey show that there is a wide range in elemental and isotopic composition among these materials. For example, the ^15N values range from-13.5‰ to +18.6‰ and the nitrogen elemental composition range is from 0.7% to 9.7%. The ^13C values range from -20‰ to -40‰ and the carbon elemental composition ranges from 15% to 47%. We are now in the process of

  15. Analytical quality control service programme, intercomparison runs, certified reference materials, reference materials 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) programme provided by the IAEA, is to assist laboratories engaged in the analysis of nuclear, environmental, biological, and materials of marine origin for radionuclide, major, minor and trace elements, as well as stable isotopes using atomic and nuclear analytical techniques, to check the quality of their work. The tables give details of the intercomparison samples and reference materials distributed by the IAEA in the period 1987 to 1988. 2 tabs

  16. Material Properties of Three Candidate Elastomers for Space Seals Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Oswald, Jay J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A next-generation docking system is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to support Constellation Space Exploration Missions to low Earth orbit (LEO), to the Moon, and to Mars. A number of investigations were carried out to quantify the properties of candidate elastomer materials for use in the main interface seal of the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). This seal forms the gas pressure seal between two mating spacecraft. Three candidate silicone elastomer compounds were examined: Esterline ELA-SA-401, Parker Hannifin S0383-70, and Parker Hannifin S0899-50. All three materials were characterized as low-outgassing compounds, per ASTM E595, so as to minimize the contamination of optical and solar array systems. Important seal properties such as outgas levels, durometer, tensile strength, elongation to failure, glass transition temperature, permeability, compression set, Yeoh strain energy coefficients, coefficients of friction, coefficients of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and diffusivity were measured and are reported herein.

  17. An outline of reference materials for analysis techniques in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides background information on the development in the field of reference materials in China. The major considerations in development of reference materials include homogeneity, stability, handling procedures and certification. Further it discusses the plans for development in the near future specific natural-matrix reference materials containing low levels of trace elements and having high degree of homogeneity

  18. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  19. Surface segregation in binary alloy first wall candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studying the conditions necessary to produce a self-sustaining stable lithium monolayer on a metal substrate as a means of creating a low-Z film which sputters primarily as secondary ions. It is expected that because of the toroidal field, secondary ions originating at the first wall will be returned and contribute little to the plasma impurity influx. Aluminum and copper have, because of their high thermal conductivity and low induced radioactivity, been proposed as first wall candidate materials. The mechanical properties of the pure metals are very poorly suited to structural applications and an alloy must be used to obtain adequate hardness and tensile strength. In the case of aluminum, mechanical properties suitable for aircraft manufacture are obtained by the addition of a few at% Li. In order to investigate alloys of a similar nature as candidate structural materials for fusion machines we have prepared samples of Li-doped aluminum using both a pyro-metallurgical and a vapor-diffusion technique. The sputtering properties and surface composition have been studied as a function of sample temperature and heating time, and ion beam mass. The erosion rate and secondary ion yield of both the sputtered Al and Li have been monitored by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger analysis providing information on surface segregation, depth composition profiles, and diffusion rates. The surface composition ahd lithium depth profiles are compared with previously obtained computational results based on a regular solution model of segregation, while the partial sputtering yields of Al and Li are compared with results obtained with a modified version of the TRIM computer program. (orig.)

  20. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5-6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS NO4400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS NO6022 Ni-Cr- MO-W alloy, UN's NO6625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30400 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 umyr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni. Key words: MIC, container materials, YM bacteria, de-alloying, Ni-depletion, Cr-depletion, polarization resistance, anodic polarization,

  1. Certification of a nickel metal reference material for neutron dosimetry (EC Nuclear Reference Material 521)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel metal, of 99.99 % nominal purity and natural isotopic composition, in the form of 0.1 mm thick foil and 0.5 mm diameter wire has been certified for its cobalt mass fraction. The certified value of cobalt (<0.1μg.g-1) is based on 38 results obtained by neutron activation analysis, emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma excitation and atomic absorption spectrometry, whereas the isotopic composition of the nickel was verified by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The material is intended to be used as a reference material in neutron metrology

  2. Certification of an iron metal reference material for neutron dosimetry (EC nuclear reference material 524)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron metal, of > 99.996% nominal purity, in the form of 0.1 mm thick foil and of 0.5 mm diameter wire has been certified for its manganese and cobalt mass fractions. The certified value of the cobalt mass fraction (-1) is based on 39 accepted results from five laboratories using two different methods. The certified value of the manganese mass fraction (-1) is based on 41 accepted results from five laboratories using three different methods. The overall purity was also verified. The material is intended to be used as a reference material in neutron dosimetry. (authors). 8 refs., 9 tabs., 2 figs

  3. 40 CFR 90.7 - Reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be inspected at U.S. EPA Air and Radiation... 19103. Document number and name 40 CFR part 90 reference ASTM D86-93: Standard Test Method for...., Warrendale, PA 15096-0001. Document number and name 40 CFR part 90 reference SAE J1930 September...

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

  5. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5--6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS N04400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS N06022 Ni-Cr-Mo- W alloy, UNS N06625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30430 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 microm/yr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni

  6. Inner material requirements and candidates screening for spent fuel disposal canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the present Spanish 'once-through' nuclear fuel cycle, the need arises to complete the geological repository reference concept with a spent fuel canister final design. One of the main issues in its design is selecting the inner material to be placed inside the canister, between the steel walls and the spent fuel assemblies. The primary purpose of this material will be to avoid the possibility of a criticality event once the canister walls have been finally breached by corrosion and the spent fuel is flooded with groundwater. That is an important role because the increase in heat generation from such an event would act against spent fuel stability and compromise bentonite barrier functions, negatively affecting overall repository performance. To prevent this possibility a detailed set of requirements for a material to fulfil this role in the repository environment have been devised and presented in this paper. With these requirements in view, eight potentially interesting candidates were selected and evaluated: cast iron or steel, borosilicate glass, spinel, depleted uranium, dehydrated zeolites, haematite, phosphates, and olivine. Among these, the first four materials or material families are found promising for this application. In addition, other relevant non-performance-related aspects of candidate materials, which could help on decision making, are also considered and evaluated. (authors)

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS), Incoloy 825, Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al have been selected as candidate materials for the containment of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. The susceptibility of these materials to stress corrosion cracking has been investigated by slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in water which simulates that from well J-13 (J-13 water) and is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. The SSRTs were performed on specimens exposed to simulated J-13 water at 93 degree C and at a strain rate 10-7 s-1 under crevice conditions and at a strain rate of 10-8 s-1 under both crevice and noncrevice conditions. All the tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strains of 1--4%. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed some crack initiation in virtually all specimens. Optical microscopy of metallographically prepared transverse sections of Type 304L SS suggests that the crack depths are small (<10 μm). Preliminary results suggest that a lower strain rate increases the severity of cracking of Types 304L and 316L SS, Incoloy 825, and Cu but has virtually no effect on Cu-30%Ni and Cu-7%Al. Differences in susceptibility to cracking were evaluated in terms of a stress ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the increase in stress after local yielding in the environment to the corresponding stress increase in an identical test in air, both computed at the same strain. On the basis of this stress ratio, the ranking of materials in order of increasing resistance to cracking is: Types 304L SS < 316L SS < Incoloy 825 congruent Cu-30%Ni < Cu congruent Cu-7%Al. 9 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Identification of Site-Specific Stroke Biomarker Candidates by Laser Capture Microdissection and Labeled Reference Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Lian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The search to date for accurate protein biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke has taken into consideration the stage and/or the size of infarction, but has not accounted for the site of stroke. In the present study, multiple reaction monitoring using labeled reference peptide (LRP following laser capture microdissection (LCM is used to identify site-specific protein biomarker candidates. In middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO rat models, both intact and infarcted brain tissue was collected by LCM, followed by on-film digestion and semi-quantification using triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thirty-four unique peptides were detected for the verification of 12 proteins in both tissue homogenates and LCM-captured samples. Six insoluble proteins, including neurofilament light polypeptide (NEFL, alpha-internexin (INA, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2, myelin basic protein (MBP, myelin proteolipid protein (PLP and 2′,3′-cyclic-nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNP, were found to be site-specific. Soluble proteins, such as neuron-specific enolase (NSE and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1, and some insoluble proteins, including neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT and tubulin β-3 chain (TUBB3, were found to be evenly distributed in the brain. Therefore, we conclude that some insoluble protein biomarkers for stroke are site-specific, and would make excellent candidates for the design and analysis of relevant clinical studies in the future.

  9. Compatibility of ITER candidate materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion tests have been conducted to determine the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) first wall/blanket systems, e.g., Type 316 stainless steel (SS), Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr. The results indicate that Type 316 SS is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 C, corrosion rates for Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy are ∼ 4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr, respectively. Iron, nickel, and chromium react rapidly with gallium. Iron shows greater corrosion than nickel at 400 C (≥ 88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively). The present study indicates that at temperatures up to 400 C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The growth of intermetallic compounds may control the overall rate of corrosion

  10. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized

  11. Humid air corrosion of YMP waste package candidate material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating candidate materials for high level nuclear waste containers (Waste Packages) for a potential deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The potential repository is located above the water table in the unsaturated zone. The rock contains nominally 10% by volume water and gas pressure in the emplacement drifts of the repository is expected to remain near the ambient atmospheric pressure. The heat generated by the radioactive decay of the waste will raise the temperature of the waste packages and the surrounding rock. Waste Package temperatures above the ambient boiling point of water are anticipated for the waste emplacement scenarios. Because the repository emplacement drifts are expected to remain at the ambient atmospheric pressure, the maximum relative humidity obtainable decreases above the boiling point of water. Temperatures of the Waste Packages and the surrounding rock are expected to reach maximum temperature within 100`s of years and then gradually decrease with time. Episodic liquid water contact with the WPs is also expected; this will result in the deposition of salts and mineral scale.

  12. Genome Sequence of a Candidate World Health Organization Reference Strain of Zika Virus for Nucleic Acid Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Musso, Didier; Blümel, Johannes; Thézé, Julien; Pybus, Oliver G; Baylis, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    We report here the sequence of a candidate reference strain of Zika virus (ZIKV) developed on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO). The ZIKV reference strain is intended for use in nucleic acid amplification (NAT)-based assays for the detection and quantification of ZIKV RNA. PMID:27587826

  13. Reproducibility of polycarbonate reference material in toxicity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Huttlinger, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    A specific lot of bisphenol A polycarbonate has been used for almost four years as the reference material for the NASA-USF-PSC toxicity screening test method. The reproducibility of the test results over this period of time indicate that certain plastics may be more suitable reference materials than the more traditional cellulosic materials.

  14. New reference materials improvement of methods of measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarizes the development of about 120 reference materials in a variety of fields (non ferrous metals, trace element analysis, food products, biomedical analysis, physical and technical properties of solid materials). The document also provides practical advice for trace element analyses, describes the principles followed for certifying reference materials and provides recommendations for their use

  15. Certification of a uranium-238 dioxide reference material for neutron dosimetry (EC nuclear reference material 501)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-238 oxide of 99.999% isotopic and 99.98% chemical purity was transformed into dioxide spheres of nominal 0.5 and 1.0 mm diameter by gel precipitation and subsequent calcination under carbon dioxide and under argon containing 5% hydrogen at 1 125 K. The spheres were analysed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, including isotope dilution, by gravimetry and by potentiometric titration. On the basis of these analyses, the uranium mass fraction was certified at 879.4 ± 2.8 g.kg-1, and the 235U/U - and 238U/U abundances at 10.4 ± 0.5 mg.kg-1 and 999.9896 ± 0.0005 g.kg-1, respectively. The material is intended to be used as a reference material in neutron metrology

  16. 40 CFR 89.6 - Reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 19428-2959. Document number and name 40 CFR part 89 reference ASTM D86-97: “Standard Test Method for... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be inspected at US EPA, OAR, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave... D287-92: “Standard Test Method for API Gravity of Crude Petroleum and Petroleum Products”...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.1010 - Reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 2001), Standard Test Method for Air Cleaning Performance of a High-Efficiency Particulate Air Filter... Specification for Automotive Spark-Ignition Engine Fuel 1065.701 ASTM D5186-03, Standard Test Method for... Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference as prescribed in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR...

  18. Reference material chemistry: synthetic groundwater formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the evaluation of the basalt formations underlying the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, as a possible repository site for the long-term storage of nuclear wastes, a recipe was developed for the preparation of a synthetic Grande Ronde Basalt groundwater. The recipe is based on water samples collected from the test horizon just below the Umtanum flow (3242 to 3529 ft). The recipe presented establishes two stable concentrated stock solutions. Forty liters of synthetic groundwater can be prepared from 1 L of each stock solution. Limitations of the synthetic groundwater recipe are discussed. It was perceived that water from this test horizon would be the most likely to migrate into either of the two candidate repository horizons within the Grande Ronde Basalt (i.e., the Umtanum and middle Sentinel Bluffs flows)

  19. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  20. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

  1. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blowers, Paul, E-mail: paul.blowers@cefas.co.uk [Cefas Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Caborn, Jane, E-mail: jane.a.caborn@nnl.co.uk [NNL, Springfields, Salwick, Preston, Lancashire, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Dell, Tony [Veterinary Laboratories Agency, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB (United Kingdom); Gingell, Terry [DSTL, Radiation Protection Services, Crescent Road, Alverstoke, Gosport, Hants, PO12 2DL (United Kingdom); Harms, Arvic [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Long, Stephanie [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, 3 Clonskeagh Square, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14, Ireland (United Kingdom); Sleep, Darren [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Stewart, Charlie [UKAEA (Waste Management Group), Chemical Support Services, D1310/14, Dounreay, Thurso, Caithness, KW14 7TZ (United Kingdom); Walker, Jill [Radiocarbon Dating, The Old Stables, East Lockinge, Wantage, Oxon OX12 8QY (United Kingdom); Warwick, Phil E. [GAU-Radioanalytical, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the {sup 14}C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing {sup 14}C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  2. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the 14C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing 14C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  3. Preparation and certification of the human hair reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of the human hair reference material and the steps taken to confirm its homogeneity and stability as well as its certification are described. Certified values for 17 elements, which are of importance for human health, and reference values for the other 13 elements are provided for this material. (author)

  4. Standard and reference materials for marine science, revised edition, 1993

    OpenAIRE

    IOC for UNESCO

    1993-01-01

    This is the third edition of the catalog of reference materials suited for use in marine science, originally compiled in 1986 for NOAA, IOC and UNEP. The catalog lists close to 2,000 reference materials from sixteen producers and contains information about their proper use, sources, availability, and analyte concentrations. Indices are included for elements, isotopes, and organic compounds, as are cross references to CAS registry numbers, alternate names, and chemical structures of selected o...

  5. [Review of normal spectral emissivity standard reference materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun; Liu, Yu-Fang; Zhao, Yue-Jin

    2012-11-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of spectral emissivity measurement, standard reference materials of spectral emissivity as the dissemination of quantity in spectral emissivity measurement are used for the calibration of spectral emissivity measurement apparatus. In the present paper, firstly the standard reference materials data proposed by the American National Institute of Standards and Technology are introduced, and some underlying standard reference materials suggested by some metering departments in Europe are analyzed in detail For the standard reference material Armco iron and SiC proposed by some researchers, the advantages and disadvantages were explored. Finally, the characteristics of standard reference materials are summarized, and the future development of spectral emissivity measurement standard is prospected. PMID:23387148

  6. Stability evaluation and chemical characterization of different vegetable oils viewing the search for candidates for certified reference materials for bio diesel; Avaliacao da estabilidade e caracterizacao quimica de diferentes oleos vegetais visando a busca de candidatos a materiais de referencia certificado (MRC) para biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Georgiana F. da; Fonseca, Mauricio G.; Goncalves, Lenise V.F.; Silva, Regina Celia F. da; Silva, Fernanda M.R. da; Rodrigues, Janaina M. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (LABOR/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Analises Organicas; Leal, Rodrigo V.P. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (LAMBOC/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Motores, Combustiveis e Lubrificantes], Email: rvleal@inmetro.gov.br; Cunha, Valnei S. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (DIMCI/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Metrologia Cientifica e Industrial

    2009-07-01

    Viewing the characterization of the various vegetable oils aiming to obtain a data bank that allows the production of certified reference materials for bio diesel of different blends, a study of chemical-physical characterization of different oils and derivative of bio diesel.

  7. Preparation of reference material for the measurement of natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to prepare reference material for the calibration of gamma spectrometry, alpha and XRF .Many procedures of chemical preparation and radiological analysis of a reference material from Triple Superphosphate were tested. Several techniques and methods of measurement were used. In addition to a description and validation of these procedures, a study of repeatability was conducted which resulted in a positive characterization of this material.

  8. Determination of arsenic in food and dietary supplement standard reference materials by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic was measured in food and dietary supplement standard reference materials by neutron activation analysis for the purpose of assigning certified or reference As mass fractions and to assess material homogeneity. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to value assign As in candidate SRM 3532 Calcium Dietary Supplement and candidate SRM 3262 Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) Aerial Parts down to about 100 μg/kg. Values were also determined for two additional candidate St. John's Wort SRMs with As mass fractions 24Na and 82Br limited the reproducibility of the method below 100 μg/kg. For measurement of lower As mass fractions, a radiochemical neutron activation analysis method with extraction of As3+ into diethyl-dithiocarbamate in chloroform and detection limits down to 0.1 μg/kg. As was used to value-assign As mass fractions for SRM 3280 Multivitamin/Multielement Tablets and for candidate SRM 3233 Fortified Breakfast Cereal, and at <10 μg/kg in candidate SRM 1845a Whole Egg Powder. (author)

  9. Study of reference material for NMR core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference Materials of NMR core experimental analysis have been studied systematically in this paper. According to the national standard criterion, a set of NMR reference materials have been made successfully. These reference materials include fluid pattern-D2O and H2O, divergence of glass grain muster, and the solid ceramics. They have been applied to the core analysis in Daqing, Xinjiang, Dagang Oilfield, etc. The results show, fluid pattern, divergence of glass grain muster as well as ceramics reference materials have different calibration results of core NMR porosity as a result of their different relaxation mechanisms. Fluid pattern is suitable for NMR porosity calibration in Berea sandstone as well as terrestrial sediment sand with little shale content and well sorted. Ceramics reference material is applied to shaly sand with average sorted. Both fluid pattern and solid ceramics material are not suitable for calibration in sandstone sample with high clay content, complex lithology with rich paramagnetic materials. It is suggested that the representative natural core sample should be selected as regional reference material to calibrate NMR porosity of complex lithology, or internal magnetic field gradient in complex rock grain/fluid system should be studied in order to get corrected NMR porosity. (authors)

  10. olive leaves as standard reference material for elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    there is no local standard reference materials which can express the local elemental matrix of plants, therefore, olive leaves is selected to be a standard reference material, young olive leaves was collected from atomic energy authority farm ( inshas area). the sample was prepared by washing,drying grinding and divided into bottles and distributed to different laboratories for analysis . this sample is intended to be used as a reference material for the measurement of major, minor and trace elements in botanical materials, agricultural food products and materials of similar matrix. it can also be used as a quality control material for the assessment of a laboratory's analytical work, for the validation of analytical methods and for quality assurance within a laboratory

  11. Characterization of the NIST seaweed Standard Reference Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Outola, I.; Filliben, J.; Inn, K.g.W.; Rosa, J. La; McMahon, C.A.; Peck, G.A.; Twining, J.; Tims, S.G.; Fifield, L.K.; Smedley, P.; Antón, M.P.; Gascó, C.; Povinec, P.; Pham, M.K.; Raaum, A.; Wei, H.-J.; Krijger, G.C.; Bouisset, P.; Litherland, A.E.; Kieser, W.E.; Betti, M.; Heras, L. Aldave de las; Hong, G.H.; Holm, E.; Skipperud, L.; Harms, A.V.; Arinc, A.; Youngman, M.; Arnold, D.; Wershofen, H.; Sill, D.S.; Bohrer, S.; Dahlgaard, H.; Croudace, I.W.; Warwick, P.E.; Ikäheimonen, T.K.; Klemola, S.; Vakulowsky, S.M.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) for seaweed was developed through an interlaboratory comparison with 24 participants from 16 countries. After evaluating different techniques to calculate certified values for the radionuclides, the median...

  12. The development and evaluation of reference materials for food microbiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in 't Veld, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1986 the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) has worked on the development and evaluation of microbiological reference materials (RMs) with support from the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR), now called Standards Measurement and Testing (SM&T). The RMs a

  13. Certified reference materials and reference methods for nuclear safeguards and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confidence in comparability and reliability of measurement results in nuclear material and environmental sample analysis are established via certified reference materials (CRMs), reference measurements, and inter-laboratory comparisons (ILCs). Increased needs for quality control tools in proliferation resistance, environmental sample analysis, development of measurement capabilities over the years and progress in modern analytical techniques are the main reasons for the development of new reference materials and reference methods for nuclear safeguards and security. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) prepares and certifices large quantities of the so-called “large-sized dried” (LSD) spikes for accurate measurement of the uranium and plutonium content in dissolved nuclear fuel solutions by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) and also develops particle reference materials applied for the detection of nuclear signatures in environmental samples. IRMM is currently replacing some of its exhausted stocks of CRMs with new ones whose specifications are up-to-date and tailored for the demands of modern analytical techniques. Some of the existing materials will be re-measured to improve the uncertainties associated with their certified values, and to enable laboratories to reduce their combined measurement uncertainty. Safeguards involve the quantitative verification by independent measurements so that no nuclear material is diverted from its intended peaceful use. Safeguards authorities pay particular attention to plutonium and the uranium isotope 235U, indicating the so-called ‘enrichment’, in nuclear material and in environmental samples. In addition to the verification of the major ratios, n(235U)/n(238U) and n(240Pu)/n(239Pu), the minor ratios of the less abundant uranium and plutonium isotopes contain valuable information about the origin and the ‘history’ of material used for commercial or possibly clandestine purposes, and

  14. Development of new reference materials for the determination of cadmium, chromium, mercury and lead in polycarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► RMs for the determination of Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb in polycarbonate were developed. ► Double ID-ICP-MS technique was used for characterization of candidate RMs. ► The certified values for the elements ranged from 51.7 to 1133 mg kg−1. ► The relative expanded uncertainties were shown to be less than 5.4%. ► New RMs were found to be suitable for the RoHS compliant tests. - Abstract: Reference materials for quantitative determination of Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb in polycarbonate were developed. Reference materials with two concentration level of elements were prepared by adding appropriate amounts of chemicals to a blank polycarbonate base material. It was shown that ten bottles with triplicate analysis are enough to demonstrate the homogeneity of these candidate reference materials. The statistical results also showed no significant trends in both short-term stability test for four weeks and long-term stability test for twelve months. The certification of the four elements was carried out by isotope-dilution-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) with microwave-assisted digestion. Certification of candidate reference materials in a single laboratory was confirmed with interlaboratory comparison participated by a certain number of well-recognized testing laboratories in Korea. The certified values and expanded uncertainties (k = 2) for the candidate reference material with low level and the one with high level were (51.7 ± 2.1) mg kg−1 Cd, (103.8 ± 2.9) mg kg−1 Cd, (98.8 ± 4.5) mg kg−1 Cr, (1004 ± 49.8) mg kg−1 Cr, (107.4 ± 4.6) mg kg−1 Hg, (1133 ± 50.7) mg kg−1 Hg, (94.8 ± 3.7) mg kg−1 Pb and (988.4 ± 53.6) mg kg−1 Pb, respectively. The reference materials developed in this study demonstrated their suitability for the quality assurance in Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb analysis for the implementation of RoHS Directive.

  15. Preparation and characterization of the fish reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The certified reference materials (CRMs) play an important role in obtaining measurement results traceable to the International System of Units, through an unbroken chain of comparisons. Thus, the demand for new certified reference materials (CRMs) increases every day in all areas of knowledge. The availability of reference materials, mainly in Brazil is still incipient, given that the demand far exceeds the available variety of these materials. The amount of certified reference materials available in the country is insufficient to meet the need of the scientific community and demands for development of new methodologies. Among the many areas in need of reference materials, we highlight the importance for the food trade balance for these products within the country. The certification of food products, intended both for export and for domestic consumption, requires analysis methods that provide precise and accurate results to ensure product quality. This paper describes the preparation and certification of a reference material in the fish matrix in mercury and methylmercury. The study brings together since the stage of material selection, preparation, development of homogeneity and stability studies and characterization. The certification was performed by means of measurements using two analytical techniques, flow injection analysis - cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FIA-CV-AAS) and isotope dilution applied to mass spectrometry (IDMS), which is a primary method. In this work the standards of the ISO 30 (ABNT 30-34) and ISO Guide 35 was used as the basis for the preparation and characterization of the material. For the calculation of uncertainties was used the GUM and Eurachem guide. As a result, was produced and certified a lot of material in relation to the concentration of mercury (Hg = 0.271 ± 0.057 mg g-1) and methylmercury (MeHg = 0.245 ± 0.038 mg g-1), and informational values of lead and arsenic. (author)

  16. Evaluation of a reference material for glycated haemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weykamp, CW; Penders, TJ; Muskiet, FAJ; vanderSlik, W

    1996-01-01

    The use of lyophilized blood as a reference material for glycated haemoglobin was investigated with respect to IFCC criteria for calibrators and control materials. Ninety-two laboratories, using 11 methods, detected no changes in glycated haemoglobin content when the lyophilizate was stored for one

  17. LEO effects on candidate solar-cell cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) test samples discussed within are part of the Solar Array Materials Passive (SAMPLE) LDEF experiment, which included contributions from NASA and Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL). Only the JPL portion is described in this paper. The JPL test plate contains 30 individual thin silicon solar cell/cover samples. It was the intent of the experiment to evaluate the stability and protective capability of various cover materials such as conventional fused silica and potential alternative materials such as Teflon, silicone RTV's, glass resins, polyimides, and a copolymer encapsulate. Examination of the recovered experiment shows extensive physical changes have occurred. Approximately 150 micrometeoroid/debris impact were noted, some directly on the solar cells. Of particular interest are the results of ultraviolet and atomic oxygen interactions with the various cover materials. Initial results show that the fused silica cover is the most stable and protective, with performance of other materials varying widely. Electrical measurements of the cell/cover samples are presented as part of the evaluation of cover materials to protect cells in low earth orbit environments

  18. Evaluation of candidate reference genes for gene expression normalization in Brassica juncea using real time quantitative RT-PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Chandna

    Full Text Available The real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is becoming increasingly important to gain insight into function of genes. Given the increased sensitivity, ease and reproducibility of qRT-PCR, the requirement of suitable reference genes for normalization has become important and stringent. It is now known that the expression of internal control genes in living organism vary considerably during developmental stages and under different experimental conditions. For economically important Brassica crops, only a couple of reference genes are reported till date. In this study, expression stability of 12 candidate reference genes including ACT2, ELFA, GAPDH, TUA, UBQ9 (traditional housekeeping genes, ACP, CAC, SNF, TIPS-41, TMD, TSB and ZNF (new candidate reference genes, in a diverse set of 49 tissue samples representing different developmental stages, stress and hormone treated conditions and cultivars of Brassica juncea has been validated. For the normalization of vegetative stages the ELFA, ACT2, CAC and TIPS-41 combination would be appropriate whereas TIPS-41 along with CAC would be suitable for normalization of reproductive stages. A combination of GAPDH, TUA, TIPS-41 and CAC were identified as the most suitable reference genes for total developmental stages. In various stress and hormone treated samples, UBQ9 and TIPS-41 had the most stable expression. Across five cultivars of B. juncea, the expression of CAC and TIPS-41 did not vary significantly and were identified as the most stably expressed reference genes. This study provides comprehensive information that the new reference genes selected herein performed better than the traditional housekeeping genes. The selection of most suitable reference genes depends on the experimental conditions, and is tissue and cultivar-specific. Further, to attain accuracy in the results more than one reference genes are necessary for normalization.

  19. The preparation and certification of ten uranium reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the procedures involved in the preparation, analysis and certification of ten 'UREM' uranium-bearing materials for use as international reference materials. Recommended values for total U3O8 are assigned to all of the ten materials. Twenty-two laboratories from seven countries contributed a total of approximately 300 analytical results for each material. The analytical methods used were X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry, colorimetry, fluorimetry, neutron-activation analysis, and emission spectroscopy using an inductively coupled plasma source. Approximately 300 kg of each reference material was prepared, primarily for use by the South African uranium industry. However, a limited amount of each material is available for overseas laboratories

  20. A new basaltic glass microanalytical reference material for multiple techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Steve; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been producing reference materials since the 1950s. Over 50 materials have been developed to cover bulk rock, sediment, and soils for the geological community. These materials are used globally in geochemistry, environmental, and analytical laboratories that perform bulk chemistry and/or microanalysis for instrument calibration and quality assurance testing. To answer the growing demand for higher spatial resolution and sensitivity, there is a need to create a new generation of microanalytical reference materials suitable for a variety of techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy/X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As such, the microanalytical reference material (MRM) needs to be stable under the beam, be homogeneous at scales of better than 10–25 micrometers for the major to ultra-trace element level, and contain all of the analytes (elements or isotopes) of interest. Previous development of basaltic glasses intended for LA-ICP-MS has resulted in a synthetic basaltic matrix series of glasses (USGS GS-series) and a natural basalt series of glasses (BCR-1G, BHVO-2G, and NKT-1G). These materials have been useful for the LA-ICP-MS community but were not originally intended for use by the electron or ion beam community. A material developed from start to finish with intended use in multiple microanalytical instruments would be useful for inter-laboratory and inter-instrument platform comparisons. This article summarizes the experiments undertaken to produce a basalt glass reference material suitable for distribution as a multiple-technique round robin material. The goal of the analytical work presented here is to demonstrate that the elemental homogeneity of the new glass is acceptable for its use as a reference material. Because the round robin exercise is still underway, only

  1. Newly developed standard reference materials for organic contaminant analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poster, D.; Kucklick, J.; Schantz, M.; Porter, B.; Wise, S. [National Inst. of Stand. and Technol., Gaithersburg, MD (USA). Center for Anal. Chem.

    2004-09-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a number of Standard Reference Materials (SRM) for specified analytes. The SRMs are biota and biological related materials, sediments and particle related SRMs. The certified compounds for analysis are polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitro-analogues, chlorinated pesticides, methylmercury, organic tin compounds, fatty acids, polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDE). The authors report on origin of materials and analytic methods. (uke)

  2. Characterization of Candidate Materials for Remote Recession Measurements of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Bradley D.; Winter, Michael; Panerai, Francesco; Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Danehy, Paul M.; Splinter, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A method of remotely measuring surface recession of a material sample in a plasma flow through emission spectroscopy of the post shock layer was characterized through experiments in the NASA Langley HYMETS arc jet facility. Different methods for delivering the seed products into the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material samples were investigated. Three samples were produced by seeding the PICA material with combinations of Al, Si, HfO2, VB2, Al2O3, SiO2, TiC, HfC, NaCl, and MgCl2 through infusing seed materials into a core of PICA, or through encapsulating seed material in an epoxy disk, mechanically bonding the disk to a PICA sample. The PICA samples seeded with the candidate tracers were then tested at surface temperatures near 2400 K under low pressure air plasma. The emission of Al, Ti, V, Na, and Mg in the post-shock layer was observed in the UV with a high resolution imaging spectrometer viewing the whole stagnation line from the side, and from UV to NIR with a fiber-coupled miniaturized spectrometer observing the sample surface in the wavelength range from 200 nm to 1,100 nm from the front through a collimator. Al, Na, and Mg were found to be emitting in the post-shock spectra even before the recession reached the seeding depth - therefore possibly characterizing the pyrolysis process rather than the recession itself. The appearance of Ti and V emission in the spectra was well correlated with the actual recession which was monitored through a video of the front surface of the sample. The applicability of a seed material as an indicator for recession appears to be related to the melting temperature of the seed material. Future parametric studies will be carried out in low power plasma facilities at the University of Kentucky.

  3. Certification of biological reference materials: participation of the Neutron Activation Laboratory (LAN-IPEN/CNEN-SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical laboratories have as one of their important goals to demonstrate their competence allowing international acceptance and comparison of analytical data. The IPEN Neutron Activation Laboratory (LAN-IPEN) has implemented its Quality Assurance Program which comprises, among other activities, the participation in intercomparison runs. As a part of this Quality Assurance Program, LAN-IPEN has participated in interlaboratorial trials to analyze two biological candidate reference materials: INCT-CF-3 Corn Flour and INCT-SBF-4 Soya Bean Flour from the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry And Technology (Warszawa, Poland). The elements Br, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn were analyzed in the candidate reference materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The performance of the laboratory was statistically evaluated in relation to the consensus values for these materials using the Z-Score test. This laboratory evaluation method has been accepted as a standard by ISO/IUPAC. In the present study, adequate Z-Score values (|Z|<2) were observed for all of the analyzed elements, confirming the accuracy of the nuclear methodology employed. The contribution of LAN-IPEN in the certification of the reference materials analyzed was very important, since the results provided were used in the statistical evaluation of the certified value. (author)

  4. The development and evaluation of reference materials for food microbiology.

    OpenAIRE

    in 't Veld, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1986 the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) has worked on the development and evaluation of microbiological reference materials (RMs) with support from the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR), now called Standards Measurement and Testing (SM&T). The RMs are the result of efforts, which was started many years ago, to develop standardised samples that could be used in collaborative studies and in particular for the evaluation of methods for the detec...

  5. Particle size studies in the preparation of AQCS reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle size determination is one of the important steps in the characterization of physical properties of each particulate material. However, particle size distribution effects also a chemical composition of the material in terms of homogeneity and representativeness of the sample, as well as allows or not a possible sub-sampling of the material. All this is of great importance in the preparation of reference materials for which the chemical composition and physical properties have to be extremely well characterized. In the present paper we intend to present same efforts which have been done by Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the field of particle size determination in the production of reference materials. The Malvern product MasterSizer X, based on laser light scattering is used for this purpose and the technique is also shortly discussed. (author)

  6. Certification of reference materials for the determination of alkylphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanari, Nobuyasu; Ishikawa, Keiichiro; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Otsuka, Satoko; Iwasawa, Ryoko; Fujiki, Naomi; Numata, Masahiko; Yarita, Takashi; Kato, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) are playing an increasingly important role in national and international standardizing activities. In Japan, primary standard solutions for analyses of endocrine disrupters are supplied under the national standards dissemination system named the Japan Calibration Service System (JCSS). For the traceability on reference materials used for preparation of the primary standard solutions based on the JCSS, the National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) has developed and certified high-purity reference materials of alkylphenols as NMIJ CRMs, such as 4-n-nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-heptylphenol, 4-tert-butylphenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol. Thereafter, it is essential to determine the alkylphenols by using these solutions based on the JCSS for environmental monitoring and risk assessments because analytical values obtained by using the solutions can ensure the reliability and traceability of the chemical analyses. PMID:25656848

  7. Preparation of reference materials for frit chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazulla, M.F.; Gomez, M.P.; Barba, A.; Orduna, M. [Inst. de Tecnologia Ceramica, Univ. Jaume I., Castellon (Spain)

    2002-08-01

    A study was undertaken on how to prepare frit reference materials in which the following elements are analysed: Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, N, K, Ti, Zr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Hf, P, B and Li. The following analytical techniques were used: X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and titrimetry. Boron and lithium were analysed by ICP-OES, sodium and lithium by AAS, and boron by titrimetry, while the remaining frit elements and sodium were analysed by XRF. The results found by the different methods were compared and each method was validated by means of reference materials. A procedure was established for preparing frit reference materials for calibrating and validating working methods on an industrial scale. (orig.)

  8. Development of Reference Materials for Thermal-Diffusivity Measurements by the Flash Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, M.; Abe, H.; Baba, T.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid materials used for thermal simulations and thermal designs can be obtained as the product of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and bulk density in many cases. The thermal diffusivity is usually measured by the flash method, and the specific heat capacity is usually measured by differential scanning calorimetry. In order to obtain reliable thermal conductivities for strict thermal design, it is necessary to measure the thermal diffusivity using the flash method, a well-validated apparatus. Reference materials are an effective means for validation of most practical measurement apparatus. For the flash method, isotropic graphite was selected as a candidate reference material. A batch of isotropic graphite samples was prepared and characterized in detail in order to be a certified reference material for thermal-diffusivity measurement. The detailed characterization ensures the traceability of the measurement results to the international system of units (SI). A convenient reference material for thermal conductivity was also obtained by using the known thermal-diffusivity measurements, specific heat capacity, and density of the material.

  9. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  10. Preparation and certification of Sargasso seaweed reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargasso seaweed reference material was prepared from Sargassum felvellum obtained from an unpolluted area in Japan. The sargasso samples were washed, freeze-dried, pulverized, sieved to pass a 80-mesh screen and finally homogenized. Collaborative studies on the elemental analysis of the sargasso reference material were performed using various analytical techniques. Certified values are provided for Ag, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sr, V and Zn, based on results of determinations by at least three independent analytical techniques. Reference values are reported for Al, Br, Cl, Cr, Cs, Hg, I, P, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Ti and U. The sargasso certified reference material contains high levels of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, I, Br, As and U, while the concentration of trace elements may be considered to be at the lower end of the range of reported values for marine brown algae. The sargasso sample will be of practical use in marine and environmental sciences as a certified reference material having an elemental composition close to background levels. (author)

  11. Preparation and certification of Sargasso seaweed reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Kensaku

    1988-01-01

    Sargasso seaweed reference material was prepared from Sargassum felvellum obtained from an unpolluted area in Japan. The sargasso samples were washed, freeze-dried, pulverized, sieved to pass a 80-mesh screen and finally homogenized. Collaborative studies on the elemental analysis of the sargasso reference material were performed using various analytical techniques. Certified values are provided for Ag, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, Rb, Sr, V and Zn, based on results of determinations by at least three independent analytical techniques. Reference values are reported for Al, Br, Cl, Cr, Cs, Hg, I, P, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Ti and U. The sargasso certified reference material contains high levels of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, I, Br, As and U, while the concentration of trace elements may be considered to be at the lower end of the range of reported values for marine brown algae. The sargasso sample will be of practical use in marine and environmental sciences as a certified reference material having an elemental composition close to background levels.

  12. On criteria for examining analysis quality with standard reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages and disadvantages and applicability of some criteria for examining analysis quality with standard reference material are discussed. The combination of the uncertainties of the instrument examined and the reference material should be determined on the basis of specific situations. Without the data of the instrument's uncertainty, it would be applicable to substitute the standard deviation multiplied by certain times for the uncertainty. The result of the examining should not result in more error reported in routine measurements than it really is. Over strict examining should also be avoided

  13. Certification of a meat reference material based on a collaborative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Salazar Arzate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a collaborative project, comparison studies were carried out to improve measurement capabilities of participating laboratories, supporting them to produce, characterize and distribute reference materials in the food sector. The project was planned in four annual stages (milk, water, meat and grains. The third stage aimed specifically to quantify and certify the nutritional content of the parameters (nitrogen, fat, sodium and potassium of a batch candidate as Certified Reference Material (CRM of canned beef. This study was conducted in collaboration between several National Metrology Institutes (NMIs and/or collaborating laboratories, which, once identified the possible causes of variability or bias in the measurements, as well as the opportunities of improvement, achieved the certification of the material beef. The CRM was distributed among the participants to cover the needs of the food industry of meat products and testing laboratories in their respective countries.

  14. Neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic breeder materials of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the European programs for the future fusion reactors, the Process Chemistry Department of ENEA, Casaccia Center (Rome), has been involved in preparing ceramic blanket materials as tritium breeders; a special consideration has been addressed to the nuclear characterization of LiAlO2 and Li2ZrO3. In this paper are reported neutron irradiation of ceramic specimens in TRIGA reactor and γ-spectrometric measurements for INAA purposes; and isothermal annealing of the irradiated samples and tritium extraction, by using an 'out of pile' system. (author) 3 refs.; 4 figs.; 4 tabs

  15. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-01

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  16. High temperature indentation tests on fusion reactor candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flat-top cylinder indenter for mechanical characterization (FIMEC) is an indentation technique employing cylindrical punches with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm. The test gives pressure-penetration curves from which the yield stress can be determined. The FIMEC apparatus was developed to test materials in the temperature range from -180 to +200 oC. Recently, the heating system of FIMEC apparatus has been modified to operate up to 500 oC. So, in addition to providing yield stress over a more extended temperature range, it is possible to perform stress-relaxation tests at temperatures of great interest for several nuclear fusion reactor (NFR) alloys. Data on MANET-II, F82H mod., Eurofer-97, EM-10, AISI 316 L, Ti6Al4V and CuCrZr are presented and compared with those obtained by mechanical tests with standard methods

  17. 235Uranium isotope abundance certified reference material for gamma spectrometry EC nuclear reference material 171 certification report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This certification report contains the information necessary for the final certification of EC nuclear reference material 171. It is also intended to inform the user of the reference material concerned on technical/scientific details which are not given in the certificate. The report describes the reference material which consists of sets of U3O8 samples with five different 235U/U abundances, filled in cylindrical aluminium cans. The can bottom serves as window for emitted gamma radiation. The report describes how the 235U/U abundances were characterized, how the other properties relevant for gamma measurements were determined and gives all connected results as well as those from the verification measurements. Appendix A represents the draft certificate. 32 refs

  18. Developing a matrix reference material for screening of transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wu, Yuhua; Li, Xiaofei; Wang, Yulei; Zhang, Li; Li, Yunjing; Wu, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) that are compatible with detection methods are needed to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Screening is the first detection step in determining the possible presence of GMO ingredients in food or feed; however, screening has been hindered by the lack of GMO CRMs. In this study, transgenic rice materials were developed via the transformation of a construct harboring 11 commonly used screening elements. Digital PCR was utilized to identify a homozygous single-copy line termed SDrice. The qualitative detections of 11 elements in 21 transgenic materials demonstrated that the genomic DNA of the SDrice was suitable for use as a positive control in the screening of GMO ingredients. The suitability of SDrice as reference material was further checked by testing the sensitivity of 11 known conventional PCR assays, ranging from 10 to 50 copies of the SDrice genome. The standard curves that were created using SDrice DNA series as calibrators all exhibited good linearities in the relationships of the Ct values with the template copy numbers in these 11 real-time PCR assays. The LODs of the real-time PCR assays were estimated to be two to five copies of the SDrice genome. Comparisons of the SDrice with other GM rice revealed that significant differences existed in both the intercepts of the standard curves and the ΔCt values of the exogenous and reference genes for the P-35S, T-nos, HPT, T-35S, and Bar assays; the SDrice was not fit for quantification of other GM rice events. This study provided a matrix reference material (RM) that was suitable for screening GM rice, determination of sensitivity and a LOD of PCR assays, and overcame some of the drawbacks of plasmid DNA as reference material. PMID:26462921

  19. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in environmental standard reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Heather M.; Schantz, Michele M.; Wise, Stephen A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Keller, Jennifer M.; Kucklick, John R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Hollings Marine Laboratory, Charleston, SC (United States); Leigh, Stefan D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Statistical Engineering Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Standard reference materials (SRMs) are valuable tools in developing and validating analytical methods to improve quality assurance standards. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a long history of providing environmental SRMs with certified concentrations of organic and inorganic contaminants. Here we report on new certified and reference concentrations for 27 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners in seven different SRMs: cod-liver oil, whale blubber, fish tissue (two materials), mussel tissue and sediment (two materials). PBDEs were measured in these SRMs, with the lowest concentrations measured in mussel tissue (SRM 1974b) and the highest in sediment collected from the New York/New Jersey Waterway (SRM 1944). Comparing the relative PBDE congener concentrations within the samples, we found the biota SRMs contained primarily tetrabrominated and pentabrominated diphenyl ethers, whereas the sediment SRMs contained primarily decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209). The cod-liver oil (SRM 1588b) and whale blubber (SRM 1945) materials were also found to contain measurable concentrations of two methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-BDEs). Certified and reference concentrations are reported for 12 PBDE congeners measured in the biota SRMs and reference values are available for two MeO-BDEs. Results from a sediment interlaboratory comparison PBDE exercise are available for the two sediment SRMs (1941b and 1944). (orig.)

  20. The updated IAEA database of natural matrix reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a database of biological and environmental reference materials of natural origin (human and animal tissues, foods, plants, soils, sediments, etc.) for trace elements, radionuclides, stable isotopes, organic contaminants and other related measurands. The purpose is to help analysts to select reference materials for quality assurance purposes that match as closely as possible (i.e., with respect to matrix type and concentrations of the measurands of interest) the real samples that are to be analyzed. Former versions of this database were prepared in co-operation with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and provided as hardcopies free of charge. The latest version was from 1995. More recently the database bas been updated by the IAEA so that it now contains more than 22,500 values (mass fraction or concentration) for 660 different measurands and 1,705 reference materials developed by 56 producers from 22 countries. An overview of the structure and content of the database and of the two ways it may be browsed is given. Emphasis is given to reference materials that are intended to verifying analysis for radioanalytical measurements. The database is soon accessible on-line, cost-free, via the internet. (author)

  1. Determination of trace quantities of iodine in different sorts of tobacco and biological standard reference materials by rapid radiochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration levels of total iodine obtained by RNAA in different sorts of tobacco, including the reference sample Kentucky Tobacco 2RI, two new candidate reference materials, Oriental Tobacco Leaves (CTA-OTL-1) and Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) prepared in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw, and some biological SRMs, are presented and discussed. (author) 51 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  2. Standard reference materials for foods and dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Katherine E; Thomas, Jeanice Brown; Christopher, Steven J; Greenberg, Robert R; Sander, Lane C; Schantz, Michele M; Welch, Michael J; Wise, Stephen A

    2007-09-01

    Well-characterized certified reference materials are needed by laboratories in the food testing, dietary supplement, and nutrition communities to facilitate compliance with labeling laws and improve the accuracy of information provided on product labels, so that consumers can make good choices. As a result of the enactment of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 and the Infant Formula Act of 1980, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) worked to develop a series of food-matrix standard reference materials (SRMs) characterized for nutrient concentrations. These include SRM 1544 Fatty Acids and Cholesterol in a Frozen Diet Composite, SRM 1546 Meat Homogenate, SRM 1548a Typical Diet, SRM 1566b Oyster Tissue, SRM 1846 Infant Formula, SRM 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, SRM 1947 Lake Michigan Fish Tissue, SRM 2383 Baby Food Composite, SRM 2384 Baking Chocolate, SRM 2385 Slurried Spinach, and SRM 2387 Peanut Butter. With the enactment of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, NIST has been working to develop suites of dietary supplement SRMs characterized for active and marker compounds and for toxic elements and pesticides, where appropriate. An updated SRM 1588b Organics in Cod Liver Oil, a suite of ephedra-containing materials (SRMs 3240-3245), a carrot extract in oil (SRM 3276), and a suite of ginkgo-containing materials (SRMs 3246-3248) are available. Several other materials are currently in preparation. Dietary supplements are sometimes provided in forms that are food-like; for these, values may also be assigned for nutrients, for example SRM 3244 Ephedra-Containing Protein Powder. Both the food-matrix and dietary supplement reference materials are intended primarily for validation of analytical methods. They may also be used as "primary control materials" in assignment of values to in-house (secondary) control materials to confirm accuracy and to establish measurement traceability to NIST. PMID:17534610

  3. Analysis of FDA in-house food reference materials with anticoincidence INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-house reference material (IRM) cocoa powder (CCP) has been in use at US Food and Drug Administration laboratories for about 15 years. A single lot of commercial material was originally characterized for 32 elements by several laboratories and five techniques. A unique approach for basis weight determination based upon ambient relative humidity was developed for CCP, eliminating the need for dry weight determinations. The CCP Reference Sheet is updated by incorporating new results approximately every 5 years. The last update occurred in 2006. As part of an effort to revalidate and update values for CCP, anticoincidence instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine mass fractions for 16 of the originally characterized elements, as well as to provide information on 16 other elements. Results were in very good agreement with 2006 Reference Sheet values. A new candidate IRM, fresh-frozen swordfish (FFSF) powder, was produced by adding inorganic As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Se to liquid nitrogen-frozen commercial swordfish filets which were then homogenized. Portions of FFSF were analyzed by INAA to provide mass fraction and homogeneity information for As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb, and Se as well as for eight other elements occurring naturally in the material. Non-homogeneities were ≤2.5 % for As, Br, Cd, and Cs, and ≤1.8 % for Cr, Hg, Rb, Sb, and Se. Certified reference materials DORM-3 Fish Protein powder and fresh-frozen SRM 1947 Lake Michigan Fish Tissue were analyzed as controls. (author)

  4. Recommended reference materials for realization of physicochemical properties density

    CERN Document Server

    Herington, E F G

    1976-01-01

    This book first presents the nomenclature and units used in the determination of densities of liquids and solids, followed by a general description of the apparatus and the methods used in the measurement of density, with particular reference to the pycnometric, hydrostatic weighing, magnetic float, and temperature flotation methods. The use of water as a density reference material is then explained, focusing on the isotopic composition of Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW) and the absolute density of SMOW as a function of temperature. Problems due to the effect of pressure and dissolved gases o

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  6. Certified reference materials of trace elements in water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Agrawal

    2005-07-01

    Measurement of trace elements is playing a vital role in industries and various sectors of science and technology including semiconductors, food, health and environmental sectors. In most of the cases a small error in measurement can vitiate all the measures taken for quality control and management. Many decisions regarding the suitability of material/products are based on the analysis. To reduce or eliminate the rejection rate of the products, accurate and reliable measurements are needed which can be achieved by the use of certified reference materials (CRMs). Their use in calibration of analytical equipments and validation of test methods ensures high quality in measurements and it provides traceability to the measurement data with national/international measurement systems (SI unit) also. In the present scenario of globalization of economy, use of certified reference materials (CRMs) in measurements is essential for global acceptance of products and test reports. Their use fulfil a mandatory requirement of international quality systems (ISO 9000, ISO/IEC standard 17025) including our national accreditation body, National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories (NABL), World Trade Organization (WTO) etc. International manufacturers of CRMs are meeting most of the requirement of CRMs of the country. To meet the demand of CRMs indigenously, the National Physical Laboratory, India initiated a national programme on preparation and dissemination of certified reference materials.

  7. Expression stabilities of candidate reference genes for RT-qPCR under different stress conditions in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Ma

    Full Text Available Due to its accuracy, sensitivity and high throughput, real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR has been widely used in analysing gene expression. The quality of data from such analyses is affected by the quality of reference genes used. Expression stabilities for nine candidate reference genes widely used in soybean were evaluated under different stresses in this study. Our results showed that EF1A and ACT11 were the best under salinity stress, TUB4, TUA5 and EF1A were the best under drought stress, ACT11 and UKN2 were the best under dark treatment, and EF1B and UKN2 were the best under virus infection. EF1B and UKN2 were the top two genes which can be reliably used in all of the stress conditions assessed.

  8. Primary certification of reference material for electrolytic conductivity of bioethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, L. F.; Gomes, M. R. F.; Cassini, G. C.; Faria, A. C. V.; Fraga, I. C. S.

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays the preservation of the planet is spreading into the international scene with the use of renewable energy sources such as bioethanol. The challenge is to guarantee the quality of produced bioethanol, and the electrolytic conductivity (EC) is one of the specified parameters for this purpose. However, is necessary to demonstrate the metrological traceability of the measurement results for EC in this matrix. This study presents the certification of a reference material for EC in bioethanol by using only primary measurements. The value of primary certified reference material (CRM) is (0.77 ± 0.06) µS.cm-1, and its use will provide the metrological traceability needed for measurement results in laboratories.

  9. Gyttja, a low-level, high-organic reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyttja, the bottom sediment from Perch Lake at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, was collected to prepare a low-level, high-organic standard radioactivity reference material. In the natural state it contained about 92% water and when dried the residue was about 50% organic material. The surface layer of this sediment contains small quantities of 60Co,90Sr,137Cs and 239Pu. The material was collected from depth using a sludge pump and the radioactivity content adjusted with addition of surface-layer material. It was then dewatered by centrifuge and freeze-dried. The overall exercise was a demonstration of co-operation between the National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C., Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, the Ontario Department of Labour, the Environmental Protection Service of Environment Canada, the Department of Agriculture, the Atomic Energy Control Board and two commercial firms, Rush Engineering and Freeze-Dried Foods, Incorporated. (author)

  10. Elemental Characterization of Olive Leaves as a Standard Reference Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive leaves standard reference material was produced by a co-operation programme between the Arab Atomic Energy Agency and Central Laboratory for Elemental and Isotopic Analysis in Atomic Energy Authority, Egypt. An intercomparison study was carried out, with 18 independent sets of results being reported from 9 analytical laboratories, The statistical evaluation of the collected data resulted in recommended values for 6 elements and information values for 8 elements

  11. Development of a Thin Film Magnetic Moment Reference Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, D P; Halloran, S T; Owings, R R; da Silva, F C S

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the development of a magnetic moment reference material for low moment magnetic samples. We first conducted an inter-laboratory comparison to determine the most useful sample dimensions and magnetic properties for common instruments such as vibrating sample magnetometers (VSM), SQUIDs, and alternating gradient field magnetometers. The samples were fabricated and then measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Their magnetic moments were calibrated by tracing back to the NIST YIG sphere, SRM 2853. PMID:27096108

  12. New Filler Material for Reference Free Part Encapsulation Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bei-zhi; YANG Jian-guo; ZHOU Hu

    2002-01-01

    Reference free part encapsulation (RFPE) is a nontraditional universal fixturing technique. In this paper,new filler material-a lower melting point alloy for RFPE technique is introduced. Based on experiment, the shrinlkage and expansion rate, the effect of filler on workpiece drift and the effect of filler thickness on cutting distortion are studied. The alloy has a good mechanical and physical performance and the need of RFPE fixturing can be perfectly satisfied. The result shows that if the formula and process parameters of filler material are properly selected, it can obviously improve the quality of the workpiece, enhance the machining efficiency and reduce the manufacturing cost.

  13. Certification of a uranium dioxide reference material for chemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, issued by the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements (CBNM), describes the characterization of a uranium dioxide reference material with accurately determined uranium mass fraction for chemical analyses. The preparation, conditioning, homogeneity tests and the analyses performed on this material are described in Annex 1. The evaluation of the individual impurity results, total of impurities and uranium mass fraction are given in Annex 2. Information on a direct determination of uranium by titration is given in Annex 3. The uranium mass fraction (881.34+-0.13) g.kg-1 calculated in Annex 2 is given on the certificate

  14. Report on the workshop to review waste inventory, waste characteristics and reference site candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need of co-operation among Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) Member States in the field of low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal. An integrated approach is essential for successful establishment of LILW disposal facilities in RCA Member States. This would include: a) identification of waste inventory and characteristics; b) guidelines for implementation of LILW disposal; c) regulatory guidelines; d) safety assessment; e) quality assurance; and f) public acceptance. This project will focus on technical issues. The overall objective of the project, established in the project formulation meeting, is to assist RCA Member States in establishing national disposal activities for radioactive waste from nuclear applications by providing expert advice and training on techniques and methodology associated with planning and establishment of disposal facilities and to obtain improved knowledge of key staff members for the implementation of LILW disposal. The purpose of this workshop was to identify waste inventories, waste characteristics, site characteristics (generic or site specific) for disposal of LILW in RCA Member States of the project and identify conceptual reference site conditions and consider reference repository concepts preliminarily. Also the workshop was to establish an action plan of the next step. The workshop was held in Shanghai, China from 7 to 9 July 1997 and attended by 7 countries, i.e. Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Evaluation of candidate reference genes for normalization of quantitative RT-PCR in soybean tissues under various abiotic stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung Tien Le

    Full Text Available Quantitative RT-PCR can be a very sensitive and powerful technique for measuring differential gene expression. Changes in gene expression induced by abiotic stresses are complex and multifaceted, which make determining stably expressed genes for data normalization difficult. To identify the most suitable reference genes for abiotic stress studies in soybean, 13 candidate genes collected from literature were evaluated for stability of expression under dehydration, high salinity, cold and ABA (abscisic acid treatments using delta CT and geNorm approaches. Validation of reference genes indicated that the best reference genes are tissue- and stress-dependent. With respect to dehydration treatment, the Fbox/ABC, Fbox/60s gene pairs were found to have the highest expression stability in the root and shoot tissues of soybean seedlings, respectively. Fbox and 60s genes are the most suitable reference genes across dehydrated root and shoot tissues. Under salt stress the ELF1b/IDE and Fbox/ELF1b are the most stably expressed gene pairs in roots and shoots, respectively, while 60s/Fbox is the best gene pair in both tissues. For studying cold stress in roots or shoots, IDE/60s and Fbox/Act27 are good reference gene pairs, respectively. With regard to gene expression analysis under ABA treatment in either roots, shoots or across these tissues, 60s/ELF1b, ELF1b/Fbox and 60s/ELF1b are the most suitable reference genes, respectively. The expression of ELF1b/60s, 60s/Fbox and 60s/Fbox genes was most stable in roots, shoots and both tissues, respectively, under various stresses studied. Among the genes tested, 60s was found to be the best reference gene in different tissues and under various stress conditions. The highly ranked reference genes identified from this study were proved to be capable of detecting subtle differences in expression rates that otherwise would be missed if a less stable reference gene was used.

  16. Development and characterisation of a new line width reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Zhu, Fan; Heidelmann, Markus; Fritz, Georg; Bayer, Thomas; Kalt, Samuel; Fluegge, Jens

    2015-11-01

    A new critical dimension (CD, often synonymously used for line width) reference material with improved vertical parallel sidewalls (IVPSs) has been developed and characterised. The sample has a size of 6 mm  ×  6 mm, consisting of 4 groups of 5  ×  5 feature patterns. Each feature pattern has a group of five reference line features with a nominal CD of 50 nm, 70 nm, 90 nm, 110 nm and 130 nm, respectively. Each feature pattern includes a pair of triangular alignment marks, applicable for precisely identifying the target measurement position, e.g. for comparison or calibration between different tools. The geometry of line features has been investigated thoroughly using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope and a CD atomic force microscope (CD-AFM). Their results indicate the high quality of the line features: the top corner radius of  strategy for the non-destructive calibration of the developed sample is introduced, which enables the application of the reference material in practice.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Candidate Materials for Hot Gas Duct of VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot gas duct of VHTR is operated at 950 .deg.. Ni based superalloys, such as Hastelloy XR, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, for hot gas duct have been candidate material because of good strength and corrosion properties at high temperature. Mechanical properties of these alloys are tested at high temperature to apply to hot gas duct of VHTR

  18. Reference materials for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material. Volume 1. Uranium oxide plus graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual describes the fabrication of reference materials for use in gamma-ray-based nondestructive assay of low-density uranium-bearing samples. The sample containers are 2-l bottles. The reference materials consist of small amounts of UO2 spread throughout a graphite matrix. The 235U content ranges from 0 to 100 g. The manual also describes the far-field assay procedure used with low-resolution detectors

  19. Preparation and quality control of materials used in the reference buffer material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A.; Hnatiw, D.S.J.; Kohle, C.L.

    1992-09-15

    This document summarizes the methodologies developed for preparing the reference buffer material (RBM) for use in laboratory-scale and field-scale experiments. Two commercially available concrete mixers have been successfully used to repeatedly produce homogeneous bulk buffer and backfill materials. The components, blending procedures, quality control sampling requirements, and mixing checklists used in the production of the reference buffer material are presented. Use of these directions will ensure that consistent batching of sealing materials is achieved and operator-induced variability is minimized.

  20. The certification of a new paint reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of paint as a coating for toys intended for sale on the European market is controlled by a European Standard (EN 71-3: 1994 - European Commission to produce a new paint reference material which can be used to validate the test methods given in the European Standard. The migration of elements from painted panels and comminuted paint produced by the Laboratory of the Government Chemist, (U.K.) was studied. Several methods were used in this certification exercise and this work reports the results of neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the migration of As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Se and Sb into a simulated stomach environment. Replicate extracts obtained from paint samples gave a precision of within 10% for most elements by both analytical techniques for the paint panels and for the comminuted paint sample. This preliminary study has shown that the standard method can provide reproducible results for each of the paint materials studied and indicates that the study should be continued to produce a fully certified paint reference material. (author)

  1. Recent developments in food-matrix Reference Materials at NIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, K E; Colbert, J C; Greenberg, R R; Schantz, M M; Welch, M J

    2001-06-01

    Since 1996, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed several food-matrix Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) characterized for nutrient concentrations. These include SRM 1544 Fatty Acids and Cholesterol in a Frozen Diet Composite, SRM 1546 Meat Homogenate, SRM 1548a Typical Diet, SRM 1566b Oyster Tissue, SRM 1846 Infant Formula, and SRM 2383 Baby Food Composite. Three additional materials--SRM 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, SRM 2384 Baking Chocolate, and SRM 2385 Spinach--are in preparation. NIST also recently assigned values for proximate (fat, protein, etc.), individual fatty acid, and total dietary fiber concentrations in a number of existing SRMs and reference materials (RMs) that previously had values assigned for their elemental composition. NIST has used several modes for assignment of analyte concentrations in the food-matrix RMs, including the use of data provided by collaborating laboratories, alone and in combination with NIST data. The use of data provided by collaborating food industry and contract laboratories for the analysis of food-matrix RMs has enabled NIST to provide assigned values for many analytes that NIST does not have the resources or analytical expertise to measure. PMID:11451251

  2. Reference Material IAEA 434: Naturally Occurring Radionuclides in Phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum is generated as a by-product of the phosphoric acid based fertilizer industry. The discharge of phosphogypsum on earth surface deposits is a potential source of enhanced natural radiation and heavy metals, and the resulting environmental impact should be considered carefully to ensure safety and compliance with environmental regulations. In addition, phosphogypsum can be used to make several building materials and it is used in agriculture as a conditioner to maintain soil productivity in areas where soils are poor and erode easily. A reliable determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum is necessary to comply with the radiation protection and environmental regulations. The IAEA-434 will assist laboratories in the IAEA Member States in validating their analytical methods for the determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum and to control the quality of the produced analytical results. Reference values for the massic activities and associated standard uncertainties were established for: Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234 and U-238. During sample production and certification, the requirements for reference material production and certification as stated in ISO guides 34 and 35 were taken into account. This report summarizes the preparation and certification process

  3. Development and characterisation of a new line width reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new critical dimension (CD, often synonymously used for line width) reference material with improved vertical parallel sidewalls (IVPSs) has been developed and characterised. The sample has a size of 6 mm  ×  6 mm, consisting of 4 groups of 5  ×  5 feature patterns. Each feature pattern has a group of five reference line features with a nominal CD of 50 nm, 70 nm, 90 nm, 110 nm and 130 nm, respectively. Each feature pattern includes a pair of triangular alignment marks, applicable for precisely identifying the target measurement position, e.g. for comparison or calibration between different tools. The geometry of line features has been investigated thoroughly using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope and a CD atomic force microscope (CD-AFM). Their results indicate the high quality of the line features: the top corner radius of  <7 nm, vertical sidewall (slope mostly within 90°  ±  0.5°) and very small line width variation (LWR down to 0.36 nm). The application of the developed sample for calibrating the scaling factor and effective tip geometry of the CD-AFM are demonstrated. The scaling factor of the CD-AFM is calibrated to be 0.9988, coinciding well with the theoretical value 1 as the tool was calibrated to a traceable metrological atomic force microscope. The effective width of a CDR120-EBD tip is calibrated as 128.32 nm. Finally, a strategy for the non-destructive calibration of the developed sample is introduced, which enables the application of the reference material in practice. (paper)

  4. The new IAEA reference material: IAEA-434 technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) in phosphogypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhashiro, A., E-mail: A.Shakhashiro@iaea.or [International Atomic Energy Agency, Agency' s Laboratories, Vienna International Center, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Sansone, U. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Agency' s Laboratories, Vienna International Center, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Wershofen, H. [Environmental Radioactivity, PTP, Braunschweig (Germany); Bollhoefer, A. [Environmental Radioactivity, Department of the Environment and Heritage, Darwin (Australia); Kim, C.K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Agency' s Laboratories, Vienna International Center, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Kim, C.S. [Department of Environmental Radioactivity Assessment, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon, Republic of Korea (Former collaborator) (Korea, Republic of); Kis-Benedek, G. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Agency' s Laboratories, Vienna International Center, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Korun, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Moune, M. [LNE-LNHB, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lee, S.H. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Tarjan, S. [Central Radiological Laboratory, Hungarian Agricultural Authority, Budapest (Hungary); Al-Masri, M.S. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2011-01-15

    A reliable determination of Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in phosphogypsum is necessary to comply with radiation protection and environmental regulations. In this respect, a new phosphogypsum reference material was produced and certified to assist in the validation of analytical methods and the quality assurance of produced analytical results. This paper presents the sample preparation methodology, material homogeneity assessment, characterization campaign results and assignment of property values, and associated uncertainties. The reference values and associated uncertainties for Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234 and U-238 were established based on consensus values calculated from analytical results reported by three National Metrology Institutes and five expert laboratories.

  5. Electrodynamics in Arbitrary Reference Frames and in Arbitrary Material Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The investigation of electromagnetic phenomena in material media still belongs to the most difficult tasks of electrodynamics. Complexity and variability of material media practically exclude effective applications of methods and computational techniques elaborated in the framework of standard microscopic electrodynamics with classical vacuum as a ground state. In order to obtain satisfactorily exact descriptions of electromagnetic properties of complex material media one is enforced to use methods and approximations which are difficult to control. Moreover, they usually break covariance properties and the results obtained are valid in one reference frame which choice remains subjective and model dependent. Some time ago we have proposed a reformulation of Maxwell electrodynamics which opens new ways in study of electromagnetic processes in material media. The formalism gets rid of assumptions characteristic for vacuum electrodynamics only and it avoids the usage of constitutive relations as primary relations put on quantities needed for a complete description of an electromagnetic system. Fundamental properties of all electromagnetic quantities are their uniquely defined transformation rules and their analysis allows to determine the possible relations between them. Within such a scheme it is possible to introduce constitutive relations which do not have analogies in macroscopic classical electrodynamics. They may be used in description of microscopic electromagnetic processes in a different way than it is done in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. (author)

  6. Preparation, characterization and certification of uranium isotope reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and certification of a set of uranium isotope reference materials ranging from 0.5 to 20.0 % of 235U in mass. The most important concepts of metrology in chemical measurements were applied so that the certified quantities in these materials could be directly traceable to the International System of Units (SI). As a consequence of this approach, these materials can be used in the instruments calibration, estimation of measurement uncertainty, method validation, assessment of performance of analysts, quality control routines and interlaboratory comparison programmes. The most advanced methods and techniques in mass spectrometry, that is, gas source mass spectrometry (GSMS), thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) were investigated to identify which are the dominant components in the uncertainty and to quantify its contribution to the final value of the measurement uncertainty of the isotopic ratio. The results obtained were then compared to verify which are the methods and techniques associated to the lowest measurement uncertainty values. The isotope amount ratio n(235U)/n(238U) was certified in the materials produced to expanded uncertainties ranging from 0.02 to 0.10 % and the ratios n(234U)/n(238U) and n(236U)/n(238U), to uncertainties ranging from 0.03 to 2.20 %. These values fully comply to the requirements of the isotopic characterization of nuclear fuel as well as the analysis of environmental samples for nuclear safeguards. (author)

  7. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys and three copper-based alloys are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The austenitic alloys are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and the high-nickel material Alloy 825. The copper-based alloys are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). Waste in the forms of both spent fuel assemblies from reactors and borosilicate glass will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking; and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Problems specific to welds, such as hot cracking, may also occur. A survey of the literature has been prepared as part of the process of selecting, from among the candidates, a material that is adequate for repository conditions. The modes of degradation are discussed in detail in the survey to determine which apply to the candidate alloys and the extent to which they may actually occur. The eight volumes of the survey are summarized in Sections 1 through 8 of this overview. The conclusions drawn from the survey are also given in this overview

  8. Multi-elemental nuclear analysis of soil reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the last years, in the LEER (Laboratorio de Espectroscopia e Espectrometria das Radiacoes) at IPEN, several certified reference materials using neutron activation aiming to optimize its uses in different areas. Based on it, several works have been done using INAA as well as NAA with Au as flux monitor, i. e., a variant of k0 - NAA, or combination of both techniques using the different experimental facilities at IPEN: the IEA-R1 and MB-01 Nuclear Reactors and Neutron Irradiator. The intention of this research was to check the viability of using parametric NAA in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor for performing soil characterization. The performance of this procedure was compared to results obtained in the same reference material using the k0-standardization method using the TRIGA MARK - IPR-R1 nuclear reactor from CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte. The concentration of the elements in the soil reference material (IAEA/SOIL-7) was obtained using the parametric and at k0- standardization methods of neutron activation analyses. For parametric analyses the Cd Ratio Technique was used for the measurement of thermal neutron flux distribution, in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN/CNEN and the concentration was obtained by using an in-house software, which correlated the measured parameters, i. e., neutron flux, net area and efficiency of the selected gamma ray with the constants physics involved (the decay constant; the atomic masses, the Avogadro number, the cross section for the selected capture reaction, the isotopic fraction and the intensity of the gamma ray). For k0-standardization measurements a set of monitors (Al-(0.1%)-Au discs and Zr foils) were used for neutron flux determination in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 nuclear reactor at CDTN/CNEN, and the concentration was obtained applying the commercial KayWin software package. The performance of these procedures is compared and the advantages and disadvantages of each method and sources of errors are discussed. (author)

  9. NAA study on homogeneity of reference materials and their suitability for microanalytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneity of the existing (Virginia Tobacco Leaves CTA-VTL-2 (ICHTJ), Apatite Concentrate CTA-AC-1 (ICHTJ), Fine Fly Ash CTA-FFA-1 (ICHTJ)) and candidate certified reference materials (CRMs) (IAEA-338 Lichen, IAEA-413 Algae, Spruce Shoots RMF II (Germany)) was studied by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Several samples of small mass (ca. 1 or 10 mg) taken from various containers were analyzed by instrumental NAA and the results for several elements were compared by Fishers's test and t-test with analogous series of results for samples taken from one container. In the second approach, sampling variance was estimated for some elements from overall variance and the components of analytical variance. The results were interpreted with the aid of Ingamells' sampling constant. Particle size distribution of the reference materials was also measured by several techniques. In addition quantitative determinations for some elements were performed and results compared with the certified values. The results of the present study were discussed with reference to suitability of CRMs to microanalytical techniques. It was pointed out that the term 'microanalysis' itself is not always unequivocally understood and used. (author)

  10. Multielemental analysis of reference material by NAA. Final report for the period. 1 September 1996 - 1 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative data on trace elements in Sea Plant Homogenate, IAEA-140/TM candidate reference material prepared by the Marine Environment Laboratory (MEL) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are presented. The results were obtained by the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA), flame (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS), and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). 44 elements and methylmercury were determined and the results are given and discussed in the present report

  11. A candidate reference measurement procedure for quantifying serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D₃ and 25-hydroxyvitamin D₂ using isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineva, Ekaterina M; Schleicher, Rosemary L; Chaudhary-Webb, Madhulika; Maw, Khin L; Botelho, Julianne C; Vesper, Hubert W; Pfeiffer, Christine M

    2015-07-01

    The inaccuracy of routine serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurements hampers the interpretation of data in patient care and public health research. We developed and validated a candidate reference measurement procedure (RMP) for highly accurate quantitation of two clinically important 25-hydroxyvitamin D metabolites in serum, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 [25(OH)D2] and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. The two compounds of interest together with spiked deuterium-labeled internal standards [d 3-25(OH)D2 and d 6-25(OH)D3] were extracted from serum via liquid-liquid extraction. The featured isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS method used reversed-phase chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in positive ion mode. A pentafluorophenylpropyl-packed UHPLC column together with isocratic elution allowed for complete baseline resolution of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 from their structural C-3 isomers within 12 min. We evaluated method trueness, precision, potential interferences, matrix effects, limits of quantitation, and measurement uncertainty. Calibration materials were, or were traceable to, NIST Standard Reference Materials 2972. Within-day and total imprecision (CV) averaged 1.9 and 2.0% for 25(OH)D3, respectively, and 2.4 and 3.5% for 25(OH)D2, respectively. Mean trueness was 100.3% for 25(OH)D3 and 25(OH)D2. The limits of quantitation/limits of detection were 4.61/1.38 nmol/L for 25(OH)D3 and 1.46/0.13 nmol/L for 25(OH)D2. When we compared our RMP results to an established RMP using 40 serum samples, we found a nonsignificant mean bias of 0.2% for total 25(OH)D. This candidate RMP for 25(OH)D metabolites meets predefined method performance specifications (≤5% total CV and ≤1.7% bias) and provides sufficient sample throughput to meet the needs of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Vitamin D Standardization Certification Program. Graphical abstract Bias assessment using NIST standard reference materials. Legend CDC mean mass fractions (ng/g) ± U 95 (6

  12. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance

  13. Fusible heat sink materials - Evaluation of alternate candidates. [for PLSS cooling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.; Lomax, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. Materials with greater thermal storage capability than water could enable both an extension of time between recharging and/or a reduction in size and/or mass. An extensive literature search identified 1,215 candidates with a solid-liquid transformation within the temperature range of -13 C to 5 C. Based on data available in the literature, several candidates with a cooling capacity significantly greater than water were identified. Measurements of the transformation temperature and enthalpy of transformation were then undertaken with a differential scanning calorimeter in order to confirm the accuracy of the literature. Laboratory measurements have thus far not been able to corroborate the extremely high values found from the literature. This paper presents the approach for materials selection utilized in this study, the experimental procedure, and the results of the measurements thus far undertaken.

  14. Bias detection and certified reference materials for random measurands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhin, Andrew L.

    2015-12-01

    A problem that frequently occurs in metrology is the bias checking of data obtained by a laboratory against the specified value and uncertainty estimate given in the certificate of analysis. The measurand—a property of a certified reference material (CRM)—is supposed to be random with a normal distribution whose parameters are given by the certificate specifications. The laboratory’s data from subsequent measurements of the CRM (a CRM experiment) are summarized by the sample mean value and its uncertainty which is commonly based on a repeatability standard deviation. New confidence intervals for the lab’s bias are derived. Although they may lack intuitive appeal, those obtained by using higher order asymptotic methods, compared and contrasted in this paper, are recommended.

  15. IAEA reference materials for quality assurance of marine radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA's Marine Environment Laboratory has been assisting laboratories in Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) for the analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment since the early seventies. AQCS through world-wide and regional intercomparison exercises and the provision of reference methods and reference materials (RM) have been recognized as an important component of quality assurance/quality control. A total of 43 intercomparison exercises were organized and 37 RM were produced for marine radioactivity studies. All important marine matrices were covered, e.g., seawater, marine sediments of different chemical compositions, fish, shellfish and seaplants. RM were prepared from samples collected at contaminated sites (e.g., the Irish Sea, the Baltic Sea, the Arabian Sea, Mururoa and Bikini Atolls, etc.) as well as from sites affected only by global fallout (e.g., the Pacific Ocean). Available RM are listed in the IAEA biennial catalogue and can be purchased at a minimal price. An overview of prepared RM for radionuclides in marine matrices is presented and discussed in more detail. (author)

  16. Preliminary corrosion studies of candidate materials for supercritical water oxidation reactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Orzalli, John Clarke

    1994-01-01

    An experimental test facility has been designed and constructed for investigation of the corrosion behavior of candidate materials in a supercritical water oxidation environment. The high temperatures (500 deg C) and high pressures (300 atm) required in this process, made the experimental apparatus construction and control a complex engineering problem. The facility consists of two systems. The first is an exposure autoclave internal volume 850 ml, with associated monitoring and control syste...

  17. Production of Working Reference Materials for the Capability Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive waste assay (NDA) methods are employed to determine the mass and activity of waste-entrained radionuclides as part of the National TRU (Trans-Uranic) Waste Characterization Program. In support of this program the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Mixed Waste Focus Area developed a plan to acquire capability/performance data on systems proposed for NDA purposes. The Capability Evaluation Project (CEP) was designed to evaluate the NDA systems of commercial contractors by subjecting all participants to identical tests involving 55 gallon drum surrogates containing known quantities and distributions of radioactive materials in the form of sealed-source standards, referred to as working reference materials (WRMs). Although numerous Pu WRMs already exist, the CEP WRM set allows for the evaluation of the capability and performance of systems with respect to waste types/configurations which contain increased amounts of 241Am relative to weapons grade Pu, waste that is dominantly 241Am, as well as wastes containing various proportions of depleted uranium. The CEP WRMs consist of a special mixture of PuO2/AmO2 (IAP) and diatomaceous earth (DE) or depleted uranium (DU) oxide and DE and were fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The IAP WRMS are contained inside a pair of welded inner and outer stainless steel containers. The DU WRMs are singly contained within a stainless steel container equivalent to the outer container of the IAP standards. This report gives a general overview and discussion relating to the production and certification of the CEP WRMs

  18. Production of Working Reference Materials for the Capability Evaluation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip D. Noll, Jr.; Robert S. Marshall

    1999-03-01

    Nondestructive waste assay (NDA) methods are employed to determine the mass and activity of waste-entrained radionuclides as part of the National TRU (Trans-Uranic) Waste Characterization Program. In support of this program the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Mixed Waste Focus Area developed a plan to acquire capability/performance data on systems proposed for NDA purposes. The Capability Evaluation Project (CEP) was designed to evaluate the NDA systems of commercial contractors by subjecting all participants to identical tests involving 55 gallon drum surrogates containing known quantities and distributions of radioactive materials in the form of sealed-source standards, referred to as working reference materials (WRMs). Although numerous Pu WRMs already exist, the CEP WRM set allows for the evaluation of the capability and performance of systems with respect to waste types/configurations which contain increased amounts of {sup 241}Am relative to weapons grade Pu, waste that is dominantly {sup 241}Am, as well as wastes containing various proportions of depleted uranium. The CEP WRMs consist of a special mixture of PuO{sub 2}/AmO{sub 2} (IAP) and diatomaceous earth (DE) or depleted uranium (DU) oxide and DE and were fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The IAP WRMS are contained inside a pair of welded inner and outer stainless steel containers. The DU WRMs are singly contained within a stainless steel container equivalent to the outer container of the IAP standards. This report gives a general overview and discussion relating to the production and certification of the CEP WRMs.

  19. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  20. Corrosion tests of candidate fuel cladding and reactor internal structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion screening tests were conducted on candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and reactor internals of supercritical water reactor (SCWR) in static and flowing supercritical water (SCW) autoclave at the temperatures of 550, 600 and 650°C, pressure of about 25MPa, deaerated or saturated dissolved hydrogen (STP). Samples are nickel base alloy type Hastelloy C276, austenitic stainless steels type 304NG and AL-6XN, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel type P92, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956. This paper focuses on the formation and breakdown of corrosion oxide scales, and proposes the future trend for the development of SCWR fuel cladding materials. (author)

  1. Corrosion tests of candidate fuel cladding and reactor internal structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Zhu, F.; Bao, Y. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai (China); Tang, R. [Nuclear Power Inst. of China, National Key Lab. for Nuclear Fuel and Materials, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2010-07-01

    Corrosion screening tests were conducted on candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and reactor internals of supercritical water reactor (SCWR) in static and flowing supercritical water (SCW) autoclave at the temperatures of 550, 600 and 650°C, pressure of about 25MPa, deaerated or saturated dissolved hydrogen (STP). Samples are nickel base alloy type Hastelloy C276, austenitic stainless steels type 304NG and AL-6XN, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel type P92, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956. This paper focuses on the formation and breakdown of corrosion oxide scales, and proposes the future trend for the development of SCWR fuel cladding materials. (author)

  2. Reference materials and interlaboratory comparison for actinide analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssens, Alain; Viallesoubranne, Carole; Roche, Claude; Liozon, Gerard [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Marcoule: BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    Measurement quality is crucial for the safety of nuclear facilities and is a primary requirement for fissile material monitoring and accountancy. CETAMA (Cea Committee for the establishment of analysis methods), in collaboration with Cea and AREVA laboratories, fabricates certified reference materials and organizes interlaboratory comparison programs for plutonium and uranium assay in solution. A new plutonium metal measurement standard (MP3) is currently being prepared by Cea and is a subject of cooperative work in view of its certification and use by analysis laboratories. U and Pu interlaboratory comparisons are carried out at regular intervals on benchmark samples in coordination with working groups from French nuclear laboratories. These programs are supported by international cooperation. 'Chemical' methods (potentiometry, gravimetric analysis, etc.) generally provide the best accuracy. Coulometry is the benchmark technique for plutonium assay: its metrological qualities should be an incentive for wider use by laboratories performing precise control assays of plutonium as well as uranium. Gravimetric analysis provides excellent results for analysis of pure uranyl nitrate solutions. In view of its many advantages we encourage laboratories to employ this technique to assay pure U or Pu solutions. 'Physical' or 'physicochemical' methods are increasingly used, and their performance has improved. K-edge absorption spectrometry and isotope dilution mass spectrometry are capable of reaching measurement quality levels comparable to those of the best 'chemical' methods. (authors)

  3. Nuclear microprobe analysis of the standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the presently existing Standard Reference Materials (SRM) for nuclear analytical methods are certified for the analyzed mass of the order of few hundred mg. Typical mass of sample which is analyzed by PIXE or XRF methods is very often below 1 mg. By the development of focused proton or x-ray beams, masses which can be typically analyzed go down to μg or even ng level. It is difficult to make biological or environmental SRMs which can give desired homogeneity at such low scale. However, use of fundamental parameter quantitative evaluation procedures (absolute method), minimize needs for SRMs. In PIXE and micro PIXE setup at our Institute, fundamental parameter approach is used. For exact calibration of the quantitative analysis procedure just one standard sample is needed. In our case glass standards which showed homogeneity down to micron scale were used. Of course, it is desirable to use SRMs for quality assurance, and therefore need for homogenous materials can be justified even for micro PIXE method. In this presentation, brief overview of PIXE setup calibration is given, along with some recent results of tests of several SRMs

  4. Reactor neutron activation analysis on reference materials from intercomparison runs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of using the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) technique in our laboratory to determine major, minor and trace elements in mineral and biological samples from international intercomparison runs organised by IAEA Vienna, IAEA-MEL Monaco, 'pb-anal' Kosice, INCT Warszawa and IPNT Krakow is presented. Neutron irradiation was carried out at WWR-S reactor in Bucharest (short and long irradiation) during 1982-1997 and at TRIGA reactor in Pitesti (long irradiation) during the later period. The following type of materials were analysed: soils, marine sediments, uranium phosphate ore, water sludge, copper flue dust, whey powder, yeast, cereal flour (rye and wheat), marine animal tissue (mussel, garfish and tuna fish), as well as vegetal tissue (seaweed, cabbage, spinach, alfalfa, algae, tea leaves and herbs). The following elements could be, in general, determined: Ag, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, Hg, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U, W, Yb and Zn of long-lived radionuclides, as well as Al, Ca, Cl, Cu, Mg, Mn, and Ti of short-lived radionuclides. Data obtained in our laboratory for various matrix samples presented and compared with the intercomparison certified values. The intercomparison exercises offer to the participating laboratories the opportunity to test the accuracy of their analytical methods as well as to acquire valuable Reference Materials/ standards for future analytical applications. (authors)

  5. IAEA AQCS catalogue for reference materials and intercomparison exercises 1998/1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore more than thirty years the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), through its Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) programme, has been assisting Member States' laboratories to maintain and improve the reliability of their analyses by organizing intercomparison exercises and by preparing and distributing biological, environmental and marine reference materials. The catalogue consists principally of two parts: The list of all available IAEA reference materials grouped into five categories: reference materials for radionuclides; reference materials for trace, minor and major elements, including oxides; reference materials for stable isotopes; reference materials for organic contaminants and methyl mercury containing materials. Lists of all available IAEA reference materials sorted by analytes. In addition information on recommended half-life data and suppliers of radioactive sources is provided. Planned intercomparisons are advertised and request forms for participation in intercomparisons are included. Forms for ordering reference materials, quality control spectra for gamma-spectrometry on diskettes and AQCS related publications are also provided

  6. Development of a standard reference material for Cr(vi) in contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagourney, S.J.; Wilson, S.A.; Buckley, B.; Kingston, H.M.S.; Yang, S.-Y.; Long, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last several decades, considerable contamination by hexavalent chromium has resulted from the land disposal of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR). COPR contains a number of hexavalent chromium-bearing compounds that were produced in high temperature industrial processes. Concern over the carcinogenic potential of this chromium species, and its environmental mobility, has resulted in efforts to remediate these waste sites. To provide support to analytical measurements of hexavalent chromium, a candidate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material?? (SRM 2701), having a hexavalent chromium content of approximately 500 mg kg -1, has been developed using material collected from a waste site in Hudson County, New Jersey, USA. The collection, processing, preparation and preliminary physico-chemical characterization of the material are discussed. A two-phase multi-laboratory testing study was carried out to provide data on material homogeneity and to assess the stability of the material over the duration of the study. The study was designed to incorporate several United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) determinative methods for hexavalent chromium, including Method 6800 which is based on speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS), an approach which can account for chromium species inter-conversion during the extraction and measurement sequence. This journal is ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry 2008.

  7. Anorganic fluorescence reference materials for decay time of fluorescence emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A.; Ottermann, C.; Klahn, J.; Korb, T.; Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Kynast, U.; Rupertus, V.

    2008-02-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools, detection methods and imaging applications for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics, and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for steady state fluorescence diagnostics, a method having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers such as absorption/excitation cross sections and quantum yield. This has been done for different types of dopands in different materials such as glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Samples doped with several fluophores of different emission wavelengths and decay times are required for fluorescent multiplexing applications. Decay times shorter than 100 ns are of special interest. In addition, a proper knowledge is necessary of quantum efficiency in highly scattering media. Recently, quantum efficiency in YAG:Ce glass ceramics has been successfully investigated. Glass and glass ceramics doped with threefold charged rare earth elements are available. However, these samples have the disadvantage of emission decay times much longer than 1 microsecond, due to the excitation and emission of their optical forbidden electronic transitions. Therefore first attempts have been made to produce decay-time standards based on organic and inorganic fluophores. Stable LUMOGEN RED pigments and YAG:Ce phosphors are diluted simultaneously in silicone matrices using a wide range of concentrations between 0.0001 and 2 wt%. Organic LUMOGEN RED has decay times in the lower nanosecond range with a slight dependency on concentration

  8. The future supply of and demand for candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the findings of a literature survey carried out to assess the future world supply of and demand for titanium, copper and lead. These metals are candidate materials for the fabrication of containers for the immobilization and disposal of Canada's nuclear used-fuel waste for a reference Used-fuel Disposal Centre. Such a facility may begin operation by approximately 2020, and continue for about 40 years. The survey shows that the world has abundant supplies of titanium minerals (mostly in the form of ilmenite), which are expected to last up to at least 2110. However, for copper and lead the balance between supply and demand may warrant increased monitoring beyond the year 2000. A number of factors that can influence future supply and demand are discussed in the report

  9. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are being considered along with three austenitic candidates as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level reprocessing wastes in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain mechanical integrity for 50 yr after emplacement to allow for retrieval of waste during the preclosure phase of repository operation. Containment is required to be substantially complete for up to 300 to 1000 yr. During the early period, the containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. The final closure joint will be critical to the integrity of the containers. This volume surveys the available data on the metallurgy of the copper-based candidate alloys and the welding techniques employed to join these materials. The focus of this volume is on the methods applicable to remote-handling procedures in a hot-cell environment with limited possibility of postweld heat treatment. The three copper-based candidates are ranked on the basis of the various closure techniques. On the basis of considerations regarding welding, the following ranking is proposed for the copper-based alloys: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 102 > CDA 613 (worst). 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  10. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA)); Weiss, H. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are being considered along with three austenitic candidates as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level reprocessing wastes in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain mechanical integrity for 50 yr after emplacement to allow for retrieval of waste during the preclosure phase of repository operation. Containment is required to be substantially complete for up to 300 to 1000 yr. During the early period, the containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. The final closure joint will be critical to the integrity of the containers. This volume surveys the available data on the metallurgy of the copper-based candidate alloys and the welding techniques employed to join these materials. The focus of this volume is on the methods applicable to remote-handling procedures in a hot-cell environment with limited possibility of postweld heat treatment. The three copper-based candidates are ranked on the basis of the various closure techniques. On the basis of considerations regarding welding, the following ranking is proposed for the copper-based alloys: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 102 > CDA 613 (worst). 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Preparation and certification of the Polish reference material `Oriental Tobacco Leaves` (CTA-OTL-1) for inorganic trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dybczynski, R.; Polkowska-Motrenko, H.; Samczynski, Z.; Szopa, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    A new Polish certified reference material `Oriental Tobacco Leaves` (CTA-OTL-1) for inorganic trace analysis was prepared. Fresh tobacco leaves of variety `Oriental` were dried, ground and sieved. All precautions were taken to avoid contamination of material with metals. The next step was homogenization. Preliminary homogeneity checking consisted in determining of Ca, Fe and K content by X-ray fluorescence. Final homogeneity testing was performed by neutron activation analysis determining Co, Cr, Fe and Rb. To assure long-term stability, the whole lot of material was sterilized by electron beam radiation. Certification of the candidate reference material was done on the basis of world-wide interlaboratory comparisons exercise in which 61 laboratories, using various analytical methods participated. (author). 30 refs, 12 tabs, 21 figs.

  12. Preparation and certification of the Polish reference material 'Oriental Tobacco Leaves' (CTA-OTL-1) for inorganic trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Polish certified reference material 'Oriental Tobacco Leaves' (CTA-OTL-1) for inorganic trace analysis was prepared. Fresh tobacco leaves of variety 'Oriental' were dried, ground and sieved. All precautions were taken to avoid contamination of material with metals. The next step was homogenization. Preliminary homogeneity checking consisted in determining of Ca, Fe and K content by X-ray fluorescence. Final homogeneity testing was performed by neutron activation analysis determining Co, Cr, Fe and Rb. To assure long-term stability, the whole lot of material was sterilized by electron beam radiation. Certification of the candidate reference material was done on the basis of world-wide interlaboratory comparisons exercise in which 61 laboratories, using various analytical methods participated. (author). 30 refs, 12 tabs, 21 figs

  13. Biologically-Induced Micropitting of Alloy 22, a Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of potential microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on candidate packaging materials for nuclear waste containment are being assessed. Coupons of Alloy 22, the outer barrier candidate for waste packaging, were exposed to a simulated, saturated repository environment (or microcosm) consisting of crushed rock (tuff) from the Yucca Mountain repository site and a continual flow of simulated groundwater for periods up to five years at room temperature and 30 C. Coupons were incubated with YM tuff under both sterile and non-sterile conditions. Surfacial analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the biotically-incubated coupons show development of both submicron-sized pinholes and pores; these features were not present on either sterile or untreated control coupons. Room temperature, biotically-incubated coupons show a wide distribution of pores covering the coupon surface, while coupons incubated at 30 C show the pores restricted to polishing ridges

  14. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Extensive sequencing of seven human genomes to characterize benchmark reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Justin M; Catoe, David; McDaniel, Jennifer; Vang, Lindsay; Spies, Noah; Sidow, Arend; Weng, Ziming; Liu, Yuling; Mason, Christopher E; Alexander, Noah; Henaff, Elizabeth; McIntyre, Alexa B R; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Chen, Feng; Jaeger, Erich; Moshrefi, Ali; Pham, Khoa; Stedman, William; Liang, Tiffany; Saghbini, Michael; Dzakula, Zeljko; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Deikus, Gintaras; Schadt, Eric; Sebra, Robert; Bashir, Ali; Truty, Rebecca M; Chang, Christopher C; Gulbahce, Natali; Zhao, Keyan; Ghosh, Srinka; Hyland, Fiona; Fu, Yutao; Chaisson, Mark; Xiao, Chunlin; Trow, Jonathan; Sherry, Stephen T; Zaranek, Alexander W; Ball, Madeleine; Bobe, Jason; Estep, Preston; Church, George M; Marks, Patrick; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Zheng, Grace X Y; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Ordonez, Heather S; Mudivarti, Patrice A; Giorda, Kristina; Sheng, Ying; Rypdal, Karoline Bjarnesdatter; Salit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Genome in a Bottle Consortium, hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is creating reference materials and data for human genome sequencing, as well as methods for genome comparison and benchmarking. Here, we describe a large, diverse set of sequencing data for seven human genomes; five are current or candidate NIST Reference Materials. The pilot genome, NA12878, has been released as NIST RM 8398. We also describe data from two Personal Genome Project trios, one of Ashkenazim Jewish ancestry and one of Chinese ancestry. The data come from 12 technologies: BioNano Genomics, Complete Genomics paired-end and LFR, Ion Proton exome, Oxford Nanopore, Pacific Biosciences, SOLiD, 10X Genomics GemCode WGS, and Illumina exome and WGS paired-end, mate-pair, and synthetic long reads. Cell lines, DNA, and data from these individuals are publicly available. Therefore, we expect these data to be useful for revealing novel information about the human genome and improving sequencing technologies, SNP, indel, and structural variant calling, and de novo assembly. PMID:27271295

  17. Extensive sequencing of seven human genomes to characterize benchmark reference materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Justin M.; Catoe, David; McDaniel, Jennifer; Vang, Lindsay; Spies, Noah; Sidow, Arend; Weng, Ziming; Liu, Yuling; Mason, Christopher E.; Alexander, Noah; Henaff, Elizabeth; McIntyre, Alexa B.R.; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Chen, Feng; Jaeger, Erich; Moshrefi, Ali; Pham, Khoa; Stedman, William; Liang, Tiffany; Saghbini, Michael; Dzakula, Zeljko; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Deikus, Gintaras; Schadt, Eric; Sebra, Robert; Bashir, Ali; Truty, Rebecca M.; Chang, Christopher C.; Gulbahce, Natali; Zhao, Keyan; Ghosh, Srinka; Hyland, Fiona; Fu, Yutao; Chaisson, Mark; Xiao, Chunlin; Trow, Jonathan; Sherry, Stephen T.; Zaranek, Alexander W.; Ball, Madeleine; Bobe, Jason; Estep, Preston; Church, George M.; Marks, Patrick; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Zheng, Grace X.Y.; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Ordonez, Heather S.; Mudivarti, Patrice A.; Giorda, Kristina; Sheng, Ying; Rypdal, Karoline Bjarnesdatter; Salit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Genome in a Bottle Consortium, hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is creating reference materials and data for human genome sequencing, as well as methods for genome comparison and benchmarking. Here, we describe a large, diverse set of sequencing data for seven human genomes; five are current or candidate NIST Reference Materials. The pilot genome, NA12878, has been released as NIST RM 8398. We also describe data from two Personal Genome Project trios, one of Ashkenazim Jewish ancestry and one of Chinese ancestry. The data come from 12 technologies: BioNano Genomics, Complete Genomics paired-end and LFR, Ion Proton exome, Oxford Nanopore, Pacific Biosciences, SOLiD, 10X Genomics GemCode WGS, and Illumina exome and WGS paired-end, mate-pair, and synthetic long reads. Cell lines, DNA, and data from these individuals are publicly available. Therefore, we expect these data to be useful for revealing novel information about the human genome and improving sequencing technologies, SNP, indel, and structural variant calling, and de novo assembly.

  18. LA-ICP-MS of magnetite: Methods and reference materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadoll, P.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a common accessory mineral in many geologic settings. Its variable geochemistry makes it a powerful petrogenetic indicator. Electron microprobe (EMPA) analyses are commonly used to examine major and minor element contents in magnetite. Laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is applicable to trace element analyses of magnetite but has not been widely employed to examine compositional variations. We tested the applicability of the NIST SRM 610, the USGS GSE-1G, and the NIST SRM 2782 reference materials (RMs) as external standards and developed a reliable method for LA-ICP-MS analysis of magnetite. LA-ICP-MS analyses were carried out on well characterized magnetite samples with a 193 nm, Excimer, ArF LA system. Although matrix-matched RMs are sometimes important for calibration and normalization of LA-ICP-MS data, we demonstrate that glass RMs can produce accurate results for LA-ICP-MS analyses of magnetite. Cross-comparison between the NIST SRM 610 and USGS GSE-1G indicates good agreement for magnetite minor and trace element data calibrated with either of these RMs. Many elements show a sufficiently good match between the LA-ICP-MS and the EMPA data; for example, Ti and V show a close to linear relationship with correlation coefficients, R2 of 0.79 and 0.85 respectively. ?? 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Reference material manufacture and certification for the AVNG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing and demonstration of any radiation measurement system requires the use of appropriate radioactive sources. An attribute measurement system (A VNG) was developed and fabricated at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center, VNIIEF, Russia, under contract with LANL, USA. The A VNG detects neutron and gamma radiation signatures and compares the data analysis results with the specified threshold values for three unclassified attributes; plutonium is present or absent, plutonium mass is greater than or less than the specified threshold value and plutonium isotopic ratio 240Pu to 239Pu) is greater than or less then the threshold value. A set of reference materials (RMs) was specially manufactured for the A VNG with masses and isotopic ratios above and below the selected thresholds. The set of RMs was certified in compliance with the Russian metrological requirements. The RMs were used to debug and test the A VNG and to demonstrate the A VNG operation to an American delegation in June 2009. In this presentation, we will describe the various steps in the manufacture and certification of these RM sources.

  20. Utilization of Research Reactors in Standard Reference Material Certification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capannesi, G.; Rosada, A. [UTFISST-CATNUC, ENEA, R.C.-Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy); Avino, P. [DIPIA, INAIL (ex-ISPESL), via Urbana 167, 00184 Rome (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    The certification issue of Standard Reference Materials is one of the most complex analytical problems and runs over different research fields. International organization, e.g. NIST, BCR etc., organize continuously systematic intercomparison campaigns among worldwide laboratories using different analytical techniques. Samples are irradiated in nuclear research reactors and analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, a technique strongly involved in this field for its significant analytical properties. This paper shows a study on Zircaloy-4. The importance of accurate measurements of minor constituents, i.d. Cr, Fe, Hf and Sn, regards its characteristics of corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The samples were irradiated in the rotating rack of the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the R.C.-Casaccia (ENEA). The gamma spectrometry measurements were performed after 30 and 90 days of decay by means of HPGe detector. The results obtained by interlaboratory intercomparison can highlight an excellent precision for Cr, Hf and Sn, and a good precision for Fe. The reliability of the technique is confirmed by Hf determination, since the INAA is one of the few analytical techniques measuring and delivering accurate and homogeneous data. (author)

  1. Reference material manufacture and certification for the AVNG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Danielle K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livke, Alexander [VNIIEF; Kondratov, Sergey [VNIIEF; Razinkov, Sergey [VNIIEF

    2010-01-01

    Testing and demonstration of any radiation measurement system requires the use of appropriate radioactive sources. The AVNG implementation that we describe is an attribute measurement system built by RFNC - VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. The AVNG detects neutron and gamma radiation signatures and displays the three unclassified attributes of 'plutonium presence,' 'plutonium mass > 2 kg,' and 'plutonium isotopic ratio ({sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu) < 0.1.' The AVNG was tested using a number of reference material (RM) sources with masses and isotopic ratios above and below these thresholds. The AVNG was demonstrated in June 2009 using several of these sources in addition to detector calibration sources. Since the AVNG was designed to measure multi-kg plutonium sources, the RM was manufactured specifically for use with this system. In addition, the RM was used to test the thresholds in the AVNG, so the size and composition of each RM was certified prior to use. In this presentation, we will describe the various steps in the manufacture and certification of these RM sources.

  2. Development of a Northern Continental Air Standard Reference Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George C; Kitzis, Duane R; Kelley, Michael E; Miller, Walter R; Hall, Bradley D; Dlugokencky, Edward J; Tans, Pieter P; Possolo, Antonio; Carney, Jennifer

    2016-03-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently began to develop standard mixtures of greenhouse gases as part of a broad program mandated by the 2009 United States Congress to support research in climate change. To this end, NIST developed suites of gravimetrically assigned primary standard mixtures (PSMs) comprising carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a dry-natural air balance at ambient mole fraction levels. In parallel, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colorado, charged 30 aluminum gas cylinders with northern hemisphere air at Niwot Ridge, Colorado. These mixtures, which constitute NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1720 Northern Continental Air, were certified by NIST for ambient mole fractions of CO2, CH4, and N2O relative to NIST PSMs. NOAA-assigned values are also provided as information in support of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Program for CO2, CH4, and N2O, since NOAA serves as the WMO Central Calibration Laboratory (CCL) for CO2, CH4, and N2O. Relative expanded uncertainties at the 95% confidence interval are first of its kind for a gaseous SRM developed by NIST. PMID:26890890

  3. Reference material manufacture and certification for the AVNG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Danielle K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacArthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livke, Alexander [RFNC - VNIIEF; Bulatov, M [RFNC-VNIIEF; Kondratov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Leplyavkina, M [RFNC-VNIIEF; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Sivachev, D [RFNC-VNIIEF; Tsybryaev, S [RFNC-VNIIEF; V' yushin, A [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-07-09

    Testing and demonstration of any radiation measurement system requires the use of appropriate radioactive sources. An attribute measurement system (A VNG) was developed and fabricated at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center, VNIIEF, Russia, under contract with LANL, USA. The A VNG detects neutron and gamma radiation signatures and compares the data analysis results with the specified threshold values for three unclassified attributes; plutonium is present or absent, plutonium mass is greater than or less than the specified threshold value and plutonium isotopic ratio 240Pu to 239Pu) is greater than or less then the threshold value. A set of reference materials (RMs) was specially manufactured for the A VNG with masses and isotopic ratios above and below the selected thresholds. The set of RMs was certified in compliance with the Russian metrological requirements. The RMs were used to debug and test the A VNG and to demonstrate the A VNG operation to an American delegation in June 2009. In this presentation, we will describe the various steps in the manufacture and certification of these RM sources.

  4. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ''excess'' nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist

  5. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.W.

    1996-01-08

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ``excess`` nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist.

  6. A quantitative assessment of microbiological contributions to corrosion of candidate nuclear waste package materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy is contributing to the design of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A system to predict the contribution of Yucca Mountain (YM) bacteria to overall corrosion rates of candidate waste package (WP) materials was designed and implemented. DC linear polarization resistance techniques were applied to candidate material coupons that had been inoculated with a mixture of YM-derived bacteria with potentially corrosive activities, or left sterile. Inoculated bacteria caused a 5- to 6-fold increase in corrosion rate of carbon steel C1020 (to approximately 7--8 microm/yr), and an almost 100-fold increase in corrosion rate of Alloy 400 (to approximately 1 microm/yr) was observed due to microbiological activities. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) rates on more resistant materials (CRMs: Alloy 625, Type 304 Stainless Steel, and Alloy C22) were on the order of hundredths of micrometers per year (microm/yr). Bulk chemical and surfacial endpoint analyses of spent media and coupon surfaces showed preferential dissolution of nickel from Alloy 400 coupons and depletion of chromium from CRMs after incubation with YM bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy also showed greater damage to the Alloy 400 surface than that indicated by electrochemical detection methods

  7. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  8. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ∼3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  9. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  10. Experimental results of angular neutron flux spectra leaking from slabs of fusion reactor candidate materials, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes experimental data of angular neutron flux spectra measured on the slab assemblies of fusion reactor candidate materials using the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method. These experiments have been performed for graphite (carbon), beryllium and lithium-oxide. The obtained data are very suitable for the benchmark tests to check the nuclear data and calculational code systems. For use of that purpose, the experimental conditions, definitions of key terms and results obtained are compiled in figures and numerical tables. (author)

  11. Development of a multi-VOC reference material for quality assurance in materials emission testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohr, Michael; Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver; Richter, Matthias; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Emission test chamber measurement is necessary to proof building materials as sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The results of such measurements are used to evaluate materials and label them according to their potential to emit harmful substances, polluting indoor air. If only labelled materials were installed indoors, this would improve indoor air quality and prevent negative impacts on human health. Because of the complex testing procedure, reference materials for the quality assurance are mandatory. Currently, there is a lack of such materials because most building products show a broad variation of emissions even within one batch. A previous study indicates lacquers, mixed with volatile organic pollutants, as reproducible emission source for a wide range of substances. In the present study, the curing of the lacquer-VOC mixture inside micro-chambers was optimised. Therefore, the humidity and the chamber flow were varied. Typical indoor air pollutants with a wide range of volatilities, for example, styrene, n-hexadecane, dimethyl and dibutyl phthalate were selected. It turned out that, under optimised curing parameters inside the micro-chamber, their emission can be reproduced with variations of less than 10 %. With this, a next important step towards a reference material for emission testing was achieved. PMID:25543146

  12. 40 CFR 600.011-93 - Reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be inspected at the U.S. Environmental Protection.... Document number and name 40 CFR part 600 reference ASTM E 29-67 (Reapproved 1973) Standard Recommended... the U.S. and Canada), or at http://www.sae.org. Document No. and name 40 CFR part 600 reference...

  13. Reference Materials in LIS Instruction: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabina, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a Delphi study conducted over a two-month period in 2011. The purpose of the study was to identify reference sources that should be covered in basic reference courses taught in LIS programs in the United States. The Delphi method was selected for its appropriateness in soliciting expert opinions and assessing the…

  14. The effects of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages has been comprehensively reviewed. The comparison of corrosion of the various materials was compared in three distinct environments: Environment A; Mg2+-enriched brines in which hydrolysis of the cation produces acidic environments and the Mg2+ interferes with the formation of protective films; Environment B; saline environments with a low Mg2+ content which remain neutral; Environment C; moist aerated conditions.The reference design of nuclear waste package for emplacement in the proposed waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, employs a dual wall arrangement, in which a 2 cm thick nickel alloy inner barrier is encapsulated within a 10 cm thick mild steel outer barrier. It is felt that this arrangement will give considerable containment lifetimes, since no common mode failure exists for the two barriers. The corrosion performance of this waste package will be determined by the exposure environment established within the emplacement drifts. Key features of the Yucca Mountain repository in controlling waste package degradation are expected to be the permanent availability of oxygen and the limited presence of water. When water contacts the surface of the waste package, its gamma radiolysis could produce an additional supply of corrosive agents. the gamma field will be produced by the radioactive decay of radionuclides within the waste form, and its magnitude will depend on the nature and age of the waste form as well as the material and wall thickness of the waste package

  15. Evaluation of Landfill Site Candidate for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Norm) and Hazardous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refers to co-location concept, Kabil site, where located at the southeast end of low hills in Batam Island, will be sited as an integrated industrial waste management center including landfill. So that, it is necessary an evaluation of the landfill site candidate for NORM and hazardous waste. The evaluation includes geological and non-geological aspects, to determine the suitability or capability in supporting the function as landfill facility. The site candidate was evaluated by serial sreps as follows: 1) criteria formulation; 2) selecting the parameter for evaluation; 3) Positive screening or evaluation of the land having potentiality for landfill site by descriptive method: and 4) determine the land suitability or capability for landfill site. The evaluation of geological and non- geological aspects include topography, litology, seismicity, groundwater and surface water, climate, hydro-oceanography, flora and fauna, spatial pattern and transportation system. The most of the parameters evaluated show the fulfilling to the site criteria, and can be mentioned that the land is suitable for landfill site. Some parameters are not so suitable for that purpose, especially on permeability and homogeneity of the rocks/soils, distance to surface water body, depth of groundwater, the flow rate of groundwater, precipitation, and humidity of the air. The lack of suitability showed by some parameters can be compensated by improving the appropriate engineered barrier in order to fulfill the landfill performance in providing the supporting capacity, long live stability and waste containment. (author)

  16. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free, high-purity copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are candidates for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass, and will be sent to the prospective repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluxes of gamma radiation outside the containers. In this environment, container materials might degrade by atmospheric oxidation, general aqueous phase corrosion, localized corrosion (LC), and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This volume is a critical survey of available data on pitting and crevice corrosion of the copper-based candidates. Pitting and crevice corrosion are two of the most common forms of LC of these materials. Data on the SCC of these alloys is surveyed in Volume 4. Pitting usually occurs in water that contains low concentrations of bicarbonate and chloride anions, such as water from Well J-13 at the Nevada Test Site. Consequently, this mode of degradation might occur in the repository environment. Though few quantitative data on LC were found, a tentative ranking based on pitting corrosion, local dealloying, crevice corrosion, and biofouling is presented. CDA 102 performs well in the categories of pitting corrosion, local dealloying, and biofouling, but susceptibility to crevice corrosion diminishes its attractiveness as a candidate. The cupronickel alloy, CDA 715, probably has the best overall resistance to such localized forms of attack. 123 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Study on corrosion behavior of candidate materials in 650℃ supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general corrosion behavior of three candidate materials (347, HR3C and In-718) was investigated in 650 ℃/25 MPa deionized water. Morphology and composition of the surface oxide film with different exposure time were observed through FEG-SEM and EDS. The phase constitute was analyzed by GIXRD. For all the test materials, the weight loss follows typical parabolic law and the weight loss of 347 shows more than 40 times higher than that of HR3C and In-718. The oxide film of three alloys mainly consists of Ni(Cr, Fe)2O4. In-718 shows severe pitting and the oxide film of 347 appears significant spalling, while HR3C has compact oxide film. In the high temperature supercritical water, the high Cr content may enhance the general corrosion property of the alloys, while addition of Nb may be detrimental to the pitting resistance of alloys. (authors)

  18. Creep rupture behavior of candidate materials for nuclear process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creep and stress rupture properties are determined for the candidate materials to be used in hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The materials and test methods are briefly described based on experimental results of test durations of about20000 h. The medium creep strengths of the alloys Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, Hastelloy-S, Manaurite-36X, IN-519, and Incoloy-800H are compared showing that Inconel-617 has the best creep rupture properties in the temperature range above 8000C. The rupture time of welded joints is in the lower range of the scatterband of the parent metal. The properties determined in different simulated HTGR atmospheres are within the scatterband of the properties obtained in air. Extrapolation methods are discussed and a modified minimum commitment method is favored

  19. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six alloys are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of containers for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Three of these candidate materials are copper-based alloys: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The other three are iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. Radioactive waste will include spent-fuel assemblies from reactors as well as waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, the containers must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after emplacement of the containers in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This radiation will promote the radiolytic decomposition of moist air to hydrogen. This volume surveys the available data on the effects of hydrogen on the six candidate alloys for fabrication of the containers. For copper, the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is discussed, and the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of the copper-based alloys are reviewed. The solubilities and diffusivities of hydrogen are documented for these alloys. For the austenitic materials, the degradation of mechanical properties by hydrogen is documented. The diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in these alloys are also presented. For the copper-based alloys, the ranking according to resistance to detrimental effects of hydrogen is: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 613 > CDA 102 (worst). For the austenitic alloys, the ranking is: Type 316L stainless steel ∼ Alloy 825 > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 87 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27

  1. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.W.; Nutt, W.M.; Bullen, D.B. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27.

  2. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Six alloys are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of containers for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Three of these candidate materials are copper-based alloys: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The other three are iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. Radioactive waste will include spent-fuel assemblies from reactors as well as waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, the containers must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after emplacement of the containers in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This radiation will promote the radiolytic decomposition of moist air to hydrogen. This volume surveys the available data on the effects of hydrogen on the six candidate alloys for fabrication of the containers. For copper, the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is discussed, and the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of the copper-based alloys are reviewed. The solubilities and diffusivities of hydrogen are documented for these alloys. For the austenitic materials, the degradation of mechanical properties by hydrogen is documented. The diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in these alloys are also presented. For the copper-based alloys, the ranking according to resistance to detrimental effects of hydrogen is: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 613 > CDA 102 (worst). For the austenitic alloys, the ranking is: Type 316L stainless steel {approx} Alloy 825 > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 87 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. [Reference ranges of 9 plasmatic proteins in Tunisian population based on the new IFCC reference material CRM 470].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znazen, Raja; Ben Ayed, Mourad; Gargouri, Jalel; Bel Hadj Hmida, Youssef; Kassis, Mondher; Damak, Jamel; Masmoudi, Hatem

    2003-04-01

    The interpretation of biological exam results requires the knowledge of physiological variation factors and reference values for every parameter. Following the preparation and the diffusion by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) of a new reference material for the dosage of plasmatic proteins (CRM470) and in order to take part in the international effort of standardization of these dosages, we established reference ranges in the tunisian population for 9 plasmatic proteins: the Immunoglobulines G, A and M, complement factors C3 and C4, albumin, transferrin, haptoglobin and the a 1-glycoprotéin acid. Our sample of 211 healthy blood donors aged between 18 and 63 years. Reference limits 0.95 that we obtained are located within variation of most reference values lately found in the literature. PMID:12848010

  4. Acquisition of improved reference values for cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in selected NIST reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, R M; Kawamura, H; Iyengar, G V

    1999-01-01

    As part of a study on the ingestion and organ content of some trace elements of importance in radiological protection, additional work has been undertaken to acquire improved reference values for cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in four selected reference materials provided by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. The materials are SRM-1548 Total Diet, SRM-1548a Typical Diet, SRM-1486 Bone Meal, and RM-8414 Bovine Muscle. A coordinated study was undertaken with the help of seven selected laboratories in five countries. Instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry were the analytical main techniques used. PMID:10676473

  5. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials (CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)), which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials [CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)], which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  7. The preparation of biological reference materials for QUASIMEME

    OpenAIRE

    Kotterman, M.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Biological materials, consisting of three different batches of mussels; from Den Helder harbour (POPs, TBT), Irish mussels (metals) and Wadden Sea mussels, fortified with highly contaminated mussels from Belgium (POPs), and of one batch of turbot liver (metals) have been prepared for use in QUASIMEME interlaboratory studies for metal and organic contaminant analyses. The homogeneity of the prepared material was tested for metals or POPs, depending on the intended use of the material, and indi...

  8. 9 CFR 77.1 - Material incorporated by reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... been approved for incorporation by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (a) The procedures... 1141, USDA South Building, 14th Street and Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC; or (3) May...

  9. 10 CFR 431.443 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... this section for incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any... Polyphase Induction Motors and Generators, approved February 9, 2004, IBR approved for § 431.444. (2) IEEE... Single-Phase Induction Motors, approved December 6, 2001, IBR approved for § 431.444....

  10. IDMS studies on sodalite - a candidate material for nuclear waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste management is one of the important aspects of nuclear fuel cycle from environmental and safety considerations. Different forms of waste storage matrices are known to be applicable for different kinds of nuclear wastes. Glass bonded sodalite (GBS) (Na8(AISiO4)6Cl2), a glass-ceramic, is a promising candidate for the immobilization of the chloride waste resulting from pyrometallurgical reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Characterization of individual components is essential for the development of this waste storage material which is expected to encounter different physicochemical conditions. For this purpose, we have undertaken studies to determine the concentrations of individual components in GBS employing Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) owing to its capability to ensure precise and accurate data for multi element analysis in a matrix

  11. Thermo-Optical and Mechanical Property Testing of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerman, WIlliam A.; Stanaland, T. L.; Womack, F.; Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Semmel, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra-lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. Solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic front layer, a thin polymeric substrate, and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate sails to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to electrons. This poster will discuss the preliminary results of this research.

  12. Global blending optimization of laminated composites with discrete material candidate selection and thickness variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren N.; Stolpe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    distinct choice among predefined numbers of candidates. The laminate thickness is variable but the number of plies must be integer. We solve the convex mixed binary non-linear programming problem by an outer approximation cutting-plane method augmented with a few heuristics to accelerate the convergence...... but is, however, convex in the original mixed binary nested form. Convexity is the foremost important property of optimization problems, and the proposed method can guarantee the global or near-global optimal solution; unlike most topology optimization methods. The material selection is limited to a...... rate. The capabilities of the method and the effect of active versus inactive manufacturing constraints are demonstrated on several numerical examples of limited size, involving at most 320 binary variables. Most examples are solved to guaranteed global optimality and may constitute benchmark examples...

  13. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strum, M.J.; Weiss, H.; Farmer, J.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-06-01

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Preliminary Investigation of Candidate Materials for Use in Accident Resistant Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Lessing; Blair H. Park; Jakeob Maupin

    2013-09-01

    As part of a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with industry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating several options for accident resistant uranium compounds including silicides, and nitrides for use in future light water reactor (LWR) fuels. This work is part of a larger effort to create accident tolerant fuel forms where changes to the fuel pellets, cladding, and cladding treatment are considered. The goal fuel form should have a resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, have an equal to or larger thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide, a melting temperature that allows the material to stay solid under power reactor conditions, and a uranium loading that maintains or improves current LWR power densities. During the course of this research, fuel fabricated at INL will be characterized, irradiated at the INL Advanced Test Reactor, and examined after irradiation at INL facilities to help inform industrial partners on candidate technologies.

  16. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  17. Selection and validation of reference genes for qRT-PCR expression analysis of candidate genes involved in olfactory communication in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Alok; Baumlé, Véronique; Amelot, Gaël; Nieberding, Caroline M

    2015-01-01

    Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a technique widely used to quantify the transcriptional expression level of candidate genes. qRT-PCR requires the selection of one or several suitable reference genes, whose expression profiles remain stable across conditions, to normalize the qRT-PCR expression profiles of candidate genes. Although several butterfly species (Lepidoptera) have become important models in molecular evolutionary ecology, so far no study aimed at identifying reference genes for accurate data normalization for any butterfly is available. The African bush brown butterfly Bicyclus anynana has drawn considerable attention owing to its suitability as a model for evolutionary ecology, and we here provide a maiden extensive study to identify suitable reference gene in this species. We monitored the expression profile of twelve reference genes: eEF-1α, FK506, UBQL40, RpS8, RpS18, HSP, GAPDH, VATPase, ACT3, TBP, eIF2 and G6PD. We tested the stability of their expression profiles in three different tissues (wings, brains, antennae), two developmental stages (pupal and adult) and two sexes (male and female), all of which were subjected to two food treatments (food stress and control feeding ad libitum). The expression stability and ranking of twelve reference genes was assessed using two algorithm-based methods, NormFinder and geNorm. Both methods identified RpS8 as the best suitable reference gene for expression data normalization. We also showed that the use of two reference genes is sufficient to effectively normalize the qRT-PCR data under varying tissues and experimental conditions that we used in B. anynana. Finally, we tested the effect of choosing reference genes with different stability on the normalization of the transcript abundance of a candidate gene involved in olfactory communication in B. anynana, the Fatty Acyl Reductase 2, and we confirmed that using an unstable reference gene can drastically alter the expression

  18. Selection and validation of reference genes for qRT-PCR expression analysis of candidate genes involved in olfactory communication in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Arun

    Full Text Available Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is a technique widely used to quantify the transcriptional expression level of candidate genes. qRT-PCR requires the selection of one or several suitable reference genes, whose expression profiles remain stable across conditions, to normalize the qRT-PCR expression profiles of candidate genes. Although several butterfly species (Lepidoptera have become important models in molecular evolutionary ecology, so far no study aimed at identifying reference genes for accurate data normalization for any butterfly is available. The African bush brown butterfly Bicyclus anynana has drawn considerable attention owing to its suitability as a model for evolutionary ecology, and we here provide a maiden extensive study to identify suitable reference gene in this species. We monitored the expression profile of twelve reference genes: eEF-1α, FK506, UBQL40, RpS8, RpS18, HSP, GAPDH, VATPase, ACT3, TBP, eIF2 and G6PD. We tested the stability of their expression profiles in three different tissues (wings, brains, antennae, two developmental stages (pupal and adult and two sexes (male and female, all of which were subjected to two food treatments (food stress and control feeding ad libitum. The expression stability and ranking of twelve reference genes was assessed using two algorithm-based methods, NormFinder and geNorm. Both methods identified RpS8 as the best suitable reference gene for expression data normalization. We also showed that the use of two reference genes is sufficient to effectively normalize the qRT-PCR data under varying tissues and experimental conditions that we used in B. anynana. Finally, we tested the effect of choosing reference genes with different stability on the normalization of the transcript abundance of a candidate gene involved in olfactory communication in B. anynana, the Fatty Acyl Reductase 2, and we confirmed that using an unstable reference gene can drastically alter the

  19. Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables

  20. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan (1) has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  1. LONG-TERM CORROSION TESTING OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE CONTAINMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results are presented from the long-term corrosion test program of candidate materials for the high-level radioactive waste packages that would be emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The present waste package design is based on a multi-barrier concept having an inner container of a corrosion resistant material and an outer container of a corrosion allowance material. Test specimens have been exposed to simulated bounding environments that may credibly develop in the vicinity of the waste packages. Corrosion rates have been calculated for weight loss and crevice specimens, and U-bend specimens have been examined for evidence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Galvanic testing has been started recently and initial results are forthcoming. Pitting characterization of test specimens will be conducted in the coming year. This test program is expected to continue for a minimum of five years so that long-term corrosion data can be determined to support corrosion model development, performance assessment, and waste package design

  2. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Cao, Guoping; Kulcinski, Gerald

    2011-07-25

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan [1] has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  3. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The austenitic materials are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr, and they must be retrievable from the disposal site during the first 50 yr after emplacement. The containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on the phase stability of both groups of candidate alloys. The austenitic alloys are reviewed in terms of the physical metallurgy of the iron-chromium-nickel system, martensite transformations, carbide formation, and intermetallic-phase precipitation. The copper-based alloys are reviewed in terms of their phase equilibria and the possibility of precipitation of the minor alloying constituents. For the austenitic materials, the ranking based on phase stability is: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) (best), and then both CDA 715 and CDA 613. 75 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Reference materials and their role in quality assurance in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of a good and routine quality control procedure for the analyses of environmental samples is presented. The use of Reference Materials as one simple procedure for validating analytical methodologies and determining the accuracy of analytical data is emphasized. The quality of the reference materials is also discussed as well as their selection and correct use. The convenience of preparing 'in-house' reference materials is discussed and attention is called to relevant aspects to be considered. An example of the preparation of a reference material is presented and some aspects of the procedure are discussed. (author)

  5. Physical oceanographic processes at candidate dredged-material disposal sites B1B and 1M offshore San Francisco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, C.R.; Denbo, D.W.; Downing, J.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Coats, D.A. (Marine Research Specialists, Ventura, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, has identified two candidate sites for ocean disposal of material from several dredging projects in San Francisco Bay. The disposal site is to be designated under Section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act. One of the specific criteria in the Ocean Dumping Act is that the physical environments of the candidate sites be considered. Toward this goal, the USACE requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct a study of physical oceanographic and sediment transport processes at the candidate sites, B1B and 1M. The results of that study are presented in this report. 40 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Certification of the uranium hexafluoride reference materials for isotopic composition

    OpenAIRE

    MIALLE SÉBASTIEN; Richter, Stephan; HENNESSY Carmel; TRUYENS Jan; Jakobsson, Ulf; Aregbe, Yetunde

    2014-01-01

    The IRMM-019 to IRMM-029 series of uranium hexafluoride materials is certified for the isotopic composition. After conversion into uranyl nitrate solution, certification and homogeneity measurements were performed by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Analyses were performed by Modified Total Evaporation and for some materials the major isotope amount ratio n(235U)/n(238U) was measured using a n(233U)/n(236U) double spike. Measurements were confirmed by UF6 Gas Source Mass Spectrometry. Ma...

  7. Evaluation of C/C-SiC Composites as Potential Candidate Materials for High Performance Braking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed at evaluating the characteristic and performance of C/C-SiC composites as potential candidate materials for high performance braking system. A set of material specifications had been derived from specific engineering design requirements. Analysis was performed by formulating the function(s), constraint(s), and objective(s) of design and materials selection. Function of a friction material is chiefly to provide friction, absorb and dissipate energy. It is done while withstanding load and maintaining the structural adequacy and characteristic of tribology at high temperature. Objective of the material selection and design is to maximize the absorption and dissipation of energy and to minimize weight and cost. Candidate materials were evaluated based on their friction and wear, thermal capacity and conductivity, structural properties, manufacturing properties, and densities. The present paper provides a state of the art example on how materials - function - geometry - design, are all interrelated.

  8. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  9. Superconducting Gamma/Neutron Spectrometer Task 1 Completion Report Evaluation of Candidate Neutron-Sensitive Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W

    2002-01-01

    A review of the scientific literature regarding boron- and lithium-containing compounds was completed. Information such as Debye temperature, heat capacity, superconductivity properties, physical and chemical characteristics, commercial availability, and recipes for synthesis was accumulated and evaluated to develop a list of neutron-sensitive materials likely to perform properly in the spectrometer. The best candidate borides appear to be MgB sub 2 (a superconductor with T sub c = 39 K), B sub 6 Si, B sub 4 C, and elemental boron; all are commercially available. Among the lithium compounds are LiH, LiAl, Li sub 1 sub 2 Si sub 7 , and Li sub 7 Sn sub 2. These materials have or are expected to have high Debye temperatures and sufficiently low heat capacities at 100 mK to produce a useful signal. The responses of sup 1 sup 0 B and sup 6 Li to a fission neutron spectrum were also estimated. These demonstrated that the contribution of scattering events is no more than 3% in a boron-based system and 1.5% in a lith...

  10. The effects of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada); King, F

    1999-07-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages has been comprehensively reviewed. The comparison of corrosion of the various materials was compared in three distinct environments: Environment A; Mg{sup 2+}-enriched brines in which hydrolysis of the cation produces acidic environments and the Mg{sup 2+} interferes with the formation of protective films; Environment B; saline environments with a low Mg{sup 2+} content which remain neutral; Environment C; moist aerated conditions.The reference design of nuclear waste package for emplacement in the proposed waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, employs a dual wall arrangement, in which a 2 cm thick nickel alloy inner barrier is encapsulated within a 10 cm thick mild steel outer barrier. It is felt that this arrangement will give considerable containment lifetimes, since no common mode failure exists for the two barriers. The corrosion performance of this waste package will be determined by the exposure environment established within the emplacement drifts. Key features of the Yucca Mountain repository in controlling waste package degradation are expected to be the permanent availability of oxygen and the limited presence of water. When water contacts the surface of the waste package, its gamma radiolysis could produce an additional supply of corrosive agents. the gamma field will be produced by the radioactive decay of radionuclides within the waste form, and its magnitude will depend on the nature and age of the waste form as well as the material and wall thickness of the waste package.

  11. Household Hazardous Materials and Their Labels: A Reference for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lillian F.

    Household hazardous materials are products or wastes which are toxic, corrosive, reactive, and/or ignitable. Although common products such as pesticides, oils, gasoline, solvents, cleaners, and polishes are hazardous, students and adults are not always aware of potential dangers. This sourcebook contains definitions and examples of household…

  12. 16O thin film reference materials for nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Thin film Ta2O5 samples were distributed to CRP participants for use in the round-robin exercise. This appendix describes how these samples were prepared and characterized. Preparation was made using anodic oxidation of tantalum using an electrolyte solution of 4% ammonium citrate prepared with water of natural 16O isotopic composition. A constant anodising current of 4 mA/cm2 was maintained until the desired electrolysis v voltage was reached, then stopped immediately. The areal density of 16O in these thin Ta2O5 films was determined by NRA using the method described elsewhere and comparing the data with that from a primary anodic Ta2O5 standard kindly made available to us by Dr C. Ortega of GPS, Paris. The 16O(d,p1)14N reaction at 850 keV was used with the protons detected with a 300 mm2 silicon detector located at an angle of 150 deg. A 12 μm MylarTM foil covered the detector. Detector count rates were kept sufficiently low so that deadtime corrections are negligible. There are various sources of uncertainty which when compounded, produce the final uncertainty in the 16O areal density of the thin film samples. The major sources of uncertainty are: 1. The primary reference standard is estimated to have an absolute value that is within ± 3% of the true value. 2. There is a small low energy tail on the p1 peak in the NRA spectrum, most likely due to oxygen dissolved in the bulk tantalum. The counts in this tailing are less than 2% of the gross counts recorded in the spectrum peak, and similar in magnitude from sample to sample. We assign a systematic error of 0.5% to the background correction for all samples. There is negligible change in the total sample uncertainty when this systematic error is added in quadrature to the uncertainty of the primary reference standard. 3. The reproducibility of peak areas from several measurements was better than 1%. This indicates that sample homogeneity and current integration were both sufficiently good that their

  13. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for ∼ 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project

  14. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Daniel [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden); Hansen, Staffan [LTH Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for {approx} 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project.

  15. Standard reference materials: srm 768: temperature reference standard for use below 0. 5 k

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolen, R.J. Jr; Dove, R.B.

    1979-04-01

    Cryogenic temperature scales are now available (viz., the newly created EPT-76) which are quite accurate and which extend deep into the cryogenic region (as low as 0.5 K). It is the region below 0.5 K where no formal scale exists which is of concern here. By developing a compact device which provides five reference temperatures from 0.015 K to 0.21 K, the authors hope to provide a lingua franca by which experimental results of different laboratories involving the parameter temperature may be meaningfully compared. Such a device, designated SRM 768, is now available and consists of a self-contained assembly of coils and five samples which can be used to provide in situ temperature calibration. Simple room temperature electronics readily permit the observation of the five narrow and highly reproducible superconducting phase transitions. These phase transitions have been assigned temperature values by means of fundamental thermometers used at the National Bureau of Standards. Provided that care is exercised in reducing the magnetic field acting upon the device, the user can confidently expect to achieve a temperature reproducibility and traceability to the NBS temperature scale of plus or minus 0.3 mK.

  16. Investigation on homogeneity within micro-areas of IAEA urban dust reference materials by SPM technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop new reference materials for microanalytical nuclear techniques, a scanning proton microprobe (SPM) was used to determine homogeneity level within 100 μm x 200 μm micro-areas of the IAEA Urban Dust Reference Materials. The experimental methods are described and the results discussed

  17. Certification of uranium hexafluoride reference materials for isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRMM-019 to IRMM-029 series of uranium hexafluoride materials is certified for the isotopic composition. After conversion into uranyl nitrate solution, certification and homogeneity measurements were performed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Analyses were performed by Modified Total Evaporation and for some materials the major isotope amount ratio n(235U)/n(238U) was measured using a n(233U)/n(236U) double spike. Measurements were confirmed by UF6 gas source mass spectrometry. Major isotope amount ratios were certified with relative expanded uncertainties (k = 2) of 0.015-0.030 % and the minor isotope amount ratios n(234U)/n(238U) and n(236U)/n(238U) were certified with relative expanded uncertainties of 0.02-3 %. (author)

  18. Alpha damage in non-reference waste form matrix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although bitumen is the matrix material currently used for European α-bearing intermediate level waste streams, polymer and polymer-modified cement matrices could have advantages over bitumen for such wastes. Two organic matrix systems have been studied - an epoxide resin, and an epoxide modified cement. Alpha irradiations were carried out by incorporating 241Am at approx. 0.9 Ci/l. Comparisons have been made with unirradiated material and with materials which had been γ-irradiated to the same dose as the α-irradiated samples. Measurements were made of dimensional changes, mechanical properties and the leaching behaviour of 241Am and 137Cs. A limited amount of swelling (< 3%) was observed in α-irradiated epoxide resin; none was observed in the epoxide modified cement. Gamma irradiation to 300 kGy has no significant effect on the mechanical properties of either system. However, alpha irradiation to the same dose produced significant changes in flexural strength, an increase for the polymer and a decrease for the polymer-cement. Leaching in these systems was found to be a diffusion-controlled process; alpha irradiation to approx. 250 kGy has little effect on the leaching behaviour of either system. (author)

  19. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of marine sediment in-house reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference materials play an important role in demonstrating the quality and reliability of analytical data. The advantage of using in-house reference materials is that they provide a relatively cheap option as compared to using commercially available certified reference material (CRM) and can closely resemble the laboratory routine test sample. A marine sediment sample was designed as an in-house reference material, in the framework of quality assurance and control (QA/QC) program of the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory at Nuclear Malaysia. The NAA technique was solely used for the homogeneity test of the marine sediment sample. The CRM of IAEA- Soil 7 and IAEA- SL1 (Lake Sediment) were applied in the analysis as compatible matrix based reference materials for QA purposes. (Author)

  20. Development of reference materials for SNF NDA systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy has over 200 different fuel types which will be placed in a geologic repository for ultimate disposal. At the present time, DOE EM is responsible for assuring safe existing conditions, achieving interim storage, and preparing for final disposition. Each task is governed by regulations which dictate a certain degree of knowledge regarding the contents and condition of the fuel. This knowledge and other associated characteristics are referred to as data needs. It is the stance of DOE EM, that personnel and economic resources are not available to obtain the necessary data to characterize such individual fuel type for final disposal documentation purposes. In addition, it is beyond the need of DOE to do so. This report describes the effort to classify the 200+ fuel types into a subset of fuel types for the purpose of non-destructive analysis (NDA) measurement system development and demonstration testing in support of the DOE National Spent Nuclear Fuel (NSNFP) Program. The fuel types have been grouped into 37 groups based on fuel composition, fuel form, assembly size, enrichment, and other characteristics which affect NDA measurements (e.g., neutron poisons)

  1. Development of reference materials for SNF NDA systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klann, R. T.

    2000-02-29

    The Department of Energy has over 200 different fuel types which will be placed in a geologic repository for ultimate disposal. At the present time, DOE EM is responsible for assuring safe existing conditions, achieving interim storage, and preparing for final disposition. Each task is governed by regulations which dictate a certain degree of knowledge regarding the contents and condition of the fuel. This knowledge and other associated characteristics are referred to as data needs. It is the stance of DOE EM, that personnel and economic resources are not available to obtain the necessary data to characterize such individual fuel type for final disposal documentation purposes. In addition, it is beyond the need of DOE to do so. This report describes the effort to classify the 200+ fuel types into a subset of fuel types for the purpose of non-destructive analysis (NDA) measurement system development and demonstration testing in support of the DOE National Spent Nuclear Fuel (NSNFP) Program. The fuel types have been grouped into 37 groups based on fuel composition, fuel form, assembly size, enrichment, and other characteristics which affect NDA measurements (e.g., neutron poisons).

  2. Growth inhibitory response and ultrastructural modification of oral-associated candidal reference strains (ATCC) by Piper betle L. extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohd-Al-Faisal Nordin; Wan Himratul-Aznita Wan Harun; Fathilah Abdul Razak; Md Yusoff Musa

    2014-01-01

    Candida species have been associated with the emergence of strains resistant to selected antifungal agents. Plant products have been used traditionally as alternative medicine to ease mucosal fungal infections. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper betle extract on the growth profile and the ultrastructure of commonly isolated oral candidal cells. The major component of P. betle was identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (LC-MS/MS). Seven ATCC control strains of Candida species were cultured in yeast peptone dextrose broth under four different growth environments:(i) in the absence of P. betle extract;and in the presence of P. betle extract at respective concentrations of (ii) 1 mg?mL21;(iii) 3 mg?mL21;and (iv) 6 mg?mL21. The growth inhibitory responses of the candidal cells were determined based on changes in the specific growth rates (m). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe any ultrastructural alterations in the candida colonies. LC-MS/MS was performed to validate the presence of bioactive compounds in the extract. Following treatment, it was observed that the m-values of the treated cells were significantly different than those of the untreated cells (P,0.05), indicating the fungistatic properties of the P. betle extract. The candidal population was also reduced from an average of 13.443106 to 1.783106 viable cell counts (CFU)?mL21. SEM examination exhibited physical damage and considerable morphological alterations of the treated cells. The compound profile from LC-MS/MS indicated the presence of hydroxybenzoic acid, chavibetol and hydroxychavicol in P. betle extract. The effects of P. betle on candida cells could potentiate its antifungal activity.

  3. Survey of currently available reference materials for use in connection with the determination of trace elements in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analysis of biological materials is at present the subject of intensive study by many different research groups throughout the world, in view of the importance of these trace elements in health and medical diagnosis. IAEA and other organizations are now making a variety of suitable reference materials available for use in connection with the determination of trace elements in biological materials. To help analysts in making a selection from among these various materials, the present report provides a brief survey of data for all such biological reference materials known to the author. These data are compiled by the author from January 1982 to June 1983

  4. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of candidate structural materials in supercritical pressurized water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, Hwanil, E-mail: hwanil.je@gmail.com; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-15

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW) was investigated for the candidate structural steels of advanced fusion and fission nuclear system, which are SUS316L austenitic steel, F82H ferritic–martensitic steel and SOC-16 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel. In order to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC with those materials, slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out at 773 K, under a pressure of 25 MPa of SCPW with deaerated condition. High temperature tensile test in vacuum at 773 K was also performed to compare the deformation and fracture behavior between corrosive environment of SCPW and non-corrosive environment. Although SUS316L showed a change in the fracture mode in the deaerated SCPW from an entire ductile fracture at higher strain rate to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture at lower one, the fracture mode of ODS steel and F82H was not changed in the tested strain rate range. Both the IGSCC and TGSCC were observed in SUS316L. And F82H steel suffered from much severer oxidation than SUS316L and SOC-16.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of candidate structural materials in supercritical pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW) was investigated for the candidate structural steels of advanced fusion and fission nuclear system, which are SUS316L austenitic steel, F82H ferritic–martensitic steel and SOC-16 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel. In order to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC with those materials, slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out at 773 K, under a pressure of 25 MPa of SCPW with deaerated condition. High temperature tensile test in vacuum at 773 K was also performed to compare the deformation and fracture behavior between corrosive environment of SCPW and non-corrosive environment. Although SUS316L showed a change in the fracture mode in the deaerated SCPW from an entire ductile fracture at higher strain rate to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture at lower one, the fracture mode of ODS steel and F82H was not changed in the tested strain rate range. Both the IGSCC and TGSCC were observed in SUS316L. And F82H steel suffered from much severer oxidation than SUS316L and SOC-16

  6. Preparation and certification of the Polish reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Polish certified reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis has been prepared. Certification of the candidate reference material was based on the world-wide interlaboratory comparison in which 60 laboratories from 18 countries, participated using various analytical methods and techniques. Data evaluation performed by means of the new multifunctional software package -SSQC. Recommended values were assigned for 33 and 'information' values for 10 elements, respectively. The validity of 'certified' values was confirmed for several elements using 'very accurate' methods developed in this Laboratory. (author)

  7. Preparation and certification of the Polish reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dybczynski, R.; Polkowska-Motrenko, H.; Samczynski, Z.; Szopa, Z.

    1997-12-31

    A new Polish certified reference material Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) for inorganic trace analysis including microanalysis has been prepared. Certification of the candidate reference material was based on the world-wide interlaboratory comparison in which 60 laboratories from 18 countries, participated using various analytical methods and techniques. Data evaluation performed by means of the new multifunctional software package -SSQC. Recommended values were assigned for 33 and `information` values for 10 elements, respectively. The validity of `certified` values was confirmed for several elements using `very accurate` methods developed in this Laboratory. (author). 47 refs, 28 figs, 12 tabs.

  8. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential ENP and the protection potential EPP. The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  9. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, ν). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m3. The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  10. Induced radioactivity evaluation for reference materials by European scientific cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global objective of this research is to apply the latest theoretical achievements for calculation of nuclear quantities on the request lists of the current EC projects related to activation (European Activation File) and fusion (European Fusion File, Joint Evaluation File and Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library). The main goal has concerned the (n,p) and (n,α) reaction cross sections, of first importance for prediction of radiation damage in fusion reactor stainless steel. The required development of adequate activation computer codes and data libraries are expected to provide improvement of the following types of nuclear data: - threshold and capture reactions leading to long-lived radionuclides; - other neutron-induced reactions producing the most critical activities in elements ranging from boron to bismuth; - charged-particle emission spectra of neutron-induced reactions and charged-particle induced reactions needed to treat the important sequential (x,n) reactions; - detailed error estimates of critical nuclear data, in order to specify the uncertainty levels of current predictions for radiological properties of potential low-activation materials

  11. Future needs and requirements for AMS 14C standards and reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C measurement uses a number of standards and reference materials with different properties. Historically the absolute calibration of 14C measurement was tied to 1890 wood, through the 'primary' standard of NBS-OxI (produced by the National Bureau of Standards, now NIST - National Institute of Standards and technology) subsequently replaced by NBS-OxII. These are both internationally calibrated and certified materials, whose 14C activities are known absolutely. A second tier of materials, often called secondary standards or reference materials, and including internationally recognised materials such as ANU-sucrose (now also IAEA-C6), Chinese - sucrose and the IAEA C1-C6 series, augmented by additional oxalic acid samples are also used routinely. The activity of these materials has been estimated from large numbers of measurements made by many laboratories. Recently, further natural materials from the Third and Fourth International Radiocarbon Inter-comparisons (TIRI and FIRI) have been added to this list. The activities of these standards and reference materials span both the applied 14C age range and the chemical composition range of typical samples, but this is not achieved uniformly and there is a continuing need for reference materials for laboratory quality control and measurement-traceability purposes. In this paper, we review the development of 14C standards and reference materials and consider the future requirements for such materials within the 14C AMS community

  12. Candidate qRT-PCR reference genes for barley that demonstrate better stability than traditional housekeeping genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene transcript expression analysis is a useful tool for correlating gene activity with plant phenotype. For these studies, an appropriate reference gene is necessary to quantify the expression of target genes. Classic housekeeping genes have often been used for this purpose, but may not be consis...

  13. Reference material IAEA 413: Major, minor and trace elements in algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference materials are a basic requirement for any sort of quantitative chemical and radiochemical analysis. Laboratories need them for calibration and quality control throughout their analytical work. The IAEA started to produce reference materials in the early 1960s to meet the needs of the analytical laboratories in its Member States that required reference materials for quality control of their measurements. The initial efforts were focused on the preparation of environmental reference materials containing anthropogenic radionuclides for use by those laboratories employing nuclear analytical techniques. These reference materials were characterized for their radionuclide content through interlaboratory comparison involving a core group of some 10 to 20 specialist laboratories. The success of these early exercises led the IAEA to extend its activities to encompass both terrestrial and marine reference materials containing primordial radionuclides and trace elements. Today, the IAEA has more than 90 reference materials and maintains a customer base of about 5000 members from more than 85 Member States. Within the frame of IAEA activities in production and certification of RM, this report describes the certification of the IAEA 413: Major, minor and trace elements in algae. Details are given on methodologies and data evaluation

  14. Reference materials for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material. Volume 2. Thin metal foils of highly enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the fabrication of reference materials for use in gamma-ray-based nondestructive assay of small high-density uranium samples. The sample containers are small Petri dishes. The reference materials consist of thin circular discs of highly enriched uranium metal foil. The 235U content ranges from 0.2 to 10 g. The report also describes the assay procedure used with low-resolution detectors

  15. Selection and Verification of Candidate Reference Genes for Mature MicroRNA Expression by Quantitative RT-PCR in the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Zhang, Xiao; Shi, Cong; Wang, Shuangshuang; Wu, Ailin; Wei, Chaoling

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a rapid and sensitive method for analyzing microRNA (miRNA) expression. However, accurate qRT-PCR results depend on the selection of reliable reference genes as internal positive controls. To date, few studies have identified reliable reference genes for differential expression analysis of miRNAs among tissues, and among experimental conditions in plants. In this study, three miRNAs and four non-coding small RNAs (ncRNA) were selected as reference candidates, and the stability of their expression was evaluated among different tissues and under different experimental conditions in the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) using the geNorm and NormFinder programs. It was shown that miR159a was the best single reference gene in the bud to the fifth leaf, 5S rRNA was the most suitable gene in different organs, miR6149 was the most stable gene when the leaves were attacked by Ectropis oblique and U4, miR5368n and miR159a were the best genes when the leaves were treated by methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA), respectively. Our results provide suitable reference genes for future investigations on miRNA functions in tea plants. PMID:27240406

  16. Selection and Verification of Candidate Reference Genes for Mature MicroRNA Expression by Quantitative RT-PCR in the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR is a rapid and sensitive method for analyzing microRNA (miRNA expression. However, accurate qRT-PCR results depend on the selection of reliable reference genes as internal positive controls. To date, few studies have identified reliable reference genes for differential expression analysis of miRNAs among tissues, and among experimental conditions in plants. In this study, three miRNAs and four non-coding small RNAs (ncRNA were selected as reference candidates, and the stability of their expression was evaluated among different tissues and under different experimental conditions in the tea plant (Camellia sinensis using the geNorm and NormFinder programs. It was shown that miR159a was the best single reference gene in the bud to the fifth leaf, 5S rRNA was the most suitable gene in different organs, miR6149 was the most stable gene when the leaves were attacked by Ectropis oblique and U4, miR5368n and miR159a were the best genes when the leaves were treated by methyl jasmonate (MeJA, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid (ABA, respectively. Our results provide suitable reference genes for future investigations on miRNA functions in tea plants.

  17. Roadmap for radioanalytical reference and performance evaluation materials for current and emerging issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference materials are fundamental tools for radiochemistry measurements laboratories to establish and evaluate analytical methods, test measurement capabilities, quantify radionuclides, compare analytical results, and establish legal confidence defensibility in measurement results. Over the past decades the focus of low-level environmental reference material producers have adapted to evolving national and international priorities and needs. This document provides a Roadmap of high priority current and future low-level radionuclide Certified Reference and Performance Evaluation Materials that subject-matter experts have identified at NIST and other public workshops (Blueprints) as crucial to metrologists and program directors to address national and international issues. (author)

  18. Embrapa's experience in the production and development of agriculture reference materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, A. R. A.; Souza, G. B.; Bossu, C. M.; Bianchi, S. R.; Verhalen, T. R.; Silva, P. T.; Peixoto, A. A. J.; Silva, C. S.

    2016-07-01

    The main challenge of Embrapa is to develop a model of genuine Brazilian tropical agriculture and livestock. To get this task, the quality of laboratories results is mandatory, increasing the demand for reference materials. Projects were proposed to produce reference materials to support the national agriculture laboratories and consolidate a network able to perform reliable and reproducible analytical testing laboratory within the internationally standards required. Reference materials were produced and available to interested laboratories and collaborative tests were conducted to obtain consensus values. The results and statistical evaluations were performed with the use of software developed by Embrapa Pecuaria Sudeste.

  19. A review of candidate ceramic materials for use as heat shield tiles in a supercritical-water-cooled-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Canadian supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR) utilizes a reactor shell made of a zirconium alloy insulated with a ceramic tile heat shield. The main consideration in the selection of a tile material will be resistance to corrosion in supercritical water and long term microstructure stability, in addition to thermal conductivity. This paper provides a review of the literature on corrosion behaviours of ceramic materials in supercritical water and ranks candidate ceramic materials accordingly. Materials reviewed include alumina, zirconia, silica glasses, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, sialon, mullite, and aluminum nitride. (author)

  20. Phase stability effects on the corrosion behavior of the metal barrier candidate materials for the nuclear waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six candidate materials are currently under consideration by the Nuclear Waste Management Program (NWMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as potential metal barrier materials for high-level nuclear waste storage. The waste package, which must meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing requirements for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI), will contain spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants PWR and BWR fuel assemblies, commercial high level waste (CHLW) in the form of borosilicate glass containing commercial spent fuel reprocessing wastes and defense high level waste (DHLW) contained in borosilicate glass. The waste package is being designed for emplacement in the unsaturated zone above the water table at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. This location should result in a slightly oxidizing repository environment. The Metal Barrier Selection and Testing Task is responsible for the selection of the materials to be employed in the waste package container. The candidate materials include three iron to nickel-based austenitic materials and three copper-based alloy materials. The austenitic materials are AISI 304L stainless steel, AISI 316L stainless steel and alloy 825. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (OFHC copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al) and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The selection of the final metal barrier material is dependent upon the expected behavior of these materials in the repository environment

  1. Metrological sharp shooting for plasma proteins and peptides: The need for reference materials for accurate measurements in clinical proteomics and in vitro diagnostics to generate reliable results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum, Frank; Siest, Gérard; Bunk, David M; Preckel, Tobias; Wenz, Christian; Hoerth, Patric; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Tammen, Harald; Adamkiewicz, Juergen; Merlini, Giampaolo; Anderson, N Leigh

    2007-09-01

    Reliable study results are necessary for the assessment of discoveries, including those from proteomics. Reliable study results are also crucial to increase the likelihood of making a successful choice of biomarker candidates for verification and subsequent validation studies, a current bottleneck for the transition to in vitro diagnostic (IVD). In this respect, a major need for improvement in proteomics appears to be accuracy of measurements, including both trueness and precision of measurement. Standardization and total quality management systems (TQMS) help to provide accurate measurements and reliable results. Reference materials are an essential part of standardization and TQMS in IVD and are crucial to provide metrological correct measurements and for the overall quality assurance process. In this article we give an overview on how reference materials are defined, prepared and what role they play in standardization and TQMS to support the generation of reliable results. We discuss how proteomics can support the establishment of reference materials and biomarker tests for IVD applications, how current reference materials used in IVD may be beneficially applied in proteomics, and we provide considerations on the establishment of reference materials specific for proteomics. For clarity, we solely focus on reference materials related to serum and plasma. PMID:21136754

  2. Trace element determination in a mussel reference material using short irradiation instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Seo, Daniele; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A.; Saiki, Mitiko, E-mail: emoreira@ipen.b, E-mail: mbvascon@ipen.b, E-mail: mitiko@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The production of certified reference materials in Brazil, and the consequent availability to national end users, is an important task for the enhancement of Metrology in Chemistry status in the country, as these materials are used for method validation, equipment calibration and for establishing metrological traceability links. In this study, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was applied to the determination of magnesium, manganese and vanadium in a mussel reference material produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP. For the determination of these elements via the comparative INAA method, the respective analytical radionuclides, {sup 27}Mg, {sup 56}Mn, and {sup 52}V, are short lived and then, short irradiations are used. The main advantage over longer irradiation methods is the faster output of analytical results. Six subsamples from two bottles of the Perna perna mussel reference material were analyzed. Each subsample was simultaneously irradiated with elemental standards for 10 s at the IEA - R1 research nuclear reactor through a pneumatic transfer system. After suitable decay periods, gamma radioactivity measurements were carried out, using a hyperpure germanium detector. The accuracy of the method was checked by using the NIST SRM 1566b - 'Oyster Tissue' certified reference material. The comparison of the obtained results to the robust mean of the interlaboratorial collaborative trial used for the characterization of the mussel reference material showed that the short irradiation INAA method is suitable for the characterization of new reference materials. (author)

  3. Trace element determination in a mussel reference material using short irradiation instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of certified reference materials in Brazil, and the consequent availability to national end users, is an important task for the enhancement of Metrology in Chemistry status in the country, as these materials are used for method validation, equipment calibration and for establishing metrological traceability links. In this study, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was applied to the determination of bromine, chlorine, magnesium, manganese, potassium and vanadium in a mussel reference material produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP. For the determination of these elements via the comparative INAA method, the respective analytical radionuclides, 80Br, 38Cl, 27Mg, 56Mn, 42K and 52V, are short lived and then, short irradiations are used. Six subsamples from two bottles of the Perna perna mussel reference material were analyzed. Each subsample was simultaneously irradiated with elemental standards for 10 s at the IEA-R1 research nuclear reactor through a pneumatic transfer system. After suitable decay periods, gamma radioactivity measurements were carried out, using a hyperpure germanium detector. The accuracy of the method was checked by using the NIST SRM 1566b-'Oyster Tissue' certified reference material. The comparison of the results obtained in this study to the robust mean of the interlaboratorial collaborative trial used for the characterization of the mussel reference material was performed via z-score tests. The comparison showed that the short irradiation INAA method is suitable for the characterization of new reference materials. (author)

  4. Preparation and characterization of the fish reference material; Preparacao e caracterizacao de um material de referencia de peixe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Joao Cristiano

    2011-07-01

    The certified reference materials (CRMs) play an important role in obtaining measurement results traceable to the International System of Units, through an unbroken chain of comparisons. Thus, the demand for new certified reference materials (CRMs) increases every day in all areas of knowledge. The availability of reference materials, mainly in Brazil is still incipient, given that the demand far exceeds the available variety of these materials. The amount of certified reference materials available in the country is insufficient to meet the need of the scientific community and demands for development of new methodologies. Among the many areas in need of reference materials, we highlight the importance for the food trade balance for these products within the country. The certification of food products, intended both for export and for domestic consumption, requires analysis methods that provide precise and accurate results to ensure product quality. This paper describes the preparation and certification of a reference material in the fish matrix in mercury and methylmercury. The study brings together since the stage of material selection, preparation, development of homogeneity and stability studies and characterization. The certification was performed by means of measurements using two analytical techniques, flow injection analysis - cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FIA-CV-AAS) and isotope dilution applied to mass spectrometry (IDMS), which is a primary method. In this work the standards of the ISO 30 (ABNT 30-34) and ISO Guide 35 was used as the basis for the preparation and characterization of the material. For the calculation of uncertainties was used the GUM and Eurachem guide. As a result, was produced and certified a lot of material in relation to the concentration of mercury (Hg = 0.271 {+-} 0.057 mg g{sup -1}) and methylmercury (MeHg = 0.245 {+-} 0.038 mg g{sup -1}), and informational values of lead and arsenic. (author)

  5. Normalization Methods and Selection Strategies for Reference Materials in Stable Isotope Analyes. Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers are highly precise, but not accurate instruments. Therefore, results have to be normalized to one of the isotope scales (e.g., VSMOW, VPDB) based on well calibrated reference materials. The selection of reference materials, numbers of replicates, δ-values of these reference materials and normalization technique have been identified as crucial in determining the uncertainty associated with the final results. The most common normalization techniques and reference materials have been tested using both Monte Carlo simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate aspects of error propagation during the normalization of isotope data. The range of observed differences justifies the need to employ the same sets of standards worldwide for each element and each stable isotope analytical technique. (author)

  6. Certification of elements in and use of standard reference material 3280 multivitamin/multielement tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3280 Multivitamin/Multielement Tablets was issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 2009 and has certified and reference mass fraction values for 13 vitamins, 26 elements, and 2 carotenoids. Elements were measured using two or more ana...

  7. Chemical quality control of plutonium fuels: potassium plutonium sulphate as a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potassium plutonium sulphate, K4Pu(SO4)4 prepared in our division has been proposed as a reference material for plutonium. The suitability of the material as a reference standard in the quality assurance of plutonium fuels has been demonstrated by its regular use in our laboratory over the past six months. Results of the analysis of the standard by potentiometric and biamperometric methods were in close agreement with the theoretical plutonium content. (author)

  8. Biological reference materials in routine analysis: Results from the German Food Contamination Monitoring Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauenburg, H.; Weigert, P. (Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-10-01

    Within the research project 'German Food Contamination Monitoring Programme', selected foodstuffs have to be examined by the official food control laboratories. Contents of pesticides and heavy metals have to be determined by means of routine analysis. Biological reference materials are used in collaborative studies and in parallel investigations for analytical quality assurance. Using lead as an example, results obtained for three reference materials are discussed. (orig.).

  9. Fresh biological reference materials. Use in inter laboratory studies and as CRMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological reference materials were prepared and packed in tins and glass jars to be used in inter laboratory studies on chlorobiphenyls and organochlorine pesticides, and trace metals, respectively. The materials were homogenised, sterilised and packed as wet tissue, which is unique for the purpose of inter laboratory studies and offers the advantage of studying the extraction and destruction steps of the analytical methods. In addition to their use in inter laboratory studies, some materials have been prepared or are being prepared as certified reference material for chlorobiphenyl analysis. (author)

  10. Reference materials for microanalytical nuclear techniques. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant problem in the use of solid- and small-sample techniques is a general lack in suitable certified reference materials (CRM). Essentially, no CRM are certified for the small sample sizes typically used. Direct utilization of most existing CRM in solid sampling analysis procedures, typically 1 mg sample size, is often difficult or even impossible because trace components may not be sufficiently homogeneously distributed in the sample or their homogeneous distribution has not been tested. To explore the production, characterization and use of CRM for determinations with sample sizes much smaller than currently used, the Coordinated Research Program focused on selection of biological and environmental materials suitable for microanalytical techniques, definition of specifications for suitable CRM, evaluation of existing CRM for use with microanalytical techniques, evaluation of requirements for sample pre-treatment, evaluation of analytical techniques and research on development of techniques to be used in characterizing the homogeneity and chemical composition of small samples, and application of analytical techniques to the characterization of candidate reference materials for use with microanalytical techniques

  11. Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for SCWR in superheated steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of cold work on oxidation kinetics was clearly observed for 15Cr–20Ni SS. • The tube-shaped 15Cr–20Ni SS showed very good oxidation resistance. • The machined layer by cold drawing has a significant role to mitigate oxidation. - Abstract: Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR), including three types of 15Cr–20Ni stainless steels (1520 SSs), in the temperature range of 700–780 °C superheated steam have been investigated. Effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), degree of cold work (CW), and machined layer by cold drawing process on the oxidation kinetics assuming power-law kinetics are discussed. Characteristics of oxide layers and its relation to oxidation behaviors are also discussed. The effect of DO on the weight gain behavior in superheated steam at 700 °C was minor for all specimens at least up to 200 ppb DO. The tube-shaped specimens of 1520 SSs showed very good oxidation resistance at 700–780 °C. There was no clear difference in the oxidation kinetics among the three investigated types of 1520 SSs. The machined layer formed at the tube surface has a significant role to mitigate oxidation in superheated steam. A fine-grained microstructure near the surface due to recrystallization by cold drawing process is effective to form the protective Cr2O3 layer. It has been suggested that since Cr diffusion in the outside surface of tubes is accelerated as a result of an increased dislocation density and/or grain refinement by cold drawing, tube specimens show very slow oxidation kinetics. Breakdown of the protective Cr2O3 layer and nodule oxide formation were partly observed on the tube-shaped specimens of 15Cr–20Ni SSs. The reliability of Cr2O3 layer has to be carefully examined to predict the oxidation kinetics after long-term exposure

  12. Standard and reference materials for marine science. Third edition. Technical memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third edition of the catalog of reference materials suited for use in marine science, originally compiled in 1986 for NOAA, IOC, and UNEP. The catalog lists close to 2,000 reference materials from sixteen producers and contains information about their proper use, sources, availability, and analyte concentrations. Indices are included for elements, isotopes, and organic compounds, as are cross references to CAS registry numbers, alternate names, and chemical structures of selected organic compounds. The catalog is being published independently by both NOAA and IOC/UNEP and is available from NOAA/NOS/ORCA in electronic form

  13. Biological and environmental reference materials for trace elements, nuclides and organic microcontaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been produced from a database on analytical reference materials of biological and environmental origin, which is maintained at the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is an updated version of an earlier report, published in 1985, which focussed mainly on reference materials for trace elements. In the present version of the report, reference materials for trace elements still constitute the major part of the data; however, information is also now included on a number of other selected analytes of relevance to IAEA programmes, i.e. radionuclides, stable isotopes and organic microcontaminants. The database presently contains 2,694 analyte values for 117 analytes in 116 biological and 77 environmental (non-biological) reference materials produced by 20 different suppliers. Additional information on the cost of the material, the unit size supplied, (weight or volume), and the minimum weight of material recommended for analysis is also provided (if available to the authors). It is expected that this report will help analysts to select the reference material that matches as closely as possible, with respect to matrix type and concentrations of the analytes of interest, the ''real'' samples that are to be analysed. Refs, 12 tabs

  14. Preparation and certification of rice flour reference materials for trace elements analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice flour reference materials were prepared from the unpolished rice grown in korea and certified for elemental composition. The reference materials consist of two samples containing normal and high level. The reference material at elevated level was prepared by spiking to the normal rice flour six toxic elements of As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb with 1.0μg/g on a dry weight basis. Homogeneity of the prepared materials was evaluated through the determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Small variance of elemental composition among inter-bottled samples assured homogeneity of the prepared materials. The materials were decomposed by high pres-sure digestion and microwave digestion method. INAA, AAS, inductively coupled plasma-atomic absorption spectrometry (ICP-AES), ICP-mass spectrometry (MS) and vapour generation techniques were employed to analyze the reference materials. From this independent analytical results, the certified or reference values are determined for As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, P, Pb, Se, Zn

  15. Surface Catalytic Efficiency of Advanced Carbon Carbon Candidate Thermal Protection Materials for SSTO Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for advanced ceramic thermal protection systems was calculated using arc-jet data. Coefficients for both oxygen and nitrogen atom recombination on the surfaces of these systems were obtained to temperatures of 1650 K. Optical and chemical stability of the candidate systems to the high energy hypersonic flow was also demonstrated during these tests.

  16. Certification of butyltins and phenyltins in marine sediment certified reference material by species-specific isotope-dilution mass spectrometric analysis using synthesized 118Sn-enriched organotin compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Inagaki, Kazumi; Takatsu, Akiko; Watanabe, Takuro; Aoyagi, Yoshie; Yarita, Takashi; Okamoto, Kensaku; Chiba, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    A new marine sediment certified reference material, NMIJ CRM 7306-a, for butyltin and phenyltin analysis has been prepared and certified by the National Metrological Institute of Japan at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST). Candidate sediment material was collected at a bay near industrial activity in Japan. After air-drying, sieving, and mixing the material was sterilized with γ-ray irradiation. The material was re-mixed and packaged into 250 gla...

  17. A study of production of radioactive environmental reference materials used for proficiency testing program in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realise radioactive environmental reference materials in Taiwan, seven environmental materials of soil, water, vegetation, meat, airborne particles (filter paper), milk and mushroom samples that are frequently encountered were used to establish the preparation of the reference materials. These seven environmental materials were collected, checked for freedom from radioactivity and prepared according to their properties. The preparation was carried out by using activity about 10–100 times that of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) in routine measurements in the radioactive standard used to spike the inactive material and this standard is traceable to national ionising radioactivity standards (TAF, 2004). To demonstrate sample traceability to the added standard, each sample was carefully measured and its uncertainty evaluated. Based on the recommendations of ISO Guide 35 for evaluation of reference materials and with the above assessment and verification procedures, the uncertainties (k=1) of the spike activity used in making reference materials were: 60Co≤4.6%, 134Cs≤4.7%, 137Cs≤5.0%, total β≤0.6% and 3H≤1.3%. - Highlights: • Seven kinds environmental materials were used to establish the production of the RMs. • Spiking the traceable standard radioactive source to the blank substance. • Each sample was carefully evaluated for its uncertainty. • The performance of the RMs was estimated with the Proficiency Testing program report. • The ability of the environment RMs in the configuration is quite good

  18. Certified reference materials for food packaging specific migration tests: development, validation and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords:certified reference materials; diffusion; food contact materials; food packaging; laurolactam; migration modelling; nylon; specific migration This thesis compiles several research topics

  19. Certified Reference Material IAEA-446 for radionuclides in Baltic Sea seaweed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, M.K.; Benmansour, M.; Carvalho, F.P.;

    2014-01-01

    A Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) from the Baltic Sea (IAEA-446) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. The 40K, 137Cs, 234U and 239þ240Pu radionuclides were certified for this material, and information values f...

  20. Certificate of Analysis, Standard Reference Material® 1849, Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard Reference material (SRM) 1849 is intended primarily for validation of methods for determining proximates, fatty acids, vitamins, elements and nucleotides in infant and adult nutritional formulas and similar materials. This SRM can also be used for quality assurance when assigning values to ...

  1. The preparation and certification of a South African phosphate concentrate for use as a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the preparation, analysis, and certification of South African Reference Material (SARM) 32. The material is a phosphate concentrate from the Phalaborwa deposit, and was supplied by the Phosphate Development Corporation Ltd (Foskor). Eighteen laboratories in eight countries used a variety of analytical techniques to provide the analytical results

  2. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO2, 20 mass % Na2O, 10 mass % Al2O3, 8 mass % B2O3, and 1.5 mass % K2O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  3. List of reference materials for non-destructive assay of U, Th and Pu isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A list of reference materials for non-destructive assay has been compiled within six countries of the EEC, the Commission and the IAEA with the assistance of the members of the Esarda working group on NDA. The reference materials have been tabulated according to the type of fuel cycle (HEU, LEU, Pu) and type of fuel. For each material the following data are given: the chemical composition, the nominal value or the range in quantity of the element, the U235 enrichment or isotopic composition, the physical form and number of pieces

  4. Report of the research co-ordination meeting on reference materials for microanalytical nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many microanalytical procedure require specific natural-matrix reference materials containing very low levels of trace elements and having a high degree of homogeneity. This proposed CRP will specifically address the question of quality control materials for these techniques. The participants of the meeting discussed the requirements for certified reference materials to by used in microanalysis with particular emphasis on the homogeneity issues. This publication contains summary of the discussions along with conclusions and recommendations made by the participants. The publication also contains 13 individual presentations delivered by the participants. Each of the individual papers has been provided with an abstract and indexed separately

  5. The use of BIM reference models for multi-material structural design

    OpenAIRE

    Djedović, Sanel

    2014-01-01

    Master thesis deals with multi-material structural design that is based on reference architectural model. We performed process and product analysis that is relevant for multi-material structural design and proposed and demonstrated its use for three construction materials (concrete, steel and wood) In the frames of process analysis we used IDEFØ methodology to describe AS-IS structural design. A detailed description of process models of existing design procedures for building permit and pr...

  6. A 2015 International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) candidate model based on Swarm’s experimental absolute magnetometer vector mode data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigneron, Pierre; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    Each of the three satellites of the European Space Agency Swarm mission carries an absolute scalar magnetometer (ASM) that provides the nominal 1-Hz scalar data of the mission for both science and calibration purposes. These ASM instruments, however, also deliver autonomous 1-Hz experimental vector...... data. Here, we report on how ASM-only scalar and vector data from the Alpha and Bravo satellites between November 29, 2013 (a week after launch) and September 25, 2014 (for on-time delivery of the model on October 1, 2014) could be used to build a very valuable candidate model for the 2015.......0 International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A parent model was first computed, describing the geomagnetic field of internal origin up to degree and order 40 in a spherical harmonic representation and including a constant secular variation up to degree and order 8. This model was next simply forwarded to...

  7. Charge, spin and orbital order in the candidate multiferroic material LuFe2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is a detailed study of the magnetic, structural and orbital order parameters of the candidate multiferroic material LuFe2O4. Multiferroic oxides with a strong magnetoelectric coupling are of high interest for potential information technology applications, but they are rare because the traditional mechanism of ferroelectricity is incompatible with magnetism. Consequently, much attention is focused on various unconventional mechanisms of ferroelectricity. Of these, ferroelectricity originating from charge ordering (CO) is particularly intriguing because it potentially combines large electric polarizations with strong magneto-electric coupling. However, examples of oxides where this mechanism occurs are exceedingly rare and none is really well understood. LuFe2O4 is often cited as the prototypical example of CO-based ferroelectricity. In this material, the order of Fe valences has been proposed to render the triangular Fe/O bilayers polar by making one of the two layers rich in Fe2+ and the other rich in Fe3+, allowing for a possible ferroelectric stacking of the individual bilayers. Because of this new mechanism for ferroelectricity, and also because of the high transition temperatures of charge order (TCO ∝320K) and ferro magnetism (TN∝240 K) LuFe2O4 has recently attracted increasing attention. Although these polar bilayers are generally accepted in the literature for LuFe2O4, direct proof is lacking. An assumption-free experimental determination of whether or not the CO in the Fe/O bilayers is polar would be crucial, given the dependence of the proposed mechanism of ferroelectricity from CO in LuFe2O4 on polar bilayers. This thesis starts with a detailed characterization of the macroscopic magnetic properties, where growing ferrimagnetic contributions observed in magnetization could be ascribed to increasing oxygen off-stoichiometry. The main focus is on samples exhibiting a sharp magnetic transition to long-range spin order at TN∝240 K

  8. Development of miniaturized specimens for the study of neutron irradiation/plasma exposure synergistic effects on candidate fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to choose a miniaturized specimen version relevant for testing candidate fusion reactor materials including mechanical testing after combined neutron irradiation/plasma exposure in a fission reactor. The material examined was reactor pressure vessel type steel in irradiated and aged (unirradiated) conditions. Comparative standard impact, three point bend and small punch tests were conducted. It is established that there is a possibility of miniaturization of irradiated steel experimental specimens by means of proper specimens type choice with mass reducing from ∼40 (Charpy) to 0.4 g (small plates). (orig.)

  9. Feasibility Study for the Development of Plutonium Reference Materials for Age Dating in Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic reference materials certified for the age of nuclear material (uranium, plutonium) are needed in the fields of nuclear forensics and environmental measurements. Therefore a feasibility study for the development of plutonium reference materials for age dating has been started recently at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (EC-JRC-IRMM). The ''age'' of the material is defined as the time that has passed since the last chemical separation of the mother and daughter isotopes (e.g. 241Pu and 241Am). Assuming that the separation has been complete and all the daughter isotopes have been removed from the original material during this last separation, the age of the material can be determined by measuring the ratio of daughter and mother radio-nuclides, e.g. 241Am/241Pu. At a given time after the last separation and depending on the half lives of the radio-nuclides involved, a certain amount of the daughter radionuclide(s) will be present. For the determination of the unknown age of a material different ''clocks'' can be used; ''clocks'' are pairs of mother and daughter radio-nuclides, such as 241Am/241Pu, 238Pu/234U, 239Pu/235U, 240Pu/236U, and possibly 242Pu/238U. For the age estimation of a real sample, such as material seized in nuclear forensics investigations or dust samples in environmental measurements, it is advisable to use more than one clock in order to ensure the reliability of the results and to exclude the possibility that the sample under question is a mixture of two or more materials. Consequently, a future reference material certified for separation date should ideally be certified for more than one ''clock'' or several reference materials for different ''clocks'' should be developed. The first step of this study is to verify the known separation dates of different plutonium materials of different ages and isotopic compositions by measuring the mother (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu) and daughter (234U, 235U, 236U, 238U and

  10. Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} as a candidate material for lead cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utili, M., E-mail: marco.utili@enea.i [Universita degli studi di Bologna, Facolta di Ingegneria, Via Risorgimento, 2 DIENCA, Bologna (Italy); Agostini, M.; Coccoluto, G. [ENEA CR Brasimone, Fis Ing, Camugnano (Italy); Lorenzini, E. [Universita degli studi di Bologna, Facolta di Ingegneria, Via Risorgimento, 2 DIENCA, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    One of the main issues regarding the design of LFR is the corrosion-erosion behaviour of materials in contact with high temperature and high velocity lead, such as pump impeller and bearing materials. Those materials will worked in lead at about 480 {sup o}C with a velocity relative to impeller blade in the magnitude of 10 m/s. Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}, a ternary compound was selected as one of the most promising candidate material, the most significant aspect of Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} is that it combines some of the most attractive proprieties of ceramics with those of metals. This material was already applied in industry but more effort is needed to qualify its performance when compared with candidate structural stainless steel available in Europe. With the purpose of evaluating the corrosion resistance of Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}, a preliminary screening test was carried out at ENEA Brasimone in fluent lead under oxidation conditions (oxygen concentration of about 10{sup -6} wt% in the melt), with an average temperature of 500 {sup o}C and a stream velocity of about 1 m/s.

  11. A mussel (Mytilus edulis) tissue certified reference material for the marine biotoxins azaspiracids

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Pearse; Giddings, Sabrina D.; Reeves, Kelley L.; Hess, Philipp; Michael A. Quilliam

    2015-01-01

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are lipophilic biotoxins produced by marine algae that can contaminate shellfish and cause human illness. The European Union (EU) regulates the level of AZAs in shellfish destined for the commercial market, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) being used as the official reference method for regulatory analysis. Certified reference materials (CRMs) are essential tools for the development, validation, and quality control of LC-MS methods. This paper describes...

  12. Biocompatibility and characterisation of a candidate microelectrode material for biosensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in microcircuit technology have enabled the fabrication of Multiple Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for investigating the characteristics of networks of neuronal cells either in vivo or in vitro. When producing a MEA materials used must be corrosion resistant, have low electrical impedance and the materials must be biocompatible. Existing MEA's have limited life spans, relatively high impedance values and limited uses. Thus creating a requirement for new MEA technology. TiN thin films have become increasingly useful in a wide variety of applications, due to their nature, which includes chemical stability, high hardness, excellent wear and electrical properties and also biocompatibility. The favourable electrical and biocompatibility characteristics of thin films of TiN make them a possible candidate for use in a MEA. TiN thin films can be deposited by a number of methods including evaporation, ion plating and sputtering. The method of deposition, along with process parameters used can have a marked effect on the characteristics of TiN films, including changes in preferred orientation, hardness and wear and also biocompatibility. TiN thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering of a Ti target, with Argon and nitrogen gas mixtures and labelled Type I TiN films. Also industrial TIN films deposited by Arc Ion plating were carefully selected for comparison and labelled Type II TiN films. The microstructure, composition, surface chemistry, surface topography and roughness were studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Profilometry. Type I TIN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone I and Type II TiN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone 2 of the Movchan and Dernchishin structure zone model for sputtered films. XPS showed that the surface composition of all TiN films was predominantly TiO2, TiN and TiNxOy. Significant differences in

  13. Preparation and development of new Pu spike isotopic reference materials at IRMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable isotope measurements of nuclear material and the availability of reference materials with small uncertainties in the certified values are of great importance for safeguarding of nuclear materials. They provide the basis for a credible measurement system in the verification of states declarations of their nuclear activities. Worldwide needs for continued and improved Isotopic Reference Materials (IRM) are the main reason for developments of new nuclear reference materials at IRMM. Measurement capabilities of laboratories have evolved considerably over the years, along with progress in modern analytical techniques. Some plutonium reference materials, however, have been on the market for decades and they need to be re-certified to smaller uncertainties. Moreover, new reference materials with appropriately small uncertainties in the certified values need to be made available enabling measurement laboratories to reduce their combined measurement uncertainties. Such high quality plutonium isotopic reference materials are essential for laboratories striving to meet the International Target Values for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials (ITVs). The preparation and the certification of such materials are demanding and challenging tasks that require state-of-theart measurement procedures and equipment. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) has repeatedly demonstrated its capabilities in plutonium analysis and represents one of the few institutes that supplies plutonium IRMs worldwide. An inter-calibration campaign has been set up at IRMM inter-linking selected plutonium spike IRMs. In the scope of this compatibility study, new reference materials have been prepared for Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) in nuclear fuel cycle measurements. A new series of large-sized dried (LSD) spikes, IRMM- 1027n, has been prepared and certified for plutonium and uranium amount content and isotopic composition. These mixed

  14. Tailored graphitized soot as reference material for EC/OC measurement validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Popovicheva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The lack of standard reference materials for calibrating, troubleshooting and intercomparing techniques that measure the composition of black carbon, commonly referred to as soot, has been a major obstacle that hinders improved understanding of how climate and health is impacted by this ubiquitous component of the atmosphere. A different approach is offered here as a means of constructing precisely controlled material with fractions of organic carbon (OC on the surface of elemental carbon (EC whose structure reflects that of the combustion produced particles found in the atmosphere. The proposed soot reference material (SRM uses EC as a basis substrate for surface coatings of organic compounds that are representative of the main classes of organics identified in the coverage of soot produced by fossil fuel burning. A number of methods are used to demonstrate the quality and stability of the reference EC and SRM. Comparison of the nominal fraction of OC deposited on the EC substrate with the fraction measured with thermal/optical analysis (TOA shows excellent agreement. Application of this type of reference material for evaluating the different methods of carbon analysis may help resolve differences that currently exist between comparable measurement techniques when trying to separate OC and EC from ambient samples.

  15. Adaptable Holders for Arc-Jet Screening Candidate Thermal Protection System Repair Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Joe; Milhoan, Jim D.

    2010-01-01

    Reusable holders have been devised for evaluating high-temperature, plasma-resistant re-entry materials, especially fabrics. Typical material samples tested support thermal-protection-system damage repair requiring evaluation prior to re-entry into terrestrial atmosphere. These tests allow evaluation of each material to withstand the most severe predicted re-entry conditions.

  16. Instrumental neutron activation analysis for the certification of biological reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multielemental instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) method by short and long irradiation has been employed for the determination of 22 minor and trace constituents in two proposed Standard Reference Materials P-RBF and P-WBF from Institute of Radioecology and Applied Nuclear Techniques, Czechoslovakia. Also some biological standards such as Bowen's Kale, Cabbage leaves (Poland) including wheat and rice flour samples of local origin were analysed. It is suggested that INAA is an ideal method for the certification of reference materials of biological matrices. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab

  17. Preliminary rare earth determinations on 14 Brazilian and one Venezuelan reference geological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of 13 Rare Earth Elements (REE) in the 12 Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), 2 Centro de Tecnologia Mineral's (CETEM) and 1 Venezuelan geological reference materials were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Among the 15 analysed samples, the clays IPT-28, IPT-30 and IPT-42 are the only samples that have REE reported in the literature, and comparisons with our results were made. While the certified elements of these reference materials made them very valuable for laboratory control in mining and industry, their value could be greatly enhanced if trace elements data of geochemical interest were available. (author)

  18. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  19. Preparation and characterization of a Perna perna (Linnaeus, 1758) mussel reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of certified reference materials in chemical analysis is an important requirement in quality assurance systems, as it allows the validation of analytical methods and the realization of the metrological traceability of results. Then, it is possible to obtain valid and comparable results not only in space, but also in time. In this study, all the steps for the preparation of a national mussel reference material were attained, from the collection of the bulk material to processing steps such as freeze-drying, grinding, bottling and sterilization. Internationally accepted principles were applied for the homogeneity and stability assessment of the material, using instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry as analytical techniques. By means of a collaborative program with participation of Brazilian and foreign laboratories, the chemical characterization of the material was performed. Element content in the mass percentage to mg kg-1 range was determined for 47 elements and some radionuclides, naturally present in the material. With the application of suitable statistical treatment to the data, it was considered that the content of 11 of those elements may be certified: As, Ca, Cl, Co, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Se, Th and Zn. This study may be considered an important step in the national metrological development, as it shows that the production and characterization of biological reference materials, mussel in particular, is feasible in Brazil, as a tool for quality assurance of environmental and nutritional studies performed in the country. (author)

  20. Assessment of international reference materials for isotope-ratio analysis (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the number of international measurement standards for anchoring stable isotope delta scales has mushroomed from 3 to more than 30, expanding to more than 25 chemical elements. With the development of new instrumentation, along with new and improved measurement procedures for studying naturally occurring isotopic abundance variations in natural and technical samples, the number of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials with a specified delta value has blossomed in the last six decades to more than 150 materials. More than half of these isotopic reference materials were produced for isotope-delta measurements of seven elements: H, Li, B, C, N, O, and S. The number of isotopic reference materials for other, heavier elements has grown considerably over the last decade. Nevertheless, even primary international measurement standards for isotope-delta measurements are still needed for some elements, including Mg, Fe, Te, Sb, Mo, and Ge. It is recommended that authors publish the delta values of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials that were used for anchoring their measurement results to the respective primary stable isotope scale.

  1. Reference material for natural radionuclides in glass designed for underground experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reference material designed for the determination of natural radionuclides in solid samples (glass pellets) is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 7 natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 235U and 238U). An information value is given for 210Pb. Radon (222Rn) emanation experiments showed results comparable within participating laboratories, however, the number of data and precision was too low to carry out a certification process. The reference material may be used for quality management of analytical laboratories engaged in the high-sensitive analysis of radionuclides in the construction materials of detectors placed in ultra low background underground laboratories. (author)

  2. Reference material for natural radionuclides in glass designed for underground experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Povinec, P P; Busto, J; Cerna, C; Degering, D; Hamajima, Y; Holy, K; Hult, M; Jeskovsky, M; Koehler, M; Kovacik, A; Laubenstein, M; Loaiza, P; Mamedov, F; Marquet, C; Mott, J; Mullerova, M; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Reyss, J -L; Saakyan, R; Simgen, H; Soule, B; Stanicek, J; Sykora, I; Stekl, I

    2015-01-01

    A reference material designed for the determination of natural radionuclides in solid samples (glass pellets) is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 7 natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 235U and 238U). An information value is given for 210Pb. Radon (222Rn) emanation experiments showed results comparable within participating laboratories, however, the number of data and precision was too low to carry out a certification process. The reference material may be used for quality management of analytical laboratories engaged in the high-sensitive analysis of radionuclides in the construction materials of detectors placed in ultra low background underground laboratories.

  3. Testing of IAEA standard reference materials by Research and Development Institute, Czechoslovak Uranium Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute have partaken of attestations for a number of years. It has thus obtained a number of reference materials and could completely test the accuracy of the analytical methods used. The materials being tested included uranium and thorium ores, milk, whey, sea sediments and algae. The methods used included X-ray fluorescence analysis, high resolution gamma spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, radiometric methods. Uranium was determined by spectrophotometry using Arsenazo III. (M.D.). 2 tabs., 17 refs

  4. Reference material for natural radionuclides in glass designed for underground experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Povinec, P.; PHAM M. K.; Busto, J.; Cerna, C.; Degering, D.; Y. Hamajima; Holy, K.; Hult, Mikael; Jeskovsky, M.; Koehler, M; Kovacik, A.; Laubenstein, Matthias; Loaiza, P.; Mamedov, F.; Marquet, C.

    2015-01-01

    A reference material designed for the determination of natural radionuclides in solid samples (glass pellets) is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 7 natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 235U and 238U). An information value is given for 210Pb. Radon (222Rn) emanation experiments showed results comparable within participating laboratories, however, the number of data and precision was too low to carry out a certifica...

  5. Material Deprivation, Economic Stress and Reference Groups in Europe: An Analysis of EU-SILC2009

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Christopher T.; Bertrand Maître

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we take advantage of the recent availability of data from the special module on material deprivation in the 2009 European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between material deprivation and economic stress, the mediating role played by cross-national differences in levels of income and income inequality and the implications for competing perspectives on the nature of reference groups in Eur...

  6. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  7. Reference material for radionuclides in sediment IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povinec, P.P.; Pham, M.K.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.;

    2007-01-01

    A reference material designed for the determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment), is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 8 radionuclides (K-40, Co-60, Eu-155, Th-230, U-238, ...... management of radioanalytical laboratories engaged in the analysis of radionuclides in the environment, as well as for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. The material is available from IAEA in 100 g units.......A reference material designed for the determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment), is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 8 radionuclides (K-40, Co-60, Eu-155, Th-230, U-238, Pu......-238, Pu239+240 and Am-241). Information values are given for 12 radionuclides (Sr-90, Cs-137, Pb-210 (Po-210), Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-232, U-234, U-235, Pu-239, Pu-240 and Pu-241). Less reported radionuclides include Th-228, U-236, Np-239 and Pu-242. The reference material may be used for quality...

  8. Collection of radiation irradiation study reports for the candidate materials and instruments in the J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the collected reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials and instruments to be used in the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility, J-PARC. The examinations were executed at the gamma-ray irradiation facility in JAEA Takasaki Institute. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. This report shows the subject of the instruments or the materials in the J-PARC facility, the theme of the irradiation study, the results of examination and the selected decision of the policy for usage. (author)

  9. Combating illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive material. Reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is intended for individuals and organizations that may be called upon to deal with the detection of and response to criminal or unauthorized acts involving nuclear or other radioactive material. It will also be useful for legislators, law enforcement agencies, government officials, technical experts, lawyers, diplomats and users of nuclear technology. This manual emphasizes the international initiatives for improving the security of nuclear and other radioactive material. However, it is recognized that effective measures for controlling the transfer of equipment, non-nuclear material, technology or information that may assist in the development of nuclear explosive devices, improvised nuclear devices (INDs) or other radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) are important elements of an effective nuclear security system. In addition, issues of personal integrity, inspection and investigative procedures are not discussed in this manual, all of which are essential elements for an effective overall security system. The manual considers a variety of elements that are recognized as being essential for dealing with incidents of criminal or unauthorized acts involving nuclear and other radioactive material. Depending on conditions in a specific State, including its legal and governmental infrastructure, some of the measures discussed will need to be adapted to suit that State's circumstances. However, much of the material can be applied directly in the context of other national programmes. This manual is divided into four main parts. Section 2 discusses the threat posed by criminal or unauthorized acts involving nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as the policy and legal bases underlying the international effort to restrain such activities. Sections 3 and 4 summarize the major international undertakings in the field. Sections 5-8 provide some basic technical information on radiation, radioactive material, the health consequences of radiation

  10. Development of a mushroom powder Certified Reference Material for calcium, arsenic, cadmium and lead measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gina; Sim, Lay Peng; Ng, Sin Yee; Ding, Yi; Shin, Richard Y C; Lee, Tong Kooi

    2016-01-01

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry and standard addition techniques were developed for the analysis of four elements (Ca, As, Cd and Pb) in a mushroom powder material. Results from the validated methods were compared to those of other national metrology institutes in the CCQM-K89 intercomparisons and the results were in excellent agreement with the reference values. The same methods were then used for the assignment of reference values to a mushroom powder Certified Reference Material (CRM). The certified values obtained for Ca, As, Cd and Pb were 1.444 ± 0.099 mg/g, 5.61 ± 0.59 mg/kg, 1.191 ± 0.079 mg/kg and 5.23 ± 0.94 mg/kg, respectively. The expanded measurement uncertainties were obtained by combining the uncertainty contributions from characterization (uchar) and between-bottle homogeneity (ubb). PMID:26212973

  11. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials FY 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Xie, YuLong; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wang, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    This annual report presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Dr. Fei Gao. This project is divided into three tasks, namely (1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; (2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and (3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonlinearity, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the findings and insights obtained in each of these three tasks are provided in this report. Additionally, papers published this fiscal year or currently in review are included in Appendix together with presentations given this fiscal year.

  12. Preparation of two uranium glass reference materials for fission-track dating of geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Commission produced and certified uranium glass for fission-track dating in 1996 (Reference Material IRMM-540). This material is now out of stock and a project for the preparation of two new reference glasses is underway. The new glasses, containing nominally 15 and 55 mg kg-1 uranium, were prepared from blended oxide powder, and cast using an improved method, which minimised micro-scale defects and optimised the yield. Glass rods were produced which were then cut into discs of 2 mm thickness and 15 mm diameter and subsequently polished. Uranium homogeneity and fission-track stability are critical properties of the glass. An extensive study was carried out to verify the homogeneity by fission-track counting, investigating both within-disc and between disc effects, and to investigate potential track fading due to thermal annealing. No evidence of uranium heterogeneity was detected. The stability study, using an 'isochronous' method, in which all measurements are made at the end of exposure to artificial ageing, is still underway. The reference material will be certified for isotopic composition (natural), uranium mass fraction and neutron fluence (one disc out of each set of three will be irradiated, together with a mica foil, to induce fission tracks in a certified fluence). The reference materials will be released as IRMM-540R (15 mg kg-1 U) and IRMM-541 (55 mg kg-1 U)

  13. Elemental determinations in NBS 1633A Fly Ash Standard Reference material using INAA PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, J.R.; Schlegel, S.C. (Missouri Univ., Columbia (USA). Research Reactor Facility)

    1985-02-01

    INAA was used for the determination of 23 elements, and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for the determination of 10 elements in U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) 1633A Fly Ash Standard Reference Material. The results are in excellent agreement with the limited number of NBS certified values available.

  14. Intercomparison of enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of an intercomparison exercise organized by the IAEA during the latter part of 1988 and 1989. Data are presented for 13 different kinds of enriched stable isotope reference material containing 2H, 13C, 15N and 18O. Results were submitted by forty participants in twenty countries. 2 refs, 13 figs, 18 tabs

  15. Use of gelatin gels as a reference material for performance evaluation of meat shear force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Establishing standards for meat tenderness based on Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) is complicated by the lack of methods for certifying WBSF testing among texture systems or laboratories. The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of using gelatin gels as a reference material ...

  16. QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF REFERENCE MATERIALS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF NUTRIENTS IN FOODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a critical role in validating the accuracy of analytical data and have been used extensively in the USDA's ongoing National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program (NFNAP), which generates contract analytical food composition data for inclusion in the USDA Nation...

  17. Determination of trace elements in standard reference materials by the ko-standardization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ko-standardization method is suitable for routine multielement determinations by reactor neutron activation analysis (NAA). Investigation of NIST standard reference materials SRM 1571 Orchard Leaves, SRM 1572 Citrus leaves, and SRM 1573 Tomato Leaves showed the systematic error of 12 certified elements determined to be less than 8%. Thirty-four elements were determined in NIST proposed SRM 1515 Apple Leaves

  18. Future needs and requirements for AMS C-14 standards and reference materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, EM; Boaretto, E; Bryant, C; Cook, GT; Gulliksen, S; Harkness, DD; Heinemeier, J; McGee, E; Naysmith, P; Possnert, G; van der Plicht, H; van Strydonck, M; Cook, Gordon T.

    2004-01-01

    C-14 measurement uses a number of standards and reference materials with different properties. Historically the absolute calibration of C-14 measurement was tied to 1890 wood, through the 'primary' standard of NBS-OxI (produced by the National Bureau of Standards, now NIST - National Institute of St

  19. The preparation of a reference material of South African zirconium concentrate from Richards Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the preparation of a South African zirconium concentrate as an inernational reference material. The procedure for the selection of preferred values is outlined. Eleven laboratories contributed to the analytical programme, and 7 elements have been asssigned preferred values

  20. Doorways III: Teacher Reference Materials. On School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). This booklet, "Doorways III: Teacher Reference Materials on School-Related…

  1. Instrumental neutron and photon activation analyses of selected geochemical reference materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 284, č. 1 (2010), s. 157-163. ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130706 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : neutron activation analysis * photon activation analysis * geochemical reference materials Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.777, year: 2010

  2. DIRECT CALIBRATION OF GC/MS SYSTEMS USING SRM (STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL) GAS CYLINDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cryogenic trapping system has been developed for use in calibrating GC/MS systems for the analysis of volatile organic compounds. This system provides for direct Standard Reference Material (SRM) traceability on data generated on gaseous samples. The cryogenic trap is a coil of...

  3. Compilation of elemental concentration data for NBS Biological and Environmental Standard Reference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentration data on up to 76 elementals in 19 NBS Standard Reference Materials have been collected from 325 journal articles and technical reports. These data are summarized into mean +- one standard deviation values and compared with available data from NBS and other review articles. Data are presented on the analytical procedures employed and all raw data are presented in appendixes

  4. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  5. In situ corrosion studies on candidate container materials for the underground disposal of high level radioactive waste in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK·CEN has developed in the early 1980's, with the support of NIRAS/ONDRAF and EC, an extensive in situ corrosion program to evaluate the long-term corrosion behavior of various candidate container materials for the disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. The in situ corrosion experiments were performed in the underground research facility, HADES, situated in the Boom Clay formation at a depth of 225 meters below ground level. These experiments place the samples either in direct contact with clay (type I), in a humid clay atmosphere (type 2), or in a concrete saturated clay atmosphere (type 3). During the period 1985--1994, twelve in situ corrosion experiments were installed in the underground laboratory. The exploitation of these experiments ended in 1996. All samples were recuperated and analyzed. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the type 1 corrosion experiments (samples in direct contact with Boom Clay). Surface analyses tend to indicate that the so-called corrosion-resistant materials, e.g. stainless steels, Ni- and Ti-alloys, remain intact after exposure to Boom Clay between 16 and 170 C, whereas carbon steel presents significant pitting corrosion. Carbon steel seems to be unsuitable for the Belgian repository concept (pits up to 240microm deep are detected after direct exposure to the argillaceous environment for 2 years at 90 C). The stainless steels look very promising candidate container materials

  6. Search for a circum-planetary material and orbital period variations of short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Z; Budaj, J; Stellingwerf, R F

    2014-01-01

    A unique short-period Mercury-size Kepler exoplanet candidate KIC012557548b has been discovered recently by Rappaport et al. (2012). This object is a transiting disintegrating exoplanet with a circum-planetary material - comet-like tail. Close-in exoplanets, like KIC012557548b, are subjected to the greatest planet-star interactions. This interaction may have various forms. In certain cases it may cause formation of the comet-like tail. Strong interaction with the host star, and/or presence of an additional planet may lead to variations in the orbital period of the planet. Our main aim is to search for comet-like tails similar to KIC012557548b and for long-term orbital period variations. We are curious about frequency of comet-like tail formation among short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates. We concentrate on a sample of 20 close-in candidates with a period similar to KIC012557548b from the Kepler mission.

  7. Thermal characteristics of non-edible oils as phase change materials candidate to application of air conditioning chilled water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad, M.; Indartono, Y. S.; Suwono, A.; Pasek, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    The addition of phase change material in the secondary refrigerant has been able to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioning systems in chilled water system. This material has a high thermal density because its energy is stored as latent heat. Based on material melting and freezing point, there are several non-edible oils that can be studied as a phase change material candidate for the application of chilled water systems. Forests and plantations in Indonesia have great potential to produce non-edible oil derived from the seeds of the plant, such as; Calophyllum inophyllum, Jatropha curcas L, and Hevea braziliensis. Based on the melting temperature, these oils can further studied to be used as material mixing in the secondary refrigerant. Thermal characteristics are obtained from the testing of T-history, Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) and thermal conductivity materials. Test results showed an increase in the value of the latent heat when mixed with water with the addition of surfactant. Thermal characteristics of each material of the test results are shown completely in discussion section of this article.

  8. Certification of a plutonium dioxide reference material for elemental analyses (EC-NRM 210)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new EC plutonium reference material is made available in the form of 5g samples of plutonium dioxide powder. Before weighing the material must be calcined at 1 2500C for two hours. The plutonium content (880.26 ± 0.44) g.kg-1 has been derived from plutonium measurements performed by three different laboratories each applying a different oxydo-reductive method. The results of the plutonium measurement, the statistical evaluation of the uncertainty of the plutonium content together with information on the impurities present in the material are given in the report

  9. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  10. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the 230Th/234U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory procedures used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations. - Highlights: • A methodology for preparing uranium age dating reference material was validated. • Detailed laboratory procedures for uranium age dating are summarized. • The difficulties and further developments of uranium age dating are demonstrated

  11. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Nuclear Waste Container Materials in Repository Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua; J. Sarver; W. Mohn

    2001-11-08

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) have been proposed as the corrosion resistant materials for fabricating the waste package outer barrier and the drip shield, respectively for the proposed nuclear waste repository Yucca Mountain Project. In this work, the susceptibility of welded and annealed Alloy 22 (N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) to crevice corrosion was studied by the Multiple Crevice Assembly (ASTM G78) method combined with surface morphological observation after four and eight weeks of exposure to the Basic Saturated Water (BSW-12) in a temperature range from 60 to 105 C. The susceptibility of the materials to crevice corrosion was evaluated based on the appearance of crevice attack underneath the crevice formers and the weight loss data. The results showed that, after exposed to BSW-12 for four and eight weeks, no obvious crevice attack was observed on these materials. The descaled weight loss increased with the increase in temperature for all materials. The weight loss, however, is believed to be caused by general corrosion, rather than crevice corrosion. There was no significant difference between the annealed and welded materials either. On the other hand, to conclude that these materials are immune to crevice corrosion in BSW-12 will require longer term testing.

  12. Reference methods and materials. A programme of support for regional and global marine pollution assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes a programme of comprehensive support for regional and global marine pollution assessments developed by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and with the collaboration of a number of other United Nations Specialized agencies including the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO), the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). Two of the principle components of this programme, Reference Methods and Reference materials are given special attention in this document and a full Reference Method catalogue is included, giving details of over 80 methods currently available or in an advanced stage of preparation and testing. It is important that these methods are seen as a functional component of a much wider strategy necessary for assuring good quality and intercomparable data for regional and global pollution monitoring and the user is encouraged to read this document carefully before employing Reference Methods and Reference Materials in his/her laboratory. 3 figs

  13. Determination of operationally defined fractions of aluminium in reference materials and acid attacked environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the presented work is to evaluate the selectivity of the operationally defined procedures for the aluminium fractionation in the reference materials and the environmental samples affected by the mining activity. The combination of the sequential optimized BCR (European Commission Community Bureau of Reference) three-step, the single (H2O, CaCl2, Na2S2O4, NH4F (NH4)2C2O4, HCl, NTA, EDTA, DTPA) and the solid phase chelating ion-exchange extraction procedures was performed for the aluminium fractionation in the samples. The amount of the reactive Al determined by the solid phase extraction on the chelating resin Iontosorb Salicyl is the most important operationally defined fraction of aluminium from the aspect of its negative effects on the environment. The available Al concentrations obtained from the different operationally defined fractionation methods were compared. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for the aluminium quantification. The X-ray diffraction analyse of the samples was performed for the mineral composition determination. The precision, the repeatability and the accuracy for the all steps of the optimized BCR sequential extraction procedure were checked on six reference materials (SRM 2710, RSS SO-2, RSS SO-4, CRM SA-B, SRM RTH 912, CRM 025-050). The precision and the repeatability were very good with the R.S.D. values 11%. The fraction specific accuracy was excellent. The new indicative fractional Al values in the used reference materials are published

  14. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials: FY 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.

    2014-10-01

    This annual reports presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project is divided into three tasks: 1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; 2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and 3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonproportionality, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the three tasks is provided in this Annual Report. Furthermore, peer-reviewed articles published this FY or currently under review and presentations given this FY are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. Localized corrosion of a candidate container material for high-level nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localized corrosion is one of the important considerations in the design of metallic containers used for the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. This paper addresses the effect of environmental factors on the localized corrosion behavior of alloy 825, one of the candidate alloys for containers in the Yucca Mountain repository site. A two-level, full factorial experimental design was used to examine the main effects and interactions of chloride, sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, and temperature. This was augmented by additional experiments involving chloride and temperature at several levels. Cyclic, potentiodynamic polarization tests were used to determine the relative susceptibility of the alloy to localized corrosion. Crevice corrosion was detected at chloride levels as low as 20 ppm, and both pitting and crevice corrosion were observed at higher chloride levels. Among the environmental factors, chloride and sulfate were found to be promoters of localized corrosion, while nitrate and fluoride were inhibitors of localized corrosion. The experiments indicated that the electrochemical parameters (e.g., pitting potential, repassivation potential, or the difference between them) were not sufficient indicators of localized corrosion. Instead, the visual observation and electrochemical parameters were combined into an index, termed localized corrosion index (LCI), to quantify the extent of localized corrosion

  16. Relativistic electron gas: A candidate for nature's left-handed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, C. A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The electric permittivities and magnetic permeabilities for a relativistic electron gas are calculated from quantum electrodynamics at finite temperature and density as functions of temperature, chemical potential, frequency, and wave vector. The polarization and the magnetization depend linearly on both electric and magnetic fields, and are the sum of a zero-temperature and zero-density vacuum part with a temperature- and chemical-potential-dependent medium part. Analytic calculations lead to generalized expressions that depend on three scalar functions. In the nonrelativistic limit, results reproduce the Lindhard formula. In the relativistic case, and in the long wavelength limit, we obtain the following: (i) for ω =0 , generalized susceptibilities that reduce to known nonrelativistic limits; (ii) for ω ≠0 , Drude-type responses at zero temperature. The latter implies that both the electric permittivity ɛ and the magnetic permeability μ may be simultaneously negative, a behavior characteristic of metamaterials. This unambiguously indicates that the relativistic electron gas is one of nature's candidates for the realization of a negative index of refraction system. Moreover, Maxwell's equations in the medium yield the dispersion relation and the index of refraction of the electron gas. Present results should be relevant for plasma physics, astrophysical observations, synchrotrons, and other environments with fast-moving electrons.

  17. Spectral emissivity measurements of candidate materials for very high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G.; Weber, S.J.; Martin, S.O.; Anderson, M.H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K., E-mail: kumars@cae.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, T.R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Heat dissipation by radiation is an important consideration in VHTR components, particularly the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), because of the fourth power temperature dependence of radiated heat. Since emissivity is the material property that dictates the ability to radiate heat, measurements of emissivities of materials that are being specifically considered for the construction of VHTR become important. Emissivity is a surface phenomenon and therefore compositional, structural, and topographical changes that occur at the surfaces of these materials as a result of their interactions with the environment at high temperatures will alter their emissivities. With this background, an experimental system for the measurement of spectral emissivity has been designed and constructed. The system has been calibrated in conformance with U.S. DoE quality assurance standards using inert ceramic materials, boron nitride, silicon carbide, and aluminum oxide. The results of high temperature emissivity measurements of potential VHTR materials such as ferritic steels SA 508, T22, T91 and austenitic alloys IN 800H, Haynes 230, IN 617, and 316 stainless steel have been presented.

  18. Spectral emissivity measurements of candidate materials for very high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat dissipation by radiation is an important consideration in VHTR components, particularly the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), because of the fourth power temperature dependence of radiated heat. Since emissivity is the material property that dictates the ability to radiate heat, measurements of emissivities of materials that are being specifically considered for the construction of VHTR become important. Emissivity is a surface phenomenon and therefore compositional, structural, and topographical changes that occur at the surfaces of these materials as a result of their interactions with the environment at high temperatures will alter their emissivities. With this background, an experimental system for the measurement of spectral emissivity has been designed and constructed. The system has been calibrated in conformance with U.S. DoE quality assurance standards using inert ceramic materials, boron nitride, silicon carbide, and aluminum oxide. The results of high temperature emissivity measurements of potential VHTR materials such as ferritic steels SA 508, T22, T91 and austenitic alloys IN 800H, Haynes 230, IN 617, and 316 stainless steel have been presented.

  19. Preparation and characterization of standard reference material 1849 infant/adult nutritional formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Katherine E; Lindstrom, Richard M; Nelson, Bryant C; Phinney, Karen W; Rimmer, Catherine A; Sander, Lane C; Schantz, Michele M; Spatz, Rabia O; Thomas, Jeanice Brown; Turk, Gregory C; Wise, Stephen A; Wood, Laura J; Yen, James H

    2010-01-01

    Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1849 Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula has been issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as a replacement for SRM 1846 Infant Formula, issued in 1996. Extraction characteristics of SRM 1846 have changed over time, as have NIST's analytical capabilities. While certified mass fraction values were provided for five constituents in SRM 1846 (four vitamins plus iodine), certified mass fraction values for 43 constituents are provided in SRM 1849 (fatty acids, elements, and vitamins) and reference mass fraction values are provided for an additional 43 constituents including amino acids and nucleotides, making it the most extensively characterized food-matrix SRM available from NIST. PMID:20922961

  20. Fe-Au and Fe-Ag composites as candidates for biodegradable stent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Jian; Bian, Dong; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-02-01

    In this study, Fe-Ag and Fe-Au composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy using spark plasma sintering. Their microstructures, mechanical properties, and biocorrosion behavior were investigated by using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, environment scanning electronic microscopy, compressive test, electrochemical measurements, and immersion tests. Microstructure characterization indicated that the as-sintered iron-based materials obtained much finer grains than that of as-cast pure iron. Phase analysis showed that the Fe-Ag composites were composed of α-Fe and pure Ag phases, and Fe-Au composites consisted of α-Fe and Au phases. Compressive test showed that the improved mechanical strengths were obtained in as-sintered iron-based materials, among which the Fe-5 wt %Ag exhibited the best mechanical properties. The electrochemical and immersion tests revealed that the addition of Ag and Au could increase the corrosion rate of the iron matrix and change the corrosion mode into more uniform one. Based on the results of cytotoxicity evaluation, it was found that all the experimental material extracts performed no significant toxicity on the L-929 cells and EA. hy-926 cells, whereas a considerable inhibition on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells was observed. The hemocompatibility tests showed that the hemolysis of all the experimental materials was within the range of 5%, which is the criteria value of biomaterials with good hemocomaptibility. The amount of platelet adhered on the surface of as-sintered iron-based materials was lower than that of as-cast pure iron, and the morphology of platelets kept smoothly spherical on the surface of all the experimental materials. PMID:25727071

  1. Effects of surface condition on the corrosion of candidate structural materials in a simulated HTGR-GT environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment was used to study the effects of surface finish conditions on the subsequent elevated-temperature corrosion behavior of key candidate structural materials. The environment contained helium with 500 μatm H2/50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH4/2O at 9000C with total test exposure durations of 3000 hours. Specimens with lapped, grit-blasted, pickled, and preoxidized surface conditions were studied. Materials tested included two cast superalloys, IN 100 and IN 713LC; one centrifugally cast high-temperature alloy, HK 40 one oxice-dispersion-strengthened alloy, Inconel MA 754; and three wrought high-temperature alloys, Hastelloy Alloy X, Inconel Alloy 617, and Alloy 800H

  2. Development of a new sodium diclofenac certified reference material using the mass balance approach and ¹H qNMR to determine the certified property value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Raquel; Garrido, Bruno C; Borges, Ricardo M; Silva, Gisele E B; Queiroz, Suzane M; Cunha, Valnei S

    2013-02-14

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) are essential tools to guarantee the metrological traceability of measurement results to the International System of Units (SI), which means the accuracy and comparability of results over time and space. In the pharmaceutical area, only a few CRMs are available and the use of (non-certified) reference materials is a much more common practice. In this paper, the studies on a new candidate CRM of sodium diclofenac based on the ISO Guides 34:2009 and 35:2005 are described. The project steps included characterization, homogeneity test, stability studies, and uncertainties estimation. In the characterization, the mass fractions of organic, inorganic, and volatile impurities were determined, and the results were cross-checked by independent reference methods or interlaboratorial study. The API mass fraction was calculated by mass balance and cross-checked by quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H qNMR). The paper also presents a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the measurement uncertainty as an approach to validate the GUM results in ¹H qNMR. The homogeneity between batch units was verified, and the candidate CRM stability under transport and storage conditions was evaluated in short- and long-term stability studies. The CRM certified property value and corresponding expanded uncertainty, obtained from the combined standard uncertainty multiplied by the coverage factor (k=2), for a confidence level of 95%, was (999.76+0.10) mg g⁻¹. PMID:23220339

  3. A new candidate as the cathode material for intermediate and low temperature SOFCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song; SUN Xueli; WEN Zhongsheng; SUN Juncai

    2006-01-01

    In order to develop the new cathode materials suitable for intermediate and low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT/LTSOFCs), LaNi1-xFexO3(x=0.4-0.8) (LNF) materials were synthesized using coprecipitation method. Their structures and morphologies were investigated by XRD and SEM, and their electronic conductivities at different temperatures were measured by dc four terminal method. Fuel cells were fabricated to evaluate the electrochemical properties of the LNF materials as cathodes at different temperatures. The performance of 450-497 mW·cm-2 was obtained in the temperature region of 580-650 ℃ for the LaNi0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode, and of 209-227 mW·cm-2 at 400-500 ℃ for the LaNi0.4Fe0.6O3. The excellent fuel cell performances indicate that the LNF materials are good cathodes for IT/LTSOFCs.

  4. Present status and strategic plan for the stable isotope reference materials at the IAEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assonov, Sergey; Groening, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    The presentation will give the overview of the stable isotope reference materials (SI-RMs) under distribution by the IAEA, its stable isotope laboratory and capacities related to material testing & production as well as future plans. Historically, most of the IAEA reference materials were produced and made available via collaborations with expert stable isotope laboratories worldwide. The IAEA plans include several directions as follows: • Maintaining the scale-defining SI-RMs at the highest level and introducing adequate replacements when needed; • Monitoring existing SI-RMs for any potential alteration(s) and of isotopic values assigned; • Identifying and then addressing the needs for new SI-RMs, with the priority to address the most critical applications (environmental and climate related applications, human health, food safety studies) and newly emerging analytical isotope techniques; • Performing all measurements aimed for characterisation of new SI-RMs and the corresponding uncertainty evaluation in accordance to the latest metrological concepts; • Promoting metrological approaches on traceability and uncertainty evaluation in every day practice of stable isotope measurements; • Expanding the IAEA capacities for SI-RMs by (i) planning a renewed laboratory at IAEA; (ii) enlarging collaboration with expert laboratories aimed to help IAEA in production and characterisation of new SI-RMs. These major directions will help to address the increasing demand for Stable Isotope Reference Materials.

  5. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Introduction, history, and current candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is to evaluate Yucca Mountain for its suitability as a potential site for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been occupied for a number of years with developing and evaluating the performance of waste packages for the potential repository. In recent years this work has been carried out under the guidance of and in collaboration with the Management and Operating contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., which in turn reports to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes the history of the selection and characterization of materials to be used in the engineered barrier system for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, describes the current candidate materials, presents a compilation of their properties, and summarizes available corrosion data and modeling. The term ''engineered materials'' is intended to distinguish those materials that are used as part of the engineered barrier system from the natural, geologic materials of the site

  6. Exploration of optical fibres as a carrier for new benzene and toluene matrix-free reference materials

    OpenAIRE

    Słomińska, Marta; Marć, Mariusz; Szczygelska-Tao, Jolanta; Konieczka, Piotr; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    To meet high expectations concerning precision and accuracy of reference materials, preparation of matrix-free reference materials using thermal decomposition-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) was proposed in this study. In the paper, the results obtained in preparation of the new reference materials for benzene and toluene are presented, based on the thermal decomposition technique of compounds chemically bound to the surface of optical fibre segments. The results obtained at v...

  7. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  8. Testing of candidate waste-package backfill and canister materials for basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) is developing a multiple-barrier waste package to contain high-level nuclear waste as part of an overall system (e.g., waste package, repository sealing system, and host rock) designed to isolate the waste in a repository located in basalt beneath the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The three basic components of the waste package are the waste form, the canister, and the backfill. An extensive testing program is under way to determine the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of potential canister and backfill materials. The data derived from this testing program will be used to recommend those materials that most adequately perform the functions assigned to the canister and backfill

  9. Composition and long-term safety of salt deposits as candidate sites for toxic material dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the evaluation of the long-term safety of toxic material dumps in salt bodies, it is necessary to understand also the potential processes in the rock and to evaluate their effects on the dump. The scientific fundamentals are observations on the geological situation as well as the mineralogical and chemical composition of the rock in which the dump is planned to be constructed. Knowledge on the existing geological, mineralogical and physico-chemical conditions of formation and transformation of evaporite allow a quantitative interpretation of mineral reactions and material transfers, which have taken place in the geological past. This working principle is independent of location. It is exemplarily applied to the Gorleben salt dome. (orig./DG)

  10. Inorganic material candidates to replace a metallic or non-metallic concrete containment liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal liners for concrete containments are generally organic or metals. They have to be able to inhibit radioactive leakage into the environment, but both types have shortcomings. The results of research to develop a better liner are published in this paper. The best material found was fibre-reinforced mortar. Of the fibres considered, steel, kevlar and glass were the best, each showing advantages and disadvantages. 1 ref., 9 tabs., 12 figs

  11. Systematic Study of Trace Radioactive Impurities in Candidate Construction Materials for EXO-200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, D.S.; Grinberg, P.; Weber, P.; Baussan, E.; Djurcic, Z.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Akimov, D.; Bellerive, A.; Bowcock, M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W.; Danilov, M.; DeVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolgolenko, A.; /Alabama U. /NRC-INMS /Neuchatel U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Maryland U. /UC, Irvine

    2007-10-24

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  12. Study of Clay Materials as Host Rock for Candidate of Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally some rock types such as crystalline, volcanic and clay materials have been using as host rock for radwaste disposal site. Objective of the paper is to completing the clays study for radwaste disposal through literature study which has related to information of clay. The characteristic of clay rocks, both physically and chemically has good potential for radwaste disposal site, due to this reason the clay rocks has been used for radwaste disposal in another countries. (author)

  13. A Straightforward and Automated Open Database Analysis as a First Sweep for Candidate Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Breternitz; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2015-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen is considered as the bottleneck in the implementation of portable fuel cell power generating systems. The necessary experimental studies to discover and develop appropriate storage materials are always time-limited. We discuss herein the approach of an uncomplicated and accessible computationally based analysis of database knowledge towards the identification of promising storage systems. The open access policy of the Crystallography Open Database (COD) invites researc...

  14. Systematic study of trace radioactive impurities in candidate construction materials for EXO-200

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, D S; Weber, P; Baussan, E; Djurcic, Z; Keefer, G; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Vuilleumier, J -L; Vuilleumier, J -M; Akimov, D; Bellerive, A; Bowcock, M; Breidenbach, M; Burenkov, A; Conley, R; Craddock, W; Danilov, M; DeVoe, R; Dixit, M; Dolgolenko, A; Ekchtout, I; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Flatt, B; Gratta, G; Green, M; Hall, C; Hall, K; Hallman, D; Hargrove, C; Herbst, R; Hodgson, J; Jeng, S; Kolkowitz, S; Kovalenko, A; Kovalenko, D; LePort, F; Mackay, D; Moe, M; Díez, M Montero; Neilson, R; Odian, A; O'Sullivan, K; Ounalli, L; Prescott, C Y; Rowson, P C; Schenker, D; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K; Smirnov, G; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Virtue, C; Wamba, K; Wodin, J

    2007-01-01

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  15. Tritium retention in candidate next-step protection materials: Engineering key issues and research requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although a considerable volume of valuable data on the behavior of tritium in beryllium and carbon-based armors exposed to hydrogenic fusion plasmas has been compiled over the past years both from operation of present-day tokamaks and from laboratory simulations, knowledge is far from being complete and tritium inventory predictions for these materials remain highly uncertain. In this paper the authors elucidate the main mechanisms responsible for tritium trapping and release in next step D-T tokamaks, as well as the applicability of some of the presently known database for design purposes. Due to their strong anticipated implications on the design, attention is focused mainly on codeposition and neutron damage effects. Some preliminary quantitative estimates are presented based on most recent experimental findings and latest modeling developments as well. The influence of important working conditions such as target temperature, loading particle fluxes, erosion and redeposition rates, as well as material characteristics such as the type of morphology of the protection material (i.e., amorphous plasma-sprayed beryllium vs. solid forms), and design dependent parameters are discussed in this paper. Remaining issues which require additional effort are identified

  16. Tritium retention in candidate next-step protection materials: engineering key issues and research requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although a considerable volume of valuable data on the behaviour of tritium in beryllium and carbon-based armours exposed to hydrogenic fusion plasmas has been compiled over the past years both from operation of present-day tokamaks and from laboratory simulations, knowledge is far from complete and tritium inventory predictions for these materials remain highly uncertain. In this paper we elucidate the main mechanisms responsible for tritium trapping and release in next-step D-T tokamaks, as well as the applicability of some of the presently known data bases for design purposes. Owing to their strong anticipated implications on tritium uptake and release, attention is focused mainly on the interaction of tritium with neutron damage induced defects, on tritium codeposition with eroded carbon and on the effects of oxide and surface contaminants. Some preliminary quantitative estimates are presented based on most recent experimental findings and latest modelling developments as well. The influence of important working conditions such as target temperature, loading particle fluxes, erosion and redeposition rates, as well as material characteristics such as the type of morphology of the protection material (i.e. amorphous plasma-sprayed beryllium vs. solid forms), and design dependent parameters are discussed in this paper. Remaining issues which require additional effort are identified. (orig.)

  17. Standard guide for preparation of working reference materials for use in analysis of nuclear fuel cycle materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the preparation and characterization of working reference materials (WRM) that are produced by a laboratory for its own use in the analysis of nuclear materials. Guidance is provided for establishing traceability of WRMs to certified reference materials by a defined characterization process. The guidance provided is generic; it is not specific for a given material. 1.2 The information provided by this guide is found in the following sections: Section Planning 6 Preparation 7 Packaging and Storage 8 Characterization 9 Statistical Analysis 10 Documentation 11 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Albedo calculations for candidate fusion reactor materials used in the inboard side of a compact tokamak reactor and the effects of using such materials on the tritium breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the total neutron albedo and associated energy distributions for 10 candidate fusion reactor materials have been calculated. The angular distributions of reflected neutrons for monodirectional 14.1 MeV neutrons incident on slabs of Pb, Be, and W are presented and the dependence of albedo on neutron energy and incident angle has been investigated. Finally, the impact on the tritium breeding of the outboard blanket of the choice of material used in the inboard side of the reactor has been assessed. Tritium breeding ratio (TBR) calculations have shown the inadequacy of the neutron albedo concept in predicting the impact of inboard materials on the TBR of the reactor. (author)

  19. Analysis of soil reference materials for vanadium(+5) species by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) with known vanadium(+5) content are currently not commercially available. Because of this, vanadium species have been determined in solid CRMs of soil, viz. CRM023-50, CRM024-50, CRM049-50, SQC001 and SQC0012. These CRMs are certified with only total vanadium content. Vanadium(+5) was extracted from soil reference materials with 0.1 M Na2CO3. The quantification of V(+5) was carried out by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). The concentration of V(+5) in the analyzed CRMs was found to be ranging between 3.60 and 86.0 μg g-1. It was also found that SQC001 contains approximately 88% of vanadium as V(+5) species. Statistical evaluation of the results of the two methods by paired t-test was in good agreement at 95% level of confidence.

  20. Applicability of microwave digestion for analysis of elements in certified reference material by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality of an analysis is contingent by several factors such as analysis method, equipment performance, standard preparation, sample preparation, staff competency and environmental condition. One of other major factor that also contributes to the quality of analysis results is the sample pre-treatment. In this study, sample pretreatment is involving digestion process of certified reference material using microwave oven whilst elemental analysis (Ba, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Ti) was done by Inductively Couple Plasma - Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The applicability of the analytical method is confirmed by analysis results of the certified reference material (CRM). The results showed that the recovery of the elements of the CRM is 65% to 133% with Z-score value of -1.63 to 1.67. (Author)

  1. The production and certification of a plutonium equal-atom reference material: NBL CRM 128

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design, production, and certification of the New Brunswick Laboratory plutonium equal-atom certified reference material (CRM), NBL CRM 128. The primary use of this CRM is for the determination of bias corrections encountered in the operation of a mass spectrometer. This reference material is available to the US Department of Energy contractor-operated and government-operated laboratories, as well as to the international nuclear safeguards community. The absolute, or unbiased, certified value for the CRM's Pu-242/Pu-239 ratio is 1.00063 ± 0.00026 (95% confidence interval) as of October 1, 1984. This value was obtained through the quantitative blending of high-purity, chemically and isotopically characterized separated isotopes, as well as through intercomparisons of CRM samples with calibration mixtures using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. 32 tabs

  2. Determination of trace elements in NIES environmental reference materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of trace elements in environmental reference materials prepared by the National Institute for Environmental Studies of Japan (NIES) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Mussel, Human Hair, Tea Leaves and Sargasso reference material samples (ca. 150∼1200 mg) were irradiated by thermal neutron without cadmium filter and epithermal neutron with cadmium filter at Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITRR). The activated samples were measured by three methods; conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, anticoincidence counting spectrometry and coincidence counting spectrometry. The γ-ray spectrometric system (GAMA system) was developed by the authors. As a result, they could determined about 30 - 50 elements by the combination of these irradiation and counting methods. The analyzed values were in good agreement with NIES certified values

  3. Prompt gamma activation analysis of boron in reference materials using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron concentrations were analyzed for standard reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The measurements were performed at the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility installed at Hanaro, the research reactor of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The facility uses a diffracted polychromatic beam with a neutron flux of 7.9 x 107 n/cm2 s. Elemental sensitivity for boron was calibrated from the prompt gamma-ray spectra of boric acid samples containing 2-45 μg boron. The sensitivity of 2131 cps/mg-B was obtained from the linearity of the boron peak count rate versus the boron mass. The detection limit for boron was estimated to be 67 ng from an empty sample bag spectrum for a counting time of 10,000 s. The measured boron concentrations for standard reference materials showed good consistency with the certified or information values

  4. The preparation and analysis of minerals for use as reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the progress made in the collection of the material for reference samples, and the five interlaboratory analytical programmes (ferrochromium slags, fluorspar, 'mixed' NIMROC samples, rare earths, and ferromanganese slags). The description of the internal analytical programme has been subdivided into eight main categories, and a comprehensive list of evaluated results covering a wide range of materials is included. Additional results for thorium, rare earths, tin, tantalum, and niobium for the appropriate reference samples are included in updated tables. The main purpose in the preparation of these samples is to provide control samples for analytical work at the National Institute for Metallurgy. Where there is a special need, limited quantities of the samples can be made available to other laboratories

  5. Certified reference materials for analytical quality control in neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical quality control in neutron activation analysis (NAA) requires the use of certified reference materials (CRM) in order to produce reliable analytical results. It is essential to evaluate the performance of NAA method when analyzing various sample matrices. Therefore, the CRM selected for an analysis should be suitable for the type of samples. There are many aspects such as concentration range, matrix match, sample size and uncertainty, which need to be considered when selecting a suitable CRM. Eventually, results of analysis of CRM were plotted into control charts in order to evaluate the qualify of the data. This is to ensure that the results are within the 95 % confidence interval as stipulated in the certificate of CRM. Thus, this article aims to discuss the uses of certified reference materials for quality control purposes in NAA involving various sample matrices. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the Community's research programme ''Nuclear measurements and reference materials'' (1980-1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A panel has evaluated the research programme ''Nuclear measurements and reference materials'' performed by JRC-Geel, CBNM (Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements) during the period 1980-85. Furthermore the panel has considered more general topics such as major facilities, staff and collaboration between JRC-Geel, CBNM and other organizations. Finally, the panel has discussed the future direction of the programme. The panel expressed its satisfaction with the scientific and technical quality of the work and recommended that JRC-Geel, CBNM should continue to play an important role in Europe in the fields of nuclear measurements and nuclear reference materials. The panel also recommended that the underlying research be strengthened and that the nuclear experience and expertise of JRC-Geel, CBNM be utilized for non-nuclear applications

  7. Development and certification of a coal fly ash certified reference material for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X; Xu, X; Cui, W; Xi, Z

    2001-08-01

    The development and certification of a coal fly ash certified reference material (CRM) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is described; this is the first natural matrix CRM for organic environmental analysis in China. The homogeneity and stability of this material have been tested by HPLC. The concentrations of several PAH were determined by use of two independent, different methods--solvent extraction-HPLC analysis with UV detection coupled with fluorescence detection (FLD) and solvent extraction, isolation with a silica column, and GC analysis with flame ionization detection (FID). Five certified values were determined: phenanthrene 7.1 +/- 2.6 microg g(-1), anthracene 2.0 +/- 0.8 microg g(-1), fluoranthene 7.4 +/- 1.9 microg g(-1), pyrene 7 +/- 2 microg g(-1), and benzo[a]pyrene 1.3 +/- 0.3 microg g(-1). Reference values for several other PAH are also suggested. PMID:11583083

  8. Multielement analysis of environmental reference materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of trace elements in environmental reference materials prepared by the National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan (NIES) and by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA (NIST) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). NIES CRM No. 5 Human Hair, No. 6 Mussel, No. 7 Tea Leaves, No. 8 Vehicle Exhaust Particulates, No. 9 Sargasso and No. 10 Rice Flour-unpolished samples (ca. 150 - 1200 mg) and NIST SRM 1632a Bituminous Coal, SRM 1635 Sub-bituminous Coal and SRM 1633a Coal Fly Ash samples (ca. 10 - 150 mg) were irradiated at the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITRR). Concentrations of 28 - 52 elements in these NIES and NIST environmental reference materials were determined by two irradiation methods and four γ-ray counting methods. The determined values were in good agreement with the NIES and NIST certified values. (author)

  9. Prompt gamma activation analysis of boron in reference materials using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, S. H.; Sun, G. M.; Choi, H. D.

    2004-01-01

    Boron concentrations were analyzed for standard reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The measurements were performed at the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility installed at Hanaro, the research reactor of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The facility uses a diffracted polychromatic beam with a neutron flux of 7.9 × 10 7 n/cm 2 s. Elemental sensitivity for boron was calibrated from the prompt gamma-ray spectra of boric acid samples containing 2-45 μg boron. The sensitivity of 2131 cps/mg-B was obtained from the linearity of the boron peak count rate versus the boron mass. The detection limit for boron was estimated to be 67 ng from an empty sample bag spectrum for a counting time of 10,000 s. The measured boron concentrations for standard reference materials showed good consistency with the certified or information values.

  10. Filling the AOAC triangle with food-matrix standard reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Katherine E; Greenberg, Robert R; Schantz, Michele M; Welch, Michael J; Wise, Stephen A; Ihnat, Milan

    2004-03-01

    Well-characterized reference materials are needed by laboratories in the food testing and nutrition communities to facilitate compliance with nutritional labeling laws, to provide traceability for food exports needed for acceptance in many foreign markets, and to improve the accuracy of nutrition information that is provided to assist consumers in making sound dietary choices. As a result of the enactment of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 and the Infant Formula Act of 1980, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a suite of food-matrix Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) characterized for nutrient concentrations. These include SRM 1544 Fatty Acids and Cholesterol in a Frozen Diet Composite, SRM 1546 Meat Homogenate, SRM 1548a Typical Diet, SRM 1566b Oyster Tissue, SRM 1846 Infant Formula, SRM 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, SRM 2383 Baby Food Composite, SRM 2384 Baking Chocolate, SRM 2385 Spinach, and SRM 2387 Peanut Butter. Many of these materials were developed at the request of the food industry to populate a nine-sectored fat-protein-carbohydrate triangle developed by AOAC International. With the completion of SRM 2387, SRMs representing each sector of the triangle are now available. These food-matrix reference materials are intended primarily for validation of analytical methods for the measurement of proximates, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and so on in foods of similar composition. They may also be used as "primary control materials" in the value-assignment of in-house, secondary, control materials to confirm accuracy as well as to establish traceability to NIST. PMID:14689156

  11. Applications of nuclear analytical techniques for multielement determination in reference materials and archaeological artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents applications of four nuclear analytical techniques namely INAA, PGNAA, PIGE and PIXE to ancient potteries as well as soil or sediment reference materials (RMs) obtained from IAEA. The methods are non-destructive in nature and capable of determining multi-elements at major to trace concentration levels. Methods have been applied to three clay potteries and two IAEA RMs namely Soil-7 and SL-3. (author)

  12. Reference Material Development for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxins and Associated Analytical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Food poisoning incidences relating to marine biotoxins are a global phenomenon and have the potential to severely impact the aquaculture industry. As a result, and as a legislative requirement in the European Union (EU), many countries have implemented monitoring programmes for these compounds but their success relies on the availability of certain quality assurance tools, two of which are reference materials (RMs) and proficiency testing. The limited amounts of RMs, in particular matrix cert...

  13. The NIMROC reference materials: revised values for thorium, yttrium, lanthanum, and the rare-earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives all the analytical results submitted by the contributing laboratories before July 1983 for thorium, yttrium, lanthanum, and the rare-earth elements in the six NIMROC reference materials (SARM 1 to 6), which were prepared in 1966 by the former National Institute for Metallurgy, now the Council for Mineral Technology (Mintek). The statistical evaluation of these results and the assignment of new or revised recommended or provisional values are described

  14. The homogeneous determination of some standard reference materials using NAA and micro-PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined application techniques of NAA (Instrumental Neutron Activation) and Micro-PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) were used to determine homogeneity for minimum sample sizes lower than 10 mg of standard reference materials, including Tobacco Leaves (Poland), Spruce Shoots (Germany), Urban Dust (IAEA-396A/M and 396A/S) and Single Cell Algae (IAEA-393A). The experimental methods were described and the results were shown for further evaluation. (author)

  15. Determination of element concentrations in biological reference materials by solid sampling and other analytical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauenburg, H.; Weigert, P. (Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany). Centre for Surveillance and Health Evaluation of Environmental Chemicals (ZEBS))

    1992-04-01

    Using solid sampling with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), values for cadmium, copper, lead and zinc in six biological reference materials were obtained from up to four laboratories participating in three collaborative studies. These results are compared with those obtained with other methods used in routine analysis from laboratories of official food control. Under certain conditions solid sampling with GFAAS seems to be suitable for routine analysis as well as conventional methods. (orig.).

  16. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations

  17. Synthesis and trace metal characterization of potassium plutonium sulphate: working reference material for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt was made to prepare potassium plutonium sulphate, which is proposed to be the working reference material for analyzing plutonium based fuel samples and associated materials. X-ray diffraction was employed for phase characterization and the structure was found to be monoclinic in nature with a space group of P21/c. Trace metallic impurity analyses was carried out for the 26 elements e.g. Ag, Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Si, Sn, Sr, W, Zn, Dy, Eu, Sm and Gd using ICP-AES as well as D.C.Arc AES. (author)

  18. Collection and characterization of a bulk PM2.5 air particulate matter material for use in reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller-Zeisler, S F; Ondov, J M; Zeisler, R

    1999-01-01

    A contemporary PM2.5 (particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns aerodynamic diameter) aerosol material from an urban site has been collected for the production of a new standard reference material that will be made available for the development of new PM2.5 air quality standards. Air particulate matter corresponding to the PM2.5 fraction was collected at an established Environmental Protection Agency monitoring site in Baltimore, Maryland. The air-sampling system that has been constructed for this collection separates fine particles with a cyclone separator and deposits them onto an array of Teflon membrane filters. The fine air particulate material is removed by ultrasonication or by mechanical means and collected for further preparation of standards. The composition of the collected PM2.5 aerosol, as well as the composition of the deposited PM2.5 aerosol, are determined by instrumental nuclear activation analysis and other techniques. PMID:10676493

  19. Optimization on electrochemical synthesis of HKUST-1 as candidate catalytic material for Green diesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, W. W.; Nugraha, R. E.; Winarni, I. D.; Adreane, M.; Rahmawati, F.

    2016-04-01

    In the effort to support the discovery of new renewable energy sources in Indonesia, biofuel is one of promising options. The conversion of vegetable oil into ready-biofuel, especially green diesel, needs several steps, one of which is a hydrogenation or hydro-deoxygenation reaction. In this case, the catalyst plays a very important role regarding to its activity and selectivity, and Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) becoming a new generation of heterogeneous catalyst in this area. In this research, a preliminary study to optimize electrochemical synthesis of the catalytic material based on MOFs, namely HKUST-1 [Cu3(BTC)2], has been conducted. Some electrochemical reaction parameters were tested, for example by modifying the electrochemical synthetic conditions, i.e. by performing variation of voltages (12, 13, 14, and 15 Volt), temperatures (RT, 40, 60, and 80 °C) and solvents (ethanol, water, methanol and dimethyl-formamide (DMF)). Material characterization was carried out by XRD, SEM, FTIR, DTA/TG and SAA. The results showed that the optimum synthetic conditions of HKUST-1 are performed at room temperature in a solvent combination of water: ethanol (1: 1) and a voltage of 15 Volt for 2 hours. The XRD-analysis revealed that the resulted peaks are identical to the simulated powder pattern generated from single crystal data and comparable to the peaks of solvothermal method. However, the porosity of the resulting material through electrochemical method is still in the range of micro-pore according to IUPAC and 50% smaller than the porosity resulted from solvothermal synthesis. The corresponding compounds are thermally stable until 300 °C according to TG/DTA.

  20. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys --- CDA 102 (OFHC copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni) --- are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for emplacement. The three copper-based alloys discussed here are being considered in addition to the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials discussed in Volume 3. The decay of radionuclides will result in substantial heat generation and in fluxes of gamma radiation. In this environment, container materials may degrade by atmospheric oxidation, uniform aqueous phase corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in tarnishing environments, or intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in nontarnishing environments. This report is a critical survey of available data on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three copper-based alloys. The requisite conditions for TGSCC and IGSCC include combinations of stress, oxygen, ammonia or nitrite, and water. Note that nitrite is generated by gamma radiolysis of moisture films in air but that ammonia is not. TGSCC has been observed in CDA 102 and CDA 613 exposed to moist ammonia-containing environments whereas SCC has not been documented for CDA 715 under similar conditions. SCC is also promoted in copper by nitrite ions. Furthermore, phosphorus-deoxidized copper is unusually susceptible to embrittlement in such environments. The presence of tin in CDA 613 prevents IGSCC. It is believed that tin segregates to grain boundaries, where it oxidizes very slowly, thereby inhibiting the oxidation of aluminum. 117 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs

  1. Certified reference material IAEA-418: I-129 in Mediterranean sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our society is attaching increasing importance to the study and assessment of the state and health of the environment. Organizations involved in such activities rely on the quality of the information provided and, ultimately, on the precision and accuracy of the data on which the information is based. Many laboratories are involved in the production of environmental data in many cases leading to wider assessments. These laboratories may develop and validate new analytical methods, study the environmental impact of human activities, provide services to other organizations, etc. In particular, laboratories are providing data on levels of radioactivity in a variety of marine matrixes such as water, suspended matter, sediments and biota. Because of the need to base scientific conclusions on valid and internationally comparable data, the need to provide policy makers with correct information and the need for society to be informed of the state of the environment, it is indispensable to ensure the quality of the data produced by each laboratory. Principles of good laboratory practice require both internal and external procedures to verify the quality of the data produced. Internal quality is verified in a number of ways such as the use of laboratory information systems, keeping full records of equipment performance and standardization of analytical procedures. External quality can also be ascertained in a number of ways, notably accreditation by an external body under a defined quality scheme but also, amongst others, the use of internationally accepted calibration standards that are traceable to the SI international system of units, the participation in interlaboratory comparisons or the regular use of reference materials to test laboratory performance. The Radiometrics Laboratory of the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratories has been providing quality products for the last 40 years which include the organization of interlaboratory comparisons, proficiency tests

  2. The IAEA's analytical quality control services (AQCS) programme on intercomparison runs and references materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 30 years the IAEA has been operating a programme of Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) concerned mainly with intercomparison and reference materials (RMs) for radionuclides, trace elements and pesticide residues. Through this programme the IAEA has established itself as a worldwide centre for analytical quality assurance which assists its Member States to maintain and improve the quality of analytical data obtained in their laboratories. The large number of participants in IAEA AQCS intercomparison runs and extensive use of IAEA AQCS RMs in laboratories around the world testify to the importance of this programme. However, demands on the level of confidence for certified values are continuously increasing. They are clearly stated in the recently published ISO Guide 34 'Quality System Guidelines for the Production of Reference Materials'. The main aim in the paper is to describe the present procedures of the IAEA AQCS concerning the production of RMs, with special reference to materials of environmental interest, and to compare them with is the latest requirements mentioned above. (author)

  3. A reference material for establishing uncertainties in full-field displacement measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple reference material for establishing the minimum measurement uncertainty of optical systems for measuring 3D surface displacement fields in deforming objects is described and its use demonstrated by employing 3D digital image correlation as an exemplar technique. The reference material consists of a stepped bar, whose dimensions can be scaled to suit the application, and that can be clamped rigidly at its thick end to create an idealized cantilever. The cantilever was excited at resonance to generate out-of-plane displacements and, in a separate experiment, loaded statically in-plane to provide in-plane displacement fields. The displacements were measured using 3D digital image correlation and compared to the predicted displacement fields derived from tip deflections obtained using a calibrated transducer that provided traceability to the national standard for length. The minimum measurement uncertainties were evaluated by comparing the measured and predicted displacement fields, taking account of the uncertainties in the input parameters for the predictions. It was found that the minimum measurement uncertainties were less than 3% for the Cartesian components of displacement present during static in-plane bending and less than 3 µm for out-of-plane displacements during dynamic loading. It was concluded that this reference material was more straightforward to use, more versatile and yielded comparable results relative to an earlier design. (paper)

  4. Evaluation of homogeneity of selected reference materials for selenium by cyclic neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The homogeneity of four reference materials was evaluated for Se by cyclic instrumental neutron activation analysis (CINAA). The relative standard deviation for Se measurements at ppb levels by CINAA was <12% for NIST Wheat Flour (SRM 1567) in 5-10 mg samples, while it was <11% for Chinese Hair (HH-CH-1), <13% for IAEA Animal Muscle (H-4) and 25% for IAEA Animal Blood (A-13) in 50 mg samples. The highest relative subsampling uncertainties were observed in the mass range of samples ≤50 mg for Chinese Hair, ≤100 mg for Wheat Flour and Animal Muscle and ≤300 mg for Animal Blood. The results of a one-way analysis of variance indicate that all reference materials above these mass ranges are adequately homogeneous with respect to Se distribution. Our data suggest that these materials, except Animal Blood, can be used as reference standards for Se in quality assurance programs well below the sample masses recommended by the issuing agencies. (author) 14 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. New π-Conjugated Materials Based on Furylenevinylene Candidate for Organic Solar Cells Application: A DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Alamy Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific properties of organic-conjugated molecules and polymers are of great importance since they have become the most promising materials for the optoelectronic device technology such as solar cells. The use of low band gap materials is a viable method for better harvesting of the solar spectrum and increasing its efficiency. The control of the parameters of these materials is a research issue of ongoing interest. In this work, a quantum chemical investigation was performed to explore the optical and electronic properties of a series of different compounds based on furylenevinylene. Different electron side groups were introduced to investigate their effects on the electronic structure. The theoretical knowledge of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO energy levels of the components is basic in studying organic solar cells; so the HOMO, LUMO, Gap energy and open circuit voltage (Voc of the studied compounds have been calculated and reported. These properties suggest that these materials behave as good candidate for organic solar cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i4.763 

  6. Compatibility of candidate overpack materials with deep argillaceous HLW disposal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Belgian R and D programme on the disposal of high level radioactive waste has been focused on the qualification of deep argillaceous formations for HLW disposal, because they have a number of inherent attractive characteristics and also because they are sufficiently abundant to cover the Belgian needs. A large number of corrosion resistant materials as well as some corrosion allowance materials have been tested. The laboratory test program included accelerated tests as well as exposure tests in simulated repository conditions. Initial ''field'' experiments have been performed in a near surface clay quarry. However, in order to obtain realistic corrosion rate estimates corrosion experiments with simultaneous monitoring of the clay environment parameters have been started in a 230 meters deep underground laboratory constructed in the Boom clay formation at Mol. Two types of experimental devices have been designed. In the first type coupons are mounted on an internally heated tubular holder and are directly exposed to the solid clay. In a second type of test a purge gas is used to extract corrosive products from the clay and circulate them subsequently over a number of metal coupons. Relevant parameters such as pH and Eh are continuously monitored for evaluating the evolution of soil agressivity after the initial chemical and mechanical disturbance of the clay, caused by the operations required for the introduction of the experimental devices. (author)

  7. Hot carrier solar cell absorbers: investigation of carrier cooling properties of candidate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conibeer, G.; Shrestha, Santosh; Huang, Shujuan; Patterson, Robert; Xia, Hongze; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Gupta, Neeti; Smyth, Suntrana; Liao, Yuanxun; Lin, Shu; Wang, Pei; Dai, Xi; Chung, Simon; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The hot carrier cell aims to extract the electrical energy from photo-generated carriers before they thermalize to the band edges. Hence it can potentially achieve a high current and a high voltage and hence very high efficiencies up to 65% under 1 sun and 86% under maximum concentration. To slow the rate of carrier thermalisation is very challenging, but modification of the phonon energies and the use of nanostructures are both promising ways to achieve some of the required slowing of carrier cooling. A number of materials and structures are being investigated with these properties and test structures are being fabricated. Initial measurements indicate slowed carrier cooling in III-Vs with large phonon band gaps and in multiple quantum wells. It is expected that soon proof of concept of hot carrier devices will pave the way for their development to fully functioning high efficiency solar cells.

  8. Evaluation of the mechanical and physical properties of nuclear fuel candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most reliable material for the research and test reactor fuel is found to be U3Si2 so far. Aluminum can be added to improve the corrosion resistance when the fuel is designed in rod shape and the fuel is restrained in compressive stress. It is proposed that further development should be put forward to the study of U3Six alloy with small addition of Cu. Thus, Seven different alloys were made and fabricated in our laboratory, and the fundamental techniques related to the variation of fabrication parameters were developed in this study. Results from the heat treatment, density measurement, hardness tests and the observation of the microstructures have shown to be very close to those of other countries. These data shall be applied as a fundamental to the development of the fabrication technology for the domestic supply of KMRR nuclear fuel. (Author)

  9. Haynes 230 Mini-Can Welding to Support Planned irradiation Testing of Candidate Space Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Space MICE-3B irradiation testing was to test uranium dioxide (UO2) and uranium nitride (UN) fuel pellets under conditions anticipated in a prototypic space reactor application. One goal of the test program was to optimize the accuracy of UN and UO2 fuel sample temperature measurement during testing. The fuel samples were required to be canned to (1) prevent sample dissociation, (2) prevent release of fission products in excess of test reactor emission thresholds, and (3) prevent chemical interaction with impurities in the helium-neon gas stream [A]. Haynes 230, a nickel-chromium-tungsten (Ni-Cr-W) high creep strength structural alloy was selected as the encapsulation material that could be easily hermetically sealed and meet material property requirements at 1550 F (1116 K), the maximum design temperature of the mini-can. Laser welding was pursued to minimize weld distortion and meet ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code weld qualification standards [2]. The mini-can design contained a 0.050 inch (1.3 mm) thick can lid that was to be welded to a 0.050 inch thick lip on the base can such that the lid overlapped the base lip as a lap joint (Figure la). The circumferential flat lap joint weld required a minimum depth of penetration of 0.050 inches (1.3 mm). Initially, a maximum diametrical distortion of 0.002-0.003 inches (50-75 microns) of the outside diameter of the can after welding was specified to allow for close proximity of a thermocouple near the external wall of the mini-can containing UN samples and result in improved fuel sample temperature measurement accuracy during testing. For the encapsulation of UO2 specimens a 0.01 0 inch (250 micron) diametrical distortion was allowed due to lower heat generation expected within the capsule and greater flexibility on thermocouple location. Manual gas tungsten arc welding was then developed with a V-groove weld lap joint design (Figures 1b). All welding was done in a high purity helium cover gas

  10. Preparation of natural standard reference material (SRM) for El-lajjun oil shale/Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard reference materials (SR Ms) represent a key tool for the quality co trol of chemical of analysis and the demand on these materials is constantly increasing word wide. A standard reference material of oil shale (SJL-1) collected from El-lajjun area in Jordan was prepared and certified to be used for quality control of ana lyes and calibration particulary for the oil shale characterization and testing laboratories. The work was a part of the Arab collaborative projects initiated by Arab Atomic Energy Agency (AAEA) during the period from 2007 to 2009.The paper describes the certification procedure and the inter-laboratory comparison study results, which was carried out through participation of twelve national and international laboroatories applying eleven different analytical techniques used to determine the analytes concentraction. Details of the production, homogeneity and stability of SJL-1 standard refernce material were reviewed as well as the results of certification. The Certificate of Analysis for SJL-1 provides assigned certified values for almnuium oxide, phosphorus pentoxide, calcium oxide, titanium dioxide magnesium oxide, potassium oxide, ferric oxide, sodium oxide, manganese oxide, sulfur, uranium, vanadium, chromium, zinc, niclel, copper, and strontium Refernce values are provided for Loss on Ignition (LOI),silicon oxide, cadmium, molybdenum, cobalt, lead, barium and arsenic. Finally, range values are assigned for other thirty-seven constituents of oil shale. (authors).

  11. Developing a reference material for diffusion-controlled formaldehyde emissions testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaomin; Cox, Steven S; Little, John C

    2013-11-19

    Formaldehyde, a known human carcinogen and mucous membrane irritant, is emitted from a variety of building materials and indoor furnishings. The drive to improve building energy efficiency by decreasing ventilation rates increases the need to better understand emissions from indoor products and to identify and develop lower emitting materials. To help meet this need, formaldehyde emissions from indoor materials are typically measured using environmental chambers. However, chamber testing results are frequently inconsistent and provide little insight into the mechanisms governing emissions. This research addresses these problems by (1) developing a reference formaldehyde emissions source that can be used to validate chamber testing methods for characterization of dynamic sources of formaldehyde emissions and (2) demonstrating that emissions from finite formaldehyde sources can be predicted using a fundamental mass-transfer model. Formaldehyde mass-transfer mechanisms are elucidated, providing practical approaches for developing diffusion-controlled reference materials that mimic actual sources. The fundamental understanding of emissions mechanisms can be used to improve emissions testing and guide future risk reduction actions. PMID:24102115

  12. Development of a certified reference material for genetically modified potato with altered starch composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broothaerts, Wim; Corbisier, Philippe; Emons, Hendrik; Emteborg, Håkan; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Trapmann, Stefanie

    2007-06-13

    The presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food and feed products is subject to regulation in the European Union (EU) and elsewhere. As part of the EU authorization procedure for GMOs intended for food and feed use, reference materials must be produced for the quality control of measurements to quantify the GMOs. Certified reference materials (CRMs) are available for a range of herbicide- and insect-resistant genetically modified crops such as corn, soybean, and cotton. Here the development of the first CRM for a GMO that differs from its non-GMO counterpart in a major compositional constituent, that is, starch, is described. It is shown that the modification of the starch composition of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, together with other characteristics of the delivered materials, have important consequences for the certification strategy. Moreover, the processing and characterization of the EH92-527-1 potato material required both new and modified procedures, different from those used routinely for CRMs produced from genetically modified seeds. PMID:17508757

  13. Determination of perfluorinated alkyl acid concentrations in biological standard reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Jessica L; O'Connell, Steven G; Butt, Craig M; Mabury, Scott A; Small, Jeff M; De Silva, Amila O; Muir, Derek C G; Delinsky, Amy D; Strynar, Mark J; Lindstrom, Andrew B; Reagen, William K; Malinsky, Michelle; Schäfer, Sandra; Kwadijk, Christiaan J A F; Schantz, Michele M; Keller, Jennifer M

    2012-11-01

    Standard reference materials (SRMs) are homogeneous, well-characterized materials used to validate measurements and improve the quality of analytical data. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a wide range of SRMs that have mass fraction values assigned for legacy pollutants. These SRMs can also serve as test materials for method development, method validation, and measurement for contaminants of emerging concern. Because inter-laboratory comparison studies have revealed substantial variability of measurements of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), future analytical measurements will benefit from determination of consensus values for PFAAs in SRMs to provide a means to demonstrate method-specific performance. To that end, NIST, in collaboration with other groups, has been measuring concentrations of PFAAs in a variety of SRMs. Here we report levels of PFAAs and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) determined in four biological SRMs: fish tissue (SRM 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, SRM 1947 Lake Michigan Fish Tissue), bovine liver (SRM 1577c), and mussel tissue (SRM 2974a). We also report concentrations for three in-house quality-control materials: beluga whale liver, pygmy sperm whale liver, and white-sided dolphin liver. Measurements in SRMs show an array of PFAAs, with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) being the most frequently detected. Reference and information values are reported for PFAAs measured in these biological SRMs. PMID:22476786

  14. The use of reference materials in the elemental analysis of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference materials (RMs) are useful to compare the accuracy and precision of laboratories and techniques. The desirable properties of biological reference materials are listed, and the problems of production, homogenization and storage described. At present there are only 10 biological RMs available compared with 213 geological and 520 metallurgical RMs. There is a need for more biological RMs including special materials for microprobe analysis and for in vivo activation analysis. A study of 650 mean values for elements in RM Kale, analysed by many laboratories, leads to the following conclusions. 61% of the values lie within +-10% of the best mean, and 80% lie within +-20% of the best mean. Atomic absorption spectrometry gives results that are 5-30% high for seven elements, while intrumental neutron activation analysis gives low and imprecise results for K. Other techniques with poor interlaboratory precision include neutron activation for Mg, polarography for Zn and arc-spectrometry for many elements. More than half the values for elements in Kale were obtained by neutron activation, confirming the importance of this technique and the need for RMs. As a rough estimate, 6 x 109 elemental analyses of biological materials are carried out each year, mostly by medical, agricultural and food scientists. It seems likely that a substantial percentage of these are inaccurate, a situation that might be improved by quality control using standard RMs. (author)

  15. The urgent requirement for new radioanalytical certified reference materials for nuclear safeguards, forensics, and consequence management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-agency workshop was held from 25 to 27 August 2009, at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to identify and prioritize the development of radioanalytical Certified Reference Materials (CRMs, generally provided by National Metrology Institutes; Standard Reference Materials, a CRM issued by NIST) for field and laboratory nuclear measurement methods to be used to assess the consequences of a domestic or international nuclear event. Without these CRMs, policy makers concerned with detecting proliferation and trafficking of nuclear materials, attribution and retribution following a nuclear event, and public health consequences of a nuclear event would have difficulty making decisions based on analytical data that would stand up to scientific, public, and judicial scrutiny. The workshop concentrated on three areas: post-incident Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) nuclear forensics, safeguard materials characterization, and consequence management for an IND or a Radiological Dispersion Device detonation scenario. The workshop identified specific CRM requirements to fulfill the needs for these three measurement communities. Of highest priority are: (1) isotope dilution mass spectrometry standards, specifically 233U, 236gNp, 244Pu, and 243Am, used for quantitative analysis of the respective elements that are in critically short supply and in urgent need of replenishment and certification; (2) CRMs that are urgently needed for post-detonation debris analysis of actinides and fission fragments, and (3) CRMs used for destructive and nondestructive analyses for safeguards measurements, and radioisotopes of interest in environmental matrices. (author)

  16. Estudo de homogeneidade de lote de material silício metálico candidato a material de referência Homogeneity testing of a lot of silicon metal prepared as a reference material

    OpenAIRE

    Queenie Siu Hang Chui; Celia Omine Iamashita; João Marcos de Almeida Bispo

    2005-01-01

    From the perspective of the uncertainties in chemical measurements all uncertainty sources should be part of the uncertainty of the reference material. When the primary methods are not available, interlaboratorial comparisons are used as a means of certification. The material to be distributed to the laboratories should have its homogeneity confirmed. The uncertainty due to this factor will be added to the characterization uncertainty. This work presents a homogeneity study of a lot of silico...

  17. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for Fuel Cladding in Canadian SCWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yimin; Guzonas, David

    2016-02-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative next generation reactor that offers many promising features, but the high-temperature high-pressure coolant introduces unique challenges to the long-term safe and reliable operation of in-core components, in particular the fuel cladding. To achieve high thermal efficiency, the Canadian SCWR concept has a coolant core outlet temperature of 625°C at 25 MPa with a peak cladding temperature as high as 800°C. International and Canadian research programs on corrosion issues in supercritical water have been conducted to support the SCWR concept. This paper provides a brief review of corrosion in supercritical water and summarizes the Canadian corrosion assessment work on potential fuel cladding materials. Five alloys, SS 347H, SS310S, Alloy 800H, Alloy 625 and Alloy 214, have been shown to have sufficient corrosion resistance to be used as the fuel cladding. Additional work, including tests in an in-reactor loop, is needed to confirm that these alloys would work as the fuel cladding in the Canadian SCWR.

  18. Laboratory scale development of coating for improving characteristics of candidate materials for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of coatings of refractory low atomic number materials on to different components of Tokamak type controlled thermonuclear reactor are expected to provide a degree of design flexibility. The project envisages to deal with the challenging problem on laboratory scale. Coatings investigated include carbon, beryllium, boron, titanium carbide and alumina and substrates chosen have been 304, 316 stainless steels, monel-400, molybdenum, copper, graphite, etc. For their deposition, different techniques (e.g. evaporation, sputtering and their different variants) have been tried, appropriate ones chosen and their parameters optimized. The coating composition has been analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Surface morphology has been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sebastian coating adherence tester has been used for adhesion measurement and Wilson's Tukon microhardness tester for their microhardness measurement. The coatings have been subjected to pulses from YAG laser to evaluate their thermal cycling behaviour. Deuterium ion bombardment (Energy: 20-120 keV; doses: 1019-9.3x1020 ions/cm2) behaviour has also been studied. In general, adherent and hard coatings capable of withstanding thermal cycling could be deposited. Out of the coatings studied, titanium carbide shows best results. The following pages are reprints and not mircrofiched: p. 25-32, 39-41, 57-81. Bibliographic description is on page 13

  19. Impact property at cryogenic temperature of candidate materials for fusion reactor and their electron beam welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impact properties at cryogenic temperature of candidate materials for fusion reactor and their electron beam welded joints are investigated by using instrumented Charpy impact testing apparatus. Material used are aluminum alloys (A7N01, A5083, A6061), JFMS (Japanese Ferritic Martensitic Steel) and two kinds of high manganese steels. Although JFMS is a steel for high temperature use, the impact test is conducted at low temperature same as the cases of the other materials. Testing results are obtained as follows. 1. Base metals and welded joint of aluminum alloys exhibit high absorbed energy at low temperature. Ductility of each base metal and welded joint gradually decreases with decreasing of testing temperature. 2. Base metal and welded joint of JFMS exhibit an absorbed energy transition temperature at near a room temperature. 3. Base metal and welded joint of high manganese steel A-T (18Mn) exhibit abrupt decreasing of absorbed energy at 77K, but base metal and welded joint of high manganese steel B-T (22Mn-0.2N) exhibit gradual increasing of maximum strength and decreasing of ductility with decreasing of testing temperature. (author)

  20. Transient Scuffing of Candidate Diesel Engine Materials at Temperatures up to 600oC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.

    2003-06-20

    This milestone report summarizes the general characteristics of scuffing damage to solid surfaces, then describes transient effects on scuffing observed during oscillating sliding wear tests of candidate material pairs for high-temperature diesel engine applications, like waste-gate bushings in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems. It is shown that oxidation and the formation of wear particle layers influence the friction of such components. In the case of metallic materials in cylindrical contacts where there is a generous clearance, debris layers can form which reduce the torque over time. For ceramic combinations, the opposite effect is observed. Here, the accumulation of wear debris leads to an increase in the turning torque. High-temperature transient scuffing behavior is considered in terms of a series of stages in which the composition and morphology of the contact is changing. These changes are used to explain the behavior of 11 material pairs consisting of stainless steels, Ni-based alloys, Co-based alloys, and structural ceramics.

  1. Investigation on candidates of principal facilities for exposure dose to public for the facilities using nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HTTR holds the nuclear fuel material use facilities in its reactor facilities, for the purpose of study on the fracture behavior of fuel and release behavior of fission products, development of high-performance fuel, and measurement of neutron flux. Due to the revision of the 'Act on the regulation of nuclear source material, nuclear fuel material and reactor', the facilities having the 'Important safety-related facilities' among the facilities applicable to the Enforcement Ordinance Article 41 (Article 41 facilities) has come to need to conform to the 'Regulations concerning standards for the location, structure, and equipment of used facilities and others'. In this case, actions such as modification by all possible means are required. The nuclear fuel substance use facilities of HTTR correspond to Article 41 facilities. So, whether it is a candidate for the 'Important safety-related facilities' has been examined. As a result, it is confirmed that the facilities are not correspond to the 'Important safety-related facilities', and it has been concluded that modification measures for the purpose of conforming to this approval standard rule are not necessary as of the present. (A.O.)

  2. Preparation and evaluation of reference materials for accountancy analysis. (1) Preparation and evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry method used for the accountancy analysis at nuclear fuel facilities requires the standard materials called LSD (Large Size Dried) spike. Generally, LSD spikes are prepared from certified reference materials (CRMs) which supplied from foreign laboratories. However, the difficulty of Pu CRM importation is increasing. It is important for safeguards to attain and continue high reliable accountancy analysis and stable securing of LSD spike is essential. Therefore, in order to conserve CRMs, several types of LSD spike were prepared under collaboration work between JAEA and JNFL, such as the amount of nuclear material in one LSD spike is decreased and others. Practical test with actual samples were performed at JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant, and those results were compared with the results obtained by using LSD spike which supplied from foreign laboratory. Preparation and verification analysis of LSD spikes and evaluation of uncertainty based on ISO-GUM will be presented. (author)

  3. Homogeneity and evaluation of the new NIST leaf certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NIST has produced and is in the process of certifying two new leaf CRMs, SRM1515 Apple Leaves and SRM 1547 Peach Leaves, as replacements for the no longer available NBS Orchard Leaves and the almost depleted Citrus Leaves. These two new materials have been processed and are being thoroughly evaluated and should provide the most advanced natural matrix botanical trace-element reference materials available. Caution should be used in determining a basis weight (drying) for these CRMs because of their very fine particle size. Homogeneity has been established by instrumental neutron activation analysis on both leaf materials for five elements, to date, to better than 1.5% (1 s) for 100-mg sample sizes

  4. Reference Material Kydex(registered trademark)-100 Test Data Message for Flammability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Carl D.; Richardson, Erin; Davis, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) database contains, as an engineering resource, a large amount of material test data carefully obtained and recorded over a number of years. Flammability test data obtained using Test 1 of NASA-STD-6001 is a significant component of this database. NASA-STD-6001 recommends that Kydex 100 be used as a reference material for testing certification and for comparison between test facilities in the round-robin certification testing that occurs every 2 years. As a result of these regular activities, a large volume of test data is recorded within the MAPTIS database. The activity described in this technical report was undertaken to mine the database, recover flammability (Test 1) Kydex 100 data, and review the lessons learned from analysis of these data.

  5. Value assignment of nutrient concentrations in standard reference material 2384 baking chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Katherine E; Brown Thomas, Jeanice; Nelson, Bryant C; Phinney, Curtis S; Sieber, John R; Wood, Laura J; Yen, James H; Howell, Daniel W

    2002-11-20

    Standard Reference Material (SRM) Baking Chocolate was recently issued, and the process used for value assignment of nutrient concentrations is reported herein. SRM 2384 is intended for use as a primary control material for assigning values to in-house control materials and for validation of analytical methods for the measurement of fatty acids, proximates, vitamins, and elements in chocolate and similar high-fat matrices. The Certificate of Analysis for SRM 2384 provides assigned values for concentrations of fatty acids, proximates, vitamins, elements, and total dietary fiber, for which product labeling is required by the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990, as well as for catechins, caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. These assigned values were based on measurements by NIST and/or collaborating laboratories. PMID:12428961

  6. Thermal emittance measurements on candidate refractory materials for application in nuclear space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a highly efficient General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) space power system requires that all of the available thermal energy from the GPHS modules be utilized in the most thermally efficient manner. This includes defining the heat transfer/thermal gradient profile between the surface of the GPHS's and the surface of the energy converter's hot end whose geometry is dependent on the converter technology selected. Control of the radiant heat transfer between these two surfaces is done by regulating how efficiently the selected converter's hot end surface can reject heat compared to a perfect blackbody, i.e. its infrared emittance. Several refractory materials of interest including niobium-1% zirconium, molybdenum-44.5% rhenium and L-605 (a cobalt-based alloy) were subjected to various surface treatments (grit blasting with either SiC or WC particulates) and heat treatments (up to 1198 K for up to 3000 hours). Room temperature infrared emittance values were then obtained using two different infrared reflectometers. Grit blasting with either SiC or WC tended to increase the emittance of flat or curved L-605 coupons by ∼0.2-0.3 independent of heat treatment. Heat treating L-605 coupons under 773 K for up to 2000 hours had only a slight effect on their emittance, while heat treating L-605 coupons at 973 K for over 150 hours appeared to significantly increase their emittance. For the temperatures and times studied here, the emittance values obtained on niobium-1% zirconium and molybdenum-44.5% rhenium coupons were independent of heat treat times and temperatures (except for the niobium-1% zirconium coupon that was heat treated at 1198 K for 150 hours)

  7. Joining Characteristics of Intermediate Heat Exchanger Candidate Materials in Very High Temperature Reactor(VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide studies have shown an increasing need for energy with the use of all energy sources, ranging from renewable sources through nuclear power, gas, to a limited extent oil and finally to the most prolific fossil fuel, coal. Although this increased need for generation capacity can met with different fuel sources, maybe the main fuel worldwide for next generation is hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor(VHTR) can produce hydrogen from only heat and water by using thermochemical iodine-sulfur(I-S) process or from heat, water, and natural gas by applying the steam reformer technology to core outlet temperatures greater than about 950 .deg. C. An intermediate heat exchanger(IHX) is the component in which the heat from the primary circuit helium is transferred to the secondary circuit helium(about 950 .deg. at 1000psi), thus keeping the secondary circuit free of radioactive contamination. The IHX will be located with a pressure vessel within the reactor containment that will be attached to the reactor pressure vessel by the cross-vessel. Therefore, an intermediate heat exchanger(IHX) especially is a key component in a VHTR. The Status of the IHX design will probably be a compact, counter-flow heat exchanger design consisting of metallic plate construction with small channels etched into each plate and assembled into a module. This heat exchanger design is refereed to as a 'printed circuit heat exchanger'. Printed circuit type heat exchanger are constructed from flat metal plates into which fluid flow channels are chemically milled. The milled plates are stacked and diffusion bonded together. In this study, the effects of the brazing temperature and homogenizing time for brazed specimens on the joint and base material microstructures, elemental distribution within the microstructures and the resulting joint tensile strength and micro hardness of Ni-based superalloy such as Haynes 230 were investigated

  8. Biological reference materials for quality control of elemental composition analytical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve biological-matrix, agricultural/food reference materials, Corn Stalk (Zea Mays) (NIST RM 8412), Corn Kernel (Zea Mays) (NIST RM 8413), Bovine Muscle Powder (NIST RM 8414), Whole Egg Powder (NIST RM 8415), Microcrystalline Cellulose (NIST RM 8416), Wheat Gluten (NIST RM 8418), Corn Starch (NIST RM 8432), Corn Bran (NIST RM 8433), Whole Milk Powder (NIST RM 8435), Durum Wheat Flour (NIST RM 8436), Hard Red Spring Wheat Flour (NIST RM 8437) and Soft Winter Wheat Flour (NIST RM 8438) were developed. They were characterized with respect to elemental composition via two extensive international interlaboratory characterization campaigns providing 303 reference and informational concentration values for 34 elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, F, Fe, Hg, I, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, N, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Ti, V, W, Zn) of nutritional, toxicological, and environmental significance. These products are available to the analytical community, for quality control of elemental composition analytical data, from the Standard Reference Materials Program, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. (author)

  9. The impact of rumination on memory for self-referent material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulds, Michelle L; Kandris, Eva; Williams, Alishia D

    2007-11-01

    Previous findings have linked rumination to the enhanced retrieval of negative memories (Lyubormirsky, Caldwell, & Nolen-Hoeksema, 1998) and overgeneral autobiographical memories (Watkins & Teasdale, 2004) in depression. However, little is known of the impact of rumination on the encoding of information, and in particular, self-referent information. This study examined the impact of rumination on self-referent encoding in high (BDI-II>or=13) and low (BDI-IIreferent. However, consistent with our hypothesis, high-dysphoric participants who ruminated recalled more negative self-referent words, after controlling for the proportion of words endorsed as self-descriptive. The findings demonstrate that rumination results in enhanced memory for negative, self-related material, and raises the possibility that this may serve as another pathway via which the negative evaluations of the self observed clinically in depression are maintained. PMID:18033619

  10. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the 63 μm. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K2O) of the Na>Mg>>K. The 2O) which indicates that also this smectite may be interstratified with a few percent illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite but in this case Fe predominates over Mg in the octahedral sheet. The structural formula suggests that this smectite has the lowest total layer charge of the smectites examined. Kutch BF 04 contains essentially no particles >63 μm. The bentonite has a high content of titanium and iron-rich accessory minerals, such as anatase, magnetite, hematite and goethite. Other accessory minerals of significance are feldspars and quartz, whereas the content of sulphur

  11. Standard reference material certification: contribution of NAA with a TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavia has cooperative links with the major international agencies devoted to the certification of SRMs or CRMs as the Bureau Communautaire de Reference (BCR), the European Institute for Reference Materials and Measurement (IRMM), the USA National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During these cooperative works, a large amount of analytical data obtained with NAA has been compared, and meaningful methodological information achieved with respect to accuracy and precision in the analysis of several elements at different concentrations in various matrices. Analytical data on As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Cs, Fe, Zn, K, Sc, U, Th, Al, Sb, Mn, V, Hg, Sr, Rb, Se,Pt, all the Rare Earths and halogens Br, Cl, I, have been obtained and contributed for the final certification

  12. Reference waste forms and packing material for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, Calif., has been given the task of designing and verifying the performance of waste packages for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. NNWSI is studying the suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, for the potential construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository. This report gives a summary description of the three waste forms for which LLNL is designing waste packages: spent fuel, either as intact assemblies or as consolidated fuel pins, reprocessed commercial high-level waste in the form of borosilicate glass, and reprocessed defense high-level waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility in Aiken, S.C. Reference packing material for use with the alternative waste package design for spent fuel is also described. 14 references, 8 figures, 20 tables

  13. Certified Reference Material IAEA-448: Soil from Oil Field Contaminated with Technically Enhanced Radium-226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure reliable evaluation of potential radiological hazards and proper decision making related to radiation protection measures, the IAEA, through the IAEA Environment Laboratories, supports Member State laboratories in their efforts to maintain readiness and to improve the quality of analytical results. It does so by producing reference materials, by developing standardized methods for sample collection and analysis, and by conducting interlaboratory comparisons and proficiency tests as tools for external quality control of analytical results. The problem of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) contamination is known to be widespread, occurring in oil and gas production facilities throughout the world. It has become a subject of attention in many IAEA Member States. In response to this radiological concern, facilities in many Member States have been characterizing the nature and extent of NORM in oil and gas installations and in the surrounding environment, evaluating the potential for exposure to workers and the public, and developing methods for properly managing these relatively high massic activity residues. Within this context, the IAEA Environment Laboratories, in cooperation with the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, an IAEA Collaborating Centre, have prepared a new certified reference material of soil contaminated with NORM, identified as IAEA-448, certified for the massic activity of 226Ra. This report presents the methodologies used for the production and certification of IAEA-448

  14. Results of a Saxitoxin Proficiency Test Including Characterization of Reference Material and Stability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Harju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A saxitoxin (STX proficiency test (PT was organized as part of the Establishment of Quality Assurance for the Detection of Biological Toxins of Potential Bioterrorism Risk (EQuATox project. The aim of this PT was to provide an evaluation of existing methods and the European laboratories’ capabilities for the analysis of STX and some of its analogues in real samples. Homogenized mussel material and algal cell materials containing paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP toxins were produced as reference sample matrices. The reference material was characterized using various analytical methods. Acidified algal extract samples at two concentration levels were prepared from a bulk culture of PSP toxins producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The homogeneity and stability of the prepared PT samples were studied and found to be fit-for-purpose. Thereafter, eight STX PT samples were sent to ten participating laboratories from eight countries. The PT offered the participating laboratories the possibility to assess their performance regarding the qualitative and quantitative detection of PSP toxins. Various techniques such as official Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC methods, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for sample analyses.

  15. Report of the consultants meeting on proper use of reference and control materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality control in analytical laboratories as a basis of a complete quality system needs still to be developed in many Member States. To support the dissemination of information in this field a consultants meeting on 'Proper Use of Reference and Quality Control Materials' was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 13 to 17 August 2001. The experts convened with the objective to prepare a TECDOC to advise analytical laboratories in Member States on the correct use of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) for Quality Control purposes and give practical recommendations to expand this concept to in-house Quality Control Materials (QCMs). In view of the existing literature in this field an urgent need for a practical guidebook for the preparation and application of cost effective and matrix matching QCMs was identified and the experts tried to fill this gap from their relevant experience. One and a half days of lecturing was followed by intensive discussion and brain storming to create a list of key words, which were structured in a logical order to provide a frame for the projected document. Responsibilities were assigned and deadlines fixed for the submission of the full text. (author)

  16. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  17. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Siv; Karnland, Ola (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the <1mum fraction were analyzed when relevant. Prior to the chemical analyses the <1 mum fractions were converted to homo-ionic clays and purified by dialysis. The chemical data were used for calculating the structural formula of the smectites. Milos BF 04 contains ca. 10% particles >63 mum. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K{sub 2}O) of the <1 mum fraction suggest that the smectite is interstratified with ca. 10% illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite and according to the structural formula, Mg predominates over Fe in the octahedral sheet. However, remnants of Mg-carbonates, if present, may be a source of error in the formula calculation. Milos BF 08 has a

  18. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  19. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  20. Determination of Natural Levels of Radionuclides in Proposed Mushroom Reference Material (A Proficiency Test Exercise)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proficiency test (PT) was organized within the framework of international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project INT/1/054, entitled 'Preparation' of Reference Materials and Organization of Proficiency Test Rounds'. This exercise served to estimate the proficiency of the analytical laboratories from participating countries. This report presents the results of the proficiency test exercise on the proposed Mushroom Reference Material for the determination of natural levels of radionuclides. Laboratories from 6 different countries submitted data on the following three radionuclides: /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K. Results for /sup 134/Cs, 137/sup 137/Cs, and /sup 40/K in the mushroom reference material were reported by three or more participating laboratories and could be subjected to statistical evaluation. The original data of these raionuclides was subjected to a computer program 'Histo Vession 2.1' provided by IAEA. The four outlier tests i.e. Dixon, Grubbs, Skewness and Kurtosis were applied to the data sets. All values for these three radionuclides were accepted by the software. Consensus (overall) mean value, absolute standard deviation, relative standard deviation, standard error, median and range of values for these three radionuclides have been are obtained (at significance level 0.05). the consensus mean values and confidence intervals are given./sup 134/Cs: 4.4 Bq/kg (3.4-5.3 Bq/kg) /sup 137/Cs: 2899 Bq/kg (2740-3058 Bq/kg) /sup 40/K: 1136 Bq/kg (1046-1226 Bq/kg). (author)

  1. Certified reference materials of agricultural products and foods bearing radioactivity from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) for food analysis were developed in an inter-laboratory experiment for validation of measurement of radiocesium in foodstuffs. Since 2012, five series of CRMs were developed, including for brown rice grain, soybean powder, beef flake, shiitake mushroom powder and marine fish (meat and bone parts). This paper discusses the strategy of development, including choice of CRMs developed and the preparation and certification procedures applied for CRM development. In particular, some detailed data are presented for the most popular CRMs developed: brown rice grain, soybean powder and beef flake. (author)

  2. DNA copy number concentration measured by digital and droplet digital quantitative PCR using certified reference materials

    OpenAIRE

    CORBISIER Philippe; Pinheiro, Leonardo; Mazoua, Stephane; KORTEKAAS Anna Maria; CHUNG PUI YAN JENNY; GERGANOVA TSVETELINA IVANOVA; Roebben, Gert; Emons, Hendrik; Emslie, K

    2015-01-01

    The value assignment for properties of six certified reference materials (ERM-AD623a–f), each containing a plasmid DNA solution ranging from 1 million to 10 copies per μL, by using digital PCR (dPCR) with the BioMark™ HD System (Fluidigm) has been verified by applying droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) using the QX100 system (Bio-Rad). One of the critical factors in the measurement of copy number concentrations by digital PCR is the partition volume. Therefore, we determined the average droplet volu...

  3. Total Digestion Efficient Results For Thorium Isotopes For Standard Reference Material (SRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical separation procedures are required to determine thorium isotopes in the environmental samples which has been used in the Radiochemistry and Environment Laboratory (RAS). Therefore, to testify the results is more efficient and reliable, the leaching and totally dissolve acid have been used in the radiochemical separation procedures for ten standard material reference (SRM) samples. From the finding shows different results of U-score, which is a totally dissolved method is more reliable and efficient compared to leaching method. Both of the digested samples are counting using alpha spectrometry counting system for 72 hours. (author)

  4. A certified reference material for radionuclides in the water sample from Irish Sea (IAEA-443)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, M.K.; Betti, M.; Povinec, P.P.;

    2011-01-01

    A new certified reference material (CRM) for radionuclides in sea water from the Irish sea (IAEA-443) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Ten radionuclides (3H, 40K, 90Sr, 137Cs, 234U, 235U, 238U, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am) have been certified, and information...... values on massic activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for four radionuclides (230Th, 232Th, 239Pu and 240Pu). Results for less frequently reported radionuclides (99Tc, 228Th, 237Np and 241Pu) are also reported. The CRM can be used for quality assurance/quality control of the analysis of...

  5. Preparation of homogeneous thorium oxide powders for development of certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the growing importance of Thorium Oxide (ThO2) as a fuel in nuclear power reactors, it is essential to develop Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) for trace level assay of ThO2 in order to validate analytical methods and also to assess the performance of an individual chemical laboratory. The present paper discusses the preparation of four batches of homogeneous Thorium Oxide (ThO2) powders on kilogram levels including a batch of ThO2 and Natural UO2 mixed oxide with varying amounts of impurities and also developing them as CRMs based on round robin tests. (author)

  6. Calibration of HPGe detectors using certified reference materials of natural origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using certified reference materials for the full energy efficiency calibration of p-type coaxial high-purity germanium detectors for the determination of radioactivity in environmental samples is discussed. The main sources of uncertainty are studied and the contributions to the total uncertainty budget for the most intense gamma lines are presented. The correction factors due to self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects are discussed in detail. The calibration procedure is validated for natural and artificial radionuclide determination in different matrices through an internal cross-validation and through the participation in a world-wide open proficiency test. (author)

  7. Validation Test For The Result Of Neutron Activation Analysis With Standard Reference Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity test with standard reference material is necessary to ensure the result analysis of samples. The analysis of CRM No.8 (Vehicle Exhaust Particulates) and SRM 1646a (Estuary Sediment) has been done in P2TRR. These analysis is intended to validate the analysis result done in NAA laboratory of P2TRR. For the CRM No. 8, is elements of the 30 certified elements were successfully analyzed Meanwhile, for SRM 1646a, 21 elements of the 39 certified elements were completely investigated The quantitative analysis showed the relative difference of 2% - 15% compared to the certificate

  8. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most significant factors impacting the performance of waste package container materials under repository relevant conditions is the thermal environment. This environment will be affected by the areal power density of the repository, which is dictated by facility design, and the dominant heat transfer mechanism at the site. The near-field environment will evolve as radioactive decay decreases the thermal output of each waste package. Recent calculations (Buscheck and Nitao, 1994) have addressed the importance of thermal loading conditions on waste package performance at the Yucca Mountain site. If a relatively low repository thermal loading design is employed, the temperature and relative humidity near the waste package may significantly affect the degradation of corrosion allowance barriers due to moist air oxidation and radiolytically enhanced corrosion. The purpose this report is to present a literature review of the potential degradation modes for moderately corrosion resistant nickel copper and nickel based candidate materials that may be applicable as alternate barriers for the ACD systems in the Yucca Mountain environment. This report presents a review of the corrosion of nickel-copper alloys, summaries of experimental evaluations of oxidation and atmospheric corrosion in nickel-copper alloys, views of experimental studies of aqueous corrosion in nickel copper alloys, a brief review of galvanic corrosion effects and a summary of stress corrosion cracking in these alloys

  9. High-strength reaction-sintered SiC: a new candidate material for large spaceborne telescope systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Yukari Y.; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Tange, Yoshio

    2004-11-01

    The high-strength reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) developed and manufactured by Toshiba and NEC-Toshiba Space Systems, NT-SiC, is one of the most promising, excellent and feasible candidates for light-weighted large-diameter space-borne optics that are applied to geostationary earth observations and astronomical observations. Small NT-SiC sample mirrors were manufactured to study basic physical parameters and features, and optical performances of the material, such as the surface conditions of polished NT-SiC, the condition of inner crystal grains, the correlation between the surface roughness and polishing, scattering characteristics, absorbance of solar light and infrared emissivity, and adhesiveness of metal coating. The current state of the art of the development of the NT-SiC mirror and the feasibility of light-weighted large-diameter NT-SiC mirrors for space-borne optics are described. Although technical challenges to achieve the surface roughness that is applicable to ultraviolet mirrors still remain, the optical performance and the physical properties of the present NT-SiC show that it is one of the most excellent mirror material in optical-infrared wavelength region.

  10. Characterization of a high depth-resolution tantalum pentoxide sputter profiling reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major of surface analysis instruments concerns composition depth profiling. In many instances poor depth resolution is obtained, one cause of which is poor beam alignment and uniformity. To enable instrument users to optimise instrument settings and know (1) the instrument contribution to depth resolution and (2) the ion etch rate, tantalum pentoxide reference materials have been developed with thicknesses of 30 nm and 100 nm and interface widths, measured by AES, of 1.5 and 1.7 nm respectively. The effects of argon ion beam energy, electron beam current density, sputtering geometry and gas purity effects on etch rate and interface width are measured and interpreted in terms of basic parameters, showing that the material is a well-behaved model system that is robust and easily used. The precise shape of the interface and preferential sputtering effects are also analysed. (author)

  11. A new reference material for radionuclides in the mussel sample from the Mediterranean Sea (IAEA-437)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Reference Material (RM) for radionuclides in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from the Mediterranean Sea (IAEA-437) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Four radionuclides (40K, 234U, 238U, and 239+240Pu) have been certified, and information values on massic activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for nine radionuclides (137Cs, 210Pb(210Po), 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 235U, and 241Am). Results for less frequently reported radionuclides (90Sr, 129I, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 240Pu) are also reported. The RM can be used for quality assurance/quality control of the analysis of radionuclides in mussel samples, for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. The material is available in 200 g units. (author)

  12. Fundamental studies to develop certified reference material to calibrate spectrophotometer in the ultraviolet region

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Conceição, F. C.; Borges, P. P.; Gomes, J. F. S.

    2016-07-01

    Spectrophotometry is the technique used in a great number of laboratories around the world. Quantitative determination of a high number of inorganic, organic and biological species can be made by spectrophotometry using calibrated spectrophotometers. International standards require the use of optical filters to perform the calibration of spectrophotometers. One of the recommended materials is the crystalline potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), which is used to prepare solutions in specific concentrations for calibration or verification of spectrophotometers in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral regions. This paper presents the results concerning the fundamental studies for developing a certified reference material (CRM) of crystalline potassium dichromate to be used as standard of spectrophotometers in order to contribute to reliable quantitative analyses.

  13. Soil contamination in plant samples and in botanical reference materials. Signature, quantification and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individual samples of several sets of plants (lichens, tobacco, spruce needles, grass, botanical reference materials) show highly significant correlations of Al, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Th, Ti and V with Sc. These correlations result from the terrigenous part of aerosols deposited on and measured together with the plants. The composition of this contamination is almost uniform among the different plant sets and can be approximated by the composition of the upper continental crust. The mass of the terrigenous material ranges from 100 mg/g plant. Its presence is expected to lead to concentrations of the above and of other elements that deviate substantially from those of plants without contamination. This is proved by the comparison of two sets of spruce needles, one of which was measured without and the other after removal of the aerosol. (author)

  14. Neutron activation analysis as a tool for checking homogeneity of certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneity of reference materials for inorganic trace analysis (Oriental Tobacco Leaves [CTA-OTL-1], Apatite Concentrate [CTA-AC-1], Virginia Tobacco Leaves [CTA-VTL-2] and Spruce Shoots [RMF II]) was studied by neutron activation analysis. Series of samples of a given nominal mass from various containers were analyzed for several elements and the results compared by Fisher''s test with analogous series of results for samples from container. Sampling variance was estimated for several elements in some of the material studied, from overall variance and components of analytical variance. The results were interpreted with the aid of Visman''s theory and Ingamell''s sampling constant. It was confirmed that Virginia Tobacco Leaves [CTA-VTL-2] is very homogeneous and can be recommended for microchemical work. (author)

  15. Certified Reference Material IAEA-446 for radionuclides in Baltic Sea seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, M K; Benmansour, M; Carvalho, F P; Chamizo, E; Degering, D; Engeler, C; Gascó, C; Gwynn, J P; Harms, A V; Hrnecek, E; Ibanez, F L; Ilchmann, C; Ikaheimonen, T; Kanisch, G; Kloster, M; Llaurado, M; Mauring, A; Møller, B; Morimoto, T; Nielsen, S P; Nies, H; Norrlid, L D R; Pettersson, H B L; Povinec, P P; Rieth, U; Samuelsson, C; Schikowski, J; Silobritiene, B V; Smedley, P A; Suplinska, M; Vartti, V-P; Vasileva, E; Wong, J; Zalewska, T; Zhou, W

    2014-05-01

    A Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) from the Baltic Sea (IAEA-446) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. The (40)K, (137)Cs, (234)U and (239+240)Pu radionuclides were certified for this material, and information values for 12 other radionuclides ((90)Sr, (99)Tc, (210)Pb ((210)Po), (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (235)U, (238)U, (239)Pu and (240)Pu) are presented. The CRM can be used for Quality Assurance/Quality Control of analysis of radionuclides in seaweed and other biota samples, as well as for development and validation of analytical methods, and for training purposes. PMID:24291528

  16. A certified reference material for radionuclides in the water sample from Irish Sea (IAEA-443)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new certified reference material (CRM) for radionuclides in sea water from the Irish sea (IAEA-443) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Ten radionuclides (3H, 40K, 90Sr, 137Cs, 234U, 235U, 238U, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am) have been certified, and information values on massic activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for four radionuclides (230Th, 232Th, 239Pu and 240Pu). Results for less frequently reported radionuclides (99Tc, 228Th, 237Np and 241Pu) are also reported. The CRM can be used for quality assurance/quality control of the analysis of radionuclides in water samples, for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. The material is available in 5 L units from IAEA (http://nucleus.iaea.org/rpst/index.htm). (author)

  17. 1984 EC enquiry into the needs for nuclear reference materials (Z>89)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For years now, experts in the nuclear field have expressed and pointed out the widespread need for Nuclear Reference Materials (NRMs) in the whole of the nuclear fuel cycle. NRMs were defined as actinides with well-characterized chemical, isotopic and/or physical properties for use as a common base for the calibration of instruments and checking of analytical methods. Since nuclear energy from fission reactors is an increasing contributor to the electricity generating capacity in the EC, there is an equivalent demand for accurate analytical measurements in the various stages of the fuel cycle and in associated fields such as: commercial transactions, production control, nuclear material accounting (safeguards), waste disposal, environmental and health physics, research and development. An essential element for improving analyses and measurements is the availability and use of the appropriate NRMs

  18. Certified Reference Material IAEA-446 for radionuclides in Baltic Sea seaweed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) from the Baltic Sea (IAEA-446) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. The 40K, 137Cs, 234U and 239+240Pu radionuclides were certified for this material, and information values for 12 other radionuclides (90Sr, 99Tc, 210Pb (210Po), 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 235U, 238U, 239Pu and 240Pu) are presented. The CRM can be used for Quality Assurance/Quality Control of analysis of radionuclides in seaweed and other biota samples, as well as for development and validation of analytical methods, and for training purposes

  19. Utilizing a reference material for assessing absolute tumor mechanical properties in modality independent elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Kyu; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    There is currently no reliable method for early characterization of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) [1,2]. Given that disruption of normal structural architecture occurs in cancer-bearing tissue, we hypothesize that further structural changes occur in response to NAC. Consequently, we are investigating the use of modalityindependent elastography (MIE) [3-8] as a method for monitoring mechanical integrity to predict long term outcomes in NAC. Recently, we have utilized a Demons non-rigid image registration method that allows 3D elasticity reconstruction in abnormal tissue geometries, making it particularly amenable to the evaluation of breast cancer mechanical properties. While past work has reflected relative elasticity contrast ratios [3], this study improves upon that work by utilizing a known stiffness reference material within the reconstruction framework such that a stiffness map becomes an absolute measure. To test, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel phantom and a silicone rubber mock mouse tumor phantom were constructed with varying mechanical stiffness. Results showed that an absolute measure of stiffness could be obtained based on a reference value. This reference technique demonstrates the ability to generate accurate measurements of absolute stiffness to characterize response to NAC. These results support that `referenced MIE' has the potential to reliably differentiate absolute tumor stiffness with significant contrast from that of surrounding tissue. The use of referenced MIE to obtain absolute quantification of biomarkers is also translatable across length scales such that the characterization method is mechanics-consistent at the small animal and human application.

  20. Multielement analysis of rice flour-unpolished reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace elements in NIES certified reference material No. 10-a∼10-c Rice Flour-Unpolished, prepared by the National Institute for Environmental Studies of Japan (NIES), were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). A set of three samples with different Cd concentration levels was subjected to analyses. Portions of each sample (ca. 200∼1000 mg) were irradiated, either with thermal neutrons without cadmium filter or with epithermal neutrons with cadmium filter, in the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITRR). The activated samples were analyzed by the three methods; conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, anticoincidence counting spectrometry, and coincidence counting spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector and a well type NaI(Tl) detector. Concentrations of 26∼28 elements were determined by these methods. The values obtained for many elements, except for Mg and K, were in good agreement with those of the NIES certified and reference. Concentrations of 10 elements (S, Sc, V, Ag, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Sm, Th), whose certified or reference values are not available from NIES, were also determined in this work. (author)

  1. Erosion and redeposition behavior of selected net-candidate materials under high-flux hydrogen, deuterium plasma bombardment in PISCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma erosion and redeposition behavior of selected candidate materials for plasma-facing components in the NET-machine have been investigated using the PISCES-A facility. Materials studied include SiC-impregnated graphite, 2D graphite weaves with and without CVD- SiC coatings, and isotropic graphite. These specimens were exposed to continuous hydrogen or deuterium plasmas under the following conditions: electron temperature range from 5 to 35eV; plasma density range from 5 x 1011 to 1 x 1012 cm-3; flux range from 5 x 1017 to 2 x 1018 ions cm-2 s-1; fluence of the order from 1021 to 1022 ions/cm2; bombarding energies of 50 and 100eV; target temperature range from 300 to 1000/degree/C. The erosion yield of SiC-impregnated graphite due to deuterium plasma bombardment is found to be a factor of 2 to 3 less than that of isotropic graphite materials. A further factor of 2-3 reduction in the erosion yield is observed in when redeposition associated with reionization of sputtered particle becomes significant. From postbombardment surface analysis with AES, the surface composition in terms of the Si/C of SiC-impregnated graphite ratio is found to increase from 0.15 to 0.7 after hydrogen plasma bombardment to a fluence around 4 x 1021 ions/cm2 at 350/degree/C. However, the final surface composition appears to remain unchanged up to 4 x 1022 ions/cm2, the highest fluence in the present study. Significant surface morphological modifications of SiC-impregnated graphite are observed after the high-fluence plasma exposure. Several structural problems such as coating-substrate adhesion have been pointed out for SiC-coated 2D graphite weave. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Application of reference materials for quality assessment in neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally accepted that an analytical procedure can be regarded as an information production system yielding information on the composition of the analyzed sample. Thus, information theory can be useful and the quantities characterizing the information properties of an analytical method may be applied not only as evaluation criteria but also as objective functions in the optimization. The usability of information theory is demonstrated on the example of neutron activation analysis. Both precision and bias of NAA results are taken into account together with the possible use of reference materials for quality assessment. The influence of the above-mentioned parameters on information properties such as information gain and profitability of NAA results is discussed in detail. It has been proved that information theory is especially useful in choosing suitable reference materials for the quality assessment of routine analytical procedures not only with respect to matrix and analyte concentration in the sample but also to concentrations and uncertainties of certified values in the CRM used. In the extreme trace analysis, CRMs with relatively large uncertainties and very low certified concentrations can still yield rather high information gain of results. (author) 14 refs.; 9 figs

  3. Determination of perfluorinated compounds in human plasma and serum standard reference materials using independent analytical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, Jessica L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Hollings Marine Laboratory, Charleston, SC (United States); Phinney, Karen W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Keller, Jennifer M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Hollings Marine Laboratory, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) were measured in three National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) (SRMs 1950 Metabolites in Human Plasma, SRM 1957 Organic Contaminants in Non-fortified Human Serum, and SRM 1958 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Serum) using two analytical approaches. The methods offer some independence, with two extraction types and two liquid chromatographic separation methods. The first extraction method investigated the acidification of the sample followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) using a weak anion exchange cartridge. The second method used an acetonitrile extraction followed by SPE using a graphitized non-porous carbon cartridge. The extracts were separated using a reversed-phase C{sub 8} stationary phase and a pentafluorophenyl (PFP) stationary phase. Measured values from both methods for the two human serum SRMs, 1957 and 1958, agreed with reference values on the Certificates of Analysis. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) values were obtained for the first time in human plasma SRM 1950 with good reproducibility among the methods (below 5% relative standard deviation). The nominal mass interference from taurodeoxycholic acid, which has caused over estimation of the amount of PFOS in biological samples, was separated from PFOS using the PFP stationary phase. Other PFCs were also detected in SRM 1950 and are reported. SRM 1950 can be used as a control material for human biomonitoring studies and as an aid to develop new measurement methods. (orig.)

  4. Experimental performance evaluation of a compton suppression system by an analysis of geological reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton scattering is one of major sources inducing a high background when a gamma ray spectrum is acquired from a radioactive sample. The high background spectrum deteriorates the detection sensitivity for an analysis of the nuclide of interest. To improve the detection sensitivity by the reduction of the spectrum background, a Compton suppression system (CSS) applying an anti coincidence mode was developed and has been used for a neutron activation analysis. A Compton suppression system (CSS) was implemented for an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at an NAA laboratory of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in 2009. The CSS consists of a high purity Ge (HPGe) detector and bismuth germinate (BGO) with electronic modules. An evaluation of the performance of the CSS was carried out based on the measurement of the gamma ray emitting source and the detectable nuclides created thorough neutron activation of biological reference materials. This study was executed to evaluate the performance of the CSS for geological standard reference materials (SRMs). Four geological SRMs produced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA were selected and irradiated using an NAA 1 irradiation hole at HANARO. Gamma ray spectra with normal mode and anti coincidence mode were acquired at the same time, and advantage factors of CSS for each nuclide detected were calculated on the basis of the signal to noise ratio

  5. Determination of copper, molybdenum and selenium in biological reference materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a contribution to the elemental characterization of 10 new reference materials, Bovine Muscle Powder (136), Corn Starch (162), Hard Red Spring Wheat Flour (165), Soft Winter Wheat Flour (166), Whole Milk Powder (183), Wheat Gluten (184), Corn Bran (186). Durum Wheat Flour (187), Whole Egg Powder (188) and Microcrystalline Cellulose (189), the total concentrations of Cu, Mo and Se were determined by the application of an analytical method based on isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cu and Mo contents were quantified by measurement of 65Cu/63Cu and 97Mo/100Mo isotopic ratios following spiking with 65Cu and 97Mo and digestion with nitric acid. Selenium was separated as hydrogen selenide from the matrix using sodium borohydride after spiking with 82Se and acid digestion-dry ashing and quantified by measurement of the 82Se/78Se isotopic ratio. Comparison of these results with those from a variety of other methods and assessment of the procedures using certified reference materials indicated that the determinations of Cu, Mo and Se were performed without analytical bias. (orig.)

  6. Performance testing of irradiation facility rabbit system pneumatic reactor RSG-GAS using standard reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation facility function test of rabbit system pneumatic (RS-5) has been done using standard reference material SRM 1633 Coal Fly ash through the sending station. Long irradiation of about 4-5 seconds. The results of qualitative analysis showed that the dominant elements listed in the certificate can be detected are Al, Ca, Mg, Si, Na, Ti, V, Mn. But only an element of Mn and Na which has a relative refractive values below 10%. And the other elements have a value relative refractive index 25% - 60%. The significant difference of value was not influenced by the position of irradiation in the reactor facility but due to the influence of the time difference between the sample and the standard count, and the half-life nuclide itself. Overall it can be said that the performance of the irradiation facility pneumatic rabbit system is good, but needs to be tested again by using different standard reference materials, in order to obtain the test results of analysis that can be trusted. (author)

  7. Neutron activation analysis of trace elements in a marine sediment reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the second intercomparison run of ARCAL-IV, it was analyzed the marine sediment, reference materials PACS-NR CC1 by INAA, in the RP-10 Reactor with a thermal flux of 7,8 x 1013 n/cm2 s. The results obtained (± 1σ,n=4) were: Co: 17,2±0,8 ppm; Cr:97,8±0,6 ppm; Fe: 46,0± 0,7 ppm; Na: 31,0±1,09/kg; Sb: 175±5 ppm; in good agreement with the certified values. The results in ppm (±18,n=4), for non certified elements were:Ba: 730±58; Ce: 25±3; Cs: 3,8±0,8; Eu: 1,00±0,03; Hf: 3,30±0,07; Lu:0,25±0,04; Rb: 44,0±0,9; Sc: 14,40±0,04; Sm: 3,4±0,5; Ta: 0,60±0,03; Tb: 0,5±0,05; Th: 3,80±0,02; U: 2,6±0,4; which are in good agreement with other three Latin American and one European INAA Laboratories. It was used the comparative method with AGV-1, GSP-1 and G-2 , USGS reference materials, as standards. (authors). 7 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Soot Reference Materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baumgardner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot.

    The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of single-particle sootphotometer (SP2 users identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop produced recommendations for the development of new SRMs that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  9. Certified Reference Materials for Radioactivity Measurements in Environmental Samples of Soil and Water: IAEA-444 and IAEA-445

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference Materials are an important requirement for any sort of quantitative chemical and radiochemical analysis. Laboratories need them for calibration and quality control throughout their analytical work. The IAEA started to produce reference materials in the early 1960's to meet the needs of the analytical laboratories in its Member States that required reference materials for quality control of their measurements. The initial efforts were focused on the preparation of environmental reference materials containing anthropogenic radionuclides for use by those laboratories employing nuclear analytical techniques. These reference materials were characterized for their radionuclide content through interlaboratory comparison involving a core group of some 10 to 20 specialist laboratories. The success of these early exercises led the IAEA to extend its activities to encompass both terrestrial and marine reference materials containing primordial radionuclides and trace elements. Within the frame of IAEA activities in production and certification of reference materials, this report describes the certification of the IAEA-444 and IAEA-445: soil and water spiked with gamma emitting radionuclides respectively. Details are given on methodologies and data evaluation

  10. Production of trace elements in coastal sea water certified reference material NMIA MX014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Jeffrey P; Saxby, David L; White, Ian E A W; Antin, Luminita; Murby, E John

    2016-06-01

    A certified reference material (CRM) for trace elements in acidified sea water, NMIA MX014, has been produced by the National Measurement Institute Australia (NMIA). The CRM consists of natural coastal sea water with 12 elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se and V) fortified to levels relevant to environmental regulatory testing in Australia ranging from 0.4 to 22 μg/kg. Certified values for these 12 elements were assigned using reference methods developed at NMIA, using either isotope dilution or standard addition with ICP-MS measurement. Specialised sample preparation (coprecipitation) and ICP-MS optimisation (online dilution, collision/reaction chemistry, high mass resolution) were used to negate the effect of the high level of dissolved solids. Multiple confirmatory experiments were performed in order to verify that ICP-MS spectral interferences were eliminated and to estimate the measurement uncertainty contribution from method precision and method trueness. Extensive homogeneity and stability testing was performed and the measurement uncertainty of certified values includes contributions from between-bottle homogeneity, short-term stability, medium-term stability and long-term stability. Special attention was paid to the stability of Hg due to well-known preservation problems. Acidified sea water matrix was satisfactory for stabilising Hg at 0.4 μg/kg for at least 4 years. Relative expanded uncertainties (k = 2) for the 12 certified values were between 1 and 11 %. NMIA MX014 is intended for use as a reference material for analytical method validation and quality control for quantification of trace elements in saline water and other similar sample types. PMID:27108283

  11. The NIST natural-matrix radionuclide standard reference material program for ocean studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997, the Low-level Working Group of the International Committee on Radionuclide Metrology met in Boston, MA (USA) to define the characteristics of a new set of environmental radioactivity reference materials. These reference materials were to provide the radiochemist with the same analytical challenges faced when assaying environmental samples. It was decided that radionuclide bearing natural materials should be collected from sites where there had been sufficient time for natural processes to redistribute the various chemically different species of the radionuclides. Over the succeeding years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in cooperation with other highly experienced laboratories, certified and issued a number of these as low-level radioactivity Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) for fission and activation product and actinide concentrations. The experience of certifying these SRMs has given NIST the opportunity to compare radioanalytical methods and learn of their limitations. NIST convened an international workshop in 1994 to define the natural-matrix radionuclide SRM needs for ocean studies. The highest priorities proposed at the workshop were for sediment, shellfish, seaweed, fish flesh and water matrix SRMs certified for mBq per sample concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs and 239Pu + 240Pu. The most recent low-level environmental radionuclide SRM issued by NIST, Ocean Sediment (SRM 4357) has certified and uncertified values for the following 22 radionuclides: 40K, 90Sr, 129I, 137Cs, 155Eu, 210Pb, 210Po, 212Pb, 214Bi, 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 234U, 235U, 237Np, 238U, 238Pu, 239Pu + 240Pu, and 241Am. The uncertainties for a number of the certified radionuclides are non-symmetrical and relatively large because of the non-normal distribution of reported values. NIST is continuing its efforts to provide the ocean studies community with additional natural matrix radionuclide SRMs. The freeze-dried shellfish flesh matrix has been

  12. High frequency dielectric reference materials BCR projekt 43. Final report of phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Group of High Frequency Specialists from Belgium, France, Germany, The Netherlands and the UK, was awarded contracts in 1975 to carry out a programme of measurements on the high frequency dielectric properties of materials. The object of this first phase of a projected three phase programme was to establish the reliability of existing methods of measurement and to examine the possibilities of specifying and producing some standard reference materials, both liquid and solid, which could be used for calibrating and checking the performance of industrial measurement equipment. The liquids chosen for the first phase were cyclohexane, cis and trans decalin, chlorobenzene and 0.1, 1, and 10% solutions of chlorobenzene in cyclohexane. Each group had a limited frequency range over which it could make meaningful measurements but there was sufficient overlap to ensure that all random and systematic errors could be quantitatively assayed. The real (epsilon') and imaginary (epsilon'') components of the complex permittivity for all the liquids were measured over the frequency range 10 - 3,000 GHz and for the two most lossy liquids (chlorobenzene and 10% chlorobenzene in cyclohexane) this range was extended downwards to one GHz. The programme established for the first time the possible experimental imprecisions to be expected in high frequency dielecric measurements and showed that the chosen liquids could be useful standard reference materials if sufficiently pure specimens could be obtained commercially at a reasonable price. The programme did however reveal an unexpected snag in that the liquids, especially cyclohexane, were found to be rather more liable to contamination than expected. Since cyclohexane is a very low-loss liquid, only a small amount of a lossy contaminant need be absorbed to make the observed loss increase dramatically. This report contains all the measured results in both tabular and graphical form and in addition full technical details are given of the

  13. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-11-01

    The high resistance of cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure is one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate such deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisted of a high-resolution video camera, light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources, and the in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. In this study eleven (11) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., 6 FeCrAl alloys and 5 nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800°C while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys and/or for relatively thick wall specimens.

  14. HCV INFECTION THROUGH PERFORATING AND CUTTING MATERIAL AMONG CANDIDATES FOR BLOOD DONATION IN BELÉM, BRAZILIAN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubenilson Caldas Valois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated epidemiological factors for HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments among candidates for blood donation (CBD in the city of Belém, Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Two definitions of HCV infection cases were used: anti-HCV positivity shown by EIA, and HCV-RNA detection by PCR. Infected and uninfected CBD completed a questionnaire about possible risk factors associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments. The information was evaluated using simple and multiple logistic regressions. Between May and November 2010, 146 (1.1% persons with anti-HCV antibodies and 106 (0.8% with HCV-RNA were detected among 13,772 CBD in Belém. Risk factors associated with HCV infection based on the EIA (model 1 and PCR (model 2 results were: use of needles and syringes sterilized at home; shared use of razors at home, sharing of disposable razors in barbershops, beauty salons etc.; and sharing manicure and pedicure material. The models of HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments should be taken into account by local and regional health authorities and by those of other countries with similar cultural practices, in order to provide useful information to guide political and public strategies to control HCV transmission.

  15. Impact of phase stability on the corrosion behavior of the austenitic candidate materials for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for the development of the waste package design to meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing requirements for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. The metallic container component of the waste package is required to assist in providing substantially complete containment of the waste for a period of up to 1000 years. Long term phase stability of the austenitic candidate materials (304L and 316L stainless steels and alloy 825) over this time period at moderate temperatures (100-2500C) can impact the mechanical and corrosion behavior of the metal barrier. A review of the technical literature with respect to phase stability of 304L, 316L and 825 is presented. The impact of martensitic transformations, carbide precipitation and intermediate (σ, chi, and eta) phase formation on the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these alloys at repository relevant conditions is discussed. The effect of sensitization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of each alloy is also addressed. A summary of the impact of phase stability on the degradation of each alloy in the proposed repository environment is included. 32 refs., 6 figs

  16. Narrow gap HST welding process and its application to candidate pipe material for 700 C USC boiler component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Gang; Sato, Takashi; Fukuda, Yuji [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Research Lab.; Mitsuhata, Koichi [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Div.

    2008-07-01

    Increasing steam temperature and pressure conditions of 700 C USC (Ultra Super Critical) power plants under consideration require the adoption of Ni-based alloys. One of the most crucial issues for the application of 700 C USC power plants is the establishment of welding technology for the thick-walled components. This paper reports the research results on the practicability of candidate material for the thickwalled components. The weld test was conducted on Ni-based Alloy617 (52Ni-22Cr- 13Co-9Mo-Ti-Al) by using the narrow gap HST (Hot wire Switching TIG) welding process developed by Babcock-Hitachi K.K with the matching filler wire of Alloy617. The weldability and strength properties of weld joint were examined. The sound weld joint was achieved. The advantages of narrow gap HST welding process for the thick-walled components of Ni-based alloy were discussed from the viewpoints of weld metal chemical composition and creep rupture strength. Due to the good shielding effect, the melting loss of alloy elements in the weld consumable during the narrow gap HST welding procedure was suppressed successfully. The narrow gap HST weld joint showed comparable strength with the parent metal. (orig.)

  17. Development of reference material for proficiency tests: arsenic in fish tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proficiency tests (PT) are extensively used to evaluate the analytical competence of laboratories, and are also used as a part of accreditation processes. For this reason are important tool for quality control of laboratories including laboratories that act directly with food exporting companies. In Brazil there are no providers of proficiency testing for toxic metals, such as arsenic in fish tissue. This study presents a protocol to produce reference material to be used in proficiency test for arsenic in fish tissue following the recommendations of the ISO Guide 35. The preparation scheme consisted of: selecting of individuals, cleaning of scale and skin, trituration, homogenization, and spiking with arsenic at two levels of concentration. The mixture was then irradiated in a cyclotron Cyclone 30 Applications ion beam with cobalt 60 at 10.00 ± 1.05 KGy, before being packed into sachets. To verify the efficacy of the irradiation procedure, 26 (randomly selected) irradiated sachets and 26 non-irradiated sachets were assessed for homogeneity and stability. The results indicate that irradiation with cobalt 60 is crucial for ensuring the preservation of the integrity of the material, providing stable material at room temperature for 2 months. The samples can therefore be transported at room temperature. (author)

  18. Determination of reference values of element contents in certified reference material SWCNT-1 by INAA a PGAA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Sturgeon, R. E.; Grinberg, P.; Oflaz, R.; Paul, R. L.; Bennett, J. W.; De Nadai Fernandes, E. A.; Kubešová, Marie; Bacchi, M. A.; Stopic, A. J.

    Vol. 5. Český Těšín: 2 THETA, 2014 - (Helán, V.), s. 35-41 ISBN 978-80-86380-73-5. [Referenční materiály a mezilaboratorní porovnání zkoušek V. Valtice (CZ), 05.11.2014-07.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * neutron activation analysis Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  19. k0-NAA quality assessment by analysis of different certified reference materials using the KAYZERO/SOLCOI software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suite of natural matrix reference materials (RMs) were used to assess the quality of analytical results obtained by k0-instrumental neutron activation analysis (k0-INAA) at the Jozef Stefan Institute (IJS). Five certified reference materials (CRMs) from the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), two standard reference materials (SRMs) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), three RMs from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and one RM from IJS were analyzed. Altogether, results for twenty-four elements in inorganic matrices and twenty-nine elements in organic matrices, obtained by k0-INAA, were compared to certified values. Results obtained show good agreement with certified or assigned values except for Fe, La, Nd, Sm and U in inorganic matrices, and Ag, Al and Cr in organic matrices. (author)

  20. Bio monitors for the determination of baseline concentrations of environmentally important elements and their use as reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of selected biomonitors could help to determine baseline concentrations of important elements and, at the same time, contribute with information as regards the pollution status of given areas. In this study, several types of molluscs, sediments, sea water, soil river water and vegetables were used as biomonitors. A number of chemical elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, V and Zn) were determine using neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy and stripping voltametry. The results indicated a good homogeneity of the samples for the elements As, Cu, Fe and Zn which are the most relevant analites for the area under study. A database with the analytical data and relevant information of the sampling site and meteorological conditions, is being implemented. To help the laboratories to reach the necessary accuracy and precision in these analyses, the Chilean Nucleae Energy Commission (CCHEN) have implemented a project aiming at the production of (secondary) reference materials (RMs) for quality control procedures. The matrices chosen initially as candidate RMs were molluscs since several laboratories are involved in the analysis of them. Samples of clamps and mussels were collected at three different bays in the coast of northern Chile, according to the information obtained from the baseline determination project. A sample preparation laboratory was implemented for handling samples of biological and environmental origins and to serve as a pilot laboratory for the preparation of modest amounts of RMs. The samples were handled and prepared according to the same protocols developed for baseline determination project. This preliminary effort has permitted to learn and develop procedures for the preparation of secondary RMs to satisfy the requirements of national laboratories

  1. Certification of B-group vitamins (b1, b2, b6, and b12) in four food reference materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollilainen, V.; Finglas, P.M.; Berg, H. van den; Froidmont-Görtz, I. de

    2001-01-01

    In 1989, the Community Bureau of Reference started a research program to improve the quality of vitamin analysis in food. To achieve this task, vitamin methodology was evaluated and tested by interlaboratory studies and the preparation of certified reference materials, which will be used for quality

  2. Nuclear measurements and reference materials annual progress report, january - december 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements (CBNM) is presented. The major changes in the role and orientation of the Joint Research Center, of which CBNM is an institute, are included. The main tasks of CBNM, which involve the program on Nuclear Measurements and Reference Materials, are given. Technical activities concerning the GELINA electron beam and Van de Graaff accelerators are reported. The study of transition radiation at linear electron accelerators, and the development of isotope dilution mass spectrometry, for trace analysis and isotope abundance measurements in iron and gallium, are summarized. The scientific and technical support to the commission, work for third parties, and contribution to conferences are presented

  3. Certified reference, intercomparison, performance evaluation and emergency preparedness exercise materials for radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The threat to global security from terrorist attack does not solely arise from illicit use of firearms, explosives or weapons of mass destruction. Terrorist threats will inevitably become more subtle as information and expertise is acquired by terrorist groups, and one vulnerable area is food and the food supply chain. Many laboratories, especially in countries with nuclear programmes, are involved in the routine monitoring of foodstuffs, and will be required to respond with increased food monitoring necessary for ensuring food safety and protecting public health after real (or perceived) contamination of food by either accidental or illicit means. This paper examines the needs for reference and performance testing materials that were identified at an international workshop to discuss this matter held at NIST in 2008, and further refined at a follow-up workshop in 2009. (author)

  4. A new Certified Reference Material for radionuclides in Irish sea sediment (IAEA-385).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, M K; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Povinec, P P; Andor, K; Arnold, D; Benmansour, M; Bikit, I; Carvalho, F P; Dimitrova, K; Edrev, Z H; Engeler, C; Fouche, F J; Garcia-Orellana, J; Gascó, C; Gastaud, J; Gudelis, A; Hancock, G; Holm, E; Legarda, F; Ikäheimonen, T K; Ilchmann, C; Jenkinson, A V; Kanisch, G; Kis-Benedek, G; Kleinschmidt, R; Koukouliou, V; Kuhar, B; Larosa, J; Lee, S-H; Lepetit, G; Levy-Palomo, I; Liong Wee Kwong, L; Llauradó, M; Maringer, F J; Meyer, M; Michalik, B; Michel, H; Nies, H; Nour, S; Oh, J-S; Oregioni, B; Palomares, J; Pantelic, G; Pfitzner, J; Pilvio, R; Puskeiler, L; Satake, H; Schikowski, J; Vitorovic, G; Woodhead, D; Wyse, E

    2008-11-01

    A new Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in sediment (IAEA-385) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Eleven radionuclides ((40)K, (137)Cs, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (230)Th, (232)Th, (234)U, (238)U, (238)Pu, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am) have been certified and information mass activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for seven other radionuclides ((90)Sr, (210)Pb((210)Po), (235)U, (239)Pu, (240)Pu and (241)Pu). Results for less frequently reported radionuclides ((60)Co, (99)Tc, (134)Cs, (155)Eu, (224)Ra and (239)Np) and information on some activity and mass ratios are also reported. The CRM can be used for quality assurance/quality control of the analysis of radionuclides in sediment samples, for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. PMID:18513984

  5. A new Certified Reference Material for radionuclides in Irish sea sediment (IAEA-385)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in sediment (IAEA-385) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Eleven radionuclides (40K, 137Cs, 226Ra, 228Ra, 230Th, 232Th, 234U, 238U, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am) have been certified and information mass activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for seven other radionuclides (90Sr, 210Pb(210Po), 235U, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Pu). Results for less frequently reported radionuclides (60Co, 99Tc, 134Cs, 155Eu, 224Ra and 239Np) and information on some activity and mass ratios are also reported. The CRM can be used for quality assurance/quality control of the analysis of radionuclides in sediment samples, for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes

  6. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of rib bone samples and of bone reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumental neutron activation analysis method was used for the determination of trace elements in rib bone samples taken from autopsies of accident victims. The elements Br, Ca, Cl, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Sr, Rb and Zn were determined in cortical tissues by using short and long irradiations with thermal neutron flux of the IEA-R1m nuclear reactor. The reference materials NIST SRM 1400 Bone Ash and NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal were also analyzed in order to evaluate the precision and the accuracy of the results. It was verified that lyophilization is the most convenient process for drying bone samples since it does not cause any element losses. Comparisons were made between the results obtained for rib samples and the literature values as well as between the results obtained for different ribs from a single individual and for bones from different individuals. (author)

  7. Characterization of Standard Reference Material 2940, Mn-ion-doped glass, spectral correction standard for fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2940 is a cuvette-shaped, Mn-ion-doped glass, recommended for use for relative spectral correction of emission and day-to-day performance validation of steady-state fluorescence spectrometers. Properties of this standard that influence its effective use or contribute to the uncertainty in its certified emission spectrum were explored here. These properties include its photostability, absorbance, dissolution rate in water, anisotropy, temperature coefficient of fluorescence intensity, and fluorescence lifetimes. Long and short lifetime components of the fluorescence displayed different emission spectra, making the certified spectrum useful with fluorescence instruments employing continuous excitation only. The expanded uncertainties in the certified spectrum are about 5% around the peak maximum at 620 nm, using an excitation wavelength of 412 nm. The SRM also exhibits a strong resistance to photodegradation, with no measurable decrease in fluorescence intensity even after 17 h of irradiation with the visible light from a Xe lamp

  8. Characterization of Standard Reference Material 2941, uranyl-ion-doped glass, spectral correction standard for fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2941 is a cuvette-shaped, uranyl-ion-doped glass, recommended for use for relative spectral correction of emission and day-to-day performance validation of fluorescence spectrometers. Properties of this standard that influence its effective use or contribute to the uncertainty in its certified emission spectrum have been explored here. These properties include its photostability, absorbance, dissolution rate in water, anisotropy, temperature coefficient of fluorescence intensity, and fluorescence lifetimes. The expanded uncertainties in the certified spectrum are about 4% around the peak maximum at 526 nm, using an excitation wavelength of 427 nm. The SRM also exhibits a strong resistance to photodegradation, with no measurable decrease in fluorescence intensity even after 8 h of laser irradiation

  9. Using environmental reference materials for quality assurance in spanish radiochemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve international acceptance of results, laboratories must be in a position to demonstrate that their results are reliable and traceable to SI units of measurement. Laboratories can provide objective evidence of their performance through participation in external quality assessment schemes sometimes referred to as proficiency tests (PT). To achieve this objective for environmental radioactivity laboratories in Spain, CSN, in collaboration with CIEMAT, has organised periodical intercomparison exercises to provide these laboratories with the means to assess the quality of their results. In order to implement the ISO/IUPAC/AOAC Harmonised Protocol for the Proficiency Testing of Analytical Laboratories, CIEMAT has been collaborating with the IAEA-AQCS during the last two exercises and has used IAEA reference materials as test samples. The first PT was organised using the IAEA-SED-1 which is a lake sediment containing K40, Ra226, Ac228, Cs137, Sr90, and Pu-(239+240), while the second PT used IAEA-Soil- 6 for the same set of radionuclides. This paper presents the results reported for the second test as well as a comparison of the participants' performance in both tests. The application of this Harmonised Protocol has provided an objective assessment of the performance of the laboratories, enabling them to evaluate and make appropriate modifications to their procedures

  10. The IAEA programme and perspectives for environmental radionuclide monitoring and preparation of reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than thirty years, the laboratories of the International Atomic Energy Agency have been involved in the monitoring of environmental radioactivity and in the world-wide provision of reference materials for radionuclides in environmental matrices. The occurrence of hot particles in selected sites and their morphological, structural, chemical and radiochemical characteristics have to be better investigated in order to identify possible correlations with the contaminating event and to assess the associated radiological risks. Research on radionuclides in the environment will also be extended to the measurement and compilation of data on the contaminants introduced by non-nuclear industrial activities and agrochemical treatments. In response to the world-wide trend towards increased reliability, comparability and traceability of chemical and radiochemical measurements, The IAEA will revise, develop and document a set of reference analytical procedures for naturally occurring radionuclides, which will supplement the current revision of procedures for anthropogenic radionuclides. The IAEA will enhance its support provided to the laboratories in the Member States for the implementation of a quality system and to achieve traceability of their radiometric measurements. Furthermore the IAEA will continue to provide training and maintain comparability and reliability of environmental radiochemical measurements by organizing proficiency tests and interlaboratory comparisons. These tests and exercises will also be used by the IAEA to monitor and evaluate the capability and preparedness of its ALMERA (Analytical Laboratories for Measuring Environmental Radioactivity) Network

  11. A mussel (Mytilus edulis) tissue certified reference material for the marine biotoxins azaspiracids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Pearse; Giddings, Sabrina D; Reeves, Kelley L; Hess, Philipp; Quilliam, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are lipophilic biotoxins produced by marine algae that can contaminate shellfish and cause human illness. The European Union (EU) regulates the level of AZAs in shellfish destined for the commercial market, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) being used as the official reference method for regulatory analysis. Certified reference materials (CRMs) are essential tools for the development, validation, and quality control of LC-MS methods. This paper describes the work that went into the planning, preparation, characterization, and certification of CRM-AZA-Mus, a tissue matrix CRM, which was prepared as a wet homogenate from mussels (Mytilus edulis) naturally contaminated with AZAs. The homogeneity and stability of CRM-AZA-Mus were evaluated, and the CRM was found to be fit for purpose. Extraction and LC-MS/MS methods were developed to accurately certify the concentrations of AZA1 (1.16 mg/kg), AZA2 (0.27 mg/kg), and AZA3 (0.21 mg/kg) in the CRM. Quantitation methods based on standard addition and matrix-matched calibration were used to compensate for the matrix effects in LC-MS/MS. Other toxins present in this CRM at lower levels were also measured with information values reported for okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-2, yessotoxin, and several spirolides. PMID:25335820

  12. Certification of the equivalent spherical diameters of silica nanoparticles in aqueous solution - Certified Reference Material ERM®-FD304

    OpenAIRE

    FRANKS Katrin; BRAUN ADELINA; CHAROUD-GOT Jean; COUTEAU Olivier; KESTENS Vikram; LAMBERTY MARIE ANDREE; Linsinger, Thomas; Roebben, Gert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the certification of several equivalent spherical diameters of silica nanoparticles in aqueous solution, Certified Reference Material (CRM) ERM®-FD304. The CRM has been certified by the European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel, BE. ERM-FD304 consists of silica nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solution. The intended use of this CRM is t o check the performance of instruments and methods that determine...

  13. Estimation of uncertainty of a reference material for proficiency testing for the determination of total mercury in fish in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide an uncertainty estimates for homogeneity and stability studies of reference material used in proficiency test for determination of total mercury in fish fresh muscle tissue. Stability was estimated by linear regression and homogeneity by ANOVA. The results indicate that the reference material is both homogeneous and chemically stable over the short term. Total mercury concentration of the muscle tissue, with expanded uncertainty, was 0.294 ± 0.089 μg g−1

  14. Toward the Development of Certified Reference Materials for Effective Biodiesel Testing - Part 1: Processing, Homogeneity, and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    ULBERTH-BUCHGRABER MANUELA; POTALIVO MONICA; EMTEBORG Per; HELD Andrea

    2011-01-01

    To address the current lack of certified reference materials (CRMs) for biodiesel analysis, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission (EC), launched a comprehensive feasibility study on the production of biodiesel CRMs for relevant specification parameters as provided in EN 14214,1 the basis for defining product specifications and measurement methods for biodiesel in the European Union (EU). Laboratories need to be able to ...

  15. Quality assurance and reference material requirements and considerations for environmental sample analysis in nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    analyses are to be used in legal proceedings and prosecutions, and also in investigative research. From the legal perspective, one must assume that any results obtained would be used as evidence in a court of law for prosecution of criminal acts. Consequently, Quality Assurance requirements are very demanding and unforgiving. For example, forensics analysis results that cannot be independently verified against certified reference materials of known composition and isotopics, may not be accepted in a court of law as reliable evidence. Thus, the ability to provide certified and traceable reference materials used in the analyses are extremely important in nuclear forensics. In addition to nuclear signatures, other signatures such as any organics or plant and animal residue that are also on the intercepted materials, become important in identifying the origin of the intercepted nuclear material, and will require traceable, known standards. This paper will describe the quality assurance requirements and considerations that must be adopted and developed for application and use in nuclear forensics. Recommendations and minimum requirements for standardization of a nuclear forensics quality assurance program that could be internationally accepted will also be presented. (author)

  16. Determination of trace elements in reference material Mussel by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentration of trace elements in an environmental reference material Mussel prepared by National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) has been determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The Mussel samples (ca. 50--250 mg) were irradiated for 2 min (pneumatic transfer) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 1012 n cm-2s-1 and then for 5h(central thimble) at thermal neutron flux of 3.2 x 1012 n cm-2s-1 in Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITRR). The gamma-ray measurements of 2 min irradiation samples were performed for 5 min intervals after 1 min cooling and for 4--27 min after 12--80 min cooling using a Ge (Li) detector coupled to a 4096 channel multichannel analyzer. The gamma-ray spectra from 5h irradiation samples were obtained by measuring samples for 3--14h after 4--8d cooling period and for 14--45h after 15--50d cooling. Peak-fitting procedure by a minicomputer system (GAMA system) was applied to analyze gamma-ray spectra. In this work 38 elements (Na,Mg,Al,S,Cl,K,Ca,Sc,V,Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni,Zn,As,Se,Br,Rb,Sr,Mo,Ag,Cd,Sn,Sb,I,Cs,Ba,La,Ce,Sm,Eu,Tb,Hf,Ta,Au,Th,U) were quantitatively determined. Special cares were taken for obtaining accurate concentrations of aluminum and magnesium by correcting contributions by interefering nuclear reactions such as 31P(n,α)28Al and 27Al(n,p)27Mg. Duplicate analyses showed a reasonable reproduciblity for the analytical data of major and trace elements, suggesting that the Mussel is homogeneous enough to be used as a certified reference material. (author)

  17. Characterization of Perchlorate in a New Frozen Human Urine Standard Reference Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lee L.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Davis, W. Clay; Kilpatrick, Eric L.; Oflaz, Rabia; Turk, Gregory C.; Leber, Dennis D.; Valentin, Liza; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, an inorganic anion, has recently been recognized as an environmental contaminant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Urine is the preferred matrix for assessment of human exposure to perchlorate. Although the measurement technique for perchlorate in urine was developed in 2005, the calibration and quality assurance aspects of the metrology infrastructure for perchlorate are still lacking in that there is no certified reference material (CRM) traceable to the International System of Units (SI). To meet the quality assurance needs in biomonitoring measurements of perchlorate and the related anions that affect thyroid health, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3668 Mercury, Perchlorate, and Iodide in Frozen Human Urine. SRM 3668 consists of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate, iodine, and mercury in urine at two levels that represent the 50th and 95th percentiles, respectively, of the concentrations (with some adjustments) in the U.S. population. It is the first CRM being certified for perchlorate. Measurements leading to the certification of perchlorate were made collaboratively at NIST and CDC using three methods based on liquid or ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS or IC-MS/MS). Potential sources of bias were analyzed and results were compared for the three methods. Perchlorate in SRM 3668 Level I urine was certified to be 2.70 μg L−1 ± 0.21 μg L−1, and for SRM 3668 Level II urine, the certified value is 13.47 μg L−1 ± 0.96 μg L−1. PMID:22850897

  18. Soot reference materials for instrument calibration and intercomparisons: a workshop summary with recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baumgardner

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soot, which is produced from biomass burning and the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, has been linked to regional and global climate change and to negative health problems. Scientists measure the properties of soot using a variety of methods in order to quantify source emissions and understand its atmospheric chemistry, reactivity under emission conditions, interaction with solar radiation, influence on clouds, and health impacts. A major obstacle currently limiting progress is the absence of established standards or reference materials for calibrating the many instruments used to measure the various properties of soot.

    The current state of availability and practicability of soot standard reference materials (SRMs was reviewed by a group of 50 international experts during a workshop in June of 2011. The workshop was convened to summarize the current knowledge on soot measurement techniques, identify the measurement uncertainties and limitations related to the lack of soot SRMs, and identify attributes of SRMs that, if developed, would reduce measurement uncertainties. The workshop established that suitable SRMs are available for calibrating some, but not all, measurement methods. The community of users of the single-particle soot-photometer (SP2, an instrument using laser-induced incandescence, identified a suitable SRM, fullerene soot, but users of instruments that measure light absorption by soot collected on filters did not. Similarly, those who use thermal optical analysis (TOA to analyze the organic and elemental carbon components of soot were not satisfied with current SRMs. The workshop, and subsequent, interactive discussions, produced a number of recommendations for the development of new SRMs, and their implementation, that would be suitable for the different soot measurement methods.

  19. Feasibility study on production of a matrix reference material for cyanobacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Christie; Thomas, Krista; Lewis, Nancy; Békri, Khalida; McCarron, Pearse; Quilliam, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    The worldwide increase in cyanobacterial contamination of freshwater lakes and rivers is of great concern as many cyanobacteria produce potent hepatotoxins and neurotoxins (cyanotoxins). Such toxins pose a threat to aquatic ecosystems, livestock, and drinking water supplies. In addition, dietary supplements prepared from cyanobacteria can pose a risk to consumers if they contain toxins. Analytical monitoring for toxins in the environment and in consumer products is essential for the protection of public health. Reference materials (RMs) are an essential tool for the development and validation of analytical methods and are necessary for ongoing quality control of monitoring operations. Since the availability of appropriate RMs for cyanotoxins has been very limited, the present study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of producing a cyanobacterial matrix RM containing various cyanotoxins. The first step was large-scale culturing of various cyanobacterial cultures that produce anatoxins, microcystins, and cylindrospermopsins. After harvesting, the biomass was lyophilized, blended, homogenized, milled, and bottled. The moisture content and physical characteristics were assessed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the production process. Toxin levels were measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and ultraviolet detection. The reference material was found to be homogeneous for toxin content. Stability studies showed no significant degradation of target toxins over a period of 310 days at temperatures up to +40 °C except for the anatoxin-a, which showed some degradation at +40 °C. These results show that a fit-for-purpose matrix RM for cyanotoxins can be prepared using the processes and techniques applied in this work. PMID:25929442

  20. Traceability and quality requirements for reference materials. The context for trace element speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over forty years the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), through its Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS), has prepared and distributed reference materials (RMs) to the analytical laboratories in its Member States to assist them in maintaining/improving the quality of their analytical measurements and to help them achieve internationally acceptable levels of quality assurance. With each new material, AQCS especially attempts to address the needs in developing Member States since these may be outside the regular programme of the national and regional commercial RMs suppliers. The AQCS programme responds to the recommendations of consultants' and working groups convened by the Agency's Director General and closely co-operates with technical assistance and co-ordinated research programmes that involve analytical measurements. The IAEA RMs include matrices of environmental and biological origin, characterised for primordial and anthropogenic radionuclides, stable isotopes, organic contaminants and inorganic elements. Preparation, characterisation and distribution of IAEA RMs is carried out by different Sections and Units of the IAEA Laboratories located in Austria and Monaco. RMs of terrestrial origin, characterised for inorganic elements and radionuclides, are mainly prepared by the Chemistry Unit (CU) located in Seibersdorf, Austria. RMs characterised for stable isotopes, H-3 and C-14 are prepared by the Isotope Hydrology Unit located in Vienna. RMs of marine origin, characterised for radionuclides, minor and trace elements and organic contaminants, are prepared by Marine Environment Laboratory located in Monaco. The selection and characterisation of RMs is performed in close co-operation with other Sections in the IAEA including: Nutrition and Health Related Environmental Studies, Industrial Applications and Chemistry, Safeguards Analytical Laboratory and the Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory. With the exception of RMs for the determination