WorldWideScience

Sample records for candidate phylum op5

  1. Diversity and Habitat Niche Modeling of Candidate Archaeal Phylum Aigarchaeota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, T. W.; Goertz, G.; Williams, A. J.; Cole, J. K.; Murugapiran, S. K.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Hedlund, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    ';Aigarchaeota' (formerly known as pSL4 and Hot Water Crenarchaeotic Group I (HWCGI)) is a candidate phylum of Archaea known only by 16S rRNA gene fragments from cultivation-independent microbial surveys and a single composite genome from Candidatus ';Caldiarchaeum subterraneum', an inhabitant of a subterranean gold mine in Japan. Sequences reported in various publications are found exclusively in geothermal settings, but a comprehensive assessment has not yet been performed. We mined public databases for 16S rRNA gene sequences related to known ';Aigarchaeota' and used a combination of approaches to rigorously define the phylogenetic boundaries of the phylum. The analyses supported the proposed relationship between ';Aigarchaeota', Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota, and Korarchaeota in the so-called 'TACK superphylum' and identified ~200 16S rRNA genes and gene fragments belonging to ';Aigarchaeota', including those recovered from terrestrial geothermal systems on several continents (North America, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Oceania) and marine geothermal and subsurface samples in both the Atlantic and Pacific. ';Aigarchaeota' belonged to at least three family- to order-level groups and at least seven genus-level groups. All genus-level groups were recovered from geographically distant locations, suggesting a global distribution within amenable habitats. ';Aigarchaeota'-specific primers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes were designed using SP-Designer and reviewed using the Ribosomal Database Project Probe Match tool. The primers will be used to determine the presence and abundance of ';Aigarchaeota' in a wide variety of samples from terrestrial geothermal systems in the western U.S. and Asia. These phylogenetic data, along with a large geochemical database, will be analyzed using multivariate statistics to develop biogeographic and habitat niche models for ';Aigarchaeota'. This study offers the first coherent view of the

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1, Representing a Novel Family within the Candidate Phylum SR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Albertsen, Mads; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel;

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the candidate phylum SR1 bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1. Its 16S rRNA gene is only 85.5% similar to that of the closest relative, RAAC1_SR1, and the genome of Aalborg_AAW-1 consequently represents the first of a novel family within the candidate phylum SR1....

  3. First genomic insights into members of a candidate bacterial phylum responsible for wastewater bulking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Sekiguchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cells belonging to the candidate bacterial phylum KSB3 were previously identified as the causative agent of fatal filament overgrowth (bulking in a high-rate industrial anaerobic wastewater treatment bioreactor. Here, we obtained near complete genomes from two KSB3 populations in the bioreactor, including the dominant bulking filament, using differential coverage binning of metagenomic data. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted probes specific for the two populations confirmed that both are filamentous organisms. Genome-based metabolic reconstruction and microscopic observation of the KSB3 filaments in the presence of sugar gradients indicate that both filament types are Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic fermenters capable of non-flagellar based gliding motility, and have a strikingly large number of sensory and response regulator genes. We propose that the KSB3 filaments are highly sensitive to their surroundings and that cellular processes, including those causing bulking, are controlled by external stimuli. The obtained genomes lay the foundation for a more detailed understanding of environmental cues used by KSB3 filaments, which may lead to more robust treatment options to prevent bulking.

  4. In Silico Analysis of the Metabolic Potential and Niche Specialization of Candidate Phylum "Latescibacteria" (WS3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha H Youssef

    Full Text Available The "Latescibacteria" (formerly WS3, member of the Fibrobacteres-Chlorobi-Bacteroidetes (FCB superphylum, represents a ubiquitous candidate phylum found in terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Recently, single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs representing the "Latescibacteria" were obtained from the anoxic monimolimnion layers of Sakinaw Lake (British Columbia, Canada, and anoxic sediments of a coastal lagoon (Etoliko lagoon, Western Greece. Here, we present a detailed in-silico analysis of the four SAGs to gain some insights on their metabolic potential and apparent ecological roles. Metabolic reconstruction suggests an anaerobic fermentative mode of metabolism, as well as the capability to degrade multiple polysaccharides and glycoproteins that represent integral components of green (Charophyta and Chlorophyta and brown (Phaeophycaea algae cell walls (pectin, alginate, ulvan, fucan, hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, storage molecules (starch and trehalose, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs. The analyzed SAGs also encode dedicated transporters for the uptake of produced sugars and amino acids/oligopeptides, as well as an extensive machinery for the catabolism of all transported sugars, including the production of a bacterial microcompartment (BMC to sequester propionaldehyde, a toxic intermediate produced during fucose and rhamnose metabolism. Finally, genes for the formation of gas vesicles, flagella, type IV pili, and oxidative stress response were found, features that could aid in cellular association with algal detritus. Collectively, these results indicate that the analyzed "Latescibacteria" mediate the turnover of multiple complex organic polymers of algal origin that reach deeper anoxic/microoxic habitats in lakes and lagoons. The implications of such process on our understanding of niche specialization in microbial communities mediating organic carbon turnover in stratified water bodies are discussed.

  5. Global metagenomic survey reveals a new bacterial candidate phylum in geothermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A; Paez-Espino, David; Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter F; Hedlund, Brian P; Dekas, Anne E; Grasby, Stephen E; Brady, Allyson L; Dong, Hailiang; Briggs, Brandon R; Li, Wen-Jun; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Pati, Amrita; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Rubin, Edward M; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia N

    2016-01-27

    Analysis of the increasing wealth of metagenomic data collected from diverse environments can lead to the discovery of novel branches on the tree of life. Here we analyse 5.2 Tb of metagenomic data collected globally to discover a novel bacterial phylum ('Candidatus Kryptonia') found exclusively in high-temperature pH-neutral geothermal springs. This lineage had remained hidden as a taxonomic 'blind spot' because of mismatches in the primers commonly used for ribosomal gene surveys. Genome reconstruction from metagenomic data combined with single-cell genomics results in several high-quality genomes representing four genera from the new phylum. Metabolic reconstruction indicates a heterotrophic lifestyle with conspicuous nutritional deficiencies, suggesting the need for metabolic complementarity with other microbes. Co-occurrence patterns identifies a number of putative partners, including an uncultured Armatimonadetes lineage. The discovery of Kryptonia within previously studied geothermal springs underscores the importance of globally sampled metagenomic data in detection of microbial novelty, and highlights the extraordinary diversity of microbial life still awaiting discovery.

  6. The human gut and groundwater harbor non-photosynthetic bacteria belonging to a new candidate phylum sibling to Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzi, Sara C; Sharon, Itai; Wrighton, Kelly C; Koren, Omry; Hug, Laura A; Thomas, Brian C; Goodrich, Julia K; Bell, Jordana T; Spector, Timothy D; Banfield, Jillian F; Ley, Ruth E

    2013-10-01

    Cyanobacteria were responsible for the oxygenation of the ancient atmosphere; however, the evolution of this phylum is enigmatic, as relatives have not been characterized. Here we use whole genome reconstruction of human fecal and subsurface aquifer metagenomic samples to obtain complete genomes for members of a new candidate phylum sibling to Cyanobacteria, for which we propose the designation 'Melainabacteria'. Metabolic analysis suggests that the ancestors to both lineages were non-photosynthetic, anaerobic, motile, and obligately fermentative. Cyanobacterial light sensing may have been facilitated by regulators present in the ancestor of these lineages. The subsurface organism has the capacity for nitrogen fixation using a nitrogenase distinct from that in Cyanobacteria, suggesting nitrogen fixation evolved separately in the two lineages. We hypothesize that Cyanobacteria split from Melainabacteria prior or due to the acquisition of oxygenic photosynthesis. Melainabacteria remained in anoxic zones and differentiated by niche adaptation, including for symbiosis in the mammalian gut. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01102.001.

  7. Evidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere.

  8. Phylogeny and physiology of candidate phylum 'Atribacteria' (OP9/JS1) inferred from cultivation-independent genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobu, Masaru K; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Rinke, Christian; Gies, Esther A; Webster, Gordon; Schwientek, Patrick; Kille, Peter; Parkes, R John; Sass, Henrik; Jørgensen, Bo B; Weightman, Andrew J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Hallam, Steven J; Tsiamis, George; Woyke, Tanja; Hedlund, Brian P

    2016-02-01

    The 'Atribacteria' is a candidate phylum in the Bacteria recently proposed to include members of the OP9 and JS1 lineages. OP9 and JS1 are globally distributed, and in some cases abundant, in anaerobic marine sediments, geothermal environments, anaerobic digesters and reactors and petroleum reservoirs. However, the monophyly of OP9 and JS1 has been questioned and their physiology and ecology remain largely enigmatic due to a lack of cultivated representatives. Here cultivation-independent genomic approaches were used to provide a first comprehensive view of the phylogeny, conserved genomic features and metabolic potential of members of this ubiquitous candidate phylum. Previously available and heretofore unpublished OP9 and JS1 single-cell genomic data sets were used as recruitment platforms for the reconstruction of atribacterial metagenome bins from a terephthalate-degrading reactor biofilm and from the monimolimnion of meromictic Sakinaw Lake. The single-cell genomes and metagenome bins together comprise six species- to genus-level groups that represent most major lineages within OP9 and JS1. Phylogenomic analyses of these combined data sets confirmed the monophyly of the 'Atribacteria' inclusive of OP9 and JS1. Additional conserved features within the 'Atribacteria' were identified, including a gene cluster encoding putative bacterial microcompartments that may be involved in aldehyde and sugar metabolism, energy conservation and carbon storage. Comparative analysis of the metabolic potential inferred from these data sets revealed that members of the 'Atribacteria' are likely to be heterotrophic anaerobes that lack respiratory capacity, with some lineages predicted to specialize in either primary fermentation of carbohydrates or secondary fermentation of organic acids, such as propionate.

  9. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  10. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    KAUST Repository

    Jahn, Martin T.

    2016-10-31

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  11. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T; Markert, Sebastian M; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-31

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  12. Single-Cell-Genomics-Facilitated Read Binning of Candidate Phylum EM19 Genomes from Geothermal Spring Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becraft, Eric D; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Ohlsson, J Ingemar; Briggs, Brandon R; Kanbar, Jad; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Quake, Stephen R; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P; Swingley, Wesley D

    2015-12-04

    The vast majority of microbial life remains uncatalogued due to the inability to cultivate these organisms in the laboratory. This "microbial dark matter" represents a substantial portion of the tree of life and of the populations that contribute to chemical cycling in many ecosystems. In this work, we leveraged an existing single-cell genomic data set representing the candidate bacterial phylum "Calescamantes" (EM19) to calibrate machine learning algorithms and define metagenomic bins directly from pyrosequencing reads derived from Great Boiling Spring in the U.S. Great Basin. Compared to other assembly-based methods, taxonomic binning with a read-based machine learning approach yielded final assemblies with the highest predicted genome completeness of any method tested. Read-first binning subsequently was used to extract Calescamantes bins from all metagenomes with abundant Calescamantes populations, including metagenomes from Octopus Spring and Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park and Gongxiaoshe Spring in Yunnan Province, China. Metabolic reconstruction suggests that Calescamantes are heterotrophic, facultative anaerobes, which can utilize oxidized nitrogen sources as terminal electron acceptors for respiration in the absence of oxygen and use proteins as their primary carbon source. Despite their phylogenetic divergence, the geographically separate Calescamantes populations were highly similar in their predicted metabolic capabilities and core gene content, respiring O2, or oxidized nitrogen species for energy conservation in distant but chemically similar hot springs.

  13. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, Mark A; Romine, Margaret; Jennings, Ryan deM; Jay, Zack J; Tringe, Susannah G; Rusch, Doug B; Beam, Jacob P; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicates that the replicate assemblies represent a new candidate phylum within the domain Archaea referred to here as 'Geoarchaeota' or 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in the metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen-sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron-oxide mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogs active in YNP today.

  14. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology. PMID:27796326

  15. Single-cell genomics reveals the lifestyle of Poribacteria, a candidate phylum symbiotically associated with marine sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegl, Alexander; Kamke, Janine; Hochmuth, Thomas; Piel, Jörn; Richter, Michael; Liang, Chunguang; Dandekar, Thomas; Hentschel, Ute

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a single-cell genomics approach for the functional characterization of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, members of which are nearly exclusively found in marine sponges. The microbial consortia of the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba were singularized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and individual microbial cells were subjected to phi29 polymerase-mediated ‘whole-genome amplification'. Pyrosequencing of a single amplified genome (SAG) derived from a member of the Poribacteria resulted in nearly 1.6 Mb of genomic information distributed among 554 contigs analyzed in this study. Approximately two-third of the poribacterial genome was sequenced. Our findings shed light on the functional properties and lifestyle of a possibly ancient bacterial symbiont of marine sponges. The Poribacteria are mixotrophic bacteria with autotrophic CO2-fixation capacities through the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway. The cell wall is of Gram-negative origin. The Poribacteria produce at least two polyketide synthases (PKSs), one of which is the sponge-specific Sup-type PKS. Several putative symbiosis factors such as adhesins (bacterial Ig-like domains, lamininin G domain proteins), adhesin-related proteins (ankyrin, fibronectin type III) and tetratrico peptide repeat domain-encoding proteins were identified, which might be involved in mediating sponge–microbe interactions. The discovery of genes coding for 24-isopropyl steroids implies that certain fossil biomarkers used to date the origins of metazoan life on earth may possibly be of poribacterial origin. Single-cell genomic approaches, such as those shown herein, contribute to a better understanding of beneficial microbial consortia, of which most members are, because of the lack of cultivation, inaccessible by conventional techniques. PMID:20613790

  16. Single-cell genomics reveals the lifestyle of Poribacteria, a candidate phylum symbiotically associated with marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegl, Alexander; Kamke, Janine; Hochmuth, Thomas; Piel, Jörn; Richter, Michael; Liang, Chunguang; Dandekar, Thomas; Hentschel, Ute

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a single-cell genomics approach for the functional characterization of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, members of which are nearly exclusively found in marine sponges. The microbial consortia of the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba were singularized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and individual microbial cells were subjected to phi29 polymerase-mediated 'whole-genome amplification'. Pyrosequencing of a single amplified genome (SAG) derived from a member of the Poribacteria resulted in nearly 1.6 Mb of genomic information distributed among 554 contigs analyzed in this study. Approximately two-third of the poribacterial genome was sequenced. Our findings shed light on the functional properties and lifestyle of a possibly ancient bacterial symbiont of marine sponges. The Poribacteria are mixotrophic bacteria with autotrophic CO(2)-fixation capacities through the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The cell wall is of Gram-negative origin. The Poribacteria produce at least two polyketide synthases (PKSs), one of which is the sponge-specific Sup-type PKS. Several putative symbiosis factors such as adhesins (bacterial Ig-like domains, lamininin G domain proteins), adhesin-related proteins (ankyrin, fibronectin type III) and tetratrico peptide repeat domain-encoding proteins were identified, which might be involved in mediating sponge-microbe interactions. The discovery of genes coding for 24-isopropyl steroids implies that certain fossil biomarkers used to date the origins of metazoan life on earth may possibly be of poribacterial origin. Single-cell genomic approaches, such as those shown herein, contribute to a better understanding of beneficial microbial consortia, of which most members are, because of the lack of cultivation, inaccessible by conventional techniques.

  17. Phylogenetic Diversity, Localization, and Cell Morphologies of Members of the Candidate Phylum TG3 and a Subphylum in the Phylum Fibrobacteres, Recently Discovered Bacterial Groups Dominant in Termite Guts▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Yuichi; Deevong, Pinsurang; Hattori, Satoshi; Inoue, Tetsushi; Noda, Satoko; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2006-01-01

    Recently we discovered two novel, deeply branching lineages in the domain Bacteria from termite guts by PCR-based analyses of 16S rRNA (Y. Hongoh, P. Deevong, T. Inoue, S. Moriya, S. Trakulnaleamsai, M. Ohkuma, C. Vongkaluang, N. Noparatnaraporn, and T. Kudo, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:6590-6599, 2005). Here, we report on the specific detection of these bacteria, the candidate phylum TG3 (Termite Group 3) and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the guts of the wood-feeding termites Microcerotermes sp. and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Both bacterial groups were detected almost exclusively from the luminal fluid of the dilated portion in the hindgut. Each accounted for approximately 10% of the total prokaryotic cells, constituting the second-most dominant groups in the whole-gut microbiota. The detected cells of both groups were in undulate or vibroid forms and apparently resembled small spirochetes. The cell sizes were 0.2 to 0.4 by 1.3 to 6.0 μm and 0.2 to 0.3 by 1.3 to 4.9 μm in the TG3 and Fibrobacteres, respectively. Using PCR screenings with specific primers, we found that both groups are distributed among various termites. The obtained clones formed monophyletic clusters that were delineated by the host genus rather than by the geographic distance, implying a robust association between these bacteria and host termites. TG3 clones were also obtained from a cockroach gut, lake sediment, rice paddy soil, and deep-sea sediments. Our results suggest that the TG3 and Fibrobacteres bacteria are autochthonous gut symbionts of various termites and that the TG3 members are also widely distributed among various other environments. PMID:17021231

  18. Phylogenetic diversity, localization, and cell morphologies of members of the candidate phylum TG3 and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, recently discovered bacterial groups dominant in termite guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Yuichi; Deevong, Pinsurang; Hattori, Satoshi; Inoue, Tetsushi; Noda, Satoko; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2006-10-01

    Recently we discovered two novel, deeply branching lineages in the domain Bacteria from termite guts by PCR-based analyses of 16S rRNA (Y. Hongoh, P. Deevong, T. Inoue, S. Moriya, S. Trakulnaleamsai, M. Ohkuma, C. Vongkaluang, N. Noparatnaraporn, and T. Kudo, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:6590-6599, 2005). Here, we report on the specific detection of these bacteria, the candidate phylum TG3 (Termite Group 3) and a subphylum in the phylum Fibrobacteres, by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the guts of the wood-feeding termites Microcerotermes sp. and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Both bacterial groups were detected almost exclusively from the luminal fluid of the dilated portion in the hindgut. Each accounted for approximately 10% of the total prokaryotic cells, constituting the second-most dominant groups in the whole-gut microbiota. The detected cells of both groups were in undulate or vibroid forms and apparently resembled small spirochetes. The cell sizes were 0.2 to 0.4 by 1.3 to 6.0 microm and 0.2 to 0.3 by 1.3 to 4.9 microm in the TG3 and Fibrobacteres, respectively. Using PCR screenings with specific primers, we found that both groups are distributed among various termites. The obtained clones formed monophyletic clusters that were delineated by the host genus rather than by the geographic distance, implying a robust association between these bacteria and host termites. TG3 clones were also obtained from a cockroach gut, lake sediment, rice paddy soil, and deep-sea sediments. Our results suggest that the TG3 and Fibrobacteres bacteria are autochthonous gut symbionts of various termites and that the TG3 members are also widely distributed among various other environments.

  19. The candidate phylum Poribacteria by single-cell genomics: new insights into phylogeny, cell-compartmentation, eukaryote-like repeat proteins, and other genomic features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Kamke

    Full Text Available The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake.

  20. The candidate phylum Poribacteria by single-cell genomics: new insights into phylogeny, cell-compartmentation, eukaryote-like repeat proteins, and other genomic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Janine; Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Mavromatis, Kostas; Ivanova, Natalia; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake.

  1. The Candidate Phylum Poribacteria by Single-Cell Genomics: New Insights into Phylogeny, Cell-Compartmentation, Eukaryote-Like Repeat Proteins, and Other Genomic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Janine; Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Mavromatis, Kostas; Ivanova, Natalia; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake. PMID:24498082

  2. Physiology and phylogeny of the candidate phylum "Atribacteria" (formerly OP9/JS1) inferred from single-cell genomics and metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, J. A.; Murugapiran, S.; Blainey, P. C.; Nobu, M.; Rinke, C.; Schwientek, P.; Gies, E.; Webster, G.; Kille, P.; Weightman, A.; Liu, W. T.; Hallam, S.; Tsiamis, G.; Swingley, W.; Ross, C.; Tringe, S. G.; Chain, P. S.; Scholz, M. B.; Lo, C. C.; Raymond, J.; Quake, S. R.; Woyke, T.; Hedlund, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Single-cell sequencing and metagenomics have extended the genomics revolution to yet-uncultivated microorganisms and provided insights into the coding potential of this so-called "microbial dark matter", including microbes belonging candidate phyla with no cultivated representatives. As more datasets emerge, comparison of individual genomes from different lineages and habitats can provide insight into the phylogeny, conserved features, and potential metabolic diversity of candidate phyla. The candidate bacterial phylum OP9 was originally found in Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, and it has since been detected in geothermal springs, petroleum reservoirs, and engineered thermal environments worldwide. JS1, another uncultivated bacterial lineage affiliated with OP9, is often abundant in marine sediments associated with methane hydrates, hydrocarbon seeps, and on continental margins and shelves, and is found in other non-thermal marine and subsurface environments. The phylogenetic relationship between OP9, JS1, and other Bacteria has not been fully resolved, and to date no axenic cultures from these lineages have been reported. Recently, 31 single amplified genomes (SAGs) from six distinct OP9 and JS1 lineages have been obtained using flow cytometric and microfluidic techniques. These SAGs were used to inform metagenome binning techniques that identified OP9/JS1 sequences in several metagenomes, extending genomic coverage in three of the OP9 and JS1 lineages. Phylogenomic analyses of these SAG and metagenome bin datasets suggest that OP9 and JS1 constitute a single, deeply branching phylum, for which the name "Atribacteria" has recently been proposed. Overall, members of the "Atribacteria" are predicted to be heterotrophic anaerobes without the capacity for respiration, with some lineages potentially specializing in secondary fermentation of organic acids. A set of signature "Atribacteria" genes was tentatively identified, including components of a bacterial

  3. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  4. Microbial community analysis in the roots of aquatic plants and isolation of novel microbes including an organism of the candidate phylum OP10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Matsuzawa, Hiroaki; Nigaya, Masahiro; Mori, Kazuhiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    A number of molecular ecological studies have revealed complex and unique microbial communities in various terrestrial plant roots; however, little is known about the microbial communities of aquatic plant roots in spite of their potential use for water quality improvement in aquatic environments (e.g. floating treatment wetland system). Here, we report the microbial communities inhabiting the roots of emerged plants, reed (Phragmites australis) and Japanese loosestrife (Lythrum anceps), collected from a floating treatment wetland in a pond by both culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the microbial compositions between the two aquatic plant roots were clearly different (e.g. the predominant microbe was Betaproteobacteria for reed and Alphaproteobacteria for Japanese loosestrife). In comparisons of microbial communities between the plant roots and pond water taken from near the plants, the microbial diversity in the plant roots (e.g. 4.40-4.26 Shannon-Weiner index) were higher than that of pond water (e.g. 3.15 Shannon-Weiner index). Furthermore, the plant roots harbored 2.5-3.5 times more phylogenetically novel clone phylotypes than pond water. The culture-dependent approach also revealed differences in the microbial composition and diversity among the two plant roots and pond water. More importantly, compared to pond water, we succeeded in isolating approximately two times more novel isolate phylotypes, including a bacterium of candidate phylum OP10 (recently named Armatimonadetes) from the plant roots. These findings suggest that aquatic plants roots are significant sources for a variety of novel organisms.

  5. On the Phylum Vetulicolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Degan

    2005-01-01

    The origins and radiations of metazoans, bilaterians, deuterostomes and vertebrates have been recognized as the four most important milestone events in animal history and, conversely four of the toughest and puzzling questions in evolutionary biology. Among them, the first two occurred in the deep time of the Precambrian and have left little information in the fossil records. Fortunately, intensive investigation into the Early Cambrian Chengjiang faunas in the past two decades have revealed numerous significant data on the main episode of the Cambrian Explosion, particularly information on the various earliest-known deuterostomes, leading to a much better understanding of the last two events. The "first fish" Haikouichthys and Myllokunmingia have been proved the oldest-known vertebrates, and to be among the most primitive ones, representing a key transitional group from acraniates to craniates. Indeed, "Paleontological work of Shu and collaborators is revising our understanding of the early evolution of chordates". Moreover, the discovery of the Phylum Vetulicolia may also throw new light on the origin of deuterostomes. This extinct group with simple gill slits might represent one of the roots in the deuterostome lineage, as the evidence of molecular biology and developmental biology has predicted. Here the first discovery of tiny vetulicolians from the Chengjiang Lagerst(a)tte is reported. The evolutionary trend from the giant to the small might represent a special adaptation in early animal history. Since all vetulicolians share similar characters in their anterior section (pharynx), and on the basis of differences in their posterior section, a new classification system is proposed, with a new class, the Heteromorphida erected. As both the "root" group vetulicolians and the "top" group vertebrates in the early deuterostome lineage, as well as those members in between, such as vetulocystids, yunnanozoans, cephalochordates and urochordates, have been recovered, a

  6. Phylum Verrucomicrobia representatives share a compartmentalized cell plan with members of bacterial phylum Planctomycetes

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    Romeo Tony

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Verrucomicrobia is a divergent phylum within domain Bacteria including members of the microbial communities of soil and fresh and marine waters; recently extremely acidophilic members from hot springs have been found to oxidize methane. At least one genus, Prosthecobacter, includes species with genes homologous to those encoding eukaryotic tubulins. A significant superphylum relationship of Verrucomicrobia with members of phylum Planctomycetes possessing a unique compartmentalized cell plan, and members of the phylum Chlamydiae including human pathogens with a complex intracellular life cycle, has been proposed. Based on the postulated superphylum relationship, we hypothesized that members of the two separate phyla Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia might share a similar ultrastructure plan differing from classical prokaryote organization. Results The ultrastructure of cells of four members of phylum Verrucomicrobia – Verrucomicrobium spinosum, Prosthecobacter dejongeii, Chthoniobacter flavus, and strain Ellin514 – was examined using electron microscopy incorporating high-pressure freezing and cryosubstitution. These four members of phylum Verrucomicrobia, representing 3 class-level subdivisions within the phylum, were found to possess a compartmentalized cell plan analogous to that found in phylum Planctomycetes. Like all planctomycetes investigated, they possess a major pirellulosome compartment containing a condensed nucleoid and ribosomes surrounded by an intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM, as well as a ribosome-free paryphoplasm compartment between the ICM and cytoplasmic membrane. Conclusion A unique compartmentalized cell plan so far found among Domain Bacteria only within phylum Planctomycetes, and challenging our concept of prokaryote cell plans, has now been found in a second phylum of the Domain Bacteria, in members of phylum Verrucomicrobia. The planctomycete cell plan thus occurs in at least two

  7. A novel denitrifying methanotroph of the NC10 phylum and its microcolony

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanfei; Cai, Chaoyang; Wang, Jiaqi; Xu, Xinhua; Zheng, Ping; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Hu, Baolan

    2016-09-01

    The NC10 phylum is a candidate phylum of prokaryotes and is considered important in biogeochemical cycles and evolutionary history. NC10 members are as-yet-uncultured and are difficult to enrich, and our knowledge regarding this phylum is largely limited to the first species ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera’ (M. oxyfera). Here, we enriched NC10 members from paddy soil and obtained a novel species of the NC10 phylum that mediates the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction. By comparing the new 16S rRNA gene sequences with those already in the database, this new species was found to be widely distributed in various habitats in China. Therefore, we tentatively named it ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis sinica’ (M. sinica). Cells of M. sinica are roughly coccus-shaped (0.7–1.2 μm), distinct from M. oxyfera (rod-shaped; 0.25–0.5 × 0.8–1.1 μm). Notably, microscopic inspections revealed that M. sinica grew in honeycomb-shaped microcolonies, which was the first discovery of microcolony of the NC10 phylum. This finding opens the possibility to isolate NC10 members using microcolony-dependent isolation strategies.

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: phylum Xenoturbellida [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available phylum Xenoturbellida Xenoturbella bocki Xenoturbellida Xenoturbella_bocki_L.png Xenoturbell...a_bocki_NL.png Xenoturbella_bocki_S.png Xenoturbella_bocki_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t...=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=NS ...

  9. Analysis of five complete genome sequences for members of the class Peribacteria in the recently recognized Peregrinibacteria bacterial phylum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Anantharaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Five closely related populations of bacteria from the Candidate Phylum (CP Peregrinibacteria, part of the bacterial Candidate Phyla Radiation (CPR, were sampled from filtered groundwater obtained from an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near the town of Rifle, CO, USA. Here, we present the first complete genome sequences for organisms from this phylum. These bacteria have small genomes and, unlike most organisms from other lineages in the CPR, have the capacity for nucleotide synthesis. They invest significantly in biosynthesis of cell wall and cell envelope components, including peptidoglycan, isoprenoids via the mevalonate pathway, and a variety of amino sugars including perosamine and rhamnose. The genomes encode an intriguing set of large extracellular proteins, some of which are very cysteine-rich and may function in attachment, possibly to other cells. Strain variation in these proteins is an important source of genotypic variety. Overall, the cell envelope features, combined with the lack of biosynthesis capacities for many required cofactors, fatty acids, and most amino acids point to a symbiotic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that these bacteria likely represent a new class within the Peregrinibacteria phylum, although they ultimately may be recognized as members of a separate phylum. We propose the provisional taxonomic assignment as ‘Candidatus Peribacter riflensis’, Genus Peribacter, Family Peribacteraceae, Order Peribacterales, Class Peribacteria in the phylum Peregrinibacteria.

  10. Phylogeny and classification of phylum Cercozoa (Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Chao, Ema E Y

    2003-10-01

    The protozoan phylum Cercozoa embraces numerous ancestrally biciliate zooflagellates, euglyphid and other filose testate amoebae, chlorarachnean algae, phytomyxean plant parasites (e.g. Plasmodiophora, Phagomyxa), the animal-parasitic Ascetosporea, and Gromia. We report 18S rRNA sequences of 27 culturable zooflagellates, many previously of unknown taxonomic position. Phylogenetic analysis shows that all belong to Cercozoa. We revise cercozoan classification in the light of our analysis and ultrastructure, adopting two subphyla: Filosa subphyl. nov. a clade comprising Monadofilosa and Reticulofilosa, ranked as superclasses, ancestrally having the same very rare base-pair substitution as all opisthokonts; and subphylum Endomyxa emend. comprising classes Phytomyxea (Plasmodiophorida, Phagomyxida), Ascetosporea (Haplosporidia, Paramyxida, Claustrosporida ord. nov.) and Gromiidea cl. nov., which did not. Monadofilosa comprise Sarcomonadea, zooflagellates with a propensity to glide on their posterior cilium and/or generate filopodia (e.g. Metopion; Cercomonas; Heteromitidae - Heteromita, Bodomorpha, Proleptomonas and Allantion) and two new classes: Imbricatea (with silica scales: Euglyphida; Thaumatomonadida, including Alias, Thaumatomastix) and Thecofilosea (Cryomonadida; Tectofilosida ord. nov. - non-scaly filose amoebae, e.g. Pseudodifflugia). Reticulofilosa comprise classes Chlorarachnea, Spongomonadea and Proteomyxidea (e.g. Massisteria, Gymnophrys, a Dimorpha-like protozoan). Cercozoa, now with nine classes and 17 orders (four new), will probably include many, possibly most, other filose and reticulose amoebae and zooflagellates not yet assigned to phyla.

  11. Tissue specific expression of antifreeze protein and growth hormone transgenes driven by the ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus) antifreeze protein OP5a gene promoter in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Rod S; Fletcher, Garth L

    2008-02-01

    Previous research aimed at producing genetically improved salmon broodstock for aquaculture led to the creation of two lines of transgenic Atlantic salmon using gene constructs that were derived in part from the ocean pout OP5a antifreeze protein (AFP) gene. One of the lines was produced using an OP5a AFP gene in which the 5' region of the promoter was removed (termed t-OP5a-AFP), and the other line contains a growth hormone (GH) transgene (EO-1alpha) that consists of a chinook salmon GH cDNA driven by a truncated OP5a AFP promoter that is almost identical to that of the t-OP5a-AFP construct. The similarity of the promoter regions of these transgenes provided an opportunity to evaluate their tissue specific expression patterns. Expression of mRNA was evaluated using Northern blot and RT-PCR techniques. The results demonstrate that the AFP and GH trangenes were expressed in almost all body tissues, suggesting that the promoter region of the OP5a AFP gene lacks tissue specific elements. Northern analysis revealed that expression of the t-OP5a-AFP gene was considerably greater than that of the EO-1alpha GH transgene. Only the spleen tissue of the GH transgenics showed a visible band of hybridization. In contrast clear bands of hybridization were evident in all tissues, except for blood cells, of the AFP transgenics with heart, liver and brain tissue showing the highest levels of mRNA expression. This higher level of expression could be attributable to the presence of introns in the t-OP5a-AFP transgene. Since the GH transgenic salmon grow considerably faster than non-transgenics the low levels of GH transgene expression in this line were clearly sufficient to produce the desired rapid growth phenotype. In contrast the levels of AFP expression were inadequate to impart any improvement in the freeze resistance of the AFP transgenic salmon.

  12. FMRFamide and related peptides in the phylum mollusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vera, Estuardo; Aguilar, Manuel B; Heimer de la Cotera, Edgar P

    2008-02-01

    FMRFamide is one of the well-known peptides studied within the phylum Mollusca. It was first isolated from the clam Macrocallista nimbosa during the end of the 1960s. Since then, a number of reports related to FMRFamide have been published from different experimental approaches, revealing that it and its related peptides (FaRPs) are implicated in a variety of physiological processes. As this year is the 30th anniversary since its discovery, this review focuses on diverse findings related to both FMRFamide and FaRPs in the phylum Mollusca.

  13. Anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota): advances in understanding their taxonomy, life cycle, ecology, role and biotechnological potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruninger, Robert J; Puniya, Anil K; Callaghan, Tony M; Edwards, Joan E; Youssef, Noha; Dagar, Sumit S; Fliegerova, Katerina; Griffith, Gareth W; Forster, Robert; Tsang, Adrian; McAllister, Tim; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2014-10-01

    Anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammalian herbivores, where they play an important role in the degradation of plant material. The Neocallimastigomycota represent the earliest diverging lineage of the zoosporic fungi; however, understanding of the relationships of the different taxa (both genera and species) within this phylum is in need of revision. Issues exist with the current approaches used for their identification and classification, and recent evidence suggests the presence of several novel taxa (potential candidate genera) that remain to be characterised. The life cycle and role of anaerobic fungi has been well characterised in the rumen, but not elsewhere in the ruminant alimentary tract. Greater understanding of the 'resistant' phase(s) of their life cycle is needed, as is study of their role and significance in other herbivores. Biotechnological application of anaerobic fungi, and their highly active cellulolytic and hemi-cellulolytic enzymes, has been a rapidly increasing area of research and development in the last decade. The move towards understanding of anaerobic fungi using -omics based (genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic) approaches is starting to yield valuable insights into the unique cellular processes, evolutionary history, metabolic capabilities and adaptations that exist within the Neocallimastigomycota.

  14. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlemann, D. P. R.; Geissinger, O.; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W.; Kunin, V.; Sun, H.; Lapidus, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Brune, A.

    2009-02-01

    The candidate phylum Termite group 1 (TG1), is regularly 1 encountered in termite hindguts but is present also in many other habitats. Here we report the complete genome sequence (1.64 Mbp) of Elusimicrobium minutum strain Pei191{sup T}, the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. We reconstructed the metabolism of this strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a beetle larva gut and discuss the findings in light of physiological data. E. minutum has all genes required for uptake and fermentation of sugars via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including several hydrogenases, and an unusual peptide degradation pathway comprising transamination reactions and leading to the formation of alanine, which is excreted in substantial amounts. The presence of genes encoding lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the presence of a pathway for peptidoglycan formation are consistent with ultrastructural evidence of a Gram-negative cell envelope. Even though electron micrographs showed no cell appendages, the genome encodes many genes putatively involved in pilus assembly. We assigned some to a type II secretion system, but the function of 60 pilE-like genes remains unknown. Numerous genes with hypothetical functions, e.g., polyketide synthesis, non-ribosomal peptide synthesis, antibiotic transport, and oxygen stress protection, indicate the presence of hitherto undiscovered physiological traits. Comparative analysis of 22 concatenated single-copy marker genes corroborated the status of Elusimicrobia (formerly TG1) as a separate phylum in the bacterial domain, which was so far based only on 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

  15. An expanded genomic representation of the phylum cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Rochelle M; Skennerton, Connor T; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Imelfort, Michael; Paech, Samuel J; Dennis, Paul G; Steen, Jason A; Parks, Donovan H; Tyson, Gene W; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Molecular surveys of aphotic habitats have indicated the presence of major uncultured lineages phylogenetically classified as members of the Cyanobacteria. One of these lineages has recently been proposed as a nonphotosynthetic sister phylum to the Cyanobacteria, the Melainabacteria, based on recovery of population genomes from human gut and groundwater samples. Here, we expand the phylogenomic representation of the Melainabacteria through sequencing of six diverse population genomes from gut and bioreactor samples supporting the inference that this lineage is nonphotosynthetic, but not the assertion that they are strictly fermentative. We propose that the Melainabacteria is a class within the phylogenetically defined Cyanobacteria based on robust monophyly and shared ancestral traits with photosynthetic representatives. Our findings are consistent with theories that photosynthesis occurred late in the Cyanobacteria and involved extensive lateral gene transfer and extends the recognized functionality of members of this phylum.

  16. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-11-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding. The phylum Synergistetes is a novel bacterial phylum consisting of Gram-negative anaerobes, with evidence of presence in biofilms associated with periodontal and endodontic infections. To date, the involvement of members of this phylum in NUG has not been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the presence and levels of known human oral Synergistetes bacterial clusters in dental plaque from patients with NUG and compare them with those found in gingivitis. Marginal dental plaque samples from 21 NUG and 21 gingivitis patients were analysed quantitatively by fluorescent in situ hybridization and microscopy for members of two oral Synergistetes clusters (A and B) and for Jonquetella anthropi. Synergistetes cluster A bacteria were detected in all samples but at higher levels (9.4-fold) and proportions (2.5-fold) in NUG patients than in gingivitis patients. However, with regard to Synergistetes cluster B bacteria, there were no differences between NUG and gingivitis patients. J. anthropi was detected in only half of the samples and at lower levels than the other taxa. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that Synergistetes cluster A bacteria, but not cluster B bacteria or J. anthropi, are more strongly associated with NUG than with gingivitis.

  17. Diversity of the candidate phylum Poribacteria in the marine sponge Aplysina fulva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoim, C.C.P.; Cox, C.J.; Peixoto, R.S.; Rosado, A.S.; Costa, R.; van Elsas, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Poribacterial clone libraries constructed for Aplysina fulva sponge specimens were analysed with respect to diversity and phylogeny. Results imply the coexistence of several, prevalently “intra-specific” poribacterial genotypes in a single sponge host, and suggest quantitative analysis as a desirable approach in studies of the diversity and distribution of poribacterial cohorts in marine sponges. PMID:24159324

  18. Genomic analysis of Chthonomonas calidirosea, the first sequenced isolate of the phylum Armatimonadetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Morgan, Xochitl C; Dunfield, Peter F; Tamas, Ivica; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Most of the lineages of bacteria have remained unknown beyond environmental surveys using molecular markers. Until the recent characterisation of several strains, the phylum Armatimonadetes (formerly known as ‘candidate division OP10') was a dominant and globally-distributed lineage within this ‘uncultured majority'. Here we report the first Armatimonadetes genome from the thermophile Chthonomonas calidirosea T49T and its role as a saccharide scavenger in a geothermal steam-affected soil environment. Phylogenomic analysis indicates T49T to be related closely to the phylum Chloroflexi. The predicted genes encoding for carbohydrate transporters (27 carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette transporter-related genes) and carbohydrate-metabolising enzymes (including at least 55 putative enzymes with glycosyl hydrolase domains) within the 3.43 Mb genome help explain its ability to utilise a wide range of carbohydrates as well as its inability to break down extracellular cellulose. The presence of only a single class of branched amino acid transporter appears to be the causative step for the requirement of isoleucine for growth. The genome lacks many commonly conserved operons (for example, lac and trp). Potential causes for this, such as dispersion of functionally related genes via horizontal gene transfer from distant taxa or recent genome recombination, were rejected. Evidence suggests T49T relies on the relatively abundant σ-factors, instead of operonic organisation, as the primary means of transcriptional regulation. Examination of the genome with physiological data and environmental dynamics (including interspecific interactions) reveals ecological factors behind the apparent elusiveness of T49T to cultivation and, by extension, the remaining ‘uncultured majority' that have so far evaded conventional microbiological techniques. PMID:24477196

  19. Deep phylogeny and evolution of sponges (phylum Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörheide, G; Dohrmann, M; Erpenbeck, D; Larroux, C; Maldonado, M; Voigt, O; Borchiellini, C; Lavrov, D V

    2012-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse taxon of benthic aquatic animals of great ecological, commercial, and biopharmaceutical importance. They are arguably the earliest-branching metazoan taxon, and therefore, they have great significance in the reconstruction of early metazoan evolution. Yet, the phylogeny and systematics of sponges are to some extent still unresolved, and there is an on-going debate about the exact branching pattern of their main clades and their relationships to the other non-bilaterian animals. Here, we review the current state of the deep phylogeny of sponges. Several studies have suggested that sponges are paraphyletic. However, based on recent phylogenomic analyses, we suggest that the phylum Porifera could well be monophyletic, in accordance with cladistic analyses based on morphology. This finding has many implications for the evolutionary interpretation of early animal traits and sponge development. We further review the contribution that mitochondrial genes and genomes have made to sponge phylogenetics and explore the current state of the molecular phylogenies of the four main sponge lineages (Classes), that is, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, Calcarea, and Homoscleromorpha, in detail. While classical systematic systems are largely congruent with molecular phylogenies in the class Hexactinellida and in certain parts of Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha, the high degree of incongruence in the class Calcarea still represents a challenge. We highlight future areas of research to fill existing gaps in our knowledge. By reviewing sponge development in an evolutionary and phylogenetic context, we support previous suggestions that sponge larvae share traits and complexity with eumetazoans and that the simple sedentary adult lifestyle of sponges probably reflects some degree of secondary simplification. In summary, while deep sponge phylogenetics has made many advances in the past years, considerable efforts are still required to achieve a

  20. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Tyagi

    2015-05-01

    gene expression in C. elegans and the human hookworm Necator americanus. We illustrate how analyzing and comparing metabolism at the level of pathway modules can improve existing knowledge of nematode metabolic potential and can provide parasitism related insights. Our reconstruction and comparison of nematode metabolic pathways at a pan-phylum and inter-phylum level enabled determination of phylogenetic restrictions and differential expression of pathways. A visualization of our results is available at http://nematode.net and the program for identification of module completeness (modDFS is freely available at SourceForge. The methods reported will help biologists to predict biochemical potential of any organism with available deduced proteome, to direct experiments and test hypotheses.

  1. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Rahul; Rosa, Bruce A; Lewis, Warren G; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-05-01

    C. elegans and the human hookworm Necator americanus. We illustrate how analyzing and comparing metabolism at the level of pathway modules can improve existing knowledge of nematode metabolic potential and can provide parasitism related insights. Our reconstruction and comparison of nematode metabolic pathways at a pan-phylum and inter-phylum level enabled determination of phylogenetic restrictions and differential expression of pathways. A visualization of our results is available at http://nematode.net and the program for identification of module completeness (modDFS) is freely available at SourceForge. The methods reported will help biologists to predict biochemical potential of any organism with available deduced proteome, to direct experiments and test hypotheses.

  2. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J; Day, Tim A; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-09-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era.

  3. Phylogenetic position of Licnophora, Lechriopyla, and Schizocaryum, three unusual ciliates (phylum Ciliophora) endosymbiotic in echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Denis H; Strüder-Kypke, Michaela

    2002-01-01

    Various echinoderms are colonized by species from several classes of the Phylum Ciliophora, indicating that the echinoderm "habitat" has been invaded independently on numerous occasions throughout evolutionary history. Two "echinoderm" ciliates whose phylogenetic positions have been problematic are Licnophora macfarlandi Stevens, 1901 and Schizocaryum dogieli Poljansky and Golikova, 1957. Licnophora macfarlandi is an endosymbiont of the respiratory trees of holothuroids, and S. dogieli is found in the esophagus of echinoids. A third species, Lechriopyla mystax Lynch, 1930, is a plagiopylid ciliate found in the intestine of echinoids. Host echinoderms were collected near the Friday Harbor Laboratories, San Juan Island, WA. Specimens of S. dogieli and L. mystax were obtained from the esophagus and intestine, respectively, of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus. Specimens of L. macfarlandi were collected from the fluid obtained from the respiratory trees of Parastichopus californicus. Using small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSrRNA) sequences of these three ciliates and a global alignment of SSrRNA sequences of other ciliates, we established the following. 1) Licnophora is a spirotrich ciliate, clearly related to the hypotrichs and stichotrichs; this is corroborated by its possession of macronuclear replication bands. 2) Lechriopyla is the sister genus to Plagiopyla and is a member of the Class Plagiopylea, which was predicted based on its cytology. 3) Schizocaryum clusters in the Class Oligohymenophorea and is most closely related to the scuticociliates; there are currently no morphological features known to relate Schizocaryum to the scuticociliates.

  4. Anti-ulcer potentials of phylum mollusca (tropical snail) slime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nwodo NJ; Okonta J M; Ezugwu CO; Attama AA

    2009-01-01

    Objective:The effectiveness of the slimy substance in snail to regenerate and repair damaged areas on its body/shell lead to this investigation.Methods:The anti-ulcer'property of snail slime extracted from phylum mollusca (tropical snail)from the giant African snail Archachatina marginata (Fam.Arionidae)was investi-gated using histamine,stress and indomethacin-induced ulcers.The solubility profile of extract was investiga-ted in different solvents and at different temperatures.Chemical analysis was carried out to determine the types of constituents present in the slim,while acute toxicity test was carried out to evaluate its profile of toxicity. The effect of the snail slim on gastrointestinal motility was investigated in mice,while the guinea pig ileum was used to study the effect of the extract on contraction produced by acetylcholine and histamine.The snail slime contained copious quantity of protein,with varying amounts of simple sugars,carbohydrates and fats.The slime was not soluble in most common solvents and increases in temperature,did not appear to increase its sol-ubility.Results:The result further indicated that although the snail slime exhibited significant (P <0.05)an-ti-ulcer induced by stress and histamine,it was most potent against ulcer induced by indomethacin.The snail slime potently inhibited gastrointestinal movement in mice in a dose-dependent manner;however,it was not a-ble to inhibit contraction induced by acetylcholine and histamine in guinea pig ileum.Conclusion:The snail mucin possesses potent antiulcer properties without any toxic effect.The mechanism responsible for the anti-ul-cer property may not be postulated with certainty but cytoprotective and anti-spasmodic activities are most likely to be involved.

  5. Two new septate junctions in the phylum Coelenterata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C R; Flower, N E

    1980-04-01

    Freeze-fracture of fixed and unfixed tissue, lanthanum tracer and conventional thin-section studies have revealed 2 new types of septate junction in the class Anthozoa, phylum Coelenterata. These new junctions have the 15-18-nm intercellular spacing of all other described septate junctions and are found around the apical circumference of cells lining a lumen or outside edge. However, in freeze-fracture replicas and tangential views of lanthanum-impregnated tissue, they are seen to be quite different from other known septate junction types. One of the new junctions is found in endothelial tissue such as that lining the gut or the inside of the tentacles. In tangential view it is seen to consist of relatively short, straight, double septa, again with lateral projections. In feeeze-fracture of unfixed tissue, the junction consists of double rows of particles on the P face, the particles of one row being rounded, those of the other being elongated at right angles to the line of the septum. This dichotomy in particle size is unexpected, as the 2 halves of the septa as seen in tangential view are symmetrical. In freeze-fracture of fixed material the particle arrays remain on the P face and appear similar to those of unfixed material, but never as clear. In fixed tissue, some distortion had occurred and in extreme cases septa appear as a single broad jumbled row of particles. In this double septa junction, the rows of particles seen in freeze-fracture are occasionally seen to anastomose with a septum dividing into 2 and a third row of particles aligning with the 2 new septa to form their double particle rows. In both fixed and unfixed tissues, the E face of the junction consists of wide, shallow grooves. The second of the new junctions occurs in epithelial tissue, such as around the outer edge of sea-anemone tentacles, and consists of long wavy septa with lateral projections. In views where these projections appear longest, they arise predominantly from one side of the

  6. Quorum Sensing: An Under-Explored Phenomenon in the Phylum Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkade, Ashish V; Mantri, Shailesh S; Patwekar, Umera J; Jangid, Kamlesh

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is known to play a major role in the regulation of secondary metabolite production, especially, antibiotics, and morphogenesis in the phylum Actinobacteria. Although it is one of the largest bacterial phylum, only 25 of the 342 genera have been reported to use quorum sensing. Of these, only nine have accompanying experimental evidence; the rest are only known through bioinformatic analysis of gene/genome sequences. It is evident that this important communication mechanism is not extensively explored in Actinobacteria. In this review, we summarize the different quorum sensing systems while identifying the limitations of the existing screening strategies and addressing the improvements that have taken place in this field in recent years. The γ-butyrolactone system turned out to be almost exclusively limited to this phylum. In addition, methylenomycin furans, AI-2 and other putative AHL-like signaling molecules are also reported in Actinobacteria. The lack of existing screening systems in detecting minute quantities and of a wider range of signaling molecules was a major reason behind the limited information available on quorum sensing in this phylum. However, recent improvements in screening strategies hold a promising future and are likely to increase the discovery of new signaling molecules. Further, the quorum quenching ability in many Actinobacteria has a great potential in controlling the spread of plant and animal pathogens. A systematic and coordinated effort is required to screen and exploit the enormous potential that quorum sensing in the phylum Actinobacteria has to offer for human benefit.

  7. Evidence for the widespread distribution of CRISPR-Cas system in the Phylum Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Fei; Axen, Seth D; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2013-05-01

    Members of the phylum Cyanobacteria inhabit ecologically diverse environments. However, the CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, CRISPR associated genes), an extremely adaptable defense system, has not been surveyed in this phylum. We analyzed 126 cyanobacterial genomes and, surprisingly, found CRISPR-Cas in the majority except the marine subclade (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), in which cyanophages are a known force shaping their evolution. Multiple observations of CRISPR loci in the absence of cas1/cas2 genes may represent an early stage of losing a CRISPR-Cas locus. Our findings reveal the widespread distribution of their role in the phylum Cyanobacteria and provide a first step to systematically understanding CRISPR-Cas systems in cyanobacteria.

  8. A Taxonomic Catalogue of the Nemerteans (Phylum Nemertea) of Spain and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Bachiller, Alfonso; Fernández-Álvarez, Fernando Ángel; Junoy, Juan

    2015-12-01

    A literature-based taxonomic catalogue of nemerteans (phylum Nemertea) from Spain and Portugal is provided, listing 75 species (12 Palaeonemertea, 24 Pilidiophora, and 39 Hoplonemertea) belonging to 34 genera. This is a low species number compared with the approximately 400 species listed in Europe. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the low number of researchers interested in the phylum and the well-known taxonomic difficulties of its study. Geographic records are indicated for each species, and for some, comments are included on certain biological and taxonomic aspects.

  9. Acidobacteria Phylum Sequences in Uranium-Contaminated Subsurface Sediments Greatly Expand the Known Diversity within the Phylum▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barns, Susan M.; Cain, Elizabeth C.; Sommerville, Leslie; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2007-01-01

    The abundance and composition of bacteria of the phylum Acidobacteria were surveyed in subsurface sediments from uranium-contaminated sites using amplification of 16S rRNA genes followed by clone/sequence analysis. Analysis of sequences from this study and public databases produced a revised and greatly expanded phylogeny of the Acidobacteria phylum consisting of 26 subgroups. PMID:17337544

  10. Phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Nematoda as revealed by ribosomal DNA, and their biological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holterman, M.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Nematodes – “eel worms”; members of the phylum Nematoda – can be considered as a success story within the Metazoa (multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes in which cells lack cell walls): they are speciose and – probably - the most numerous group of multicellular animals on our planet. Nematodes are

  11. A phylum-level phylogenetic classification of zygomycete fungi based on genome-scale data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygomycete fungi were classified as a single phylum, Zygomycota, based on sexual reproduction by zygospores, frequent asexual reproduction by sporangia, absence of multicellular sporocarps, and production of coenocytic hyphae, all with some exceptions. Molecular phylogenies based on one or a few gen...

  12. Correction: Phylogenetic placement of the enigmatic parasite, Polypodium hydriforme, within the Phylum Cnidaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Allen G

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Evans, N.M., Lindner, A., Raikova, E.V., Collins, A.G. and Cartwright, P. Phylogenetic placement of the enigmatic parasite, Polypodium hydriforme, within the phylum Cnidaria. BMC Evol Biol, 2008, 8:139.

  13. Comparative Analysis of 35 Basidiomycete Genomes Reveals Diversity and Uniqueness of the Phylum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Otillar, Robert; Fagnan, Kirsten; Boussau, Bastien; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Held, Benjamin; Nagy, Laszlo; Floudas, Dimitris; Morin, Emmanuelle; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Martin, Francis; Blanchette, Robert; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycete fungi including 6 newly sequenced genomes. The genomes of basidiomycetes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. A phylogenetic tree of Basidiomycota was generated using the Phyldog software, which uses all available protein sequence data to simultaneously infer gene and species trees. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) comprising proteins found in only one organism. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay among the members of Agaricomycotina subphylum. There is a correlation of the profile of certain gene families to nutritional mode in Agaricomycotina. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of such profiles, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has liginolytic class II fungal peroxidases. Furthermore, we find that both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics in growth assays. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the high value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  14. Genomic distribution of B-vitamin auxotrophy and uptake transporters in environmental bacteria from the Chloroflexi phylum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Plymale, Andrew E.; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Konopka, Allan; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Osterman, Andrei; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria from the Chloroflexi phylum are dominant members of phototrophic microbial mat communities in terrestrial thermal environments. Vitamins of B-group are key intermediates (precursors) in the biosynthesis of indispensable enzyme cofactors driving numerous metabolic processes in all forms of life. A genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of respective biosynthetic and salvage pathways and riboswitch regulons in over 20 representative Chloroflexi genomes revealed a widespread auxotrophy for some of the vitamins. The most prominent predicted phenotypic signature, auxotrophy for vitamins B1 and B7 was experimentally confirmed for the best studied model organism Chloroflexus aurantiacus. These observations along with identified candidate genes for the respective uptake transporters pointed to B vitamin exchange as an important aspect of syntrophic metabolism in microbial communities. Inferred specificities of homologous substrate-binding components of ABC transporters for vitamins B1 (ThiY) and B2 (RibY) were verified by thermofluorescent shift approach. A functional activity of the thiamine-specific transporter ThiXYZ from C. aurantiacus was experimentally verified by genetic complementation in E. coli. Expanding the integrative approach, which was applied here for a comprehensive analysis of B-vitamin metabolism in Chloroflexi would allow reconstruction of metabolic interdependencies in microbial communities.

  15. Methane metabolism in the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota revealed by genome-centric metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Chadwick, Grayson L; Robbins, Steven J; Orphan, Victoria J; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2015-10-23

    Methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea play important roles in the global flux of methane. Culture-independent approaches are providing deeper insight into the diversity and evolution of methane-metabolizing microorganisms, but, until now, no compelling evidence has existed for methane metabolism in archaea outside the phylum Euryarchaeota. We performed metagenomic sequencing of a deep aquifer, recovering two near-complete genomes belonging to the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota (formerly known as the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group). These genomes contain divergent homologs of the genes necessary for methane metabolism, including those that encode the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) complex. Additional non-euryarchaeotal MCR-encoding genes identified in a range of environments suggest that unrecognized archaeal lineages may also contribute to global methane cycling. These findings indicate that methane metabolism arose before the last common ancestor of the Euryarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota.

  16. First survey on ecological host range of aphid pathogenic fungi (Phylum Entomophthoromycota) in Tunisia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Fekih, Ibtissem; Boukhris-Bouhachem, Sonia; Allagui, Mohamed Bechir;

    2015-01-01

    sites belonging to three different bioclimatic zones. Four pathogens from the phylum Entomophthoromycota were found to occur naturally in Tunisian ecosystems: Pandora neoaphidis (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Entomophthora planchoniana (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Conidiobolus obscurus...... (Entomophthorales: Ancylistaceae) and Neozygites fresenii (Neozygitales: Neozygitaceae). The occurrence of entomophthoralean fungi depended on the sampling area, the bioclimatic zone, and aphid species. P. neoaphidis and E. planchoniana were the predominant pathogens infecting a wide range of aphid species whereas...

  17. Widespread vertical transmission and associated host sex-ratio distortion within the eukaryotic phylum Microspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Rebecca S; Smith, Judith E; Sharpe, Rosie G; Rigaud, Thierry; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Ironside, Joseph E; Rollinson, David; Bouchon, Didier; MacNeil, Calum; Dick, Jaimie T A; Dunn, Alison M

    2004-09-01

    Vertical transmission (VT) and associated manipulation of host reproduction are widely reported among prokaryotic endosymbionts. Here, we present evidence for widespread use of VT and associated sex-ratio distortion in a eukaryotic phylum. The Microspora are an unusual and diverse group of eukaryotic parasites that infect all animal phyla. Following our initial description of a microsporidian that feminizes its crustacean host, we survey the diversity and distribution of VT within the Microspora. We find that vertically transmitted microsporidia are ubiquitous in the amphipod hosts sampled and that they are also diverse, with 11 species of microsporidia detected within 16 host species. We found that infections were more common in females than males, suggesting that host sex-ratio distortion occurs in five out of eight parasite species tested. Phylogenetic reconstruction demonstrates that VT occurs in all major lineages of the phylum Microspora and that sex-ratio distorters are found on multiple branches of the phylogenetic tree. We propose that VT is either an ancestral trait or evolves with peculiar frequency in this phylum. If the association observed here between VT and host sex-ratio distortion holds true across other host taxa, these eukaryotic parasites may join the bacterial endosymbionts in their importance as sex-ratio distorters.

  18. Eikelboom's morphotype 0803 in activated sludge belongs to the genus Caldilinea in the phylum Chloroflexi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelund, Caroline; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Mielczarek, Artur Tomasz; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2011-06-01

    Micromanipulated filamentous bacteria from bulking and foaming activated sludge morphologically identified as Eikelboom type 0803 were shown to be affiliated to the genus Caldilinea within the phylum Chloroflexi. Specific FISH probes were designed for their in situ detection and quantification in seven Danish wastewater treatment plants with biological nutrient removal. The survey applied all species-specific probes for Chloroflexi of relevance in activated sludge treatment plants as well as the phylum-specific probes. Type 0803 filaments constituted around 20% of the total Chloroflexi population. In four of the treatment plants, type 0803 and type 0092 co-occurred and were the dominating fraction of the Chloroflexi population. In the other plants, most Chloroflexi could not be identified beyond the phylum level, suggesting a yet far larger diversity. On average, for all plants, the total Chloroflexi population constituted 12% of the entire microbial population and seems to play an important structural role in the sludge floc formation. Ecophysiological characterization of type 0803 showed their potential role in macromolecule conversion as evident by high levels of exoenzyme expression. Acetate was not consumed. Glucose was consumed with oxygen, nitrite and nitrite as electron acceptors, suggesting that type 0803 may be a denitrifier. Their surfaces were hydrophobic, explaining their occasional occurrence in foaming incidents.

  19. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Arthur, Robert K.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2) from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements. PMID:26020930

  20. Phylum-specific environmental DNA analysis reveals remarkably high global biodiversity of Cercozoa (Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, David; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    This study presents the first 18S rRNA multi-library environmental PCR survey of a single protozoan phylum, Cercozoa Cavalier-Smith 1998, from a range of different habitats. Phylogenetic analysis reveals at least nine novel clades within the phylum, several possibly at the level of order or above. Further experiments are described to ascertain the true ecological and geographical distributions of some clades that might be inferred from the tree to be restricted in either or both ways. These results suggest that the diversity of cercozoan taxa may run into thousands of lineages, making it comparable in diversity to the largest better-characterized protozoan phyla, e.g. Ciliophora (ciliates and suctorians) and Foraminifera. New sequences of cultured Spongomonas, Metromonas and Metopion are also presented. In the light of these additions, and the increased taxon sampling from the environmental libraries, some revisions of cercozoan classification are made: the transfer of Spongomonadea from Reticulofilosa to Monadofilosa; the removal of Metopiida from Sarcomonadea; and the creation of the new order Metromonadida, currently containing the single genus Metromonas. Although Metromonas groups with weak to moderate support with Chlorarachnea, it is here placed in superclass Monadofilosa, to which it is morphologically more similar.

  1. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Bauters

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species.

  2. Phylogeny of anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota), with contributions from yak in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewei; Liu, Xingzhong; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Neocallimastigomycota contains eight genera (about 20 species) of strictly anaerobic fungi. The evolutionary relationships of these genera are uncertain due to insufficient sequence data to infer their phylogenies. Based on morphology and molecular phylogeny, thirteen isolates obtained from yak faeces and rumen digesta in China were assigned to Neocallimastix frontalis (nine isolates), Orpinomyces joyonii (two isolates) and Caecomyces sp. (two isolates), respectively. The phylogenetic relationships of the eight genera were evaluated using complete ITS and partial LSU sequences, compared to the ITS1 region which has been widely used in this phylum in the past. Five monophyletic lineages corresponding to six of the eight genera were statistically supported. Isolates of Caecomyces and Cyllamyces were present in a single lineage and could not be separated properly. Members of Neocallimastigomycota with uniflagellate zoospores represented by Piromyces were polyphyletic. The Piromyces-like genus Oontomyces was consistently closely related to the traditional Anaeromyces, and separated the latter genus into two clades. The phylogenetic position of the Piromyces-like genus Buwchfawromyces remained unresolved. Orpinomyces and Neocallimastix, sharing polyflagellate zoospores, were supported as sister genera in the LSU phylogeny. Apparently ITS, specifically ITS1 alone, is not a good marker to resolve the generic affinities of the studied fungi. The LSU sequences are easier to align and appear to work well to resolve generic relationships. This study provides a comparative phylogenetic revision of Neocallimastigomycota isolates known from culture and sequence data.

  3. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacy L Gordon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2 from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements.

  4. Distribution and evolution of nitrogen fixation genes in the phylum Bacteroidetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun-ichi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Iino, Takao; Noda, Satoko; Hongoh, Yuichi; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2015-01-01

    Diazotrophs had not previously been identified among bacterial species in the phylum Bacteroidetes until the rapid expansion of bacterial genome sequences, which revealed the presence of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in this phylum. We herein determined the draft genome sequences of Bacteroides graminisolvens JCM 15093(T) and Geofilum rubicundum JCM 15548(T). In addition to these and previously reported 'Candidatus Azobacteroides pseudotrichonymphae' and Paludibacter propionicigenes, an extensive survey of the genome sequences of diverse Bacteroidetes members revealed the presence of a set of nif genes (nifHDKENB) in strains of Dysgonomonas gadei, Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides, Saccharicrinis fermentans, and Alkaliflexus imshenetskii. These eight species belonged to and were distributed sporadically within the order Bacteroidales. Acetylene reduction activity was detected in the five species examined, strongly suggesting their diazotrophic nature. Phylogenetic analyses showed monophyletic clustering of the six Nif protein sequences in the eight Bacteroidales species, implying that nitrogen fixation is ancestral to Bacteroidales and has been retained in these species, but lost in many other lineages. The identification of nif genes in Bacteroidales facilitates the prediction of the organismal origins of related sequences directly obtained from various environments.

  5. [Use of genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers of Chlorobi Phylum representatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turova, T P; Kovaleva, O L; Gorlenko, V M; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2014-01-01

    This work examined the feasibility of using certain genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers adequate for studying phylogeny and ecology of green sulfur bacteria (GSB) of the Chlorobi phylum. Primers designed to amplify the genes of ATP citrate lyase (aclB) and citrate synthase (gltA) revealed the respective genes in the genomes of all of the newly studied GSB strains. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on nucleotide sequences of these genes and amino acid sequences of the conceptually translated proteins were on the whole congruent with the 16S rRNA gene tree, with the single exception of GltA of Chloroherpeton thalassium, which formed a separate branch beyond the cluster comprised by other representatives of the Chlorobi phylum. Thus, the aclB genes but not gltA genes proved to be suitable for the design of primers specific to all Chlorobi representatives. Therefore, it was the aclB gene that was further used asa molecular marker to detect GSB in enrichment cultures and environmental samples. AclB phylotypes of GSB were revealed in all of the samples studied, with the exception of environmental samples from soda lakes. The identification of the revealed phylotypes was in agreement with the identification based on the FMO protein gene (fmo), is a well-known Chlorobi-specific molecular marker.

  6. The Ecological Controls on the Prevalence of Candidate Division TM7 in Polar Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristrom eWinsley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The candidate division TM7 is ubiquitous and yet uncultured phylum of the Bacteria that encompasses a commonly environmental associated clade, TM7-1, and a ‘host-associated’ clade, TM7-3. However, as members of the TM7 phylum have not been cultured, little is known about what differs between these two clades. We hypothesized that these clades would have different environmental niches. To test this, we used a large-scale global soil dataset, encompassing 223 soil samples, their environmental parameters and associated bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequence data. We correlated chemical, physical and biological parameters of each soil with the relative abundance of the two major classes of the phylum to deduce factors that influence the groups’ seemingly ubiquitous nature. The two classes of the phylum (TM7-1 and TM7-3 were indeed distinct from each other in their habitat requirements. A key determinant of each class’ prevalence appears to be the pH of the soil. The class TM7-1 displays a facultative anaerobic nature with correlations to more acidic soils with total iron, silicon, titanium and copper indicating a potential for siderophore production. However, the TM7-3 class shows a more classical oligotrophic, heterotroph nature with a preference for more alkaline soils, and a probable pathogenic role with correlations to extractable iron, sodium and phosphate. In addition, the TM7-3 was abundant in diesel contaminated soils highlighting a resilient nature along with a possible carbon source. In addition to this both classes had unique co-occurrence relationships with other bacterial phyla. In particular, both groups had opposing correlations to the Gemmatimonadetes phylum, with the TM7-3 class seemingly being outcompeted by this phylum to result in a negative correlation. These ecological controls allow the characteristics of a TM7 phylum preferred niche to be defined and give insight into possible avenues for cultivation of this previously

  7. Diaspore bank of bryophytes in tropical rain forests: the importance of breeding system, phylum and microhabitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel-Silva, Adaíses S; Válio, Ivany Ferraz Marques; Rydin, Håkan

    2012-02-01

    Diaspore banks are crucial for the maintenance and resilience of plant communities, but diaspore banks of bryophytes remain poorly known, especially from tropical ecosystems. This is the first study to focus on the role of diaspore banks of bryophytes in tropical rain forests. Our aim was to test whether microhabitat (substrate type) and species traits (breeding system, phylum) are important in explaining the diaspore bank composition. Using samples cultivated in the laboratory, we assessed the number of species and shoots emerging from bark, decaying wood and soil from two sites of the Atlantic rain forest (montane and sea level) in Brazil by comparing the contribution of species by phylum (mosses, liverworts) and breeding system (monoicous, dioicous). More species emerged from bark (68) and decaying wood (55) than from soil (22). Similar numbers of species were found at both sites. Mosses were more numerous in terms of number of species and shoots, and monoicous species dominated over dioicous species. Substrate pH had only weak effects on shoot emergence. Species commonly producing sporophytes and gemmae had a high contribution to the diaspore banks. These superficial diaspore banks represented the extant vegetation rather well, but held more monoicous species (probably short-lived species) compared to dioicous ones. We propose that diaspore bank dynamics are driven by species traits and microhabitat characteristics, and that short-term diaspore banks of bryophytes in tropical rain forests contribute to fast (re)establishment of species after disturbances and during succession, particularly dioicous mosses investing in asexual reproduction and monoicous mosses investing in sexual reproduction.

  8. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Passel, Mark W.J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Kant, Ravi [University of Helsinki; Palva, Airi [University of Helsinki; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; De Vos, Willem M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Zoetendal, Erwin G. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  9. Independent candidates in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Gonzalo Santiago

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the issue of independent candidates in Mexico, because through the so-called political reform of 2012 was incorporated in the Political Constitution of the Mexican United States the right of citizens to be registered as independent candidates. Also, in September 2013 was carried out a reform of Article 116 of the Political Constitution of the Mexican United States in order to allow independent candidates in each state of the Republic. However, prior to the constitutio...

  10. Evaluating the Utility of Single-Locus DNA Barcoding for the Identification of Ribbon Worms (Phylum Nemertea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Sundberg

    Full Text Available Whereas many nemerteans (ribbon worms; phylum Nemertea can be identified from external characters if observed alive, many are still problematic. When it comes to preserved specimens (as in e.g. marine inventories, there is a particular need for specimen identifier alternatives. Here, we evaluate the utility of COI (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I as a single-locus barcoding gene. We sequenced, data mined, and compared gene fragments of COI for 915 individuals representing 161 unique taxonomic labels for 71 genera, and subjected different constellations of these to both distance-based and character-based DNA barcoding approaches, as well as species delimitation analyses. We searched for the presence or absence of a barcoding gap at different taxonomic levels (phylum, subclass, family and genus in an attempt to understand at what level a putative barcoding gap presents itself. This was performed both using the taxonomic labels as species predictors and using objectively inferred species boundaries recovered from our species delimitation analyses. Our data suggest that COI works as a species identifier for most groups within the phylum, but also that COI data are obscured by misidentifications in sequence databases. Further, our results suggest that the number of predicted species within the dataset is (in some cases substantially higher than the number of unique taxonomic labels-this highlights the presence of several cryptic lineages within well-established taxa and underscores the urgency of an updated taxonomic backbone for the phylum.

  11. Genomic Analysis of Caldithrix abyssi, the Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium of the Novel Bacterial Phylum Calditrichaeota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kublanov, Ilya V.; Sigalova, Olga M.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Lebedinsky, Alexander V.; Rinke, Christian; Kovaleva, Olga; Chernyh, Nikolai A.; Ivanova, Natalia; Daum, Chris; Reddy, T.B.K.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Reva, Oleg N.; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.

    2017-01-01

    The genome of Caldithrix abyssi, the first cultivated representative of a phylum-level bacterial lineage, was sequenced within the framework of Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project. The genomic analysis revealed mechanisms allowing this anaerobic bacterium to ferment peptides or to implement nitrate reduction with acetate or molecular hydrogen as electron donors. The genome encoded five different [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases, one of which, group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase, is presumably involved in lithoheterotrophic growth, three other produce H2 during fermentation, and one is apparently bidirectional. The ability to reduce nitrate is determined by a nitrate reductase of the Nap family, while nitrite reduction to ammonia is presumably catalyzed by an octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase εHao. The genome contained genes of respiratory polysulfide/thiosulfate reductase, however, elemental sulfur and thiosulfate were not used as the electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration with acetate or H2, probably due to the lack of the gene of the maturation protein. Nevertheless, elemental sulfur and thiosulfate stimulated growth on fermentable substrates (peptides), being reduced to sulfide, most probably through the action of the cytoplasmic sulfide dehydrogenase and/or NAD(P)-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenase (sulfhydrogenase) encoded by the genome. Surprisingly, the genome of this anaerobic microorganism encoded all genes for cytochrome c oxidase, however, its maturation machinery seems to be non-operational due to genomic rearrangements of supplementary genes. Despite the fact that sugars were not among the substrates reported when C. abyssi was first described, our genomic analysis revealed multiple genes of glycoside hydrolases, and some of them were predicted to be secreted. This finding aided in bringing out four carbohydrates that supported the growth of C. abyssi: starch, cellobiose, glucomannan and xyloglucan. The genomic analysis

  12. Isolation and survey of novel fluoroacetate-degrading bacteria belonging to the phylum Synergistetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Carl K; Webb, Richard I; Sly, Lindsay I; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Chris S

    2012-06-01

    Microbial dehalogenation of chlorinated compounds in anaerobic environments is well known, but the degradation of fluorinated compounds under similar conditions has rarely been described. Here, we report on the isolation of a bovine rumen bacterium that metabolizes fluoroacetate under anaerobic conditions, the mode of degradation and its presence in gut ecosystems. The bacterium was identified using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as belonging to the phylum Synergistetes and was designated strain MFA1. Growth was stimulated by amino acids with greater quantities of amino acids metabolized in the presence of fluoroacetate, but sugars were not fermented. Acetate, formate, propionate, isobutryate, isovalerate, ornithine and H(2) were end products of amino acid metabolism. Acetate was the primary end product of fluoroacetate dehalogenation, and the amount produced correlated with the stoichiometric release of fluoride which was confirmed using fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance ((19) F NMR) spectroscopy. Hydrogen and formate produced in situ were consumed during dehalogenation. The growth characteristics of strain MFA1 indicated that the bacterium may gain energy via reductive dehalogenation. This is the first study to identify a bacterium that can anaerobically dehalogenate fluoroacetate. Nested 16S rRNA gene-specific PCR assays detected the bacterium at low numbers in the gut of several herbivore species.

  13. Antifilarial activity of Zoanthus species (Phylum Coelenterata, Class Anthzoa) against human lymphatic filaria, Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V; Saxena, A; Pandey, K; Bajpai, Preeti; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2004-07-01

    The chloroform methanol (1:1) extract of an unidentified green zoanthus (Phylum Coelenterata, Class Anthozoa) showed promising in vitro adulticidal activity with a lethal concentration of 125 microg/ml on Brugia malayi. This extract brought about a 52.2% reduction in circulating microfilariae of B. malayi when administered to infected Mastomys coucha at 250 mg/kg, orally for 5 consecutive days. Further fractionation of the extract led to the recovery of four fractions, which were evaluated simultaneously in both in vitro and in vivo systems against B. malayi. The chloroform fraction at 250 mg/kg orally for 5 days exhibited the highest macrofilaricidal action (42.5%), closely followed by the insoluble n-butanol fraction (34.3%), the soluble hexane fraction (32.4%), and the soluble n-butanol fraction (20.4%). In addition, the hexane soluble fraction caused 44.3% sterilization of the surviving female parasites. Two compounds isolated were found devoid of antifilarial activity.

  14. Global Habitat Suitability and Ecological Niche Separation in the Phylum Placozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Paknia

    Full Text Available The enigmatic placozoans, which hold a key position in the metazoan Tree of Life, have attracted substantial attention in many areas of biological and biomedical research. While placozoans have become an emerging model system, their ecology and particularly biogeography remain widely unknown. In this study, we use modelling approaches to explore habitat preferences, and distribution pattern of the placozoans phylum. We provide hypotheses for discrete ecological niche separation between genetic placozoan lineages, which may also help to understand biogeography patterns in other small marine invertebrates. We, here, used maximum entropy modelling to predict placozoan distribution using 20 environmental grids of 9.2 km2 resolution. In addition, we used recently developed metrics of niche overlap to compare habitat suitability models of three genetic clades. The predicted distributions range from 55°N to 44°S and are restricted to regions of intermediate to warm sea surface temperatures. High concentrations of salinity and low nutrient concentrations appear as secondary factors. Tests of niche equivalency reveal the largest differences between placozoan clades I and III. Interestingly, the genetically well-separated clades I and V appear to be ecologically very similar. Our habitat suitability models predict a wider latitudinal distribution for placozoans, than currently described, especially in the northern hemisphere. With respect to biogeography modelling, placozoans show patterns somewhere between higher metazoan taxa and marine microorganisms, with the first group usually showing complex biogeographies and the second usually showing "no biogeography."

  15. Molecular phylogeny of echiuran worms (Phylum: Annelida reveals evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Goto

    Full Text Available The Echiura, or spoon worms, are a group of marine worms, most of which live in burrows in soft sediments. This annelid-like animal group was once considered as a separate phylum because of the absence of segmentation, although recent molecular analyses have placed it within the annelids. In this study, we elucidate the interfamily relationships of echiuran worms and their evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism, by performing molecular phylogenetic analyses using four genes (18S, 28S, H3, and COI of representatives of all extant echiuran families. Our results suggest that Echiura is monophyletic and comprises two unexpected groups: [Echiuridae+Urechidae+Thalassematidae] and [Bonelliidae+Ikedidae]. This grouping agrees with the presence/absence of marked sexual dimorphism involving dwarf males and the paired/non-paired configuration of the gonoducts (genital sacs. Furthermore, the data supports the sister group relationship of Echiuridae and Urechidae. These two families share the character of having anal chaetae rings around the posterior trunk as a synapomorphy. The analyses also suggest that deposit feeding is a basal feeding mode in echiurans and that filter feeding originated once in the common ancestor of Urechidae. Overall, our results contradict the currently accepted order-level classification, especially in that Echiuroinea is polyphyletic, and provide novel insights into the evolution of echiuran worms.

  16. The occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota in Israeli soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In December 1997 and June-July 2000, 49 and 113 rhizosphere soil and root mixtures were collected, respectively, to determine the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of the phylum Glomeromycota in different sites of Israel. Except for five samples taken from under cultivated plants, all the others came from under Ammophila arenaria and Oenothera drummondii colonizing sand dunes adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea. After a continuous cultivation of the mixtures in pot trap cultures with Plantago lanceolata as the plant host up to 2006 and their examination at least twice a year, spores of AMF were found in 41 and 103 cultures with the 1997 and 2000 soil and root mixtures, respectively. The spores represented 30 species and 8 undescribed morphotypes in 7 genera of the Glomeromycota. The AMF most frequently found in Israeli soils were Glomus aurantium and G. constrictum, followed by G. coronatum, G. gibbosum, an undescribed Glomus 178, and Scutellospora dipurpurescens. Up to 2001, 21 species of AMF were known to occur in Israel, and this paper increases this number to 33, of which 11 are new fungi for this country. Moreover, four species, G. aurantium, G. drummondii, G. walkeri and G. xanthium, were recently described as new for science based on spores isolated from Israeli soils. Additionally, the general distribution in the world of the formally described species found in Israel was presented.

  17. A history of the taxonomy and systematics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi belonging to the phylum Glomeromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürmer, Sidney Luiz

    2012-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are grouped in a monophyletic group, the phylum Glomeromycota. In this review, the history and complexity of the taxonomy and systematics of these obligate biotrophs is addressed by recognizing four periods. The initial discovery period (1845-1974) is characterized by description mainly of sporocarp-forming species and the proposal of a classification for these fungi. The following alpha taxonomy period (1975-1989) established a solid morphological basis for species identification and classification, resulting in a profuse description of new species and a need to standardize the nomenclature of spore subcellular structures. The cladistics period from 1990 to 2000 saw the first cladistic classification of AMF based on phenotypic characters only. At the end of this period, genetic characters played a role in defining taxa and elucidating evolutionary relationships within the group. The most recent phylogenetic synthesis period (2001 to present) started with the proposal of a new classification based on genetic characters using sequences of the multicopy rRNA genes.

  18. A unique mitovirus from Glomeromycota, the phylum of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Ryoko; Ikeda, Yoji; Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota associate with most land plants and supply mineral nutrients to the host plants. One of the four viral segments found by deep-sequencing of dsRNA in the AM fungus Rhizophagus clarus strain RF1 showed similarity to mitoviruses and is characterized in this report. The genome segment is 2,895 nucleotides in length, and the largest ORF was predicted by applying either the mold mitochondrial or the universal genetic code. The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 820 amino acids with a molecular mass of 91.2 kDa and conserves the domain of the mitovirus RdRp superfamily. Accordingly, the dsRNA was designated as R. clarus mitovirus 1 strain RF1 (RcMV1-RF1). Mitoviruses are localized exclusively in mitochondria and thus generally employ the mold mitochondrial genetic code. The distinct codon usage of RcMV1-RF1, however, suggests that the virus is potentially able to replicate not only in mitochondria but also in the cytoplasm. RcMV1-RF1 RdRp showed the highest similarity to the putative RdRp of a mitovirus-like ssRNA found in another AM fungus, followed by RdRp of a mitovirus in an ascomycotan ectomycorrhizal fungus. The three mitoviruses found in the three mycorrhizal fungi formed a deeply branching clade that is distinct from the two major clades in the genus Mitovirus.

  19. Development of a multilocus-based approach for sponge (phylum Porifera) identification: refinement and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M. M.; Sorokin, Shirley J.; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    For sponges (phylum Porifera), there is no reliable molecular protocol available for species identification. To address this gap, we developed a multilocus-based Sponge Identification Protocol (SIP) validated by a sample of 37 sponge species belonging to 10 orders from South Australia. The universal barcode COI mtDNA, 28S rRNA gene (D3–D5), and the nuclear ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region were evaluated for their suitability and capacity for sponge identification. The highest Bit Score was applied to infer the identity. The reliability of SIP was validated by phylogenetic analysis. The 28S rRNA gene and COI mtDNA performed better than the ITS region in classifying sponges at various taxonomic levels. A major limitation is that the databases are not well populated and possess low diversity, making it difficult to conduct the molecular identification protocol. The identification is also impacted by the accuracy of the morphological classification of the sponges whose sequences have been submitted to the database. Re-examination of the morphological identification further demonstrated and improved the reliability of sponge identification by SIP. Integrated with morphological identification, the multilocus-based SIP offers an improved protocol for more reliable and effective sponge identification, by coupling the accuracy of different DNA markers. PMID:28150727

  20. The correlation between Clostridium-difficile infection and human gut concentrations of Bacteroidetes phylum and clostridial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, E; Amir, I; Zafran, M; Gophna, U; Samra, Z; Pitlik, S; Bishara, J

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to assess differences in bacterial intensities of Bacteroidetes phylum and different clostridial species in the human intestines with respect to C. difficile infection. Patients with a stool assay for C. difficile toxin were identified via the microbiology laboratory in our institute. Bacterial populations were quantified from stool samples of four groups of patients: Group I-patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD); Group II-asymptomatic C. difficile carriers; Group III-patients with non-C. difficile diarrhea; Group IV-patients with no diarrhea and negative stool samples for the C. difficile toxin (control group). Stool was examined for three genes-C. difficile toxin A gene, 16S rRNA gene from Clostridium thermocellum representing other clostridial species, and 16S rRNA gene from Bacteroides fragilis representing the Bacteroidetes phylum. Fifty-nine patients underwent analysis of the stool (CDAD group 14, carriers group 14, non-C. difficile diarrhea group 16, control group 15). C. difficile concentration was highest in the CDAD group, followed by the carriers group. Higher concentrations of both clostridial species and Bacteriodetes were observed in the control and non-C. difficile diarrhea groups compared to the CDAD and carriers groups. We demonstrated an inverse association between infection with C. difficile and the abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and other clostridial species in human intestines. Studies with larger samples and broader diagnostic procedures are needed in order to better explore and understand this association.

  1. Genome Analysis of Thermosulfurimonas dismutans, the First Thermophilic Sulfur-Disproportionating Bacterium of the Phylum Thermodesulfobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, Andrey V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Slobodkin, Alexander I.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2016-01-01

    Thermosulfurimonas dismutans S95T, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent is the first bacterium of the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria reported to grow by the disproportionation of elemental sulfur, sulfite, or thiosulfate with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source. In contrast to its phylogenetically close relatives, which are dissimilatory sulfate-reducers, T. dismutans is unable to grow by sulfate respiration. The features of this organism and its 2,1 Mb draft genome sequence are described in this report. Genome analysis revealed that the T. dismutans genome contains the set of genes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction including ATP sulfurylase, the AprA and B subunits of adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase, and dissimilatory sulfite reductase. The oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfite could be enabled by APS reductase-associated electron transfer complex QmoABC and heterodisulfide reductase. The genome also contains several membrane-linked molybdopterin oxidoreductases that are thought to be involved in sulfur metabolism as subunits of thiosulfate, polysulfide, or tetrathionate reductases. Nitrate could be used as an electron acceptor and reduced to ammonium, as indicated by the presence of periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases. Autotrophic carbon fixation is enabled by the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway, and the complete set of genes that is required for nitrogen fixation is also present in T. dismutans. Overall, our results provide genomic insights into energy and carbon metabolism of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-disproportionating bacterium that could be important primary producer in microbial communities of deep-sea hydrothermal vents. PMID:27379079

  2. The zooflagellates Stephanopogon and Percolomonas are a clade (class Percolatea: Phylum Percolozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Nikolaev, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The enigmatic marine protozoan Stephanopogon was first classified with ciliate protozoa because its pellicle also has rows of cilia. As ciliates have nuclear dimorphism with separate germline and somatic nuclei, Stephanopogon with several identical nuclei was regarded as a model for a hypothetical homokaryotic ancestor of ciliates. When electron microscopy revealed radical differences from ciliates this idea was abandoned, but its evolutionary position remains controversial, affinities with three other phyla being suggested. We sequenced 18S rDNA from Stephanopogon aff. minuta and actin genes from it and Stephanopogon apogon to clarify their evolutionary position. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA nest S. aff. minuta and Stephanopogon minuta securely within the protozoan phylum Percolozoa with zooflagellates of the genus Percolomonas, their closest relatives, comprising the clade Percolatea. This supports a previous grouping of Stephanopogon (order Pseudociliatida) with Percolomonas (order Percolomonadida) as a purely zooflagellate class Percolatea within Percolozoa, in contrast to the fundamentally amoeboid Heterolobosea, which are probably ancestral to Percolatea. Stephanopogon actins evolve exceptionally fast: actin trees place them as a long branch within bikont eukaryotes without revealing their sisters. We establish Percolomonadidae fam. n. for Percolomonas, excluding Pharyngomonas kirbyi g., sp. n. and Pharyngomonas (=Tetramastix=Percolomonas) salina comb. n., which unlike Percolomonas have two anterior and two posterior cilia and a pocket-like pharynx, like "Macropharyngomonas", now grouped with Pharyngomonas as a new purely zooflagellate class Pharyngomonadea, within a new subphylum Pharyngomonada; this contrasts them with the revised ancestrally amoeboflagellate subphylum Tetramitia. We discuss evolution of the percolozoan cytoskeleton and different body forms.

  3. Primary and Presidential Candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at primary and presidential candidates in 2008 and 2012. Evidence suggests that voters are less influenced by candidates’ color, gender, or religious observation than previously. Conversely, markers of difference remain salient in the imaginations of pollsters and journalists...

  4. Co-evolution of RNA polymerase with RbpA in the phylum Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Dey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of RbpA in the backdrop of M. smegmatis showed that it rescues mycobacterial RNA polymerase from rifampicin-mediated inhibition (Dey et al., 2010; Dey et al., 2011. Paget and co-workers (Paget et al., 2001; Newell et al., 2006 have revealed that RbpA homologs occur exclusively in actinobacteria. Newell et al. (2006 showed that MtbRbpA, when complemented in a ∆rbpA mutant of S. coelicolor, showed a low recovery of MIC (from 0.75 to 2 μg/ml as compared to complementation by native RbpA of S. coelicolor (MIC increases from 0.75 to 11 μg/ml. Our studies on MsRbpA show that it is a differential marker for M. smegmatis RNA polymerase as compared to E. coli RNA polymerase at IC50 levels of rifampicin. A recent sequence-based analysis by Lane and Darst (2010 has shown that RNA polymerases from Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria have had a divergent evolution. E. coli is a representative of Proteobacteria and M. smegmatis is an Actinobacterium. RbpA has an exclusive occurrence in Actinobacteria. Since protein–protein interactions might not be conserved across different species, therefore, the probable reason for the indifference of MsRbpA toward E. coli RNA polymerase could be the lineage-specific differences between actinobacterial and proteobacterial RNA polymerases. These observations led us to ask the question as to whether the evolution of RbpA in Actinobacteria followed the same route as that of RNA polymerase subunits from actinobacterial species. We show that the exclusivity of RbpA in Actinobacteria and the unique evolution of RNA polymerase in this phylum share a co-evolutionary link. We have addressed this issue by a blending of experimental and bioinformatics based approaches. They comprise of induction of bacterial cultures coupled to rifampicin-tolerance, transcription assays and statistical comparison of phylogenetic trees for different pairs of proteins in actinobacteria.

  5. Pilot Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    pilot selection system and to best support up-front track selection for SUPT? Assumptions The USAF Trainer Masterplan does not include a plan to...replace the T-41 with a new flight screening aircraft. In addition, the Masterplan states that candidates will be track selected prior to entry into primary...training. (3:10) While the Masterplan is not a static document and aircraft procurement plans and/or the timing of track selection are subject to

  6. Genome of Diaporthe sp. provides insights into the potential inter-phylum transfer of a fungal sesquiterpenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sena Filho, Jose Guedes; Quin, Maureen B; Spakowicz, Daniel J; Shaw, Jeffrey J; Kucera, Kaury; Dunican, Brian; Strobel, Scott A; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Fungi have highly active secondary metabolic pathways which enable them to produce a wealth of sesquiterpenoids that are bioactive. One example is Δ6-protoilludene, the precursor to the cytotoxic illudins, which are pharmaceutically relevant as anticancer therapeutics. To date, this valuable sesquiterpene has only been identified in members of the fungal division Basidiomycota. To explore the untapped potential of fungi belonging to the division Ascomycota in producing Δ6-protoilludene, we isolated a fungal endophyte Diaporthe sp. BR109 and show that it produces a diversity of terpenoids including Δ6-protoilludene. Using a genome sequencing and mining approach 17 putative novel sesquiterpene synthases were identified in Diaporthe sp. BR109. A phylogenetic approach was used to predict which gene encodes Δ6-protoilludene synthase, which was then confirmed experimentally. These analyses reveal that the sesquiterpene synthase and its putative sesquiterpene scaffold modifying cytochrome P450(s) may have been acquired by inter-phylum horizontal gene transfer from Basidiomycota to Ascomycota. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that inter-phylum transfer of these minimal sequiterpenoid secondary metabolic pathways may have occurred in other fungi. This work provides insights into the evolution of fungal sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolic pathways in the production of pharmaceutically relevant bioactive natural products.

  7. Single-Cell Genome and Group-Specific dsrAB Sequencing Implicate Marine Members of the Class Dehalococcoidia (Phylum Chloroflexi) in Sulfur Cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Cooper, Myriel; Schreiber, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    The marine subsurface sediment biosphere is widely inhabited by bacteria affiliated with the class Dehalococcoidia (DEH), phylum Chloroflexi, and yet little is known regarding their metabolisms. In this report, genomic content from a single DEH cell (DEH-C11) with a 16S rRNA gene that was affilia......The marine subsurface sediment biosphere is widely inhabited by bacteria affiliated with the class Dehalococcoidia (DEH), phylum Chloroflexi, and yet little is known regarding their metabolisms. In this report, genomic content from a single DEH cell (DEH-C11) with a 16S rRNA gene...... subsurface DEH....

  8. Phylum-wide analysis of SSU rDNA reveals deep phylogenetic relationships among nematodes and accelerated evolution toward Crown Clades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holterman, M.H.M.; Wurff, van der A.W.G.; Elsen, van den S.J.J.; Megen, van H.H.B.; Bongers, A.M.T.; Holovachov, O.V.; Bakker, J.; Helder, J.

    2006-01-01

    Inference of evolutionary relationships between nematodes is severely hampered by their conserved morphology, the high frequency of homoplasy, and the scarcity of phylum-wide molecular data. To study the origin of nematode radiation and to unravel the phylogenetic relationships between distantly rel

  9. Comparative Metagenomics Reveal Phylum Level Temporal and Spatial Changes in Mycobiome of Belowground Parts of Crocus sativus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Singh, Heikham Russiachand; Gowda, Malali; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Plant-fungal associations have been explored by routine cultivation based approaches and cultivation based approaches cannot catalogue more than 5% of fungal diversity associated with any niche. In the present study, an attempt has been made to catalogue fungal diversity associated with belowground parts i.e. rhizosphere and cormosphere, of Crocus sativus (an economically important herb) during two growth stages, using cultivation independent ITS gene targeted approach, taking bulk soil as reference. The 454 pyrosequencing sequence data analysis suggests that the fungal diversity was niche and growth stage specific. Fungi diversity, in the present case, was not only different between the two organs (roots and corm) but the dominance pattern varies between the cormosphere during two growth stages. Zygomycota was dominant fungal phylum in the rhizosphere whereas Basidiomycota was dominant in cormosphere during flowering stage. However in cormosphere though Basidiomycota was dominant phylum during flowering stage but Zygomycota was dominant during dormant stage. Interestingly, in cormosphere, the phyla which was dominant at dormant stage was rare at flowering stage and vice-versa (Basidiomycota: Flowering = 93.2% Dormant = 0.05% and Zygomycota: Flowering = 0.8% Dormant = 99.7%). At genus level, Rhizopus was dominant in dormant stage but was rare in flowering stage (Rhizopus: Dormant = 99.7% Flowering = 0.55%). This dynamics is not followed by the bulk soil fungi which was dominated by Ascomycota during both stages under study. The genus Fusarium, whose species F. oxysporum causes corm rot in C. sativus, was present during both stages with slightly higher abundance in roots. Interestingly, the abundance of Rhizopus varied a great deal in two stages in cormosphere but the abundance of Fusarium was comparable in two growth stages (Bulk soil Flowering = 0.05%, Rhizosphere Flowering = 1.4%, Cormosphere Flowering = 0.06%, Bulk soil Dormant = 2.47% and cormosphere dormant

  10. Complete genome sequence of the extremely acidophilic methanotroph isolate V4, Methylacidiphilum infernorum, a representative of the bacterial phylum Verrucomicrobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stott Matthew B

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Verrucomicrobia is a widespread but poorly characterized bacterial clade. Although cultivation-independent approaches detect representatives of this phylum in a wide range of environments, including soils, seawater, hot springs and human gastrointestinal tract, only few have been isolated in pure culture. We have recently reported cultivation and initial characterization of an extremely acidophilic methanotrophic member of the Verrucomicrobia, strain V4, isolated from the Hell's Gate geothermal area in New Zealand. Similar organisms were independently isolated from geothermal systems in Italy and Russia. Results We report the complete genome sequence of strain V4, the first one from a representative of the Verrucomicrobia. Isolate V4, initially named "Methylokorus infernorum" (and recently renamed Methylacidiphilum infernorum is an autotrophic bacterium with a streamlined genome of ~2.3 Mbp that encodes simple signal transduction pathways and has a limited potential for regulation of gene expression. Central metabolism of M. infernorum was reconstructed almost completely and revealed highly interconnected pathways of autotrophic central metabolism and modifications of C1-utilization pathways compared to other known methylotrophs. The M. infernorum genome does not encode tubulin, which was previously discovered in bacteria of the genus Prosthecobacter, or close homologs of any other signature eukaryotic proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal proteins and RNA polymerase subunits unequivocally supports grouping Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chlamydiae into a single clade, the PVC superphylum, despite dramatically different gene content in members of these three groups. Comparative-genomic analysis suggests that evolution of the M. infernorum lineage involved extensive horizontal gene exchange with a variety of bacteria. The genome of M. infernorum shows apparent adaptations for existence under extremely

  11. Characterization of a new marine nitrite oxidizing bacterium, Nitrospina watsonii sp. nov., a member of the newly proposed phylum "Nitrospinae".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieck, Eva; Keuter, Sabine; Wenzel, Thilo; Bock, Eberhard; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Nitrite oxidizing bacteria are an integral part of the nitrogen cycle in marine waters, but the knowledge about their diversity is limited. Recently, a high abundance of Nitrospina-like 16S rRNA gene sequences has been detected in oceanic habitats with low oxygen content by molecular methods. Here, we describe a new strain of Nitrospina, which was sampled in 100m depth from the Black Sea. It coexisted with a not-yet cultivated chemoorganotrophic gammaproteobacterium and could be purified by classical isolation methods including Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The new Nitrospina-like bacterium grew lithoautotrophically at 28°C in diluted seawater supplemented with inorganic salts and nitrite. Gram-negative rods were characterized morphologically, physiologically and partly biochemically. The 16S rRNA gene of the new strain of Nitrospina is 97.9% similar to the described species N. gracilis and DNA/DNA hybridization experiments revealed a relatedness of 30.0%. The data from both Nitrospina species and environmental clones were used for an extensive 16S rRNA based phylogenetic study applying high quality filtering. Treeing analyses confirm the newly defined phylum status for "Nitrospinae" [18]. The results of phylogenetic and genotypic analyses support the proposal of a novel species Nitrospina watsonii sp. nov. (type strain 347(T), LMG 27401(T), NCIMB 14887(T)).

  12. Water bears in the Anthropocene: a comparison of urban and woodland tardigrade (Phylum Tardigrada communities in Southwestern Louisiana, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry A. Meyer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans have had such a profound effect on global ecosystems, including biodiversity, that Anthropocene is being increasingly used as a chronological term to mark the period of greatest human impact. No areas show the effect of human impact on the environment more than cities, which often have novel combinations of species in unique communities. Tardigrades (Phylum Tardigrada have often been collected in cities, but studies dedicated to urban tardigrade biodiversity are few, and those comparing urban diversity with nearby rural or natural sites even fewer. In this paper we compare the diversity and abundance of tardigrade species in Lake Charles with a nearby forested nonurban site, Sam Houston Jones State Park (SHJSP. Although tardigrade density did not differ significantly between Lake Charles and SHJSP, species richness and diversity were greater in SHJSP (17 species, H1=3.01 than in Lake Charles (8 species, H1=1.30. All but one species found in Lake Charles also occurred in SHJSP. The number of species found in Lake Charles lies within the range (5-10 found in previous urban surveys. All tardigrade studies comparing urban with nearby nonurban habitats have found lower species richness in cities.

  13. Design of phylum-specific hybrid primers for DNA barcoding: addressing the need for efficient COI amplification in the Echinodermata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoareau, T B; Boissin, E

    2010-11-01

    Recent research has shown the usefulness of the Folmer region of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) as a genetic barcode to assist in species delimitation of echinoderms. However, amplification of COI is often challenging in echinoderms (low success or pseudogenes). We present a method that allows the design of phylum-specific hybrid primers, and use this to develop COI primers for the Echinodermata. We aligned COI sequences from 310 echinoderm species and designed all possible primers along the consensus sequence with two methods (standard degenerate and hybrid). We found much lower degeneracy for hybrid primers (4-fold degeneracy) than for standard degenerate primers (≥48-fold degeneracy). We then designed the most conserved hybrid primers to amplify a >500-bp region within COI. These primers successfully amplified this gene region in all tested taxa (123 species across all echinoderm classes). Sequencing of 30 species among these confirmed both the quality of the sequences (>500 bp, no pseudogenes) and their utility as a DNA barcode. This method should be useful for developing primers for other mitochondrial genes and other phyla. The method will also be of interest for the development of future projects involving both community-based genetic assessments on macroorganisms and biodiversity assessment of environmental samples using high-throughput sequencing.

  14. 76 FR 4896 - Call for Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Call for Candidates AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board. ACTION: Notice... Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) is currently seeking candidates (candidates must...

  15. Wenyingzhuangia gracilariae sp. nov., a novel marine bacterium of the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Oku, Naoya; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    A Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, beige-pigmented, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strain designated N5DB13-4(T) was isolated from the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Rhodophyta) collected at Sodegaura Beach, Chiba, Japan. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the novel isolate is affiliated with the family Flavobacteriaceae within the phylum Bacteroidetes and that it showed highest sequence similarity (97.3 %) to Wenyingzhuangia heitensis H-MN17(T). The hybridization values for DNA-DNA relatedness between the strains N5DB13-4(T) and W. heitensis H-MN17(T) were 34.1 ± 3.5 %, which is below the threshold accepted for the phylogenetic definition of a novel prokaryotic species. The DNA G+C content of strain N5DB13-4(T) was determined to be 31.8 mol%; MK-6 was identified as the major menaquinone; and the presence of iso-C15:0, iso-C15:0 3-OH and iso-C17:0 3-OH as the major (>10 %) cellular fatty acids. A complex polar lipid profile was present consisting of phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified glycolipids and four unidentified lipids. From the distinct phylogenetic position and combination of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Wenyingzhuangia for which the name Wenyingzhuangia gracilariae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of W. gracilariae sp. nov. is N5DB13-4(T) (=KCTC 42246 (T)=NBRC 110602(T)).

  16. Understanding alternative fluxes/effluxes through comparative metabolic pathway analysis of phylum actinobacteria using a simplified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mansi; Lal, Devi; Saxena, Anjali; Anand, Shailly; Kaur, Jasvinder; Kaur, Jaspreet; Lal, Rup

    2013-12-01

    Actinobacteria are known for their diverse metabolism and physiology. Some are dreadful human pathogens whereas some constitute the natural flora for human gut. Therefore, the understanding of metabolic pathways is a key feature for targeting the pathogenic bacteria without disturbing the symbiotic ones. A big challenge faced today is multiple drug resistance by Mycobacterium and other pathogens that utilize alternative fluxes/effluxes. With the availability of genome sequence, it is now feasible to conduct the comparative in silico analysis. Here we present a simplified approach to compare metabolic pathways so that the species specific enzyme may be traced and engineered for future therapeutics. The analyses of four key carbohydrate metabolic pathways, i.e., glycolysis, pyruvate metabolism, tri carboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway suggest the presence of alternative fluxes. It was found that the upper pathway of glycolysis was highly variable in the actinobacterial genomes whereas lower glycolytic pathway was highly conserved. Likewise, pentose phosphate pathway was well conserved in contradiction to TCA cycle, which was found to be incomplete in majority of actinobacteria. The clustering based on presence and absence of genes of these metabolic pathways clearly revealed that members of different genera shared identical pathways and, therefore, provided an easy method to identify the metabolic similarities/differences between pathogenic and symbiotic organisms. The analyses could identify isoenzymes and some key enzymes that were found to be missing in some pathogenic actinobacteria. The present work defines a simple approach to explore the effluxes in four metabolic pathways within the phylum actinobacteria. The analysis clearly reflects that actinobacteria exhibit diverse routes for metabolizing substrates. The pathway comparison can help in finding the enzymes that can be used as drug targets for pathogens without effecting symbiotic organisms

  17. Exploring the potential of small RNA subunit and ITS sequences for resolving phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Ctenophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, Paul; Bekkouche, Nicolas; Jager, Muriel; Quéinnec, Eric; Manuel, Michaël

    2015-04-01

    Ctenophores are a phylum of non-bilaterian marine (mostly planktonic) animals, characterised by several unique synapomorphies (e.g., comb rows, apical organ). Relationships between and within the nine recognised ctenophore orders are far from understood, notably due to a paucity of phylogenetically informative anatomical characters. Previous attempts to address ctenophore phylogeny using molecular data (18S rRNA) led to poorly resolved trees but demonstrated the paraphyly of the order Cydippida. Here we compiled an updated 18S rRNA data set, notably including a few newly sequenced species representing previously unsampled families (Lampeidae, Euryhamphaeidae), and we constructed an additional more rapidly evolving ITS1 + 5.8S rRNA + ITS2 alignment. These data sets were analysed separately and in combination under a probabilistic framework, using different methods (maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference) and models (e.g., doublet model to accommodate secondary structure; data partitioning). An important lesson from our exploration of these datasets is that the fast-evolving internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions are useful markers for reconstructing high-level relationships within ctenophores. Our results confirm the paraphyly of the order Cydippida (and thus a "cydippid-like" ctenophore common ancestor) and suggest that the family Mertensiidae could be the sister group of all other ctenophores. The family Lampeidae (also part of the former "Cydippida") is probably the sister group of the order Platyctenida (benthic ctenophores). The order Beroida might not be monophyletic, due to the position of Beroe abyssicola outside of a clade grouping the other Beroe species and members of the "Cydippida" family Haeckeliidae. Many relationships (e.g. between Pleurobrachiidae, Beroida, Cestida, Lobata, Thalassocalycida) remain unresolved. Future progress in understanding ctenophore phylogeny will come from the use of additional rapidly evolving markers and improvement of

  18. Screening of antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate extracts of phylum Mollusca from South East Coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj Gupta; Muthuvel Arumugam; Raj Vardhan Azad; Rohit Saxena; Supriyo Ghose; Nihar Ranjan Biswas; Thirumurthy Velpandian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate species of Phylum Mollusca from south east coast of India.Methods:Live specimens of molluscan species were collected and their methanolic extracts were evaluated for preliminary antiangiogenic activity using the in ovo chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay. The extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity using chemical cautery induced corneal neovascularization assay in rats and oxygen induced retinopathy assay in rat pups.Results:In the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay, four methanolic extracts of marine molluscan species viz. Meretrix meretrix, Meretrix casta, Telescopium telescopium and Bursacrumena methanolic extracts exhibited noticeable antiangiogenic activity at the tested concentration of 200 µg whereby they significantly inhibited the VEGF induced proliferation of new blood vessels. Among these four extracts, the methanolic extract of Meretrix casta exhibited relatively higher degree of antiangiogenic activity with an inhibitiory percentage (64.63%) of the VEGF induced neovascularization followed by the methanolic extracts of Telescopium telescopium (62.02%), Bursa crumena (60.48%) and Meretrix meretrix (47.01%). These four methanolic extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity whereby the methanolic extract of Telescopium telescopium exhibited most noticeable inhibition (42.58%) of the corneal neovascularization in rats in comparison to the sham treated group, and also exhibited most noticeable inhibition (31.31%) of the oxygen induced retinal neovascularization in rat pups in comparison to the hyperoxia group that was observed for considerable retinal neovascularization.Conclusions:The significant antiangiogenic activity evinced by the extract of Telescopium telescopium merits further investigation for ocular neovascular diseases.

  19. Methane oxidation at 55 degrees C and pH 2 by a thermoacidophilic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia phylum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tajul; Jensen, Sigmund; Reigstad, Laila Johanne; Larsen, Oivind; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2008-01-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria constitute a ubiquitous group of microorganisms playing an important role in the biogeochemical carbon cycle and in control of global warming through natural reduction of methane emission. These bacteria share the unique ability of using methane as a sole carbon and energy source and have been found in a great variety of habitats. Phylogenetically, known methanotrophs constitute a rather limited group and have so far only been affiliated with the Proteobacteria. Here, we report the isolation and initial characterization of a nonproteobacterial obligately methanotrophic bacterium. The isolate, designated Kam1, was recovered from an acidic hot spring in Kamchatka, Russia, and is more thermoacidophilic than any other known methanotroph, with optimal growth at approximately 55 degrees C and pH 3.5. Kam1 is only distantly related to all previously known methanotrophs and belongs to the Verrucomicrobia lineage of evolution. Genes for methane monooxygenases, essential for initiation of methane oxidation, could not be detected by using standard primers in PCR amplification and Southern blot analysis, suggesting the presence of a different methane oxidation enzyme. Kam1 also lacks the well developed intracellular membrane systems typical for other methanotrophs. The isolate represents a previously unrecognized biological methane sink, and, due to its unusual phylogenetic affiliation, it will shed important light on the origin, evolution, and diversity of biological methane oxidation and on the adaptation of this process to extreme habitats. Furthermore, Kam1 will add to our knowledge of the metabolic traits and biogeochemical roles of the widespread but poorly understood Verrucomicrobia phylum.

  20. Candidate Prediction Models and Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Madsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    This document lists candidate prediction models for Work Package 3 (WP3) of the PSO-project called ``Intelligent wind power prediction systems'' (FU4101). The main focus is on the models transforming numerical weather predictions into predictions of power production. The document also outlines...

  1. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-08

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/.

  2. Candidate cave entrances on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Glen E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents newly discovered candidate cave entrances into Martian near-surface lava tubes, volcano-tectonic fracture systems, and pit craters and describes their characteristics and exploration possibilities. These candidates are all collapse features that occur either intermittently along laterally continuous trench-like depressions or in the floors of sheer-walled atypical pit craters. As viewed from orbit, locations of most candidates are visibly consistent with known terrestrial features such as tube-fed lava flows, volcano-tectonic fractures, and pit craters, each of which forms by mechanisms that can produce caves. Although we cannot determine subsurface extents of the Martian features discussed here, some may continue unimpeded for many kilometers if terrestrial examples are indeed analogous. The features presented here were identified in images acquired by the Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System visible-wavelength camera, and by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera. Select candidates have since been targeted by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment. Martian caves are promising potential sites for future human habitation and astrobiology investigations; understanding their characteristics is critical for long-term mission planning and for developing the necessary exploration technologies.

  3. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of the Acetothermia (OP1, was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylum Parcubacteria (OD1 that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, including Microgenomates (OP11, Atribacteria (OP9, candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, and Marinimicrobia (SAR406. The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes.

  4. Automatic Classification of Kepler Planetary Transit Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    McCauliff, Sean D.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Burke, Christopher J.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Seader, Shawn; Li, Jie; Cote, Miles

    2014-01-01

    In the first three years of operation the Kepler mission found 3,697 planet candidates from a set of 18,406 transit-like features detected on over 200,000 distinct stars. Vetting candidate signals manually by inspecting light curves and other diagnostic information is a labor intensive effort. Additionally, this classification methodology does not yield any information about the quality of planet candidates; all candidates are as credible as any other candidate. The torrent of exoplanet disco...

  5. Enthalpy screen of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2016-11-15

    The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the binding affinity of drug candidates have been acknowledged to be important determinants of the quality of a drug molecule. These quantities, usually summarized in the thermodynamic signature, provide a rapid assessment of the forces that drive the binding of a ligand. Having access to the thermodynamic signature in the early stages of the drug discovery process will provide critical information towards the selection of the best drug candidates for development. In this paper, the Enthalpy Screen technique is presented. The enthalpy screen allows fast and accurate determination of the binding enthalpy for hundreds of ligands. As such, it appears to be ideally suited to aid in the ranking of the hundreds of hits that are usually identified after standard high throughput screening.

  6. Leishmaniasis: vaccine candidates and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhawana; Sundar, Shyam

    2012-06-06

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite and a causative agent of the various clinical forms of leishmaniasis. High cost, resistance and toxic side effects of traditional drugs entail identification and development of therapeutic alternatives. The sound understanding of parasite biology is key for identifying novel drug targets, that can induce the cell mediated immunity (mainly CD4+ and CD8+ IFN-gamma mediated responses) polarized towards a Th1 response. These aspects are important in designing a new vaccine along with the consideration of the candidates with respect to their ability to raise memory response in order to improve the vaccine performance. This review is an effort to identify molecules according to their homology with the host and their ability to be used as potent vaccine candidates.

  7. Host-associated bacterial taxa from Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, GN02, Synergistetes, SR1, TM7, and WPS-2 Phyla/candidate divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Camanocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: In addition to the well-known phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, Fusobacteria, Tenericutes, and Chylamydiae, the oral microbiomes of mammals contain species from the lesser-known phyla or candidate divisions, including Synergistetes, TM7, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, GN02, SR1, and WPS-2. The objectives of this study were to create phyla-selective 16S rDNA PCR primer pairs, create selective 16S rDNA clone libraries, identify novel oral taxa, and update canine and human oral microbiome databases. Design: 16S rRNA gene sequences for members of the lesser-known phyla were downloaded from GenBank and Greengenes databases and aligned with sequences in our RNA databases. Primers with potential phylum level selectivity were designed heuristically with the goal of producing nearly full-length 16S rDNA amplicons. The specificity of primer pairs was examined by making clone libraries from PCR amplicons and determining phyla identity by BLASTN analysis. Results: Phylum-selective primer pairs were identified that allowed construction of clone libraries with 96–100% specificity for each of the lesser-known phyla. From these clone libraries, seven human and two canine novel oral taxa were identified and added to their respective taxonomic databases. For each phylum, genome sequences closest to human oral taxa were identified and added to the Human Oral Microbiome Database to facilitate metagenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic studies that involve tiling sequences to the most closely related taxon. While examining ribosomal operons in lesser-known phyla from single-cell genomes and metagenomes, we identified a novel rRNA operon order (23S-5S-16S in three SR1 genomes and the splitting of the 23S rRNA gene by an I-CeuI-like homing endonuclease in a WPS-2 genome. Conclusions: This study developed useful primer pairs for making phylum-selective 16S rRNA clone libraries. Phylum-specific libraries

  8. Toward organometallic antischistosomal drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jeannine; Keiser, Jennifer; Gasser, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of novel approaches for the treatment of parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis. Among the different approaches used, organometallic compounds were found to offer unique opportunities in the design of antiparasitic drug candidates. A ferrocenyl derivative, namely ferroquine, has even entered clinical trials as a novel antimalarial. In this short review, we report on the studies describing the use of organometallic compounds against schistosomiasis.

  9. A canonical FtsZ protein in Verrucomicrobium spinosum, a member of the Bacterial phylum Verrucomicrobia that also includes tubulin-producing Prosthecobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staley James T

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin and evolution of the homologous GTP-binding cytoskeletal proteins FtsZ typical of Bacteria and tubulin characteristic of eukaryotes is a major question in molecular evolutionary biology. Both FtsZ and tubulin are central to key cell biology processes – bacterial septation and cell division in the case of FtsZ and in the case of tubulins the function of microtubules necessary for mitosis and other key cytoskeleton-dependent processes in eukaryotes. The origin of tubulin in particular is of significance to models for eukaryote origins. Most members of domain Bacteria possess FtsZ, but bacteria in genus Prosthecobacter of the phylum Verrucomicrobia form a key exception, possessing tubulin homologs BtubA and BtubB. It is therefore of interest to know whether other members of phylum Verrucomicrobia possess FtsZ or tubulin as their FtsZ-tubulin gene family representative. Results Verrucomicrobium spinosum, a member of Phylum Verrucomicrobia of domain Bacteria, has been found to possess a gene for a protein homologous to the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ. The deduced amino acid sequence has sequence signatures and predicted secondary structure characteristic for FtsZ rather than tubulin, but phylogenetic trees and sequence analysis indicate that it is divergent from all other known FtsZ sequences in members of domain Bacteria. The FtsZ gene of V. spinosum is located within a dcw gene cluster exhibiting gene order conservation known to contribute to the divisome in other Bacteria and comparable to these clusters in other Bacteria, suggesting a similar functional role. Conclusion Verrucomicrobium spinosum has been found to possess a gene for a protein homologous to the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ. The results suggest the functional as well as structural homology of the V. spinosum FtsZ to the FtsZs of other Bacteria implying its involvement in cell septum formation during division. Thus, both bacteria-like FtsZ and eukaryote

  10. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  11. Teacher Candidates' Communication Skills and Communicator Styles

    OpenAIRE

    Cem ÇUHADAR; Özgür, Hasan; Akgün, Fatma; GÜNDÜZ, Şemseddin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the relationship between the communication skills and the communicator styles of teacher candidates. This research was conducted among the senior class students, studying at Trakya University, Faculty of Education in the fall semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. 205 women and 110 men, in a total of 315 teacher candidates participated in the research. As a result, it has been observed that the teacher candidates bear animated/expressive features the...

  12. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of thes...

  13. Evidence for the presence of key chlorophyll-biosynthesis-related proteins in the genus Rubrobacter (Phylum Actinobacteria) and its implications for the evolution and origin of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Radhey S; Khadka, Bijendra

    2016-02-01

    Homologs showing high degree of sequence similarity to the three subunits of the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase enzyme complex (viz. BchL, BchN, and BchB), which carries out a central role in chlorophyll-bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) biosynthesis, are uniquely found in photosynthetic organisms. The results of BLAST searches and homology modeling presented here show that proteins exhibiting a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to the BchB and BchN proteins are also present in organisms from the high G+C Gram-positive phylum of Actinobacteria, specifically in members of the genus Rubrobacter (R. x ylanophilus and R. r adiotolerans). The results presented exclude the possibility that the observed BLAST hits are for subunits of the nitrogenase complex or the chlorin reductase complex. The branching in phylogenetic trees and the sequence characteristics of the Rubrobacter BchB/BchN homologs indicate that these homologs are distinct from those found in other photosynthetic bacteria and that they may represent ancestral forms of the BchB/BchN proteins. Although a homolog showing high degree of sequence similarity to the BchL protein was not detected in Rubrobacter, another protein, belonging to the ParA/Soj/MinD family, present in these bacteria, exhibits high degree of structural similarity to the BchL. In addition to the BchB/BchN homologs, Rubrobacter species also contain homologs showing high degree of sequence similarity to different subunits of magnesium chelatase (BchD, BchH, and BchI) as well as proteins showing significant similarity to the BchP and BchG proteins. Interestingly, no homologs corresponding to the BchX, BchY, and BchZ proteins were detected in the Rubrobacter species. These results provide the first suggestive evidence that some form of photosynthesis either exists or was anciently present within the phylum Actinobacteria (high G+C Gram-positive) in members of the genus Rubrobacter. The significance of these results concerning the

  14. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    events by monitoring the brightness of a very large number of stars over extended time intervals. During the past years, it has also included a search for periodic, very shallow "dips" in the brightness of stars, caused by the regular transit of small orbiting objects (small stars, brown dwarfs [2] or Jupiter-size planets). The OGLE team has since announced 177 "planetary transit candidates" from their survey of several hundred thousand stars in three southern sky fields, one in the direction of the Galactic Centre, another within the Carina constellation and the third within the Centaurus/Musca constellations. The nature of the transiting object can however only be established by subsequent radial-velocity observations of the parent star. The size of the velocity variations (the amplitude) is directly related to the mass of the companion object and therefore allows discrimination between stars and planets as the cause of the observed brightness "dip". A Bonanza of Low-Mass Stars An international team of astronomers [3] has made use of the 8.2-m VLT Kueyen telescope for this work. Profiting from the multiplex capacity of the FLAMES/UVES facility that permits to obtain high-resolution spectra of up to 8 objects simultaneously, they have looked at 60 OGLE transit candidate stars, measuring their radial velocities with an accuracy of about 50 m/s [4]. This ambitious programme has so far resulted in the discovery of five new transiting exoplanets (see, e.g., ESO PR 11/04 for the announcement of two of those). Most of the other transit candidates identified by OGLE have turned out to be eclipsing binaries, that is, in most cases common, small and low-mass stars passing in front of a solar-like star. This additional wealth of data on small and light stars is a real bonanza for the astronomers. Constraining the Relation Between Mass and Radius Low-mass stars are exceptionally interesting objects, also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with

  15. Microheliella maris (Microhelida ord. n.), an ultrastructurally highly distinctive new axopodial protist species and genus, and the unity of phylum Heliozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuki, Akinori; Chao, Ema E; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    A new heliozoan, Microheliella maris, has sufficiently distinctive ultrastructure to merit a new order, Microhelida. Its 18S and 28S rRNA genes were sequenced earlier under the informal name 'marine microheliozoan'; we here sequenced its Hsp90 gene. A three-gene tree suggests that it is distantly related to centrohelids and others in chromist subkingdom Hacrobia; but it is too divergent to be placed accurately by few genes. Unlike centrohelids, its central spherical centrosome has two concentric granular shells and a dense core devoid of a trilaminar central disc. Microtubules radiate from the centrosomal shells. Unlike centrohelids, axopodia have only three microtubules, fixed basally by dense plasma membrane anchors, and bear terminal and lateral haptosome-like extrusomes. As in the heliomonad Heliomorpha, the centrosome is embedded in a nuclear cavity, and centrosomal microtubules traverse the nucleus inside cytoplasmic channels. A novel filogranular network interconnects mitochondria, ER, and plasma membrane. The microbody is attached to the nucleus and mitochondrion, which has vermicular tubular cristae. We group Microhelida and Heliomonadida, purged of dissimilar flagellates, as a new tubulicristate class Endohelea within phylum Heliozoa. Previously misassigned GenBank 18S rDNA sequences reveal Microhelida as diverse and ancient. We discuss principles underlying the biogenesis and diversity of axopodial patterns.

  16. 187-gene phylogeny of protozoan phylum Amoebozoa reveals a new class (Cutosea) of deep-branching, ultrastructurally unique, enveloped marine Lobosa and clarifies amoeba evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Chao, Ema E; Lewis, Rhodri

    2016-06-01

    Monophyly of protozoan phylum Amoebozoa, and subdivision into subphyla Conosa and Lobosa each with different cytoskeletons, are well established. However early diversification of non-ciliate lobose amoebae (Lobosa) is poorly understood. To clarify it we used recently available transcriptomes to construct a 187-gene amoebozoan tree for 30 species, the most comprehensive yet. This robustly places new genus Atrichosa (formerly lumped with Trichosphaerium) within lobosan class Tubulinea, not Discosea as previously supposed. We identified an earliest diverging lobosan clade comprising marine amoebae armoured by porose scaliform cell-envelopes, here made a novel class Cutosea with two pseudopodially distinct new families. Cutosea comprise Sapocribrum, ATCC PRA-29 misidentified as 'Pessonella', plus from other evidence Squamamoeba. We confirm that Acanthamoeba and ATCC 50982 misidentified as Stereomyxa ramosa are closely related. Discosea have a strongly supported major subclade comprising Thecamoebida plus Glycostylida (suborders Dactylopodina, Stygamoebina; Vannellina) phylogenetically distinct from Centramoebida. Stygamoeba is sister to Dactylopodina. Himatismenida are either sister to Centramoebida or deeper branching. Discosea usually appear holophyletic (rarely paraphyletic). Paramoeba transcriptomes include prokinetoplastid Perkinsela-like endosymbiont sequences. Cunea, misidentified as Mayorella, is closer to Paramoeba than Vexillifera within holophyletic Dactylopodina. Taxon-rich site-heterogeneous rDNA trees confirm cutosan distinctiveness, allow improved conosan taxonomy, and reveal previous dictyostelid tree misrooting.

  17. Cattle Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlec, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to make an overview of important candidate genes affecting milk yield and milk quality parameters, with an emphasis on genes associated with the quantity and quality of milk proteins and milk fat.

  18. New Zika Vaccine Candidate Provides Powerful Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163384.html New Zika Vaccine Candidate Provides Powerful Protection Made without live ... HealthDay News) -- A single dose of an experimental Zika vaccine protected mice and monkeys from the virus, ...

  19. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, M.A. van; Brunner, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information i

  20. Towards Treating Chemistry Teacher Candidates as Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewthwaite, Brian Ellis

    2008-05-01

    This research inquiry investigates the factors influencing chemistry teacher candidates’ development during their extended practica in the second and final year of an After-Degree Bachelor of Education at a university in central Canada. A variety of data sources are used to identify the risk and protective factors impeding and contributing to the achievement of their chemistry pedagogical aspirations. Two theoretical frameworks, both having their origins in the pioneering work of Kurt Lewin, are used to conceptualize how a complex amalgam of personal attribute and environmental factors and the interplay among these factors influence teacher candidate developmental trajectories. The tenets of both Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological model and Learning Environment research provide insights into how the factors influencing teacher candidate development can be understood and systematically documented to provide a template for reflective consideration of the practicum experience for both teacher candidates and those involved in fostering the development of chemistry teacher candidates.

  1. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Driel Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information is the usual strategy by which candidate disease genes are selected. Enrichment for candidate disease genes, however, depends on the skills of the operating researcher. Over the past few years, a number of bioinformatics methods that enrich for the most likely candidate disease genes have been developed. Such in silico prioritisation methods may further improve by completion of datasets, by development of standardised ontologies across databases and species and, ultimately, by the integration of different strategies.

  2. Do People 'Like' Candidates on Facebook?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    The online popularity of a few exceptional candidates has led many to suggest that social media have given politicians powerful ways of communicating directly with voters. In this paper, we examine whether this is happening on a significant scale and show, based on analysis of 224 candidates....... We therefore suggest that the political implications of social media are generally better understood in terms of facilitating indirect communication and institutional change than in terms of direct communication....

  3. Cardiac evaluation of liver transplant candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes Susan Mandell; JoAnn Lindenfeld; Mei-Yung Tsou; Michael Zimmerman

    2008-01-01

    Physicians previously thought that heart disease was rare in patients with end stage liver disease. However, recent evidence shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy is increased in transplant candidates compared to most other surgical candidates. Investigators estimate that up to 26% of all liver transplant candidates have at least one critical coronary artery stenosis and that at least half of these patients will die perioperatively of cardiac complications. Cardiomyopathy also occurs in greater frequency. While all patients with advanced cardiac disease have defects in cardiac performance, a larger than expected number of patients have classical findings of dilated, restrictive and hypertropic cardiomyopathy. This may explain why up to 56% of patients suffer from hypoxemia due to pulmonary edema following transplant surgery. There is considerable controversy on how to screen transplant candidates for the presence of heart disease. Questions focus upon, which patients should be screened and what tests should be used. This review examines screening strategies for transplant candidates and details the prognostic value of common tests used to identify ischemic heart disease. We also review the physiological consequences of cardiomyopathy in transplant candidates and explore the specific syndrome of "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy".

  4. A New Way to Confirm Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    What was the big deal behind the Kepler news conference yesterday? Its not just that the number of confirmed planets found by Kepler has more than doubled (though thats certainly exciting news!). Whats especially interesting is the way in which these new planets were confirmed.Number of planet discoveries by year since 1995, including previous non-Kepler discoveries (blue), previous Kepler discoveries (light blue) and the newly validated Kepler planets (orange). [NASA Ames/W. Stenzel; Princeton University/T. Morton]No Need for Follow-UpBefore Kepler, the way we confirmed planet candidates was with follow-up observations. The candidate could be validated either by directly imaging (which is rare) or obtaining a large number radial-velocity measurements of the wobble of the planets host star due to the planets orbit. But once Kepler started producing planet candidates, these approaches to validation became less feasible. A lot of Kepler candidates are small and orbit faint stars, making follow-up observations difficult or impossible.This problem is what inspired the development of whats known as probabilistic validation, an analysis technique that involves assessing the likelihood that the candidates signal is caused by various false-positive scenarios. Using this technique allows astronomers to estimate the likelihood of a candidate signal being a true planet detection; if that likelihood is high enough, the planet candidate can be confirmed without the need for follow-up observations.A breakdown of the catalog of Kepler Objects of Interest. Just over half had previously been identified as false positives or confirmed as candidates. 1284 are newly validated, and another 455 have FPP of1090%. [Morton et al. 2016]Probabilistic validation has been used in the past to confirm individual planet candidates in Kepler data, but now Timothy Morton (Princeton University) and collaborators have taken this to a new level: they developed the first code thats designed to do fully

  5. JELLYFISH GALAXY CANDIDATES AT LOW REDSHIFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Omizzolo, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Paccagnella, A. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Padova (Italy); Moretti, A.; D’Onofrio, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Padova (Italy); Jaffé, Y. L. [Department of Astronomy, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Vulcani, B. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8582 (Japan); Fritz, J. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, CRyA, UNAM, Michoacán (Mexico); Couch, W. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Galaxies that are being stripped of their gas can sometimes be recognized from their optical appearance. Extreme examples of stripped galaxies are the so-called “jellyfish galaxies” that exhibit tentacles of debris material with a characteristic jellyfish morphology. We have conducted the first systematic search for galaxies that are being stripped of their gas at low-z (z = 0.04−0.07) in different environments, selecting galaxies with varying degrees of morphological evidence for stripping. We have visually inspected B- and V-band images and identified 344 candidates in 71 galaxy clusters of the OMEGAWINGS+WINGS sample and 75 candidates in groups and lower mass structures in the PM2GC sample. We present the atlas of stripping candidates and a first analysis of their environment and their basic properties, such as morphologies, star formation rates and galaxy stellar masses. Candidates are found in all clusters and at all clustercentric radii, and their number does not correlate with the cluster velocity dispersion σ or X-ray luminosity L{sub X}. Interestingly, convincing cases of candidates are also found in groups and lower mass halos (10{sup 11}−10{sup 14}M{sub ⊙}), although the physical mechanism at work needs to be securely identified. All the candidates are disky, have stellar masses ranging from log M/M{sub ⊙} < 9 to > 11.5 and the majority of them form stars at a rate that is on average a factor of 2 higher (2.5σ) compared to non-stripped galaxies of similar mass. The few post-starburst and passive candidates have weak stripping evidence. We conclude that disturbed morphologies suggestive of stripping phenomena are ubiquitous in clusters and could be present even in groups and low mass halos. Further studies will reveal the physics of the gas stripping and clarify the mechanisms at work.

  6. Jellyfish Galaxy Candidates at Low Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Omizzolo, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Moretti, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Jaffé, Y. L.; Vulcani, B.; Fritz, J.; Couch, W.; D'Onofrio, M.

    2016-03-01

    Galaxies that are being stripped of their gas can sometimes be recognized from their optical appearance. Extreme examples of stripped galaxies are the so-called “jellyfish galaxies” that exhibit tentacles of debris material with a characteristic jellyfish morphology. We have conducted the first systematic search for galaxies that are being stripped of their gas at low-z (z = 0.04-0.07) in different environments, selecting galaxies with varying degrees of morphological evidence for stripping. We have visually inspected B- and V-band images and identified 344 candidates in 71 galaxy clusters of the OMEGAWINGS+WINGS sample and 75 candidates in groups and lower mass structures in the PM2GC sample. We present the atlas of stripping candidates and a first analysis of their environment and their basic properties, such as morphologies, star formation rates and galaxy stellar masses. Candidates are found in all clusters and at all clustercentric radii, and their number does not correlate with the cluster velocity dispersion σ or X-ray luminosity LX. Interestingly, convincing cases of candidates are also found in groups and lower mass halos (1011-1014M⊙), although the physical mechanism at work needs to be securely identified. All the candidates are disky, have stellar masses ranging from log M/M⊙ 11.5 and the majority of them form stars at a rate that is on average a factor of 2 higher (2.5σ) compared to non-stripped galaxies of similar mass. The few post-starburst and passive candidates have weak stripping evidence. We conclude that disturbed morphologies suggestive of stripping phenomena are ubiquitous in clusters and could be present even in groups and low mass halos. Further studies will reveal the physics of the gas stripping and clarify the mechanisms at work.

  7. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia.

  8. Picomonas judraskeda gen. et sp. nov.: the first identified member of the Picozoa phylum nov., a widespread group of picoeukaryotes, formerly known as 'picobiliphytes'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Seenivasan

    Full Text Available In 2007, a novel, putatively photosynthetic picoeukaryotic lineage, the 'picobiliphytes', with no known close eukaryotic relatives, was reported from 18S environmental clone library sequences and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although single cell genomics later showed these organisms to be heterotrophic rather than photosynthetic, until now this apparently widespread group of pico-(or nano-eukaryotes has remained uncultured and the organisms could not be formally recognized. Here, we describe Picomonas judraskeda gen. et sp. nov., from marine coastal surface waters, which has a 'picobiliphyte' 18S rDNA signature. Using vital mitochondrial staining and cell sorting by flow cytometry, a single cell-derived culture was established. The cells are biflagellate, 2.5-3.8×2-2.5 µm in size, lack plastids and display a novel stereotypic cycle of cell motility (described as the "jump, drag, and skedaddle"-cycle. They consist of two hemispherical parts separated by a deep cleft, an anterior part that contains all major cell organelles including the flagellar apparatus, and a posterior part housing vacuoles/vesicles and the feeding apparatus, both parts separated by a large vacuolar cisterna. From serial section analyses of cells, fixed at putative stages of the feeding cycle, it is concluded that cells are not bacterivorous, but feed on small marine colloids of less than 150 nm diameter by fluid-phase, bulk flow endocytosis. Based on the novel features of cell motility, ultrastructure and feeding, and their isolated phylogenetic position, we establish a new phylum, Picozoa, for Picomonas judraskeda, representing an apparently widespread and ecologically important group of heterotrophic picoeukaryotes, formerly known as 'picobiliphytes'.

  9. Interviews with candidates for president transmitted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Gomes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In election years, television interviews with presidential candidates, broadcast live, i.e. without the use of editing, have become an important genre of journalistic representation in Brazilian political campaigns. These interviews are conducted in network studios by well-known Brazilian news anchors. The fact that these interviews are transmitted directly to the electorate in an unedited form is generally offered as a guarantee of a genuine, authentic portrayal of the candidates themselves. The present work proposes that live network candidate interviews, rather than a means of political presentation on television, are actually an arena in which the institution of journalism attempts to use rhetorical and argumentative means to control the candidates’ discourse without relying on the traditional advantages conferred in daily news coverage.

  10. Candidal Leukoplakia on Patient with Removable Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiril Paskalis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida infection is a common problem in patients using removable dentures, with the most frequent type is denture stomatitis. But other type of candidal infection could also happen in these patients, such as candidal leukoplakia. We reported a 61 years old female patient who complained a painful lesion under her lower removable denture. Oral examination revealed white plaque that could not be rubbed over an ulcer on the lingual part of alveolar processes under the lower removable denture plate, and also an erythematous area on palatum durum above the upper full denture. The patient was suspected to have candidal leukoplakia on the lingual part of the mandible and denture stomatitis on the palate area. The treatment consisted of nystatin oral suspension, chlorhexidine solution, multivitamins, along with denture replacement and oral health education. The entire lesion resolved within 2 months therapy. Candidal infection treatment on denture patient needs not only medication or denture replacement, but also patient compliance to achieve maximal result.

  11. Fuzzy Treatment of Candidate Outliers in Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo E. D'Errico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Robustness against the possible occurrence of outlying observations is critical to the performance of a measurement process. Open questions relevant to statistical testing for candidate outliers are reviewed. A novel fuzzy logic approach is developed and exemplified in a metrology context. A simulation procedure is presented and discussed by comparing fuzzy versus probabilistic models.

  12. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Rietman; J.-P. Sommeijer; C.N. Levelt; J.A. Heimel; A.B. Brussaard; J.G.G. Borst; Y. Elgersma; N. Galjart; G.T. van der Horst; C.M. Pennartz; A.B. Smit; B.M. Spruijt; M. Verhage; C.I. de Zeeuw

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to the identification of genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. To discover new candidate genes, we have reexamined data from one such study on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in recombinant inbred BXD mouse strains. We have correlated

  13. Secondary Teacher Candidates' Lesson Planning Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, Christina; Zhang, Shaoan

    2016-01-01

    Teacher candidates (TCs) use clinical experiences to enact concepts taught in their university courses; therefore field experiences may be the most important component of teacher preparation (Hammerness et al., 2005). TCs require support and guidance as they learn to adapt curriculum materials for effective use in the classroom (Davis, 2006). They…

  14. Teacher Candidate Portfolios: Routine or Reflective Action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Christie; Dangel, Julie Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Documentation is sparse regarding outcomes associated with teacher education portfolios and the quality of the reflections contained within the portfolios. This collective case study of six teacher candidates enrolled in an elementary teacher education program at a large midwestern university explores the outcomes of developing a portfolio based…

  15. Query by image example: The CANDID approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, P.M.; Cannon, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computer Research and Applications Group; Hush, D.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-02-01

    CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases) was developed to enable content-based retrieval of digital imagery from large databases using a query-by-example methodology. A user provides an example image to the system, and images in the database that are similar to that example are retrieved. The development of CANDID was inspired by the N-gram approach to document fingerprinting, where a ``global signature`` is computed for every document in a database and these signatures are compared to one another to determine the similarity between any two documents. CANDID computes a global signature for every image in a database, where the signature is derived from various image features such as localized texture, shape, or color information. A distance between probability density functions of feature vectors is then used to compare signatures. In this paper, the authors present CANDID and highlight two results from their current research: subtracting a ``background`` signature from every signature in a database in an attempt to improve system performance when using inner-product similarity measures, and visualizing the contribution of individual pixels in the matching process. These ideas are applicable to any histogram-based comparison technique.

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Beginning Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Madeline; Espinoza, Sue

    2007-01-01

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Texas will need over 82,000 new teachers by 2008. Many teachers are leaving the profession within 5 years of being employed. Closing a revolving door, teacher preparation programs are discussing this phenomenon. One hundred sixty beginning teacher candidates were surveyed using the Emotional Skills…

  17. Spectroscopy of Hyades L dwarf candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Lodieu, N; Bejar, V J S

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic follow-up of L dwarf candidates identified in the Hyades cluster by Hogan et al. (2008). We obtained low-resolution optical spectroscopy with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the Gran Telescopio de Canarias for all 12 L dwarf candidates as well as new J-band imaging for a subsample of eight to confirm their proper motion. We also present mid-infrared photometry from the Wise Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for the Hyades L and T dwarf candidates and estimate their spectroscopic distances, effective temperatures, and masses. We confirm the cool nature of several L dwarf candidates and confirm astrometrically their membership, bridging the gap between the coolest M dwarfs and the two T dwarfs previously reported in the Hyades cluster. These members represent valuable spectral templates at an age of 625 Myr and slightly super solar metallicity (Fe/H=+0.13). We update the Hyades mass function across the hydrogen-burning limit and in the substel...

  18. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing ...

  19. Towards Treating Chemistry Teacher Candidates as Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewthwaite, Brian Ellis

    2008-01-01

    This research inquiry investigates the factors influencing chemistry teacher candidates' development during their extended practica in the second and final year of an After-Degree Bachelor of Education at a university in central Canada. A variety of data sources are used to identify the risk and protective factors impeding and contributing to the…

  20. Promoting Team Leadership Skills in Doctoral Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Whetton, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral programs can serve as an optimal opportunity for candidates to engage in tasks and activities to transform them and their schools. The paradigm shifts in such preparation involve moving from sitting and getting to making and taking. Most importantly, it requires building leadership skills and styles necessary to bring about desired change…

  1. Teacher Candidate Disposition: Moral Judgement or Regurgitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lisa E.

    2008-01-01

    Developing teacher candidates who are able to make moral judgements to equitably resolve classroom dilemmas, conduct student assessment and allocate resources is critical for today's diverse classrooms and should be part of fostering professional disposition. However, one challenge of incorporating dispositions in teacher education and a valid…

  2. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. (Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  3. 76 FR 36130 - Call for Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Call for Candidates AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board. ACTION: Request for... Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB or the Board) with the requested materials in response to...

  4. 11 CFR 9003.2 - Candidate certifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... excess of the aggregate payments to which they will be entitled under 11 CFR part 9004. (2) That no... funds under 11 CFR 9003.2(c)(3) shall not count against such candidate's $50,000 expenditure limitation... expenditures in excess of the limitations of 11 CFR 110.8(a), the Commission may seek civil penalties under...

  5. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liset Rietman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify new candidate genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity. To this aim, we combined previously obtained data from recombinant inbred BXD strains on ocular dominance (OD plasticity and gene expression levels in the neocortex. We validated our approach using a list of genes which alter OD plasticity when inactivated. The expression levels of one fifth of these genes correlated with the amount of OD plasticity. Moreover, the two genes with the highest relative inter-strain differences were among the correlated genes. This suggests that correlation between gene expression levels and OD plasticity is indeed likely to point to genes with a causal role in modulating or generating plasticity in the visual cortex. After this validation on known plasticity genes, we identified new candidate genes by a multi-step approach. First, a list was compiled of all genes of which the expression level in BXD strains correlate with the amount of OD plasticity. To narrow this list to the more promising candidates, we took its cross-section with a list of genes co-regulated with the sensitive period for OD plasticity and a list of genes associated with pathways implicated in OD plasticity. This analysis resulted in a list of 32 candidate genes. The list contained unproven, but not surprising, candidates, such as the genes for IGF-1, NCAM1, NOGO-A, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A receptor, acetylcholine esterase and the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. This was indicative of the viability of our approach, but more interesting were the novel candidate genes: Akap7, Akt1, Camk2d, Cckbr, Cd44, Crim1, Ctdsp2, Dnajc5, Gnai1, Itpka, Mapk8, Nbea, Nfatc3, Nlk, Npy5r, Phf21a, Phip, Ppm1l, Ppp1r1b, Rbbp4, Slc1a3, Slit2, Socs2, Spock3, St8sia1, Zfp207. The possible role of some of these candidates is discussed in the article.

  6. Ichthyobacterium seriolicida gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the phylum 'Bacteroidetes', isolated from yellowtail fish (Seriola quinqueradiata) affected by bacterial haemolytic jaundice, and proposal of a new family, Ichthyobacteriaceae fam. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomokazu; Matsuyama, Tomomasa; Sakai, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Yoji; Kamaishi, Takashi; Nakayasu, Chihaya; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Sorimachi, Minoru; Iida, Takaji

    2016-02-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped (0.3 × 4-6 μm), non-flagellated, aerobic strain with gliding motility, designated JBKA-6T, was isolated in 1991 from a yellowtail fish, Seriola quinqueradiata, showing symptoms of bacterial haemolytic jaundice. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain JBKA-6T was related most closely to members of the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum 'Bacteroidetes'. Furthermore, based on gyrB gene sequence analysis, JBKA-6T was classified into a single clade within the order Flavobacteriales, which was distinct from the known clades of the families Flavobacteriaceae, Blattabacteriaceae and Cryomorphaceae. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was identified as MK-6 (97.9 %), and the major cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were C14 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. The main polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified phospholipids, two unidentified aminophospholipids and two unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G+C content of JBKA-6T, as derived from its whole genome, was 33.4 mol%. The distinct phylogenetic position and phenotypic traits of strain JBKA-6T distinguish it from all other described species of the phylum 'Bacteroidetes', and therefore it was concluded that strain JBKA-6T represents a new member of the phylum 'Bacteroidetes', and the name Ichthyobacterium seriolicida gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Ichthyobacterium seriolicida is JBKA-6T ( = ATCC BAA-2465T = JCM 18228T). We also propose that Icthyobacterium gen. nov. is the type genus of a novel family, Ichthyobacteriaceae fam. nov.

  7. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...

  8. Attitudes of Teacher Candidates Towards Teaching Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Emre BOZDOĞAN

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the attitudes of teacher candidates regarding teaching profession from the point of view of different variables. This study was taken place at Ahi Ervan University Teachers’ College in 2006-2007 year of education and 181 Applied science and Social science students participated it. In order to obtain the data of the research scanning method entitled “Determination of Attitude Towards Teaching Profession” was used which was developed by Aşkar and Erden (1987 . During the analysis of the research data SPSS 12.0 program and the necessary statistical methods were used to analize the data of the research. As a result of the research it is understood that the attitudes of teacher candidates change according to sex and factor that made them to choose the department they study.

  9. Candidate Species Selection: Cultural and Photosynthetic Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Cultural information is provided for a data base that will be used to select candidate crop species for a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). Lists of food crops which will satisfy most nutritional requirements of humans and also fit within the scope of cultural restrictions that logically would apply to a closed, regenerating system were generated. Cultural and environmental conditions that will allow the most rapid production of edible biomass from candidate species in the shortest possible time are identified. Cultivars which are most productive in terms of edible biomass production by (CE) conditions, and which respond to the ever-closed approach to optimization realized by each shortened production cycle are selected. The experimental approach with lettuce was to grow the crop hydroponically in a growth chamber and to manipulate such variables as light level and duration, day/night temperature, and nutrient form and level in the solution culture.

  10. New drug candidates in tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begüm Evranos Aksöz

    2014-12-01

    makes them quit the treatment. From these problems emerges the need for development of effective new drugs, with smaller duration of therapy, less side effects and without the problem of resistance. After a long period such as 40 years, a new drug molecule bedaquiline was approved in December 2012 by FDA while the drug was in phase II research. Bedaquiline will be used in multidrug resistant tuberculosis therapy. When the chemical structures of bedaquilline and other candidate drugs were examined, the structures such as diarylquinoline, oxazolidinone, nitroimidazole, ethylenediamine drew attention. These common structures will be directive in designing new molecules. In this review, bedaquiline and other candidate drug molecules such as sutezolide, linezolide, PA-824, delamanide, rifapentine, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, BTZ-043, TBA-354, CPZEN-45, DC-159a, Q201, SQ-609, SQ-641 were mentioned.

  11. Decision Analysis of Advanced Scout Helicopter Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    assist the ASH SSG by constructing a comprehensive ASH evaluation model utilizing multi-attribute utility assessment ( MAUA ) modeling. ~~UA is a forre...results are included as well. The output of the MAUA model is a numerical representation of the worth of each ASH candidate. These numbers are...instance of a methodology called Multi-Attribute Utility Analysis ( MAUA ). In general, MAUA is characterized by the represen- tation of outcomes in terms

  12. Optical durability testing of candidate solar mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G.; Kennedy, C.; King, D.; Terwilliger, K.

    2000-03-24

    Durability testing of a variety of candidate solar reflector materials at outdoor test sites and in laboratory accelerated weathering chambers is the main activity within the Advanced Materials task of the Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Program. Outdoor exposure testing (OET) at up to eight outdoor, worldwide exposure sites has been underway for several years. This includes collaboration under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Power and Chemical Energy Systems (SolarPACES) agreement. Outdoor sites are fully instrumented in terms of monitoring meteorological conditions and solar irradiance. Candidate materials are optically characterized prior to being subjected to exposure in real and simulated weathering environments. Optical durability is quantified by periodically re-measuring hemispherical and specular reflectance as a function of exposure time. By closely monitoring the site- and time-dependent environmental stress conditions experienced by the material samples, site-dependent loss of performance may be quantified. In addition, accelerated exposure testing (AET) of these materials in parallel under laboratory-controlled conditions may permit correlating the outdoor results with AET, and subsequently predicting service lifetimes. Test results to date for a large number of candidate solar reflector materials are presented in this report. Acronyms are defined. Based upon OET and AET results to date, conclusions can be drawn about the optical durability of the candidate reflector materials. The optical durability of thin glass, thick glass, and two metallized polymers can be characterized as excellent. The all-polymeric construction, several of the aluminized reflectors, and a metallized polymer can be characterized as having intermediate durability and require further improvement, testing and evaluation, or both.

  13. Sensitive Radio Survey of Obscured Quasar Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael M; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars over a range of redshifts to understand the role of radio activity in accretion using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 6.0GHz and 1.4GHz. Our z~2.5 sample consists of optically-selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of $\

  14. Release of uranium from candidate wasteforms

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, N.; Harrison, M.; Brogden, M,; Hanson, B

    2012-01-01

    Large volumes of depleted natural and low-enriched uranium exist in the UK waste inventory. This work reports on initial investigations of the leaching performance of candidate glass and cement encapsulation matrices containing UO3 powder as well as that of uranium oxide powders. The surface areas of UO3 powder and the monolith samples of UO3 conditioned in the glass and cement matrices were very different making leaching comparisons difficult. The results showed that for both types of monoli...

  15. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Toshikazu Sasabe; Shoichi Ishiura

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports sugg...

  16. ATTITUDES OF ENGLISH TEACHER CANDIDATES TOWARD ICT

    OpenAIRE

    HİSMANOGLU, Murat; HİSMANOGLU, Sibel; Hismanoglu, Murat; HISMANOGLU, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of English teacher candidates at formal and distance higher education contexts toward ICT and reveal whether there was a significant difference between these two groups in terms of their attitudes toward ICT. The sample of the study consisted of 175 prospective English teachers at two different higher education contexts. The participants were randomly selected among forth-year students at the ELT departments of Euopean University of L...

  17. ATTITUDES OF ENGLISH TEACHER CANDIDATES TOWARD ICT

    OpenAIRE

    Hismanoglu, Murat; HISMANOGLU, Sibel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of English teacher candidates at formal and distance higher education contexts toward ICT and reveal whether there was a significant difference between these two groups in terms of their attitudes toward ICT. The sample of the study consisted of 175 prospective English teachers at two different higher education contexts. The participants were randomly selected among forth-year students at the ELT departments of Euopean University of L...

  18. Searching for candidate genes for male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.N.Truong; E.K.Moses; J.E.Armes; D.J.Venter; H.W.G.Baker

    2003-01-01

    Aim: We describe an approach to search for candidate genes for male infertility using the two human genome databases: the public University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and private Celera databases which list known and predicted gene sequences and provide related information such as gene function, tissue expression,known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods and Results: To demonstrate this in silico research, the following male infertility candidate genes were selected: (1) human BOULE, mutations of which may lead to germ cell arrest at the primary spermatocyte stage, (2) mutations of casein kinase 2 alpha genes which may cause globozoospermia, (3) DMR-N9 which is possibly involved in the spermatogenic defect of myotonic dystrophy and (4) several testes expressed genes at or near the breakpoints of a balanced translocation associated with hypospermatogenesis. We indicate how information derived from the human genome databases can be used to confirm these candidate genes may be pathogenic by studying RNA expression in tissue arrays using in situ hybridization and gene sequencing. Conclusion: The paper explains the new approach to discovering genetic causes of male infertility using information about the human genome. ( Asian J Andro1 2003 Jun; 5:137-147 )

  19. Nuclear safety in EU candidate countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-01

    Nuclear safety in the candidate countries to the European Union is a major issue that needs to be addressed in the framework of the enlargement process. Therefore WENRA members considered it was their duty to offer their technical assistance to their Governments and the European Union Institutions. They decided to express their collective opinion on nuclear safety in those candidate countries having at least one nuclear power plant: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. The report is structured as follows: A foreword including background information, structure of the report and the methodology used, General conclusions of WENRA members reflecting their collective opinion, For each candidate country, an executive summary, a chapter on the status of the regulatory regime and regulatory body, and a chapter on the nuclear power plant safety status. Two annexes are added to address the generic safety characteristics and safety issues for RBMK and VVER plants. The report does not cover radiation protection and decommissioning issues, while safety aspects of spent fuel and radioactive waste management are only covered as regards on-site provisions. In order to produce this report, WENRA used different means: For the chapters on the regulatory regimes and regulatory bodies, experts from WENRA did the work. For the chapters on nuclear power plant safety status, experts from WENRA and from French and German technical support organisations did the work. Taking into account the contents of these chapters, WENRA has formulated its general conclusions in this report.

  20. Molecular candidates of MTV in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Nico; Mirzaei, Mehrnoosh; van de Water, Willem

    2011-11-01

    In molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), the molecules of a gas are used as flow tracers. These tracers can be produced at will by illumination with a laser which promotes molecules to a long- lived excited state, fuses N2 and N2 to NO, or makes molecules phosphoresce. A while later these tagged molecules can be visualized by laser-induced fluorescence, or by just watching them while they phosphoresce. Candidates for MTV in turbulence research must be arranged in structures narrower than the Kolmogorov scale, which remain narrow as time progresses, and must live longer than the Kolmogorov time. These requirements invalidate many candidates, candidates once deemed successful. They do so in various surprising manners that involve a combination of fluid flow and molecular dynamics. Rather than velocimetry in turbulence, MTV techniques offer a unique view on basic dispersion processes at the smallest scales of turbulence. In this way we have measured the spreading of clouds whose size is a few times the Kolmogorov length and the Batchelor dispersion of objects whose size is inside the inertial range.

  1. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  2. ARIEL: an ESA M4 mission candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, L.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Heske, A.; Escudero Sanz, I.; Crouzet, P.-E.

    2016-07-01

    The Atmospheric Remote sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large survey (ARIEL) mission is an M-class mission candidate within the science program Cosmic Vision of the European Space Agency (ESA). It was selected in June 2015 as one of three candidates to enter an assessment phase (phase 0/A). This process involves the definition of science and mission requirements as well as a preliminary model payload, and an internal Concurrent Design Facility (CDF) study providing the input to parallel industrial studies (in progress since 2016). After this process, the three candidates will be reviewed and in mid-2017 one of them will be selected as the M4 mission for launch in 2026. ARIEL is a survey-type mission dedicated to the characterisation of exoplanetary atmospheres. Using the differential technique of transit spectroscopy, ARIEL will obtain transmission and/or emission spectra of the atmospheres of a large and diverse sample of known exoplanets (~500) covering a wide range of masses, densities, equilibrium temperatures, orbital properties and host-star characteristics. This will include hot Jupiters to warm Super-Earths, orbiting M5 to F0 stars. This paper describes critical requirements, and reports on the results of the Concurrent Design Facility (CDF) study that was conducted in June / July 2015, providing a description of the resulting spacecraft design. It will employ a 0.7 m x 1.1 m off-axis three mirror telescope, feeding four photometric channels in the VNIR range (0.5-1.95 μm) and an IR spectrometer covering 1.95-7.8 μm.

  3. Blend Analysis of HATNet Transit Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakos G.Á.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidate transiting planet systems discovered by wide-field groundbased surveys must go through an intensive follow-up procedure to distinguish the true transiting planets from the much more common false positives. Especially pernicious are configurations of three or more stars which produce radial velocity and light curves that are similar to those of single stars transited by a planet. In this contribution we describe the methods used by the HATNet team to reject these blends, giving a few illustrative examples.

  4. Avalanche Effect in Improperly Initialized CAESAR Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ukrop

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptoprimitives rely on thorough theoretical background, but often lack basic usability features making them prone to unintentional misuse by developers. We argue that this is true even for the state-of-the-art designs. Analyzing 52 candidates of the current CAESAR competition has shown none of them have an avalanche effect in authentication tag strong enough to work properly when partially misconfigured. Although not directly decreasing their security profile, this hints at their security usability being less than perfect. Paper details available at crcs.cz/papers/memics2016

  5. Alcoholism and alternative splicing of candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabe, Toshikazu; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2010-04-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  6. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing...... masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 ± 0.01 M⊙ and 0.019 ± 0.002 M⊙ for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events...

  7. Reducing stigma and discrimination: Candidate interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Aliya

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper proposes that stigma in relation to people with mental illness can be understood as a combination of problems of knowledge (ignorance, attitudes (prejudice and behaviour (discrimination. From a literature review, a series of candidate interventions are identified which may be effective in reducing stigmatisation and discrimination at the following levels: individuals with mental illness and their family members; the workplace; and local, national and international. The strongest evidence for effective interventions at present is for (i direct social contact with people with mental illness at the individual level, and (ii social marketing at the population level.

  8. Geoscience Training for NASA Astronaut Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. E.; Evans, C. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Graff, T. G.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-01-01

    After being selected to the astronaut office, crewmembers go through an initial two year training flow, astronaut candidacy, where they learn the basic skills necessary for spaceflight. While the bulk of astronaut candidate training currently centers on the multiple subjects required for ISS operations (EVA skills, Russian language, ISS systems, etc.), training also includes geoscience training designed to train crewmembers in Earth observations, teach astronauts about other planetary systems, and provide field training designed to investigate field operations and boost team skills. This training goes back to Apollo training and has evolved to support ISS operations and future exploration missions.

  9. Top Zika Vaccine Candidate Moves Closer to Field Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161274.html Top Zika Vaccine Candidate Moves Closer to Field Testing DNA- ... MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The leading Zika vaccine candidate should be ready for field testing ...

  10. Phenol sulfotransferases: Candidate genes for Batten disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, T.P.; Probst, P.; Obermoeller, R.D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-05

    Batten disease (juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the cytosomal accumulation of autofluorescent protolipopigments in neurons and other cell types. The Batten disease gene (CLN3) has not yet been identified, but has been mapped to a small region of human chromosome area 16p12.1-p11.2. We recently reported the fortuitous discovery that the cytosolic phenol sulfotransferase gene (STP) is located within this same interval of chromosome 16p. Since phenol sulfotransferase is expressed in neurons, can sulfate lipophilic phenolic compounds, and is mapped near CLN3, STP is considered as a candidate gene for Batten disease. YAC and cosmid cloning results have further substantiated the close proximity of STP and a highly related sulfotransferase (STM), encoding the catecholamine-preferring enzyme, to the CLN3 region of chromosome 16p. In this report, we summarize some of the recent progress in the identification of two phenol sulfotransferase genes (STP and STM) as positional candidate genes for Batten disease. 42 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Pulsar Candidates Toward Fermi Unassociated Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A; Jagannathan, P; Intema, H T

    2016-01-01

    We report on a search for steep spectrum radio sources within the 95% confidence error ellipses of the Fermi unassociated sources from the Large Array Telescope (LAT). Using existing catalogs and the newly released GMRT all-sky survey at 150 MHz we identify compact radio sources that are bright at MHz frequencies but faint or absent at GHz frequencies. Such steep spectrum radio sources are rare and constitute a sample of pulsar candidates, selected independently of period, dispersion measure, interstellar scattering and orbital parameters. We find point-like, steep spectrum candidates toward 11 Fermi sources. Based on the gamma-ray/radio positional coincidence, the rarity of such radio sources, and the properties of the 3FGL sources themselves, we argue that many of these sources could be pulsars. They may have been missed by previous radio periodicity searches due to interstellar propagation effects or because they lie in an unusually tight binary. If this hypothesis is correct, then renewed gamma-ray and ra...

  12. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Eisele

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines.

  13. Theoretical Comparison Between Candidates for Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeough, James; Hira, Ajit; Valdez, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Since the generally-accepted view among astrophysicists is that the matter component of the universe is mostly dark matter, the search for dark matter particles continues unabated. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) improvements, aided by advanced computer simulations at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) and Brown University's Center for Computation and Visualization (CCV), can potentially eliminate some particle models of dark matter. Generally, the proposed candidates can be put in three categories: baryonic dark matter, hot dark matter, and cold dark matter. The Lightest Supersymmetric Particle(LSP) of supersymmetric models is a dark matter candidate, and is classified as a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). Similar to the cosmic microwave background radiation left over from the Big Bang, there is a background of low-energy neutrinos in our Universe. According to some researchers, these may be the explanation for the dark matter. One advantage of the Neutrino Model is that they are known to exist. Dark matter made from neutrinos is termed ``hot dark matter''. We formulate a novel empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in ΛCDM N-body simulations. This function adequately treats both void size and redshift, and describes the scale radius and the central density of voids. We started with a five-parameter model. Our research is mainly on LSP and Neutrino models.

  14. Vaccine candidates for leishmaniasis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagill, Rajeev; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2011-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a diverse group of clinical syndromes caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. The clinical manifestation of the disease varies from self-limiting cutaneous lesions to progressive visceral disease. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk in 88 countries, with a global incidence of 1-1.5 million cases of cutaneous and 500,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The key control measures mainly rely on early case detection and chemotherapy which has been hampered by the toxicity of drugs, side-effects and by the emergence of drug resistance in parasites. Control of reservoir host and vector is difficult due to operational difficulties and frequent relapses in the host. Therefore, the development of effective and affordable vaccine against leishmaniasis is highly desirable. Although considerable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding immune mechanisms underlying potential candidate antigens, including killed, live attenuated parasites, crude parasites, pure or recombinant Leishmania proteins or DNA encoding leishmanial proteins, as well as immunomodulators from sand fly saliva, very few candidate vaccines have progressed beyond the experimental stage. As such there is no vaccine against any form of human leishmaniasis. In recent years, however, much interest has been stimulated towards vaccination against leishmaniasis focused mainly on cutaneous leishmaniasis with fewer attempts against visceral leishmaniasis.

  15. Serological profile of candidates for corneal donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adroaldo Lunardelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: The purpose of this study is to map the serological profile of candidates to corneal donation at Irmandade Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, identifying the percentage of disposal by serology and the marker involved. Methods: There have been analised – retrospectively – the results of serology of all corneal donors, made between the period of 1st january 2006 and 31st december 2012. Data analised were related to age, gender and the results of serology pertinent to viral markers (HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HCV and anti-HIV, these, determined by immunosorbent tests (ELISA. Results: In the period of the study, there were 2476 corneal donors at the institution, with a major incidence on the male gender, on an average of 58.7 years old. 23% of retention because of serological unfitness was also identified, that is, 570 samples were non-negative to any of the used tests. The marker anti- HBc was the most prevalent on the studied population, followed by the Hepatitis C virus (HCV and by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. Conclusion: From the data found through this study, it is essential to have the participation of an efficient service on the serological evaluation of the candidates to corneal donation, once the security of the receptor must be taken into consideration in a population of donors with 23% of unfitness prevalence, in which the most prevalent marker is the one of Hepatits B.

  16. Elemental Abundances of Solar Sibling Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, I.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Roederer, I. U.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  17. Elemental Abundances of Solar Sibling Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, I; Bobylev, V V; Roederer, I U; Lambert, D L; Endl, M; Cochran, W D; MacQueen, P J; Wittenmyer, R A

    2014-01-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying a...

  18. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor S. Lukashevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF. LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  19. Advanced vaccine candidates for Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-10-29

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  20. Uncovering the nucleus candidate for NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Günthardt, G I; Camperi, J A; Díaz, R J; Gomez, P L; Bosch, G; Schirmer, M

    2015-01-01

    NGC253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst which becomes the best candidate to study the relationship between starburst and AGN activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus. The near infrared spectroscopy could be advantageous in order to shed light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis and through the brightest infrared source. We present evidence showing that the brightest near infrared and mid infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a stellar supercluster, in fact, presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. It is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.0" of the symmetry center of the galactic bar. Moreover, our data indicate that this object i...

  1. Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-1205 (United States); Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V. [Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of RAS, 65/1, Pulkovskoye Chaussee, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Roederer, I. U. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wittenmyer, R. A. [School of Physics, UNSW Australia, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  2. Political Candidate Campaign Advertising: A Selected Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Susan A.

    This paper provides a selected review of political candidate campaign advertising studies from the political science, mass communication, advertising, and political communication literature. The paper examines the literature in terms of research pertaining to (1) candidate advertising content (commercials for male versus female candidates and for…

  3. Views on Values Education: From Teacher Candidates to Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscan, Canay Demirhan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the views of experienced class teachers and class teacher candidates on values education. It conducted standard open-ended interviews with experienced class teachers and teacher candidates. The study group comprised 9 experienced class teachers from different socio-economic levels and 9 teacher candidates with…

  4. Encouraging Discussion between Teacher Candidates and Families with Exceptional Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The Families as Faculty experience assists universities to better prepare candidates for service as classroom teachers. Upon entering their practica and student teaching, many teacher candidates have had no to limited contact with exceptional students. Often candidates are unaware of the realities of having a student with disabilities in their…

  5. Mirror Images: Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Disposition Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercaw, Lynne A.; Summers, Deborah G.; Colby, Susan A.; Payne, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of disposition development for teacher candidates continues to be discussed and debated in teacher education. This study compares two programs and the different ways each approaches the disposition development of their respective candidates. More than 200 candidates from two institutions were surveyed on how and where they perceived…

  6. Identity Functions and Empathetic Tendencies of Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Alpaslan; Kadi, Aysegul

    2016-01-01

    Objective of this research is to investigate identity functions and empathetic tendencies of teacher candidates. Sample consists of 232 teacher candidates in social studies teacher education. Survey model is preferred to investigate the difference between identity functions and empathetic tendencies of teacher candidates. And also correlational…

  7. Production of EV71 vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pele; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Wu, Suh-Chin; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chow, Yen-Hung; Su, Ih-Jen; Klein, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia and with Coxsackie virus (CV) it is the other major causative agent of hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD). Effective medications and/or prophylactic vaccines against HFMD are urgently needed. From a scientific (the feasibility of bioprocess, immunological responses and potency in animal challenge model) and business development (cost of goods) points of view, we in this review address and discuss the pros and cons of different EV71 vaccine candidates that have been produced and evaluated in animal models. Epitope-based synthetic peptide vaccine candidates containing residues 211-225 of VP1 formulated with Freund's adjuvant (CFA/IFA) elicited low EV71 virus neutralizing antibody responses, but were protective in the suckling mouse challenge model. Among recombinant EV71 subunits (rVP1, rVP2 and rVP3) expressed in E. coli, purified and formulated with CFA/IFA, only VP1 elicited mouse antibody responses with measurable EV71-specific virus neutralization titers. Immunization of mice with either a DNA plasmid containing VP1 gene or VP1 expressed in Salmonella typhimurium also generated neutralizing antibody responses and protected animals against a live EV71 challenge. Recombinant EV71 virus-like particles (rVLP) produced from baculovirus formulated either with CFA/IFA or alum elicited good virus neutralization titers in both mice and non-human primates, and were found to be protective in the suckling mouse EV71 challenge model. Synthetic peptides or recombinant EV71 subunit vaccines (rVP1 and rVLP) formulated in alum were found to be poorly immunogenic in rabbits. Only formalin-inactivated (FI) EV71 virions formulated in alum elicited cross-neutralizing antibodies against different EV71 genotypes in mice, rabbits and non-human primates but induced weak neutralizing responses against CAV16. From a regulatory, economic and market acceptability standpoint, FI-EV71 virion vaccines are the most

  8. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  9. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND CANDIDATE NR 4

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : MYERS First Name : Stephen I have been at CERN since 1972, and was elected member of the Governing Board for the first time in 1998. The Governing Board then nominated me to the Investments Committee where I have been a member since the beginning of 1999. Since then I have actively participated in redefining and transforming the investment portfolio in order to improve the overall return and where possible reduce the risk. The portfolio has recently been greatly improved and now allows much simpler more transparent monitoring of our investment. I have also actively participated and hopefully made useful contributions in discussions conc...

  10. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND 4th candidate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : MYERS First Name : Stephen I have been at CERN since 1972, and was elected member of the Governing Board for the first time in 1998. The Governing Board then nominated me to the Investments Committee where I have been a member since the beginning of 1999. Since then I have actively participated in redefining and transforming the investment portfolio in order to improve the overall return and where possible reduce the risk. The portfolio has recently been greatly improved and now allows much simpler more transparent monitoring of our investment. I have also actively participated and hopefully made useful contributions in discussions conc...

  11. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Sasabe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  12. Halopentacenes: Promising Candidates for Organic Semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Gong-He; REN Zhao-Yu; GUO Ping; ZHENG Ji-Ming

    2009-01-01

    We introduce polar substituents such as F, Cl, Br into pentacene to enhance the dissolubility in common organic solvents while retaining the high charge-carrier mobilities of pentacene. Geometric structures, dipole moments,frontier molecule orbits, ionization potentials and electron affinities, as well as reorganization energies of those molecules, and of pentacene for comparison, are successively calculated by density functional theory. The results indicate that halopentacenes have rather small reorganization energies (< 0.2 eV), and when the substituents are in position 2 or positions 2 and 9, they are polarity molecules. Thus we conjecture that they can easily be dissolved in common organic solvents, and are promising candidates for organic semiconductors.

  13. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND CANDIDATE NR 3

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : HAUVILLER First Name : Claude Dear colleague of CERN and ESO, For the first time, I am standing and requesting your support to become a member of the Governing Board of our Pension Fund. CERN staff member since 1974, I have already carried elective mandates: I have been Delegate to the Staff Council and Member of the Senior Staff Consultative Committee (the Nine). For the majority of us, our Pension Fund is our only social provident scheme and source of retirement income; I believe I can usefully contribute to its successful management and help ensure its balance. Our Fund reaches its majority: soon, there will be more beneficiaries tha...

  14. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND 3rd candidate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : Hauviller First Name : Claude Dear colleague of CERN and ESO, For the first time, I am standing and requesting your support to become a member of the Governing Board of our Pension Fund. CERN staff member since 1974, I have already carried elective mandates: I have been Delegate to the Staff Council and Member of the Senior Staff Consultative Committee (the Nine). For the majority of us, our Pension Fund is our only social provident scheme and source of retirement income; I believe I can usefully contribute to its successful management and help ensure its balance. Our Fund reaches its majority: soon, there will be more beneficiaries tha...

  15. New potential AChE inhibitor candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, A A N; Martins, J B L; dos Santos, M L; Nascente, L de C; Romeiro, L A S; Areas, T F M A; Vieira, K S T; Gambôa, N F; Castro, N G; Gargano, R

    2009-09-01

    We have theoretically studied new potential candidates of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors designed from cardanol, a non-isoprenoid phenolic lipid of cashew Anacardium occidentale nut-shell liquid. The electronic structure calculations of fifteen molecule derivatives from cardanol were performed using B3LYP level with 6-31G, 6-31G(d), and 6-311+G(2d,p) basis functions. For this study we used the following groups: methyl, acetyl, N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N,N-dimethylamine, N,N-diethylamine, piperidine, pyrrolidine, and N,N-methylbenzylamine. Among the proposed compounds we identified that the structures with substitution by N,N-dimethycarbamoyl, N,N-dimethylamine, and pyrrolidine groups were better correlated to rivastigmine, and represent possible AChE inhibitors against Alzheimer disease.

  16. Hypervelocity Star Candidates in the SEGUE G & K Dwarf Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Palladino, Lauren E; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beers, Timothy C; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P

    2013-01-01

    We identify 13 candidate hypervelocity stars from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) G and K dwarf samples. Previous searches for hypervelocity stars have only focused on large radial velocities; in this study we also use proper motions to select the candidates. We determine the hypervelocity likelihood of each candidate, considering the significant errors often associated with high proper motion stars via Monte Carlo simulations. We find that more than half of the candidates exceed their escape velocities with at least 90% probability. All of our candidates also have less than a 60% chance of being a high velocity fluke within the SEGUE sample. Based on orbits calculated using the observed 6-d positions and velocities, few, if any, of these candidates originate from the Galactic Center. If these candidates are truly hypervelocity stars, they were not ejected by interactions with the Milky Way's supermassive black hole. This calls for a more serious examination of alternati...

  17. The modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus is cell-attached, and its C-terminal domain has several putative homologues among cell-attached proteins within the phylum Bacteroidetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Hachem, Maher Abou; Ramchuran, Santosh

    2004-01-01

    cell attachment. To confirm this theory, R. marinus was grown, and activity assays showed that the major part of the xylanase activity was connected to whole cells. Moreover, immunocytochemical detection using a Xyn10A-specific antibody proved presence of Xyn10A on the R. marinus cell surface......-termini of proteins that were predominantly extra-cellular/cell attached. A primary structure motif of three conserved regions including structurally important glycines and a proline was also identified suggesting a conserved 3D fold. This bioinformatic evidence suggested a possible role of this domain in mediating....... In the light of this, a revision of experimental data present on both Xyn10A and Man26A was performed, and the results all indicate a cell-anchoring role of the domain, suggesting that this domain represents a novel type of module that mediates cell attachment in proteins originating from members of the phylum...

  18. SHIELD: Observations of Three Candidate Interacting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvolo, Elizabeth; Miazzo, Masao; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Salzer, John Joseph; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Elson, Edward C.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Jozsa, Gyula; Leisman, Luke; Ott, Juergen; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L.; Saintonge, Amelie; Van Sistine, Angela; Warren, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract:The “Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs” (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength study of local volume low-mass galaxies. Using the now-complete Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) source catalog, 82 systems are identified that meet distance, line width, and HI flux criteria for being gas-rich, low-mass galaxies. These systems harbor neutral gas reservoirs smaller than 3x10^7 M_sun, thus populating the faint end of the HI mass function with statistical confidence for the first time. In a companion poster, we present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array D-configuration HI spectral line observations of 32 previously unobserved galaxies. Three galaxies in that study have been discovered to lie in close angular proximity to more massive galaxies. Here we present VLA HI imaging of these candidate interacting systems. We compare the neutral gas morphology and kinematics with optical images from SDSS. We discuss the frequency of low-mass galaxies undergoing tidal interaction in the complete SHIELD sample.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant 1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  19. Galactic worms. I - Catalog of worm candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl; Reach, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of candidates for the Galactic worms that are possibly the walls surrounding the superbubbles is compiled; 118 isolated structures that appear both in H I and in IR (60 and 100 microns). Fifty-two are possibly associated with H II regions. It is found that the 100-micron emissivity increases systematically toward the Galactic interior, which is consistent with the increase of the general interstellar radiation field. The 100-micron emissivity of the structures associated with the H II regions is larger than that of the structures without associated H II regions. The 60-100-micron ratio is large, 0.28 +/- 0.03, which may indicate that the grains associated with the atomic gas have a relatively large population of small grains. Thirty-five structures appear in the 408-MHz continuum. The IR and the radio continuum properties suggest that the 408-MHz continuum emission in those structures is very likely thermal. The implications of these results on the ionization of gas far from the Galactic plane are discussed.

  20. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND CANDIDATE NO 1

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name: MAURINFirst Name:Guy I have been a member of the personnel since 1967 and as early as 1972 I was involved, in my capacity as President of the Staff Association, in the improvement of the Pension Fund benefits. As for most of us the Pension Fund is the only social provident scheme to which we belong, it is important to ensure that it is well managed and in balance. As a member of the Governing Board since 1974 and Vice-Chairman of this Board since 1977, I have continued to pursue these objectives.One of the main responsibilities of the Governing Board is our asset investment policy. The Investment Committee, of which I am Chairman, must have an overall view of the management of our 4 billion Swiss francs and seek the best yield with minimum risk. The investment structure must continuously be adapted...

  1. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND CANDIDATE NO 2

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund.   Candidate: Name: RANJARDFirst Name: Florence Having been a member of the Governing Board of the Pension Fund since 1983 as Guy Maurin’s alternate, I am standing for a further 3-year term of office. Over the past few years work has concentrated essentially on following items: Monitoring of the work of the fund managers and their performances. The three-yearly study of the Fund’s actuarial situation. The pension guarantees ­ second phase. The Fund is approaching its maturity: the level of benefits exceeds contributions. In this context it has to strike a suitable balance between management of the risk from a dynamic investment policy, while a prudent policy avoiding any significant loss of its capital. These will be my concerns within the Governing Board of the Pension Fund if you...

  2. Photon defects in noncommutative standard model candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, S.A.; Khoze, V.V. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Center for Particle Theory; Jaeckel, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Restrictions imposed by gauge invariance in noncommutative spaces together with the effects of ultraviolet/infrared mixing lead to strong constraints on possible candidates for a noncommutative extension of the Standard Model. We study a general class of noncommutative models consistent with these restrictions. Specifically we consider models based upon a gauge theory with the gauge group U(N{sub 1}) x U(N{sub 2}) x.. x U(N{sub m}) coupled to matter fields transforming in the (anti)-fundamental, bi-fundamental and adjoint representations. We pay particular attention to overall trace-U(1) factors of the gauge group which are affected by the ultraviolet/infrared mixing. Typically, these trace-U(1) gauge fields do not decouple sufficiently fast in the infrared, and lead to sizable Lorentz symmetry violating effects in the low-energy effective theory. In a 4-dimensional theory on a continuous space-time making these effects unobservable would require making the effects of noncommutativity tiny, M{sub NC} >> M{sub P}. This severely limits the phenomenological prospects of such models. However, adding additional universal extra dimensions the trace-U(1) factors decouple with a power law and the constraint on the noncommutativity scale is weakened considerably. Finally, we briefly mention some interesting properties of the photon that could arise if the noncommutative theory is modified at a high energy scale. (Orig.)

  3. Virus-like particles as nanovaccine candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, G.; Aguilar, J. C.; Dueñas, S.; Hermida, L.; Iglesias, E.; Penton, E.; Lobaina, Y.; Lopez, M.; Mussachio, A.; Falcon, V.; Alvarez, L.; Martinez, G.; Gil, L.; Valdes, I.; Izquierdo, A.; Lazo, L.; Marcos, E.; Guzman, G.; Muzio, V.; Herrera, L.

    2013-03-01

    The existing vaccines are mainly limited to the microorganisms we are able to culture and produce and/or to those whose killing is mediated by humoral response (antibody mediated). It has been more difficult to develop vaccines capable of inducing a functional cellular response needed to prevent or cure chronic diseases. New strategies should be taken into account in the improvement of cell-based immune responses in order to prevent and control the infections and eventually clear the virus. Preclinical and clinical results with vaccine candidates developed as a vaccine platform based on virus-like particles (VLPs) evidenced their ability to stimulate mucosal as well as systemic immunity. Particles based on envelope, membrane or nucleocapsid microbial proteins induce a strong immune response after nasal or parenteral administration in mice, non-human primates and humans. In addition, the immune response obtained was modulated in a Th1 sense. The VLPs were also able to immunoenhance the humoral and cellular immune responses against several viral pathogens. Studies in animals and humans with nasal and systemic formulations evidenced that it is possible to induce functional immune response against HBV, HCV, HIV and dengue virus. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October - 2 November 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  4. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND 5th candidate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate :  Name : Sonnemann  First Name : Florian Since my arrival at CERN in 1997 I have worked in the accelerator and administrative sectors. I have recently been elected as member of the Staff Council and of the Executive Committee of the Staff Association in which I am actively following matters concerning the Pension Fund. My candidature for the Governing Board of the CERN Pension Fund is mainly motivated to add my part in ensuring a solid financial situation of the Pension Fund. The Pension Fund is our only social security system. I wish to play a role in ensuring that the pensions will remain a secure revenue for all staff membe...

  5. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND CANDIDATE NR 5

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate :  Name : Sonnemann  First Name : Florian Since my arrival at CERN in 1997 I have worked in the accelerator and administrative sectors. I have recently been elected as member of the Staff Council and of the Executive Committee of the Staff Association in which I am actively following matters concerning the Pension Fund. My candidature for the Governing Board of the CERN Pension Fund is mainly motivated to add my part in ensuring a solid financial situation of the Pension Fund. The Pension Fund is our only social security system. I wish to play a role in ensuring that the pensions will remain a secure revenue for all staff membe...

  6. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND CANDIDATE NR 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : CHIAVERI First Name : Enrico I have been a CERN staff member since 1973 and have always been interested in our working conditions. As a member of the Executive Committee of the Staff Association I participated from 1980 to 1984 in the Working Group on Pensions mandated by the CERN Council. This commitment led to my becoming a member of the Governing Board of the Pension Fund in 1983, since when I have taken an active part in various commissions and working groups (Real Estate Asset Management Committee, Working Group on Actuarial Matters etc.); in so doing I have gained a thorough knowledge of different areas of the Pension Fund. Since ...

  7. Algal Lectins as Potential HIV Microbicide Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Schols

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The development and use of topical microbicides potentially offers an additional strategy to reduce the spread of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. Carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs that show specificity for high mannose carbohydrates on the surface of the heavily glycosylated envelope of HIV are endowed with potent anti-HIV activity. In fact, a number of algal lectins such as cyanovirin-N, microvirin, microcystis viridis lectin, scytovirin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin and griffithsin are considered as potential microbicide candidates to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV through topical applications. They not only inhibit infection of cells by cell-free virus but they can also efficiently prevent virus transmission from virus-infected cells to uninfected CD4+ target T-lymphocytes and DC-SIGN-directed capture of HIV-1 and transmission to CD4+ T lymphocytes. This review focuses on the structural properties and carbohydrate specificity of these algal lectins, their antiviral activity against HIV and several other enveloped viruses, their safety profile and viral resistance patterns.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker candidates for parkinsonian disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu eConstantinescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The parkinsonian disorders are a large group of neurodegenerative diseases including idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD and atypical parkinsonian disorders, such as multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. The etiology of these disorders is not known although it is considered to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. One of the greatest obstacles for developing efficacious disease-modifying treatment strategies is the lack of biomarkers. Reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis, to measure disease progression and response to therapy. In this review several of the most promising cerebrospinal biomarker candidates are discussed. Alpha synuclein seems to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies and its levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid and in plasma. In a similar way, tau protein accumulation seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Urate, a potent antioxidant, seems to be associated to the risk of developing PD and with its progression. Neurofilament light chain levels are increased in atypical parkinsonian disorders compared with PD and healthy controls. The new "omics" techniques are potent tools offering new insights in the patho-etiology of these disorders. Some of the difficulties encountered in developing biomarkers are discussed together with future perspectives.

  9. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND CANDIDATE NR 2

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : FRANDSEN First Name : Poul Kjaer  I have been member of the staff since 1974, and member of staff council for more than 12 years, and my main motivation has been to work for improving the social conditions of the CERN staff. A very important pillar of this is a sound and healthy pension fund. A capitalised scheme has been and still is the best choice for assuring the benefits for the CERN staff, present and future, this social system being part of the whole necessary to attract the best staff to the future High Energy Physics in Europe. However, even the hypothetic close down of the Organisation should allow the benefits to exi...

  10. ELECTIONS PENSION FUND 2nd candidate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    ORGANISATION EUROPEENNE POUR LA RECHERCHE NUCLEAIRE CERN EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CAISSE DE PENSIONS / PENSION FUND Caisse de Pensions - ELECTIONS - Pension Fund This candidature has been duly registered and is hereby presented in accordance with paragraph 6.h of the Regulations for Elections to the Governing Board of the Pension Fund. Candidate : Name : FRANDSEN First Name : Poul Kjaer  I have been member of the staff since 1974, and member of staff council for more than 12 years, and my main motivation has been to work for improving the social conditions of the CERN staff. A very important pillar of this is a sound and healthy pension fund. A capitalised scheme has been and still is the best choice for assuring the benefits for the CERN staff, present and future, this social system being part of the whole necessary to attract the best staff to the future High Energy Physics in Europe. However, even the hypothetic close down of the Organisation should allow the benefits to exi...

  11. The FK Comae candidate UX Librae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, B. W.; Goodrich, B. D.; Africano, J. L.; Noah, P. V.; Meredith, R. J.; Palmer, L. H.; Quigley, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    New optical spectroscopic and photometric data are presented for the active chromosphere FK Com candidate UZ Lib. The star is shown to have an extremely large photometric amplitude in V of 0.35 mag, and its rotation period is established as 4.75 + or - 0.01 days. The optical spectrum is that of an early K giant, broadened by a rotation velocity of approximately 65 km/s. H-alpha is visible as a very broad emission feature, with a profile resembling that seen in FK Com. The emission intensity and profile are variable over the rotation period, with the strongest emission present at photometric minimum, in accord with dark starspot models. The photospheric absorption line profiles show variable asymmetries and distortions which are interpreted as due to the effects of the dark starspot rotating across the line of sight. New radial velocity measures are combined with published data to demonstrate the UZ Lib is a member of a binary system in synchronous rotation with a secondary of mass approximately 0.5 solar masses. This information is considered in light of the conflicting models for the origin of the optical and spectral variability of the FK Com stars, as well as their uncertain evolutionary status.

  12. A Catalog of Kepler Habitable Zone Exoplanet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Hill, Michelle L.; Kasting, James F.; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Ciardi, David R.; Haghighipour, Nader; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Selsis, Franck; Torres, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Kepler mission ha s discovered thousands of new planetary candidates, many of which have been confirmed through follow-up observations. A primary goal of the mission is to determine the occurrence rate of terrestrial-size planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their host stars. Here we provide a list of HZ exoplanet candidates from the Kepler Q1–Q17 Data Release 24 data-vetting process. This work was undertaken as part of the Kepler HZ Working Group. We use a variety of criteria regarding HZ boundaries and planetary sizes to produce complete lists of HZ candidates, including a catalog of 104 candidates within the optimistic HZ and 20 candidates with radii less than two Earth radii within the conservative HZ. We cross-match our HZ candidates with the stellar properties and confirmed planet properties from Data Release 25 to provide robust stellar parameters and candidate dispositions. We also include false-positive probabilities recently calculated by Morton et al. for each of the candidates within our catalogs to aid in their validation. Finally, we performed dynamical analysis simulations for multi-planet systems that contain candidates with radii less than two Earth radii as a step toward validation of those systems.

  13. Extracting definition candidates from specialized corpora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senja Pollak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human knowledge is available in different forms, including domain texts, terminological dictionaries, encyclopaediae, and recently also in computer- understandable representations of domain knowledge, such as taxonomies and ontologies. Since manual domain modeling is costly and time-consuming, researchers in human language technologies have started developing methods and tools for semi-automatic extraction of domain-specific knowledge from unstructured texts, involving tasks, such as terminology extraction, definition extraction, semantic relations extraction, or semi-automatic ontology building. This article presents a methodology for definition extraction from domain corpora, currently available for Slovene and English. Since most of the existing methods and tools are language specific and not developed for minor languages, the main contribution of the dissertation is the developed definition extraction methodology for Slovene. The proposed definition extraction methodology is based on three different approaches to extracting definition candidates. The first follows the traditional pattern-based approach, in which patterns are composed of lemmas and morphosyntactic descriptions; the second approach relies on pairs of domain terms extracted through automatic term extraction; the third approach exploits wordnet hypernym pairs. We propose an original combination of the three approaches. The developed methodology was applied to a real-case problem of modeling the language technologies domain, for which we constructed a comparable Slovene- English corpus consisting of about two million tokens. We extracted more than 3,400 definition candidates, of which over 700 (approximately 480 for Slovene and 230 for English were evaluated as definitions. The results are used as a basis for the Language Technologies Glossary.17 An additional contribution is the proposed domain-modeling pipeline—from corpus uploading and preprocessing to inspecting the

  14. Characterization for Fusion Candidate Vanadium Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Muroga; T. Nagasaka; J. M. Chen; Z. Y. Xu; Q. Y. Huang; y. C. Wu

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent achievements in the characterization of candidate vanadium alloys obtained for fusion in the framework of the Japan-China Core University Program.National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) has a program of fabricating high-purity V-4Cr4Ti alloys. The resulting products (NIFS-HEAT-1,2), were characterized by various research groups in the world including Chinese partners. South Western Institute of Physics (SWIP) fabricated a new V-4Cr-4Ti alloy (SWIP-Heat), and carried out a comparative evaluation of hydrogen embrittlement of NIFS-HEATs and SWIP-Heat. The tensile test of hydrogen-doped alloys showed that the NIFS-HEAT maintained the ductility to relatively high hydrogen levels.The comparison of the data with those of previous studies suggested that the reduced oxygen level in the NIFS-HEATs should be responsible for the increased resistance to hydrogen embrittlement.Based on the chemical analysis data of NIFS-HEATs and SWIP-Heats, neutron-induced activation was analyzed in Institute of Plasma Physics (IPP-CAS) as a function of cooling time after the use in the fusion first wall. The results showed that the low level of Co dominates the activity up to 50 years followed by a domination of Nb or Nb and Al in the respective alloys. It was suggested that reduction of Co and Nb, both of which are thought to have been introduced via cross-contamination into the alloys from the molds used should be crucial for reducing further the activation.

  15. Primary-Grade Teacher Candidates' Views on Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Ayse Mentis

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies the primary-grade teacher candidates' views on museum education. The research is a descriptive research that used survey model. The study group is made up of 209 primary-grade teacher candidates who were seniors in the Primary-Grade Teaching Program. They were all attending Konya University's Faculty of Education. A survey…

  16. Investigating Academic Achievements and Critical Thinking Dispositions of Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöl, Ibrahim; Bekmezci, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between academic achievements and critical thinking dispositions of teacher candidates in Faculty of Education and to find out whether critical thinking dispositions and academic achievements scores of teacher candidates differ according to different variables. The population consists of the…

  17. Chemical Literacy Levels of Science and Mathematics Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Suat

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate Turkish science and mathematics teacher candidates' levels of attainment in chemical literacy. These candidates had all studied the new Turkish chemistry curriculum in high school. The sample of the study consisted of 112 students, who were first-year students in the Department of Secondary Science…

  18. Five kepler target stars that show multiple transiting exoplanet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffen..[], Jason H.; Batalha, N. M.; Broucki, W J.;

    2010-01-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets...

  19. 11 CFR 106.1 - Allocation of expenses between candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... broadcast communication, the attribution shall be determined by the proportion of space or time devoted to... non-Federal candidates, and that is made by a political committee with separate Federal and non...) An authorized expenditure made by a candidate or political committee on behalf of another...

  20. Social Studies Teacher Candidates' Views on Historical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Current study aimed to present Social Studies teacher candidates' views on historical thinking skills. Study was conducted using qualitative design and working group was composed of a total of 121 teacher candidates (62 females and 59 males) attending Social Studies Teaching Department of Karadeniz Technical University and Adiyaman University…

  1. Preparing Preservice Teacher Candidates to Differentiate Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Bianca R.

    2013-01-01

    This action research study focused on how various grouping strategies influenced preservice teachers' differentiation of instruction. The participants included a third grade mentor teacher and three preservice teacher candidates. The candidate preparation curriculum consisted of seminars, daily field-based learning experiences, and ongoing…

  2. 11 CFR 100.152 - Fundraising costs for Presidential candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fundraising costs for Presidential candidates... U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.152 Fundraising costs for Presidential candidates. (a... the solicitation of contributions means any cost reasonably related to fundraising activity,...

  3. Opinions of Counselor Candidates Regarding Counseling Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladag, Mine; Yaka, Baris; Koç, Ismet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to contribute to the enhancement of the quality of counseling skills training and counselor education through the medium of understanding the opinions of counselor candidates regarding counseling skills training. The research group consisted of 67 counselor candidates who voluntarily participated in the study. The research…

  4. Writing Instruction for Teacher Candidates: Strengthening a Weak Curricular Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, Dana L.; Wolsey, Thomas Devere

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, two teacher educators in literacy examined teacher candidates' (N = 24) learning of writing instruction across a three-course sequence of literacy methods. Data collected included a survey of candidates' knowledge of writing instruction, their formal observations of writing lessons in their student-teaching placements, a…

  5. Assessing Student Teaching Experiences: Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohi; Tice, Kathleen; Collins, Denise; Brown, Amber; Smith, Cleta; Fox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of student teaching experiences by measuring teacher candidates' perceptions of their preparedness. The participants were 130 teacher candidates who had completed their student teaching as part of a program preparing them to teach children in pre-K through grade 4. Teacher candidates…

  6. Fostering the Development of Chemistry Teacher Candidates: A Bioecological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewthwaite, Brian; Wiebe, Rick

    2012-01-01

    This ongoing research inquiry investigates through the analysis of teacher candidate experiences the factors influencing two groups of chemistry teacher candidates' development during their extended practica in their second and final year of an after-degree bachelor of education at a university in central Canada. The tenets of Bronfenbrenner's…

  7. DAZLA: an important candidate gene in male subfertility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, R.J.T. van; Tuerlings, J.H.A.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Schoute, F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the role of the autosomal candidate gene DAZLA (Deleted in AZoospermia Like Autosome) in male subfertility. METHODS: We reviewed clinical data of subfertile men with oligozoospermia or azoospermia, mostly candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Mutation detection wa

  8. Facebook Connection Styles among Physical Education Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogdu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the Facebook connection styles of physical education (PE) teacher candidates. The participants were composed of 626 (age = 21.21 ± 2.024) physical education teacher candidates from the departments of Physical Education and Sports. They teach in five different universities. It was done in 2014-2015 academic…

  9. Developing Benchmarks to Measure Teacher Candidates' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Laura Corbin; Brown-Hobbs, Stacy; Palmer, Barbara Martin

    2013-01-01

    This paper traces the development of teacher candidate benchmarks at one liberal arts institution. Begun as a classroom assessment activity over ten years ago, the benchmarks, through collaboration with professional development school partners, now serve as a primary measure of teacher candidates' performance in the final phases of the…

  10. Sensitive radio survey of obscured quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars in samples at both low (z ˜ 0.5) and high (z ˜ 2.5) redshift to understand the role of radio activity in accretion, using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 6.0 GHz and 1.4 GHz. Our z ˜ 2.5 sample consists of optically selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of νLν[1.4 GHz] ≲ 1040 erg s-1. Only a single source is individually detected in our deep (rms˜10 μJy) exposures. This population would not be identified by radio-based selection methods used for distinguishing dusty star-forming galaxies and obscured active nuclei. In our pilot A-array study of z ˜ 0.5 radio-quiet quasars, we spatially resolve four of five objects on scales ˜5 kpc and find they have steep spectral indices with an average value of α = -0.75. Therefore, radio emission in these sources could be due to jet-driven or radiatively driven bubbles interacting with interstellar material on the scale of the host galaxy. Finally, we also study the additional population of ˜200 faint ( ˜ 40 μJy-40 mJy) field radio sources observed over ˜120 arcmin2 of our data. 60 per cent of these detections (excluding our original targets) are matched in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and are, in roughly equal shares, active galactic nuclei (AGN) at a broad range of redshifts, passive galaxies with no other signs of nuclear activity and infrared-bright but optically faint sources. Spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed star-forming galaxies constitute only a small minority of the matches. Such sensitive radio surveys allow us to address important questions of AGN evolution and evaluate the AGN contribution to the radio-quiet sky.

  11. Almost All of Kepler's Multiple Planet Candidates are Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Lissauer, Jack J; Rowe, Jason F; Bryson, Stephen T; Adams, Elisabeth; Buchhave, Lars A; Ciardi, David R; Cochran, William D; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John; Gilliland, Ronald L; Holman, Matthew J; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G; Morehead, Robert C; Ragozzine, Darin; Seader, Shawn E; Tanenbaum, Peter G; Torres, Guillermo; Twicken, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis that demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of Kepler candidate multiple transiting systems (multis) indeed represent true, physically-associated transiting planets. Binary stars provide the primary source of false positives among Kepler planet candidates, implying that false positives should be nearly randomly-distributed among Kepler targets. In contrast, true transiting planets would appear clustered around a smaller number of Kepler targets if detectable planets tend to come in systems and/or if the orbital planes of planets encircling the same star are correlated. There are more than one hundred times as many Kepler planet candidates in multi-candidate systems as would be predicted from a random distribution of candidates, implying that the vast majority are true planets. Most of these multis are multiple planet systems orbiting the Kepler target star, but there are likely cases where (a) the planetary system orbits a fainter star, and the planets are thus significa...

  12. PEACE: Pulsar Evaluation Algorithm for Candidate Extraction -- A software package for post-analysis processing of pulsar survey candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K J; Jenet, F A; Martinez, J; Dartez, L P; Mata, A; Lunsford, G; Cohen, S; Biwer, C M; Rohr, M; Flanigan, J; Walker, A; Banaszak, S; Allen, B; Barr, E D; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Desvignes, G; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P; Hessels, J W T; Karuppusamy, R; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Lyne, A; McLaughlin, M; Ransom, S; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Spitler, L; Stairs, I; Tan, M; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2013-01-01

    Modern radio pulsar surveys produce a large volume of prospective candidates, the majority of which are polluted by human-created radio frequency interference or other forms of noise. Typically, large numbers of candidates need to be visually inspected in order to determine if they are real pulsars. This process can be labor intensive. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm called PEACE (Pulsar Evaluation Algorithm for Candidate Extraction) which improves the efficiency of identifying pulsar signals. The algorithm ranks the candidates based on a score function. Unlike popular machine-learning based algorithms, no prior training data sets are required. This algorithm has been applied to data from several large-scale radio pulsar surveys. Using the human-based ranking results generated by students in the Arecibo Remote Command enter programme, the statistical performance of PEACE was evaluated. It was found that PEACE ranked 68% of the student-identified pulsars within the top 0.17% of sorted candidates, 95% ...

  13. A Catalog of Kepler Habitable Zone Exoplanet Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Stephen R; Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Quintana, Elisa V; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Ciardi, David R; Haghighipour, Nader; Hinkel, Natalie R; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Selsis, Franck; Torres, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Kepler mission has discovered thousands of new planetary candidates, many of which have been confirmed through follow-up observations. A primary goal of the mission is to determine the occurrance rate of terrestrial-size planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their host stars. Here we provide a list of HZ exoplanet candidates from the Kepler Data Release 24 Q1-Q17 data vetting process. This work was undertaken as part of the Kepler Habitable Zone Working Group. We use a variety of criteria regarding HZ boundaries and planetary sizes to produce complete lists of HZ candidates, including a catalog of 104 candidates within the optimistic HZ and 20 candidates with radii less than two Earth radii within the conservative HZ. We cross-match our HZ candidates with the Data Release 25 stellar properties and confirmed planet properties to provide robust stellar parameters and candidate dispositions. We also include false positive probabilities recently calculated by Morton et al. (2016) for each of the cand...

  14. Pathogenic Network Analysis Predicts Candidate Genes for Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Xia Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of our study was to predicate candidate genes in cervical cancer (CC using a network-based strategy and to understand the pathogenic process of CC. Methods. A pathogenic network of CC was extracted based on known pathogenic genes (seed genes and differentially expressed genes (DEGs between CC and normal controls. Subsequently, cluster analysis was performed to identify the subnetworks in the pathogenic network using ClusterONE. Each gene in the pathogenic network was assigned a weight value, and then candidate genes were obtained based on the weight distribution. Eventually, pathway enrichment analysis for candidate genes was performed. Results. In this work, a total of 330 DEGs were identified between CC and normal controls. From the pathogenic network, 2 intensely connected clusters were extracted, and a total of 52 candidate genes were detected under the weight values greater than 0.10. Among these candidate genes, VIM had the highest weight value. Moreover, candidate genes MMP1, CDC45, and CAT were, respectively, enriched in pathway in cancer, cell cycle, and methane metabolism. Conclusion. Candidate pathogenic genes including MMP1, CDC45, CAT, and VIM might be involved in the pathogenesis of CC. We believe that our results can provide theoretical guidelines for future clinical application.

  15. Phylum Level Change in the Cecal and Fecal Gut Communities of Rats Fed Diets Containing Different Fermentable Substrates Supports a Role for Nitrogen as a Factor Contributing to Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kalmokoff

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation differs between the proximal and distal gut but little is known regarding how the bacterial communities differ or how they are influenced by diet. In order to investigate this, we compared community diversity in the cecum and feces of rats by 16S rRNA gene content and DNA shot gun metagenomics after feeding purified diets containing different fermentable substrates. Gut community composition was dependent on the source of fermentable substrate included in the diet. Cecal communities were dominated by Firmicutes, and contained a higher abundance of Lachnospiraceae compared to feces. In feces, community structure was shifted by varying degrees depending on diet towards the Bacteroidetes, although this change was not always evident from 16S rRNA gene data. Multi-dimensional scaling analysis (PCoA comparing cecal and fecal metagenomes grouped by location within the gut rather than by diet, suggesting that factors in addition to substrate were important for community change in the distal gut. Differentially abundant genes in each environment supported this shift away from the Firmicutes in the cecum (e.g., motility towards the Bacteroidetes in feces (e.g., Bacteroidales transposons. We suggest that this phylum level change reflects a shift to ammonia as the primary source of nitrogen used to support continued microbial growth in the distal gut.

  16. Planet Hunters VI: The First Kepler Seven Planet Candidate System and 13 Other Planet Candidates from the Kepler Archival Data

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Joseph R; Fischer, Debra A; Jek, Kian J; Moriarty, John C; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Schwamb, Megan E; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon M; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Lynn, Stuart; Simpson, Robert; Omohundro, Mark; Winarski, Troy; Goodman, Samuel J; Jebson, Tony; Lacourse, Daryll

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of 14 new transiting planet candidates in the Kepler field from the Planet Hunters citizen science program. None of these candidates overlap with Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), and five of the candidates were missed by the Kepler Transit Planet Search (TPS) algorithm. The new candidates have periods ranging from 124-904 days, eight residing in their host star's habitable zone (HZ) and two (now) in multiple planet systems. We report the discovery of one more addition to the six planet candidate system around KOI-351, marking the first seven planet candidate system from Kepler. Additionally, KOI-351 bears some resemblance to our own solar system, with the inner five planets ranging from Earth to mini-Neptune radii and the outer planets being gas giants; however, this system is very compact, with all seven planet candidates orbiting $\\lesssim 1$ AU from their host star. We perform a numerical integration of the orbits and show that the system remains stable for over 100 million years....

  17. Campaigning on the Internet: 2008 Presidential General Election Candidate Webpage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Benoit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet is becoming an increasingly important component of political campaigns. This study employed content analysis to apply Functional Theory and Issue Ownership Theory to Obama’s and McCain’s presidential candidate webpages in the 2008 campaign. Acclaims (92% were more common than attacks (98%; defenses did not occur in this sample. Policy (82% was addressed more than character (18%. When discussing policy, these candidates addressed future plans most frequently, followed by general goals and then past deeds; on character, candidates discussed ideals, then personal qualities, and then leadership ability. This study shows that as candidates use the Internet to reach voters, their webpages conform to theoretical expectations.

  18. Spectroscopy of candidate electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources

    CERN Document Server

    Steele, Iain A; Piascik, Andrzej S

    2016-01-01

    A programme of worldwide, multi-wavelength electromagnetic follow-up of sources detected by gravitational wave detectors is in place. Following the discovery of GW150914 and GW151226, wide field imaging of their sky localisations identified a number of candidate optical counterparts which were then spectrally classified. The majority of candidates were found to be supernovae at redshift ranges similar to the GW events and were thereby ruled out as a genuine counterpart. Other candidates ruled out include AGN and solar system objects. Given the GW sources were black hole binary mergers, the lack of an identified electromagnetic counterpart is not surprising. However the observations show that is it is possible to organise and execute a campaign that can eliminate the majority of potential counterparts. Finally we note the existence of a "classification gap" with a significant fraction of candidates going unclassified.

  19. 11 CFR 100.148 - Volunteer activity for candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., magazines, billboards, direct mail or similar types of general public communication or political advertising... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for...

  20. 11 CFR 100.88 - Volunteer activity for candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., billboards, direct mail or similar types of general public communication or political advertising. (b) The... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for...

  1. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... from the SEL for Active Candidate consideration based on a preliminary assessment of the designation... environmental impact statement shall be published in the Federal Register and in newspapers in the area(s)...

  2. The impact of alternate fuels on future candidate automotive engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahnke, C.J.; Nichols, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    The thermal efficiency that could occur in the future for a variety of automotive engine candidates operating on conventional and alternate fuels is projected based on current automotive engine development trends and the special characteristics of the various alternate fuels. The multi-fuel engine candidates include mixture cycle and direct injection reciprocating engines, as well as adiabatic turbocompound engines and advanced gas turbine and Stirling engines. The alternate fuels considered are propane, methanol, ethanol, diesel and methane.

  3. Radiative Neutrino Mass via Both Minimal Dark Matter Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah; Picek, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    We identify a minimal model achieving one-loop radiative neutrino masses due to couplings with dark matter. Interestingly the model contains both the quintuplet fermion and the septuplet scalar identified as minimal dark matter candidates by Cirelli, Fornengo and Strumia - it gives radiative neutrino mass due to both minimal dark matter candidates. The model is related to those proposed in a recent work (dubbed minimal R$\

  4. Transiting exoplanet candidates from K2 Campaigns 5 and 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Benjamin J. S.; Parviainen, Hannu; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new transit search and vetting pipeline for observations from the K2 mission, and present the candidate transiting planets identified by this pipeline out of the targets in Campaigns 5 and 6. Our pipeline uses the Gaussian process-based K2SC code to correct for the K2 pointing systematics and simultaneously model stellar variability. The systematics-corrected, variability-detrended light curves are searched for transits with the box-least-squares method, and a period-dependent detection threshold is used to generate a preliminary candidate list. Two or three individuals vet each candidate manually to produce the final candidate list, using a set of automatically generated transit fits and assorted diagnostic tests to inform the vetting. We detect 145 single-planet system candidates and 5 multi-planet systems, independently recovering the previously published hot Jupiters EPIC 212110888b, WASP-55b (EPIC 212300977b) and Qatar-2b (EPIC 212756297b). We also report the outcome of reconnaissance spectroscopy carried out for all candidates with Kepler magnitude Kp ≤ 13, identifying 12 targets as likely false positives. We compare our results to those of other K2 transit search pipelines, noting that ours performs particularly well for variable and/or active stars, but that the results are very similar overall. All the light curves and code used in the transit search and vetting process are publicly available, as are the follow-up spectra.

  5. 22 CFR 11.11 - Mid-level Foreign Service officer career candidate appointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... affirmative factor in the selection of candidates for appointment as Foreign Service officer career candidates..., experience, and skills needed by the Foreign Service at the mid-level. (3) Age. All career candidate... terminated and the candidate so informed. (10) Foreign language requirement. All candidates who pass the...

  6. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. III. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 1629 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Baker, Anna; Roberts, Sarah; Ciardi, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results of our search for stars nearby 1629 Kepler planet candidate hosts. With survey sensitivity to objects as close as ∼0.″15, and magnitude differences Δm ≤slant 6, we find 223 stars in the vicinity of 206 target KOIs; 209 of these nearby stars have not been previously imaged in high resolution. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 12.6 % +/- 0.9 % at separations between 0.″15 and 4.″0. Particularly interesting KOI systems are discussed, including 26 stars with detected companions that host rocky, habitable zone candidates and five new candidate planet-hosting quadruple star systems. We explore the broad correlations between planetary systems and stellar binarity, using the combined data set of Baranec et al. and this paper. Our previous 2σ result of a low detected nearby star fraction of KOIs hosting close-in giant planets is less apparent in this larger data set. We also find a significant correlation between detected nearby star fraction and KOI number, suggesting possible variation between early and late Kepler data releases.

  7. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey III: Adaptive Optics Imaging of 1629 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Carl; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Baker, Anna; Roberts, Sarah; Ciardi, David R

    2016-01-01

    The Robo-AO \\textit{Kepler} Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every \\textit{Kepler} planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We present in this paper the results of our search for stars nearby 1629 \\textit{Kepler} planet candidate hosts. With survey sensitivity to objects as close as $\\sim$0.15" and magnitude differences $\\Delta$m$\\le$6, we find 223 stars in the vicinity of 206 target KOIs; 209 of these nearby stars have not previously been imaged in high resolution. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for \\textit{Kepler} planet candidates of 12.6\\%$\\pm$0.9\\% out to a separation of 4.0". Particularly interesting KOI systems are discussed, including 23 stars with detected companions which host rocky, habitable zone candidates, and five new candidate planet-hosting quadruple star systems. We explore the broad correlations between planetary systems...

  8. Properties of Optically Selected Supernova Remnant Candidates in M33

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    We present a sample of supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in M33 based on optical narrow band images in the Local Group Survey. We identify emission line objects that have enhanced [SII]:H{\\alpha} (> 0.4) and circular shapes using continuum-subtracted H{\\alpha}and [SII] images and produce a list of 199 SNR candidates, of which 79 are previously unknown. We classify them considering two types of criteria: their progenitor type (Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs) and their morphological type. Of the total sample, 170 are likely remnants of CC SNe and 29 are likely remnants of Type Ia SNe. We obtain a cumulative size distribution of the SNR candidates, showing that it follows a power law with an index,{\\alpha}= 2.38{\\pm}0.05 (17 < D < 50 pc). This indicates that most of the M33 SNR candidates found in this study are in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The [SII]:H{\\alpha} distribution of the SNR candidates shows two peaks at [SII]:H{\\alpha} ~0.55 and ~0.8. Interestingly X-ray and...

  9. Fuzzy Logic Based Trusted Candidate Selection for Stable Multipath Routing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata V. Mallapur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs, providing reliable and stable communication paths between wireless devices is critical. This paper presents a fuzzy logic stablebackbone-based multipath routing protocol (FLSBMRP for MANET that provides a high-quality path for communication between nodes. The proposed protocol has two main phases. The first phase is the selection of candidate nodes using a fuzzy logic technique. The second phase is the construction of a routing backbone that establishes multiple paths between nodes through the candidate nodes, thus forming a routing backbone. If any candidate node in the path fails due to a lack of bandwidth, residual energy or link quality, an alternate path through another candidate node is selected for communication before the route breaks, because a candidate node failure may lead to a broken link between the nodes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed protocol performs better in terms of the packet delivery ratio, overhead, delay and packet drop ratio than the major existing ad hoc routing protocols.

  10. Transiting exoplanet candidates from K2 Campaigns 5 and 6

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Benjamin J S; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new transit search and vetting pipeline for observations from the K2 mission, and present the candidate transiting planets identified by this pipeline out of the targets in Campaigns 5 and 6. Our pipeline uses the Gaussian Process-based K2SC code to correct for the K2 pointing systematics and simultaneously model stellar variability. The systematics-corrected, variability-detrended light curves are searched for transits with the Box Least Squares method, and a period-dependent detection threshold is used to generate a preliminary candidate list. Two or three individuals vet each candidate manually to produce the final candidate list, using a set of automatically-generated transit fits and assorted diagnostic tests to inform the vetting. We detect 147 single-planet system candidates and 5 multi-planet systems, independently recovering the previously-published hot~Jupiters EPIC 212110888b, WASP-55b (EPIC 212300977b) and Qatar-2b (EPIC 212756297b). We also report the outcome of reconnaissance spec...

  11. On security arguments of the second round SHA-3 candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreeva, Elena; Bogdanov, Andrey; Mennink, Bart;

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the US National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) announced a call for the design of a new cryptographic hash algorithm in response to vulnerabilities like differential attacks identified in existing hash functions, such as MD5 and SHA-1. NIST received many submissions, 51...... of which got accepted to the first round. 14 candidates were left in the second round, out of which five candidates have been recently chosen for the final round. An important criterion in the selection process is the SHA-3 hash function security. We identify two important classes of security arguments...... for the new designs: (1) the possible reductions of the hash function security to the security of its underlying building blocks and (2) arguments against differential attack on building blocks. In this paper, we compare the state of the art provable security reductions for the second round candidates...

  12. BL LAC candidates for TeV observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; Errando, M.; D' Abrusco, R.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2013-07-01

    BL Lac objects are the most numerous class of extragalactic TeV-detected sources. One of the biggest difficulties in investigating their TeV emission is due to their limited number, since only 47 BL Lac objects are known to be TeV emitters. In this paper, we propose new criteria to select TeV BL Lac candidates based on infrared and X-ray observations. We apply our selection criteria to the BL Lac objects listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog, thereby identifying 41 potential TeV emitters. We then perform a search over a more extended sample combining the ROSAT bright source catalog and the WISE all-sky survey, revealing 54 additional candidates for TeV observations. Our investigation also led to a tentative classification of 16 unidentified X-ray sources as BL Lac candidates. This analysis provides new interesting BL Lac targets for future observations with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes.

  13. Natural Flavonoids as Promising Analgesic Candidates: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Gui, Xuan; Chen, Lu; Huang, Baokang

    2016-11-01

    Due to the chemical structural diversity and various analgesic mechanisms, an increasing number of studies indicated that some flavonoids from medicinal plants could be promising candidates for new natural analgesic drugs, which attract high interests of advanced users and academic researchers. The aim of this systematic review is to report flavonoids and its derivatives as new analgesic candidates based on the pharmacological evidences. Sixty-four papers were found concerning the potential analgesic activity of 46 flavonoids. In this case, the evidence for analgesic activity of flavonoids and total flavonoids was investigated. Meanwhile, the corresponding analgesic mechanism of flavonoids was discussed by generalizing and analyzing the current publications. Based on this review, the conclusion can be drawn that some flavonoids are promising candidates for painful conditions and deserve particular attention in further research and development.

  14. Five Kepler target stars that show multiple transiting exoplanet candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Borucki, William J; Buchhave, Lars A; Caldwell, Douglas A; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Fressin, François; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan J; Haas, Michael J; Holman, Matthew J; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M; Koch, David; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Marcy, Geoffrey; MacQueen, Phillip J; Quinn, Samuel N; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Seager, Sara; Torres, Guillermo; Welsh, William F

    2010-01-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities - two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multitransiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories; as well as their likely masses and chemical compos...

  15. Additional TWA Members? Spectroscopic verification of kinematically selected TWA candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Song, I; Zuckerman, B; Song, Inseok

    2002-01-01

    We present spectroscopic measurements of the 23 new candidate members of the TW Hydrae Association from Makarov & Fabricius (2000). Based on Halpha and Li 6708 A strengths together with location on a color-magnitude diagram for Hipparcos TWA candidates, we found only three possible new members (TYC 7760-0835-1, TYC 8238-1462-1, and TYC 8234-2856-1) in addition to the already known member, TWA 19. This eliminated most of the candidates more distant than 100 pc. Three Tycho stars, almost certainly members of the Lower Centaurus Crux association, are the most distant members of the TWA. A claim of isotropic expansion of TWA has to be re-evaluated based on our new results. Generally, one cannot identify new members of a diffuse nearby stellar group based solely on kinematic data. To eliminate interlopers with similar kinematics, spectroscopic verification is essential.

  16. Planetary Nebula Candidates Uncovered with the HASH Research Platform

    CERN Document Server

    Fragkou, Vasiliki; Frew, David; Parker, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed examination of new high quality radio catalogues (e.g. Cornish) in combination with available mid-infrared (MIR) satellite imagery (e.g. Glimpse) has allowed us to find 70 new planetary nebula (PN) candidates based on existing knowledge of their typical colors and fluxes. To further examine the nature of these sources, multiple diagnostic tools have been applied to these candidates based on published data and on available imagery in the HASH (Hong Kong/ AAO/ Strasbourg H{\\alpha} planetary nebula) research platform. Some candidates have previously-missed optical counterparts allowing for spectroscopic follow-up. Indeed, the single object spectroscopically observed so far has turned out to be a bona fide PN.

  17. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    coefficients is also reported. Maps of differences in the vertical field intensity at Earth’s surface between the candidates and weighted mean models are presented. Candidates with anomalous aspects are identified and efforts made to pinpoint both troublesome coefficients and geographical regions where large...... vector satellite data is demonstrated; based on internal consistency DGRF-2005 has a formal root mean square vector field error over Earth’s surface of 1.0 nT. Difficulties nevertheless remain in accurately forecasting field evolution only five years into the future....

  18. Light Sensor Candidates for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Knoetig, M L; Kurz, M; Hose, J; Lorenz, E; Schweizer, T; Teshima, M; Buzhan, P; Popova, E; Bolmont, J; Tavernet, J -P; Vincent, P; Shayduk, M

    2011-01-01

    We report on the characterization of candidate light sensors for use in the next-generation Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope project called Cherenkov Telescope Array, a major astro-particle physics project of about 100 telescopes that is currently in the prototyping phase. Our goal is to develop with the manufacturers the best possible light sensors (highest photon detection efficiency, lowest crosstalk and afterpulsing). The cameras of those telescopes will be based on classical super-bi-alkali Photomultiplier tubes but also Silicon Photomultipliers are candidate light sensors. A full characterisation of selected sensors was done. We are working in close contact with several manufacturers, giving them feedback and suggesting improvements.

  19. Former Head of CNOOC Named as Candidate for Governor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ The Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party has appointed Wei Liucheng, Former President of CNOOC and Former Chairman and CEO of CNOOC Limited, as Deputy Secretary of Hainan Provincial Committee and named him as the candidate for Governor of Hainan Province. At a conference of Hainan Provincial Committee of the Party held on October 8, at which the organization department of the Communist Party of China announced nomination of Wei as the deputy Party secretary of Hainan, which is the second highest position in the provincial government. Wei was also chosen as a candidate for the governor of the island province.

  20. Practical Large Scale Syntheses of New Drug Candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Yin Li

    2001-01-01

    @@ This presentation will be focus on Practical large scale syntheses of lead compounds and drug candidates from three major therapeutic areas from DuPont Pharmaceuticals Research Laboratory: 1). DMP777-a selective, non-toxic, orally active human elastase inhibitor; 2). DMP754-a potent glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonist; 3). R-Wafarin-the pure enantiomeric form of wafarin. The key technology used for preparation these drug candidates is asymmetric hydrogenation under very mild reaction conditions, which produced very high quality final products at large scale (>99% de, >99 A% and >99 wt%). Some practical and GMP aspects of process development will be also discussed.

  1. Decomposing the Relationship Between Candidates' Facial Appearance and Electoral Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    candidates’ faces and electoral success is challenged in two ways: (i) non-facial factors in candidate photos such as clothing and hair style as well as (ii) parties’ nomination strategies are suggested as potential confounds. This study is based on original data about all 268 candidates running in three...... facial competence also predicts electoral success over and above what can be accounted for by attractiveness. Importantly these relationships are found when seven different non-facial factors, parties’ nomination strategies and candidates’ age and gender are controlled for. This suggests that the two...

  2. Facial discrimination of political candidates and voting behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Duduciuc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available After a review of psychosociological research concerning the sources of prejudices and discriminations, this article brings into discussion the cognitive approach of perceiving the other as being „otherwise” than the members of the in-group. We will discuss the situations, structural and personal factors as being some determining ones for discriminant behavior. Within the lines of cognitive paradigm, we ask how the individual does discriminate, by perceptive processes, between candidates which are considered attractive, which go together with the expectations of the electorate concerning the physical aspects and candidates who are „less desirable”.

  3. A preliminary systems assessment of the Starlite Demo candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathke, C.G.

    1995-12-01

    The Starlite project has evaluated the following five tokamaks as candidates for the US Demo Power Plant: (1) steady state, first stability regime; (2) pulsed, first stability regime; (3) steady state, second stability regime; (4) steady state, reversed shear; and (5) steady state, low aspect ratio. Systems analysis of these candidates has played an important role in the selection of a reversed-shear tokamak for further conceptual design as a US Demo Power Plant. The cost-based systems analysis that led to the selection of a reversed-shear tokamak is described herein.

  4. On Intrinsic Magnetic Moments In Black Hole Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, S L; Robertson, Stanley L.; Leiter, Darryl J.

    2003-01-01

    In previous work we found that many of the spectral properties of low mass x-ray binaries, including galactic black hole candidates could be explained by a magnetic propeller model that requires an intrinsically magnetized central object. Here we describe how the Einstein field equations of General Relativity and equipartition magnetic fields permit the existence of highly red shifted, extremely long lived, collapsing, radiating objects. We examine the properties of these collapsed objects and discuss characteristics that might lead to their confirmation as the source of black hole candidate phenomena.

  5. Practical Large Scale Syntheses of New Drug Candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Yin; Li

    2001-01-01

    This presentation will be focus on Practical large scale syntheses of lead compounds and drug candidates from three major therapeutic areas from DuPont Pharmaceuticals Research Laboratory: 1). DMP777-a selective, non-toxic, orally active human elastase inhibitor; 2). DMP754-a potent glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonist; 3). R-Wafarin-the pure enantiomeric form of wafarin. The key technology used for preparation these drug candidates is asymmetric hydrogenation under very mild reaction conditions, which produced very high quality final products at large scale (>99% de, >99 A% and >99 wt%). Some practical and GMP aspects of process development will be also discussed.……

  6. Operational support and analysis a guide for ITIL exam candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Sansbury, John

    2014-01-01

    This user-friendly book aims to assist candidates pass the ITIL® OSA Intermediate examination. It references material from the core ITIL texts and gives practical guidance. This new edition includes the latest ITIL guidance as well as additional insights from the author's own experience of developing effective solutions. An ITIL® licensed product.

  7. Integrated spectral study of reddened globular clusters and candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, E.; Claria, J. J.; Piatti, A. E.; Bonatto, C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents integrated spectra in the range 6700 - 9500 Angstroms for 20 Galactic globular clusters (and candidates) in the bulge and 5 others projected on the Galactic disk (|l|>30mbox {^{\\circ}}\\ and |b|Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), Argentina, and European Southern Observatory (ESO), Chile.

  8. Investigation of Teacher Candidates' Learning Styles and Critical Thinking Dispositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Açışlı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study teacher candidates’ learning styles and critical thinking dispositions were investigated. The study group is composed of 938 students attending class teaching and science teaching departments of Artvin Çoruh, Karadeniz Technical, and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan Universities. Colb Learning Styles Inventory and California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI were used as a means of data-collection. The data were analysed with SPSS 17, and it was detected that there are some differences between the learning styles and critical thinking dispositions of teacher candidates in terms of the variables. It was also observed that 40,9 % of students have "assimilator", 31,2 % of students have "diverger", 15,9 % of students have "converger" , and 11,9 % of students have "accommodator" learning style. The teacher candidates got the highest score from the "being analytical" subscale. As for teacher candidates critical thinking dispositions according to the class levels, a statistically meaningful difference was seen for those attending the final classes only in "open-mindedness" subscale. Upon the analysis of whether teacher candidates critical thinking dispositions differ according to school type variable, a meaningful difference was detected at the subscales of curiosity and seeking for truth while a meaningful difference was not found at the subscales of being analytical, being systematical, and self-confidence.

  9. Supervising PETE Candidates Using the Situational Supervision Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Linda S.; Johnson, Lynn V.

    2012-01-01

    Physical education teacher candidates (PETCs) often, as part of their curricular requirements, engage in early field experiences that prepare them for student teaching. Matching the PETC's developmental level with the mentor's supervision style enhances this experience. The situational supervision model, based on the situational leadership model,…

  10. Primary School Teacher Candidates' Geometric Habits of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Nilu¨fer Y.; Tanisli, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Geometric habits of mind are productive ways of thinking that support learning and using geometric concepts. Identifying primary school teacher candidates' geometric habits of mind is important as they affect the development of their future students' geometric thinking. Therefore, this study attempts to determine primary school teachers' geometric…

  11. Direct Dark Matter Searches: Fits to WIMP Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Gelmini, Graciela B.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief introduction to dark matter in general and to WIMPs as candidates, we review recent results of direct dark matter searches. We concentrate on older and more recent hints pointing to light WIMP's with mass below 10 GeV.

  12. Supporting Clinical Practice Candidates in Learning Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Nancy K.; Sudeck, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to monitor pre-service teacher candidates' progression and implementation of the learning community philosophy along with classroom management strategies. The study took place during their final semester of clinical practice. Data were collected from self-reports, surveys, university supervisor…

  13. IT Service Management A guide for ITIL Foundation Exam candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Brewster, Ernest; Lawes, Aidan; Sansbury, John

    2012-01-01

    ITIL® is a framework for IT service management and provides best management practice to meet ISO/IEC 20k. This guide introduces ITIL to Foundation Exam candidates and offers a practical understanding of IT service management. The new edition is fully updated and contains several additional processes. An ITIL® licensed product.

  14. Effects of Critical Thinking Intervention for Early Childhood Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heejeong Sophia; Brown, E. Todd

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on an intervention designed to enhance early childhood teacher candidates' critical thinking abilities. The concept, elements, standards, and traits of critical thinking were integrated into the main course contents, and the effects of the intervention were examined. The results indicated that early childhood teacher…

  15. Are Teacher and Principal Candidates Prepared to Address Student Cyberbullying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Ronald A., Jr.; Bonner, Jessica L.; Styron, Jennifer L.; Bridgeforth, James; Martin, Cecelia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the preparation of teacher and principal candidates to address problems created in K-12 settings as a result of cyberbullying. Participants included teacher and principal preparation students. Findings indicated that respondents were familiar with the most common forms of cyberbullying and its impact on…

  16. Documenting Teacher Candidates' Professional Growth through Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Suh, Jennifer; Parsons, Seth A.; Parker, Audra K.; Ramirez, Erin M.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, colleges of education are responding to demands for increased accountability. The purpose of this article is to describe one teacher education program's implementation of a performance evaluation tool during final internship that measures teacher candidates' development across four domains: Planning and Preparation,…

  17. First microlensing candidates from the MEGA survey of M 31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JTA; Kuijken, K; Crotts, APS; Sackett, PD; Sutherland, WJ; Uglesich, RR; Baltz, EA; Cseresnjes, P; Gyuk, G; Widrow, LM

    2004-01-01

    We present the first M 31 candidate microlensing events from the Microlensing Exploration of the Galaxy and Andromeda (MEGA) survey. MEGA uses several telescopes to detect microlensing towards the nearby Andromeda galaxy, M 3 1, in order to establish whether massive compact objects are a significant

  18. Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Scientists: Images and Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The masculine image of scientists as elderly men wearing white coats and glasses, working alone in the laboratory has been documented since the 1950s. Because it is important that teacher candidates have a scientifically literate image of scientists due to the impact they have on their future students, this investigation is salient. This study…

  19. NIR Flare of the AGN Candidate PMNJ0107+0333

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L.; Miramon, J.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Chavushyan, V.; Mayya, D. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the new NIR flare of the AGN candidate PMNJ0107+0333, cross identified with the X-ray source 1RXS J010729.5+033341. On November 13th,2016 (MJD 2457705.699), we found the source with the following flux in the NIR band: H = 14.657 +/- 0.05.

  20. Candidate new rotavirus species in sheltered dogs, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Gellért, Ákos; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-04-01

    We identified unusual rotavirus strains in fecal specimens from sheltered dogs in Hungary by viral metagenomics. The novel rotavirus species displayed limited genome sequence homology to representatives of the 8 rotavirus species, A-H, and qualifies as a candidate new rotavirus species that we tentatively named Rotavirus I.

  1. Nonequilibrium Candidate Monte Carlo Simulations with Configurational Freezing Schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Edoardo; Gellini, Cristina; Pietraperzia, Giangaetano; Cardini, Gianni; Chelli, Riccardo

    2014-10-14

    Nonequilibrium Candidate Monte Carlo simulation [Nilmeier et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2011, 108, E1009-E1018] is a tool devised to design Monte Carlo moves with high acceptance probabilities that connect uncorrelated configurations. Such moves are generated through nonequilibrium driven dynamics, producing candidate configurations accepted with a Monte Carlo-like criterion that preserves the equilibrium distribution. The probability of accepting a candidate configuration as the next sample in the Markov chain basically depends on the work performed on the system during the nonequilibrium trajectory and increases with decreasing such a work. It is thus strategically relevant to find ways of producing nonequilibrium moves with low work, namely moves where dissipation is as low as possible. This is the goal of our methodology, in which we combine Nonequilibrium Candidate Monte Carlo with Configurational Freezing schemes developed by Nicolini et al. (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2011, 7, 582-593). The idea is to limit the configurational sampling to particles of a well-established region of the simulation sample, namely the region where dissipation occurs, while leaving fixed the other particles. This allows to make the system relaxation faster around the region perturbed by the finite-time switching move and hence to reduce the dissipated work, eventually enhancing the probability of accepting the generated move. Our combined approach enhances significantly configurational sampling, as shown by the case of a bistable dimer immersed in a dense fluid.

  2. HMGA1a recognition candidate DNA sequences in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Manabe

    Full Text Available High mobility group protein A1a (HMGA1a acts as an architectural transcription factor and influences a diverse array of normal biological processes. It binds AT-rich sequences, and previous reports have demonstrated HMGA1a binding to the authentic promoters of various genes. However, the precise sequences that HMGA1a binds to remain to be clarified. Therefore, in this study, we searched for the sequences with the highest affinity for human HMGA1a using an existing SELEX method, and then compared the identified sequences with known human promoter sequences. Based on our results, we propose the sequences "-(G/A-G-(A/T-(A/T-A-T-T-T-" as HMGA1a-binding candidate sequences. Furthermore, these candidate sequences bound native human HMGA1a from SK-N-SH cells. When candidate sequences were analyzed by performing FASTAs against all known human promoter sequences, 500-900 sequences were hit by each one. Some of the extracted genes have already been proven or suggested as HMGA1a-binding promoters. The candidate sequences presented here represent important information for research into the various roles of HMGA1a, including cell differentiation, death, growth, proliferation, and the pathogenesis of cancer.

  3. Candidate eco-friendly gas mixtures for MPGDs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071648; Saviano, G.; Muhammad, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Ferrini, M.; Parvis, M.; Grassing, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Kjøbro, J.; Sharma, A.; Yang, D.; Chen, G.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  4. Evaluation of Candidate Teachers Related to the Weblog Writing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Tugba; Demirgünes, Sercan

    2016-01-01

    Weblogs offer a new writing and reading environment. Most people in the education process may improve their writing skills and achieve new perspectives related to writing via weblogs. In this study the changes that weblog writing process created in undergraduates'/candidate teachers' minds regarding writing are revealed. The weblog writing process…

  5. Candidate optical counterparts of MAXI J1543-564

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russell, D.M.; Lewis, F.; Roche, P.; Altamirano, D.

    2011-01-01

    We report on optical observations of the field of the black hole candidate X-ray binary MAXI J1543-564 (ATel #3330, #3331, #3334, #3336, #3341, #3355) with the 2-m Faulkes Telescope South (located at Siding Spring, Australia). Three images were acquired in SDSS i'-band on 2011 May 11th, 14th and 15t

  6. Single Integrated Air Picture (SIAP) Block 1 Candidate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    to produce joint warfighting capability. Since there was no process for the Single Integrated Air Picture System Engineering Task Force ( SIAP SE TF...to inherit or leverage, the SIAP SE TF had to build a process to identify candidate systems that will be impacted by the SIAP Block I upgrade.

  7. A kinematical selection of glueball candidates in central production

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D; Binon, Freddy G; Carney, J N; Close, Francis Edwin; Danielsen, K M; Dolgopolov, A V; Donskov, S V; Earl, B C; Evans, D; French, Bernard R; Inaba, S; Inyakin, A V; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobsen, T; Khaustov, G V; Kinashi, T; Kinson, J B; Kirk, A; Klempt, W; Kobayashi, M; Kondashov, A A; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Lednev, A A; Lenti, V; Maljukov, S; Martinengo, P; Minashvili, I A; Myklebost, K; Nakagawa, T; Norman, K L; Olsen, J M; Peigneux, J P; Polovnikov, S A; Polyakov, V A; Prokoshkin, Yu D; Romanovsky, V I; Rotscheidt, Herbert; Rumyantsev, V; Rusakovitch, N A; Sadovsky, S A; Samoylenko, V D; Semenov, A A; Sené, M; Sené, R; Shagin, P M; Shimizu, H M; Singovsky, A V; Soloviev, A S; Stassinaki, M; Stroot, Jean-Pierre; Sugonyaev, V P; Takamatsu, K; Tchlatchidze, G A; Tsuru, T; Vasileiadis, G; Venables, M; Villalobos Baillie, O; Votruba, M F; Yasu, Y

    1997-01-01

    A study of central meson production as a function of the difference in transverse momentum ($dP_T$) of the exchanged particles shows that undisputed $q \\overline q$ mesons are suppressed at small $dP_T$ whereas the glueball candidates are enhanced.

  8. Quotas and intersectionality: ethnicity and gender in candidate selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celis, K.; Erzeel, S.; Mügge, L.; Damstra, A.

    2014-01-01

    Gender equality is not fully realised when it is restricted to ethnic majority men and women. This article examines how gender quotas as a form of equality policy affect ethnic minority groups, in particular, the gender balance among ethnic minority candidates for political office. Our analysis focu

  9. 11 CFR 9003.1 - Candidate and committee agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....1(b)(1). Upon request, documentation explaining the computer system's software capabilities shall be provided, and such personnel as are necessary to explain the operation of the computer system's software... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate and committee agreements....

  10. 11 CFR 9033.1 - Candidate and committee agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... operation of the computer system's software and the computerized information prepared or maintained by the... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate and committee agreements. 9033.1 Section 9033.1 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN...

  11. How political candidates use Twitter and the impact on votes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruikemeier, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the content characteristics of Twitter during an election campaign, and the relationship between candidates’ style of online campaigning (i.e., politically personalized and interactive communication) and electoral support for those candidates. Thereby, it provides a better un

  12. THE 3 MU-M SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE CARBON STARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROENEWEGEN, MAT; DEJONG, T; GEBALLE, TR

    1994-01-01

    We have searched for the 3.1 mum absorption feature, a well-known characteristic of optical carbon stars, in a sample of sixteen candidate carbon stars, most of which have very red colors and some of which have no optical counterparts. The sample was selected on the basis of similarity of LRS spectr

  13. X-ray spectroscopy of a recoiling SMBH candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predehl, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Recent numerical relativity simulations of coalescencing supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries predict that SMBHs can receive kicks with velocities up to several thousand km/s due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. We have recently found the best candidate todate for such a recoiling SMBH (Komossa et al. 2008). We apply for a 25 ks ACIS-S exposure of this exceptional source.

  14. Faculty Meeting: A Simulation for Secondary Teacher Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Janet E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a one-hour simulation used in methods courses at the University of Texas at Austin, to provide secondary teacher candidates with insights into the administrative functioning of a school and their future roles as department and school staff members. (SJL)

  15. Single Transit Candidates from K2: Detection and Period Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, H P; Brown, D J A; McCormac, J; Doyle, A P; Louden, T M; Kirk, J; Spake, J J; Lam, K W F; Walker, S R; Faedi, F; Pollacco, D L

    2015-01-01

    Photometric surveys such as Kepler have the precision to identify exoplanet and eclipsing binary candidates from only a single transit. K2, with its 75d campaign duration, is ideally suited to detect significant numbers of single-eclipsing objects. Here we develop a Bayesian transit-fitting tool ("Namaste: An Mcmc Analysis of Single Transit Exoplanets") to extract orbital information from single transit events. We achieve favourable results testing this technique on known Kepler planets, and apply the technique to 7 candidates identified from a targeted search of K2 campaigns 1, 2 and 3. We find EPIC203311200 to host an excellent exoplanet candidate with a period, assuming zero eccentricity, of $540 ^{+410}_{-230}$ days and a radius of $0.51 \\pm 0.05 R_{Jup}$. We also find six further transit candidates for which more follow-up is required to determine a planetary origin. Such a technique could be used in the future with TESS, PLATO and ground-based photometric surveys such as NGTS, potentially allowing the d...

  16. Teacher Candidates' Attitudes to Using Oral History in History Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the views of history teacher candidates towards an oral history project carried out in the Special Teaching Method Course of the history pedagogy program of the Fatih Faculty of Education (FFE) at Karadeniz Technical University in Turkey. An open-ended questionnaire and semi-structured interview were the…

  17. Teacher Candidates' Collaboration and Identity in Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    In an online context, without facial, verbal or gestural cues, establishing identities through naming social positions appeared essential to effective written communication for graduate pre-service teacher candidates enrolled in a course on literacy education for elementary students. As they engaged in small group asynchronous discussions about…

  18. 11 CFR 110.8 - Presidential candidate expenditure limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the aggregate of expenditures under this paragraph in any one State shall not exceed the greater of 16... CFR 110.18. (b) The expenditure limitations shall not be considered violated if, after the date of the... expenditure limitation under 11 CFR 9035.1. (d)(1) If an individual is a candidate for more than one...

  19. Recent production of candidate reference materials at IRMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, G.N.; Pauwels, J.; Le Guern, L.; Schimmel, H.; Trapmann, S. [Commission of the European Communities, Geel (Belgium). Joint Research Centre

    2001-06-01

    In the execution of its mission to promote a common European measurement system in support of EU policies, IRMM's Reference Materials Unit is currently involved in preparation of proficiency-testing samples and candidate reference materials. Recent work related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cows, genetically modified organisms, and a variety of environmental materials is described. (orig.)

  20. Candidate chemosensory genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides.

  1. Many-Objective Distinct Candidates Optimization using Differential Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Peter; Ursem, Rasmus Kjær

    2010-01-01

    for each objective. The Many-Objective Distinct Candidates Optimization using Differential Evolution (MODCODE) algorithm takes a novel approach by focusing search using a user-defined number of subpopulations each returning a distinct optimal solution within the preferred region of interest. In this paper...

  2. Generating Genome-Scale Candidate Gene Lists for Pharmacogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niclas Tue; Brunak, Søren; Altman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    A critical task in pharmacogenomics is identifying genes that may be important modulators of drug response. High-throughput experimental methods are often plagued by false positives and do not take advantage of existing knowledge. Candidate gene lists can usefully summarize existing knowledge...

  3. Mission Driven Scene Understanding: Candidate Model Training and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302...driven scene understanding. One of the candidate engines that we are evaluating is a convolutional neural network (CNN) program installed on a Windows 10...environments on scene understanding model results. 15. SUBJECT TERMS computer vision, context, saliency, convolutional neural network , dynamic

  4. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  5. Discovery of optical candidate supernova remnants in Sagittarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikakos, J.; Boumis, P.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Goudis, C. D.

    2012-08-01

    During an [O III] survey of planetary nebulae, we identified a region in Sagittarius containing several candidate supernova remants (SNRs) and obtained deep optical narrow-band images and spectra to explore their nature. We obtained images of the area of interest by acquiring observations in the emission lines of Hα + [N II], [S II] and [O III]. The resulting mosaic covers an area of 1.4° × 1.0°, where both filamentary and diffuse emission was discovered, suggesting that there is more than one SNR in the area. Deep long-slit spectra were also taken of eight different regions. Both the flux-calibrated images and the spectra show that the emission from the filamentary structures originates from shock-heated gas, while the photo-ionization mechanism is responsible for the diffuse emission. Part of the optical emission is found to be correlated with the radio at 4850 MHz suggesting that they are related, while the infrared emission found in the area at 12 μm and 22 μm marginally correlates with the optical. The presence of the [O III] emission line in one of the candidate SNRs implies that the shock velocities in the interstellar "clouds" are between 120 km s-1 and 200 km s-1, while its absence in the other candidate SNRs indicates that the shock velocities there are slower. For all candidate remnants, the [S II] λλ 6716/6731 ratio indicates that the electron densities are below 240 cm-3, while the Hα emission is measured to be between 0.6 and 41 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. The existence of eight pulsars within 1.5° of the center of the candidate SNRs also implies that there are many SNRs in the area as well as that the detected optical emission could be part of a number of supernovae explosions.

  6. The Important Candidate Genes in Goats - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    China SUPAKORN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 271 candidate genes have been detected in goats. However, comprehensive investigations have been carried out on the polymorphism of some genes, involved in the control of economic traits. Candidate genes have an effect on the physiological pathway, metabolism and expression of phenotypes. For growth traits, growth hormone (GH, growth hormone receptor (GHR, insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I, leptin (LEP, caprine pituitary specific transcription factor-1 (POU1F1, caprine myostatin (MSTN and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP genes are necessary for bone formation, birth weight, weaning weight, body condition and muscle growth. For reproduction, forkhead box L 2 (FOXL2, melatonin receptor 1A (MTNR1A, sex determination region of Y chromosome (SRY and amelogenin (AMEL genes influence sex determination and proliferation. The major candidate genes for milk yield and milk composition traits are the casein gene and their family. Keratin associated protein (KAP and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R genes are candidate genes for wool traits. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC gene is considered important for the immune system and disease resistance traits. The functions of these genes on economically important traits are different. Some genes have synergistic or antagonistic effects in nature for expression of phenotypic traits. On the other hand, some genes could control more than one trait. Also, the producers should be concerned with these effects because selection of a single trait by using only a gene could affect other traits. Therefore, the identification of candidate genes and their mutations which cause variations of gene expression and phenotype of economic traits will help breeders to search some genetic markers for these economic traits. It may be used as an aid in the selection of parent stock at an early age in the future.

  7. Academic Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teacher Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Etem YEŞİLYURT

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims determining academic self-efficacy perception of teacher candidates. It is survey model. Population of the study consists of teacher candidates in 2010-2011 academic years at Ahmet Keleşoğlu Education Faculty of Education Formation of Selçuk University. A simple random sample was selected as sampling method and the study was conducted on 312 teacher candidates. The data of this study was obtained by “academic selfefficacy scale” which was developed by Jerusalem and Schwazer (1981 and translated into Turkish by Yılmaz, Gürçay, and Ekici (2007 and its reliability value was determined as .79. However, Cronbach Alfa reliability value of this scale became .76 with the result of the data analysis of the study. SPSS package program was used to analyze the data; and the data analysis, frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation, independent samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc tests (LSD test were used. When the findings of the research were considered in general, the result showed that the academic self-efficacy perception level of the candidates was at desired level. However, teachers' views about the level of academic self-efficacy perception showed that most of them preferred a lower level option "suits me", instead of "totally suits me" option that was the highest degree of participation of four likert-type scale. This illustrated that their perception about this issue was not at a very high level. When independent variables were taken into account, among the academic perception levels of teacher candidates, a significant difference was detected in terms of working as a teacher or not and academic achievement variables but it revealed no significant difference in terms of gender and type of education program variables.

  8. Identification of candidate genome regions controlling disease resistance in Arachis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pike Jodie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, diseases are important reducers of peanut (Arachis hypogaea yield. Sources of resistance against many diseases are available in cultivated peanut genotypes, although often not in farmer preferred varieties. Wild species generally harbor greater levels of resistance and even apparent immunity, although the linkage of agronomically un-adapted wild alleles with wild disease resistance genes is inevitable. Marker-assisted selection has the potential to facilitate the combination of both cultivated and wild resistance loci with agronomically adapted alleles. However, in peanut there is an almost complete lack of knowledge of the regions of the Arachis genome that control disease resistance. Results In this work we identified candidate genome regions that control disease resistance. For this we placed candidate disease resistance genes and QTLs against late leaf spot disease on the genetic map of the A-genome of Arachis, which is based on microsatellite markers and legume anchor markers. These marker types are transferable within the genus Arachis and to other legumes respectively, enabling this map to be aligned to other Arachis maps and to maps of other legume crops including those with sequenced genomes. In total, 34 sequence-confirmed candidate disease resistance genes and five QTLs were mapped. Conclusion Candidate genes and QTLs were distributed on all linkage groups except for the smallest, but the distribution was not even. Groupings of candidate genes and QTLs for late leaf spot resistance were apparent on the upper region of linkage group 4 and the lower region of linkage group 2, indicating that these regions are likely to control disease resistance.

  9. Shigella sonnei Vaccine Candidates WRSs2 and WRSs3 Are as Immunogenic as WRSS1, a Clinically Tested Vaccine Candidate, in a Primate Model of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: Barnoy S, et al. Shigella sonnei vaccine candidates WRSs2 and WRSs3 are as immunogenic as WRSS1, a clinically... Shigella sonnei vaccine candidates WRSs2 and WRSs3 are as immunogenic as WRSS1, a clinically tested vaccine candidate, in a primate...o Article history: Received 15 October 2010 Accepted 28 April 2011 Available online Keywords: Shigella sonnei Live vaccine candidates WRSs2

  10. The CHAOS-3 Geomagnetic Field Model and Candidates for the 11th Generation IGRF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Mandea, Mioara; Sabaka, Terence J.

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the 11th generation IGRF defined by IAGA, we propose a candidate model for the DGRF 2005, a candidate model for IGRF 2010 and a candidate model for the mean secular variation between 2010 and 2015. These candidate models, the derivation of which is described in the following, are bas...

  11. Framing the Candidates in Presidential Primaries: Issues and Images in Press Releases and News Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Mark; Andsager, Julie L.; Riechert, Bonnie P.

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to research on political communication by examining how 1996 GOP presidential candidates framed themselves in press releases and how elite newspapers covered them. Shows that candidate images were distinct in press releases and news stories; candidate positions were represented differently in both; and candidates were differentially…

  12. Comparing What Teacher Candidates Know about Each Other: China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Byker, Erik Jon; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare teacher candidates' knowledge and perceptions about China and the United States. Using a survey research design, 91 Chinese teacher candidates and 96 teacher candidates from the United Sates participated. The survey findings indicated that, while both groups of teacher candidates had a basic level of…

  13. A Research on the Burnout and the Teaching Profession Attitudes of Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, Aysegül; Beytekin, Osman Ferda; Arslan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to examine burnout and teaching profession attitudes of teacher candidates. Research was conducted with 287 teacher candidates. By the findings; burnout and teaching profession attitudes of teacher candidates don't differ according to their gender. Burnout of teacher candidates differs according to their graduation status…

  14. Representações sociais dos moradores da Baía de Camamu sobre o Filo Porifera Social representations of Camamu Bay, Brazil, inhabitants of the Phylum Porífera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyana Docio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta uma pesquisa que teve o objetivo de traçar um perfil das representações sociais dos moradores de três localidades da Baía de Camamu, Estado da Bahia, sobre o Filo Porifera. O foco nos poríferos foi motivado pela grande biomassa de esponjas no fenômeno de arribação da baía e ausência de pesquisas sobre esses animais na área do ensino. A metodologia esteve pautada nas representações sociais, pois conhecimentos (reconstruídos na vivência de um local característico, como o apresentado por esse ambiente, permitem desenhar perspectivas que subsidiam o ensino de Ciências, por exemplo, no tratamento dos obstáculos epistemológicos à aprendizagem de conceitos científicos. Foram realizadas sessenta entrevistas semiestruturadas, vinte em cada lugarejo (Ilha do Contrato, Barra Grande e Ilha dos Tubarões. Os dados foram organizados em categorias que resultaram num perfil de conhecimentos sobre os seguintes aspectos dos poríferos: estado vital, origem, taxonomia, ecologia, anatomia, fisiologia, utilidade antrópica e espongose.This study established a profile of social representations by inhabitants in three locations in Camamu Bay (state of Bahia of the Phylum Porifera. Among other reasons, the focus on Porifera is due to its significant biomass ascertained in the bay region's migration phenomenon and the lack of research on these animals in education. The methodology used was based on social representations because when knowledge is (rebuilt from experience of a location with a characteristic profile is compared to scientific knowledge, it is possible to draw perspectives for Science education, such as the epistemological obstacles to the learning of scientific concepts. Sixty semi-structured interviews were carried out, twenty in each place (Ilha do Contrato, Barra Grande, and Ilha dos Tubarões. The gathered data was organized into categories that outlined a profile of knowledge that includes characteristics such

  15. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey II: Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-01-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high-angular-resolution visible-light laser-adaptive-optics imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to $\\Delta m \\approx 6$ that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within $\\sim$4" of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby-star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% $\\pm$ 1.1% a...

  16. Automatic extraction of candidate nomenclature terms using the doublet method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman Jules J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New terminology continuously enters the biomedical literature. How can curators identify new terms that can be added to existing nomenclatures? The most direct method, and one that has served well, involves reading the current literature. The scholarly curator adds new terms as they are encountered. Present-day scholars are severely challenged by the enormous volume of biomedical literature. Curators of medical nomenclatures need computational assistance if they hope to keep their terminologies current. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of rapidly extracting new, candidate terms from huge volumes of biomedical text. The resulting lists of terms can be quickly reviewed by curators and added to nomenclatures, if appropriate. The candidate term extractor uses a variation of the previously described doublet coding method. The algorithm, which operates on virtually any nomenclature, derives from the observation that most terms within a knowledge domain are composed entirely of word combinations found in other terms from the same knowledge domain. Terms can be expressed as sequences of overlapping word doublets that have more specific meaning than the individual words that compose the term. The algorithm parses through text, finding contiguous sequences of word doublets that are known to occur somewhere in the reference nomenclature. When a sequence of matching word doublets is encountered, it is compared with whole terms already included in the nomenclature. If the doublet sequence is not already in the nomenclature, it is extracted as a candidate new term. Candidate new terms can be reviewed by a curator to determine if they should be added to the nomenclature. An implementation of the algorithm is demonstrated, using a corpus of published abstracts obtained through the National Library of Medicine's PubMed query service and using "The developmental lineage classification and taxonomy of neoplasms" as a reference

  17. Short period eclipsing binary candidates identified using SuperWASP

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, A J; Evans, T; West, R G; Wheatley, P J; Anderson, D R; Barros, S C C; Butters, O W; Cameron, A Collier; Christian, D J; Enoch, B; Faedi, F; Haswell, C A; Hellier, C; Holmes, S; Horne, K D; Lister, T A; Maxted, P F L; Parley, N; Pollacco, D; Simpson, E K; Skillen, I; Smalley, B; Southworth, J; Street, R A

    2011-01-01

    We present light curves and periods of 53 candidates for short period eclipsing binary stars identified by SuperWASP. These include 48 newly identified objects with periods <2x10^4 seconds (~0.23d), as well as the shortest period binary known with main sequence components (GSC2314-0530 = 1SWASP J022050.85+332047.6) and four other previously known W UMa stars (although the previously reported periods for two of these four are shown to be incorrect). The period distribution of main sequence contact binaries shows a sharp cut-off at a lower limit of around 0.22d, but until now, very few systems were known close to this limit. These new candidates will therefore be important for understanding the evolution of low mass stars and to allow investigation of the cause of the period cut-off.

  18. A novel live-attenuated vaccine candidate for mayaro Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Weise

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus (MAYV is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease.

  19. An improved catalog of halo wide binary candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Christine

    2014-01-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries, compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. (2004), and Chanam\\'e \\& Gould. (2004) but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan (1992) and Zapatero-Osorio \\& Martin (2004). All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included, when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, for 150 of which radial velocities are available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law $f...

  20. Vaccine Candidates against Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouzi, Ava; Vaziri, Farzam; Rahimi-Jamnani, Fatemeh; Afrough, Parviz; Rahbar, Mohammad; Satarian, Fereshteh; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-01-01

    Nonencapsulated, nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) remains an important cause of acute otitis and respiratory diseases in children and adults. NTHi bacteria are one of the major causes of respiratory tract infections, including acute otitis media, cystic fibrosis, and community-acquired pneumonia among children, especially in developing countries. The bacteria can also cause chronic diseases such as chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the lower respiratory tract of adults. Such bacteria express several outer membrane proteins, some of which have been studied as candidates for vaccine development. Due to the lack of effective vaccines as well as the spread and prevalence of NTHi worldwide, there is an urgent need to design and develop effective vaccine candidates against these strains. PMID:28088130

  1. A novel live-attenuated vaccine candidate for mayaro Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, William J; Hermance, Meghan E; Forrester, Naomi; Adams, A Paige; Langsjoen, Rose; Gorchakov, Rodion; Wang, Eryu; Alcorn, Maria D H; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Weaver, Scott C

    2014-08-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease.

  2. Pedophiles and stalkers as transplant candidates: one program's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Wayne; Miller, Rachel; Hille, Cheryl; Nour, Bakr; Griggs, Johnny

    2005-12-01

    Transplant assessment of pedophiles and stalkers presents a challenge for clinicians and requires the ability to separate the science from the hysteria. Although rarely seen in organ transplant clinics, the presence of psychosexual disorders can result in both criminal charges and harsh societal reactions. Clinicians must be able to assess and make informed recommendations about the suitability of the candidate and any potential risks for staff, other patients, and society at large. Six patients (5 pedophiles and 1 stalker) were assessed at our major regional multiorgan transplant program; each patient presented with unique and challenging assessment, treatment, and selection issues for the transplant team. The objectives of this article are to raise awareness of the issues associated with pedophiles and stalkers, and to provide the basis for better-informed discussions based on one program's struggles with its candidate selection and follow-up.

  3. On the Low False Positive Probabilities of Kepler Planet Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, Timothy D

    2011-01-01

    We present a framework to conservatively estimate the probability that any particular planet-like transit signal observed by the Kepler mission is in fact a planet, prior to any ground-based follow-up efforts. We use Monte Carlo methods based on stellar population synthesis and Galactic structure models, and we provide empirical analytic fits to our results that may be applied to the as-yet-unconfirmed Kepler candidates. We find that the false positive probability for candidates that pass preliminary Kepler vetting procedures is generally 20% to < 2%, assuming a continuous power law for the planet mass function with index alpha = -1.5. Since Kepler will detect many more planetary signals than can be positively confirmed with ground-based follow-up efforts in the near term, these calculations will be crucial to using the ensemble of Kepler data to determine population characteristic s of planetary systems.

  4. PTPS Candidate Exoplanet Host Star Radii Determination with CHARA Array

    CERN Document Server

    Zielinski, Pawel; Baines, Ellyn; Niedzielski, Andrzej; Wolszczan, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    We propose to measure the radii of the Penn State - Torun Planet Search (PTPS) exoplanet host star candidates using the CHARA Array. Stellar radii estimated from spectroscopic analysis are usually inaccurate due to indirect nature of the method and strong evolutionary model dependency. Also the so-called degeneracy of stellar evolutionary tracks due to convergence of many tracks in the giant branch decreases the precision of such estimates. However, the radius of a star is a critical parameter for the calculation of stellar luminosity and mass, which are often not well known especially for giants. With well determined effective temperature (from spectroscopy) and radius the luminosity may be calculated precisely. In turn also stellar mass may be estimated much more precisely. Therefore, direct radii measurements increase precision in the determination of planetary candidates masses and the surface temperatures of the planets.

  5. Scaling laws and universality in the choice of election candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovani, M C; Moro, M V; Picoli, S; Mendes, R S

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing interest of physicists in finding regularities related to social phenomena. This interest is clearly motivated by applications that a statistical mechanical description of the human behavior may have in our society. By using this framework, we address this work to cover an open question related to elections: the choice of elections candidates (candidature process). Our analysis reveals that, apart from the social motivations, this system displays features of traditional out-of-equilibrium physical phenomena such as scale-free statistics and universality. Basically, we found a non-linear (power law) mean correspondence between the number of candidates and the size of the electorate (number of voters), and also that this choice has a multiplicative underlying process (lognormal behavior). The universality of our findings is supported by data from 16 elections from 5 countries. In addition, we show that aspects of network scale-free can be connected to this universal behavior.

  6. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  7. A thermodynamic approach to the affinity optimization of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2009-11-01

    High throughput screening and other techniques commonly used to identify lead candidates for drug development usually yield compounds with binding affinities to their intended targets in the mid-micromolar range. The affinity of these molecules needs to be improved by several orders of magnitude before they become viable drug candidates. Traditionally, this task has been accomplished by establishing structure activity relationships to guide chemical modifications and improve the binding affinity of the compounds. As the binding affinity is a function of two quantities, the binding enthalpy and the binding entropy, it is evident that a more efficient optimization would be accomplished if both quantities were considered and improved simultaneously. Here, an optimization algorithm based upon enthalpic and entropic information generated by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry is presented.

  8. Planetary transit candidates in COROT-IRa01 field

    CERN Document Server

    Carpano, S; Alonso, R; Barge, P; Aigrain, S; Almenara, J -M; Bordé, P; Bouchy, F; Carone, L; Deeg, H J; De la Reza, R; Deleuil, M; Dvorak, R; Erikson, A; Fressin, F; Fridlund, M; Gondoin, P; Guillot, T; Hatzes, A; Jorda, L; Lammer, H; Léger, A; Llebaria, A; Magain, P; Moutou, C; Ofir, A; Ollivier, M; Pacheco, E J; Pátzold, M; Pont, F; Queloz, D; Rauer, H; Régulo, C; Renner, S; Rouan, D; Samuel, B; Schneider, J; Wuchterl, G

    2009-01-01

    Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first field observed by CoRoT, IRa01, the initial run toward the Galactic anticenter, which lasted for 60 days. Methods: We analysed 3898 sources in the coloured bands and 5974 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were taken into account using detrending tools before applying various transit search algorithms. Results: Fifty sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and the most reliable 40 detections were declared targets for follow-up ground-based observations. Two of these targets have so far been confirmed as planets, COROT-1b and COROT-4b, for which a complete characterization and specific studies were performed.

  9. Determination of candidate subjects for better recognition of faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuansheng; Chen, Zhen; Teng, Zhongming

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of face recognition and to solve the problem of various poses, we present an improved collaborative representation classification (CRC) algorithm using original training samples and the corresponding mirror images. First, the mirror images are generated from the original training samples. Second, both original training samples and their mirror images are simultaneously used to represent the test sample via improved collaborative representation. Then, some classes which are "close" to the test sample are coarsely selected as candidate classes. At last, the candidate classes are used to represent the test sample again, and then the class most similar to the test sample can be determined finely. The experimental results show our proposed algorithm has more robustness than the original CRC algorithm and can effectively improve the accuracy of face recognition.

  10. Moving candidate vaccines into development from research: lessons from HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mark

    2009-07-01

    There is a logarithmic increase in the cost and complexity of the research and development process when transitioning a promising candidate vaccine from the laboratory into the clinic. Managing complex development programs involving people from diverse technical, cultural and geographical backgrounds is a specialised skill. It is essential that the group is clear on their objectives and how their activities affect others, that communication is open, inclusive and effective, and that the most rigorous, scientific approach based on statistical principles in compliance with regulatory requirements is used. Applying these standards to all vaccine development programs will filter out inappropriate candidates more readily and enhance the efficiency of vaccine development. The challenges of developing a new vaccine are illustrated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccinology. Selecting vaccine candidates for HIV requires the ability to evaluate the large number of potential antigens in imperfect and non-standardised animal models. Further, using these models to evaluate questions such as dose scaling to humans, optimal route of administration, the use of adjuvants and potential formulation improvements adds variable to variable, making the interpretation of results particularly challenging. This may lead to the promotion of a poor candidate or the elimination of a good one. The absence of precise immunological correlates of protection and the prohibitive cost of confirmatory clinical trials are further significant barriers. However, there are practical steps that can be taken to standardise early vaccine evaluation, which would result in more efficient development of new vaccines for HIV and other disease areas with similarly challenging development issues (such as hepatitis C virus, influenza, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and malaria).

  11. Identification of new transitional disk candidates in Lupus with Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, I.; Merín, B.; Ribas, Á.; Bouy, H.; Prusti, T.; Pilbratt, G. L.; André, Ph.

    2015-06-01

    Context. New data from the Herschel Space Observatory are broadening our understanding of the physics and evolution of the outer regions of protoplanetary disks in star-forming regions. In particular they prove to be useful for identifying transitional disk candidates. Aims: The goals of this work are to complement the detections of disks and the identification of transitional disk candidates in the Lupus clouds with data from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. Methods: We extracted photometry at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm of all spectroscopically confirmed Class II members previously identified in the Lupus regions and analyzed their updated spectral energy distributions. Results: We have detected 34 young disks in Lupus in at least one Herschel band, from an initial sample of 123 known members in the observed fields. Using recently defined criteria, we have identified five transitional disk candidates in the region. Three of them are new to the literature. Their PACS-70 μm fluxes are systematically higher than those of normal T Tauri stars in the same associations, as already found in T Cha and in the transitional disks in the Chamaeleon molecular cloud. Conclusions: Herschel efficiently complements mid-infrared surveys for identifying transitional disk candidates and confirms that these objects seem to have substantially different outer disks than the T Tauri stars in the same molecular clouds. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables 5-7 and Figs. 3 and 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Production and characterization of a bovine liver candidate reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, S. R.; Peixoto, A. M. J.; Souza, G. B.; Tullio, R. R.; Nogueira, A. R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The preparation of a bovine liver candidate reference material and the steps are taken to confirm its homogeneity, long and short term stabilities, and consensus values are described. Details of the sample preparation and the final collaborative exercise are presented. The material elemental composition was characterized by 17 elements (As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mo, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn) of nutritional and toxicological significance.

  13. Detection of candidal antigens in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, P; Perheentupa, J; Krohn, K J

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I (APS I) is associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. To characterize the antibody responses in this subgroup of Candida albicans infections, we screened a candidal cDNA expression library with patient sera and found four cDNA clones encoding the immunopositive proteins enolase, heat shock protein 90, pyruvate kinase, and alcohol dehydrogenase. The reactivity to these antigens was studied further by immunoprecipitation assays with in vitro-tran...

  14. Three new optical nova candidates in M 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, W.; Henze, M.; Burwitz, V.; Kaur, A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Williams, G.; Milne, P.

    2011-06-01

    We report the discovery of three nova candidates in M 31 on 7x60s stacked R filter CCD images obtained with the robotic 60cm telescope with an E2V CCD (2kx2k, 13.5 micron sq. pixels) of the Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System (Super-LOTIS, located at Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA) on 2011 June 7.418 UT. The objects are visible on all individual images.

  15. Consortium analysis of 7 candidate SNPs for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, S.J.; Vierkant, R.A.; Johnatty, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H...... for SNPs identified from relatively large initial studies shows the importance of replicating associations by a consortium approach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7/15...

  16. Searches for millisecond pulsar candidates among the unidentified Fermi objects

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Hu, C P; Lin, L C C; Li, K L; Kong, A K H; Tam, P H T; Takata, J; Cheng, K S; Jin, Ruolan; Yen, T -C; Kim, Chunglee

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the results of searching millisecond pulsar (MSP) candidates from the Fermi LAT second source catalog (2FGL). Seven unassociated $\\gamma-$ray sources in this catalog are identified as promising MSP candidates based on their $\\gamma$-ray properties. Through the X-ray analysis, we have detected possible X-ray counterparts, localized to an arcsecond accuracy. We have systematically estimated their X-ray fluxes and compared with the corresponding $\\gamma$-ray fluxes. The X-ray to $\\gamma$-ray flux ratios for 2FGL J1653.6-0159 and 2FGL J1946.4-5402 are comparable with the typical value for pulsars. For 2FGL J1625.2-0020, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 and 2FGL J1946.4-5402, their candidate X-ray counterparts are bright enough for performing a detailed spectral and temporal analysis to discriminate their thermal/non thermal nature and search for the periodic signal. We have also searched for possible optical/IR counterparts at the X-ray positions. For the optical/IR source coincident with the brightest X-ray obje...

  17. Five Kepler target stars that show multiple transiting exoplanet candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Batalha, Natalie M.; /San Jose State U.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Buchhave, Lars A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Bohr Inst.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View; Cochran, William D.; /Texas U.; Endl, Michael; /Texas U.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Phys. Dept. /NASA, Ames

    2010-06-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities - two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multitransiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories; as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTV) due to gravitational interactions - though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  18. Candidate Disk Wide Binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sesar, Branimir; Juric, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Using SDSS Data Release 6, we construct two independent samples of candidate stellar wide binaries selected as i) pairs of unresolved sources with angular separation in the range 3'' - 16'', ii) common proper motion pairs with 5'' - 30'' angular separation, and make them publicly available. These samples are dominated by disk stars, and we use them to constrain the shape of the main-sequence photometric parallax relation M_r(r-i) and to study the properties of wide binary systems. We estimate M_r(r-i) by searching for a relation that minimizes the difference between distance moduli of primary and secondary components of wide binary candidates. We model M_r(r-i) by a fourth degree polynomial and determine the coefficients using Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting, independently for each sample. Aided by the derived photometric parallax relation, we construct a series of high-quality catalogs of candidate main-sequence binary stars. Using these catalogs, we study the distribution of semi-major axes of wide binarie...

  19. Five Kepler Target Stars That Show Multiple Transiting Exoplanet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, François; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Haas, Michael J.; Holman, Matthew J.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Marcy, Geoffrey; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Seager, Sara; Torres, Guillermo; Welsh, William F.

    2010-12-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities—two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multi-transiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories, as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions, though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  20. TIME SERIES FORECASTING WITH MULTIPLE CANDIDATE MODELS: SELECTING OR COMBINING?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Lean; WANG Shouyang; K. K. Lai; Y.Nakamori

    2005-01-01

    Various mathematical models have been commonly used in time series analysis and forecasting. In these processes, academic researchers and business practitioners often come up against two important problems. One is whether to select an appropriate modeling approach for prediction purposes or to combine these different individual approaches into a single forecast for the different/dissimilar modeling approaches. Another is whether to select the best candidate model for forecasting or to mix the various candidate models with different parameters into a new forecast for the same/similar modeling approaches. In this study, we propose a set of computational procedures to solve the above two issues via two judgmental criteria. Meanwhile, in view of the problems presented in the literature, a novel modeling technique is also proposed to overcome the drawbacks of existing combined forecasting methods. To verify the efficiency and reliability of the proposed procedure and modeling technique, the simulations and real data examples are conducted in this study.The results obtained reveal that the proposed procedure and modeling technique can be used as a feasible solution for time series forecasting with multiple candidate models.

  1. Candidate tidal dwarf galaxies associated with the Stephan's Quintet

    CERN Document Server

    De Oliveira, C M; Amram, P; Balkowski, C; Bolte, M

    2001-01-01

    We present kinematic and photometric evidence for the presence of seven candidate tidal dwarf galaxies in Stephan's quintet. The central regions of the two most probable parent galaxies, N7319 and N7318B, contain little or no gas whereas the intragroup medium, and particularly the optical tails that seem to be associated with N7318B are rich in cold and ionized gas. Two tidal-dwarf candidates may be located at the edge of a tidal tail, one within a tail and for four others there is no obvious stellar/gaseous bridge between them and the parent galaxy. Two of the candidates are associated with HI clouds, one of which is, in addition, associated with a CO cloud. All seven regions have low continuum fluxes and high H$\\alpha$ luminosity densities (F(H$\\alpha$) = 1 -- 60 $\\times$ 10$^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$). Their magnitudes (M$_B =$ --16.1 to --12.6), sizes ($\\sim$ 3.5 h$_{75}^{-1}$ kpc), colors (typically $B-R = 0.7$) and gas velocity gradients ($\\sim$ 8 -- 26 h$_{75}$ km s$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-1}$) are typical f...

  2. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Lung Transplant Candidates: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Tonguino Rosero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR aims to improve physical fitness and to decrease symptoms in patients with chronic lung disease; however there is not clear evidence regarding the benefits of PR in candidates for lung transplantation (LT. Objective. To determine the effectiveness of PR in LT candidates and also to find out how quality of life and exercise tolerance affects the survival of these patients. Methodology. Electronic databases (Medline, Cochrane, PEDro, Scient Direct and SciELO Search of articles in spanish, english or portuguese; controlled clinical trials and cohort studies published between 2000-2011 regarding PR in candidates for LT, the model of Cochrane systematic reviews was used. Results. The papers included were four cohort, two of which regarded of survival pre LT using the six minutes walking test (6MWT; a study of quality of life related to post LT survival and an exercise tolerance study. Controlled clinical trial was not found. Conclusions. The information found in the included studies had clinical and methodological heterogeneity therefore a meta-analysis could not been undertaken. The PR should be considered as an essential part to maintain the exercise tolerance and the patient’s survival. Research regarding this subject is important and should be carried out.

  3. Runaway M Dwarf Candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Favia, Andrej; Theissen, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    We present a sample of 20 runaway M dwarf candidates (RdMs) within 1 kpc of the Sun whose Galactocentric velocities exceed 400 km s$^{-1}$. The candidates were selected from the SDSS DR7 M Dwarf Catalog of West et al. (2011). Our RdMs have SDSS+USNO-B proper motions that are consistent with those recorded in the PPMXL, LSPM, and combined WISE+SDSS+2MASS catalogs. Sixteen RdMs are classified as dwarfs, while the remaining four RdMs are subdwarfs. We model the Galactic potential using a bulge-disk-halo profile (Kenyon et al. 2008; Brown et al. 2014). Our fastest RdM, with Galactocentric velocity 658.5 $\\pm$ 236.9 km s$^{-1}$, is a possible hypervelocity candidate, as it is unbound in 77% of our simulations. About half of our RdMs have kinematics that are consistent with ejection from the Galactic center. Seven of our RdMs have kinematics consistent with an ejection scenario from M31 or M32 to within 2{\\sigma}, although our distance-limited survey makes such a realization unlikely. No more than four of our RdMs ...

  4. Stellar Cluster Candidates Discovered in the Magellanic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Andrés E.

    2017-01-01

    We address the currently exciting issue of the presence of stellar clusters in the periphery of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) and beyond by making use of a wealth of wide-field high-quality images released in advance from the Magellanic Stellar Hystory (SMASH) survey. We conducted a sound search for new stellar cluster candidates from suitable kernel density estimators running for appropriate ranges of radii and stellar densities. In addition, we used a functional relationship to account for the completeness of the SMASH field sample analyzed that takes into account not only the number of fields used but also their particular spatial distribution; the present sample statistically represents ∼50% of the whole SMASH survey. The relative small number of new stellar cluster candidates identified, most of them distributed in the outer regions of the MCs, might suggest that the lack of detection of a larger number of new cluster candidates beyond the main bodies of the MCs could likely be the outcome once the survey is completed.

  5. ALMA and VLA Observations of Proplyd Candidates near Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Cotton, William D.; Royster, Marc; Kunneriath, Devaky; Wardle, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Wootten, Al; Schoedel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Using the VLA, we recently detected a large number of protoplanetary disk (proplyd) candidates lying within a couple of light years of the massive black hole Sgr A*. The bow-shock appearance of proplyd candidates point toward the young massive stars located near Sgr A*. Similar to Orion proplyds, the strong UV radiation from the cluster of massive stars at the Galactic center is expected to photoevaporate and photoionize the circumstellar disks around young, low mass stars, thus allowing detection of the ionized outflows. To confirm this interpretation, ALMA observations detect millimeter emission at 226 GHz from five proplyd candidates that had been detected at 44 and 34 GHz with the VLA. We determine the mass of protoplanetary disks from cool dust emission. These measurements show the presence of on-going star formation with the implication that gas clouds can survive near Sgr A* and the relative importance of high vs low-mass star formation in the strong tidal and radiation fields of the Galactic center.

  6. Identification of candidate genes for dyslexia susceptibility on chromosome 18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Scerri

    Full Text Available Six independent studies have identified linkage to chromosome 18 for developmental dyslexia or general reading ability. Until now, no candidate genes have been identified to explain this linkage. Here, we set out to identify the gene(s conferring susceptibility by a two stage strategy of linkage and association analysis.Linkage analysis: 264 UK families and 155 US families each containing at least one child diagnosed with dyslexia were genotyped with a dense set of microsatellite markers on chromosome 18. Association analysis: Using a discovery sample of 187 UK families, nearly 3000 SNPs were genotyped across the chromosome 18 dyslexia susceptibility candidate region. Following association analysis, the top ranking SNPs were then genotyped in the remaining samples. The linkage analysis revealed a broad signal that spans approximately 40 Mb from 18p11.2 to 18q12.2. Following the association analysis and subsequent replication attempts, we observed consistent association with the same SNPs in three genes; melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R, dymeclin (DYM and neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4-like (NEDD4L.Along with already published biological evidence, MC5R, DYM and NEDD4L make attractive candidates for dyslexia susceptibility genes. However, further replication and functional studies are still required.

  7. THE EVALUATION OF THE MOTIVATIONS OF TEACHER CANDIDATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal ÇELİKTÜRK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim in this study is to define the reading profiles of teacher candidates in terms of text/reading types and reading purposes. The study is designed as a screening type, qualitative research. 65 teacher candidates from Mehmet Akif Ersoy University are selected with random sampling to take place in the study. The data is collected by the interview method, which is a qualitative research method. An interview form named “Motivation to Read Profile”, that is adapted by researchers, is used as the tool for data collection. Data is analyzed by content analyzing. At the end of the study it’s determined that, 80% of the teacher candidates have high motivations to read; and they usually read to acquire information, get the help of their teachers ad friends to choose books, use internet a lot for finding reading materials, and they don’t usually carry books with themselves, yet they read at home and library. Also, the results show that the readings at home are usually news/newspapers on the internet, and the readings at library are more generally for research and homework; because of this, readings at library are more focused on books and magazines.

  8. Evaluation and selection of candidate high-level waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernadzikowski, T. A.; Allender, J. S.; Butler, J. L.; Gordon, D. E.; Gould, Jr., T. H.; Stone, J. A.

    1982-03-01

    Seven candidate waste forms being developed under the direction of the Department of Energy's National High-Level Waste (HLW) Technology Program, were evaluated as potential media for the immobilization and geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. The evaluation combined preliminary waste form evaluations conducted at DOE defense waste-sites and independent laboratories, peer review assessments, a product performance evaluation, and a processability analysis. Based on the combined results of these four inputs, two of the seven forms, borosilicate glass and a titanate based ceramic, SYNROC, were selected as the reference and alternative forms for continued development and evaluation in the National HLW Program. Both the glass and ceramic forms are viable candidates for use at each of the DOE defense waste-sites; they are also potential candidates for immobilization of commercial reprocessing wastes. This report describes the waste form screening process, and discusses each of the four major inputs considered in the selection of the two forms.

  9. Discovery of Two Jovian Planet Candidates Around AU Mic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Tanner, Angelle M.; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Kane, Stephen R.; White, Russel; Johnson, John A.; Hall, Ryan; Giddens, Frank; Zilberman, Perri; Huber, Joe; Nishimoto, America; Cancino, Andrew; Weigand, Denise; Klenke, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    We present a pair of candidate Jovian exoplanets discovered with the radial velocity (RV) technique in the near-infrared (NIR) orbiting the young M dwarf star AU Mic (a ~ 0.3 and 3.5 AU; M_p ~ 1.5 and 6 M_J). Data were obtained at 2.3 microns from 2010-2016 with the R=46,000 CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, and from 2005-2007 with the R=25,000 NIRSPEC spectrograph at the Keck Observatory. AU Mic possesses long-lived BY Draconis type polar starspots with a known rotation period of 4.865 days. No signal in the NIR RVs is identified that is consistent with the rotation period of the star, but stellar activity remains a possible explanation for the observed NIR RV variability. The outer Jovian planet candidate offers a plausible dynamical explanation for the observed debris disk dynamics of moving "clumps" on several year time-scales. It may be possible to directly image the outer planet candidate with the current generation of high contrast imaging instruments. If confirmed, this discovery would demonstrate the utility of RV precursor observations for informing direct imaging surveys and the utility of NIR RV searches for planets around young and/or active stars. These results also point to the promise of future NIR precise RVs, including iSHELL, SPIRou, HPF and CARMENES, which will operate at higher precision and with larger spectral grasp than CSHELL.

  10. Identification of new transitional disk candidates in Lupus with Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, I; Ribas, Á; Bouy, H; Prusti, T; Pilbratt, G L; André, Ph

    2015-01-01

    New data from the Herschel Space Observatory are broadening our understanding of the physics and evolution of the outer regions of protoplanetary disks in star forming regions. In particular they prove to be useful to identify transitional disk candidates. The goals of this work are to complement the detections of disks and the identification of transitional disk candidates in the Lupus clouds with data from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We extracted photometry at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 $\\mu$m of all spectroscopically confirmed Class II members previously identified in the Lupus regions and analyzed their updated spectral energy distributions. We have detected 34 young disks in Lupus in at least one Herschel band, from an initial sample of 123 known members in the observed fields. Using the criteria defined in Ribas et al. (2013) we have identified five transitional disk candidates in the region. Three of them are new to the literature. Their PACS-70 $\\mu$m fluxes are systematically higher than thos...

  11. New Young Star Candidates in CG4 and Sa101

    CERN Document Server

    Rebull, L M; Hoette, V; Kim, J S; Laine, S; Foster, M; Laher, R; Legassie, M; Mallory, C R; McCarron, K; Sherry, W H

    2011-01-01

    The CG4 and Sa101 regions together cover a region of ~0.5 square degree in the vicinity of a "cometary globule" that is part of the Gum Nebula. There are seven previously identified young stars in this region; we have searched for new young stars using mid- and far-infrared data (3.6 to 70 microns) from the Spitzer Space Telescope, combined with ground-based optical data and near-infrared data from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). We find infrared excesses in all 6 of the previously identified young stars in our maps, and we identify 16 more candidate young stars based on apparent infrared excesses. Most (73%) of the new young stars are Class II objects. There is a tighter grouping of young stars and young star candidates in the Sa101 region, in contrast to the CG4 region, where there are fewer young stars and young star candidates, and they are more dispersed. Few likely young objects are found in the "fingers" of the dust being disturbed by the ionization front from the heart of the Gum Nebula.

  12. The mass function of nearby black hole candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Caramete, Laurentiu I

    2009-01-01

    The mass function of super-massive black holes in our cosmic neighborhood is required to understand the statistics of activity, specifically the production of ultra high energy particles. We determine a mass function of black hole candidates from the entire sky outside the Galactic plane. Using the 2MASS catalogue as a starting point, and the well established correlation between black hole mass and the old bulge population of stars, we derive a list of nearby black hole candidates within the redshift range z 10^7 M_sol has 5,634 entries. Here we use this catalogue to derive the mass function. We correct for volume, so that this mass function is a volume limited distribution to redshift 0.025. The mass function of nearby black hole candidates is a straight simple power-law, extending down into the mass range, where nuclear star clusters may replace the super-massive black holes. The slope of this mass function can be explained in a simple merger picture. Integrating this mass function over the redshift range,...

  13. Evaluation of the Physics Teacher Candidates' Constructivist Teaching Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rıza AKDENİZ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to evaluate that physics teacher candidates improved constructivist activities according to 5E teaching Method in Special Teaching Methods-I courses. This study is carried out with 27 Physics teacher candidates who studied at KTU Fatih Education Faculty in spring term of 2007-2008 academic year. The findings from the study consist of 21 teaching activities which were created by the seven groups according to the defined criteria by the researchers. In conclusion, it was seen that physics teacher candidates can reflect some of 5E teaching method in the materials, and provide activities which include primary experiences for students can build their knowledge. However, it was determined some mistakes and defects about relations physics topics and real life, and explanation stage, extension stage, evaluation stage and crossing about this stages. Therefore it can be suggested that teacher candidates’ defects on the occupational education lessons both making up for and taking into account for new students and reflecting contemporary teaching approaches to the field education lessons.

  14. First microlensing candidate towards M31 from Nainital Microlensing Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Y C; Narasimha, D; Sagar, R

    2004-01-01

    We report our first microlensing candidate NMS-E1 towards M31 from the data accumulated during four years long Nainital Microlensing Survey. Cousin R and I band observations of ~13'x13' field in the direction of M31 were carried out since 1998 and data is analysed using pixel technique proposed by the AGAPE collaboration. The NMS-E1 lies in the disk of M31 at \\alpha = 0:43:33.3 and \\delta = +41:06:44, about 15.5 arcmin away in the South-East direction from the center of M31. The degenerate Paczy\\'{n}ski fit gives a half intensity duration of ~ 59 days. The photometric analysis of candidate shows that it reached up to R ~ 20.1 mag at the time of maximum brightness and colour of the source star estimated to be (R-I)_0 ~ 1.1 mag. It is seen that the microlensing candidate is blended by red variable stars consequently light curves do not strictly follow the characteristic Paczy\\'{n}ski shape and achromatic nature however its long period monitoring and similar behaviour in R and I bands lend support of its microle...

  15. Candidate z~8-9 Galaxies from WFC3 Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzoni, Silvio; Wilkins, Stephen; Stanway, Elizabeth; Jarvis, Matt; Caruana, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    We present a search for galaxies at 7.5candidates at redshift z~8-9 over an area of ~50 square arcminutes. Previous searches for Y-drops with WFC3 have focussed only on the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), and our larger survey (involving two other nearby deep fields and a wider area survey) has trebelled the number of robust Y-drop candidates. For the first time, we have sufficient Z~8-9 galaxies to fit a both phi* and M* of the UV Schechter luminosity function. There is evidence for evolution in this luminosity function from z=6-7 to z=8-9, in the sense that there are fewer UV-bright galaxies at z~8-9, consistent with an evolution mainly in M*. The candidate z~8-9 galaxies we detect have insufficient ionizing flux to ...

  16. Candidate genes for idiopathic epilepsy in four dog breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickelson James R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic epilepsy (IE is a naturally occurring and significant seizure disorder affecting all dog breeds. Because dog breeds are genetically isolated populations, it is possible that IE is attributable to common founders and is genetically homogenous within breeds. In humans, a number of mutations, the majority of which are genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters, or their regulatory subunits, have been discovered to cause rare, specific types of IE. It was hypothesized that there are simple genetic bases for IE in some purebred dog breeds, specifically in Vizslas, English Springer Spaniels (ESS, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs (GSMD, and Beagles, and that the gene(s responsible may, in some cases, be the same as those already discovered in humans. Results Candidate genes known to be involved in human epilepsy, along with selected additional genes in the same gene families that are involved in murine epilepsy or are expressed in neural tissue, were examined in populations of affected and unaffected dogs. Microsatellite markers in close proximity to each candidate gene were genotyped and subjected to two-point linkage in Vizslas, and association analysis in ESS, GSMD and Beagles. Conclusions Most of these candidate genes were not significantly associated with IE in these four dog breeds, while a few genes remained inconclusive. Other genes not included in this study may still be causing monogenic IE in these breeds or, like many cases of human IE, the disease in dogs may be likewise polygenic.

  17. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  18. Radiologic diagnosis for AIDS patients complicated with candidal esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Gen-dong; LU Pu-xuan; QIN Jing; LIU Shui-teng; ZHAN Neng-yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Candidal esophagitis is the primary infection among all digestive tract opportunistic ones in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases. X-ray manifestation reports of it are still rare. This study aimed to conduct a retrospective analysis on the X-ray data of 6 AIDS cases complicated with candidal esophagitis,and to study the X-ray characteristics of it combined with the findings from gastroscopy.Methods Among 6 cases in this series,all cases were confirmed by Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to be HIV positive and all of them had CD4 cell counts less than 150×106/L. All cases underwent X-ray and gastroscopy,and mycelium were found in the mucous membrane of the esophagus.Results In this series,the findings of the X-ray were as follows:(1) Affected areas:Four cases in the whole esophagus,2 cases in the middle and lower part of esophagus;(2) Abnormal motivity:Six cases had decreased tension,loose walls,weakened peristalsis,decreased number of peristalsis waves and delayed emptying of barium;(3) Abnormal contour:Six cases had the sign of "decorative border" or "brush",two cases had narrowed canal;(4) Abnormal membrane and "cobblestone sign":Six cases had thickened membrane and "cobblestone sign" on the surface of the abnormal membrane. The hyperemia of mucosa was covered tightly with yellow-white pseudomembrane spots. This was in accordance with the small cobblestone-like filling defect found by X-ray.Conclusions If the AIDS cases have dysphagia,and X-ray shows that more than two sections of the esophagus are affected,with decreased motility,the walls in the sign of "brush" or "decorative edges",thickened membrane with "cobblestone sign",candidal esophagitis is highly possible.

  19. Transiting planet candidates with ASTEP 400 at Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mékarnia, D.; Guillot, T.; Rivet, J.-P.; Schmider, F.-X.; Abe, L.; Gonçalves, I.; Agabi, A.; Crouzet, N.; Fruth, T.; Barbieri, M.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Zhou, G.; Aristidi, E.; Szulagyi, J.; Daban, J.-B.; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y.; Gouvret, C.; Erikson, A.; Rauer, H.; Bouchy, F.; Gerakis, J.; Bouchez, G.

    2016-11-01

    ASTEP 400, the main instrument of the ASTEP (Antarctica Search for Transiting ExoPlanets) programme, is a 40 cm telescope, designed to withstand the harsh conditions in Antarctica, achieving a photometric accuracy of a fraction of millimagnitude on hourly time-scales for planet-hosting southern bright (R ˜ 12 mag) stars. We review the performances of this instrument, describe its operating conditions, and present results from the analysis of observations obtained during its first three years (2010-2012) of operation, before its repatriation in 2014. During this time, we observed a total of 22 stellar fields (1° × 1° field of view). Each field, in which we measured stars up to magnitude R = 18 mag, was observed continuously during ˜7 to ˜30 d. More than 200 000 frames were recorded and 310 000 stars processed, using an implementation of the optimal image subtraction photometry algorithm. We found 43 planetary transit candidates. 20 of these candidates were observed using spectroscopic follow-ups including four targets classified as good planet candidates. Our results demonstrate that accurate near-continuous photometric observations are achievable from the Concordia station at Dome C in Antarctica, even if we were not able to reach the nominal photometric precision of the instrument. We conducted a correlation analysis between the rms noise and a large number of external parameters and found that source of the ˜1 mmag correlated noise is not obvious and does not depend on a single parameter. However, our analysis provided some hints and guidance to increase the photometric accuracy of the instrument. These improvements should equip any future telescope operating in Antarctica.

  20. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. Zoom into the tracking detector and the LAr calorimeter where its detailed structure is highlighted. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively.

  1. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively.

  2. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. Zoom into the tracking detector. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively.

  3. Experience with CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, P.; Cannon, M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents results from the authors experience with CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases), which was designed to facilitate image retrieval by content using a query-by-example methodology. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized similarity measure between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to a user-provided example image. Results for three test applications are included.

  4. Elementary particles, dark matter candidate and new extended standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jaekwang

    2017-01-01

    Elementary particle decays and reactions are discussed in terms of the three-dimensional quantized space model beyond the standard model. Three generations of the leptons and quarks correspond to the lepton charges. Three heavy leptons and three heavy quarks are introduced. And the bastons (new particles) are proposed as the possible candidate of the dark matters. Dark matter force, weak force and strong force are explained consistently. Possible rest masses of the new particles are, tentatively, proposed for the experimental searches. For more details, see the conference paper at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308723916.

  5. Environmental Systems Research Candidates FY-01 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David Lynn; Piet, Steven James

    2001-03-01

    The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program ran from April 2000 through September 2001 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ESRA provides key science and technology to meet the cleanup mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), and performs research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEEL’s scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the accomplishments of the ESRC Program. The ESRC Program consisted of 25 tasks subdivided within four research areas.

  6. Proper motions of Upper Sco T-type candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Lodieu, N; Dobbie, P D

    2013-01-01

    We present new z- and H-band photometry and proper motion measurements for the five candidate very-low-mass T-type objects we recently proposed to be members of the nearest OB association to the Sun, Upper Scorpius. These new data fail to corroborate our prior conclusions regarding their spectral types and affiliation with the Upper Scorpius population. We conclude that we may be in presence of a turnover in the mass function of Upper Sco taking place below 10-4 Jupiter masses, depending on the age assigned to Upper Sco and the models used.

  7. A double candidate survivable routing protocol for HAP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Panfeng; Li, Chunyue; Ni, Shuyan

    2016-11-01

    To improve HAP network invulnerability, and at the same time considering the quasi-dynamic topology in HAP network, a simple and reliable routing protocol is proposed in the paper. The protocol firstly uses a double-candidate strategy for the next-node select to provide better robustness. Then during the maintenance stage, short hello packets instead of long routing packets are used only to check link connectivity in the quasi-dynamic HAP network. The route maintenance scheme based on short hello packets can greatly reduce link spending. Simulation results based on OPNET demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed routing protocol.

  8. 29 CFR 1990.121 - Candidate list of potential occupational carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Health Organization; (5) The Toxic Substances Control Act Inventory of Chemical Substances, published by... classification. The Secretary may tentatively designate substances on the Candidate List as candidates for... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF...

  9. Performance of women candidates on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination, 1973-1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, J J; Fletcher, S W; Quimby, B B; Shea, J A

    1985-01-01

    Trends in the performances of female and male candidates taking the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination from 1973 through 1982 were examined. The mean scores of female candidates who graduated from medical schools in the United States or Canada and who were taking the examination for the first time improved from 428 to 470, and the percentage of those passing improved from 59% to 76%. The number of women taking the examination also increased markedly, by over 500%. Performance of female candidates remained slightly lower than that of male candidates, regardless of the quality of the residency training program or the medical school from which a candidate had graduated or the rating given a candidate by the director of the candidate's residency program. Except for the oldest candidates, age followed this pattern as well. Our findings suggest that the gender gap in scores on the Certifying Examination in Internal Medicine is narrowing.

  10. ADAM33, a new candidate for psoriasis susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Lesueur

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder with multifactorial etiology. In a recent study, we reported results of a genome-wide scan on 46 French extended families presenting with plaque psoriasis. In addition to unambiguous linkage to the major susceptibility locus PSORS1 on Chromosome 6p21, we provided evidence for a susceptibility locus on Chromosome 20p13. To follow up this novel psoriasis susceptibility locus we used a family-based association test (FBAT for an association scan over the 17 Mb candidate region. A total of 85 uncorrelated SNP markers located in 65 genes of the region were initially investigated in the same set of large families used for the genome wide search, which consisted of 295 nuclear families. When positive association was obtained for a SNP, candidate genes nearby were explored more in detail using a denser set of SNPs. Thus, the gene ADAM33 was found to be significantly associated with psoriasis in this family set (The best association was on a 3-SNP haplotype P = 0.00004, based on 1,000,000 permutations. This association was independent of PSORS1. ADAM33 has been previously associated with asthma, which demonstrates that immune system diseases may be controlled by common susceptibility genes with general effects on dermal inflammation and immunity. The identification of ADAM33 as a psoriasis susceptibility gene identified by positional cloning in an outbred population should provide insights into the pathogenesis and natural history of this common disease.

  11. Self-gravitating disc candidates around massive young stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, D. H.; Ilee, J. D.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    There have been several recent detections of candidate Keplerian discs around massive young protostars. Given the relatively large disc-to-star mass ratios in these systems, and their young ages, it is worth investigating their propensity to becoming self-gravitating. To this end, we compute self-consistent, semi-analytic models of putative self-gravitating discs for five candidate disc systems. Our aim is not to fit exactly the observations, but to demonstrate that the expected dust continuum emission from marginally unstable self-gravitating discs can be quite weak, due to high optical depth at the mid-plane even at millimetre wavelengths. In the best cases, the models produce `observable' disc masses within a factor of self-gravitating disc model compares well with observations. If these discs are self-gravitating, they satisfy the conditions for disc fragmentation in their outer regions. These systems may hence have as-yet-unresolved low-mass stellar companions, and are thus promising targets for future high angular resolution observations.

  12. Gaia FGK Benchmark Stars: New Candidates At Low-Metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, Keith; Heiter, Ulrike; Soubiran, Caroline; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Casagrande, Luca; Gilmore, Gerry; Lind, Karin; Magrini, Laura; Masseron, Thomas; Pancino, Elena; Randich, Sofia; Worley, Clare C

    2016-01-01

    We have entered an era of large spectroscopic surveys in which we can measure, through automated pipelines, the atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances for large numbers of stars. Calibrating these survey pipelines using a set of "benchmark stars" in order to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the provided parameters and abundances is of utmost importance. The recent proposed set of Gaia FGK benchmark stars of Heiter et al. (2015) has no recommended stars within the critical metallicity range of $-2.0 <$ [Fe/H] $< -1.0$ dex. In this paper, we aim to add candidate Gaia benchmark stars inside of this metal-poor gap. We began with a sample of 21 metal-poor stars which was reduced to 10 stars by requiring accurate photometry and parallaxes, and high-resolution archival spectra. The procedure used to determine the stellar parameters was similar to Heiter et al. (2015) and Jofre et al. (2014) for consistency. The effective temperature (T$_{\\mathrm{eff}}$) of all candidate stars was determined using...

  13. SEMG1 may be the candidate gene for idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Zhou, Q; Wei, Q; Li, J; Feng, C; Mao, X

    2014-03-01

    Asthenozoospermia (AZS) is a major cause of male infertility, aetiology of which is reported to be related with gene mutation or deletion. However, studies on candidate genes for AZS are very scarce. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles of asthenozoosperm. Gene expression profile analyses with microarray on spermatozoa specimens from 12 asthenozoosperm patients and 12 age-matched volunteers were performed; data analysis was performed with bioinformatics tools. Data analysis revealed that 1265 and 262 genes were significantly (P < 0.05) and differently expressed (≥2-fold) between groups performed with GeneSpring and BRB-ArrayTools respectively. Of these differently expressed genes, 71 were identified as molecular signatures of asthenozoosperm, of which most involved in primary metabolic process and cellular metabolic process. Molecular signatures were filtered performed with NextBio, 21 genes were identified to be specially expressed in asthenozoosperm. We used Finding Associated Concepts with Text Analysis to match the specially expressed genes against the MEDLINE database and found SEMG1 and PGAP1 were related to male fertility. Validation of the microarray data of SEMG1 was carried out using real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that SEMG1 was significantly changed in asthenozoosperm, which could be the candidate gene for the development of diagnostic marker and provided the opportunity to further illustrate the biological mechanisms of asthenozoosperm.

  14. CANDIDATE GENE ANALYSIS IN ISRAELI SOLDIERS WITH STRESS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Yanovich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of polymorphisms within candidate genes which we hypothesized may contribute to stress fracture predisposition, a case-control, cross- sectional study design was employed. Genotyping 268 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms- SNPs within 17 genes in 385 Israeli young male and female recruits (182 with and 203 without stress fractures. Twenty-five polymorphisms within 9 genes (NR3C1, ANKH, VDR, ROR2, CALCR, IL6, COL1A2, CBG, and LRP4 showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 in the distribution between stress fracture cases and non stress fracture controls. Seventeen genetic variants were associated with an increased stress fracture risk, and eight variants with a decreased stress fracture risk. None of the SNP associations remained significant after correcting for multiple comparisons (false discovery rate- FDR. Our findings suggest that genes may be involved in stress fracture pathogenesis. Specifically, the CALCR and the VDR genes are intriguing candidates. The putative involvement of these genes in stress fracture predisposition requires analysis of more cases and controls and sequencing the relevant genomic regions, in order to define the specific gene mutations

  15. A spectroscopic study of field BHB star candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Kinman, T D; Cacciari, C; Bragaglia, A; Harmer, D; Valdes, F G

    2000-01-01

    New spectroscopic observations (R=15000 and 40000) are given for 31 nearby (V < 11) BHB star candidates. IUE low-resolution spectra are available for most of them. New determinations of temperature, gravity, reddening and abundances were obtained from these data using models computed by Castelli with an updated version of the ATLAS9 code. A summary of the visual photometry for these stars (including new photometry obtained at Kitt Peak) is also given. All 31 candidates are halo stars. We classify 28 as BHB stars because: (1) They lie close to the ZAHB (in a similar position to globular cluster BHB stars) in the Teff vs. log g plot. (2) Their distribution of vsini (less than 40 km/s) is similar to that found for the BHB stars in globular clusters. (3) Their [Fe/H] lies between -0.99 and -2.95 (mean [Fe/H] -1.67, dispersion 0.42 dex) which is similar to that found for field halo RR Lyrae and red HB stars but more metal- poor than for halo globular clusters. Field BHB stars with Teff greater than 8500 K show ...

  16. A Candidate Dual AGN at z=1.175

    CERN Document Server

    Barrows, R Scott; Madsen, Kristin; Harrison, Fiona; Assef, Roberto J; Comerford, Julia M; Cushing, Michael C; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Gonzalez, Anthony; Griffith, Roger; Hickox, Ryan; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Lagattuta, David J

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray source CXOXBJ142607.6+353351 (CXOJ1426+35), which was identified in a 172 ks Chandra image in the Bootes field, shows double-peaked rest-frame optical/UV emission lines, separated by 0.69" (5.5 kpc) in the spatial dimension and by 690 km s^-1 in the velocity dimension. The high excitation lines and emission line ratios indicate both systems are ionized by an AGN continuum, and the double-peaked profile resembles that of candidate dual AGN. At a redshift of z=1.175, this source is the highest redshift candidate dual AGN yet identified. However, many sources have similar emission line profiles for which other interpretations are favored. We have analyzed the substantial archival data available in this field, as well as acquired near-infrared (NIR) adaptive optics (AO) imaging and NIR slit spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum is hard, implying a column density of several 10^23 cm^-2. Though heavily obscured, the source is also one of the brightest in the field, with an absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminos...

  17. A computer vision based candidate for functional balance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalci, Alican; Khodamoradi, Alireza; Balkan, Ozgur; Nahab, Fatta; Garudadri, Harinath

    2015-08-01

    Balance in humans is a motor skill based on complex multimodal sensing, processing and control. Ability to maintain balance in activities of daily living (ADL) is compromised due to aging, diseases, injuries and environmental factors. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate of the costs of falls among older adults was $34 billion in 2013 and is expected to reach $54.9 billion in 2020. In this paper, we present a brief review of balance impairments followed by subjective and objective tools currently used in clinical settings for human balance assessment. We propose a novel computer vision (CV) based approach as a candidate for functional balance test. The test will take less than a minute to administer and expected to be objective, repeatable and highly discriminative in quantifying ability to maintain posture and balance. We present an informal study with preliminary data from 10 healthy volunteers, and compare performance with a balance assessment system called BTrackS Balance Assessment Board. Our results show high degree of correlation with BTrackS. The proposed system promises to be a good candidate for objective functional balance tests and warrants further investigations to assess validity in clinical settings, including acute care, long term care and assisted living care facilities. Our long term goals include non-intrusive approaches to assess balance competence during ADL in independent living environments.

  18. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  19. Candidíase em pacientes aidéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E.O.P. Campos

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e cinco aidéticos entre 19 e 55 anos admitidos e tratados de candidíase no Hospital Emílio Ribas, SP, com ELISA positivo para HIV e confirmado pelo Western Blot. Tuberculose em 9 sendo 2 com pericardite; neurotoxoplasmose em 6; neurocriptococose em 5; herpes labial em 4; pneumocistose em 3 e sarcoma de Kaposi em 2, achavam-se associadas. A concentração inibitória mínima 50% (MIC 50% para os azoles foi: ketoconazol= 2,2 µg/ml; itraconazol- 21,0 µg/ml; fluconazol = 19,0 µg/ml. O MIC 50% para ospolienos: nistatina- 50,0 µg/ml; anfotericina B= 0,12 µg/ml e para 5 fluorcitosina= 1,6 µg/ml nas 35 amostras de Candida isoladas. Testes não paramétricos de Siegel revelaram significante identificação (80% das Candida albicans na candidíase, e que a dose de AMB não modificou o número de óbitos, precoce e tardio, ocorridos nesses aidéticos. O uso prévio dos azoles e da nistatina explicaria, talvez, o elevado MIC 50% observado nas amostras de Candida isoladas.

  20. Candidate plasma-facing materials for EUV lithography source components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Burtseva, Tatiana; Brooks, Jeff N.; Konkashbaev, Isak K.; Rice, Bryan J.

    2003-06-01

    Material selection and lifetime issues for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are of critical importance to the success of this technology for commercial applications. This paper reviews current trends in production and use of plasma-facing electrodes, insulators, and wall materials for EUV type sources. Ideal candidate materials should be able to: withstand high thermal shock from the short pulsed plasma; withstand high thermal loads without structural failure; reduce debris generation during discharge; and be machined accurately. We reviewed the literature on current and proposed fusion plasma-facing materials as well as current experience with plasma gun and other simulation devices. Both fusion and EUV source materials involve issues of surface erosion by particle sputtering and heat-induced evaporation/melting. These materials are either bare structural materials or surface coatings. EUV materials can be divided into four categories: wall, electrode, optical, and insulator materials. For electric discharge sources, all four types are required, whereas laser-produced plasma EUV sources do not require electrode and insulator materials. Several types of candidate alloy and other materials and methods of manufacture are recommended for each component of EUV lithography light sources.

  1. Novel approaches to identify protective malaria vaccine candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ni eChia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to develop vaccines against malaria have been the focus of substantial research activities for decades. Several categories of candidate vaccines are currently being developed for protection against malaria, based on antigens corresponding to the pre-erythrocytic, blood-stage or sexual stages of the parasite. Long lasting sterile protection from Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite challenge has been observed in human following vaccination with whole parasite formulations, clearly demonstrating that a protective immune response targeting predominantly the pre-erythrocytic stages can develop against malaria. However, most of vaccine candidates currently being investigated, which are mostly subunits vaccines, have not been able to induce substantial (>50% protection thus far. This is due to the fact that the antigens responsible for protection against the different parasite stages are still yet to be known and relevant correlates of protection have remained elusive. For a vaccine to be developed in a timely manner, novel approaches are required. In this article, we review the novel approaches that have been developed to identify the antigens for the development of an effective malaria vaccine.

  2. Engineering of glucosinolate biosynthesis: candidate gene identification and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møldrup, Morten E; Salomonsen, Bo; Halkier, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    The diverse biological roles of glucosinolates as plant defense metabolites and anticancer compounds have spurred a strong interest in their biosynthetic pathways. Since the completion of the Arabidopsis genome, functional genomics approaches have enabled significant progress on the elucidation of glucosinolate biosynthesis, although in planta validation of candidate gene function often is hampered by time-consuming generation of knockout and overexpression lines in Arabidopsis. To better exploit the increasing amount of data available from genomic sequencing, microarray database and RNAseq, time-efficient methods for identification and validation of candidate genes are needed. This chapter covers the methodology we are using for gene discovery in glucosinolate engineering, namely, guilt-by-association-based in silico methods and fast proof-of-function screens by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the lessons learned in the rapid, transient tobacco system are readily translated to our robust, versatile yeast expression platform, where additional genes critical for large-scale microbial production of glucosinolates can be identified. We anticipate that the methodology presented here will be beneficial to elucidate and engineer other plant biosynthetic pathways.

  3. Non-Vestoid candidates in the inner Main Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Nicholas; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Skiff, Brian; Kankiewicz, Pawel; Licandro, Javier; Galiazzo, Mattia; Zeilinger, Werner

    2016-10-01

    Most Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite (HED) meteorites (analogues to V-type asteroids) are thought to originate from asteroid (4) Vesta. However some HEDs show distinct oxygen isotope ratios and therefore are thought to originate from other asteroids. In this study we try to identify asteroids that may represent parent bodies of those mismatching HEDs. In particular the origin of the anomalous Bunburra Rockhole meteorite was traced back to the inner main asteroid belt, showing that there might be asteroids that are not genetically linked to the asteroid (4) Vesta (the main source of V-type asteroids and HED meteorites) in the inner main belt. In this work we identify V-type asteroids outside the dynamical Vesta family whose rotational properties (retrograde vs prograde rotation) suggest the direction of Yarkovsky drift that sets them apart from typical Vestoids and Vesta fugitives. Specificly Nesvorny et al. 2008 simulated escapes paths from the Vesta family and showed that typical Vesta fugitives in the inner main asteroid belt at semi-major axis a drift or showing Yarkovsky drift direction towards (4) Vesta are the best candidates for non-Vestoidal V-type asteroids and therefore parent bodies of anomalous HED. In this study we have performed accurate photometric observations and determined sense of rotation for several asteroids testing their links to Vesta and anomalous HED. We have found several potential non-Vestoid candidates. Those objects have to be studied in more detail to fully confirm their link to anomalous HEDs.

  4. Trinocular stereo vision method based on mesh candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Gang; Li, Haibin

    2010-10-01

    One of the most interesting goals of machine vision is 3D structure recovery of the scenes. This recovery has many applications, such as object recognition, reverse engineering, automatic cartography, autonomous robot navigation, etc. To meet the demand of measuring the complex prototypes in reverse engineering, a trinocular stereo vision method based on mesh candidates was proposed. After calibration of the cameras, the joint field of view can be defined in the world coordinate system. Mesh grid is established along the coordinate axes, and the mesh nodes are considered as potential depth data of the object surface. By similarity measure of the correspondence pairs which are projected from a certain group of candidates, the depth data can be obtained readily. With mesh nodes optimization, the interval between the neighboring nodes in depth direction could be designed reasonably. The potential ambiguity can be eliminated efficiently in correspondence matching with the constraint of a third camera. The cameras can be treated as two independent pairs, left-right and left-centre. Due to multiple peaks of the correlation values, the binocular method may not satisfy the accuracy of the measurement. Another image pair is involved if the confidence coefficient is less than the preset threshold. The depth is determined by the highest sum of correlation of both camera pairs. The measurement system was simulated using 3DS MAX and Matlab software for reconstructing the surface of the object. The experimental result proved that the trinocular vision system has good performance in depth measurement.

  5. Sociological profiles of the candidate Turkish primary school teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ali Arslan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Teachers define the tomorrow’s of the society. In order to know and predict about future of the society, It has to be known the sociological profiles of the educators. In other words, it should be helpful to plan the education and to define the socio-political decisions on issue, if the social and psychological characteristics of the todays’ teachers were known before. Therefore, It was aimed to examine and analyse the sociological and social-psychological backgrounds of the candidate teachers. What a kind of social profile do they have? What are their opinion on particular actual social and political issues of the society. Do they present a homogeneus group character? Do they have enough skill and knowledge to educate tomorrow’s Turkish individuals? What are their major problems as the primary school teachers and teacher candidates? The answers of the theese kind of questions were examined within the research.A compherensive field reserarch realised to achieve the aim. A questionnaire form was developed and used for the interviews. There were structured, semi structured and open-ended questions in the questionnaire. A data sets was created from the data that were gathered from the field. The computer program of the SPSS (Statistical Packages for Social Sciences was used for analysing the data sets.

  6. No Evidence for Association between Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghandehari Motlagh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is an inherited tooth disorder. Despite the fact that up to now, several gene muta­tions in MMP20, ENAM, AMELX and KLK4 genes have been reported to be associated with AI, many other genes sug­gested to be involved. The main objective of this study was to find the mutations in three major candidate genes including MMP20, ENAM and KLK4 responsible for AI from three Iranian families with generalized hypoplastic phenotype in all teeth. "nMethods: All exon/intron boundaries of subjected genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct sequencing."nResults: One polymorphisms was identified in KLK4 exon 2, in one family a homozygous mutation was found in the third base of codon 22 for serine (TCG>TCT, but not in other families. Although these base substitutions have been occurred in the signaling domain, they do not seem to influence the activity of KLK4 protein."nConclusion: Our results might support the further evidence for genetic heterogeneity; at least, in some AI cases are not caused by a gene in these reported candidate genes.

  7. Prevalence of substance-related disorders in heart transplantation candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirri, L; Potena, L; Masetti, M; Tossani, E; Grigioni, F; Magelli, C; Branzi, A; Grandi, S

    2007-01-01

    Substance abuse cessation is one of the leading factors in determining the eligibility for the heart transplantation waiting list, as noncompliance with this issue may seriously endanger posttransplantation outcomes. Yet, the prevalence of substance-related disorders among candidates for heart transplantation has not been evaluated enough. Eighty three heart transplantation candidates were assessed for prior or current substance-related disorders through the Structured Clinical Interview for mental disorders according to DSM-IV. A prior history of at least one substance-related disorder was found in 64% of patients, with nicotine dependence as the most prevalent diagnosis (61.4% of the sample). Ten subjects were currently smokers, despite heart failure. A prior history of alcohol abuse and caffeine intoxication was found in 9.6% and 2.4% of patients, respectively. Substance abuse or dependence behaviors should be monitored during all the phases of heart transplantation program. Early identification of current substance-related disorders may allow better allocation of organ resources and proper lifestyle modification programs provision. A prior history of substance-related disorders should alert physicians to assess patients for possible relapse, especially after transplantation. The inclusion of a specialist in the assessment and treatment of substance-related disorders in the heart transplantation unit may reduce the risk of unsuccessful outcomes due to noncompliance with an adequate lifestyle.

  8. First catalog of strong lens candidates in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Faure, Cecile; Covone, Giovanni; Tasca, Lidia; Leauthaud, Alexie; Capak, Peter; Jahnke, Knud; Smolcic, Vernesa; de la Torre, Sylvain; Ellis, Richard; Finoguenov, Alexis; Heymans, Catherine; Koekemoer, Anton; Le Fevre, Olivier; Massey, Richard; Mellier, Yannick; Refregier, Alexandre; Rhodes, Jason; Scoville, Nick; Schinnerer, Eva; Taylor, James; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Walcher, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    We present the first catalog of 67 strong galaxy-galaxy lens candidates discovered in the 1.64 square degree Hubble Space Telescope COSMOS survey. Twenty of these systems display multiple images or strongly curved large arcs. Our initial search is performed by visual inspection of the data and is restricted, for practical considerations, to massive early-type lens galaxies with arcs found at radii smaller than ~5''. Simple mass models are constructed for the best lens candidates and our results are compared to the strong lensing catalogs of the SLACS survey and the CASTLES database. These new strong galaxy-galaxy lensing systems constitute a valuable sample to study the mass distribution of early-type galaxies and their associated dark matter halos. We further expect this sample to play an important role in the testing of software algorithms designed to automatically search for strong gravitational lenses. From our analysis a robust lower limit is derived for the expected occurrence of strong galaxy-galaxy sy...

  9. Speeding disease gene discovery by sequence based candidate prioritization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porteous David J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regions of interest identified through genetic linkage studies regularly exceed 30 centimorgans in size and can contain hundreds of genes. Traditionally this number is reduced by matching functional annotation to knowledge of the disease or phenotype in question. However, here we show that disease genes share patterns of sequence-based features that can provide a good basis for automatic prioritization of candidates by machine learning. Results We examined a variety of sequence-based features and found that for many of them there are significant differences between the sets of genes known to be involved in human hereditary disease and those not known to be involved in disease. We have created an automatic classifier called PROSPECTR based on those features using the alternating decision tree algorithm which ranks genes in the order of likelihood of involvement in disease. On average, PROSPECTR enriches lists for disease genes two-fold 77% of the time, five-fold 37% of the time and twenty-fold 11% of the time. Conclusion PROSPECTR is a simple and effective way to identify genes involved in Mendelian and oligogenic disorders. It performs markedly better than the single existing sequence-based classifier on novel data. PROSPECTR could save investigators looking at large regions of interest time and effort by prioritizing positional candidate genes for mutation detection and case-control association studies.

  10. Transiting extrasolar planetary candidates in the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, K C; Bond, H E; Valenti, J; Smith, T E; Minniti, D; Zoccali, M; Livio, M; Panagia, N; Piskunov, N; Brown, T M; Brown, T; Renzini, A; Rich, R M; Clarkson, W; Lubow, S; Sahu, Kailash C.; Casertano, Stefano; Bond, Howard E.; Valenti, Jeff; Minniti, Dante; Zoccali, Manuela; Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Piskunov, Nikolai; Brown, Thomas M.; Brown, Timothy; Renzini, Alvio; Clarkson, Will; Lubow, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    More than 200 extrasolar planets have been discovered around relatively nearby stars, primarily through the Doppler line shifts owing to the reflex motions of their host stars, and more recently through transits of some planets across the face of the host stars. The detection of planets with the shortest known periods, 1.2 to 2.5 days, has mainly resulted from transit surveys which have generally targeted stars more massive than 0.75 M_sun. Here we report the results from a planetary transit search performed in a rich stellar field towards the Galactic bulge. We discovered 16 candidates with orbital periods between 0.4 and 4.2 days, five of which orbit stars of 0.44 to 0.75 M_sun. In two cases, radial-velocity measurements support the planetary nature of the companions. Five candidates have orbital periods below 1.0 day, constituting a new class of ultra-short-period planets (USPPs), which occur only around stars of less than 0.88 M_sun. This indicates that those orbiting very close to more luminous stars mig...

  11. Reliability of MRI findings in candidates for lumbar disc prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Linda; Espeland, Ansgar [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Radiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Neckelmann, Gesche [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); Gjertsen, Oeivind [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Oslo (Norway); Hellum, Christian [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Department of Orthopaedics, Oslo (Norway); Johnsen, Lars G. [University Hospital of Trondheim, National Centre for Diseases of the Spine, Trondheim (Norway); University Hospital of Trondheim, Orthopaedic Department, Trondheim (Norway); Eide, Geir E. [Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Clinical Research, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-07-15

    Limited reliability data exist for localised magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to planning of treatment with lumbar disc prosthesis and later outcomes. We assessed the reliability of such findings in chronic low back pain patients who were accepted candidates for disc prosthesis. On pretreatment MRI of 170 patients (mean age 41 years; 88 women), three experienced radiologists independently rated Modic changes, disc findings and facet arthropathy at L3/L4, L4/L5 and L5/S1. Two radiologists rerated 126 examinations. For each MRI finding at each disc level, agreement was analysed using the kappa statistic and differences in prevalence across observers using a fixed effects model. All findings at L3/L4 and facet arthropathy at L5/S1 had a mean prevalence <10% across observers and were not further analysed, ensuring interpretable kappa values. Overall interobserver agreement was generally moderate or good (kappa 0.40-0.77) at L4-S1 for Modic changes, nucleus pulposus signal, disc height (subjective and measured), posterior high-intensity zone (HIZ) and disc contour, and fair (kappa 0.24) at L4/L5 for facet arthropathy. Posterior HIZ at L5/S1 and severely reduced subjective disc height at L4/L5 differed up to threefold in prevalence between observers (p < 0.0001). Intraobserver agreement was mostly good or very good (kappa 0.60-1.00). In candidates for disc prosthesis, mostly moderate interobserver agreement is expected for localised MRI findings. (orig.)

  12. Recoiling Black Holes: Electromagnetic Signatures, Candidates, and Astrophysical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Komossa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Supermassive black holes (SMBHs may not always reside right at the centers of their host galaxies. This is a prediction of numerical relativity simulations, which imply that the newly formed single SMBH, after binary coalescence in a galaxy merger, can receive kick velocities up to several 1000 km/s due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. Long-lived oscillations of the SMBHs in galaxy cores, and in rare cases even SMBH ejections from their host galaxies, are the consequence. Observationally, accreting recoiling SMBHs would appear as quasars spatially and/or kinematically offset from their host galaxies. The presence of the “kicks” has a wide range of astrophysical implications which only now are beginning to be explored, including consequences for black hole and galaxy assembly at the epoch of structure formation, black hole feeding, and unified models of active galactic nuclei (AGN. Here, we review the observational signatures of recoiling SMBHs and the properties of the first candidates which have emerged, including follow-up studies of the candidate recoiling SMBH of SDSSJ092712.65+294344.0.

  13. Self-gravitating disc candidates around massive young stars

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, D H; Cyganowski, C J; Brogan, C L; Hunter, T R

    2016-01-01

    There have been several recent detections of candidate Keplerian discs around massive young protostars. Given the relatively large disc-to-star mass ratios in these systems, and their young ages, it is worth investigating their propensity to becoming self-gravitating. To this end, we compute self-consistent, semi-analytic models of putative self-gravitating discs for five candidate disc systems. Our aim is not to fit exactly the observations, but to demonstrate that the expected dust continuum emission from marginally unstable self-gravitating discs can be quite weak, due to high optical depth at the midplane even at millimetre wavelengths. In the best cases, the models produce "observable" disc masses within a factor of <1.5 of those observed, with midplane dust temperatures comparable to measured temperatures from molecular line emission. We find in two cases that a self-gravitating disc model compares well with observations. If these discs are self-gravitating, they satisfy the conditions for disc fragm...

  14. A Bioinformatics Filtering Strategy for Identifying Radiation Response Biomarker Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hun; Wong, Harry P.; Wang, Xiaowei; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2012-01-01

    The number of biomarker candidates is often much larger than the number of clinical patient data points available, which motivates the use of a rational candidate variable filtering methodology. The goal of this paper is to apply such a bioinformatics filtering process to isolate a modest number (<10) of key interacting genes and their associated single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in radiation response, and to ultimately serve as a basis for using clinical datasets to identify new biomarkers. In step 1, we surveyed the literature on genetic and protein correlates to radiation response, in vivo or in vitro, across cellular, animal, and human studies. In step 2, we analyzed two publicly available microarray datasets and identified genes in which mRNA expression changed in response to radiation. Combining results from Step 1 and Step 2, we identified 20 genes that were common to all three sources. As a final step, a curated database of protein interactions was used to generate the most statistically reliable protein interaction network among any subset of the 20 genes resulting from Steps 1 and 2, resulting in identification of a small, tightly interacting network with 7 out of 20 input genes. We further ranked the genes in terms of likely importance, based on their location within the network using a graph-based scoring function. The resulting core interacting network provides an attractive set of genes likely to be important to radiation response. PMID:22768051

  15. A bioinformatics filtering strategy for identifying radiation response biomarker candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hun Oh

    Full Text Available The number of biomarker candidates is often much larger than the number of clinical patient data points available, which motivates the use of a rational candidate variable filtering methodology. The goal of this paper is to apply such a bioinformatics filtering process to isolate a modest number (<10 of key interacting genes and their associated single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in radiation response, and to ultimately serve as a basis for using clinical datasets to identify new biomarkers. In step 1, we surveyed the literature on genetic and protein correlates to radiation response, in vivo or in vitro, across cellular, animal, and human studies. In step 2, we analyzed two publicly available microarray datasets and identified genes in which mRNA expression changed in response to radiation. Combining results from Step 1 and Step 2, we identified 20 genes that were common to all three sources. As a final step, a curated database of protein interactions was used to generate the most statistically reliable protein interaction network among any subset of the 20 genes resulting from Steps 1 and 2, resulting in identification of a small, tightly interacting network with 7 out of 20 input genes. We further ranked the genes in terms of likely importance, based on their location within the network using a graph-based scoring function. The resulting core interacting network provides an attractive set of genes likely to be important to radiation response.

  16. The Effect of Designed Geometry Teaching Lesson to the Candidate Teachers' Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli; Koparan, Timur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out how designed Geometry Teaching Lesson affects candidate teachers' Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Levels. For that purpose, 14 weeks long study was performed with 44 candidate teachers who were university students in Turkey. Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Test was applied to candidate teachers before and after…

  17. An Analysis of the Candidate Teachers' Beliefs Related to Knowledge, Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Erdal; Vural, Ömer Faruk; Demir, Servet; Bagceci, Birsen

    2015-01-01

    Candidate teachers have several beliefs related to their knowledge, learning and teaching. The purpose of this study is to analyze the beliefs of candidate teachers about knowledge, learning and teaching. Candidate teachers were assigned a scale and from the answers "belief points" were obtained based on their attitudes about these three…

  18. A fair trial? Assessment of liver transplant candidates with psychiatric illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    Allocating scarce organs to transplant candidates is only one stage in the long process of organ transplantation. Before being listed, all candidates must undergo a rigorous assessment by a multidisciplinary transplant team. The Department of Health and NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) are responsible for the development of detailed strategies to ensure a fair and objective assessment experience for all transplant candidates. Difficulties arise when particularly vulnerable candidates, such as candidates with psychiatric illnesses, are assessed. NHSBT has already developed unique assessment guidelines for alcoholic and substance-abusing liver transplant candidates to allow for a more comprehensive evaluation, but candidates with psychiatric illnesses are still assessed against general criteria. Should these candidates be assessed against their own criteria? On what clinical grounds do transplant teams justify excluding such candidates from transplantation? Is redress available for candidates who feel they have been unfairly refused a liver transplant simply because of their psychiatric illness? This essay will critically examine the provisions published by the Department of Health and NHSBT for the assessment of liver transplant candidates with psychiatric illnesses, and will provide a commentary as to whether enough is being done to protect these particularly vulnerable candidates from inconsistent assessment decisions.

  19. Performance Assessment for California Teachers and English-Language Arts Candidates in a Rural Border Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the appropriateness of the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) as an instrument of assessing English-language arts (ELA) teacher candidates' effectiveness in a rural border community. Eight -candidates participated in the study. The findings call into question the adequacy of PACT to assess the candidates'…

  20. Preparing Teacher Candidates for Virtual Field Placements via an Exposure to K-12 Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tian; Hibbard, Laura; Franklin, Teresa; Moore, David Richard

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The goal of this project was to determine what effects exposure to online K-12 teaching and learning activities had on teacher candidates' perceptions of K-12 online learning, how the exposure allowed teacher candidates to reach greater understanding of online pedagogy, and what effect such exposure had on teacher candidates'…

  1. 11 CFR 116.12 - Repayment of candidate loans of $250,000 or less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repayment of candidate loans of $250,000 or less. 116.12 Section 116.12 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL DEBTS OWED BY CANDIDATES AND POLITICAL COMMITTEES § 116.12 Repayment of candidate loans of $250,000 or less. (a)...

  2. Identifying the Relationship of Teacher Candidates' Humor Styles with Anxiety and Self-Compassion Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Aydan

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Teacher candidates who will soon be responsible for educating the future generations should possess certain characteristics. Specific teacher candidates should have specific characteristics taken into consideration: pre-school and primary teacher candidates should be seen as role models by younger students; psychological…

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Political Candidates: Implications for the Voter Decision Making Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Susan A.; King, Stephen W.

    A study was conducted to examine the evaluative criteria or schemata that voters use in making decisions about competing candidates. More specifically, the study sought to determine (1) whether the criteria that voters employ differ between the candidates, and (2) the relative importance of various candidate-specific criteria in the voting…

  4. 76 FR 77831 - 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates To...: Notice of matching fund submission dates and submission dates for statements of net outstanding campaign... fund submission dates for publicly funded 2012 presidential primary candidates. Eligible candidates...

  5. Candidate gene markers for sperm quality and fertility in bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmoy Mishra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fertility is one of the primary traits of reproduction in bulls. Decrease in fertility is a multifactorial condition and is verydifficult to diagnose. Among various causes genetic abnormality holds a major share. By identifying various genes that haveeffects on fertility the genetic cause behind subferility can be explored and also other non genetic factors can be identified.Advancement of molecular genetic tools now easily enables us to explore individual genes in animals. Identification of thesegenes will eventually lead to genome assembly and development of novel tools for analysing complex genetic traits. Thispaper gives a brief idea about the candidate genes for bull fertility, including genes encoding hormones and their receptors,proteins of the seminal plasma, proteins involved in spermatozoa-ovum binding and genes influencing sexual development.The chromosomal location and gene structure are described, based on the bovine genome assembly.

  6. Evaluation of Candidate Anti-Aids Drugs In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-31

    for the drug request form). The drugs were solubiized and delivered to the HlV labatory on the day of testing. All drugs were weighed in 5 mg amounas...EVALUATION OF CANDIDATE ANTI-AIDS DRUGS IN VITRO PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. William M. Shannon CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Southern Research Institute...SEý89 rI ,E 4-IO S4Urf CjMrhCAfpW "va~luation of C.&riidate Anti-AlrxS Drug InV4=r L. Wmt~rnck. L-J Wi kf P.- ;01 1a r10 V RIC1 b ýkq~III coi4 3Ar1 00

  7. Expression studies of the obesity candidate gene FTO in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Majbritt Busk; Birck, Malene Muusfeldt; Fredholm, Merete

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem worldwide and research on candidate genes in good animal models is highly needed. The pig is an excellent model as its metabolism, organ size, and eating habits resemble that of humans. The present study is focused on the characterization of the fat mass and obesity...... associated gene (FTO) in pig. This gene has recently been associated with increased body mass index in several human populations. To establish information on the expression profile of FTO in the pig we performed quantitative PCR in a panel of adult pig tissues and in tissues sampled at different...... and cerebellum). Additionally, in order to see the involvement of the FTO gene in obesity, the changes in expression level were investigated in a nutritional study in brain of Gottingen minipigs under a high cholesterol diet. Significantly higher (P

  8. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively. The three displays on the right-hand side show the r-phi view of the event (top), a zoom into the vertex region, indicating that the 4 electrons originate from the same primary vertex (middle), and a Lego plot indicating the amount of transverse energy Et measured in the calorimeters (bottom).

  9. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display (side view) of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. The tracks of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively. Electron clusters in the LAr calorimeter are colored darkgreen. The three displays on the right-hand side show the r-phi view of the event (top), a zoom into the vertex region, indicating that the 4 electrons originate from the same primary vertex (middle), and a Lego plot indicating the amount of transverse energy Et measured in the calorimeters (bottom).

  10. Candidate eco-friendly gas mixtures for MPGDs

    CERN Document Server

    Saviano, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for the detection of elementary particles, and MPGDs in particular, require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. This work investigates the properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements. The aim is to discuss some of the important properties of gases for MPGDs, to list and summarize basic properties of eco-friendly refrigerants from the literature available, to discuss their properties for materials compatibility and safe use, and to make a prediction on selected parameters (i.e., ionization potentials, ionization pairs, etc) crucial for the performance of gas detectors considered by making use of both known parametrizations and quantum chemistry simulation codes.

  11. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  12. A New Candidate for Guided Tissue Regeneration: Biomimetic Eggshell Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Duan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease that involves the deterioration of tooth supporting structures is the primary cause of tooth loss among adults. Guided tissue regeneration (GTR technique is a commonly used surgical procedure for the treatment of periodontal diseases by using a barrier membrane. Natural eggshell membrane (ESM is a semi-permeable membrane consisting of two individual layers with fibrous meshwork structures. With the aid of successful preparation of soluble eggshell membrane proteins (SEP from natural ESM in the previous study, we hypothesized that one new type of biomimetic nanofibrous eggshell membrane could be successfully constructed by sequential electrospinning method. This proposed membrane is composed of two interconnected nanofibrous layers with different density and porosity which can mimic the composition, morphology and structure of natural ESM. It is expected to greatly enhance the periodontal tissue regeneration as well as physically maintain the space for tissue repair, thus to be a promising and cost-effective GTR membrane candidate.

  13. Candidate driver genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhopuro, Pia; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Niittymäki, Iina;

    2012-01-01

    . Here, we evaluated somatic mutations in microsatellite repeats of 790 genes chosen based on reduced expression in MSI CRC and existence of a coding mononucleotide repeat of 6–10 bp in length. All the repeats were initially sequenced in 30 primary MSI CRC samples and whenever frameshift mutations were...... types (A/T and C/G, 6–10 bp). Along with several know target genes, including TGFBR2, ACVR2, and MSH3, six novel candidate driver genes emerged that harbored significantly more mutations than identical control repeats. The mutation frequencies in 100 MSI CRC samples were 51% in G8 of GLYR1, 47% in T9...... genes that when mutated are likely to contribute to MSI CRC development....

  14. Cognitive Deficits in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Surgical Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daren C.; Sandoval-Garcia, Carolina; Rocque, Brandon G.; Wilbrand, Stephanie M.; Mitchell, Carol C.; Hermann, Bruce P.; Dempsey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The role played by vessel disease in stroke-related cognition dysfunction is unclear. We assessed the impact of significant atherosclerotic disease on cognition—even in patients asymptomatic for stroke. We hypothesized that patients would perform poorly relative to controls, but that symptomatic/asymptomatic status (history of stroke/transient ischemic attack) would have no effect. Fifty-two carotid endarterectomy candidates with >60% carotid stenosis and 17 controls underwent a 60-min neuropsychological test protocol. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients showed deficits in executive function, delayed verbal recall, and general knowledge. Patients symptomatic for stroke also performed worse on tests of language and motor/visuomotor ability. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients differed in working memory and language task performance. Although all patients showed deficits in executive function and memory, only symptomatic patients showed additional deficits in language and motor function. Cognitive abnormalities in patients viewed as “asymptomatic” for stroke underscore the need for early identification and treatment. PMID:26663810

  15. Candidate gene copy number analysis by PCR and multicapillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szantai, Eszter; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Guttman, András; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria

    2009-04-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are often considered as risk factors of complex diseases serving as valuable and easily detectable biomarkers, also stable during the whole lifespan. A novel type of genetic polymorphism has been identified just recently, referred to as gene copy number variation (CNV) or copy number polymorphism. CNV of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and its adjacent gene, Nr1i2 (pregnane X receptor isoform), has been reported to associate with bipolar depression. In our study we introduced multicapillary electrophoresis for gene copy number analysis as an affordable alternative to real-time PCR quantification with TaqMan gene probes. Our results show the reliability of the developed method based on conventional PCR followed by separation of products by multicapillary electrophoresis with quantitative evaluation. This method can be readily implemented for the analysis of candidate gene CNVs in high throughput clinical laboratories and also in personalized medicine care of depression-related risk factors.

  16. Vaccines for leishmaniasis: from proteome to vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Juliane; Aebischer, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania spp. cause a wide spectrum of tropical diseases which are threatening an estimated 350 million people around the globe. While in most cases non-fatal, the disease is associated with high morbidity, social stigmata and poverty. However, the most severe form visceral leishmaniasis can be fatal if left untreated. Chemotherapeutics are available but show high toxicity, costs and are prone to resistance development due to prolonged treatment periods. Healing is associated with a life-long resistance to re-infection and this argues for the feasibility of vaccination. However, despite much effort, no such vaccine has become available yet. Here, the status of vaccine development in this field is briefly summarized before the focus is set on the promise of reverse vaccinology for anti-Leishmania vaccine development in the post-genomic era. We report on our own experience with this approach using an instructive example of successful candidate vaccine antigen identification.

  17. Maximized ExoEarth Candidate Yields for Starshades

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Christopher C; Lisman, Doug; Cady, Eric; Savransky, Dmitry; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi M

    2016-01-01

    The design and scale of a future mission to directly image and characterize potentially Earth-like planets will be impacted, to some degree, by the expected yield of such planets. Recent efforts to increase the estimated yields, by creating observation plans optimized for the detection and characterization of Earth-twins, have focused solely on coronagraphic instruments; starshade-based missions could benefit from a similar analysis. Here we explore how to prioritize observations for a starshade given the limiting resources of both fuel and time, present analytic expressions to estimate fuel use, and provide efficient numerical techniques for maximizing the yield of starshades. We implemented these techniques to create an approximate design reference mission code for starshades and used this code to investigate how exoEarth candidate yield responds to changes in mission, instrument, and astrophysical parameters for missions with a single starshade. We find that a starshade mission operates most efficiently so...

  18. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials.

  19. Women candidates: the relationships between gender, media and discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maria Finamore

    Full Text Available On this paper we discuss, within the cross over of two representations - woman and politic function - the media’s power to influence voters’ choices and their roles as interpreters of media messages. Under a position that understands the relativity of the media’s power, we set the idea of gender discourse as a mediator of its influence. Whereas literature shows how a candidate suffers an important effect of media exposition, transformed in a marketing product, we suggest that women in politics suffer from the stereotype that states "women’s place is at home". We conclude that women politic participation is strongly linked to the way in which they are represented in the common sense and a change in the hegemonic discourses about women that cross individuals and social groups becomes necessary as to have this situation modified.

  20. Two new high energy gamma-ray blazar candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, R; Bernieri, E; Massaro, E

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of two new gamma-ray sources in the Fermi-LAT sky (Pass 8) at energies higher than 20 GeV, and confirmed at lower energies, using a source detection tool based on the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm. One of these sources, at a Galactic latitude of about -4{\\deg}, is a new discovery, while the other was previously reported above 50 GeV in the 2FHL catalogue. We searched for archival multi-wavelength data of possible counterparts and found interesting candidates. Both objects are radio sources and their WISE infrared colours are typical of blazars. While for the former source no optical spectra are available, for the latter a puzzling optical spectrum corresponding to a white dwarf star is found in the 6dF database. We discuss the spectral energy distributions of both sources and possible interpretations.

  1. Preselecting AGN candidates from multi-wavelength data by ADTree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Zheng, Hongwen; Zhao, Yongheng

    2005-03-01

    With the information era in astronomy coming, this "data avalanche" may provide many answers to important problems in contemporary astrophysics. The most important problem is sifting through massive amounts of data to mine knowledge. In this paper, we positionally cross-identify multi-wavelength data from optical, near-infrared, and x-ray bands, and then employ alternating decision trees (adtree) to quickly and robustly separate AGN candidates to a high degree of accuracy. We emphasise the application of the method due to the development of large survey projects and the establishment of the virtual observatory, and conclude that the application of data mining algorithms in astronomy is of great importance to discover new knowledge impossible to obtain before, and promote the development of astronomy.

  2. Herschel Reveals Massive Cold Clump Candidates in NGC 7538

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallscheer, Cassandra; Reid, Mike; Di Francesco, James; Martin, Peter; Hill, Tracey

    2013-07-01

    Observations of the high-mass star formation region NGC 7538 taken with the Herschel Space Observatory were made at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron as part of the Herschel imaging study of OB Young Stellar objects (HOBYS) Key Programme. Within the one square degree field, we identify 780 dense sources and classify 224 of those. With the intention of investigating the existence of cold massive starless or class 0-like clumps that would have the potential to form intermediate- to high-mass stars, we further isolate 13 clumps as the most likely candidates for follow-up studies. A peculiar feature in the observations is a large, nearly complete ring of material. The evacuated ring is of unknown origin and hosts a number of the detected sources.

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of four post-AGB candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Molina, R E; Pereira, C B; Ferro, A Arellano; Muneer, S

    2014-01-01

    We have done a detailed abundance analysis of four unexplored candidate post- Asymptotic Giant Branch(AGB) stars IRAS 13110 - 6629, IRAS 17579 - 3121, IRAS 18321 - 1401 and IRAS 18489 - 0629 using high resolution spectra. We have constructed Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for these objects using the existing photometric data combined with infrared (IR) fluxes. For all sample stars, the SEDs exhibit double peaked energy distribution with well separated IR peaks showing the presence of dusty circumstellar material. The CNO abundances indicate the production of N via CN cycling, but observed [C/Fe] indicates the mixing of carbon produced by He burning by third dredge up although C/O ratio remains less that 1. A moderate DG effect is clearly seen for IRAS 18489 - 0629 and IRAS 17579 - 3121 while a large scatter observed in depletion plots for IRAS 18321 - 1401 and IRAS 13110 - 6629 indicate the presence of other processes affecting the observed abundance pattern.

  4. Transforming fragments into candidates: small becomes big in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloe, Gerdien E; Bailey, David; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2009-07-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a logical and efficient approach to lead discovery and optimisation. It can draw on structural, biophysical and biochemical data, incorporating a wide range of inputs, from precise mode-of-binding information on specific fragments to wider ranging pharmacophoric screening surveys using traditional HTS approaches. It is truly an enabling technology for the imaginative medicinal chemist. In this review, we analyse a representative set of 23 published FBDD studies that describe how low molecular weight fragments are being identified and efficiently transformed into higher molecular weight drug candidates. FBDD is now becoming warmly endorsed by industry as well as academia and the focus on small interacting molecules is making a big scientific impact.

  5. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yufan; Qiao, Hongbin; Shi, Yanli; Han, Yu; Liu, Jinming; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl) has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials. PMID:27957496

  6. Space exploration initiative candidate nuclear propulsion test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darrell; Clark, John S.

    1993-01-01

    One-page descriptions for approximately 200 existing government, university, and industry facilities which may be available in the future to support SEI nuclear propulsion technology development and test program requirements are provided. To facilitate use of the information, the candidate facilities are listed both by location (Index L) and by Facility Type (Index FT). The included one-page descriptions provide a brief narrative description of facility capability, suggest potential uses for each facility, and designate a point of contact for additional information that may be needed in the future. The Nuclear Propulsion Office at NASA Lewis presently plans to maintain, expand, and update this information periodically for use by NASA, DOE, and DOD personnel involved in planning various phases of the SEI Nuclear Propulsion Project.

  7. Proteins of Bartonella bacilliformis: Candidates for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Henriquez-Camacho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella bacilliformis is the etiologic agent of Carrión’s disease or Oroya fever. B. bacilliformis infection represents an interesting model of human host specificity. The notable differences in clinical presentations of Carrión’s disease suggest complex adaptations by the bacterium to the human host, with the overall objectives of persistence, maintenance of a reservoir state for vectorial transmission, and immune evasion. These events include a multitude of biochemical and genetic mechanisms involving both bacterial and host proteins. This review focuses on proteins involved in interactions between B. bacilliformis and the human host. Some of them (e.g., flagellin, Brps, IalB, FtsZ, Hbp/Pap31, and other outer membrane proteins are potential protein antigen candidates for a synthetic vaccine.

  8. Current understanding of increased insulin sensitivity after exercise - emerging candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine Just; Sylow, Lykke; Richter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    insulin sensitivity. It is believed that increased sarcolemmal content of the glucose transporter GLUT4 can explain the phenomenon to some extent. Surprisingly no improvement in the proximal insulin signaling pathway is observed at the level of the insulin receptor, IRS1, PI3K or Akt. Recently more distal...... signaling component in the insulin signaling pathway such as aPKC, Rac1, TBC1D4 and TBC1D1 have been described. These are all affected by both insulin and exercise which means that they are likely converging points in promoting GLUT4 translocation and therefore possible candidates for regulating insulin...... in signaling to GLUT4 translocation, factors influencing the trans-sarcolemmal glucose concentration gradient might also be important. With regard to the interstitial glucose concentration microvascular perfusion is particular relevant as correlative evidence supports a connection between insulin sensitivity...

  9. On the occurrence of glitches in pulsar free precession candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D I; Prix, R

    2016-01-01

    The timing properties of radio pulsars provide a unique probe of neutron star interiors. Recent observations have uncovered quasi-periodicities in the timing and pulse properties of some pulsars, a phenomenon that has often been attributed to free precession of the neutron star, with profound implications for the distribution of superfluidity and superconductivity in the star. We advance this programme by developing consistency relations between free precession and pulsars glitches, and show that there are difficulties in reconciling the two phenomena in some precession candidates. This indicates that either the precession model used here needs to be modified, or some other phenomenon is at work in producing the quasi-periodicities, or even that there is something missing in terms of our understanding of glitches.

  10. Some more Exotic Dark Matter Candidates: GUT Balls, Fermi Balls...

    CERN Document Server

    Sivaram, C

    2011-01-01

    The nature of dark matter (DM), which is supposed to constitute about one-fourth of the universe, is still a mystery. There is evidence that much of the DM may be made up of as yet undiscovered particles with several experiments all over the world trying to detect these. In this article we introduce some new candidates which are exotic in nature but still are consistent with known physics. We look at DM objects that can be formed by the balance of gravity with the four-fermion force, nuclear tension, etc. We see that their radii are much larger than their corresponding Schwarzschild radius; hence they are distinct from Hawking primordial black holes. We have determined their mass and the required number densities to account for the DM in the galaxy and possible ways of detecting them.

  11. Disformal scalars as dark matter candidates — Branon phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembranos, Jose A. R.; Maroto, Antonio L.

    2016-05-01

    Scalar particles coupled to the Standard Model fields through a disformal coupling arise in different theories, such as massive gravity or braneworld models. We will review the main phenomenology associated with such particles. Distinctive disformal signatures could be measured at colliders and with astrophysical observations. The phenomenological relevance of the disformal coupling demands the introduction of a set of symmetries, which may ensure the stability of these new degrees of freedom. In such a case, they constitute natural dark matter candidates since they are generally massive and weakly coupled. We will illustrate these ideas by paying particular attention to the branon case, since these questions arise naturally in braneworld models with low tension, where they were first discussed.

  12. Disformal scalars as dark matter candidates: Branon phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, Jose A R

    2016-01-01

    Scalar particles coupled to the Standard Model fields through a disformal coupling arise in different theories, such as massive gravity or brane-world models. We will review the main phenomenology associated with such particles. Distinctive disformal signatures could be measured at colliders and with astrophysical observations. The phenomenological relevance of the disformal coupling demands the introduction of a set of symmetries, which may ensure the stability of these new degrees of freedom. In such a case, they constitute natural dark matter candidates since they are generally massive and weakly coupled. We will illustrate these ideas by paying particular attention to the branon case, since these questions arise naturally in brane-world models with low tension, where they were first discussed.

  13. A New Optical Survey of Supernova Remnant Candidates in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    We present a survey of optically emitting supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 based on H$\\alpha$ and [SII] images in the Local Group Survey. Using these images, we select objects that have [SII]:H$\\alpha$ $>$ 0.4 and circular shapes. We find 76 new SNR candidates. We also inspect 234 SNR candidates presented in previous studies, finding that only 80 of them are SNR candidates according to our criteria. Combining them with the new candidates, we produce a master catalog of 156 SNR candidates in M31. We classify these SNR candidates according to two criteria: the SNR progenitor type [Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs] and the morphological type. Type Ia and CC SNR candidates make up 23% and 77%, respectively, of the total sample. Most of the CC SNR candidates are concentrated in the spiral arms, while the Type Ia SNR candidates are rather distributed over the entire galaxy, including the inner region. The CC SNR candidates are brighter in H$\\alpha$ and [SII] than the Type Ia SNR candidates. We derive a cumulativ...

  14. Candidate genes for performance in horses, including monocarboxylate transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaê Cristina Regatieri

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Some horse breeds are highly selected for athletic activities. The athletic potential of each animal can be measured by its performance in sports. High athletic performance depends on the animal capacity to produce energy through aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways, among other factors. Transmembrane proteins called monocarboxylate transporters, mainly the isoform 1 (MCT1 and its ancillary protein CD147, can help the organism to adapt to physiological stress caused by physical exercise, transporting lactate and H+ ions. Horse breeds are selected for different purposes so we might expect differences in the amount of those proteins and in the genotypic frequencies for genes that play a significant role in the performance of the animals. The study of MCT1 and CD147 gene polymorphisms, which can affect the formation of the proteins and transport of lactate and H+, can provide enough information to be used for selection of athletic horses increasingly resistant to intense exercise. Two other candidate genes, the PDK4 and DMRT3, have been associated with athletic potential and indicated as possible markers for performance in horses. The oxidation of fatty acids is highly effective in generating ATP and is controlled by the expression of PDK4 (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 in skeletal muscle during and after exercise. The doublesex and mab-3 related transcription factor 3 (DMRT3 gene encodes an important transcription factor in the setting of spinal cord circuits controlling movement in vertebrates and may be associated with gait performance in horses. This review describes how the monocarboxylate transporters work during physical exercise in athletic horses and the influence of polymorphisms in candidate genes for athletic performance in horses.

  15. VALFAST: Secure Probabilistic Validation of Hundreds of Kepler Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Tim; Petigura, E.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A.; Marcy, G. W.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Riddle, R. L.; Ciardi, D. R.; Robo-AO Team

    2014-01-01

    The scope, scale, and tremendous success of the Kepler mission has necessitated the rapid development of probabilistic validation as a new conceptual framework for analyzing transiting planet candidate signals. While several planet validation methods have been independently developed and presented in the literature, none has yet come close to addressing the entire Kepler survey. I present the results of applying VALFAST---a planet validation code based on the methodology described in Morton (2012)---to every Kepler Object of Interest. VALFAST is unique in its combination of detail, completeness, and speed. Using the transit light curve shape, realistic population simulations, and (optionally) diverse follow-up observations, it calculates the probability that a transit candidate signal is the result of a true transiting planet or any of a number of astrophysical false positive scenarios, all in just a few minutes on a laptop computer. In addition to efficiently validating the planetary nature of hundreds of new KOIs, this broad application of VALFAST also demonstrates its ability to reliably identify likely false positives. This extensive validation effort is also the first to incorporate data from all of the largest Kepler follow-up observing efforts: the CKS survey of ~1000 KOIs with Keck/HIRES, the Robo-AO survey of >1700 KOIs, and high-resolution images obtained through the Kepler Follow-up Observing Program. In addition to enabling the core science that the Kepler mission was designed for, this methodology will be critical to obtain statistical results from future surveys such as TESS and PLATO.

  16. Validation of transting planet candidates: a Bayesian view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Rodrigo Fernando; Almenara, Jose Manuel; Santerne, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Transiting candidate validation is essentially a Bayesian model comparison problem: different models, all explaining the observations comparably well, compete for the support of the available data. It has, however, two particularities that render it very complex and difficult to tackle: i) the relevant data sets are of diverse nature (transit light curves, broad band photometry, high angular resolution images, radial velocity observations, etc.), and ii) the models representing each hypothesis are highly non-linear and in some cases make the computation of the likelihood very time consuming.Despite its clear Bayesian nature, the planet validation problem has received in the past mainly a frequentist treatment (BLENDER). Other techniques exist, but they employ unrealistic models that increase speed but only partially exploit the available datasets (ValFast).The Planet Analysis and Small Transit Investigation Software (PASTIS) was developped keeping these issues and the characteristics of the problem in mind. It aims at computing the Bayesian evidence for a full set of false positive scenarios and the planet hypothesis, modelling in all cases the available data self-consistently, thus producing robust and rigorous Bayes factor for all models of interest. Its object-oriented architecture also permits constructing a vast set of false positive models easily.I will review some key results of the planet validation technique, showing the limitations and dangers of some approaches and of the validation technique in general. I will also describe the PASTIS tool and present out results on CoRoT-22 b, Kepler-22 b, and other transiting candidates.

  17. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina C. Wollenberg Valero

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1, affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2 lipoprotein metabolism, (3 membrane channels, (4 stress response, (5 response to oxidative stress, (6 muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7 vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and

  18. Neurological soft signs as a candidate for endophenotype of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kałużyńska, Olga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A concept of an endophenotype, also termed as an internal endophenotype, is used in genetic studies on psychiatric disorders. Neurological soft signs are also considered candidates for endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Neurological soft signs are, objectively measured, non-localizing abnormalities, not related to impairment of a specific brain region, reflecting improper corical-subcorical and intercortical connections. This paper presents the main domains of NSS, methods of measurement of NSS, their neuroanatomical substrate, association of NSS with schizophrenia symptoms the and analysis of the literature in order to check whether NSS meet the criteria of the phenotype. A marker can be considered a phenotype if it meets the following criteria: 1 association with a disease in a population, 2 heritability, 3 state-independence, 4 familial association (the endophenotype is more prevalent in the affected individuals, their affected and non-affected family members in comparison to the normal population, 5 co-segregation ( the endophenotype is more prevalent among ill family members of ill probands compared with healthy relatives. Currently, there is an ample evidence that the NSS, especially these representing impaired motor coordination, meet certain criteria of an endophenotype. However, there are still several unresolved questions concerning NSS: studies on relatives of schizophrenic patients included small groups of subjects, many of the studies included individuals with schizophrenia, as well as schizophrenia spectrum disorders, the available date-base of twins (schizophrenia-concordant and schizophrenia non-concordant is not sufficiently large, there are too few studies evaluating the relationship of NSS and individual genes, there are no objective and quantitative methods of measurement of NSS. Therefore, NSS still represent only candidates for an endophenotype of schizophrenia. Finding correlations of selected NSS with other endophenotypes

  19. Screening for keratoconus suspects among candidates for refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonnies, Charles W

    2014-11-01

    This review examines methods for estimating the risk of post-surgical ectasia in candidates for refractive surgery by establishing a diagnosis of keratoconus suspect as a contraindication for proceeding with surgery. Notwithstanding the desirability of achieving 100 per cent sensitivity, any associated reduction in specificity and increased numbers of false positives might deny some candidates the opportunity to proceed with refractive surgery. The introduction of a model for the risk of ectasia involving both pre- and post-surgical findings has been followed by a plethora of attempts to achieve the same purpose based on topographic and/or tomographic evaluation before surgery. The desirability of being able to depend on objective assessment using one type of instrument needs to be weighed against the possibility that subjective assessments may contribute significantly to screening success. For example, consideration of ethnicity, family history of keratoconus, a history of atopy or ocular allergies in particular, a history of significant exposure to corneal trauma associated with abnormal rubbing habits or with vocational, leisure or geographically increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation or with contact lens wear trauma or a history of significant exposure to activities which elevate intraocular pressure may improve screening success. To the extent that these factors could contribute to increased risk of the development of keratoconus, they may be useful in estimating the risk of post-surgical ectasia. If any combination of these factors helps to explain the development of keratoconus in normal or even thicker than normal corneas, they may have more significance for those corneas, which have been thinned surgically.

  20. Extremely metal-poor star candidates in the SDSS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Yao Xu; Hua-Wei Zhang; Xiao-Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    For a sample of metal-poor stars (-3.3 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤-2.2) that have highresolution spectroscopic abundance determinations,we have measured equivalent widths of the Ca Ⅱ K,Mg Ⅰ b and near-infrared Ca Ⅱ triplet lines using low-resolution spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS),calculated effective temperatures from (g-z)o color,deduced stellar surface gravities by fitting stellar isochrones,and determined metallicities based on the aforementioned quantities.Metallicities thus derived from the Ca Ⅱ K line are in much better agreement with the results determined from high-resolution spectra than the values given in the SDSS Data Release 7.The metallicities derived from the Mg Ⅰ b lines have a large dispersion owing to the large measurement errors,whereas those deduced from the Ca Ⅱ triplet lines are too high due to both non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects and measurement errors.Abundances after correction for the NLTE effect for the Mg Ⅰ b lines and Ca Ⅱ triplet lines are also presented.Following this method,we have identified six candidates of ultra-metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] ~-4.0 from a sample of 166 metal-poor star candidates.One of them,SDSS J102915+172927,was recently confirmed to be an ultra-metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-4.0) star with the lowest metallicity ever measured.Follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy for the other five ultra-metal-poor stars in our sample will therefore be of great interest.

  1. Adaptations to climate in candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Hancock

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary pressures due to variation in climate play an important role in shaping phenotypic variation among and within species and have been shown to influence variation in phenotypes such as body shape and size among humans. Genes involved in energy metabolism are likely to be central to heat and cold tolerance. To test the hypothesis that climate shaped variation in metabolism genes in humans, we used a bioinformatics approach based on network theory to select 82 candidate genes for common metabolic disorders. We genotyped 873 tag SNPs in these genes in 54 worldwide populations (including the 52 in the Human Genome Diversity Project panel and found correlations with climate variables using rank correlation analysis and a newly developed method termed Bayesian geographic analysis. In addition, we genotyped 210 carefully matched control SNPs to provide an empirical null distribution for spatial patterns of allele frequency due to population history alone. For nearly all climate variables, we found an excess of genic SNPs in the tail of the distributions of the test statistics compared to the control SNPs, implying that metabolic genes as a group show signals of spatially varying selection. Among our strongest signals were several SNPs (e.g., LEPR R109K, FABP2 A54T that had previously been associated with phenotypes directly related to cold tolerance. Since variation in climate may be correlated with other aspects of environmental variation, it is possible that some of the signals that we detected reflect selective pressures other than climate. Nevertheless, our results are consistent with the idea that climate has been an important selective pressure acting on candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

  2. Selection of Lactic Acid Bacteria as Probiotic Candidate for Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hamida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB regarded as safe microorganisms; they can naturally live in gastrointestinal tract, so appropriately used as a probiotic for chicken. This study aimed to select six isolates of LAB (E1223, E3, E4, E5, E7, and E8 to obtain the isolates potentially as probiotic candidate for chicken. The six isolates were derived from spontaneous fermented corn obtained from Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Biomedical, PPSHB, Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia. LAB isolates were tested their susceptibility to antibiotics (bambermycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline then were examined in vitro for their tolerance to gastrointestinal pH (2, 3, 4, and 7.2 and 0.5% bile salt condition, antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enteritidis and Enterococcus casseliflavus, and ability to adhere to chicken ileal cells. The results showed the isolates E5, E7, and E8 were sensitive to tetracycline and chloramphenicol, they could survive at pH 2, 3, 4, and 7.2, could survive at 0.5% bile salts, produced antimicrobial activity, and able to adhere to ileal cells (9.40±0.00 Log CFU/cm2 of E8 and were significantly (P<0.05 higher than those of control (5.30±0.14 Log CFU/cm2. In conclusion, this study showed that isolate E8 had better potential compared to isolates E5 and E7 in most in vitro assays as a probiotic candidate for chicken. E5, E7, and E8 were closely related with Pediococcus pentosaceus based on 16S rRNA gene.

  3. Government instability shifts skin tone representations of and intentions to vote for political candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Chadly; Balcetis, Emily; Cole, Shana; West, Tessa V; Caruso, Eugene M

    2016-01-01

    Does government stability shift the way White and Black Americans represent and make voting decisions about political candidates? Participants judged how representative lightened, darkened, and unaltered photographs were of a racially ambiguous candidate ostensibly running for political office (Studies 1-3). When the governmental system was presented as stable, White participants who shared (vs. did not share) the candidate's political beliefs rated a lightened photo as more representative of the candidate, and Black participants who shared (vs. did not share) the candidate's political beliefs rated a darkened photo as more representative (Studies 1-3). However, under conditions of instability, both Whites and Blacks who shared (vs. did not share) the candidate's political beliefs rated a lightened photo as more representative (Study 3). Representations of (Studies 2 and 3) and actual differences in (Studies 4a and 4b) skin tone predicted intentions to vote for candidates, as a function of government stability and participants' race. Further evidence suggested that system stability shifted the motivations that guided voting decisions (Study 4a and 4b). When the system was stable, the motivation to enhance one's group predicted greater intentions to vote for lighter skinned candidates among Whites, and greater intentions to vote for darker skinned candidates among Blacks. When the system was unstable, however, lacking confidence in the sociopolitical system predicted intentions to vote for lighter skinned candidates among both Whites and Blacks. Implications for political leadership and social perception are discussed.

  4. A new drug candidate (GEMSP) for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Arturo; Coveñas, Rafael; Bodet, Dominique; Duleu, Sebastien; Geffard, Michel

    2009-01-01

    GEMSP is a mixture of functional polypeptides: fatty acids linked to poly-L-Lysine (PL), antioxidants linked to PL, free radical scavengers linked to PL, and amino acids linked to PL (patent numbers 6114388 (USA) and 792167 (EU)). In this review, we update the data on this new drug reported in the literature. There is evidence suggesting that GEMSP is a good candidate for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by focal leukocyte inflammation, demyelization and axonal degeneration, resulting in nerve cell dysfunction. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the main animal model used in the study of MS, a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. EAE has many clinical and histopathological similarities to MS. In this model, preclinical studies on GEMSP have demonstrated that the drug strongly inhibits brain leukocyte infiltration and completely abolishes EAE episodes and clinical scores, and it also appears that GEMSP preserves myelin integrity. In general, treatment with the free constituents of GEMSP (not linked to the inert carrier protein) is poorly active against brain leukocyte infiltration in EAE-immunized animals. This means that free molecules (not linked to PL) exert a very poor action on such infiltration and that these molecules are either rapidly incorporated into the metabolism or are degraded. Moreover, with immunocytochemical techniques, it has been demonstrated that one component of GEMSP, the methionine compound, is stored inside the motoneurons of the ventral horn of the spinal cord. However, this component of GEMSP has not been found in the brain. The new candidate for MS therapy has shown no toxicity either in experimental animals or in humans. An open clinical trial in humans has demonstrated that GEMSP is completely safe. In addition, the approved drugs for the treatment of MS exert marked side effects, but no side

  5. Four Finalist Landing Site Candidates for Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Out of more than 30 sites considered as possible landing targets for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, by November 2008 four of the most intriguing places on Mars rose to the final round of the site-selection process. The four finalists are, alphabetically: Eberswalde, where an ancient river deposited a delta in a possible lake; Gale, with a mountain of stacked layers including clays and sulfates; Holden, a crater containing alluvial fans, flood deposits, possible lake beds and clay-rich deposits; and Mawrth, which shows exposed layers containing at least two types of clay. The locations of these four candidates are indicated here on a background map of color-coded topographical data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. Red is higher elevation; blue is lower elevation. In latitude, the map extends from 70 degrees (north) to minus 70 degrees (south). The east-west axis is labeled at the top in degrees of east longitude, with the zero meridian at the center. The Mars Science Laboratory mission's capabilities for landing more precisely and at higher elevation than ever before, for driving farther, and for generating electricity without reliance on sunshine have enabled consideration of a wider range of possible landing sites than for any previous Mars mission. During the past two years, multiple observations of dozens of candidate sites by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have augmented data from earlier orbiters for evaluating sites' scientific attractions and engineering risks. More than 100 Mars scientists have participated in a series of open workshops presenting and assessing data that the orbiters have provided about the candidate sites. The four sites rated highest by researchers at a September 2008 workshop were the same ones chosen by mission leaders after a subsequent round of safety evaluations and analysis of terrain for rover driving. As a clay-bearing site where a river once flowed into a lake, Eberswalde Crater

  6. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins and

  7. Candidíase em pacientes aidéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E.O.P. Campos

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e cinco aidéticos entre 19 e 55 anos admitidos e tratados de candidíase no Hospital Emílio Ribas, SP, com ELISA positivo para HIV e confirmado pelo Western Blot. Tuberculose em 9 sendo 2 com pericardite; neurotoxoplasmose em 6; neurocriptococose em 5; herpes labial em 4; pneumocistose em 3 e sarcoma de Kaposi em 2, achavam-se associadas. A concentração inibitória mínima 50% (MIC 50% para os azoles foi: ketoconazol= 2,2 µg/ml; itraconazol- 21,0 µg/ml; fluconazol = 19,0 µg/ml. O MIC 50% para ospolienos: nistatina- 50,0 µg/ml; anfotericina B= 0,12 µg/ml e para 5 fluorcitosina= 1,6 µg/ml nas 35 amostras de Candida isoladas. Testes não paramétricos de Siegel revelaram significante identificação (80% das Candida albicans na candidíase, e que a dose de AMB não modificou o número de óbitos, precoce e tardio, ocorridos nesses aidéticos. O uso prévio dos azoles e da nistatina explicaria, talvez, o elevado MIC 50% observado nas amostras de Candida isoladas.A total of 35 in patients admitted at Emilio Ribas Hospital - São Paulo, Brazil, with digestive candidiasis and AIDS clinical diagnostic were evaluated 10 month later, being 29 male and 6 female; white outnumbering black with age ranged from 30 to 50 years old. Agar Sabouraud culture and tube germinative tests identified 28 (80% Candida albicans out 35 strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC 50% was against azoles (ketoconazole= 2.2 µg/ml; itraconazole = 21.0 µg/ml and fluconazole- 19.0 µg/ml; polyenes (ny statine - 50.0 µg/ml and amphotericin B= 0.12 µg/ml and 5 fluorcytosine= 1.6µg/ml. Siegeltests showed significant Candida albicans proportions in strains isolated from 35 AIDS patients. There was no significant relation between AMB dosis and early or late death. Conclusions: candidiasis in AIDS patients showed high MIC 50% to azoles and nystatine and significant Candida albicans proportion in all strains isolated from AIDS patients. Previous amphotericin B

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie M O'Brien

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT. Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836 and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836. CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively. Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic

  9. Roussel. Sinfonien Nr. 3 g-Moll op. 42 und Nr. 4 A-Dur op. 5, Neeme Järvi / Christoph Schlüren

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Schlüren, Christoph

    1995-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Roussel. Sinfonien Nr. 3 g-Moll op. 42 und Nr. 4 A-Dur op. 53, Bacchus et Ariane op. 43 (Zweite Orchestersuite). Sinfonietta für Streichorchester d-Moll op. 52. Detroit Symphony Orchester, N. Järvi". Chandos/Koch CD 7007(WD: 70'10") DDD

  10. A phenomenographic analysis of elementary teacher candidates' conceptions of geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Brian D.

    A phenomenographic analysis of elementary teacher candidates attending a large university in north Texas was conducted during the Spring and Fall of 2007. The research study was conducted in two phases with a total of 150 participants. Analysis of the data sought to describe the diversity of conceptions of geography as well as the diversity of conceptions of learning geography held by this participant group. Three conceptions of geography emerged from the data analysis. Two of the three conceptions represent a surface (or shallow) conception of geography and one conception was interpreted to be relational in nature. Four conceptions of learning of geography were found. One of these conceptions of learning geography represents the highest level of phenomenographic categorization: "growing or changing as a person or teacher." Overall the data suggests that the participants of the study have a more advanced understanding of pedagogy than of the content of geography. This apparent disconnect between the conceptions of the content of a subject and the conceptions of learning that subject has not been previously reported in the academic literature.

  11. Romania becomes a candidate for accession to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Romanian Minister Daniel Petru Funeriu, and CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer. On Thursday 11 February Romanian Minister of Education, Research, Youth and Sport, Daniel Petru Funeriu, and CERN Director-General, Rolf Heuer, signed an agreement that formally recognises Romania as a Candidate for Accession to membership of CERN. Romania’s pre-membership will cover a five-year period during which the country’s contributions will ramp up to normal Member State levels, in parallel with Romania's participation in CERN projects. At the end of this five-year period the Council will decide on Romania's application for full membership, as the Organization's 21st Member State. Romania entered into direct collaboration with CERN in the early 1990s. In recent years Romania has been constantly increasing its expenditure on R&D and this has been intensified since the country's accession to the EU in January 2007. Romania is involved in three LHC experiments, namely ATLAS, ALICE and LHCb . It al...

  12. Abundances of metal-weak thick-disc candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, P; Molaro, P

    1999-01-01

    High resolution spectra of 5 candidate metal-weak thick-disc stars suggested by Beers & Sommer-Larsen (1995) are analyzed to determine their chemical abundances. The low abundance of all the objects has been confirmed with metallicity reaching [Fe/H]=-2.9. However, for three objects, the astrometric data from the Hipparcos catalogue suggests they are true halo members. The remaining two, for which proper-motion data are not available, may have disc-like kinematics. It is therefore clear that it is useful to address properties of putative metal-weak thick-disc stars only if they possess full kinematic data. For CS 22894-19 the abundance pattern similar to those of typical halo stars is found, suggesting that chemical composition is not a useful discriminant between thick-disc and halo stars. CS 29529-12 is found to be C enhanced with [C/Fe]=+1.0; other chemical peculiarities involve the s process elements: [Sr/Fe]=-0.65 and [Ba/Fe]=+0.62, leading to a high [Ba/Sr] considerably larger than what is found in ...

  13. Afterpulse measurement for 8-inch candidate PMTs for LHAASO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Tang, Z.; Li, C.; Chen, H.; Zhang, Y.; Li, X.; Shao, M.; Sun, Y.; Zha, W.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-05-01

    An afterpulse occurs within a short time after the main pulse and cannot be directly distinguished from the true physical signals. In cosmic ray experiments, a large number of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are used, which means the occurrence of afterpulses leads to a significant background. Therefore, before PMTs are employed, their afterpulse characteristics need to be evaluated to make sure they perform as expected. To evaluate the impact of afterpulses, we investigate the afterpulses for the Hamamatsu PMT R5912 (a candidate of the WCDA and MD for LHAASO) using two different electronic testing systems. First, we measured the characteristics of afterpulses in detail using a frequency-tunable flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with a time window of up to 15 μ s after a laser signal. We measured the time delay with respect to the main pulse, the amplitude, and the rate of the afterpulse dependence, on the main signal amplitude and the applied high voltage. Second, we developed a system that uses a multi-hit time-to-digital converter (multi-hit TDC), which allows for much faster measurement of the afterpulse rates, in order to make it possible to test up to 5000 large-sized PMTs.

  14. Spectroscopy of Young Planetary Mass Candidates with Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Jayawardhana, R; Jayawardhana, Ray; Ivanov, Valentin D.

    2006-01-01

    It is now well established that many young brown dwarfs exhibit characteristics similar to classical T Tauri stars, including infrared excess from disks and emission lines related to accretion. Whether the same holds true for even lower mass objects, namely those near and below the Deuterium-burning limit, is an important question. Here we present optical spectra of six isolated planetary mass candidates in Chamaeleon II, Lupus I and Ophiuchus star-forming regions, recently identified by Allers and collaborators to harbor substantial mid-infrared excesses. Our spectra, from ESO's Very Large Telescope and New Technology Telescope, show that four of the targets have spectral types in the ~M9-L1 range, and three of those also exhibit H_alpha. Their luminosities are consistent with masses of ~5-15 M_{Jupiter} according to models of Chabrier, Baraffe and co-workers, thus placing these four objects among the lowest mass brown dwarfs known to be surrounded by circum-sub-stellar disks. Our findings bolster the idea t...

  15. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Current/voltage data was obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consists of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to fully evaluate this approach to corrosion screening. Corrosion test screening of candidates for the oxygen reduction electrode of the alkaline fuel cell was applied to two substances, the pyrochlore Pb2Ru2O6.5 and the spinel NiCo2O4. The substrate gold screen and a sample of the IFC Orbiter Pt-Au performance electrode were included as blanks. The pyrochlore data indicate relative stability, although nothing yet can be said about long term stability. The spinel was plainly unstable. For this type of testing to be validated, comparisons will have to be made with long term performance tests.

  16. Vitamin D Status in Monkey Candidates for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, S. B.; Wronski, T. J.; Koslovskeya, I.; Dotsenko, R.; Navidi, M.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In preparation for the Cosmos 2229 Biosatellite space flight experiments in Rhesus monkeys, we evaluated the status of vitamin D in animals of different origins: candidates for space flight raised in Moscow (IMBP) and animals housed at Ames Research Ctr. (ARC) for pilot studies. Diets at IMBP were natural foods found by analysis to contain 1.4% Ca, 2.8% P andmonkey chow with 0.9% Ca, 0.5% P and 6600 IU D3/kg. We measured body weights (BW), serum calcium (TCa), total protein (TP), phosphorus (Pi), alkaline phosphatase (AP), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) in 16 IMBP and 15 ARC male animals and indices of bone formation in cancellous bone obtained from iliac crest biopsy of 6 IMBP and 13 ARC animals. BW were the same in juveniles at IMBP as ARC although ARC monkeys were born a year later. Mean(1SD) TCa and TP were higher and 25D lower (1819 vs. 93+18 ng/ml,pmonkeys of the same BW (p<.05) Indices of bone formation were inversely related to 25D, not 1,25D. Of interest are similar 1,25D levels associated with a wide range of substrate and extensive osteoid in bone of D replete animals.

  17. Small molecule screen for candidate antimalarials targeting Plasmodium Kinesin-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqiong; Richard, Jessica; Kim, Sunyoung; Wojcik, Edward J

    2014-06-06

    Plasmodium falciparum and vivax are responsible for the majority of malaria infections worldwide, resulting in over a million deaths annually. Malaria parasites now show measured resistance to all currently utilized drugs. Novel antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. The Plasmodium Kinesin-5 mechanoenzyme is a suitable "next generation" target. Discovered via small molecule screen experiments, the human Kinesin-5 has multiple allosteric sites that are "druggable." One site in particular, unique in its sequence divergence across all homologs in the superfamily and even within the same family, exhibits exquisite drug specificity. We propose that Plasmodium Kinesin-5 shares this allosteric site and likewise can be targeted to uncover inhibitors with high specificity. To test this idea, we performed a screen for inhibitors selective for Plasmodium Kinesin-5 ATPase activity in parallel with human Kinesin-5. Our screen of nearly 2000 compounds successfully identified compounds that selectively inhibit both P. vivax and falciparum Kinesin-5 motor domains but, as anticipated, do not impact human Kinesin-5 activity. Of note is a candidate drug that did not biochemically compete with the ATP substrate for the conserved active site or disrupt the microtubule-binding site. Together, our experiments identified MMV666693 as a selective allosteric inhibitor of Plasmodium Kinesin-5; this is the first identified protein target for the Medicines of Malaria Venture validated collection of parasite proliferation inhibitors. This work demonstrates that chemical screens against human kinesins are adaptable to homologs in disease organisms and, as such, extendable to strategies to combat infectious disease.

  18. Is mortalin a candidate gene for T1DM ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Jesper; Pie, Angeles; Karlsen, Allan Ertmann; Larsen, Zenia Marian; Jensen, Allan; Vissing, Henrik; Kristiansen, Ole Peter; Pociot, Flemming; Nerup, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Mortalin has been found to be up-regulated by 2D-protein gel analysis in isolated rodent islets exposed to cytokines. In islets from two rat strains with different sensitivity to the toxic effects of cytokines we observed a significant difference in IL-1beta mediated mortalin expression. Constitutive over-expression of rat mortalin in NIH3T3 cells reduced cellular survival in accordance with mortalin being associated to cellular senescence. Hence we consider the gene encoding for mortalin at chromosome 5q31.1 a putative candidate gene in cytokine induced beta-cell destruction. We scanned the human mortalin gene for polymorphisms and identified three novel polymorphisms. Neither the SNPs individually nor as constructed haplotypes showed disease association tested by (E)TDT in a Danish type 1 diabetes (T1DM) population. Furthermore, we tested the D5S500 microsatelite located close to 5q31.1 without finding linkage to (T1DM). In conclusion, the functional data identifying a difference in mortalin expression in IL-1beta stimulated islets between two rat strains and over-expression of mortalin in NIH3T3 cells associated with decreased viability suggests a functional role for mortalin in cytokine mediated beta cell destruction; however, the identified polymorphisms did not reveal any association in the presence of linkage disequilibrium of mortalin to T1DM in the Danish population.

  19. New Candidate Eruptive Young Stars in Lynds 1340

    CERN Document Server

    Kun, M; O'Linger-Luscusk, J; Moór, A; Stecklum, B; Szegedi-Elek, E; Wolf-Chase, G

    2014-01-01

    We report on the discovery of three candidate eruptive young stars, found during our comprehensive multi-wavelength study of the young stellar population of the dark cloud L1340. These stars are as follows. (1) IRAS~02224+7227 (2MASS 02270555+7241167, HH 487 S) exhibited FUor-like spectrum in our low-resolution optical spectra. The available photometric data restrict its luminosity to 23 L_sun < L_bol < 59 L_sun. (2) 2MASS 02263797+7304575, identified as a classical T Tauri star during our H alpha survey, exhibited an EXor type brightening in 2005 November, at the time of the SDSS observations of the region. (3) 2MASS 02325605+7246055, a low-mass embedded young star, associated with a fan-shaped infrared nebula, underwent an outburst between the DSS1 and DSS2 surveys, leading to the appearance of a faint optical nebula. Our [SII] and H alpha images, as well as the Spitzer IRAC 4.5 micron images revealed Herbig-Haro objects associated with this star. Our results suggest that amplitudes and time scales of...

  20. RXTE and XMM observations of intermediate polar candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Butters, O W; Mukai, K; Tomsick, J A

    2010-01-01

    Aims. To determine the credentials of nine candidate intermediate polars in order to confirm whether or not they are magnetic cataclysmic variables. Methods. Frequency analysis of RXTE and XMM data was used to search for temporal variations which could be associated with the spin period of the magnetic white dwarf. X-ray spectral analysis was carried out to characterise the emission and absorption properties of each target. Results. The hard X-ray light curve of V2069 Cyg shows a pulse period of 743.2 s, and its spectrum is fit by an absorbed bremsstrahlung model with an iron line, confirming this to be a genuine intermediate polar. The hard X-ray light curve of the previously confirmed intermediate polar IGR J00234+6141 is shown to be consistent with the previous low energy X-ray detection of a 563.5 s pulse period. The likely polar IGR J14536-5522 shows no coherent modulation at the previously identified period of 3.1 hr, but does exhibit a clear signal at periods likely to be harmonically related to it. Wh...

  1. Identification of Schistosoma mansoni candidate antigens for diagnosis of schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardenia Braz Figueiredo Carvalho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a more sensitive diagnostic test for schistosomiasis is needed to overcome the limitations of the use of stool examination in low endemic areas. Using parasite antigens in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay is a promising strategy, however a more rational selection of parasite antigens is necessary. In this study we performed in silico analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome, using SchistoDB database and bioinformatic tools for screening immunogenic antigens. Based on evidence of expression in all parasite life stage within the definitive host, extracellular or plasmatic membrane localization, low similarity to human and other helminthic proteins and presence of predicted B cell epitopes, six candidates were selected: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored 200 kDa protein, two putative cytochrome oxidase subunits, two expressed proteins and one hypothetical protein. The recognition in unidimensional and bidimensional Western blot of protein with similar molecular weight and isoelectric point to the selected antigens by sera from S. mansoni infected mice indicate a good correlation between these two approaches in selecting immunogenic proteins.

  2. Measurements of Stellar Inclinations for Kepler Planet Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Takeda, Yoichi; Narita, Norio; Winn, Joshua N; Taruya, Atsushi; Suto, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period $P_s$ inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity $V\\sin I_s$ and stellar radius obtained by a high resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination $I_s$ of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line-of-sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination $I_s$ can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 KOI systems, whose lightcurves show periodic flux variations. After detailed analyses of their lightcurves and spectra, it turned out that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, probably representing ellipsoidal variations, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations $I_s$ for eight systems. Am...

  3. Gamma-Ray Spectral States of Galactic Black Hole Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Grove, J E; Kroeger, R A; McNaron-Brown, K; Skibo, J G; Phlips, B F

    1998-01-01

    OSSE has observed seven transient black hole candidates: GRO J0422+32, GX339-4, GRS 1716-249, GRS 1009-45, 4U 1543-47, GRO J1655-40, and GRS 1915+105. Two gamma-ray spectral states are evident and, based on a limited number of contemporaneous X-ray and gamma-ray observations, these states appear to be correlated with X-ray states. The former three objects show hard spectra below 100 keV (photon number indices Gamma < 2) that are exponentially cut off with folding energy ~100 keV, a spectral form that is consistent with thermal Comptonization. This "breaking gamma-ray state" is the high-energy extension of the X-ray low, hard state. In this state, the majority of the luminosity is above the X-ray band, carried by photons of energy ~100 keV. The latter four objects exhibit a "power-law gamma-ray state" with a relatively soft spectral index (Gamma ~ 2.5-3) and no evidence for a spectral break. For GRO J1655-40, the lower limit on the break energy is 690 keV. GRS 1716-249 exhibits both spectral states, with th...

  4. Assessment of candidate plant DNA barcodes using the Rutaceae family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a rapidly developing frontier technology that is gaining worldwide attention.Here,seven regions (psbA-trnH,matK,ycf5,rpoC1,rbcL,ITS2,and ITS) with potential for use as DNA barcodes were tested for their ability to identify 300 samples of 192 species from 72 genera of the family Rutaceae.To evaluate each barcode’s utility for species authentication,PCR amplification efficiency,genetic divergence,and barcoding gaps were assessed.We found that the ITS2 region exhibited the highest inter-specific divergence,and that this was significantly higher than the intra-specific variation in the "DNA barcoding gap" assessment and Wilcoxon two-sample tests.The ITS2 locus had the highest identification efficiency among all tested regions.In a previous study,we found that ITS2 was able to discriminate a wide range of plant taxa,and here we confirmed that ITS2 was also able to discriminate a number of closely related species.Therefore,we propose that ITS2 is a promising candidate barcode for plant species identification.

  5. Photometry of some neglected bright cataclysmic variables and candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Bruch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    As part of an effort to better characterize bright cataclysmic variables (CVs) which have received little attention in the past light curves of four confirmed systems (CZ Aql, BO Cet, V380 Oph and EF Tuc) and one candidate (Lib 3) are analyzed. For none of these stars time resolved photometry has been published previously. While no variability was found in the case of Lib 3, which thus cannot be confirmed as a CV, the light curves of all other targets are dominated by strong flickering. Modulations on hourly time scales superimposed on the flickering can probably be related to orbital variations in BO Cet and V380 Oph, but not in CZ Aql and EF Tuc. Variations on the time scale of 10 minutes in CZ Aql, while not yet constituting convincing evidence, together with previous suspicions of a magnetically channeled accretion flow may point at an intermediate polar nature of this star. Some properties of the flickering are quantified in an effort to enlarge the data base for future comparative flickering studies in ...

  6. Structure and kinematics of candidate double-barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, A V; Chavushyan, V H

    2003-01-01

    Results of optical and NIR spectral and photometric observations of a sample of candidate double-barred galaxies are presented. Velocity fields and velocity dispersion maps of stars and ionized gas, continuum and emission-line images were constructed from integral-field spectroscopy observations carried out at the 6m telescope (BTA) of SAO RAS, with the MPFS spectrograph and the scanning Fabry-Perot Interferometer. NGC2681 was also observed with long-slit spectrograph of the BTA. Optical and NIR images were obtained at the BTA and at the 2.1m telescope (OAN, M\\'exico). High-resolution images were retrieved from the HST data archive. Morphological and kinematic features of all 13 sample objects are described in detail. Attention is focused on the interpretation of observed non-circular motions of gas and stars in circumnuclear (one kiloparsec- scale) regions. We have shown first of all that these motions are caused by a gravitational potential of large-scale bar. NGC3368 and NGC3786 have nuclear bars only, the...

  7. High-Resolution Observations of a Binary Black Hole Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Jarrett, Thomas; Emonts, Bjorn; Cluver, Michelle; Eisenhardt, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    We propose a 12-hour 2.3 GHz continuum Long Baseline Array (LBA) observation of WISE J2332-5056, a newly discovered supermassive black hole (SMBH) merger candidate that is located in the nearby universe (z = 0.3447). Our recently acquired 9 GHz ATCA map shows unusual radio morphology: a one-sided, smaller (and likely younger) FR-I jet perpendicular to a larger, Doppler-boosted FR-II jet. Follow-up Gemini-S/GMOS spectroscopy of this WISE-selected radio galaxy reveals broad emission lines blue-shifted by > 3,500 km/s with respect to the narrow lines and host galaxy, hallmarks of a dual AGN system. Combined, the optical spectroscopy and radio morphology of this object are strongly suggestive of a black hole merger system. Even in the local universe these systems are extremely difficult to identify; yet the process of supermassive blackhole growth is vital toward understanding galaxy evolution from the early to the current universe. Moreover, nearby merging SMBHs may serve as outstanding targets for gravitational wave studies. The proposed high resolution LBA map, reaching 50 pc resolution at the source redshift will allow us to investigate the SMBH merger scenario hypothesis.

  8. Identification of a candidate stem cell in human gallbladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Rohan; Li, Yaming; Fohrer, Helene; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Chandran, Uma R; LaFramboise, William A; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no reports of identification of stem cells in human gallbladder. The differences between human gallbladder and intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) cells have also not been explored. The goals of this study were to evaluate if human fetal gallbladder contains a candidate stem cell population and if fetal gallbladder cells are distinct from fetal IHBD cells. We found that EpCAM+CD44+CD13+ cells represent the cell population most enriched for clonal self-renewal from primary gallbladder. Primary EpCAM+CD44+CD13+ cells gave rise to EpCAM+CD44+CD13+ and EpCAM+CD44+CD13- cells in vitro, and gallbladder cells expanded in vitro exhibited short-term engraftment in vivo. Last, we found that CD13, CD227, CD66, CD26 and CD49b were differentially expressed between gallbladder and IHBD cells cultured in vitro indicating clear phenotypic differences between the two cell populations. Microarray analyses of expanded cultures confirmed that both cell types have unique transcriptional profiles with predicted functional differences in lipid, carbohydrate, nucleic acid and drug metabolism. In conclusion, we have isolated a distinct clonogenic population of epithelial cells from primary human fetal gallbladder with stem cell characteristics and found it to be unique compared to IHBD cells.

  9. Assessment of candidate plant DNA barcodes using the Rutaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Chen, ShiLin; Chen, KeLi; Song, JingYuan; Yao, Hui; Ma, XinYe; Zhu, YingJie; Pang, XiaoHui; Yu, Hua; Li, XiWen; Liu, Zhen

    2010-06-01

    DNA barcoding is a rapidly developing frontier technology that is gaining worldwide attention. Here, seven regions (psbA-trnH, matK, ycf5, rpoC1, rbcL, ITS2, and ITS) with potential for use as DNA barcodes were tested for their ability to identify 300 samples of 192 species from 72 genera of the family Rutaceae. To evaluate each barcode's utility for species authentication, PCR amplification efficiency, genetic divergence, and barcoding gaps were assessed. We found that the ITS2 region exhibited the highest inter-specific divergence, and that this was significantly higher than the intra-specific variation in the "DNA barcoding gap" assessment and Wilcoxon two-sample tests. The ITS2 locus had the highest identification efficiency among all tested regions. In a previous study, we found that ITS2 was able to discriminate a wide range of plant taxa, and here we confirmed that ITS2 was also able to discriminate a number of closely related species. Therefore, we propose that ITS2 is a promising candidate barcode for plant species identification.

  10. Torsion as a Dark Matter Candidate from the Higgs Portal

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Alexander S; Thomas, Marc C

    2016-01-01

    Torsion is a metric-independent component of gravitation, which may provide a more general geometry than the one taking place within general relativity. On the other hand torsion could lead to interesting phenomenology in both particle physics and cosmology. In the present work it is shown that a torsion field interacting with the SM Higgs doublet and having a negligible coupling to SM fermions is protected from decaying by a $Z_2$ symmetry, and therefore becomes a promising Dark Matter (DM) candidate. In order to check the consistency of this scenario we evaluate the DM relic density and explore direct DM detection and collider constraints on this model. It turns out that in the model when the Higgs boson is only partly responsible for the generation of torsion mass, there is a region of parameter space where torsion contributes 100% to the DM budget of the Universe. Furthermore, we show that the LHC currently has a limited sensitivity to the torsion parameter space via mono-jet signature and will be able to...

  11. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management in Prerenal Transplantation Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Eric M; Hall, Amanda K; Hess, Jordan; Abraham, Jo; Smith, Brigham; Hopkins, Paul N; Shihab, Fuad; Welt, Frederick; Owan, Theophilus; Fang, James C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) assessment in prerenal transplant patients varies by center. Current guidelines recommend stress testing for candidates if ≥ 3 CV risk factors exist. We evaluated the CV assessment and management in 685 patients referred for kidney transplant over a 7-year period. All patients had CV risk factors, and the most common cause of end-stage renal disease was diabetes. Thirty-three percent (n = 229) underwent coronary angiography. The sensitivity of stress testing to detect obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) was poor (0.26). Patients who had no CAD, nonobstructive CAD, or CAD with intervention had significantly higher event-free survival compared with patients with obstructive CAD without intervention. There were no adverse clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, stroke, revascularization, and graft failure) within 30 days post-transplant in patients who had preoperative angiography (n = 77). Of the transplanted patients who did not have an angiogram (n = 289), there were 8 clinical events (6 myocardial infarctions) in the first 30 days. In conclusion, our results indicate that stress testing and usual risk factors were poor predictors of obstructive CAD and that revascularization may prove beneficial in these patients.

  12. Cystatin C: a candidate biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E Wilson

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurologic disease characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration. Clinical disease management is hindered by both a lengthy diagnostic process and the absence of effective treatments. Reliable panels of diagnostic, surrogate, and prognostic biomarkers are needed to accelerate disease diagnosis and expedite drug development. The cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C has recently gained interest as a candidate diagnostic biomarker for ALS, but further studies are required to fully characterize its biomarker utility. We used quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to assess initial and longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma cystatin C levels in 104 ALS patients and controls. Cystatin C levels in ALS patients were significantly elevated in plasma and reduced in CSF compared to healthy controls, but did not differ significantly from neurologic disease controls. In addition, the direction of longitudinal change in CSF cystatin C levels correlated to the rate of ALS disease progression, and initial CSF cystatin C levels were predictive of patient survival, suggesting that cystatin C may function as a surrogate marker of disease progression and survival. These data verify prior results for reduced cystatin C levels in the CSF of ALS patients, identify increased cystatin C levels in the plasma of ALS patients, and reveal correlations between CSF cystatin C levels to both ALS disease progression and patient survival.

  13. A Lyman Break Galaxy Candidate at z~9

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, Alaina L; Colbert, James W; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I; McCarthy, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a z~9 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) candidate, selected from the NICMOS Parallel Imaging Survey as a J-dropout with J110 - H160 = 1.7. Spitzer/IRAC photometry reveals that the galaxy has a blue H160 - 3.6 um color, and a spectral break between 3.6 and 4.5 um. We interpret this break as the Balmer break, and derive a best-fit photometric redshift of z~9. We use Monte Carlo simulations to test the significance of this photometric redshift, and show a 96% probability of z>7. We estimate a lower limit to the comoving number density of such galaxies at z~9 of phi > 3.8 x 10^{-6} Mpc^{-3}. If the high redshift of this galaxy is confirmed, this will indicate that the luminous end of the rest-frame UV luminosity function has not evolved substantially from z~ 9 to z~3. Still, some small degeneracy remains between this z~9 model and models at z~2-3; deep optical imaging (reaching I ~ 29 AB) can rule out the lower-z models.

  14. Monoclonal antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics.

  15. Candidate antibody-based therapeutics against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-06-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics have been successfully used for the treatment of various diseases and as research tools. Several well characterized, broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs) targeting HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins or related host cell surface proteins show sterilizing protection of animals, but they are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection in humans. Recently, a number of novel bnmAbs, engineered antibody domains (eAds), and multifunctional fusion proteins have been reported which exhibit exceptionally potent and broad neutralizing activity against a wide range of HIV-1 isolates from diverse genetic subtypes. eAds could be more effective in vivo than conventional full-size antibodies generated by the human immune system. Because of their small size (12∼15 kD), they can better access sterically restricted epitopes and penetrate densely packed tissue where HIV-1 replicates than the larger full-size antibodies. HIV-1 possesses a number of mechanisms to escape neutralization by full-size antibodies but could be less likely to develop resistance to eAds. Here, we review the in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacies of existing HIV-1 bnmAbs, summarize the development of eAds and multispecific fusion proteins as novel types of HIV-1 inhibitors, and discuss possible strategies to generate more potent antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV-1, including some that could be used to eradicate the virus.

  16. Testing of Candidate Icons to Identify Acetaminophen-Containing Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Shiffman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding icons on labels of acetaminophen-containing medicines could help users identify the active ingredient and avoid concomitant use of multiple medicines containing acetaminophen. We evaluated five icons for communication effectiveness. Adults (n = 300 were randomized to view a prescription container label or over-the-counter labels with either one or two icons. Participants saw two icon candidates, and reported their interpretation; experts judged whether these reflected critical confusions that might cause harm. Participants rated how effectively each icon communicated key messages. Icons based on abbreviations of “acetaminophen” (“Ac”, “Ace”, “Acm” were rated less confusing and more effective in communicating the active ingredient than icons based on “APAP” or an abstract symbol. Icons did not result in critical confusion when seen on a readable medicine label. Icon implementation on prescription labels was more effective at communicating the warning against concomitant use than implementation on over-the-counter (OTC labels. Adding an icon to a second location on OTC labels did not consistently enhance this communication, but reduced rated effectiveness of acetaminophen ingredient communication among participants with limited health literacy. The abbreviation-based icons seem most suitable for labeling acetaminophen-containing medications to enable users to identify acetaminophen-containing products.

  17. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  18. In silico Analysis of Candidate Genes Involved in Sanfilippo Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Zaka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sanfilippo syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, caused by the deficiency of enzymes that play an important role in degradation of glycosaminoglycans and also called mucopolysaccharidosis III. Mucopolysaccharidosis is genetic disorder. Here, we searched the candidate genes for Sanfilippo syndrome by using BLAST with the query sequence. As no suitable homology was found against the query sequence we moved towards threading approach. The threading approach was carried out by employing online CPH models and LOMETS tools. Through present research, domains of the proteins were predicted by utilizing the Domain Sweep tools, GNS and two domains were reported. Motif search reported the maximum number of motifs for Type D protein as compared to other types. All four proteins were totally soluble proteins and no transmembrane domains were found. In future, these results and predicted 3D structures can be used for the molecular docking studies, binding activities and protein-protein interactions for all the four types of Sanfilippo syndrome.

  19. Critiquing bachelor candidates' theses: are the criteria useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapborg, I; Berterö, C

    2002-06-01

    Nursing education programmes should be at an academic level and connected to research. In Sweden, empirical studies are generally required in order to obtain a Bachelor's degree; hence, in some cases, these studies are replaced by a literature review. A study was conducted using 11 criteria. Thirteen theses produced in a department of nursing science were examined, elaborated and reproduced by reviewing international and national literature. Thereafter, the criteria themselves were scrutinized. Principal findings when critiquing the theses were that in eight theses the purpose was dearly identified and well defined in relation to the study accomplished; in three theses the purpose was indistinct and vague; and in two the definitions and research questions were lacking. The topic was relevant for the area of nursing in all theses. General problems identified were poor spelling and grammar, and unsatisfactory thesis structure. This article discusses whether criteria are useful when examining the Bachelor candidates' theses. The authors report that the criteria seemed to be useful, giving some guidance for scrutinizing theses and facilitating correspondence. Criteria could be appropriate guidelines for using to increase the quality of the theses as well as the quality of nursing.

  20. Humans Need Not Apply: Robotization of Kepler Planet Candidate Vetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Kepler Team

    2015-01-01

    Until now, the vast majority of Kepler planet candidate vetting has been performed by a dedicated team of humans. While human expertise has been invaluable in understanding the nuances of Kepler data, human vetting is very time-consuming and can be inconsistent. Over 20,000 threshold crossing events have been produced by the latest pipeline run on all 17 quarters of Kepler mission data, and many more artificial planet transits have been injected to estimate completeness. Given these large numbers, human vetting is no longer feasible on a reasonable time-scale, and would be difficult to characterize. We have created automated vetting programs known as "robovetters" that are specifically designed to mimic the decision-making process employed by the humans. They analyze both the light curve and pixel-level data in order to produce specific reasons for identifying false positives. We present benchmark tests on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet catalog, which was vetted by humans, and present preliminary robovetter results based on a recent transit-search of the newly reprocessed Q1-Q17 data set.

  1. A Candidate M31/M32 Intergalactic Microlensing Event

    CERN Document Server

    Paulin-Henriksson, S; Bouquet, A; Carr, B J; Creze, M; Evans, N W; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gould, A; Hewett, P C; Kaplan, J; Kerins, E; Le Du, Y; Melchior, A L; Smartt, S J; Valls-Gabaud, D

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery of a microlensing candidate projected 2'54" from the center of M32, on the side closest to M31. The blue color (R-I= 0.00 +/- 0.14) of the source argues strongly that it lies in the disk of M31, while the proximity of the line of sight to M32 implies that this galaxy is the most likely host of the lens. If this interpretation is correct, it would confirm previous arguments that M32 lies in front of M31. We estimate that of order one such event or less should be present in the POINT-AGAPE data base. If more events are discovered in this direction in a dedicated experiment, they could be used to measure the mass function of M32 up to an unknown scale factor. By combining microlensing observations of a binary-lens event with a measurement of the M31-M32 relative proper motion using the astrometric satellites SIM or GAIA, it will be possible to measure the physical separation of M31 and M32, the last of the six phase-space coordinates needed to assign M32 an orbit.

  2. A young hierarchical triple system harbouring a candidate debris disc

    CERN Document Server

    Deacon, N R; Olofsson, J; Johnston, K G; Henning, Th

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of a wide young hierarchical triple system where the primary has a candidate debris disc. The primary, TYC 5241-986-1 A, is a known Tycho star which we classify as a late-K star with emission in the X-ray, near and far-UV and H\\alpha\\ suggestive of youth. Its proper motion, photometric distance (65-105 pc) and radial velocity lead us to associate the system with the broadly defined Local Association of young stars but not specifically with any young moving group. The presence of weak lithium absorption and X-ray and calcium H and K emission support an age in the 20 to ~125 Myr range. The secondary is a pair of M4.5+-0.5 dwarfs with near and far UV and H\\alpha\\ emission separated by approximately 1 arcsec (~65-105 AU projected separation) which lie 145 arcsec (9200-15200 AU) from the primary. The primary has a WISE 22 micron excess and follow-up Herschel observations also detect an excess at 70 micron. The excess emissions are indicative of a 100-175 K debris disc. We also explore the p...

  3. Long-term Spectroscopic Monitoring of LBVs and LBV Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Lobel, A; Torres, K; Gorlova, N

    2010-01-01

    We present results of a long-term spectroscopic monitoring program (since mid 2009) of Luminous Blue Variables with the new HERMES echelle spectrograph on the 1.2 m Mercator telescope at La Palma (Spain). We investigate high-resolution (R=80,000) optical spectra of two LBVs, P Cyg and HD 168607, the LBV candidates MWC 930 and HD 168625, and the LBV binary MWC 314. In P Cyg we observe flux changes in the violet wings of the Balmer H{\\alpha}, H{\\beta}, and He I lines between May and Sep 2009. The changes around 200 km/s to 300 km/s are caused by variable opacity at the base of the supersonic wind from the blue supergiant. We observe in MWC 314 broad double-peaked metal emission lines with invariable radial velocities over time. On the other hand, we measure in the photospheric S II {\\lambda}5647 absorption line, with lower excitation energy of ~14 eV, an increase of the heliocentric radial velocity centroid from 37 km/s to 70 km/s between 5 and 10 Sep 2009 (and 43 km/s on 6 Apr 2010). The increase of radial vel...

  4. Assessment of the candidate markets for liquid boiler fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    Liquid fuels can be produced from coal in a number of indirect and direct liquefaction processes. While indirect coal liquefaction has been proved commercially outside the United States, most attention in this country has focused on the direct liquefaction processes, which include the processes under examination in this report; namely, the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), the H-Coal, and the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) II processes. The objectives of the study were to: compare the boiler fuels of direct coal liquefaction with residual fuel oil (No. 6 fuel oil) including physical characteristics and environmental hazards, such as carcinogenic characteristics and toxic hazard characteristics; determine whether a boiler fuel market would exist for the coal liquefaction products given their physical characteristics and potential environmental hazards; determine the advantages of utilizing methanol as a boiler fuel on a continuous basis in commercial boilers utilizing existing technology; identify the potential regional candidate markets for direct coal liquefaction products as liquid boiler fuels; determine the distributing and handling costs associated with marketing coal liquefaction products as liquid boiler fuels; determine the current regulatory issues associated with the marketing of coal liquefaction products as boiler fuels; and determine and evaluate other institutional issues associated with the marketing of direct coal liquefaction products as boiler fuels.

  5. Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars are Preferentially Metal Rich

    CERN Document Server

    Schlaufman, Kevin C

    2011-01-01

    We find that Kepler exoplanet candidate (EC) host stars are preferentially metal-rich, including the low-mass stellar hosts of small-radius ECs. The last observation confirms a tentative hint that there is a correlation between the metallicity of low-mass stars and the presence of low-mass and small-radius exoplanets. In particular, we compare the J-H--g-r color-color distribution of Kepler EC host stars with a control sample of dwarf stars selected from the ~150,000 stars observed during Q1 and Q2 of the Kepler mission but with no detected planets. We find that at J-H = 0.30 characteristic of solar-type stars, the average g-r color of stars that host giant ECs is 4-sigma redder than the average color of the stars in the control sample. At the same time, the average g-r color of solar-type stars that host small-radius ECs is indistinguishable from the average color of the stars in the control sample. In addition, we find that at J-H = 0.62 indicative of late K dwarfs, the average g-r color of stars that host ...

  6. Ascaris suum enolase is a potential vaccine candidate against ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Xiu-Xiang; Zhang, Yan-Zhong; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Chao; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-05-14

    Ascariasis caused by Ascaris is the most common parasite problem in humans and pigs worldwide. No vaccines are available for the prevention of Ascaris infections. In the present study, the gene encoding Ascaris suum enolase (As-enol-1) was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Amino acid sequence alignment indicated that As-enol-1 was highly conserved between different nematodes and shared the highest identity (87%) with enolase from Anisakis simplex s.l. The recombinant pVAX-Enol was successfully expressed in Marc-145 cells. The ability of the pVAX-Enol for inducing immune protective responses against challenge infection with A. suum L3 was evaluated in Kunming mice. The immune response was evaluated by lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and antibody measurements, and the reduction rate of recovery larvae. The results showed that the mice immunized with pVAX-Enol developed a high level of specific antibody responses against A. suum, a strong lymphoproliferative response, and significant levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 production, compared with the other groups immunized with empty plasmid or blank controls, respectively. There was a 61.13% reduction (P<0.05) in larvae recovery compared with that in the blank control group. Our data indicated that A. suum enolase is a potential vaccine candidate against A. suum infection.

  7. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  8. Models with radiative neutrino masses and viable dark matter candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Restrepo, Diego; Yaguna, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We provide a list of particle physics models at the TeV-scale that are compatible with neutrino masses and dark matter. In these models, the Standard Model particle content is extended with a small number (\\leq 4) of scalar and fermion fields transforming as singlets, doublets or triplets under SU(2), and neutrino masses are generated radiatively via 1-loop diagrams. The dark matter candidates are stabilized by a Z_2 symmetry and are in general mixtures of the neutral components of such new multiplets. We describe the particle content of each of these models and determine the conditions under which they are consistent with current data. We find a total of 35 viable models, most of which have not been previously studied in the literature. There is a great potential to test these models at the LHC not only due to the TeV-scale masses of the new fields but also because about half of the viable models contain particles with exotic electric charges, which give rise to background-free signals. Our results should se...

  9. Extreme BL Lacs: probes for cosmology and UHECR candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Tavecchio, F

    2015-01-01

    High-energy observations of extreme BL Lac objects, such as 1ES0229+200 or 1ES 0347-121, recently focused interest both for blazar and jet physics and for the implication on the extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic field estimate. Moreover, their enigmatic properties have been interpreted in a scenario in which their primary high- energy output is through a beam of high-energy hadrons. However, despite their possible important role in all these topics, the number of these extreme highly peaked BL Lac objects (EHBL) is still rather small. Aiming at increase their number, we selected a group of EHBL candidates considering those undetected (or only barely detected) by the LAT onboard Fermi and characterized by a high X-ray versus radio flux ratio. We assembled the multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution of the resulting 9 sources, using available archival data of Swift, GALEX, and Fermi satellites, confirming their nature. Through a simple one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model we est...

  10. Evidence For Intrinsic Magnetic Moments in Black Hole Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, S L; Robertson, Stanley L.; Leiter, Darryl J.

    2002-01-01

    We show that the power law part of the quiescent x-ray emissions of neutron stars in low mass x-ray binaries is magnetospheric in origin. It can be very accurately calculated from rates of spin and the $\\sim 10^{3 - 4}$ times brighter luminosity at the transition to the hard spectral state. We establish that the spectral state transition for neutron stars is a magnetospheric propeller effect. We test the hypothesis that the similar spectral state switches and quiescent power law emissions of the black hole candidates might be magnetospheric effects. In the process we derive proposed magnetic moments and rates of spin for them and accurately predict their quiescent luminosities. We discuss other tests of the hypothesis and consider some attractive aspects of a unified magnetospheric model for low mass x-ray binaries. We also consider some of the changes that would be needed for strong-field gravity theories to accomodate intrinsic magnetic moments in collapsed objects.

  11. Immunodiagnosis of porcine cysticercosis: identification of candidate antigens through immunoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Masmela, Yuliet; Fragoso, Gladis; Ambrosio, Javier R; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rosas, Gabriela; Estrada, Karel; Carrero, Julio César; Sciutto, Edda; Laclette, Juan P; Bobes, Raúl J

    2013-12-01

    Cysticercosis, caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium, is a zoonotic disease affecting pigs and humans that is endemic to developing countries in Latin America, Africa and South East Asia. The prevalence of infection in pigs, the intermediate host for T. solium, has been used as an indicator for monitoring disease transmission in endemic areas. However, accurate and specific diagnostic tools for porcine cysticercosis remain to be established. Using proteomic approaches and the T. solium genome sequence, seven antigens were identified as specific for porcine cysticercosis, namely, tropomyosin 2, alpha-1 tubulin, beta-tubulin 2, annexin B1, small heat-shock protein, 14-3-3 protein, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. None of these proteins were cross-reactive when tested with sera from pigs infected with Ascaris spp., Cysticercus tenuicollis and hydatid cysts of Echinococcus spp. or with serum from a Taenia saginata-infected cow. Comparison with orthologues, indicated that the amino acid sequences of annexin B1 and cAMP-dependent protein kinase possessed highly specific regions, which might make them suitable candidates for development of a specific diagnostic assay for porcine cysticercosis.

  12. Identification of Novel Vaccine Candidates against Campylobacter through Reverse Vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Meunier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union. Human cases are mainly due to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli, and contamination is associated with the handling and/or consumption of poultry meat. In fact, poultry constitutes the bacteria’s main reservoir. A promising way of decreasing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans would be to decrease avian colonization. Poultry vaccination is of potential for this purpose. However, despite many studies, there is currently no vaccine available on the market to reduce the intestinal Campylobacter load in chickens. It is essential to identify and characterize new vaccine antigens. This study applied the reverse vaccinology approach to detect new vaccine candidates. The main criteria used to select immune proteins were localization, antigenicity, and number of B-epitopes. Fourteen proteins were identified as potential vaccine antigens. In vitro and in vivo experiments now need to be performed to validate the immune and protective power of these newly identified antigens.

  13. Pre-Spectroscopic False Positive Elimination of Kepler Planet Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Batalha, N M; Gilliland, R L; Jenkins, J J; Caldwell, D A; Borucki, W J; Koch, D G; Lissauer, J J; Dunham, E W; Gautier, T N; Howell, S B; Latham, D W; Marcy, G W; Prsa, A

    2010-01-01

    Ten days of commissioning data (Quarter 0) and thirty-three days of science data (Quarter 1) yield instrumental flux timeseries of ~150,000 stars that were combed for transit events, termed Threshold Crossing Events (TCE), each having a total detection statistic above 7.1-sigma. TCE light curves are modeled as star+planet systems. Those returning a companion radius smaller than 2R_J are assigned a KOI (Kepler Object of Interest) number. The raw flux, pixel flux, and flux-weighted centroids of every KOI are scrutinized to assess the likelihood of being an astrophysical false-positive versus the likelihood of a being a planetary companion. This vetting using Kepler data is referred to as data validation. Herein, we describe the data validation metrics and graphics used to identify viable planet candidates amongst the KOIs. Light curve modeling tests for a) the difference in depth of the odd- versus even-numbered transits, b) evidence of ellipsoidal variations, and c) evidence of a secondary eclipse event at pha...

  14. Tyrosine aminotransferase from Leishmania infantum: A new drug target candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin. The disease is fatal without treatment, which has been based on antimonial pentavalents for more than 60 years. Due to resistances, relapses and toxicity to current treatment, the development of new drugs is required. The structure of the L. infantum tyrosine aminotransferase (LiTAT has been recently solved showing important differences with the mammalian orthologue. The characterization of LiTAT is reported herein. This enzyme is cytoplasmic and is over-expressed in the more infective stages and nitric oxide resistant parasites. Unlike the mammalian TAT, LiTAT is able to use ketomethiobutyrate as co-substrate. The pharmacophore model of LiTAT with this specific co-substrate is described herein. This may allow the identification of new inhibitors present in the databases. All the data obtained support that LiTAT is a good target candidate for the development of new anti-leishmanial drugs.

  15. Candidate Endophenotypes for Genetic Studies of Suicidal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J. John; Arango, Victoria A.; Avenevoli, Shelli; Brent, David A.; Champagne, Frances A.; Clayton, Paula; Currier, Dianne; Dougherty, Donald M.; Haghighi, Fatemah; Hodge, Susan E.; Kleinman, Joel; Lehner, Thomas; McMahon, Francis; Mościcki, Eve K.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Pandey, Ganshayam N.; Pearson, Jane; Stanley, Barbara; Terwilliger, Joseph; Wenzel, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Twin, adoption, and family studies have established the heritability of suicide attempts and suicide. Identifying specific suicide diathesis-related genes has proven more difficult. As with psychiatric disorders in general, methodological difficulties include complexity of the phenotype for suicidal behavior and distinguishing suicide diathesis-related genes from genes associated with mood disorders and other suicide-associated psychiatric illness. Adopting an endophenotype approach involving identification of genes associated with heritable intermediate phenotypes, including biological and/or behavioral markers more proximal to genes, is an approach being used for other psychiatric disorders. Therefore, a workshop convened by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University, and the National Institute of Mental Health sought to identify potential target endophenotypes for genetic studies of suicidal behavior. The most promising endophenotypes were trait aggression/impulsivity, early-onset major depression, neurocognitive function, and cortisol social stress response. Other candidate endophenotypes requiring further investigation include serotonergic neurotransmission, second messenger systems, and borderline personality disorder traits. PMID:19201395

  16. Factors influencing Turkish teacher candidates' elective course preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Uçgun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available By the Academic Year of 2006-2007, new curriculum has been begun to be applied in the Faculties of Education. When it is evaluated in terms of Turkish Language Teacher Training Departments, it is seen that the most attractive changes are the abolition of Side Branch application, the increase in the number of the courses which will contribute to teacher candidates’ profession and the enrichment in the content. In the curriculum are 5 elective courses beside necessary ones. The aim of this study is to determine what and how much effects the Turkish Language Teacher Candidates as they decide on the courses mentioned above. In the study, based on scanning method, of which subject is consists of 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students from Turkish Language Teacher Training Department, The Faculty of Education of Nigde University Likert-type Scale with four grades which was improved by Tezcan and Gumus (2008 has been used as data collection tool. According to the finding acquired from the study the factors effecting Turkish Language Teacher Candidates’ preferences about elective courses have been determined and ideas which are going to contribute to determination of elective courses and effective process of them have been suggested.

  17. Candidate Genes for Inherited Autism Susceptibility in the Lebanese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtian, Silva; Soueid, Jihane; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Guisso, Dikran Richard; Chahrour, Maria; Boustany, Rose-Mary N.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by ritualistic-repetitive behaviors and impaired verbal/non-verbal communication. Many ASD susceptibility genes implicated in neuronal pathways/brain development have been identified. The Lebanese population is ideal for uncovering recessive genes because of shared ancestry and a high rate of consanguineous marriages. Aims here are to analyze for published ASD genes and uncover novel inherited ASD susceptibility genes specific to the Lebanese. We recruited 36 ASD families (ASD: 37, unaffected parents: 36, unaffected siblings: 33) and 100 unaffected Lebanese controls. Cytogenetics 2.7 M Microarrays/CytoScan™ HD arrays allowed mapping of homozygous regions of the genome. The CNTNAP2 gene was screened by Sanger sequencing. Homozygosity mapping uncovered DPP4, TRHR, and MLF1 as novel candidate susceptibility genes for ASD in the Lebanese. Sequencing of hot spot exons in CNTNAP2 led to discovery of a 5 bp insertion in 23/37 ASD patients. This mutation was present in unaffected family members and unaffected Lebanese controls. Although a slight increase in number was observed in ASD patients and family members compared to controls, there were no significant differences in allele frequencies between affecteds and controls (C/TTCTG: γ2 value = 0.014; p = 0.904). The CNTNAP2 polymorphism identified in this population, hence, is not linked to the ASD phenotype. PMID:28358038

  18. Tracing back the evolution of the candidate LBV HD168625

    CERN Document Server

    Mahy, L; Royer, P; Waelkens, C

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We obtained Herschel/PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula surrounding the candidate LBV HD168625. By combining these data with optical spectra of the star, we want to constrain the abundances in the nebula and in the star and compare them to trace back its evolution. Methods. We use CMFGEN to determine the fundamental parameters and the CNO abundances of the central star whilst the abundances of the nebula are derived from the emission lines present in the Herschel/PACS spectrum. Result. The FIR images show a nebula composed of an elliptical ring/torus of ejecta with a ESE-WNW axis and of a second perpendicular bipolar structure composed of empty caps/rings. We detect equatorial shells composed of dust and ionized material with different sizes when observed at different wavelengths, and bipolar caps more of less separated from the central star in H$\\alpha$ and mid-IR images. This complex global structure seems to show 2 different inclinations: 40{\\deg} for the equatorial torus and 6...

  19. Rethinking stereotype reliance. Understanding the connection between female candidates and gender stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nichole M

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of female candidates are running for Congress in American national elections. Despite the rise in female candidates running for office, women are not significantly increasing their presence in the House and Senate. A much hypothesized influence over the electoral fates of female candidates is the role of gender stereotypes. However, political science scholars have struggled to pinpoint the effect of stereotypes on vote choice, if there is any effect. This essay compares the way social psychology and political science scholars theoretically, conceptually and empirically test for gender stereotype influence over evaluations of female candidates and politicians. Differences emerge in the theoretical assumptions made in the two disciplines, the types of measures used in research, and the empirical tests conducted to demonstrate the presence or absence of stereotypes in evaluations of women. The discussion explores how scholars studying female candidates and politicians can integrate insights from social psychology to clarify the role of stereotypes in candidate evaluation and choice.

  20. Planet Hunters: New Kepler planet candidates from analysis of quarter 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lintott, Chris; Sharzer, Charlie; Fisher, Debra A; Barclay, Thomas; Parrish, Michael; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F; Schawinski, Kevin; Gagliano, Rovert; Gilardi, Joe; Jek, Kian J; Pääkkönen, Jari-Pekka; Smits, Tjapko

    2012-01-01

    We present new planet candidates identified in NASA Kepler quarter two public release data by volunteers engaged in the Planet Hunters citizen science project. The two candidates presented here survive checks for false-positives, including examination of the pixel offset to constrain the possibility of a background eclipsing binary. The orbital periods of the planet candidates are 97.46 days (KIC 4552729) and 284.03 (KIC 10005758) days and the modeled planet radii are 5.3 and 3.790 R_Earth. The latter star has an additional known planet candidate with a radius of 5.05 R_Earth and a period of 134.49 which was detected by the Kepler pipeline. The discovery of these candidates illustrates the value of massively distributed volunteer review of the Kepler database to recover candidates which were otherwise uncatalogued.