WorldWideScience

Sample records for candidate molecular structure

  1. Valency and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Cartmell, E

    1977-01-01

    Valency and Molecular Structure, Fourth Edition provides a comprehensive historical background and experimental foundations of theories and methods relating to valency and molecular structures. In this edition, the chapter on Bohr theory has been removed while some sections, such as structures of crystalline solids, have been expanded. Details of structures have also been revised and extended using the best available values for bond lengths and bond angles. Recent developments are mostly noted in the chapter on complex compounds, while a new chapter has been added to serve as an introduction t

  2. Photoionization and molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, A.

    1983-01-01

    A presentation is here given of the theoretical work on photoionization and molecular structure carried out by the author and coworkers. The implications of the photoionization process on the molecular geometry are emphasized. In particular, the ionization effect on deep orbitals is considered and it is shown that, contrary to traditional thinking, these orbitals have relevant effects on the molecular geometry. The problem of calculating photoionization relative intensities for the full spectrum is also considered, and the results of the present model are compared with experimental and other theoretical results. (author)

  3. Molecular Gas toward the Gemini OB1 Molecular Cloud Complex. II. CO Outflow Candidates with Possible WISE Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingjie; Li, Fa-Cheng; Xu, Ye; Wang, Chen; Du, Xin-Yu; Yang, Wenjin; Yang, Ji

    2018-03-01

    We present a large-scale survey of CO outflows in the Gem OB1 molecular cloud complex and its surroundings, using the Purple Mountain Observatory Delingha 13.7 m telescope. A total of 198 outflow candidates were identified over a large area (∼58.5 square degrees), of which 193 are newly detected. Approximately 68% (134/198) are associated with the Gem OB1 molecular cloud complex, including clouds GGMC 1, GGMC 2, BFS 52, GGMC 3, and GGMC 4. Other regions studied are: the Local arm (Local Lynds, West Front), Swallow, Horn, and Remote cloud. Outflow candidates in GGMC 1, BFS 52, and Swallow are mainly located at ring-like or filamentary structures. To avoid excessive uncertainty in distant regions (≳3.8 kpc), we only estimated the physical parameters for clouds in the Gem OB1 molecular cloud complex and in the Local arm. In those clouds, the total kinetic energy and the energy injection rate of the identified outflow candidates are ≲1% and ≲3% of the turbulent energy and the turbulent dissipation rate of each cloud, indicating that the identified outflow candidates cannot provide enough energy to balance turbulence of their host cloud at the scale of the entire cloud (several to dozens of parsecs). The gravitational binding energy of each cloud is ≳135 times the total kinetic energy of the identified outflow candidates within the corresponding cloud, indicating that the identified outflow candidates cannot cause major disruptions to the integrity of their host cloud at the scale of the entire cloud.

  4. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  5. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  6. Prediction of molecular mimicry candidates in human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxey, Andrew C; McConkey, Brendan J

    2013-08-15

    Molecular mimicry of host proteins is a common strategy adopted by bacterial pathogens to interfere with and exploit host processes. Despite the availability of pathogen genomes, few studies have attempted to predict virulence-associated mimicry relationships directly from genomic sequences. Here, we analyzed the proteomes of 62 pathogenic and 66 non-pathogenic bacterial species, and screened for the top pathogen-specific or pathogen-enriched sequence similarities to human proteins. The screen identified approximately 100 potential mimicry relationships including well-characterized examples among the top-scoring hits (e.g., RalF, internalin, yopH, and others), with about 1/3 of predicted relationships supported by existing literature. Examination of homology to virulence factors, statistically enriched functions, and comparison with literature indicated that the detected mimics target key host structures (e.g., extracellular matrix, ECM) and pathways (e.g., cell adhesion, lipid metabolism, and immune signaling). The top-scoring and most widespread mimicry pattern detected among pathogens consisted of elevated sequence similarities to ECM proteins including collagens and leucine-rich repeat proteins. Unexpectedly, analysis of the pathogen counterparts of these proteins revealed that they have evolved independently in different species of bacterial pathogens from separate repeat amplifications. Thus, our analysis provides evidence for two classes of mimics: complex proteins such as enzymes that have been acquired by eukaryote-to-pathogen horizontal transfer, and simpler repeat proteins that have independently evolved to mimic the host ECM. Ultimately, computational detection of pathogen-specific and pathogen-enriched similarities to host proteins provides insights into potentially novel mimicry-mediated virulence mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in amphibians and insects: candidate receptors and candidate molecular mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John B.; Jorge, Paulo E.; Muheim, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic compass orientation by amphibians, and some insects, is mediated by a light-dependent magnetoreception mechanism. Cryptochrome photopigments, best known for their role in circadian rhythms, are proposed to mediate such responses. In this paper, we explore light-dependent properties of magnetic sensing at three levels: (i) behavioural (wavelength-dependent effects of light on magnetic compass orientation), (ii) physiological (photoreceptors/photopigment systems with properties suggesting a role in magnetoreception), and (iii) molecular (cryptochrome-based and non-cryptochrome-based signalling pathways that are compatible with behavioural responses). Our goal is to identify photoreceptors and signalling pathways that are likely to play a specialized role in magnetoreception in order to definitively answer the question of whether the effects of light on magnetic compass orientation are mediated by a light-dependent magnetoreception mechanism, or instead are due to input from a non-light-dependent (e.g. magnetite-based) magnetoreception mechanism that secondarily interacts with other light-dependent processes. PMID:20124357

  8. Structural biology of Molecular machines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    a structural biology perspective. TANWEER HUSSAIN. Molecular Reproduction, Development and Genetics (MRDG). Indian Institute of Science (IISc). Bangalore. Symposium on “Molecular Machines: a multidiscipline enterprise” 1st July 2017. 28th mid-year meeting of Indian Academy of Sciences at IISc, Bangalore ...

  9. Molecular analysis of desmoid tumors with a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array identifies new molecular candidate lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, Philipp; Nowak, Daniel; Sauer, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Hohenberger, Peter; Kasper, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues. The mutation status of the gene coding for catenin (cadherin-associated protein) beta 1 (CTNNB1) and trisomy 8 on the chromosomal level have been described to have prognostic relevance. In order to elucidate new molecular mechanisms underlying these tumors, we carried out a molecular analysis with a genome-wide human high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, in 9 patients. Single samples showed numerical aberrations on chromosomes (Chrs) 20 and 6 with either trisomy 20 or monosomy 6. No trisomy 8 could be detected. Recurrent heterozygous deletions were found in Chr 5q (including the APC gene locus, n = 3) and Chr 8p23 (n = 4, containing coding regions for the potential tumor suppressor gene CSMD1). This novel deletion in 8p23 showed an association with local recurrence. In addition, structural chromosomal changes (gain of Chrs 8 and 20) were found in a minority of cases. The genomic alteration affecting the candidate gene CSMD1 could be important in the development of desmoid tumors.

  10. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, T

    2001-01-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of parac...

  11. Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

  12. Compatibility of candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-01-01

    Scoping tests were conducted on compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chronimum. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant to corrosion in static gallium. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/y for Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than does nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥90 and 17 mm/y, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds

  13. Structure and evolution of barley powdery mildew effector candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Carsten

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein effectors of pathogenicity are instrumental in modulating host immunity and disease resistance. The powdery mildew pathogen of grasses Blumeria graminis causes one of the most important diseases of cereal crops. B. graminis is an obligate biotrophic pathogen and as such has an absolute requirement to suppress or avoid host immunity if it is to survive and cause disease. Results Here we characterise a superfamily predicted to be the full complement of Candidates for Secreted Effector Proteins (CSEPs in the fungal barley powdery mildew parasite B. graminis f.sp. hordei. The 491 genes encoding these proteins constitute over 7% of this pathogen’s annotated genes and most were grouped into 72 families of up to 59 members. They were predominantly expressed in the intracellular feeding structures called haustoria, and proteins specifically associated with the haustoria were identified by large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomics. There are two major types of effector families: one comprises shorter proteins (100–150 amino acids, with a high relative expression level in the haustoria and evidence of extensive diversifying selection between paralogs; the second type consists of longer proteins (300–400 amino acids, with lower levels of differential expression and evidence of purifying selection between paralogs. An analysis of the predicted protein structures underscores their overall similarity to known fungal effectors, but also highlights unexpected structural affinities to ribonucleases throughout the entire effector super-family. Candidate effector genes belonging to the same family are loosely clustered in the genome and are associated with repetitive DNA derived from retro-transposons. Conclusions We employed the full complement of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses as well as structural prediction methods to identify and characterize the members of the CSEPs superfamily in B. graminis f

  14. Structure and evolution of barley powdery mildew effector candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein effectors of pathogenicity are instrumental in modulating host immunity and disease resistance. The powdery mildew pathogen of grasses Blumeria graminis causes one of the most important diseases of cereal crops. B. graminis is an obligate biotrophic pathogen and as such has an absolute requirement to suppress or avoid host immunity if it is to survive and cause disease. Results Here we characterise a superfamily predicted to be the full complement of Candidates for Secreted Effector Proteins (CSEPs) in the fungal barley powdery mildew parasite B. graminis f.sp. hordei. The 491 genes encoding these proteins constitute over 7% of this pathogen’s annotated genes and most were grouped into 72 families of up to 59 members. They were predominantly expressed in the intracellular feeding structures called haustoria, and proteins specifically associated with the haustoria were identified by large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomics. There are two major types of effector families: one comprises shorter proteins (100–150 amino acids), with a high relative expression level in the haustoria and evidence of extensive diversifying selection between paralogs; the second type consists of longer proteins (300–400 amino acids), with lower levels of differential expression and evidence of purifying selection between paralogs. An analysis of the predicted protein structures underscores their overall similarity to known fungal effectors, but also highlights unexpected structural affinities to ribonucleases throughout the entire effector super-family. Candidate effector genes belonging to the same family are loosely clustered in the genome and are associated with repetitive DNA derived from retro-transposons. Conclusions We employed the full complement of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses as well as structural prediction methods to identify and characterize the members of the CSEPs superfamily in B. graminis f.sp. hordei. Based on relative

  15. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jespersen

    Full Text Available Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L. x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease, antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase, energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, cell expansion (expansin, and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101. Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection.

  16. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Theresa

    2001-07-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of paracetamol (acetaminophen), the influence of the variations of the molecular model on the crystal structure lattice energy minima, has also been studied. The general problem of prediction methods based on the assumption that the experimental thermodynamically stable polymorph corresponds to the global lattice energy minimum, is that more hypothetical low lattice energy structures are found within a few kJ mol{sup -1} of the global minimum than are likely to be experimentally observed polymorphs. This is illustrated by the results for molecule I, 3-oxabicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-1,4-diene, studied for the first international blindtest for small organic crystal structures organised by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) in May 1999. To reduce the number of predicted polymorphs, additional factors to thermodynamic criteria have to be considered. Therefore the elastic constants and vapour growth morphologies have been calculated for the lowest lattice energy

  17. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized

  18. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  19. Molecular genetic gene-environment studies using candidate genes in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modinos, Gemma; Iyegbe, Conrad; Prata, Diana; Rivera, Margarita; Kempton, Matthew J; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Sham, Pak C; van Os, Jim; McGuire, Philip

    2013-11-01

    The relatively high heritability of schizophrenia suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of the disorder. On the other hand, a number of environmental factors significantly influence its incidence. As few direct genetic effects have been demonstrated, and there is considerable inter-individual heterogeneity in the response to the known environmental factors, interactions between genetic and environmental factors may be important in determining whether an individual develops the disorder. To date, a considerable number of studies of gene-environment interactions (G×E) in schizophrenia have employed a hypothesis-based molecular genetic approach using candidate genes, which have led to a range of different findings. This systematic review aims to summarize the results from molecular genetic candidate studies and to review challenges and opportunities of this approach in psychosis research. Finally, we discuss the potential of future prospects, such as new studies that combine hypothesis-based molecular genetic candidate approaches with agnostic genome-wide association studies in determining schizophrenia risk. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Similarity of molecular phenotype between known epilepsy gene LGI1 and disease candidate gene LGI2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenhaber Frank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The LGI2 (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 2 gene, a prime candidate for partial epilepsy with pericentral spikes, belongs to a family encoding secreted, beta-propeller domain proteins with EPTP/EAR epilepsy-associated repeats. In another family member, LGI1 (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 mutations are responsible for autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE. Because a few LGI1 disease mutations described in the literature cause secretion failure, we experimentally analyzed the secretion efficiency and subcellular localization of several LGI1 and LGI2 mutant proteins corresponding to observed non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs affecting the signal peptide, the leucine-rich repeats and the EAR propeller. Results Mapping of disease-causing mutations in the EAR domain region onto a 3D-structure model shows that many of these mutations co-localize at an evolutionary conserved surface region of the propeller. We find that wild-type LGI2 is secreted to the extracellular medium in glycosylated form similarly to LGI1, whereas several mutant proteins tested in this study are secretion-deficient and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum. Interestingly, mutations at structurally homologous positions in the EAR domain have the same effect on secretion in LGI1 and LGI2. Conclusions This similarity of experimental mislocalization phenotypes for mutations at homologous positions of LGI2 and the established epilepsy gene LGI1 suggests that both genes share a potentially common molecular pathogenesis mechanism that might be the reason for genotypically distinct but phenotypically related forms of epilepsy.

  1. Rotational spectra and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wollrab, James E

    1967-01-01

    Physical Chemistry, A Series of Monographs: Rotational Spectra and Molecular Structure covers the energy levels and rotational transitions. This book is divided into nine chapters that evaluate the rigid asymmetric top molecules and the nuclear spin statistics for asymmetric tops. Some of the topics covered in the book are the asymmetric rotor functions; rotational transition intensities; classes of molecules; nuclear spin statistics for linear molecules and symmetric tops; and classical appearance of centrifugal and coriolis forces. Other chapters deal with the energy levels and effects of ce

  2. CSMB | Center For Structural Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Structural Molecular Biologyat ORNL is dedicated to developing instrumentation and methods for determining the 3-dimensional structures of proteins,...

  3. Uncertainties of Molecular Structural Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    performed. Simply, there are significant disagreements between the same bond lengths measured by different techniques. These disagreements are, however, systematic and can be computed via techniques of quantum chemistry which deal not only with the motions of the electrons (electronic structure theory) but also with the often large amplitude motions of the nuclei. As to the relevant quantum chemical computations, since about 1970 electronic structure theory has become able to make quantitative predictions and thus challenge (or even overrule) many experiments. Nevertheless, quantitative agreement of quantum chemical results with experiment can only be expected when the motions of the atoms are also considered. In the fourth age of quantum chemistry we are living in an era where one can bridge quantitatively the gap between ‘effective’, experimental and ‘equilibrium’, computed structures at even elevated temperatures of interest thus minimizing any real uncertainties of structural parameters. The connections mentioned are extremely important as they help to understand the true uncertainty of measured structural parameters. Traditionally it is microwave (MW) and millimeterwave (MMW) spectroscopy, as well as gas-phase electron diffraction (GED), which yielded the most accurate structural parameters of molecules. The accuracy of the MW and GED experiments approached about 0.001Å and 0.1º under ideal circumstances, worse, sometimes considerably worse, in less than ideal and much more often encountered situations. Quantum chemistry can define both highly accurate equilibrium (so-called Born-Oppenheimer, r e BO , and semiexperimental, r e SE ) structures and, via detailed investigation of molecular motions, accurate temperature-dependent rovibrationally averaged structures. Determining structures is still a rich field for research, understanding the measured or computed uncertainties of structures and structural parameters is still a challenge but there are firm and well

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of massive young stellar object candidates in the central molecular zone

    OpenAIRE

    Nandakumar, G.; Schultheis, M.; Feldmeier-Krause, A; Schödel, Rainer; Neumayer, N; Matteucci, F; Ryde, N; Rojas-Arriagada, A; Tej, A

    2018-01-01

    Context. The central molecular zone (CMZ) is a similar to 200 pc region around the Galactic centre. The study of star formation in the central part of the Milky Way is of great interest as it provides a template for the closest galactic nuclei. Aims. We present a spectroscopic follow-up of photometrically selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the CMZ of the Galactic centre. Our goal is to quantify the contamination of this YSO sample by reddened giant stars with circumstellar...

  5. Investigation of the molecular relationship between breast cancer and obesity by candidate gene prioritization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Garshasbi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer and obesity are two major public health concerns. More than 12 million cases of cancer are reported annually. Many reports confirmed obesity as a risk factor for cancer. The molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer has not been clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate priorities of effective genes in the molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer. Methods: In this study, computer simulation method was used for prioritizing the genes that involved in the molecular links between obesity and breast cancer in laboratory of systems biology and bioinformatics (LBB, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran, from March to July 2014. In this study, ENDEAVOUR software was used for prioritizing the genes and integrating multiple data sources was used for data analysis. Training genes were selected from effective genes in obesity and/or breast cancer. Two groups of candidate genes were selected. The first group was included the existential genes in 5 common region chromosomes (between obesity and breast cancer and the second group was included the results of genes microarray data analysis of research Creighton, et al (In 2012 on patients with breast cancer. The microarray data were analyzed with GER2 software (R online software on GEO website. Finally, both training and candidate genes were entered in ENDEAVOUR software package. Results: The candidate genes were prioritized to four style and five genes in ten of the first priorities were repeated twice. In other word, the outcome of prioritizing of 72 genes (Product of microarray data analysis and genes of 5 common chromosome regions (Between obesity and breast cancer showed, 5 genes (TNFRSF10B, F2, IGFALS, NTRK3 and HSP90B1 were the priorities in the molecular connection between obesity and breast cancer. Conclusion: There are some common genes between breast cancer and obesity. So, molecular relationship is confirmed. In this study the possible effect

  6. Candidate magnetic dust structures for star light polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoular, R.

    2017-11-01

    Rotation damping and alignment are discussed as prerequisites for polarization. An expression is derived from first principles, for the damping time of the rotation of a particle in a magnetic field, under the Faraday braking torque, provided its electrical properties are known. This makes it possible to describe mathematically, in great detail, the motion of the particle and determine its ultimate state of motion, if a steady state is possible at all. This work defines, first, the necessary condition for the Faraday braking to be effective: (a) the net electronic charge distribution should not be uniform throughout and (b) the number of vibration modes should exceed a few tens. Resonance of rotation frequency with any of these modes is not a requirement. For alignment to be possible, the ratio of gyroscopic and conservative magnetic to non-conservative (retarding) magnetic torques must be low. Either dia-, para- or ferromagnetism can do, and a small susceptibility is enough and even preferable. This opens up a wide spectrum of possible candidates. A few examples are given.

  7. Molecular evolution of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jennifer R; McAssey, Edward V; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations.

  8. Chemistry Teacher Candidates' Acceptance and Opinions about Virtual Reality Technology for Molecular Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritas, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    The meaningful knowledge creation about molecular geometry has always been the challenge of chemistry learning. In particular, microscopic world of chemistry science (example, atoms, molecules, structures) used in traditional two dimensional way of chemistry teaching can lead to such problem as students create misconceptions. In recent years,…

  9. Trypanosoma equiperdum Low Molecular Weight Proteins As Candidates for Specific Serological Diagnosis of Dourine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Luciani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of dourine can be difficult because the clinical signs of this disease in horses are similar to those of surra, caused by Trypanosoma evansi. Moreover, T. equiperdum and T. evansi are closely related and, so far, they cannot be distinguished using serological tests. In a previous work, the T. equiperdum protein pattern recognized by antibodies from dourine-infected horses and the humoral immune response kinetics were investigated by immunoblotting assay; a total of 20 sera from naturally and experimentally infected horses and from healthy animals were tested. Immunoblotting analysis showed that antibodies from infected horses specifically bind T. equiperdum low molecular weight proteins (from 16 to 35 kDa, which are not recognized by antibodies from uninfected horses. In this work, we tested other 615 sera (7 from naturally infected horses and 608 sera from healthy horses and donkeys: results confirmed the data obtained previously. In addition, six SDS-PAGE bands with molecular weight ranging from 10 to 37 kDa were analyzed by mass spectrometry, in order to identify immunogenic proteins that could be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis of dourine. A total of 167 proteins were identified. Among them, 37 were found unique for T. equiperdum. Twenty-four of them could represent possible candidate diagnostic antigens for the development of serological tests specific for T. equiperdum.

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of massive young stellar object candidates in the central molecular zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, G.; Schultheis, M.; Feldmeier-Krause, A.; Schödel, R.; Neumayer, N.; Matteucci, F.; Ryde, N.; Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Tej, A.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The central molecular zone (CMZ) is a 200 pc region around the Galactic centre. The study of star formation in the central part of the Milky Way is of great interest as it provides a template for the closest galactic nuclei. Aims: We present a spectroscopic follow-up of photometrically selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the CMZ of the Galactic centre. Our goal is to quantify the contamination of this YSO sample by reddened giant stars with circumstellar envelopes and to determine the star formation rate (SFR) in the CMZ. Methods: We obtained KMOS low-resolution near-infrared spectra (R 4000) between 2.0 and 2.5 μm of sources, many of which have been previously identified by mid-infrared photometric criteria as massive YSOs in the Galactic centre. Our final sample consists of 91 stars with good signal-to-noise ratio. We separated YSOs from cool late-type stars based on spectral features of CO and Brγ at 2.3 μm and 2.16 μm, respectively. We made use of spectral energy distribution (SED) model fits to the observed photometric data points from 1.25 to 24 μm to estimate approximate masses for the YSOs. Results: Using the spectroscopically identified YSOs in our sample, we confirm that existing colour-colour diagrams and colour-magnitude diagrams are unable to efficiently separate YSOs and cool late-type stars. In addition, we define a new colour-colour criterion that separates YSOs from cool late-type stars in the H-KS vs. H -[8.0] diagram. We use this new criterion to identify YSO candidates in the |l| Chile, programme number 097.C-0208(A).

  11. Low activation structural material candidates for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty, C.B.A.; Cook, I.

    1997-06-01

    Under the SEAL Programme of the European Long-Term Fusion Safety Programme, an assessment was performed of a number of possible blanket structural materials. These included the steels then under consideration in the European Blanket Programme, as well as materials being considered for investigation in the Advanced Materials Programme. Calculations were performed, using SEAFP methods, of the activation properties of the materials, and these were related, based on the SEAFP experience, to assessments of S and E performance. The materials investigated were the SEAFP low-activation martensitic steel (LA12TaLC); a Japanese low-activation martensitic steel (F-82H), a range of compositional variants about this steel; the vanadium-titanium-chromium alloy which was the original proposal of the ITER JCT for the ITER in-vessel components; a titanium-aluminium intermetallic (Ti-Al) which is under investigation in Japan; and silicon carbide composite (SiC). Assessed impurities were included in the compositions of these materials, and they have very important impacts on the activation properties. Lack of sufficiently detailed data on the composition of chromium alloys precluded their inclusion in the study. (UK)

  12. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  13. Structural characterization of the mechanosensitive channel candidate MCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Shigematsu

    Full Text Available Mechanosensing in plants is thought to be governed by sensory complexes containing a Ca²⁺-permeable, mechanosensitive channel. The plasma membrane protein MCA1 and its paralog MCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana are involved in mechanical stress-induced Ca²⁺ influx and are thus considered as candidates for such channels or their regulators. Both MCA1 and MCA2 were functionally expressed in Sf9 cells using a baculovirus system in order to elucidate their molecular natures. Because of the abundance of protein in these cells, MCA2 was chosen for purification. Purified MCA2 in a detergent-solubilized state formed a tetramer, which was confirmed by chemical cross-linking. Single-particle analysis of cryo-electron microscope images was performed to depict the overall shape of the purified protein. The three-dimensional structure of MCA2 was reconstructed at a resolution of 26 Å from 5,500 particles and appears to comprise a small transmembrane region and large cytoplasmic region.

  14. Back to the sea twice: identifying candidate plant genes for molecular evolution to marine life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reusch Thorsten BH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seagrasses are a polyphyletic group of monocotyledonous angiosperms that have adapted to a completely submerged lifestyle in marine waters. Here, we exploit two collections of expressed sequence tags (ESTs of two wide-spread and ecologically important seagrass species, the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L. Delile and the eelgrass Zostera marina L., which have independently evolved from aquatic ancestors. This replicated, yet independent evolutionary history facilitates the identification of traits that may have evolved in parallel and are possible instrumental candidates for adaptation to a marine habitat. Results In our study, we provide the first quantitative perspective on molecular adaptations in two seagrass species. By constructing orthologous gene clusters shared between two seagrasses (Z. marina and P. oceanica and eight distantly related terrestrial angiosperm species, 51 genes could be identified with detection of positive selection along the seagrass branches of the phylogenetic tree. Characterization of these positively selected genes using KEGG pathways and the Gene Ontology uncovered that these genes are mostly involved in translation, metabolism, and photosynthesis. Conclusions These results provide first insights into which seagrass genes have diverged from their terrestrial counterparts via an initial aquatic stage characteristic of the order and to the derived fully-marine stage characteristic of seagrasses. We discuss how adaptive changes in these processes may have contributed to the evolution towards an aquatic and marine existence.

  15. Candidate gene molecular markers as tools for analyzing genetic susceptibility to morbillivirus infection in stranded Cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejskalova, K; Bayerova, Z; Futas, J; Hrazdilova, K; Klumplerova, M; Oppelt, J; Splichalova, P; Di Guardo, G; Mazzariol, S; Di Francesco, C E; Di Francesco, G; Terracciano, G; Paiu, R-M; Ursache, T D; Modry, D; Horin, P

    2017-12-01

    Morbilliviruses, such as Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) or Phocine distemper virus (PDV), represent a growing threat for marine mammals on both hemispheres. Because free-ranging animal populations strongly rely on natural resistance mechanisms, innate immunity-related genes and virus cell entry receptor genes may represent key factors involved in susceptibility to CeMV in Cetaceans. Using the next generation sequencing technology, we have sequenced 11 candidate genes in two model species, Stenella coeruleoalba and Phocoena phocoena. Suitable single nucleotide polymorphism markers of potential functional importance, located in genes coding for basigin (BSG, CD147), the signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAMF1), the poliovirus-related receptor-4 (NECTIN4, PVRL4), toll-like receptors 3, 7, 8 (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8), natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (SLC11A1) and natural cytotoxicity triggering receptor 1 (NCR1), were identified in each model species, along with MHC-DQB haplotypes unique for each species. This set of molecular markers represents a potentially useful tool for studying host genetic variation and susceptibility to morbillivirus infection in Cetaceans as well as for studying functionally important genetic diversity of selected Cetacean populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chain, that is, after 34 A. The distance of a phosphorus atom from the fibre axis is 10. A. As the phosphates are on the outside, cations have easy access to them. The structure is an open one, and its water content is rather high. At lower water contents we would expect the bases to tilt so that the structure could become more.

  17. Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A structure for nucleic acid has already been proposed by Pauling and Corey [1]. They kindly made'their manuscript available to us in advance of publication. Their model consists of three inter-twined chains, with the phosphates near the fibre axis, and the bases on the outside. In our opinion, this structure is unsatisfactory ...

  18. Molecular Cloud Structures and Massive Star Formation in N159

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, O.; Meixner, M.; Fukui, Y.; Tachihara, K.; Onishi, T.; Saigo, K.; Tokuda, K.; Harada, R.

    2018-02-01

    The N159 star-forming region is one of the most massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We show the 12CO, 13CO, CS molecular gas lines observed with ALMA in N159 west (N159W) and N159 east (N159E). We relate the structure of the gas clumps to the properties of 24 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) that include 10 newly identified YSOs based on our search. We use dendrogram analysis to identify properties of the molecular clumps, such as flux, mass, linewidth, size, and virial parameter. We relate the YSO properties to the molecular gas properties. We find that the CS gas clumps have a steeper size–linewidth relation than the 12CO or 13CO gas clumps. This larger slope could potentially occur if the CS gas is tracing shocks. The virial parameters of the 13CO gas clumps in N159W and N159E are low (energy distribution type in comparison to the YSO candidates in N159W. These differences lead us to conclude that the giant molecular cloud complex in N159E is more evolved than the giant molecular cloud complex in N159W.

  19. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded...

  20. Exploring mechanisms of diet-colon cancer associations through candidate molecular interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergaard, David; Li, Jun; Jensen, Kasper; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2014-05-17

    Epidemiological studies in the recent years have investigated the relationship between dietary habits and disease risk demonstrating that diet has a direct effect on public health. Especially plant-based diets -fruits, vegetables and herbs- are known as a source of molecules with pharmacological properties for treatment of several malignancies. Unquestionably, for developing specific intervention strategies to reduce cancer risk there is a need for a more extensive and holistic examination of the dietary components for exploring the mechanisms of action and understanding the nutrient-nutrient interactions. Here, we used colon cancer as a proof-of-concept for understanding key regulatory sites of diet on the disease pathway. We started from a unique vantage point by having a database of 158 plants positively associated to colon cancer reduction and their molecular composition (~3,500 unique compounds). We generated a comprehensive picture of the interaction profile of these edible and non-edible plants with a predefined candidate colon cancer target space consisting of ~1,900 proteins. This knowledge allowed us to study systematically the key components in colon cancer that are targeted synergistically by phytochemicals and identify statistically significant and highly correlated protein networks that could be perturbed by dietary habits. We propose here a framework for interrogating the critical targets in colon cancer processes and identifying plant-based dietary interventions as important modifiers using a systems chemical biology approach. Our methodology for better delineating prevention of colon cancer by nutritional interventions relies heavily on the availability of information about the small molecule constituents of our diet and it can be expanded to any other disease class that previous evidence has linked to lifestyle.

  1. Structure-activity relationship analysis of cytotoxic cyanoguanidines: selection of CHS 828 as candidate drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullbo Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-(6-(4-chlorophenoxyhexyl-N'-cyano-N''-4-pyridyl guanidine (CHS 828 is the first candidate drug from a novel group of anti-tumour agents – the pyridyl cyanoguanidines, shown to be potent compounds interfering with cellular metabolism (inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and NF-κB signalling. Substituted cyanoguanidines are also found in anti-hypertensive agents such as the potassium channel opener pinacidil (N-cyano-N'-(4-pyridyl-N''-(1,2,2-trimethylpropylguanidine and histamine-II receptor antagonists (e.g. cimetidine, N-cyano-N'-methyl-N''-[2-[[(5-methylimidazol-4-yl]methyl]thio]ethylguanidine. In animal studies, CHS 828 has shown very promising activity, and phase I and II studies resulted in further development of a with a water soluble prodrug. Findings To study the structural requirements for cyanoguanidine cytotoxicity a set of 19 analogues were synthesized. The cytotoxic effects were then studied in ten cell lines selected for different origins and mechanisms of resistance, using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA. The compounds showed varying cytotoxic activity even though the dose-response curves for some analogues were very shallow. Pinacidil and cimetidine were found to be non-toxic in all ten cell lines. Starting with cyanoguanidine as the crucial core it was shown that 4-pyridyl substitution was more efficient than was 3-pyridyl substitution. The 4-pyridyl cyanoguanidine moiety should be linked by an alkyl chain, optimally a hexyl, heptyl or octyl chain, to a bulky end group. The exact composition of this end group did not seem to be of crucial importance; when the end group was a mono-substituted phenyl ring it was shown that the preferred position was 4-substitution, followed by 3- and, finally, 2-substitution as the least active. Whether the substituent was a chloro, nitro or methoxy substituent seemed to be of minor importance. Finally, the activity patterns in the

  2. Candidate molecular markers of hygienic behavior in honeybees (Apis mellifera: an expression study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Dell'Orco

    2016-06-01

    The differential expression analysis of the candidate markers, performed after selection of the normalizing gene through geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, highlighted a correlation of OBP4 and ACT5C expression level with HB score.

  3. Molecular mapping and candidate gene analysis for resistance to powdery mildew in Cucumis sativus stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P N; Miao, H; Lu, H W; Cui, J Y; Tian, G L; Wehner, T C; Gu, X F; Zhang, S P

    2017-08-31

    Powdery mildew (PM) of cucumber (Cucumis sativus), caused by Podosphaera xanthii, is a major foliar disease worldwide and resistance is one of the main objectives in cucumber breeding programs. The resistance to PM in cucumber stem is important to the resistance for the whole plant. In this study, genetic analysis and gene mapping were implemented with cucumber inbred lines NCG-122 (with resistance to PM in the stem) and NCG-121 (with susceptibility in the stem). Genetic analysis showed that resistance to PM in the stem of NCG-122 was qualitative and controlled by a single-recessive nuclear gene (pm-s). Susceptibility was dominant to resistance. In the initial genetic mapping of the pm-s gene, 10 SSR markers were discovered to be linked to pm-s, which was mapped to chromosome 5 (Chr.5) of cucumber. The pm-s gene's closest flanking markers were SSR20486 and SSR06184/SSR13237 with genetic distances of 0.9 and 1.8 cM, respectively. One hundred and fifty-seven pairs of new SSR primers were exploited by the sequence information in the initial mapping region of pm-s. The analysis on the F 2 mapping population using the new molecular markers showed that 17 SSR markers were confirmed to be linked to the pm-s gene. The two closest flanking markers, pmSSR27and pmSSR17, were 0.1 and 0.7 cM from pm-s, respectively, confirming the location of this gene on Chr.5. The physical length of the genomic region containing pm-s was 135.7 kb harboring 21 predicted genes. Among these genes, the gene Csa5G623470 annotated as encoding Mlo-related protein was defined as the most probable candidate gene for the pm-s. The results of this study will provide a basis for marker-assisted selection, and make the benefit for the cloning of the resistance gene.

  4. How We Teach Molecular Structure to Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Michael O.

    2002-01-01

    Currently molecular structure is taught in general chemistry using three theories, this being based more on historical development rather than logical pedagogy. Electronegativity is taught with a confusing mixture of definitions that do not correspond to modern practice. Valence bond theory and VSEPR are used together in a way that often confuses…

  5. Molecular structure, vibrational spectroscopic studies and natural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 74; Issue 5. Molecular structure ... The entropy of the title compound was also performed at HF using the hybrid functional BLYP and B3LYP with 6-31 G(d,p) as basis set levels of theory. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of the title molecule is also carried out.

  6. Multivariate models from RNA-Seq SNVs yield candidate molecular targets for biomarker discovery: SNV-DA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Matt R; Levitt, Nicholas P; Moore, David E; Watson, Patricia M; Wilson, Robert C; Denlinger, Chadrick E; Watson, Dennis K; Anderson, Paul E

    2016-03-31

    It has recently been shown that significant and accurate single nucleotide variants (SNVs) can be reliably called from RNA-Seq data. These may provide another source of features for multivariate predictive modeling of disease phenotype for the prioritization of candidate biomarkers. The continuous nature of SNV allele fraction features allows the concurrent investigation of several genomic phenomena, including allele specific expression, clonal expansion and/or deletion, and copy number variation. The proposed software pipeline and package, SNV Discriminant Analysis (SNV-DA), was applied on two RNA-Seq datasets with varying sample sizes sequenced at different depths: a dataset containing primary tumors from twenty patients with different disease outcomes in lung adenocarcinoma and a larger dataset of primary tumors representing two major breast cancer subtypes, estrogen receptor positive and triple negative. Predictive models were generated using the machine learning algorithm, sparse projections to latent structures discriminant analysis. Training sets composed of RNA-Seq SNV features limited to genomic regions of origin (e.g. exonic or intronic) and/or RNA-editing sites were shown to produce models with accurate predictive performances, were discriminant towards true label groupings, and were able to produce SNV rankings significantly different from than univariate tests. Furthermore, the utility of the proposed methodology is supported by its comparable performance to traditional models as well as the enrichment of selected SNVs located in genes previously associated with cancer and genes showing allele-specific expression. As proof of concept, we highlight the discovery of a previously unannotated intergenic locus that is associated with epigenetic regulatory marks in cancer and whose significant allele-specific expression is correlated with ER+ status; hereafter named ER+ associated hotspot (ERPAHS). The use of models from RNA-Seq SNVs to identify and

  7. Candidate gene molecular markers as tools for analyzing genetic susceptibility to morbillivirus infection in stranded Cetaceans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stejskalová, K.; Bayerova, Z.; Futas, J.; Hrazdilová, K.; Klumplerova, M.; Oppelt, J.; Šplíchalová, P.; Di Guardo, G.; Mazzariol, S.; Di Francesco, C. E.; Di Francesco, G.; Terracciano, G.; Paiu, R.M.; Ursache, T. D.; Modrý, David; Horin, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 6 (2017), s. 343-353 ISSN 2059-2302 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cetacea * haplotype * immunity * innate * mhc-dqb * Phocoena phocoena * polymorphism * single nucleotide * Stenella coeruleoalba Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  8. Marine Biotoxins: Laboratory Culture and Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-21

    4 (B) 108.3 12.1 6.4 - (L) GT - Cambierdiscus toxicus PL - Prorocentrum lima KB - Kahala Beach L - lethal + - toxic symptoms - 15 - Table IV. DaM for...on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Mice, Lab Animals, Maitotoxin, RA I, BD, Marine Toxin , 076 13 Ciquatoxin...most potent naturally occurring toxins known. Their physiological actions are diverse, as are their molecular structures, not all of which have been

  9. Molecular analysis of desmoid tumors with a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array identifies new molecular candidate lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Erben, Philipp; Nowak, Daniel; Sauer, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Hohenberger, Peter; Kasper, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Background: Desmoid tumors are neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues. The mutation status of the gene coding for catenin (cadherin-associated protein) beta 1 (CTNNB1) and trisomy 8 on the chromosomal level have been described to have prognostic relevance. Patients and Methods: In order to elucidate new molecular mechanisms underlying these tumors, we carried out a molecular analysis with a genome-wide human high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, in 9 patients. Resu...

  10. Discovery of Novel Leptospirosis Vaccine Candidates Using Reverse and Structural Vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan John Alexander McBride

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira spp. are diderm (two membranes bacteria that infect mammals causing leptospirosis, a public health problem with global implications. Thousands of people die every year due to leptospirosis, especially in developing countries with tropical climates. Prophylaxis is difficult due to multiple factors, including the large number of asymptomatic hosts that transmit the bacteria, poor sanitation, increasing numbers of slum dwellers, and the lack of an effective vaccine. Several leptospiral recombinant antigens were evaluated as a replacement for the inactivated (bacterin vaccine; however, success has been limited. A prospective vaccine candidate is likely to be a surface-related protein that can stimulate the host immune response to clear leptospires from blood and organs. In this study, a comprehensive bioinformatics approach based on reverse and structural vaccinology was applied toward the discovery of novel leptospiral vaccine candidates. The Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain L1-130 genome was mined in silico for the enhanced identification of conserved β-barrel (βb transmembrane proteins and outer membrane (OM lipoproteins. Orthologs of the prospective vaccine candidates were screened in the genomes of 20 additional Leptospira spp. Three-dimensional structural models, with a high degree of confidence, were created for each of the surface-exposed proteins. Major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II epitopes were identified, and their locations were mapped on the structural models. A total of 18 βb transmembrane proteins and 8 OM lipoproteins were identified. These proteins were conserved among the pathogenic Leptospira spp. and were predicted to have epitopes for several variants of MHC-II receptors. A structural and functional analysis of the sequence of these surface proteins demonstrated that most βb transmembrane proteins seem to be TonB-dependent receptors associated with transportation. Other proteins

  11. Propagator theory of atomic and molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehrn, Y.

    1976-01-01

    It is not at all obvious which methods of use in quantum chemistry can be characterized as being without wavefunctions. There are, however, a number of methods that purpose to calculate atomic and molecular electronic structure and properties without the explicit use of many-electron wavefunctions. Fully realizing the arbitrariness of any classification of such methods as well as the absence of sharp boundaries between any choice of groups, the author separates the three kinds of approaches: (i) Local Density Energy Functional Methods, (ii) Density Matrix Methods, (iii) Propagator or Green's Function Methods. (Auth.)

  12. Structure and interactions of a malarial vaccine candidate, AMA1, form the parasite plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, L.A.; Keizer, D.W.; Hodder, A.N.; Nair, M.; Hinds, M.G.; Norton, R.S.; Li, F.; Foley, M.; Coley, A.; Anders, R.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), a merozoite surface protein found in all species of Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites, is a strong candidate for inclusion in a malarial vaccine. Recombinant AMA1 protected against P. fragile in monkeys and P. chabaudi adami in mice. P. falciparum AMA1 which has a 62-kDa ectodomain consisting of three disulphide-stabilised domains, is a target of antibodies that inhibit merozoite invasion in vitro. Here we describe the solution structure of domain III (14 kDa), determined by NMR on 15 N- and 13 C/ 15 N-labelled samples. It has a well-defined disulphide-stabilised core interrupted by a disordered loop, and both the N- and C-terminal regions of the molecule are unstructured. The structured region includes all three disulphide bonds. Naturally-occurring mutations across 11 different P falciparum strains that are located far apart in the sequence cluster around the disulphide core in the 3D structure of domain III, suggesting that this region contains the major epitopes recognised by neutralising antibodies. Consistent with this, the disulphide-bond stabilised conformation of the ectodomain was essential for protection, as the antigen was not an effective vaccine after reduction and alkylation. Peptides have been found by phage display that bind to AMA1 and block merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. We have investigated their solution structures and interaction with full-length AMA1 ectodomain in an effort to understand the structure-function relationships of this important vaccine candidate

  13. Structural, phylogenetic and docking studies of D-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA, a candidate schizophrenia gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a neurodegenerative disorder that occurs worldwide and can be difficult to diagnose. It is the foremost neurological disorder leading to suicide among patients in both developed and underdeveloped countries. D-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA, also known as G72, is directly implicated in the glutamateric hypothesis of schizophrenia. It activates D-amino acid oxidase, which oxidizes D-serine, leading to modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Methods MODELLER (9v10 was utilized to generate three dimensional structures of the DAOA candidate gene. The HOPE server was used for mutational analysis. The Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA5 tool was utilized to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the candidate gene DAOA. AutoDock was used for protein-ligand docking and Gramm-X and PatchDock for protein-protein docking. Results A suitable template (1ZCA was selected by employing BLASTp on the basis of 33% query coverage, 27% identity and E-value 4.9. The Rampage evaluation tool showed 91.1% favored region, 4.9% allowed region and 4.1% outlier region in DAOA. ERRAT demonstrated that the predicted model had a 50.909% quality factor. Mutational analysis of DAOA revealed significant effects on hydrogen bonding and correct folding of the DAOA protein, which in turn affect protein conformation. Ciona was inferred as the outgroup. Tetrapods were in their appropriate clusters with bifurcations. Human amino acid sequences are conserved, with chimpanzee and gorilla showing more than 80% homology and bootstrap value based on 1000 replications. Molecular docking analysis was employed to elucidate the binding mode of the reported ligand complex for DAOA. The docking experiment demonstrated that DAOA is involved in major amino acid interactions: the residues that interact most strongly with the ligand C28H28N3O5PS2 are polar but uncharged (Gln36, Asn38, Thr 122 and non-polar hydrophobic (Ile119, Ser171

  14. Molecular Models of Genetic and Organismic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    In recent studies we showed that the earlier relational theories of organismic sets (Rashevsky,1967), Metabolic-Replication (M,R)-systems (Rosen,1958)and molecular sets (Bartholomay,1968) share a joint foundation that can be studied within a unified categorical framework of functional organismic structures (Baianu,1980. This is possible because all relational theories have a biomolecular basis, that is, complex structures such as genomes, cells,organs and biological organisms are mathematically represented in terms of biomolecular properties and entities,(that are often implicit in their representation axioms. The definition of organismic sets, for example, requires that certain essential quantities be determined from experiment: these are specified by special sets of values of general observables that are derived from physicochemical measurements(Baianu,1970; Baianu,1980; Baianu et al, 2004a.)Such observables are context-dependent and lead directly to natural transformations in categories and Topoi, that are...

  15. [Molecular structure and fractal analysis of oligosaccharide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-long; Wang, Lu-man; He, Dong-qi; Zhang, Tian-lan; Gou, Bao-di; Li, Qing

    2014-10-18

    To propose a calculation method of oligosaccharides' fractal dimension, and to provide a new approach to studying the drug molecular design and activity. By using the principle of energy optimization and computer simulation technology, the steady structures of oligosaccharides were found, and an effective way of oligosaccharides fractal dimension's calculation was further established by applying the theory of box dimension to the chemical compounds. By using the proposed method, 22 oligosaccharides' fractal dimensions were calculated, with the mean 1.518 8 ± 0.107 2; in addition, the fractal dimensions of the two activity multivalent oligosaccharides which were confirmed by experiments, An-2 and Gu-4, were about 1.478 8 and 1.516 0 respectively, while C-type lectin-like receptor Dectin-1's fractal dimension was about 1.541 2. The experimental and computational results were expected to help to find a class of glycoside drugs whose target receptor was Dectin-1. Fractal dimension, differing from other known macro parameters, is a useful tool to characterize the compound molecules' microscopic structure and function, which may play an important role in the molecular design and biological activity study. In the process of oligosaccharides drug screening, the fractal dimension of receptor and designed oligosaccharides or glycoclusters can be calculated respectively. The oligosaccharides with fractal dimension close to that of target receptor should then take priority compared with others, to get the drug molecules with latent activity.

  16. Antihypertensives for combating dementia? A perspective on candidate molecular mechanisms and population-based prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, M; Esler, M; Ritchie, K; Brodaty, H

    2012-04-24

    Age-related increases in prevalent dementia over the next 30-40 years risk collapsing medical resources or radically altering the way we treat patients. Better prevention of dementia therefore needs to be one of our highest medical priorities. We propose a perspective on the pathological basis of dementia based on a cerebrovascular-Alzheimer disease spectrum that provides a more powerful explanatory framework when considering the impact of possible public health interventions. With this in mind, a synthesis of evidence from basic, clinical and epidemiological studies indeed suggests that the enhanced treatment of hypertension could be effective for the primary prevention of dementia of either Alzheimer or vascular etiology. In particular, we focus on candidate preventative mechanisms, including reduced cerebrovascular disease, disruption of hypoxia-dependent amyloidogenesis and the potential neuroprotective properties of calcium channel blockers. Following the successful translation of large, long-term and resource-intense trials in cardiology into improved vascular health outcomes in many countries, new multinational prevention trials with dementia-related primary outcomes are now urgently required.

  17. Molecular basis of albinism in India: evaluation of seven potential candidate genes and some new findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, M; Sengupta, M; Samanta, S; Sil, A; Ray, K

    2012-12-15

    Albinism represents a group of genetic disorders with a broad spectrum of hypopigmentary phenotypes dependent on the genetic background of the patients. Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) patients have little or no pigment in their eyes, skin and hair, whereas ocular albinism (OA) primarily presents the ocular symptoms, and the skin and hair color may vary from near normal to very fair. Mutations in genes directly or indirectly regulating melanin production are responsible for different forms of albinism with overlapping clinical features. In this study, 27 albinistic individuals from 24 families were screened for causal variants by a PCR-sequencing based approach. TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, SLC45A2, SLC24A5, TYRP2 and SILV were selected as candidate genes. We identified 5 TYR and 3 OCA2 mutations, majority in homozygous state, in 8 unrelated patients including a case of autosomal recessive ocular albinism (AROA). A homozygous 4-nucleotide novel insertion in SLC24A5 was detected in a person showing with extreme cutaneous hypopigmentation. A potential causal variant was identified in the TYRP2 gene in a single patient. Haplotype analyses in the patients carrying homozygous mutations in the classical OCA genes suggested founder effect. This is the first report of an Indian AROA patient harboring a mutation in OCA2. Our results also reveal for the first time that mutations in SLC24A5 could contribute to extreme hypopigmentation in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular characterization of five porcine candidate genes for drip loss in pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, Agnieszka; Drögemuller, Cord; Wimmers, Klaus; Schellander, Karl; Leeb, Tosso

    2010-04-01

    Drip loss is the loss of fluid from a piece of meat without mechanical force and represents an important meat quality trait. Previous work revealed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for drip loss in pork in an experimental Duroc x Pietrain (DUPI) F2 family on SSC 5. Based on functional data indicating their possible involvement in water holding capacity and their expression in skeletal muscle, we selected five positional candidates (ACO2, ADSL, CBY1, KCNJ4, PLA2AG6) out of 130 predicted genes in the QTL interval for further analysis. We performed a mutation analysis of all coding exons and discovered 204 polymorphisms. We genotyped 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 192 Pietrain pigs with extreme drip loss phenotypes and detected a possible association with drip loss for one non-coding SNP in the ADSL gene (ss107793818, p(raw) = 0.021). Correspondingly, ADSL diplotypes were associated with drip loss and pH1 of M. longissimus dorsi. However, after correction for multiple testing, none of the tested SNPs were significantly associated with drip loss. One possible explanation for these results is that one of the QTL-alleles from the experimental DUPI family may be fixed or nearly fixed in the tested Pietrain population.

  19. Manipulation of molecular structures with magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boamfa, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the use of magnetic fields as a handle to manipulate matter at a molecular level and as a tool to probe molecular properties or inter molecular interactions. The work consists of in situ optical studies of (polymer) liquid crystals and molecular aggregates in high

  20. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-08-14

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation--a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation.

  1. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation—a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation. PMID:18715062

  2. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-08-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation-a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation.

  3. Molecular motion and structure in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolan, K.R.; Baxter, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: When molten thermoplastics solidify, the polymeric chains form a completely amorphous structure or a mixture of crystalline and amorphous regions. Measurement of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times provides information about the configuration and molecular motion of polymeric chains in solid plastics. We are currently measuring the NMR relaxation times T 1 , T 2 , T 2 and T 1p as a function of temperature using a Bruker High Power pulsed NMR Spectrometer for several different classes of thermoplastics containing varying concentrations of inorganic filler materials. We present data here for T 1 , and T 2 obtained for polyethylenes, polypropylenes, polystyrenes and acrylics in the temperature range 100 K to 450 K. At temperatures below 320 K, all of the polyethylenes and polypropylenes and some of the polystyrenes and acrylics produced NMR signals after a single radio frequency (RF) pulse with rapidly and slowly decaying components corresponding to the rigid and flexible regions within the plastic. From these results we have estimated using Mathematica the amount of crystallinity within the polyethylenes and polypropylenes. For the impact modified polystyrenes and acrylics studied we have estimated the amounts of elastomeric phases present. We find that the initial rapid decay signal produced by polyethylenes and polypropylenes is Gaussian while the long tail is Lorentzian. All of the signal components from the polystyrenes and the acrylics were fitted using Lorentzian functions indicating their structures are highly amorphous. Addition of CaCO 3 filler to polypropylene resins appears to reduce the crystallinity of the material. We also present data for the activation energy of the molecular motion inducing longitudinal relaxation, from T 1 measurements

  4. Thermal Conductivity and Specific Heat Measurements of Candidate Structural Materials for the JWST Optical Bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, E. R.; Tuttle, J. G.

    2006-03-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will include an optical bench known as the integrated science instrument module (ISIM). Candidate structural materials for the ISIM must have low density, high stiffness, and low thermal expansion coefficient at the operating temperature of 30 Kelvin. The thermal conductivity and specific heat are important in modeling the on-orbit cooldown. We built two different systems for measuring the thermal conductivity and specific heat of samples between 4 Kelvin and 290 Kelvin. Both experiments were carefully designed to minimize potential errors due to radiative heat transfer. We chose the cooling system and instrumentation to allow long-term unattended operation. Software was developed to automate each experiment. It used an algorithm designed to ensure that each system was in steady state before a measurement was taken. We describe the two experiments and present the data.

  5. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structures of Chimeric Hemagglutinin Displayed on a Universal Influenza Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Erin E H; Podolsky, Kira A; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Kuybeda, Oleg; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Tan, Gene S; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2016-03-22

    Influenza viruses expressing chimeric hemagglutinins (HAs) are important tools in the quest for a universal vaccine. Using cryo-electron tomography, we have determined the structures of a chimeric HA variant that comprises an H1 stalk and an H5 globular head domain (cH5/1 HA) in native and antibody-bound states. We show that cH5/1 HA is structurally different from native HA, displaying a 60° rotation between the stalk and head groups, leading to a novel and unexpected "open" arrangement of HA trimers. cH5/1N1 viruses also display higher glycoprotein density than pH1N1 or H5N1 viruses, but despite these differences, antibodies that target either the stalk or head domains of hemagglutinins still bind to cH5/1 HA with the same consequences as those observed with native H1 or H5 HA. Our results show that a large range of structural plasticity can be tolerated in the chimeric spike scaffold without disrupting structural and geometric aspects of antibody binding. Chimeric hemagglutinin proteins are set to undergo human clinical trials as a universal influenza vaccine candidate, yet no structural information for these proteins is available. Using cryo-electron tomography, we report the first three-dimensional (3D) visualization of chimeric hemagglutinin proteins displayed on the surface of the influenza virus. We show that, unexpectedly, the chimeric hemagglutinin structure differs from those of naturally occurring hemagglutinins by displaying a more open head domain and a dramatically twisted head/stalk arrangement. Despite this unusual spatial relationship between head and stalk regions, virus preparations expressing the chimeric hemagglutinin are fully infectious and display a high glycoprotein density, which likely helps induction of a broadly protective immune response. Copyright © 2016 Tran et al.

  6. Physics Structure Analysis of Parallel Waves Concept of Physics Teacher Candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwi, S; Linuwih, S; Supardi, K I

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to find a parallel structure concept of wave physics and the factors that influence on the formation of parallel conceptions of physics teacher candidates. The method used qualitative research which types of cross-sectional design. These subjects were five of the third semester of basic physics and six of the fifth semester of wave course students. Data collection techniques used think aloud and written tests. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive technique-percentage. The data analysis technique for belief and be aware of answers uses an explanatory analysis. Results of the research include: 1) the structure of the concept can be displayed through the illustration of a map containing the theoretical core, supplements the theory and phenomena that occur daily; 2) the trend of parallel conception of wave physics have been identified on the stationary waves, resonance of the sound and the propagation of transverse electromagnetic waves; 3) the influence on the parallel conception that reading textbooks less comprehensive and knowledge is partial understanding as forming the structure of the theory. (paper)

  7. Physics Structure Analysis of Parallel Waves Concept of Physics Teacher Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwi, S.; Supardi, K. I.; Linuwih, S.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research was to find a parallel structure concept of wave physics and the factors that influence on the formation of parallel conceptions of physics teacher candidates. The method used qualitative research which types of cross-sectional design. These subjects were five of the third semester of basic physics and six of the fifth semester of wave course students. Data collection techniques used think aloud and written tests. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive technique-percentage. The data analysis technique for belief and be aware of answers uses an explanatory analysis. Results of the research include: 1) the structure of the concept can be displayed through the illustration of a map containing the theoretical core, supplements the theory and phenomena that occur daily; 2) the trend of parallel conception of wave physics have been identified on the stationary waves, resonance of the sound and the propagation of transverse electromagnetic waves; 3) the influence on the parallel conception that reading textbooks less comprehensive and knowledge is partial understanding as forming the structure of the theory.

  8. Gene-Expression-Guided Selection of Candidate Loci and Molecular Phenotype Analyses Enhance Genetic Discovery in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Koldobskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a highly heterogeneous autoimmune disorder characterized by differences in autoantibody profiles, serum cytokines, and clinical manifestations. We have previously conducted a case-case genome-wide association study (GWAS of SLE patients to detect associations with autoantibody profile and serum interferon alpha (IFN-α. In this study, we used public gene expression data sets to rationally select additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for validation. The top 200 GWAS SNPs were searched in a database which compares genome-wide expression data to genome-wide SNP genotype data in HapMap cell lines. SNPs were chosen for validation if they were associated with differential expression of 15 or more genes at a significance of P<9×10−5. This resulted in 11 SNPs which were genotyped in 453 SLE patients and 418 matched controls. Three SNPs were associated with SLE-associated autoantibodies, and one of these SNPs was also associated with serum IFN-α (P<4.5×10−3 for all. One additional SNP was associated exclusively with serum IFN-α. Case-control analysis was insensitive to these molecular subphenotype associations. This study illustrates the use of gene expression data to rationally select candidate loci in autoimmune disease, and the utility of stratification by molecular phenotypes in the discovery of additional genetic associations in SLE.

  9. Gene-expression-guided selection of candidate loci and molecular phenotype analyses enhance genetic discovery in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldobskaya, Yelena; Ko, Kichul; Kumar, Akaash A; Agik, Sandra; Arrington, Jasmine; Kariuki, Silvia N; Franek, Beverly S; Kumabe, Marissa; Utset, Tammy O; Jolly, Meenakshi; Skol, Andrew D; Niewold, Timothy B

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a highly heterogeneous autoimmune disorder characterized by differences in autoantibody profiles, serum cytokines, and clinical manifestations. We have previously conducted a case-case genome-wide association study (GWAS) of SLE patients to detect associations with autoantibody profile and serum interferon alpha (IFN-α). In this study, we used public gene expression data sets to rationally select additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for validation. The top 200 GWAS SNPs were searched in a database which compares genome-wide expression data to genome-wide SNP genotype data in HapMap cell lines. SNPs were chosen for validation if they were associated with differential expression of 15 or more genes at a significance of P < 9 × 10(-5). This resulted in 11 SNPs which were genotyped in 453 SLE patients and 418 matched controls. Three SNPs were associated with SLE-associated autoantibodies, and one of these SNPs was also associated with serum IFN-α (P < 4.5 × 10(-3) for all). One additional SNP was associated exclusively with serum IFN-α. Case-control analysis was insensitive to these molecular subphenotype associations. This study illustrates the use of gene expression data to rationally select candidate loci in autoimmune disease, and the utility of stratification by molecular phenotypes in the discovery of additional genetic associations in SLE.

  10. Molecular structure input on the web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A molecule editor, that is program for input and editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. This review focuses on a special type of molecule editors, namely those that are used for molecule structure input on the web. Scientific computing is now moving more and more in the direction of web services and cloud computing, with servers scattered all around the Internet. Thus a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, and a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. The review covers a history of web-based structure input, starting with simple text entry boxes and early molecule editors based on clickable maps, before moving to the current situation dominated by Java applets. One typical example - the popular JME Molecule Editor - will be described in more detail. Modern Ajax server-side molecule editors are also presented. And finally, the possible future direction of web-based molecule editing, based on technologies like JavaScript and Flash, is discussed.

  11. Curcumin: A Potential Candidate in Prevention of Cancer via Modulation of Molecular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad H. Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the most dreadful disease worldwide in terms of morbidity and mortality. The exact cause of cancer development and progression is not fully known. But it is thought that cancer occurs due to the structural and functional changes in the genes. The current approach to cancer treatment based on allopathic is expensive, exhibits side effects; and may also alter the normal functioning of genes. Thus, a safe and effective mode of treatment is needed to control the cancer development and progression. Some medicinal plants provide a safe, effective and affordable remedy to control the progression of malignant cells. The importance of medicinal plants and their constituents has been documented in Ayurveda, Unani medicine, and various religious books. Curcumin, a vital constituent of the spice turmeric, is an alternative approach in the prevention of cancer. Earlier studies have shown the effect of curcumin as an antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumor and it also has a noteworthy role in the control of different diseases. In this review, we summarize the understanding of chemopreventive effects of curcumin in the prevention of cancer via the regulation of various cell signaling and genetic pathways.

  12. Curcumin: A Potential Candidate in Prevention of Cancer via Modulation of Molecular Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Arshad H.; Al Zohairy, Mohammad A.; Aly, Salah M.; Khan, Masood A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the most dreadful disease worldwide in terms of morbidity and mortality. The exact cause of cancer development and progression is not fully known. But it is thought that cancer occurs due to the structural and functional changes in the genes. The current approach to cancer treatment based on allopathic is expensive, exhibits side effects; and may also alter the normal functioning of genes. Thus, a safe and effective mode of treatment is needed to control the cancer development and progression. Some medicinal plants provide a safe, effective and affordable remedy to control the progression of malignant cells. The importance of medicinal plants and their constituents has been documented in Ayurveda, Unani medicine, and various religious books. Curcumin, a vital constituent of the spice turmeric, is an alternative approach in the prevention of cancer. Earlier studies have shown the effect of curcumin as an antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumor and it also has a noteworthy role in the control of different diseases. In this review, we summarize the understanding of chemopreventive effects of curcumin in the prevention of cancer via the regulation of various cell signaling and genetic pathways. PMID:25295272

  13. Glutathione transferase (GST) as a candidate molecular-based biomarker for soil toxin exposure in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaCourse, E. James, E-mail: james.la-course@liverpool.ac.u [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); Hernandez-Viadel, Mariluz; Jefferies, James R. [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Huntingdon PE28 2LS (United Kingdom); Barrett, John [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); John Morgan, A.; Kille, Peter [Biosciences, University of Cardiff, Cardiff CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Brophy, Peter M. [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    The earthworm Lumbricus rubellus (Hoffmeister, 1843) is a terrestrial pollution sentinel. Enzyme activity and transcription of phase II detoxification superfamily glutathione transferases (GST) is known to respond in earthworms after soil toxin exposure, suggesting GST as a candidate molecular-based pollution biomarker. This study combined sub-proteomics, bioinformatics and biochemical assay to characterise the L. rubellus GST complement as pre-requisite to initialise assessment of the applicability of GST as a biomarker. L. rubellus possesses a range of GSTs related to known classes, with evidence of tissue-specific synthesis. Two affinity-purified GSTs dominating GST protein synthesis (Sigma and Pi class) were cloned, expressed and characterised for enzyme activity with various substrates. Electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following SDS-PAGE were superior in retaining subunit stability relative to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). This study provides greater understanding of Phase II detoxification GST superfamily status of an important environmental pollution sentinel organism. - This study currently provides the most comprehensive view of the Phase II detoxification enzyme superfamily of glutathione transferases within the important environmental pollution sentinel earthworm Lumbricus rubellus.

  14. Glutathione transferase (GST) as a candidate molecular-based biomarker for soil toxin exposure in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaCourse, E. James; Hernandez-Viadel, Mariluz; Jefferies, James R.; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J.; Barrett, John; John Morgan, A.; Kille, Peter; Brophy, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    The earthworm Lumbricus rubellus (Hoffmeister, 1843) is a terrestrial pollution sentinel. Enzyme activity and transcription of phase II detoxification superfamily glutathione transferases (GST) is known to respond in earthworms after soil toxin exposure, suggesting GST as a candidate molecular-based pollution biomarker. This study combined sub-proteomics, bioinformatics and biochemical assay to characterise the L. rubellus GST complement as pre-requisite to initialise assessment of the applicability of GST as a biomarker. L. rubellus possesses a range of GSTs related to known classes, with evidence of tissue-specific synthesis. Two affinity-purified GSTs dominating GST protein synthesis (Sigma and Pi class) were cloned, expressed and characterised for enzyme activity with various substrates. Electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following SDS-PAGE were superior in retaining subunit stability relative to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). This study provides greater understanding of Phase II detoxification GST superfamily status of an important environmental pollution sentinel organism. - This study currently provides the most comprehensive view of the Phase II detoxification enzyme superfamily of glutathione transferases within the important environmental pollution sentinel earthworm Lumbricus rubellus.

  15. Density functional studies of molecular structures of N-methyl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    studies. Sparse experimental data on the gas-phase geometry of DMF reported in the literature compares well with the DFT results on DMF. DFT emerges as a powerful method to calculate molecular structures. Keywords. Density functional theory; alkyl amides; molecular structure of alkyl amides; transition state search; ...

  16. Association study of molecular polymorphisms in candidate genes related to stress responses with production and meat quality traits in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenina, E; Babigumira, B M; Le Mignon, G; Bazovkina, D; Rousseau, S; Salin, F; Bendixen, C; Mormede, P

    2013-02-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis exerts a large range of effects on metabolism, the immune system, inflammatory processes, and brain functions. Together with the sympathetic nervous system, it is also the most important stress-responsive neuroendocrine system. Both systems influence production traits, carcass composition, and meat quality. The HPA axis may be a critical target for genetic selection of more robust animals. Indeed, numerous studies in various species have demonstrated the importance of genetic factors in shaping the individual HPA axis phenotype, and genetic polymorphism can be found at each level of the axis, including hormone production by the adrenal cortices under stimulation by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), hormone bioavailability, or receptor and postreceptor mechanisms. The aim of the present experiment was to extend these findings to the brain neurochemical systems involved in stress responses. To this end, a number of candidate genes were sequenced for molecular polymorphisms and their association was studied with stress neuroendocrine and production traits in a genetically diverse population consisting of 100 female pigs from an advanced intercross (F10-F12) between 2 highly divergent breeds, Large White (LW) and Meishan (MS). The LW breed has a high production potential for lean meat and a low HPA axis activity, and the MS breed has low growth rate, fat carcasses-but large litters of highly viable piglets-and a high HPA axis activity. Candidate genes were chosen in the catecholaminergic and serotonergic pathways, in the pituitary control of cortisol production, among genes previously demonstrated to be differentially expressed in ACTH-stimulated adrenal glands from LW and MS pigs, and in cortisol receptors. Sixty new polymorphisms were found. The association study with carcass and meat quality traits and with endocrine traits showed a number of significant results, such as monoamine oxidase (MAOA) polymorphisms with

  17. Molecular structure and centrifugal distortion in methylthioethyne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsen, D. den

    1969-01-01

    The investigation of the microwave spectra of five isotopic species of methylthioethyne, HCCSCH3 enabled a fairly reliable calculation to be made of bond lengths and angles. The centrifugal distortion parameters are related to molecular vibrations.

  18. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated alg...

  19. Molecular catalysts structure and functional design

    CERN Document Server

    Gade, Lutz H

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the key aspects and latest advances in the rapidly developing field of molecular catalysis, this book covers new strategies to investigate reaction mechanisms, the enhancement of the catalysts' selectivity and efficiency, as well as the rational design of well-defined molecular catalysts. The interdisciplinary author team with an excellent reputation within the community discusses experimental and theoretical studies, along with examples of improved catalysts, and their application in organic synthesis, biocatalysis, and supported organometallic catalysis. As a result, readers wil

  20. Similarity Measure for Molecular Structure: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, S. A.; Muda, A. K.; Choo, Y. H.; Muda, N. A.; Pratama, S. F.

    2017-09-01

    Similarity or distance measures have been used widely to calculate the similarity or dissimilarity between two samples of dataset. Cheminformatics is known as the domain that dealing with chemical information and both similarity and distance coefficient have been an important role for matching, searching and classification of chemical information. There are various types of similarity/distance coefficient used in molecular structure similarity searching. Generally, the calculation using similarity/distance coefficient is focusing more on 2-dimensional (2D) rather than 3-dimensional (3D) structure. In this paper, the popular similarity/distance coefficients for molecular structure will be reviewed together with the review on 3D molecular structure.

  1. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database to molecular inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpen, A Guy

    2002-06-01

    Applications of the data in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) to knowledge acquisition and fundamental research in molecular inorganic chemistry are reviewed. Various classes of application are identified, including the derivation of typical molecular dimensions and their variability and transferability, the derivation and testing of theories of molecular structure and bonding, the identification of reaction paths and related conformational analyses based on the structure correlation hypothesis, and the identification of common and presumably energetically favourable intermolecular interactions. In many of these areas, the availability of plentiful structural data from the CSD is set against the emergence of high-quality computational data on the geometry and energy of inorganic complexes.

  2. Theoretical study of electron transport throughout some molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A. A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2017-11-01

    The present work is a theoretical study of the electronic properties of some molecular structures. The system that takes into account in the study is left lead-donor-molecule-acceptor-right lead. The molecule, such as (phenyl, biphenyl, triphenyl, naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene), is threaded by magnetic flux. This work contains two parts. First is computing density of states of the molecular structures as a closed system by density functional theory (DFT). Second is calculating the transmission probability and electric current of such molecular structures as an open system by steady-state theoretical model. Furthermore, the most important effects, taking into consideration are quantum interference, magnetic flux, and interface structure. Our results show that the connection of the molecule to the two leads, the number of rings, the magnetic flux, and the geometrical structure of the molecule play an important role in determining the energy gap of molecular structures.

  3. Prediction of overall in vitro microsomal stability of drug candidates based on molecular modeling and support vector machines. Case study of novel arylpiperazines derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Ulenberg

    Full Text Available Other than efficacy of interaction with the molecular target, metabolic stability is the primary factor responsible for the failure or success of a compound in the drug development pipeline. The ideal drug candidate should be stable enough to reach its therapeutic site of action. Despite many recent excellent achievements in the field of computational methods supporting drug metabolism studies, a well-recognized procedure to model and predict metabolic stability quantitatively is still lacking. This study proposes a workflow for developing quantitative metabolic stability-structure relationships, taking a set of 30 arylpiperazine derivatives as an example. The metabolic stability of the compounds was assessed in in vitro incubations in the presence of human liver microsomes and NADPH and subsequently quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Density functional theory (DFT calculations were used to obtain 30 models of the molecules, and Dragon software served as a source of structure-based molecular descriptors. For modeling structure-metabolic stability relationships, Support Vector Machines (SVM, a non-linear machine learning technique, were found to be more effective than a regression technique, based on the validation parameters obtained. Moreover, for the first time, general sites of metabolism for arylpiperazines bearing the 4-aryl-2H-pyrido[1,2-c]pyrimidine-1,3-dione system were defined by analysis of Q-TOF-MS/MS spectra. The results indicated that the application of one of the most advanced chemometric techniques combined with a simple and quick in vitro procedure and LC-MS analysis provides a novel and valuable tool for predicting metabolic half-life values. Given the reduced time and simplicity of analysis, together with the accuracy of the predictions obtained, this is a valid approach for predicting metabolic stability using structural data. The approach presented provides a novel, comprehensive and reliable tool

  4. Lewis Structures Are Models for Predicting Molecular Structure, Not Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1999-07-01

    This article argues against a close relationship between Lewis dot structures and electron structure obtained from quantum mechanical calculations. Lewis structures are a powerful tool for structure prediction, though they are classical models of bonding and do not predict electronic structure. The "best" Lewis structures are those that, when combined with the VSEPR model, allow the accurate prediction of molecular properties, such as polarity, bond length, bond angle, and bond strength. These structures are achieved by minimizing formal charges within the molecule, even if it requires an expanded octet on atoms beyond the second period. Lewis structures that show an expanded octet do not imply full d-orbital involvement in the bonding. They suggest that the presence of low-lying d-orbitals is important in producing observed molecular structures. Based on this work, the presence of electron density, not a large separation in charge, is responsible for the short bond lengths and large angles in species containing nonmetal atoms from beyond the second period. This result contradicts results obtained from natural population analysis, a method that attempts to derive Lewis structures from molecular orbital calculations.

  5. Molecular dynamics modeling of structural battery components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verners, O.; Van Duin, A.C.T.; Wagemaker, M.; Simone, A.

    2015-01-01

    A crosslinked polymer based solid electrolyte prototype material –poly(propylene glycol) diacrylate– is studied using the reactive molecular dynamics force field ReaxFF. The focus of the study is the evaluation of the effects of equilibration and added plasticizer (ethylene carbonate) or anion

  6. Molecular structure of the lecithin ripple phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, AH; Yefimov, S; Mark, AE; Marrink, SJ

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lecithin lipid bilayers in water as they are cooled from the liquid crystalline phase show the spontaneous formation of rippled bilayers. The ripple consists of two domains of different length and orientation, connected by a kink. The organization of the lipids in

  7. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic investigations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cates an easy outlook of the makeup of the molec- ular orbitals in a certain energy range. The energy split between the HOMOs and LUMOs are the crit- ical parameters in special molecular electrical trans- port properties which help in the measure of elec- tron conductivity.42 The HOMO represents the ability to donate an ...

  8. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic investigations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spectroscopic properties of the title compound have beeninvestigated by using IR, UV–Vis and ¹H NMR techniques. The molecular geometry and spectroscopic data of the title compound have been calculated by using the density functional method (B3LYP) invoking 6-311G(d,p) basis set. UV-Vis spectra of the two ...

  9. Flavonoids-Rich Orthosiphon stamineus Extract as New Candidate for Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibition: A Molecular Docking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaei, Armaghan; Sultan Khan, Md Shamsuddin; F A Aisha, Abdalrahim; Abdul Majid, Amin Malik Shah; Hamdan, Mohammad Razak; Mordi, Mohd Nizam; Ismail, Zhari

    2016-11-09

    This study aims to evaluate the in vitro angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition activity of different extracts of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) leaves and their main flavonoids, namely rosmarinic acid (RA), sinensetin (SIN), eupatorin (EUP) and 3'-hydroxy-5,6,7,4'-tetramethoxyflavone (TMF). Furthermore, to identify possible mechanisms of action based on structure-activity relationships and molecular docking. The in vitro ACE inhibition activity relied on determining hippuric acid (HA) formation from ACE-specific substrate (hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL)) by the action of ACE enzyme. A High Performance Liquid Chromatography method combined with UV detection was developed and validated for measurement the concentration of produced HA. The chelation ability of OS extract and its reference compounds was evaluated by tetramethylmurexide reagent. Furthermore, molecular docking study was performed by LeadIT-FlexX : BioSolveIT's LeadIT program. OS ethanolic extract (OS-E) exhibited highest inhibition and lowest IC 50 value (45.77 ± 1.17 µg/mL) against ACE compared to the other extracts. Among the tested reference compounds, EUP with IC 50 15.35 ± 4.49 µg/mL had highest inhibition against ACE and binding ability with Zn (II) (56.03% ± 1.26%) compared to RA, TMF and SIN. Molecular docking studies also confirmed that flavonoids inhibit ACE via interaction with the zinc ion and this interaction is stabilized by other interactions with amino acids in the active site. In this study, we have demonstrated that changes in flavonoids active core affect their capacity to inhibit ACE. Moreover, we showed that ACE inhibition activity of flavonoids compounds is directly related to their ability to bind with zinc ion in the active site of ACE enzyme. It was also revealed that OS extract contained high amount of flavonoids other than RA, TMF, SIN and EUP. As such, application of OS extract is useful as inhibitors of ACE.

  10. Structure of bright-rimmed molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootten, A.; Sargent, A.; Knapp, G.; Huggins, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Five bright-rimmed molecular clouds, NGC 1977, IC 1396, IC 1848 A, B35, and NGC 7822, have been mapped with 30'' resolution in the J = 2--1 lines of 12 co. For the first three, 13 CO maps have also been made. The spatial distributions of temperature, density, and molecular abundance in these clouds have been determined, particularly in the vicinity of the rims. In general, the gas densities increase close to the rims, but temperature enhancements occur over comparatively extended regions. Near the rims the gas kinematics is varied: velocity gradients are observed in several regions, and in IC 1396 line broadening is distinguishable. A detailed study of the excitation of 13 CO demonstrates that near the well-resolved rim in NGC 1977 where C I and carbon recombination lines have been observed, there is a definite decline in the CO abundance. These molecular clouds span a variety of stages of star formation, but in none does the interaction with the adjacent H II region appear to have substantially affected the course of the star-forming history of the cloud

  11. MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS IN RUSSIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Abramycheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials and methods. 285 Russian patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS including 260 patients with a sporadic form and 25 with a familial form were examined for mutations in SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP,  ANG and other genes and the presence of associations among polymorphic sites in ATXN2 (polyCAG and VEGF (-2578С/А genes.Molecular genetic analysis was performed using direct sequencing, fragment analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction. On the last stage, rare ALS candidate genes were evaluated using a next generation sequencing (NGS panel.Results. Total rate of the identified mutations in the examined ALS cohort was 9.5 %. The most frequently observed defects were mutations in the SOD1 (24.0 % in familial ALS and 4.6 % in sporadic ALS and C9orf72 (pathological hexanucleotide repeat expansion was identified in 1.8 % cases of ALS, all sporadic genes. The TARDBP gene didn’t contain any mutations, though in the ALS group deletion c.715-126delG located in intron 5 of the TARDBP gene was significantly over-represented – 38.0 % vs. 26.6 % (χ2 = 13.17; р = 0.002. Mutations in the ANG gene were identified in 1.05 % of ALS patients (all cases were sporadic. In 1 (0.35 % sporadic case a G1082A mutation in the DCTN1 gene was identified. The examined group significantly more frequently carried a risk allele of the ATXN2 gene with an “intermediate” (28–33  number of CAG repeats – 5.0 % vs. 1.7 % in the control group (χ2 = 3.89; р = 0.0486. In Russian ALS patients, an association between the disease and the presence of a risk А-allele and homozygote genotype А/А of -2578С/А polymorphism in the VEGF gene was identified (χ2 = 7.14; р = 0.008 and χ2 = 13.46; р = 0.001 for the rates in the ALS population and in the control population, respectively, which is confirmed by the odds ratio.Conclusion. In the current article, molecular structure of ALS in the Russian population was examined, rates of individual genetic forms

  12. Crystal structure and pair potentials: A molecular-dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1980-10-06

    With use of a Lagrangian which allows for the variation of the shape and size of the periodically repeating molecular-dynamics cell, it is shown that different pair potentials lead to different crystal structures.

  13. Analysis of genetic structure in Slovak Pinzgau cattle using five candidate genes related to milk production traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miluchova Martina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper was to identify genetic structure of five candidate genes for milk production in Slovak Pinzgau breed. A total of 86 mothers of bulls of Slovak Pinzgau cattle were use in this study. To genotype of cows for candidate genes we used PCR methods (PCR-RFLP, ARMS-PCR, multiplex PCR-RFLP. On the basis of PCR analyses we established genotype structure of cattle population and calculated allelic frequencies. Effectiveness of allele incidence and genetic diversity was evaluated with following parameters: theoretical heterozygosity (He exp, experimental heterozygosity (He obs, polymorphism information content (PIC, expected homozygosity (E, effective number of alleles (ENA, level of possible variability realization (V%. Slovak Pinzgau cattle exhibit the high values of heterozygosity, polymorphism information content, effective number of alleles and level of possible variability realization for genes CSN2, CSN3 and LALBA. In opposite, for genes CSN1S1 and LGB show high values of homozygosity.

  14. Hybrid structures for molecular level sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Melburne Charles

    With substantial molecular mobility and segment dynamics relative to metals and ceramics, all polymeric materials, to some extent, are stimuli-responsive by exhibiting pronounced chemical and physical changes in the backbone, side chains, segments, or end groups induced by changes in the local environment. Thus, the push to incorporate polymeric materials as sensing/responsive nanoscale layers into next-generation miniaturized sensor applications is a natural progression. The significance and impact of this research is wide-ranging because it offers design considerations and presents results in perhaps two of the most critical broad areas of nanotechnology: ultrathin multifunctional polymer coatings and miniaturized sensors. In this work, direct evidence is given showing that polymer coatings comprised of deliberately selected molecular segments with very different chemistry can have switchable properties, and that the surface composition can be precisely controlled, and thus properties can be tuned: all in films on the order of 20 nm and less. Furthermore, active sensing layers in the form of plasma-polymerized polymers are successfully incorporated into actual silicon based microsensors resulting in a novel hybrid organic/inorganic materials platform for microfabricated MEMS sensors with record performance far beyond contemporary sensors in terms of detection sensitivity to various environments. The results produced in this research show thermal sensors with more than two orders of magnitude better sensitivity than what is attainable currently. In addition, a humidity response on the order of parts per trillion, which is four orders of magnitude more sensitive than current designs is achieved. Molecular interactions and forces for organic molecules are characterized at the picoscale to optimize polymeric nanoscale layer design that in turn optimize and lead to microscale hybrid sensors with unprecedented sensitivities.

  15. Holistic computational structure screening of more than 12,000 candidates for solid lithium-ion conductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendek, Austin D.; Yang, Qian; Cubuk, Ekin D.; Duerloo, Karel-Alexander N.; Cui, Yi; Reed, Evan J.

    We present a new type of large-scale computational screening approach for identifying promising candidate materials for solid state electrolytes for lithium ion batteries that is capable of screening all known lithium containing solids. To predict the likelihood of a candidate material exhibiting high lithium ion conductivity, we leverage machine learning techniques to train an ionic conductivity classification model using logistic regression based on experimental measurements reported in the literature. This model, which is built on easily calculable atomistic descriptors, provides new insight into the structure-property relationship for superionic behavior in solids and is approximately one million times faster to evaluate than DFT-based approaches to calculating diffusion coefficients or migration barriers. We couple this model with several other technologically motivated heuristics to reduce the list of candidate materials from the more than 12,000 known lithium containing solids to 21 structures that show promise as electrolytes, few of which have been examined experimentally. Our screening utilizes structures and electronic information contained in the Materials Project database. This work is supported by an Office of Technology Licensing Fellowship through the Stanford Graduate Fellowship Program and a seed Grant from the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy at Stanford.

  16. Systematic analysis of crystal and molecular structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2012), s. 86-87 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura 2012. Kolokvium Krystalografické společnosti. 11.06.2012-14.06.2012, Klatovy] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : structure databases * structure-function relations * organic and inorganic materials Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  17. Characterising the Structure of Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Graeme Francis

    The Interstellar Medium contains the building blocks of matter in our Galaxy and plays a vital role in the evolution of low mass star formation. The poorly studied molecular clouds of Lupus and Chamaeleon contain ongoing low mass star formation, and are in close proximity to our Solar System. While on the other hand the Carina molecular cloud, poorly observed in radio wavelength, is an active region of star formation and host some of the brightest stars known within our Galaxy. Using tracers like carbon monoxide, atomic neutral carbon, and ammonia, we are able to measure the temperature and density of the gas cloud. This information allows us to understand the initial conditions of the formation of low mass stars. Observations conducted with the 22-m Mopra radio telescope (located at the edge of the Warrumbungle Mountains near Coonabarabran), in the Carbon monoxide (CO) isotopologues 12 CO, 13 CO, C17O, and C18O (1-0) transitions, have mapped the Chamaeleon II cloud, an intermediate mass cloud within the Chamaeleon. Through the sub-arcminute maps, comparisons have been made to previous low resolution (2.5') maps which have been to resolve some of the dense clumps previously identified. Optical depth, column density, and excitation temperature derived from the CO maps, are consistent with previous results. A detailed comparison between identified C18O clumps have shown the different conditions occurring within the clumps, some of which contain or are located near a population of young stellar objects. The Northern region of the Carina Nebular Complex, was observed with NANTEN2, a 4-m radio telescope (located in the Chilean Atacama desert), in the 12CO (4-3) and [C I] 3P1-3P0 emission lines. Previous observations towards this region has either been at poor resolution or had limited coverage. The presented observations, strike a balance between the two; observing in sub-arcmin resolution (0.6') and with an area of 0.9° X 0.5° mapped. Excitation temperature of the 12

  18. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic investigations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 29 December 2015; revised 9 April 2016; accepted 25 May 2016 ... B, open form blue. Scheme 1. Structures and Photochromic reaction of the title compound. 2. Experimental. 2.1 Materials and measurements. The mid-IR spectra were obtained in the ... segment is put between two parallel Au(111) surfaces,.

  19. Structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA: Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structures of crystals of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA, grown and analysed under different conditions, provide insights into hitherto underappreciated details of molecular structure and plasticity. In particular, they yield information on the invariant and variable features of the geometry of the P-loop, whose binding to ATP ...

  20. Molecular dynamics of the structure and thermodynamics of dusty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The static structure and thermodynamic properties of two-dimensional dusty plasma are analyzed for some typical values of coupling and screening parameters using classical molecular dynamics. Radial distribution function and static structure factor are computed. The radial distribution functions display the typical ...

  1. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Harter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES. Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES used in Born-Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v, then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters.

  2. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  3. Structures of Life: The Role of Molecular Structures in Scientists' Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; van der Vet, P.E.; Nijholt, Antinus; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Jorge, J

    2008-01-01

    The visual and multidimensional representations like images and graphical structures related to biology provide great insights into understanding the complexities of different organisms. Especially, life scientists use different representations of molecular structures to answer biological questions

  4. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  5. Characteristics of Color Development in Seeds of Brown- and Yellow-Seeded Heading Chinese Cabbage and Molecular Analysis of Brsc, the Candidate Gene Controlling Seed Coat Color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjing Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The proanthocyanidin (PA is the main flavonoids which affect the seed coat color in Brassica species. In this paper, characteristics of color development and accumulation of flavonoids were analyzed in the seeds of brown-seeded (B147 and yellow-seeded (B80 heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. Pekinensis. It is found that the content of phenolic compounds in B147 were significantly more than that of B80 by using dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA staining and toluidine blue O (TBO staining. In previous studies, the locus associated with seed coat color has been mapped. The results of whole genome re-sequencing showed that there are large fragment deletions variation in the mapping region between the brown-seeded parent ‘92S105’ and the yellow-seeded parent ‘91-125.’ Based on the B. rapa genome annotation information, the TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1 (TTG1, is likely to be the candidate gene controlling seed coat color. A 94-base deletion was found in the 96th base downstream of the initiation codon in the TTG1 of yellow seed, thus, the termination codon TGA was occurred in the 297th base which makes the full length of TTG1 of yellow seed is 300 bp. Based on the differential sequences of TTG1 of brown and yellow seed, a functional marker, Brsc-yettg1, was developed to detect the variation of TTG1. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of BrTTG1 in different tissues showed that expression levels of BrTTG1 was not tissue-specific. During the whole seed development period, the expression of BrTTG1 in B147 was higher than that of B80. The expression levels of four structural genes, BrDFR, BrANS, BrANR1, and BrANR2 in B147 were also higher than those in B80. The co-segregation molecular markers obtained in this report and TTG1 related information provide a basis for further understanding of the molecular mechanism of seed coat color in heading Chinese cabbage.

  6. MOSBY: a molecular structure viewer program with portability and extensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yutaka; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2002-03-01

    A molecular structure viewer program, MOSBY has been developed for studies that use atomic coordinates to understand the structures of protein molecules. The program is designed to be portable with a comprehensive user interface by our high-throughput graphics library. In addition, it cooperates with extension modules customized for individual research topics and analysis. For example, an electron density module loads and displays electron density maps derived in X-ray crystallographic analysis superimposed to an atomic model. A molecular dynamics module reads a trajectory file of the results of molecular dynamics calculations and animates the structure. These plug-in modules are devised to function without modification to the MOSBY program. For variations of analysis and calculations with atomic coordinates, the portability and extensibility illustrated by MOSBY play an important rule in scientific computational tools with active software development.

  7. Molecular structures guide the engineering of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekel, Stefan J; Haynes, Karmella A

    2017-07-27

    Chromatin is a system of proteins, RNA, and DNA that interact with each other to organize and regulate genetic information within eukaryotic nuclei. Chromatin proteins carry out essential functions: packing DNA during cell division, partitioning DNA into sub-regions within the nucleus, and controlling levels of gene expression. There is a growing interest in manipulating chromatin dynamics for applications in medicine and agriculture. Progress in this area requires the identification of design rules for the chromatin system. Here, we focus on the relationship between the physical structure and function of chromatin proteins. We discuss key research that has elucidated the intrinsic properties of chromatin proteins and how this information informs design rules for synthetic systems. Recent work demonstrates that chromatin-derived peptide motifs are portable and in some cases can be customized to alter their function. Finally, we present a workflow for fusion protein design and discuss best practices for engineering chromatin to assist scientists in advancing the field of synthetic epigenetics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Structural and molecular hair abnormalities in trichothiodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christine; Morris, Andrea; Schlücker, Sebastian; Imoto, Kyoko; Price, Vera H; Menefee, Emory; Wincovitch, Stephen M; Levin, Ira W; Tamura, Deborah; Strehle, Katrin R; Kraemer, Kenneth H; DiGiovanna, John J

    2006-10-01

    We examined hair from 15 patients with trichothiodystrophy (TTD), a rare inherited disorder with brittle, cystine-deficient hair. They had a wide variety of phenotypes, from brittle hair only to severe intellectual impairment and developmental delay. Polarizing light microscopic examination showed alternating light and dark (tiger tail) bands under polarizing microscopy. Confocal microscopy captured structural features of breaks in intact TTD hairs. The autofluorescent appearance was regular and smooth in normal donors and markedly irregular in sections of TTD hairs possibly reflecting abnormalities in melanin distribution. Scanning electron microscopy revealed numerous surface irregularities. All TTD hair samples had reduced sulfur content. We observed an inverse correlation (R(val)=0.9) between sulfur content and percent of hairs with shaft abnormalities (trichoschisis, trichorrhexis nodosa, or ribbon/twist). There was no association between clinical disease severity and percent of abnormal hairs. Raman spectra of hairs from TTD patients and normal donors revealed a larger contribution of energetically less favored disulfide conformers in TTD hairs. Our data indicate that the brittleness of the TTD hair is dependent upon abnormalities at several levels of organization. These changes make TTD hairs excessively prone to breakage and weathering.

  9. RxnFinder: biochemical reaction search engines using molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian-Nan; Deng, Zhe; Hu, Huanan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions play a key role to help sustain life and allow cells to grow. RxnFinder was developed to search biochemical reactions from KEGG reaction database using three search criteria: molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity. RxnFinder is helpful to get reference reactions for biosynthesis and xenobiotics metabolism. RxnFinder is freely available via: http://sdd.whu.edu.cn/rxnfinder. qnhu@whu.edu.cn.

  10. Electronic structure of molecular Rydberg states of some small molecules and molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Biao; Li Jiaming

    1993-01-01

    Based on an independent-particle-approximation (i.e. the multiple scattering self-consistent-field theory), the electronic structures of Rydberg states of the small diatomic molecules H 2 , He 2 and the He 2 + molecular ion were studied. The principal quantum number of the first state of the Rydberg series is determined from a convention of the limit of the molecular electronic configuration. The dynamics of the excited molecules and molecular ion has been elucidated. The theoretical results are in fair agreement with the existing experimental measurements, thus they can serve as a reliable basis for future refined treatment such as the configuration interaction calculation

  11. Nonlinear excitations in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Rasmussen, Kim; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1995-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence of the imp......We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence...... excitations. Analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation....

  12. Molecular structure of dextran sulphate sodium in aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Every, Hayley A.; Jiskoot, Wim; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Buijs, Wim

    2018-03-01

    Here we propose a 3D-molecular structural model for dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in a neutral aqueous environment based on the results of a molecular modelling study. The DSS structure is dominated by the stereochemistry of the 1,6-linked α-glucose units and the presence of two sulphate groups on each α-glucose unit. The structure of DSS can be best described as a helix with various patterns of di-sulphate substitution on the glucose rings. The presence of a side chain does not alter the 3D-structure of the linear main chain much, but affects the overall spatial dimension of the polymer. The simulated polymers have a diameter similar to or in some cases even larger than model α-hemolysin nano-pores for macromolecule transport in many biological processes, indicating a size-limited translocation through such pores. All results of the molecular modelling study are in line with previously reported experimental data. This study establishes the three-dimensional structure of DSS and summarizes the spatial dimension of the polymer, serving as the basis for a better understanding on the molecular level of DSS-involved electrostatic interaction processes with biological components like proteins and cell pores.

  13. Nanohashtag structures based on carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Connor W.; Rybolt, Thomas R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular mechanics was used to study the noncovalent interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers. Groups of nanotubes have the tendency to form tight, parallel bundles (||||). Molecular linkers were introduced into our models to stabilize nanostructures with carbon nanotubes held in perpendicular orientations. Molecular mechanics makes it possible to estimate the strength of noncovalent interactions holding these structures together and to calculate the overall binding energy of the structures. A set of linkers were designed and built around a 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene tether with two corannulene containing pincers that extend in opposite directions from the central cyclooctatetraene portion. Each pincer consists of a pairs of "arms." These molecular linkers were modified so that the "hand" portions of each pair of "arms" could close together to grab and hold two carbon nanotubes in a perpendicular arrangement. To illustrate the possibility of more complicated and open perpendicular CNTs structures, our primary goal was to create a model of a nanohashtag (#) CNT conformation that is more stable than any parallel CNT arrangements with bound linker molecules forming clumps of CNTs and linkers in non-hashtag arrangements. This goal was achieved using a molecular linker (C280H96) that utilizes van der Waals interactions to two perpendicular oriented CNTs. Hydrogen bonding was then added between linker molecules to augment the stability of the hashtag structure. In the hashtag structure with hydrogen bonding, four (5,5) CNTs of length 4.46 nm (18 rings) and four linkers (C276H92N8O8) stabilized the hashtag so that the average binding energy per pincer was 118 kcal/mol.

  14. Investigation of structure-activity relationships of synthetic anti-gonadotropin releasing hormone vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chenghung; Varamini, Pegah; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Mansfeld, Friederike M; D'Occhio, Michael J; Toth, Istvan

    2015-05-01

    The immunoneutralization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) can be used for the treatment of human hormone-dependent male and female cancers or as immunocontraceptives in animals. Vaccine candidates 1 [Th(K-LP)GnRH], 2 [GnRH(K-LP)Th], 3 [GnRH(K-Th)LP], and 4 [Th(K-GnRH)LP] (for which K=lysine, LP=lipopeptide Ser-Ser-C16 -C16 , and Th=T helper cell epitope influenza HA2), were synthesized by assembling a CD4(+) T helper cell epitope (Th), GnRH, and an adjuvanting lipid moiety (LP) in various spatial arrangements. All compounds were efficiently taken up by antigen-presenting cells with significant immunogenicity without an external adjuvant. Compounds 2, 3, and 4, in which GnRH is conjugated through its C terminus, produced higher GnRH-specific antibody responses than construct 1, in which the GnRH moiety is conjugated through its N terminus. All four constructs induced a significant antiproliferative effect (up to 55 %) on GnRH-receptor-positive LNCaP cells, but showed weaker activity in the GnRH-receptor-negative SKOV-3 cell line. Marked degenerative changes were observed in morphology and follicular development in the ovaries of immunized mice, with approximately 30 % higher degenerative antral and atretic follicles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: Integrated molecular dynamics—Statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, M. Ilk; Nar, A.; Ferrarini, A.; Frezza, E.; Greco, C.; Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio.

  16. Investigation of candidate data structures and search algorithms to support a knowledge based fault diagnosis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, Edward L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The focus of this research is the investigation of data structures and associated search algorithms for automated fault diagnosis of complex systems such as the Hubble Space Telescope. Such data structures and algorithms will form the basis of a more sophisticated Knowledge Based Fault Diagnosis System. As a part of the research, several prototypes were written in VAXLISP and implemented on one of the VAX-11/780's at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This report describes and gives the rationale for both the data structures and algorithms selected. A brief discussion of a user interface is also included.

  17. Improvement in Aqueous Solubility of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Agonists by Bending the Molecular Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Michiaki; Ichikawa, Yuki; Tomoshige, Shusuke; Makishima, Makoto; Muranaka, Atsuya; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Minoru

    2016-08-05

    Aqueous solubility is a key requirement for many functional molecules, e. g., drug candidates. Decrease of the partition coefficient (log P) by chemical modification, i.e., introduction of hydrophilic group(s) into molecules, is a classical strategy for improving aqueous solubility. We have been investigating alternative strategies for improving the aqueous solubility of pharmaceutical compounds by disrupting intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that introducing a bend into the molecular structure of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonists by changing the substitution pattern from para to meta or ortho dramatically enhances aqueous solubility by up to 890-fold. We found that meta analogs exhibit similar hydrophobicity to the parent para compound, and have lower melting points, supporting the idea that the increase of aqueous solubility was due to decreased intermolecular interactions in the solid state as a result of the structural changes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fluid structure and molecular interaction of acetophenone derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 1129-1137. Fluid structure and molecular interaction of acetophenone derivatives. K K GUPTA and P J sINGH. Department of Physics, Government MSJ (PG) College, Bharatpur 321 001, India. E-mail: kkguptakkg@indiatimes.com. MS received 4 June 2003; revised 2 January 2004; accepted 2 January 2004. Abstract.

  19. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and structure prediction of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and structure prediction of the related to b 0,+ amino acid transporter (rBAT) in Cyprinus carpio L. ... The amplified product was 2370 bp, including a 42 bp 5'-untranslated region, a 288 bp 3'-untranslated region, and a 2040 bp open reading frame (ORF), which encoded 679 amino acids ...

  20. Molecular conformation and liquid structure of 2-propanol through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neutron diffraction data [12]. 3. Method of analysis. 3.1 General background. In the following paragraph we present the extraction of total neutron molecular structure .... carbon and oxygen contributions and important information about the hydrogen positions ... the hydroxyl group OD1 is at a staggered position, as expected.

  1. Molecular structure and DFT investigations on new cobalt(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sci. Vol. 127, No. 12, December 2015, pp. 2137–2149. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0976-x. Molecular structure and DFT investigations on new cobalt(II) chloride complex with superbase guanidine type ligand. SAIED M SOLIMANa,b,∗, MORSY A M ABU-YOUSSEFb,∗. , JΦRG ALBERINGc and.

  2. Variational cellular model of the molecular and crystal electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.G.; Leite, J.R.

    1977-12-01

    A variational version of the cellular method is developed to calculate the electronic structure of molecules and crystals. Due to the simplicity of the secular equation, the method is easy to be implemented. Preliminary calculations on the hydrogen molecular ion suggest that it is also accurate and of fast convergence [pt

  3. Molecular tailoring approach for exploring structures, energetics and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    4,5 proposed a density matrix divide-and-conquer (DC) method for electronic structure calculation of large molecules. The method is based on partitioning the density matrix and is applicable to both HF and DFT level of theories. Subsequently, Gadre et al. 6 formulated the. Molecular Tailoring Approach (MTA) for evaluating.

  4. Learning Molecular Structures in a Tangible Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kikuo; Takase, Norio

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the characteristics of using a tangible table top environment produced by augmented reality (AR), aimed at improving the environment in which learners observe three-dimensional molecular structures. The authors perform two evaluation experiments. A performance test for a user interface demonstrates that learners with a…

  5. Molecular epidemiology and population structure of bovine Streptococcus uberis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rato, M G; Bexiga, R; Nunes, S F

    2008-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology and population structure of 30 bovine subclinical mastitis field isolates of Streptococcus uberis, collected from 6 Portuguese herds (among 12 farms screened) during 2002 and 2003, were examined by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for clustering of the isol...

  6. Molecular conformation and liquid structure of 2-propanol through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The neutron diffraction data analysis of deuterated liquid 2-propanol at room temperature to define its molecular conformation is presented. 2-Propanol being a large molecule with twelve atomic sites, the conformation analysis is tricky and an improved method of data analysis is given. The intermolecular structural ...

  7. Density functional studies of molecular structures of N-methyl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Density functional theory was applied to the calculation of molecular structures of N-methyl formamide (NMF), N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF), and N,Ndimethyl acetamide (DMA). DFT calculations on NMF, DMF, and DMA were performed using a combination of the local functional of Vosko, Wilk, and Nusair (VWN) with the ...

  8. Molecular and vibrational structure of 2,2'-dihydroxybenzophenone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birklund Andersen, Kristine; Langgård, M.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    2,2'-dihydroxybenzophenone (DHBP) contains similar bifold intramolecular H-bonding as the psoriatic drug anthralin, but because of steric interference the phenolic rings are twisted in a propeller-like manner, resulting in a molecular structure of C2 symmetry. In contrast to the case of C2v anthr...

  9. Structural changes in polytetrafluoroethylene molecular chains upon sliding against steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J.T.; Pei, Y.T.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    In this work, the influence of dry sliding between a steel counterpart ball and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) plate sample on the transformation of PTFE molecular structure is investigated. With X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

  10. Structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buda, F. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio (USA)); Chiarotti, G.L. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Laboratorio Tecnologie Avanzate Superfici e Catalisi del Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Padriciano 99, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)); Car, R. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Institut Romard de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Parrinello, M. (IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland))

    1991-09-15

    We have generated a model of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by first-principles molecular dynamics. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and provide new insight into the microscopic structure of this material. The calculation lends support to models in which monohydride complexes are prevalent, and indicates a strong tendency of hydrogen to form small clusters.

  11. Exploring antioxidant reactivity and molecular structure of phenols ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MERCEDES BECERRA-HERRERA

    2017-07-11

    Jul 11, 2017 ... Abstract. Phenolic compounds can be considered as the most important bioactive compounds in Mediterranean diet. However, many of the complex connections between phenols antioxidant reactivity and their molecular structure remain unsolved. To shine light on these issues, the antioxidant reactivity of ...

  12. Exploring antioxidant reactivity and molecular structure of phenols ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phenolic compounds can be considered as themost important bioactive compounds in Mediterranean diet. However, many of the complex connections between phenols antioxidant reactivity and their molecular structure remain unsolved. To shine light on these issues, the antioxidant reactivity of 15 relevant phenolic ...

  13. Cambridge Structural Database as a tool for studies of general structural features of organic molecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleshova, Lyudmila N; Antipin, Mikhail Yu

    1999-01-01

    The review surveys and generalises data on the use of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for studying and revealing general structural features of organic molecular crystals. It is demonstrated that software and facilities of the CSD allow one to test the applicability of a number of known concepts of organic crystal chemistry (the principle of close packing, the frequency of occurrence of space groups, the preferred formation of centrosymmetrical molecular crystals, etc.) on the basis of abundant statistical data. Examples of the use of the Cambridge Structural Database in engineering of molecular crystals and in the systematic search for compounds with specified properties are given. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  14. Novel tubulin and tau neuroprotective fragments sharing structural similarities with the drug candidate NAP (Davuentide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozes, Illana; Iram, Tal; Maryanovsky, Evgenia; Arviv, Carmit; Rozenberg, Liora; Schirer, Yulie; Giladi, Eliezer; Furman-Assaf, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    NAP (NAPVSIPQ, davunetide) is a microtubule stabilizing peptide drug candidate. Here, we set out to identify NAP-like peptides that provide neuroprotection and reduce tau pathology. NAP-like peptides were derived using publically available search engines, which identified sequence homologies in the microtubule subunit tubulin and in the microtubule associated protein, tau. NATLSIHQ (NAT) and STPTAIPQ were derived from tubulin, and TAPVPMPD (TAP) was derived from tau. All peptides provided neuroprotection against the Alzheimer's disease (AD) toxin, the amyloid-β 1-42 peptide, although NAT and TAP were much more potent than STPTAIPQ. NAT also protected astrocytes, while STPTAIPQ was active only at micromolar concentrations. Because NAT and TAP were much more potent than STPTAIPQ in neuroprotection, those peptides were also tested for inhibition of tau-like aggregation (the second protein hallmark pathology of AD). Both NAT and TAP inhibited tau-like aggregation, with NAT being active over a very broad concentration range. NAT also protected in vivo in a frontotemporal dementia transgenic mouse model (Tau-Tg), when tested at the age of ~10 months. Results showed significantly decreased levels of the NAP parent protein, activity-dependent neuroprotective protein in the cerebral cortex of the Tau-Tg which was increased back to normal levels by NAT treatment. This was coupled to protection of Brain-Body weight ratio in the compromised Tau-Tg. With AD being the major tauopathy and with tau taking part in frontotemporal dementia, novel NAP derivatives that reduce tauopathy and provide neuroprotection are of basic and clinical interest.

  15. Physiochemical Characteristics and Molecular Structures for Digestible Carbohydrates of Silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Basim; Prates, Luciana L; Khan, Nazir A; Lei, Yaogeng; Christensen, David A; McKinnon, John J; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-10-18

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the magnitude of differences among new barley silage varieties (BS) selected for varying rates of in vitro neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility (ivNDFD; Cowboy BS with higher ivNDFD, Copeland BS with intermediate ivNDFD, and Xena BS with lower ivNDFD) with regard to their carbohydrate (CHO) molecular makeup, CHO chemical fractions, and rumen degradability in dairy cows in comparison with a new corn silage hybrid (Pioneer 7213R) and (2) to quantify the strength and pattern of association between the molecular structures and digestibility of carbohydrates. The carbohydrate-related molecular structure spectral data was measured using advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy (FT/IR). In comparison to BS, corn silage showed a significantly (P carbohydrates were significantly (P carbohydrate content of the silages. In conclusion, the univariate approach with only one-factor consideration (ivNDFD) might not be a satisfactory method for evaluating and ranking BS quality. FT/IR molecular spectroscopy can be used to evaluate silage quality rapidly, particularly the digestible fiber content.

  16. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Huang, Fang; Wang, Guo-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov–Popov–Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  17. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structures of Chimeric Hemagglutinin Displayed on a Universal Influenza Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E. H. Tran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses expressing chimeric hemagglutinins (HAs are important tools in the quest for a universal vaccine. Using cryo-electron tomography, we have determined the structures of a chimeric HA variant that comprises an H1 stalk and an H5 globular head domain (cH5/1 HA in native and antibody-bound states. We show that cH5/1 HA is structurally different from native HA, displaying a 60° rotation between the stalk and head groups, leading to a novel and unexpected “open” arrangement of HA trimers. cH5/1N1 viruses also display higher glycoprotein density than pH1N1 or H5N1 viruses, but despite these differences, antibodies that target either the stalk or head domains of hemagglutinins still bind to cH5/1 HA with the same consequences as those observed with native H1 or H5 HA. Our results show that a large range of structural plasticity can be tolerated in the chimeric spike scaffold without disrupting structural and geometric aspects of antibody binding.

  18. Molecular analysis of retinal fascin gene 2 (FSCN2), a candidate gene for progressive rod-cone degeneration in dogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Pavel; Knoll, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 9, Mimoriadne číslo (2006), s. 62-64 ISSN 1335-258X. [XXII. dni genetiky. 12.09.2006-14.09.2006, Nitra] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : pig * polymorphism * LEPR and H-FABP genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Building bridges between cellular and molecular structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Ardan; Brandt, Robert; Butcher, Sarah J; Collinson, Lucy; Gault, David; Grünewald, Kay; Hecksel, Corey; Huiskonen, Juha T; Iudin, Andrii; Jones, Martin L; Korir, Paul K; Koster, Abraham J; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Lawson, Catherine L; Mastronarde, David; McCormick, Matthew; Parkinson, Helen; Rosenthal, Peter B; Saalfeld, Stephan; Saibil, Helen R; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Solanes Valero, Irene; Subramaniam, Sriram; Swedlow, Jason R; Tudose, Ilinca; Winn, Martyn; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2017-07-06

    The integration of cellular and molecular structural data is key to understanding the function of macromolecular assemblies and complexes in their in vivo context. Here we report on the outcomes of a workshop that discussed how to integrate structural data from a range of public archives. The workshop identified two main priorities: the development of tools and file formats to support segmentation (that is, the decomposition of a three-dimensional volume into regions that can be associated with defined objects), and the development of tools to support the annotation of biological structures.

  20. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.M.; Serrano-Andres, L.; Klein, D.J.; Schleyer, P.V.R.; Mich, J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of poly carborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i) the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii) endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii) the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv) higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photo energy processes.

  1. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons.

  2. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Anastacio Alves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors.

  3. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-12-19

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Molecular and vibrational structure of 2,2'-dihydroxybenzophenone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birklund Andersen, Kristine; Langgård, M.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    2,2'-dihydroxybenzophenone (DHBP) contains similar bifold intramolecular H-bonding as the psoriatic drug anthralin, but because of steric interference the phenolic rings are twisted in a propeller-like manner, resulting in a molecular structure of C2 symmetry. In contrast to the case of C2v...... anthralin, the description of the vibrational structure of the compound is thus complicated by the circumstance that moment directions for transitions polarized perpendicular to the C2 axis (z) are not uniquely determined by symmetry, but can take any direction in the xy plane. The molecular vibrations...... of DHBP were investigated by IR polarization spectroscopy on samples aligned in stretched polyethylene. The observed Linear Dichroic (LD) absorbance curves, corresponding to absorbance measured with the electric vector of the sample beam parallel (U) and perpendicular (V) to the stretching direction, were...

  5. VPAC receptors: structure, molecular pharmacology and interaction with accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvineau, Alain; Laburthe, Marc

    2012-05-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a neuropeptide with wide distribution in both central and peripheral nervous systems, where it plays important regulatory role in many physiological processes. VIP displays a large biological functions including regulation of exocrine secretions, hormone release, fetal development, immune responses, etc. VIP appears to exert beneficial effect in neuro-degenerative and inflammatory diseases. The mechanism of action of VIP implicates two subtypes of receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2), which are members of class B receptors belonging to the super-family of GPCR. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the structure and molecular pharmacology of VPAC receptors. The structure-function relationship of VPAC1 receptor has been extensively studied, allowing to understand the molecular basis for receptor affinity, specificity, desensitization and coupling to adenylyl cyclase. Those studies have clearly demonstrated the crucial role of the N-terminal ectodomain (N-ted) of VPAC1 receptor in VIP recognition. By using different approaches including directed mutagenesis, photoaffinity labelling, NMR, molecular modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, it has been shown that the VIP molecule interacts with the N-ted of VPAC1 receptor, which is itself structured as a 'Sushi' domain. VPAC1 receptor also interacts with a few accessory proteins that play a role in cell signalling of receptors. Recent advances in the structural characterization of VPAC receptor and more generally of class B GPCRs will lead to the design of new molecules, which could have considerable interest for the treatment of inflammatory and neuro-degenerative diseases. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Exponential Repulsion Improves Structural Predictability of Molecular Docking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bazgier, Václav; Berka, K.; Otyepka, M.; Banáš, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 28 (2016), s. 2485-2494 ISSN 0192-8651 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : cyclin-dependent kinases * structure-based design * scoring functions * cdk2 inhibitors * force-field * ligand interactions * drug discovery * purine * potent * protein-kinase-2 * molecular docking * dock 6.6 * drug design * cyclin-dependent kinase 2 * directory of decoys Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.229, year: 2016

  7. Invariant molecular-dynamics approach to structural phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzcovitch, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Two fictitious Lagrangians to be used in molecular-dynamics simulations with variable cell shape and suitable to study problems like structural phase transitions are introduced. Because they are invariant with respect to the choice of the simulation cell edges and eliminate symmetry breaking associated with the fictitious part of the dynamics, they improve the physical content of numerical simulations that up to now have been done by using Parrinello-Rahman dynamics

  8. Theoretical study on the molecular and crystal structures of nitrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The molecular and crystal structure of the adduct NF3·BF3 was studied computationally using density functional theory. It shows that the adduct exists in the form of a complex but is not ionic. The heats of formation in the gas and the condensed phase of the adduct are −1266.09 and −1276.37 kJ·mol−1, respectively, which ...

  9. Manifestation, management and molecular analysis of candidate genes in two rare cases of thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalin-Jantti, Camilla; Laine, Tiina; Valli-Jaakola, Kaisa; Lonnqvist, Tuula; Kontula, Kimmo; Valimaki, Matti J

    2005-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis as a complication of thyrotoxicosis (THypoKPP) is common in Asians but not well recognized in Western countries or pediatric patients, where most cases are due to the familial variant (FHypoKPP). Ion channel gene mutations may underlie these diseases. We describe the first pediatric and a rare adult Caucasian case of THypoKPP in Finland. Manifestation and management of two THypoKPP cases. We studied for possible mutations in KCNE3, KCNJ2, SCN4A and CACNA1S genes. A 15-year-old Vietnamese boy presented with sudden-onset paralysis and severe hypokalemia, 1.8 mmol/l. The case was first regarded as FHypoKPP, but thyroid function testing revealed a suppressed TSH and highly elevated FT4. A 37-year-old Caucasian male presented with acute tetraparesis. His plasma potassium was only 1.4 mmol/l. Treatment with carbimazole had been initiated two weeks earlier, but FT4 was still elevated. No mutations in KCNE3, KCNJ2, SCN4A or CACNA1S genes were detected. THypoKPP is a potentially life-threatening condition which bares many similarities with FHypoKPP. THypoKPP is rare in Western countries but should be considered in sudden-onset paralysis, independently of age and especially in males. Mutations in ion channel candidate genes did not underlie the disease in the present cases. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Reinforcing the membrane-mediated mechanism of action of the anti-tuberculosis candidate drug thioridazine with molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms of action, the cell membrane-mediated one is peculiarly tempting due to the distinctive feature of phenothiazine drug family to accumulate in selected body tissues. In this study, we employ long-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions of three different concentrations...... for the negatively charged bilayer. We show that the origin of such changes is the drug induced decrease of the interfacial tension, which ultimately leads to the significant membrane expansion. Our findings support the hypothesis that the phenothiazines therapeutic activity may arise from the drug...

  11. Using photoelectron diffraction to determine complex molecular adsorption structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, D P

    2010-01-01

    Backscattering photoelectron diffraction, particularly in the energy-scan mode, is now an established technique for determining in a quantitative fashion the local structure of adsorbates on surfaces, and has been used successfully for ∼100 adsorbate phases. The elemental and chemical-state specificity afforded by the characteristic core level photoelectron binding energies means that it has particular advantages for molecular adsorbates, as the local geometry of inequivalent atoms in the molecule can be determined in a largely independent fashion. On the other hand, polyatomic molecules present a general problem for all methods of surface structure determination in that a mismatch of intramolecular distances with interatomic distances on the substrate surface means that the atoms in the adsorbed molecule are generally in low-symmetry sites. The quantities measured experimentally then represent an incoherent sum of the properties of each structural domain that is inequivalent with respect to the substrate point group symmetry. This typically leads to greater ambiguity or precision in the structural solutions. The basic principles of the method are described and illustrated with a simple example involving molecule/substrate bonding through only one constituent atom (TiO 2 -(110)/H 2 O). This example demonstrates the importance of obtaining quantitative local structural information. Further examples illustrate both the successes and the problems of this approach when applied to somewhat more complex molecular adsorbates.

  12. CD44 and CD74: The promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, Pouyan Amini; Ensani, Fereshteh; Abdirad, Afshin; Valizadeh, Bahareh; Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Sum, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering molecular target therapy concept in the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), many attempts have been performed to introduce an effective molecular marker during recent years. Several investigations have emphasized on the role of CD44 in various cancers and few studies have mentioned CD24 and CD74. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between CD44, CD24 and CD74 expressions and several clinical or histopathological factors in OSCC patients. Materials and Methods: In our analytical cross-sectional study, forty primary OSCC specimens were immunohistochemically stained for CD44, CD24, and CD74 proteins. Then, the relationship between their expressions and age, sex, lymph node metastasis, and histopathologic grading was statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney nonparametric and t-test. Furthermore, P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: CD44 and CD74 proteins were significantly over-expressed in OSCC patients with high grade (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001) as compared to those with low grade. Furthermore, CD74 immunoreactivity showed significantly higher expression in patients with lower age (P = 0.039). Considering lymph node metastasis, we observed significant overexpression of CD74 in patients with no lymph node involvement (P = 0.033). Conclusion: Our observations support the significant role of membranous CD44 protein in progression of OSCC and also introduce CD74 protein as a probable interfering factor in different aspects of OSCC. PMID:25878685

  13. CD44 and CD74: The promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan Amini Shakib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering molecular target therapy concept in the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, many attempts have been performed to introduce an effective molecular marker during recent years. Several investigations have emphasized on the role of CD44 in various cancers and few studies have mentioned CD24 and CD74. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between CD44, CD24 and CD74 expressions and several clinical or histopathological factors in OSCC patients. Materials and Methods: In our analytical cross-sectional study, forty primary OSCC specimens were immunohistochemically stained for CD44, CD24, and CD74 proteins. Then, the relationship between their expressions and age, sex, lymph node metastasis, and histopathologic grading was statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney nonparametric and t-test. Furthermore, P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: CD44 and CD74 proteins were significantly over-expressed in OSCC patients with high grade (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001 as compared to those with low grade. Furthermore, CD74 immunoreactivity showed significantly higher expression in patients with lower age (P = 0.039. Considering lymph node metastasis, we observed significant overexpression of CD74 in patients with no lymph node involvement (P = 0.033. Conclusion: Our observations support the significant role of membranous CD44 protein in progression of OSCC and also introduce CD74 protein as a probable interfering factor in different aspects of OSCC.

  14. NIR-Cyanine Dye Linker: a Promising Candidate for Isochronic Fluorescence Imaging in Molecular Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Debus, Jürgen; Braun, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Personalized anti-cancer medicine is boosted by the recent development of molecular diagnostics and molecularly targeted drugs requiring rapid and efficient ligation routes. Here, we present a novel approach to synthetize a conjugate able to act simultaneously as an imaging and as a chemotherapeutic agent by coupling functional peptides employing solid phase peptide synthesis technologies. Development and the first synthesis of a fluorescent dye with similarity in the polymethine part of the Cy7 molecule whose indolenine-N residues were substituted with a propylene linker are described. Methylating agent temozolomide is functionalized with a tetrazine as a diene component whereas Cy7-cell penetrating peptide conjugate acts as a dienophilic reaction partner for the inverse Diels-Alder click chemistry-mediated ligation route yielding a theranostic conjugate, 3-mercapto-propionic-cyclohexenyl-Cy7-bis-temozolomide-bromide-cell penetrating peptide. Synthesis route described here may facilitate targeted delivery of the therapeutic compound to achieve sufficient local concentrations at the target site or tissue. Its versatility allows a choice of adequate imaging tags applicable in e.g. PET, SPECT, CT, near-infrared imaging, and therapeutic substances including cytotoxic agents. Imaging tags and therapeutics may be simultaneously bound to the conjugate applying click chemistry. Theranostic compound presented here offers a solid basis for a further improvement of cancer management in a precise, patient-specific manner.

  15. Structural modeling and molecular dynamics simulation of the actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Holmes, Kenneth C; Noé, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-07-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Molecular interaction study of commercial cyclic peptides and MERS-COV papain-like protease as novel drug candidate for MERS-COV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M. A. F.; Azzuhdi, M. G.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2017-07-01

    Middle-east respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has become the current outbreak, MERS-CoV infection results in illness at the respiratory system, digestive, and even lead to death with an average mortality caused by MERS-CoV infection reaches 50 %. Until now, there is not any effective vaccine or drug to ward off MERS-CoV infection. Papain-like protease (PLpro) is responsible for cleavage of a nonstructural protein that is essential for viral maturation. Inhibition of PLpro with a ligand will block the cleavage process of nonstructural protein, thus reduce the infection of MERS-CoV. Through of bioinformatics study with molecular docking and binding interaction analysis of commercial cyclic peptides, aldosterone secretion inhibiting factor (1-35) (bovine) was obtained as an inhibitor for PLpro. Thus, aldosterone secretion inhibiting factor (1-35) (bovine) has a potential as a novel candidate drug for treating MERS-CoV.

  17. Alternative modelling of brittle structures in a sub-area of the SKB candidate area at Forsmark, eastern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askling, Per; Tiren, Sven A.; Beckholmen, Monica; Straeng, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    One way to test the confidence of a presented model is to construct an alternative model. Such work is cognitive process of skill acquisition and also a process of understanding data in the sense of sorting and classifying data. This is of particular interest for the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) in their technical review of SKB's on-going site investigation programme for potential repository sites. In this study, an alternative brittle deformation model of a selected part of the SKB candidate area in eastern Sweden was constructed. The input data set was obtained from SKB's database SICADA and is a selected set of data from five cored boreholes drilled from two drill-sites and comprises geophysical borehole logs, geological core-logs, hydrological logs (PFL; Posiva Flow Log) and borehole deviation measurements. Statistical cluster analysis applied on the geophysical borehole data were used to obtain the locations of bedrock with contrasting physical characteristics similar to those of brittle deformation zones. The cluster analysis is an objective procedure, contrasting with SKB's more subjective approach to the single-hole interpretation. Thus some differences are expected which could illustrate the effect of methodology that includes subjective 'expert judgement.' and indicate the possibility of alternative interpretations. The information about brittle structures in the geological boreholes logs was sorted and classification was made according to character of the structures (all fractures, open fractures, partly open fractures, frequency, orientate on/identification of fracture sets, sections of crush rock, and alteration). A separate study was performed to relate rock alteration with structures. The resolution applied in the fracture statistics is one metre, i.e. all studied entities were expressed per metre borehole length. All clusters were structurally characterized by the fractures inside the clusters (orientation and density of fractures) and

  18. Alternative modelling of brittle structures in a sub-area of the SKB candidate area at Forsmark, eastern Sweden.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askling, Per; Tiren, Sven A.; Beckholmen, Monica; Straeng, Thomas (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    One way to test the confidence of a presented model is to construct an alternative model. Such work is cognitive process of skill acquisition and also a process of understanding data in the sense of sorting and classifying data. This is of particular interest for the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) in their technical review of SKB's on-going site investigation programme for potential repository sites. In this study, an alternative brittle deformation model of a selected part of the SKB candidate area in eastern Sweden was constructed. The input data set was obtained from SKB's database SICADA and is a selected set of data from five cored boreholes drilled from two drill-sites and comprises geophysical borehole logs, geological core-logs, hydrological logs (PFL; Posiva Flow Log) and borehole deviation measurements. Statistical cluster analysis applied on the geophysical borehole data were used to obtain the locations of bedrock with contrasting physical characteristics similar to those of brittle deformation zones. The cluster analysis is an objective procedure, contrasting with SKB's more subjective approach to the single-hole interpretation. Thus some differences are expected which could illustrate the effect of methodology that includes subjective 'expert judgement.' and indicate the possibility of alternative interpretations. The information about brittle structures in the geological boreholes logs was sorted and classification was made according to character of the structures (all fractures, open fractures, partly open fractures, frequency, orientate on/identification of fracture sets, sections of crush rock, and alteration). A separate study was performed to relate rock alteration with structures. The resolution applied in the fracture statistics is one metre, i.e. all studied entities were expressed per metre borehole length. All clusters were structurally characterized by the fractures inside the clusters (orientation and

  19. Flavonoids-Rich Orthosiphon stamineus Extract as New Candidate for Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibition: A Molecular Docking Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armaghan Shafaei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the in vitro angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition activity of different extracts of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS leaves and their main flavonoids, namely rosmarinic acid (RA, sinensetin (SIN, eupatorin (EUP and 3′-hydroxy-5,6,7,4′-tetramethoxyflavone (TMF. Furthermore, to identify possible mechanisms of action based on structure–activity relationships and molecular docking. The in vitro ACE inhibition activity relied on determining hippuric acid (HA formation from ACE-specific substrate (hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL by the action of ACE enzyme. A High Performance Liquid Chromatography method combined with UV detection was developed and validated for measurement the concentration of produced HA. The chelation ability of OS extract and its reference compounds was evaluated by tetramethylmurexide reagent. Furthermore, molecular docking study was performed by LeadIT-FlexX: BioSolveIT’s LeadIT program. OS ethanolic extract (OS-E exhibited highest inhibition and lowest IC50 value (45.77 ± 1.17 µg/mL against ACE compared to the other extracts. Among the tested reference compounds, EUP with IC50 15.35 ± 4.49 µg/mL had highest inhibition against ACE and binding ability with Zn (II (56.03% ± 1.26% compared to RA, TMF and SIN. Molecular docking studies also confirmed that flavonoids inhibit ACE via interaction with the zinc ion and this interaction is stabilized by other interactions with amino acids in the active site. In this study, we have demonstrated that changes in flavonoids active core affect their capacity to inhibit ACE. Moreover, we showed that ACE inhibition activity of flavonoids compounds is directly related to their ability to bind with zinc ion in the active site of ACE enzyme. It was also revealed that OS extract contained high amount of flavonoids other than RA, TMF, SIN and EUP. As such, application of OS extract is useful as inhibitors of ACE.

  20. Anhamonic finite temperature effects on the Raman and Infrared spectra to determine the crystal structure phase III of solid molecular hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ranber; Azadi, Sam; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the Raman and IR spectra, as well as electronic properties at zero and finite temperature to elucidate the crystal structure of phase III of solid molecular hydrogen. We find that anharmonic finite temperature are particularly important and qualitatively influences the main conclusions. While P6$_3$/m is the most likely candidate for phase III at the nuclear ground state, at finite temperature the C2/c structure appears to be more suitable.

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction: oriented molecular structures in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, J Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2005-11-11

    The technique of ultrafast electron diffraction allows direct measurement of changes which occur in the molecular structures of isolated molecules upon excitation by femtosecond laser pulses. The vectorial nature of the molecule-radiation interaction also ensures that the orientation of the transient populations created by the laser excitation is not isotropic. Here, we examine the influence on electron diffraction measurements--on the femtosecond and picosecond timescales--of this induced initial anisotropy and subsequent inertial (collision-free) molecular reorientation, accounting for the geometry and dynamics of a laser-induced reaction (dissociation). The orientations of both the residual ground-state population and the excited- or product-state populations evolve in time, with different characteristic rotational dephasing and recurrence times due to differing moments of inertia. This purely orientational evolution imposes a corresponding evolution on the electron scattering pattern, which we show may be similar to evolution due to intrinsic structural changes in the molecule, and thus potentially subject to misinterpretation. The contribution of each internuclear separation is shown to depend on its orientation in the molecular frame relative to the transition dipole for the photoexcitation; thus not only bond lengths, but also bond angles leave a characteristic imprint on the diffraction. Of particular note is the fact that the influence of anisotropy persists at all times, producing distinct differences between the asymptotic "static" diffraction image and the predictions of isotropic diffraction theory.

  2. Large Molecule Structures by Broadband Fourier Transform Molecular Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Spada, Lorenzo; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Fourier transform molecular rotational resonance spectroscopy (FT-MRR) using pulsed jet molecular beam sources is a high-resolution spectroscopy technique that can be used for chiral analysis of molecules with multiple chiral centers. The sensitivity of the molecular rotational spectrum pattern to small changes in the three dimensional structure makes it possible to identify diastereomers without prior chemical separation. For larger molecules, there is the additional challenge that different conformations of each diastereomer may be present and these need to be differentiated from the diastereomers in the spectral analysis. Broadband rotational spectra of several larger molecules have been measured using a chirped-pulse FT-MRR spectrometer. Measurements of nootkatone (C15H22O), cedrol (C15H26O), ambroxide (C16H28O) and sclareolide (C16H26O2) are presented. These spectra are measured with high sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio near 1,000:1) and permit structure determination of the most populated isomers using isotopic analysis of the 13C and 18O isotopologues in natural abundance. The accuracy of quantum chemistry calculations to identify diastereomers and conformers and to predict the dipole moment properties needed for three wave mixing measurements is examined.

  3. HA03 as an Iranian Candidate Concealed Antigen for Vaccination against Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum: Comparative Structural and In silico Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades researchers had focused on developing a vaccine against tick based on protective antigen. Recombinant vaccines based on concealed antigen from Boophilus microplus have been developed in Australia and Cuba by the name of TICKGARD and GAVAC (De La Fuente and Kocan, 2006. Further studies on this antigen have shown some extent of protection against other species (De Vos et al., 2001. In Iran most important species is Hyalomma anatolicum and limited information about its control are available. This paper reports structural and polymorphic analysis of HA03 as an Iranian candidate concealed antigen of H. a. anatolicum deposited in Gen-Bank .(Aghaeipour et al. GQ228820. The comparison between this antigen and other mid gut concealed antigen that their characteristics are available in GenBank showed there are high rate of similarity between them. The HA03 amino acid sequence had a homology of around 89%, 64%, 56% with HA98, BM86, BM95 respectively. Potential of MHC class I and II binding region indicated a considerable variation between BM86 antigen and its efficiency against Iranian H. a. anatolicum. In addition, predicted major of hydrophobisity and similarity in N-glycosylation besides large amount of cystein and seven EGF like regions presented in protein structure revealed that value of HA03 as a new protective antigen and the necessity of the development, BM86 homolog of H. a. anatolicum HA03 based recombinant vaccine.

  4. The dyslexia candidate locus on 2p12 is associated with general cognitive ability and white matter structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Scerri

    Full Text Available Independent studies have shown that candidate genes for dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI impact upon reading/language-specific traits in the general population. To further explore the effect of disorder-associated genes on cognitive functions, we investigated whether they play a role in broader cognitive traits. We tested a panel of dyslexia and SLI genetic risk factors for association with two measures of general cognitive abilities, or IQ, (verbal and non-verbal in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC cohort (N>5,000. Only the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus showed statistically significant association (minimum P = 0.00009 which was further supported by independent replications following analysis in four other cohorts. In addition, a fifth independent sample showed association between the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus and white matter structure in the posterior part of the corpus callosum and cingulum, connecting large parts of the cortex in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that this locus, originally identified as being associated with dyslexia, is likely to harbour genetic variants associated with general cognitive abilities by influencing white matter structure in localised neuronal regions.

  5. Molecular tailoring approach for exploring structures, energetics and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Molecular clusters; linear scaling methods; molecular tailoring approach (MTA); Hartree-Fock (HF) method; density functional theory (DFT); Møller-Plesset second order (MP2) method; molecular electron density (MED); molecular electrostatic potential.

  6. Relationship between molecular structure and Raman spectra of quinolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    DFT calculations were applied to investigate the relationship between the molecular structure and the Raman spectra of quinolines. A variety of different quinolines with increasing complexity was investigated and an aminoquinoline nucleus was found that describes the Raman spectrum of protonated chloroquine. It was discovered that the biological important, rigid C7-chloro group and C4-side chain of chloroquine significantly disturb certain molecular vibrations. The protonation at the N1 position causes dramatic changes of the Raman bands in the wavenumber region between 1500 cm -1 and 1650 cm -1. These bands are putative marker bands of the aminoquinoline drugs for π-π interactions to the hematin targets in malaria infected cells. The calculation of the normal modes and the illustration of the associated atomic displacements are very valuable for a deeper understanding of the associated bands in the Raman spectra.

  7. BO2-functionalized B3N3C54 heterofullerene as a possible candidate for molecular spintronics and nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Misra, Neeraj

    2016-04-01

    BO2-substituted B3N3C54 heterofullerene was studied using density functional theory, and its electronic, magnetic and nonlinear optical properties are discussed. The substitution was considered at the B and N sites of the heterofullerene, in lower and higher spin states. We notice that BO2 substitution at the B sites of B3N3C54 heterofullerene leads to interesting properties, such as a smaller energy gap (0.66 eV) and a high spin magnetic moment (3 μ B). The density-of-states curves, molecular orbitals and spin density surfaces have been used to explain these facts. In addition, the first-order mean hyperpolarizability of B3N3C54 heterofullerene has been found to be significantly large (3.6 × 103 a.u.), which is due to smaller transition energy in the crucial excited state. This is reflected by the absorption spectra calculated using the time-dependent density functional theory method. These findings may be exploited to design novel materials for possible spintronic and electro-optical applications.

  8. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  9. Chemistry and structure of giant molecular clouds in energetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Crystal Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Throughout the years many studies on Galactic star formation have been conducted. This resulted in the idea that giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are hierarchical in nature with substructures spanning a large range of sizes. The physical processes that determine how molecular clouds fragment, form clumps/cores and then stars depends strongly on both recent radiative and mechanical feed- back from massive stars and, on longer term, from enhanced cooling due to the buildup of metals. Radiative and mechanical energy input from stellar populations can alter subsequent star formation over a large part of a galaxy and hence is relevant to the evolution of galaxies. Much of our knowledge of star formation on galaxy wide scales is based on scaling laws and other parametric descriptions. But to understand the overall evolution of star formation in galaxies we need to watch the feedback processes at work on giant molecular cloud (GMC) scales. By doing this we can begin to answer how strong feedback environments change the properties of the substructure in GMCs. Tests of Galactic star formation theory to other galaxies has been a challenging process due to the lack of resolution with current instruments. Thus, only the nearest galaxies allow us to resolve GMCs and their substructures. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is one of the closest low metallicity dwarf galaxies (D˜ 50 kpc) and is close enough that current instruments can resolve the sub- structure of its GMCs to gas tracers (e.g. HCO+, HCN, HNC, CS, C2H, N2H+) detected in the LMC at 1.5-40 pc scales and in NGC 5253 at 40 pc scales. I then compare the molecular gas detections to the Central Molecular Zone in our Galaxy. Dense molecular gas was detected in all of the sources. For the regions in the LMC, molecular lines of CS, N2H+, C 2H, HNC, HCO+ and HCN were all detected in N159W and N113 while only HCN, HCO+, HNC, and C2H were detected in 30Dor-10. Toward NGC 5253 only HCO+, HCN, C2H and CS were detected. I observe

  10. Close-packed (polytypic) structures in molecular-dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, M.; Ray, J.R.; Rahman, A.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics (MD) computer-simulation studies are used to study close-packed structures found in solid-phase atomic systems interacting via a Morse potential (parametrized to model Ni). A graphical display of particle positions [a (112-bar0) projection] within the parallelepiped forming the MD cell is illustrated. Such a graphic projection allows accurate, complete, and readily visual recognition of the stacking order of close-packed planes and is a much more effective way of identifying polytypes than a study of the pair-distribution function for the structure. These illustrations demonstrate the polytypic nature of previously and newly recognized MD close-packed structures. When assuming compatibility with periodic boundary conditions, as is conventional in MD, only certain polytypes are allowed for an MD simulation system. A discussion of compatibility between close-packed structures and the periodic boundary conditions is presented. The pair coordination numbers, geometrical structure-factor intensities, and potential-energy lattice sums are then calculated for some of these compatible structures. This paper concludes that, through careful consideration, a considerable variety of close-packed physical systems may be appropriately modeled with use of MD computer simulation. Conversely, proper interpretation of the data obtained during such studies may require awareness of the findings presented here

  11. Molecular structure of a tolyl derivative of γ-pyrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranfić Bakić, Marina; Cetina, Mario; Mazalović, Sanja

    2018-01-01

    A study of the molecular structure of a new derivative of γ-pyrone, which is assumed to be of biological and pharmacological importance, has been carried out. The detailed insight into the structure of the γ-pyrone derivative was obtained by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, its crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method and its behavior in solutions was examined by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Assignment of the vibrational spectra of the studied compound is presented and correlated to some structural parameters. DFT calculations, namely geometry optimization, frequency calculations, and NBO population analysis, were performed at B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory and the obtained data was compared to the experimental results to further elucidate the structural details. In addition, energies of the electronic transitions were estimated using DFT calculations at the same level of theory, and the calculated results showed good agreement with experimental data. It was shown that longer Csbnd C and shorter Cdbnd C bonds alternate in the pyrone ring and that the structure of the studied γ-pyrone derivative comprises two intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O bonds. All the results pointed to relatively weak π-electron delocalization inside the pyrone moiety and significantly stronger π-electron delocalization through tolyl substituents.

  12. Contributions to Advances in Blend Pellet Products (BPP) Research on Molecular Structure and Molecular Nutrition Interaction by Advanced Synchrotron and Globar Molecular (Micro)Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Oquendo, VÍctor H; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-04-13

    To date, advanced synchrotron-based and globar-sourced techniques are almost unknown to food and feed scientists. There has been little application of these advanced techniques to study blend pellet products at a molecular level. This article aims to provide recent research on advanced synchrotron and globar vibrational molecular spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction. How processing induced molecular structure changes in relation to nutrient availability and utilization of the blend pellet products. The study reviews Utilization of co-product components for blend pellet product in North America; Utilization and benefits of inclusion of pulse screenings; Utilization of additives in blend pellet products; Application of pellet processing in blend pellet products; Conventional evaluation techniques and methods for blend pellet products. The study focus on recent applications of cutting-edge vibrational molecular spectroscopy for molecular structure and molecular structure association with nutrient utilization in blend pellet products. The information described in this article gives better insight on how advanced molecular (micro)spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction.

  13. Coalescence of silver unidimensional structures by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.E.; Mondragon, G.; Arenas, J.

    2007-01-01

    The study of nanoparticles coalescence and silver nano rods phenomena by means of molecular dynamics simulation under the thermodynamic laws is reported. In this work we focus ourselves to see the conditions under which the one can be given one dimension growth of silver nano rods for the coalescence phenomenon among two nano rods or one nano rod and one particle; what allows us to study those structural, dynamic and morphological properties of the silver nano rods to different thermodynamic conditions. The simulations are carried out using the Sutton-Chen potentials of interaction of many bodies that allow to obtain appropriate results with the real physical systems. (Author)

  14. The structure of molecular liquids. Neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, L.

    2000-05-01

    Neutron diffraction (ND) measurements on liquid methanol (CD 3 OD, CD 3 O(H/D), CD 3 OH) under ambient conditions were performed to obtain the distinct (intra- + inter-molecular), G dist (r) and inter-molecular, G inter (r) radial distribution functions (rdfs) for the three samples. The H/D substitution on hydroxyl-hydrogen (Ho) has been used to extract the partial distribution functions, G XHo (r) (X=C, O, and H - a methyl hydrogen) and G XX (r) at both the distinct and inter-molecular levels from the difference techniques of ND. The O-Ho bond length, which has been the subject of controversy in the past, is found purely from the distinct partial distribution function, G XHo (r) to be 0.98 ± 0.01 A. The C-H distance obtained from the distinct G XX (r) partial is 1.08 ± 0.01 A. These distances determined by fitting an intra-molecular model to the total distinct structure functions are 0.961 ± 0.001 A and 1.096 ± 0.001 A, respectively. The inter-molecular G XX (r) function, dominated by contributions from the methyl groups, apart from showing broad oscillations extending up to ∼14 A is featureless, mainly because of cancellation effects from six contributing pairs. The Ho-Ho partial pair distribution function (pdf), g HoHo (r), determined from the second order difference, shows that only one other Ho atom can be found within a mean Ho-Ho separation of 2.36 A. The average position of the O-Ho hydrogen bond determined for the first time purely from experimental inter-molecular G XHo (r) partial distribution function is found to be at 1.75 ± 0.03 A. The experimental structural results at the partial distribution level are compared with those obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed in NVE ensemble by using both 3- and 6-site force field models for the first time in this study. The MD simulations with both the models reproduce the ND rdfs rather well. However, discrepancies begin to appear between the simulated and the experimental partial

  15. Imaging molecular structure and dynamics using laser driven recollisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marangos, J.P.; Baker, S.; Torres, R.; Kajumba, N.; Haworth, C.; Robinson, J.; Tisch, J.W.G.; Lein, M.; Chirila, C.; Vozzi, C.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Laser driven electron recollision provides a unique tool for measuring the structure and dynamics of matter. We illustrate this with experiments that use HHG to measure molecular structure with sub-Angstrom spatial and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution. Our recent work has looked in particular at the signal from high order harmonic generation which contains rich information about the structure and intra-molecular dynamics of small molecules. This we will illustrate by two types of experiment; (a) measurements of HHG from aligned molecular samples to observe two-centre recombination interference and electronic structure dependence of the angle dependent yield, (b) reconstruction of intra-molecular proton dynamics from the spectral dependence of the HHG using the intrinsic chirp of recolliding electrons. We experimentally investigate the process of intramolecular quantum interference in high-order harmonic generation in impulsively aligned CO 2 molecules. The recombination interference effect is clearly seen through the order dependence of the harmonic yield in an aligned sample. This confirms that the effective de Broglie wavelength of the returning electron wave is not significantly altered by acceleration in the Coulomb field of the molecular ion. For the first time, to our knowledge, we demonstrate that such interference effects can be effectively controlled by changing the ellipticity of the driving laser field. Here we also report the results of angular dependence measurements of high order harmonics (17 tt h - 27 th ) from impulsively aligned organic molecules: Acetylene, Ethylene, and Allene. Since these molecules have a relatively low I p an appropriately short pulse is required to produce as many harmonic orders as possible. This was provided by the ∼ 10 fs beam line of the ASTRA laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory whilst a somewhat longer pulse, properly forwarded with respect to the driving pulse, induced the

  16. The Candidate

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, John C

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The Candidate is an attempt to marry elements of journalism and gaming into a format that both entertains and educates the player. The Google-AP Scholarship, a new scholarship award that is given to several journalists a year to work on projects at the threshold of technology and journalism, funded the project. The objective in this prototype version of the game is to put the player in the shoes of a congressional candidate during an off-year election, specificall...

  17. The radio structure of the peculiar narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy candidate J1100+4421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabányi, K. É.; Frey, S.; Paragi, Z.; Järvelä, E.; Morokuma, T.; An, T.; Tanaka, M.; Tar, I.

    2018-01-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1) are an intriguing subclass of active galactic nuclei. Their observed properties indicate low central black hole mass and high accretion rate. The extremely radio-loud NLS1 sources often show relativistic beaming and are usually regarded as younger counterparts of blazars. Recently, the object SDSS J110006.07+442144.3 was reported as a candidate NLS1 source. The characteristics of its dramatic optical flare indicated its jet-related origin. The spectral energy distribution of the object was similar to that of the γ-ray detected radio-loud NLS1, PMN J0948+0022. Our high-resolution European very long baseline interferometry network observations at 1.7 and 5 GHz revealed a compact core feature with a brightness temperature of ≳1010 K. Using the lowest brightness temperature value and assuming a moderate Lorentz factor of ∼9, the jet viewing angle is ≲26°. Archival Very Large Array data show a large-scale radio structure with a projected linear size of ∼150 kpc reminiscent of double-sided morphology.

  18. Nb-Base FS-85 Alloy as a Candidate Structural Material for Space Reactor Applications: Effects of Thermal Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Hoelzer, David T.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2009-04-01

    The proposed uses of fission reactors for manned or deep space missions have typically relied on the potential use of refractory metal alloys as structural materials. Throughout the history of these programs, a leading candidate has been Nb-1Zr, due to its good fabrication and welding characteristics. However, the less-than-optimal creep resistance of this alloy has encouraged interest in the more complex FS-85 (Nb-28Ta-10W-1Zr) alloy. Despite this interest, only a relatively small database exists for the properties of FS-85. Database gaps include the potential microstructural instabilities that can lead to mechanical property degradation. In this work, changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of FS-85 were investigated following 1100 hours of thermal aging at 1098, 1248, and 1398 K. The changes in electrical resistivity, hardness, and tensile properties between the as-annealed and aged materials are compared. Evaluation of the microstructural changes was performed through optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The development of intragranular and grain-boundary precipitation of Zr-rich compounds as a function of aging temperature was followed. Brittle tensile behavior was measured in the material aged at 1248 K, while ductile behavior occurred in samples aged above and below this temperature. The effect of temperature on the under- and overaging of the grain-boundary particles is believed to have contributed to the mechanical property behavior of the aged materials.

  19. Nb-base FS-85 Alloy as a Candidate Structural Material for Space Reactor Applications: Effects of Thermal Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Hoelzer, David T.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    The proposed use of fission reactors for manned or deep space missions have typically relied on the potential use of refractory metal alloys as structural materials. Throughout the history of these programs, the lead candidate has been Nb-1Zr due to its good fabrication and welding characteristics. However, the less than optimal creep resistance of this alloy has encouraged interest in the more complex FS-85 (Nb-28Ta-10W-1Zr) alloy. Despite this interest, a relatively small database exists for the properties of FS-85. These gaps include potential microstructural instabilities that can lead to mechanical property degradation. In this work, changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of FS-85 were investigated following 1100 h of thermal aging at 1098, 1248 and 1398 K. The changes in electrical resistivity, hardness and tensile properties between the as-annealed and aged materials are compared. Evaluation of the microstructural changes was performed through optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The development of intragranular and grain boundary precipitation of Zr-rich compounds as a function of aging temperature was followed. Brittle tensile behavior was measured in the 1248 K aged material, while ductile behavior occurred in material aged above and below this temperature. The effect of temperature on the under and overaging of the grain boundary particles are believed to have contributed to the mechanical property behavior of the aged material

  20. DFT charge transfer of hybrid molecular ferrocene/Si structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calborean, Adrian; Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Graur, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior and electronic properties of redox-active ferrocenes grafted onto semiconductor Si(100) substrate were investigated theoretically by first-principles calculations. Organic molecules were attached via the formation of Si-C covalent bonds through two different linkers: vinyl (direct grafting), and N 3 (CH 2 ) 11 (indirect grafting). Redox energies and the electronic properties relating to different spacers in hybrid ferrocene Fc/Si and ferrocenium Fc + /Si structures were theoretically extracted and compared with experimental cyclic voltametry data. Electronic charge transfers are discussed through the alignment positions of the frontier orbitals of the molecule with respect to the Si substrate gap. Periodic boundary conditions were used to investigate the Si(100) as a slab surface and hybrid Fc/Si structures. The resulting projected density of states (PDOS) were compared with molecular results and discussed in the light of experimental data. (paper)

  1. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  2. Structures and physicochemical properties of molecular aggregates of lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwahashi, Makio

    2005-01-01

    Structures and physicochemical properties of lipids such as fatty acids, alcohols, acylglycerols and steroids in their two- or three-dimensional states were studied through the measurements of surface pressure (π), surface-molecular area (A), vapor-pressure osmosis, radioactivity (R), self-diffusion coefficient (D), density, viscosity, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR), 13 C-NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ), ESR, SEM, DSC, X-ray diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Following results are obtained: (1) π-A and R-A relationships indicate that the explanation, being widely believed, of the reaction occurred in the oleic acid or the trioleylglycerol monolayer on the aqueous KMnO 4 solution is incorrect. (2) By using the LB film of 3 H-labelled fatty acid, the upper limit of the neutrino mass was determined. In addition, by using the LB film of 14 C-labelled fatty acid, a new type of crystal-transformation process was found, in which fatty-acid crystal transforms from its unstable state to its stable one by the transfer of the fatty acid molecules through the vapor phase. (3) Fatty acids always exist as their dimers in their liquid state and mostly in non-polar solvents; the dimers are the units of the molecular movements in the molten liquid and in solvents. T 1 results clearly showed the internal molecular movements of the dimers. In addition, D and SANS results indicated that two different kinds of fatty acids in their binary mixture make only each homodimers. (4) Furthermore, the study on the liquid structure of fatty acids such as cis-6-, cis-9-, cis-11-, trans-9-octadecenoic acids and stearic acid indicated that these fatty-acid dimers construct the clusters resemble to the smectic-liquid crystal in the liquid state. The clusters determine the physicochemical properties of the liquid of the fatty acid. (author)

  3. Equilibrium theory of molecular fluids: Structure and freezing transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Jokhan

    2014-05-01

    In this article we review equilibrium theory of molecular fluids which includes structure and freezing transitions. The application of the theory to evaluate the pair correlation functions using Integral Equation methods and Computer Simulations have been discussed. Freezing of classical complex fluids based on the density functional approach is also discussed and compare a variety of its versions. Transitions discussed are sensitive to the value of direct correlation functions of the effective liquid which is required as an input information in the theory. Accurate evaluation of pair correlation functions is emphasized. Calculation of these correlation functions which pose problems in the case of ordered phases is discussed. The pair correlation functions of the ordered phase, which are supposed to be made up of two contributions, one that preserves the symmetry of the isotropic phase and a second that breaks it, are discussed. A new free-energy functional developed for an inhomogeneous system that contains both symmetry conserved and symmetry broken parts of the direct pair correlation function is discussed. The most useful three dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) and its extension done recently by many workers is discussed. Application of this theory to a large variety of complex systems in combination with the density functional theory method implemented in the Amsterdam density functional software package is discussed. Coupling of the 3D-RISM salvation theory with molecular dynamics in the Amber molecular dynamics package is also given. The importance of the density functional theory for the study of the structure and phase behaviour of hard polyhedral is also discussed. The dynamical density functional and its generalized form applied for many important class of problems such as binary mixture, anisotropic particles dynamics of freezing and wetting, colloidal samples, particle self diffusion in complex environment, colloidal sedimentation

  4. Micro structure processing on plastics by accelerated hydrogen molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Nishikawa, H.

    2017-08-01

    A proton has 1836 times the mass of an electron and is the lightest nucleus to be used for accelerator in material modification. We can setup accelerator with the lowest acceleration voltage. It is preferable characteristics of Proton Beam Writer (PBW) for industrial applications. On the contrary ;proton; has the lowest charge among all nuclei and the potential impact to material is lowest. The object of this research is to improve productivity of the PBW for industry application focusing on hydrogen molecular ions. These ions are generated in the same ion source by ionizing hydrogen molecule. There is no specific ion source requested and it is suitable for industrial use. We demonstrated three dimensional (3D) multilevel micro structures on polyester base FPC (Flexible Printed Circuits) using proton, H2+ and H3+. The reactivity of hydrogen molecular ions is much higher than that of proton and coincident with the level of expectation. We can apply this result to make micro devices of 3D multilevel structures on FPC.

  5. The twisted radio structure of PSO J334.2028+01.4075, still a supermassive binary black hole candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooley, K. P.; Wrobel, J. M.; Anderson, M. M.; Hallinan, G.

    2018-01-01

    Supermassive binary black holes (BBHs) on sub-parsec scales are prime targets for gravitational wave experiments. They also provide insights on close binary evolution and hierarchical structure formation. Sub-parsec BBHs cannot be spatially resolved but indirect methods can identify candidates. In 2015 Liu et al. reported an optical-continuum periodicity in the quasar PSO J334.2028+01.4075, with the estimated mass and rest-frame period suggesting an orbital separation of about 0.006 pc (0.7 μ arcsec). The persistence of the quasar's optical periodicity has recently been disfavoured over an extended baseline. However, if a radio jet is launched from a sub-parsec BBH, the binary's properties can influence the radio structure on larger scales. Here, we use the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to study the parsec- and kiloparsec-scale emission energized by the quasar's putative BBH. We find two VLBA components separated by 3.6 mas (30 pc), tentatively identifying one as the VLBA 'core' from which the other was ejected. The VLBA components contribute to a point-like, time-variable VLA source that is straddled by lobes spanning 8 arcsec (66 kpc). We classify PSO J334.2028+01.4075 as a lobe-dominated quasar, albeit with an atypically large twist of 39° between its elongation position angles on parsec- and kiloparsec-scales. By analogy with 3C 207, a well-studied lobe-dominated quasar with a similarly-rare twist, we speculate that PSO J334.2028+01.4075 could be ejecting jet components over an inner cone that traces a precessing jet in a BBH system.

  6. Molecular characterization of γ gliadin from durum wheat ( Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gliadin protein associated with gluten strength and viscoelasticity of the dough, we performed an in silico molecular and structural analysis in order to define its putative functional properties. The latter could be a valuable candidate as molecular ...

  7. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  8. Molecular Structure of Endotoxins from Gram-negative Marine Bacteria: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Molinaro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria are microrganisms that have adapted, through millions of years, to survival in environments often characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, namely pressure, temperature and salinity. The main interest in the research on marine bacteria is due to their ability to produce several biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents. Nonetheless, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, or their portions, from Gram-negative marine bacteria, have often shown low virulence, and represent potential candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock. Besides, the molecular architecture of such molecules is related to the possibility of thriving in marine habitats, shielding the cell from the disrupting action of natural stress factors. Over the last few years, the depiction of a variety of structures of lipids A, core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been given. In particular, here we will examine the most recently encountered structures for bacteria belonging to the genera Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas, of the γ-Proteobacteria phylum, and to the genera Flavobacterium, Cellulophaga, Arenibacter and Chryseobacterium, of the Cytophaga- Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention will be paid to the chemical features expressed by these structures (characteristic monosaccharides, non-glycidic appendages, phosphate groups, to the typifying traits of LPSs from marine bacteria and to the possible correlation existing between such features and the adaptation, over years, of bacteria to marine environments.

  9. Chalcone scaffolds as anti-infective agents: structural and molecular target perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-08-28

    In recent years, widespread outbreak of numerous infectious diseases across the globe has created havoc among the population. Particularly, the inhabitants of tropical and sub-tropical regions are mainly affected by these pathogens. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones deserve the credit of being potential anti-infective candidates that inhibit various parasitic, malarial, bacterial, viral, and fungal targets like cruzain-1/2, trypanopain-Tb, trans-sialidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fumarate reductase, falcipain-1/2, β-hematin, topoisomerase-II, plasmepsin-II, lactate dehydrogenase, protein kinases (Pfmrk and PfPK5), and sorbitol-induced hemolysis, DEN-1 NS3, H1N1, HIV (Integrase/Protease), protein tyrosine phosphatase A/B (Ptp-A/B), FtsZ, FAS-II, lactate/isocitrate dehydrogenase, NorA efflux pump, DNA gyrase, fatty acid synthase, chitin synthase, and β-(1,3)-glucan synthase. In this review, a comprehensive study (from Jan. 1982 to May 2015) of the structural features of anti-infective chalcones, their mechanism of actions (MOAs) and structure activity relationships (SARs) have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-infective agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular structure of endotoxins from Gram-negative marine bacteria: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Serena; Silipo, Alba; L Nazarenko, Evgeny; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio

    2007-09-19

    Marine bacteria are microrganisms that have adapted, through millions of years, to survival in environments often characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, namely pressure, temperature and salinity. The main interest in the research on marine bacteria is due to their ability to produce several biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents. Nonetheless, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), or their portions, from Gram-negative marine bacteria, have often shown low virulence, and represent potential candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock. Besides, the molecular architecture of such molecules is related to the possibility of thriving in marine habitats, shielding the cell from the disrupting action of natural stress factors. Over the last few years, the depiction of a variety of structures of lipids A, core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been given. In particular, here we will examine the most recently encountered structures for bacteria belonging to the genera Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas, of the gamma-Proteobacteria phylum, and to the genera Flavobacterium, Cellulophaga, Arenibacter and Chryseobacterium, of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention will be paid to the chemical features expressed by these structures (characteristic monosaccharides, non-glycidic appendages, phosphate groups), to the typifying traits of LPSs from marine bacteria and to the possible correlation existing between such features and the adaptation, over years, of bacteria to marine environments.

  11. Drug Repositioning by Kernel-Based Integration of Molecular Structure, Molecular Activity, and Phenotype Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems. PMID:24244318

  12. Amino Acid Molecular Units: Building Primary and Secondary Protein Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido R. Silva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the learning quality and suitable knowledge  use  about structural biology, it is fundamental to  exist, since the beginning of  students’ formation, the possibility of clear visualization of biomolecule structures. Nevertheless, the didactic books can only bring  schematic  drawings; even more elaborated figures and graphic computation  do not permit the necessary interaction.  The representation of three-dimensional molecular structures with ludic models, built with representative units, have supplied to the students and teachers a successfully experience to  visualize such structures and correlate them to the real molecules.  The design and applicability of the representative units were discussed with researchers and teachers before mould implementation.  In this stage  it  will be presented the  developed  kit  containing the  representative  plastic parts of the main amino acids.  The kit can demonstrate the interaction among the amino acids  functional groups  (represented by colors, shapes,  sizes and  the peptidic bonds between them  facilitating the assembly and visuali zation of the primary and secondary protein structure.  The models were designed for  Ca,  amino,  carboxyl groups  and  hydrogen. The  lateral chains have  well defined models that represent their geometrical shape.  The completed kit set  will be presented in this meeting (patent requested.  In the last phase of the project will be realized  an effective evaluation  of the kit  as a facilitative didactic tool of the teaching/learning process in the Structural Molecular Biology area.

  13. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  14. Axis I psychopathology in bariatric surgery candidates with and without binge eating disorder: results of structured clinical interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Corneille, LaShanda R; Wadden, Thomas A; Sarwer, David B; Faulconbridge, Lucy F; Fabricatore, Anthony N; Stack, Rebecca M; Cottrell, Faith A; Pulcini, Melissa E; Webb, Victoria L; Williams, Noel N

    2012-03-01

    Prior studies have reached contradictory conclusions concerning whether binge eating disorder (BED) is associated with greater psychopathology in extremely obese patients who seek bariatric surgery. This study used the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnoses (SCID) to compare rates of axis I psychopathology in surgery candidates who were determined to have BED or to be currently free of eating disorders. The relationship of BED to other psychosocial functioning and weight loss goals also was examined. One hundred ninety five bariatric surgery patients completed the Weight and Lifestyle Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and were later administered the Eating Disorder Examination. Of these 195, 44 who were diagnosed with BED, and 61 who were currently free of eating pathology, completed a telephone-administered SCID. Significantly more BED than non-BED participants had a current mood disorder (27.3% vs. 4.9%, p = 0.002) as well as a lifetime history of this condition (52.3% vs. 23.0%, p = 0.003). More BED than non-BED participants also had a current anxiety disorder (27.3% vs. 8.2%, p = 0.014) and lifetime anxiety disorder (36.4% vs. 16.4%, p = 0.019). BED also was associated with greater symptoms of depression, as measured by the BDI-II, as well as with lower self-esteem. BED and non-BED groups, however, did not differ in their desired weight loss goals following surgery. The present findings indicate that the presence of BED, in patients who seek bariatric surgery, is associated with an increased prevalence of axis I psychopathology, beyond the already elevated rate observed with severe (i.e., class III) obesity.

  15. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  16. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  17. Isotope chemistry and molecular structure. Carbon and oxygen isotope chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigeleisen, J.; Hom, R.C.; Ishida, T.

    1976-01-01

    The relationships between force constants and the isotope chemistry of carbon and oxygen are calculated for H 2 O, CO 2 , CH 2 O, CH 4 , C 2 H 4 , C 2 H 6 , and C 6 H 6 . Significant differences are found from the general features of protium--deuterium isotope chemistry. These are shown to be associated with a structural effect. Hydrogen is always an end atom except for hydrogen bonded moleules. Carbon is generally tetrahedrally bonded and its isotope chemistry shows significant contributions from the interaction between stretching and bending modes. These interactions lead to deviations in additivity of the total isotope effect from the contributions of the individual force constants. Stretching forces dominate the isotope chemistry of carbon and oxygen as they do in hydrogen. They account for 70%--90% of the reduced partition function ratios. Correlations are made between the stretching force contributions and molecular structure. It is shown that while significant differences exist between the specific contributions calculated from different force fields for methane, ethane, and benzene, the absolute value of ln(s/s') f is rather insensitive to the detailed structures of the F matrices studied

  18. Transmission electron microscopy and the molecular structure of icosahedral viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    The field of structural virology developed in parallel with methodological advances in X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. At the end of the 1970s, crystallography yielded the first high resolution structure of an icosahedral virus, the T=3 tomato bushy stunt virus at 2.9Å. It took longer to reach near-atomic resolution in three-dimensional virus maps derived from electron microscopy data, but this was finally achieved, with the solution of complex icosahedral capsids such as the T=25 human adenovirus at ∼3.5Å. Both techniques now work hand-in-hand to determine those aspects of virus assembly and biology that remain unclear. This review examines the trajectory followed by EM imaging techniques in showing the molecular structure of icosahedral viruses, from the first two-dimensional negative staining images of capsids to the latest sophisticated techniques that provide high resolution three-dimensional data, or snapshots of the conformational changes necessary to complete the infectious cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Controlling molecular deposition and layer structure with supramolecular surface assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, James A.; Oxtoby, Neil S.; Phillips, Michael A.; Champness, Neil R.; Beton, Peter H.

    2003-08-01

    Selective non-covalent interactions have been widely exploited in solution-based chemistry to direct the assembly of molecules into nanometre-sized functional structures such as capsules, switches and prototype machines. More recently, the concepts of supramolecular organization have also been applied to two-dimensional assemblies on surfaces stabilized by hydrogen bonding, dipolar coupling or metal co-ordination. Structures realized to date include isolated rows, clusters and extended networks, as well as more complex multi-component arrangements. Another approach to controlling surface structures uses adsorbed molecular monolayers to create preferential binding sites that accommodate individual target molecules. Here we combine these approaches, by using hydrogen bonding to guide the assembly of two types of molecules into a two-dimensional open honeycomb network that then controls and templates new surface phases formed by subsequently deposited fullerene molecules. We find that the open network acts as a two-dimensional array of large pores of sufficient capacity to accommodate several large guest molecules, with the network itself also serving as a template for the formation of a fullerene layer.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Solving structures of protein complexes by molecular replacement with Phaser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, Airlie J.

    2006-01-01

    Four case studies in using maximum-likelihood molecular replacement, as implemented in the program Phaser, to solve structures of protein complexes are described. Molecular replacement (MR) generally becomes more difficult as the number of components in the asymmetric unit requiring separate MR models (i.e. the dimensionality of the search) increases. When the proportion of the total scattering contributed by each search component is small, the signal in the search for each component in isolation is weak or non-existent. Maximum-likelihood MR functions enable complex asymmetric units to be built up from individual components with a ‘tree search with pruning’ approach. This method, as implemented in the automated search procedure of the program Phaser, has been very successful in solving many previously intractable MR problems. However, there are a number of cases in which the automated search procedure of Phaser is suboptimal or encounters difficulties. These include cases where there are a large number of copies of the same component in the asymmetric unit or where the components of the asymmetric unit have greatly varying B factors. Two case studies are presented to illustrate how Phaser can be used to best advantage in the standard ‘automated MR’ mode and two case studies are used to show how to modify the automated search strategy for problematic cases

  2. Effect of processing on carbon molecular sieve structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Mita

    2010-11-01

    Sub-micron sized carbon molecular sieve (CMS) materials were produced via ball milling for subsequent use in hybrid material formation. A detailed analysis of the effects of the milling process in the presence of different milling environments is reported. The milling process apparently alters the molecular scale structure and properties of the carbon material. Three cases: unmilled, air milled and nitrogen milled, were analyzed in this work. The property changes were probed using equilibrium sorption experiments with different gases. Furthermore, WAXD and BET results also showed differences between milling processes. Finally in order to improve the interfacial polymer-sieve region of hybrid membranes, the CMS surface was chemically modified with a linkage unit capable of covalently bonding the polymer to the sieve. A published single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) modification method was adopted to attach a primary aromatic amine to the surface. Several aspects including rigidity, chemical composition, bulky groups and length were considered in selecting the preferred linkage unit. Fortunately kinetic and equilibrium sorption properties of the modified sieves showed very little difference from unmodified samples, suggesting that the linkage unit is not excessively filling or obstructing access to the pores of the CMSs during the modification process. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Introductory group theory and its application to molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1975-01-01

    The success of the first edition of this book has encouraged us to revise and update it. In the second edition we have attempted to further clarify por­ tions of the text in reference to point symmetry, keeping certain sections and removing others. The ever-expanding interest in solids necessitates some discussion on space symmetry. In this edition we have expanded the discus­ sion on point symmetry to include space symmetry. The selection rules in­ clude space group selection rules (for k = 0). Numerous examples are pro­ vided to acquaint the reader with the procedure necessary to accomplish this. Recent examples from the literature are given to illustrate the use of group theory in the interpretation of molecular spectra and in the determination of molecular structure. The text is intended for scientists and students with only a limited theoretical background in spectroscopy. For this reason we have presented detailed procedures for carrying out the selection rules and normal coor­ dinate treatment of ...

  4. Influence of the molecular structure on hydrolyzability of epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pays, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    EDF has decided to use glass reinforced composites for certain pipework in Pressurized Water Reactors (service water, emergency-supplied service water, fine pipe works, etc...) as a replacement for traditional materials. In practice, steel is prone to rapid corrosion in these circuits; introducing composites could prove economically viable if their long term behaviour can be demonstrated. However, composite materials can undergo deterioration in service through hydrolysis of the resin or the fibre-matrix interface. Different resins can be chosen depending on the programmed use. A first study has covered the hydrolyzability of polyester and vinyl ester resins. The present document undertakes the resistance to hydrolysis of epoxy resins, concentrating on those reputed to withstand high temperatures. This research uses model monomer, linking the molecular structure of the materials to their resistance to hydrolysis. (author)

  5. Calculations of optical rotation: Influence of molecular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF method and Density Functional Theory (DFT were used to calculate the optical rotation of 26 chiral compounds. The effects of theory and basis sets used for calculation, solvents influence on the geometry and values of calculated optical rotation were all discussed. The polarizable continuum model, included in the calculation, did not improve the accuracy effectively, but it was superior to γs. Optical rotation of five or sixmembered of cyclic compound has been calculated and 17 pyrrolidine or piperidine derivatives which were calculated by HF and DFT methods gave acceptable predictions. The nitrogen atom affects the calculation results dramatically, and it is necessary in the molecular structure in order to get an accurate computation result. Namely, when the nitrogen atom was substituted by oxygen atom in the ring, the calculation result deteriorated.

  6. Hamiltonian flow over saddles for exploring molecular phase space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farantos, Stavros C.

    2018-03-01

    Despite using potential energy surfaces, multivariable functions on molecular configuration space, to comprehend chemical dynamics for decades, the real happenings in molecules occur in phase space, in which the states of a classical dynamical system are completely determined by the coordinates and their conjugate momenta. Theoretical and numerical results are presented, employing alanine dipeptide as a model system, to support the view that geometrical structures in phase space dictate the dynamics of molecules, the fingerprints of which are traced by following the Hamiltonian flow above saddles. By properly selecting initial conditions in alanine dipeptide, we have found internally free rotor trajectories the existence of which can only be justified in a phase space perspective. This article is part of the theme issue `Modern theoretical chemistry'.

  7. Coding considerations for standalone molecular dynamics simulations of atomistic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaya, R. O.; Terblans, J. J.

    2017-10-01

    The laws of Newtonian mechanics allow ab-initio molecular dynamics to model and simulate particle trajectories in material science by defining a differentiable potential function. This paper discusses some considerations for the coding of ab-initio programs for simulation on a standalone computer and illustrates the approach by C language codes in the context of embedded metallic atoms in the face-centred cubic structure. The algorithms use velocity-time integration to determine particle parameter evolution for up to several thousands of particles in a thermodynamical ensemble. Such functions are reusable and can be placed in a redistributable header library file. While there are both commercial and free packages available, their heuristic nature prevents dissection. In addition, developing own codes has the obvious advantage of teaching techniques applicable to new problems.

  8. Structural insight into molecular mechanism of poly(ethylene terephthalate) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Seongjoon; Cho, In Jin; Seo, Hogyun; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Sagong, Hye-Young; Shin, Tae Joo; Choi, So Young; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2018-01-26

    Plastics, including poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), possess many desirable characteristics and thus are widely used in daily life. However, non-biodegradability, once thought to be an advantage offered by plastics, is causing major environmental problem. Recently, a PET-degrading bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis, was identified and suggested for possible use in degradation and/or recycling of PET. However, the molecular mechanism of PET degradation is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of I. sakaiensis PETase (IsPETase) at 1.5 Å resolution. IsPETase has a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad at its active site and contains an optimal substrate binding site to accommodate four monohydroxyethyl terephthalate (MHET) moieties of PET. Based on structural and site-directed mutagenesis experiments, the detailed process of PET degradation into MHET, terephthalic acid, and ethylene glycol is suggested. Moreover, other PETase candidates potentially having high PET-degrading activities are suggested based on phylogenetic tree analysis of 69 PETase-like proteins.

  9. Determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions by ''Coulomb-explosion'' techniques with fast (MeV) molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the dissociation of fast (MeV) molecular ion beams in thin foils suggest a novel alternative approach to the determination of molecular ion structures. In this article we review some recent high-resolution studies on the interactions of fast molecular ion beams with solid and gaseous targets and indicate how such studies may be applied to the problem of determining molecular ion structures. The main features of the Coulomb explosion of fast-moving molecular ion projectiles and the manner in which Coulomb-explosion techniques may be applied to the problem (difficult to attack by more conventional means) of determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions has been described in this paper. Examples have been given of early experiments designed to elicit structure information. The techniques are still in their infancy, and it is to be expected that as both the technology and the analysis are refined, the method will make valuable contributions to the determination of molecular ion structures

  10. Molecular structure and exciton dynamics in organic conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alan K.

    , quenchable, isolated singlet excitations. The structure of J aggregates which leads to isolated excitations, and the role which inter-chain contact sites play in triplet formation from these singlet excitations is revealed. New structure-function relationships were uncovered in poly (3-alkyl-thienylenevinylene) (P3ATV) derivatives using resonance Raman and photocurrent spectroscopies. Time-dependent spectroscopic theory was used to interpret experimental Raman and absorption spectra that revealed the presence of structural polymorphs. These polymorphs provide an explanation of the spectroscopic evidence without presumption of a deactivating dark state in this unusually non-fluorescence material. Photovoltaic devices constructed from blends of poly (2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT) and PCBM blends were examined using Raman and photocurrent imaging techniques. These techniques were used to identify different packing states in blended thin films and correlate photocurrent production with local order. Intensity modulated spectroscopic techniques (IMPS) were then used to locate regions of non-geminate charge recombination at interfaces between amorphous and crystalline regions in working devices. Next, P3HT/PCBM OPV devices were exposed to ionizing radiation in a vacuum chamber. These devices were characterized before and after exposure, using standardized solar cell tests, Raman imaging, wide-field IMPS, and IMVS spectroscopies. An analysis of the spectroscopic data determined that the donor polymer is highly resistant to radiation damage, and that the degradation of device performance is due to an effect (cross-linking or degradation) within aggregates of the acceptor. This dissertation concludes with an interpretation of the significance of the findings contained herein to organic electronics, followed by a brief outlook for future work in these fields. Potential theories to describe and predict molecular interactions for organic polymers in

  11. Molecular structure of tetramethylgermane from gas electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákvári, Éva; Rozsondai, Béla; Hargittai, István

    1991-05-01

    The molecular structure of Ge(CH 3) 4 has been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction augmented by a normal coordinate analysis. Assuming tetrahedral symmetry for the germanium bond configuration, the following structural parameters are found: rg(GeC) = 1.958 ± 0.004 Å, rg(CH) = 1.111 ± 0.003 Å and ∠(GeCH) = 110.7 ± 0.2° ( R=4.0%). The methyl torsional barrier V 0 is estimated to be 1.3 kJ mol -1 on the basis of an effective angle of torsion 23.0 ± 1.5°, from the staggered form, yielded directly by the analysis. The GeC bond length of Ge(CH 3) 4 is the same, within experimental error, as that of Ge(C 6H 5) 4 and is in agreement with the prediction of a modified Schomaker-Stevenson relationship.

  12. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models.

  13. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Edmund R; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2015-10-28

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10,000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. A basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  14. Molecular characterization of thyroid hormone receptor beta from Schistosoma japonicum and assessment of its potential as a vaccine candidate antigen against schistosomiasis in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Chunhui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid hormones (TH modulate growth, development and differentiation and metabolic processes by interacting with thyroid hormone receptors (THRs. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel thyroid hormone receptor beta encoding gene of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTHRβ and to investigate its potential as a vaccine candidate antigen against schistosomiasis in BALB/c mice. Methods The full-length cDNA sequence of SjTHRβ, its gene organization, and its transcript levels were characterized, and the phylogenetic relationship between THR, RAR and RXR from other organisms were analysis, the ability of this protein binding to a conserved DNA core motif, and its potential as a vaccine candidate antigen against schistosomiasis in BALB/c mice were evaluated. Results The SjTHRβ cDNA was cloned, verified by 5’ and 3’ Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends and shown to be polyadenylated at the 3’end, suggesting the transcript is full-length. SjTHRβ is homologous to THRs from other species and has a predicted conservative DNA binding domain and ligand binding domain that normally characterizes these receptors. A comparative quantitative PCR analysis showed that SjTHRβ was the highest expressed in 21d worms and the lowest in 7 d and 13 d schistosomula. The cDNA corresponding to DNA binding domain (SjTHRβ-DBD and ligand binding domain (SjTHRβ-LBD were cloned and subsequently expressed in E coli. The expressed proteins were used to immunize mice and generate specific serum against recombinant SjTHRβ (rSjTHRβ. Western blotting revealed that anti-rSjTHRβ-LBD serum recognized two protein bands in extracts from 21 d worm with molecular sizes of approximately 95 kDa and 72 kDa. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA analysis showed that rSjTHRβ-DBD could bind to a conserved DNA core motif. Immunization of BALB/c mice with rSjTHRβ-LBD could induce partial protective efficacy(27.52% worm reduction and 29.50% liver eggs

  15. Retinal structure, function, and molecular pathologic features in gyrate atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Davidson, Alice E; Lenassi, Eva; Devery, Sophie R; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R

    2012-03-01

    To describe phenotypic variability and to report novel mutational data in patients with gyrate atrophy. Retrospective case series. Seven unrelated patients (10 to 52 years of age) with clinical and biochemical evidence of gyrate atrophy. Detailed ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and microperimetry testing were performed. The coding region and intron-exon boundaries of ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) were analyzed. OAT mRNA was isolated from peripheral blood leucocytes of 1 patient and analyzed. OAT mutation status and resultant clinical, structural, and functional characteristics. Funduscopy revealed circular areas of chorioretinal atrophy, and FAF imaging showed sharply demarcated areas of increased or preserved signal in all 7 patients. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed multiple intraretinal cystic spaces and hyperreflective deposit in the ganglion cell layer of all study subjects. Round tubular, rosette-like structures located in the outer nuclear layer of the retinae of the 4 older patients were observed (termed outer retinal tubulation). Thickening was evident in the foveolae of younger patients, despite the posterior pole appearing relatively preserved. Macular function, assessed by microperimetry, was preserved over areas of normal or increased autofluorescence. However, sensitivity was reduced even in structurally intact parts of the retina. The molecular pathologic features were determined in all study subjects: 9 mutations, 4 novel, were detected in the OAT gene. OAT mRNA was isolated from blood leukocytes, and monoallelic expression of a mutated allele was demonstrated in 1 patient. Fundus autofluorescence imaging can reveal the extent of neurosensory dysfunction in gyrate atrophy patients. Macular edema is a uniform finding; the fovea is relatively thick in early stages of disease and retinal tubulation is present in advanced disease

  16. X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and analysis of molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontecilla-Camps, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The only method that is capable to show the atomic structure of most of macromolecules is the X ray diffraction; neutron diffraction is mostly used for the localization of hydrogen atoms, too light to be detected by X ray diffraction. With the growing number of known structures, the molecular crystallographic study may combine the molecular replacement technique and the co-crystallization method, or use the new Laue method, and leads to the functional and topological analysis of biological molecular structures

  17. Light-operated machines based on threaded molecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credi, Alberto; Silvi, Serena; Venturi, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Rotaxanes and related species represent the most common implementation of the concept of artificial molecular machines, because the supramolecular nature of the interactions between the components and their interlocked architecture allow a precise control on the position and movement of the molecular units. The use of light to power artificial molecular machines is particularly valuable because it can play the dual role of "writing" and "reading" the system. Moreover, light-driven machines can operate without accumulation of waste products, and photons are the ideal inputs to enable autonomous operation mechanisms. In appropriately designed molecular machines, light can be used to control not only the stability of the system, which affects the relative position of the molecular components but also the kinetics of the mechanical processes, thereby enabling control on the direction of the movements. This step forward is necessary in order to make a leap from molecular machines to molecular motors.

  18. Molecular-Orbital Structure in Neutron-Rich Be and C Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, N.; Okabe, S.; Ikeda, K.; Tanihata, I.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of 10 Be and 12 Be are investigated using a microscopic α+α+n+n+··· model based on the molecular orbit (MO) model. The model space employed is extended from the traditional MO models, and the low-lying states are characterized by three basic orbits (3/2 - , 1/2 - and 1/2 + ) for the valence neutrons. The orbits perpendicular to the α-α axis with one node (3/2 - and 1/2 - ) are called π-orbit and one along the α-α axis (1/2 + ) is called σ-orbit, which has two nodes. In 10 Be, all of the observed positive-parity bands and the negative-parity bands are described within the model. The second 0 + state, which has dominantly the (1/2 + ) 2 configuration for the two valence neutrons, is shown to have a particularly enlarged α-α structure. The kinetic energy of the two valence neutrons occupying along the α-α axis is reduced remarkably due to the strong α clustering and simultaneously, the spin-orbit interaction plays unexpectedly important role to make the energy of this state much lower. The rotational band structure with enhanced α-α is compared with the experimental data. 12 Be is also investigated using α+α+4n model. The energy surface is shown to exhibit the similar characteristics, that the remarkable α clustering and the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction make the binding of the ground state with the (3/2 - ) 2 (1/2 - ) 2 configuration for valence neutrons properly stronger in comparison with the (3/2 - ) 2 (1/2 - ) 2 configuration. These effects play crucial roles in accounting for breaking of the N = 8 (closed p-shell) magic number. The molecular-like structure of the C isotopes is also investigated and the orbits are introduced around three α-clusters. The neutrons in π-orbit increase the binding and stabilize the linear-chain configuration of three α against the breathing-like break-up. On the other hand, the σ-orbits prevent the bending motion of the three-α chain. The combination of these configuration for the

  19. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen Piters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem—also called “microbiome”—is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1:e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting.

  20. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  1. Modeling Carbon and Hydrocarbon Molecular Structures in EZTB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A software module that models the electronic and mechanical aspects of hydrocarbon molecules and carbon molecular structures on the basis of first principles has been written for incorporation into, and execution within, the Easy (Modular) Tight-Binding (EZTB) software infrastructure, which is summarized briefly in the immediately preceding article. Of particular interest, this module can model carbon crystals and nanotubes characterized by various coordinates and containing defects, without need to adjust parameters of the physical model. The module has been used to study the changes in electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, caused by bending of the nanotubes, for potential utility as the basis of a nonvolatile, electriccharge- free memory devices. For example, in one application of the module, it was found that an initially 50-nmlong carbon, (10,10)-chirality nanotube, which is a metallic conductor when straight, becomes a semiconductor with an energy gap of .3 meV when bent to a lateral displacement of 4 nm at the middle.

  2. Pathways to Structure-Property Relationships of Peptide-Materials Interfaces: Challenges in Predicting Molecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Tiffany R

    2017-07-18

    An in-depth appreciation of how to manipulate the molecular-level recognition between peptides and aqueous materials interfaces, including nanoparticles, will advance technologies based on self-organized metamaterials for photonics and plasmonics, biosensing, catalysis, energy generation and harvesting, and nanomedicine. Exploitation of the materials-selective binding of biomolecules is pivotal to success in these areas and may be particularly key to producing new hierarchically structured biobased materials. These applications could be accomplished by realizing preferential adsorption of a given biomolecule onto one materials composition over another, one surface facet over another, or one crystalline polymorph over another. Deeper knowledge of the aqueous abiotic-biotic interface, to establish clear structure-property relationships in these systems, is needed to meet this goal. In particular, a thorough structural characterization of the surface-adsorbed peptides is essential for establishing these relationships but can often be challenging to accomplish via experimental approaches alone. In addition to myriad existing challenges associated with determining the detailed molecular structure of any molecule adsorbed at an aqueous interface, experimental characterization of materials-binding peptides brings new, complex challenges because many materials-binding peptides are thought to be intrinsically disordered. This means that these peptides are not amenable to experimental techniques that rely on the presence of well-defined secondary structure in the peptide when in the adsorbed state. To address this challenge, and in partnership with experiment, molecular simulations at the atomistic level can bring complementary and critical insights into the origins of this abiotic/biotic recognition and suggest routes for manipulating this phenomenon to realize new types of hybrid materials. For the reasons outlined above, molecular simulation approaches also face

  3. Molecular, structural, and phylogenetic analyses of Taxus chinensis JAZs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Chen, Ying; Nie, Lin; Jin, Xiaofei; Fu, Chunhua; Yu, Longjiang

    2017-07-15

    Taxus spp. are ancient gymnosperms that produce a unique secondary metabolite, namely, taxol, an anticancer drug. JAZ proteins are key regulators of the JA signaling pathway, which control taxol biosynthesis. However, the JAZ proteins of Taxus spp. are poorly studied. In this work, nine JAZ genes from Taxus chinensis were identified using our previous transcriptome data and named as TcJAZ1-TcJAZ9. Of these nine TcJAZ proteins, eight contain Jas and TIFY domains, and the Jas domain of TcJAZ6 is incomplete. Most TcJAZs and PsJAZs are not related to AtJAZs and OsJAZs. Phylogenetic analysis divided all JAZ proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Picea sitchensis, and T. chinensis into eight subgroups; gymnosperms JAZs were classified into subgroups V-VIII, and angiosperm JAZs were categorized into subgroups I-V. Three motifs of subgroups VI-VIII were identified in gymnosperm JAZs, indicating that gymnosperm JAZ proteins exhibit a different evolutionary process from those of angiosperms. The expression patterns of nine TcJAZs showed that TcJAZ2/3/8 was a key regulator, indicating their important roles in T. chinensis. Results revealed that gymnosperm JAZs differ from angiosperm JAZs in terms of molecular structure. Three novel conserved motifs were found in TcJAZs and PsJAZs. This study provides a basis for research on JA regulatory system in Taxus spp. and for elucidating the significance of JA signaling pathway to land plants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. An Insight towards Conceptual Understanding: Looking into the Molecular Structures of Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyulgan, Melis Arzu; Akkuzu, Nalan

    2016-01-01

    The subject of molecular structures is one of the most important and complex subject in chemistry which a majority of the undergraduate students have difficulties to understand its concepts and characteristics correctly. To comprehend the molecular structures and their characteristics the students need to understand related subjects such as Lewis…

  5. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M; Prates, Luciana L; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-05

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HED N/OM ), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M.; Prates, Luciana L.; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HEDN/OM), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions.

  7. Exploration of NVE classical trajectories as a tool for molecular crystal structure prediction, with tests on ice polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, V.; Martoňák, R.; Parrinello, M.

    2006-05-01

    Following an initial Communication [Buch et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 051108 (2005)], a new molecular-dynamics-based approach is explored to search for candidate crystal structures of molecular solids corresponding to minima of the enthalpy. The approach is based on the observation of phase transitions in an artificial periodic system with a small unit cell and relies on the existence of an optimal energy range for observing freezing to low-lying minima in the course of classical trajectories. Tests are carried out for O structures of nine H2O-ice polymorphs. NVE trajectories for a range of preimposed box shapes display freezing to the different crystal polymorphs whenever the box dimensions approximate roughly the appropriate unit cell; the exception is ice II for which freezing requires unit cell dimensions close to the correct ones. In an alternate version of the algorithm, an initial box shape is picked at random and subsequently readjusted at short trajectory intervals by enthalpy minimization. Tests reveal the existence of ice forms which are "difficult" and "easy" to locate in this way. The former include ice IV, which is also difficult to crystallize experimentally from the liquid, and ice II, which does not interface with the liquid in the phase diagram. On the other hand, the latter crystal search procedure located successfully the remaining seven ice polymorphs, including ice V, which corresponds to the most complicated structure of all ice phases, with a monoclinic cell of 28molecules.

  8. Molecular evolution, intracellular organization, and the quinary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, E H

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that at least half of 370 denatured polypeptides from hamster cells and human cells are indistinguishable in terms of isoelectric points and molecular weights. Molecular evolution may have been more conservative for this set of proteins than sequence studies on soluble proteins have implied. This may be a consequence of complexities of intracellular organization and the numerous macromolecular interactions in which most ...

  9. The method used to set the pass mark in an objective structured clinical examination defines the performance of candidates for certification as rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Guilaisne Bernard-Medina, Ana; Flores-Alvarado, Diana Elsa; Portela-Hernández, Margarita; Maldonado-Velázquez, María Del Rocío; Jara-Quezada, Luis Javier; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis Manuel; Rubio-Judith López-Zepeda, Nadina E; Álvarez-Hernandez, Everardo; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Arce-Salinas, César Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    The Mexican Accreditation Council for Rheumatology certifies trainees (TR) on an annual basis using both a multiple-choice question (MCQ) test and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). For 2013 and 2014, the OSCE pass mark (PM) was set by criterion referencing as ≥6 (CPM), whereas overall rating of borderline performance method (BPM) was added for 2015 and 2016 accreditations. We compared OSCE TR performance according to CPM and BPM, and examined whether correlations between MCQ and OSCE were affected by PM. Forty-three (2015) and 37 (2016) candidates underwent both tests. Altogether, OSCE were integrated by 15 validated stations; one evaluator per station scored TR performance according to a station-tailored check-list and a Likert scale (fail, borderline, above range) of overall performance. A composite OSCE score was derived for each candidate. Appropriate statistics were used. Mean (±standard derivation [SD]) MCQ test scores were 6.6±0.6 (2015) and 6.4±0.6 (2016) with 5 candidates receiving a failing score each year. Mean (±SD) OSCE scores were 7.4±0.6 (2015) and 7.3±0.6 (2016); no candidate received a failing CPM score in either 2015 or 2016 OSCE, although 21 (49%) and 19 (51%) TR, respectively, received a failing BPM score (calculated as 7.3 and 7.4, respectively). Stations for BPM ranged from 4.5 to 9.5; overall, candidates showed better performance in CPM. In all, MCQ correlated with composite OSCE, r=0.67 (2015) and r=0.53 (2016); P≤.001. Trainees with a passing BPM score in OSCE had higher MCQ scores than those with a failing score. Overall, OSCE-PM selection impacted candidates' performance but had a limited affect on correlation between clinical and practical examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of growth temperature and device structure on GaP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaisman, M.; Tomasulo, S.; Masuda, T.; Lang, J. R.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) is an attractive candidate for wide-bandgap solar cell applications, possessing the largest bandgap of the III-arsenide/phosphides without aluminum. However, GaP cells to date have exhibited poor internal quantum efficiency (IQE), even for photons absorbed by direct transitions, motivating improvements in material quality and device structure. In this work, we investigated GaP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy over a range of substrate temperatures, employing a much thinner emitter than in prior work. Higher growth temperatures yielded the best solar cell characteristics, indicative of increased diffusion lengths. Furthermore, the inclusion of an AlGaP window layer improved both open-circuit voltage and short wavelength IQE.

  11. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  12. Insights into structural features of HDAC1 and its selectivity inhibition elucidated by Molecular dynamic simulation and Molecular Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixto-López, Yudibeth; Bello, Martiniano; Correa-Basurto, José

    2018-03-06

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of proteins whose main function is the removal of acetyl groups from lysine residues located on histone and non-histone substrates, which regulates gene transcription and other activities in cells. HDAC1 dysfunction has been implicated in cancer development and progression; thus, its inhibition has emerged as a new therapeutic strategy. Two additional metal binding sites (Site 1 and Site 2) in HDACs have been described that are primarily occupied by potassium ions, suggesting a possible structural role that affects HDAC activity. In this work, we explored the structural role of potassium ions in Site 1 and Site 2 and how they affect the interactions of compounds with high affinities for HDAC1 (AC1OCG0B, Chlamydocin, Dacinostat and Quisinostat) and SAHA (a pan-inhibitor) using molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in concert with a Molecular-Mechanics-Generalized-Born-Surface-Area (MMGBSA) approach. Four models were generated: one with a potassium ion (K + ) in both sites (HDAC1 k ), a second with K + only at site 1 (HDAC1 ks1 ), a third with K + only at site 2 (HDAC1 ks2 ) and a fourth with no K + (HDAC1 wk ). We found that the presence or absence of K + not only impacted the structural flexibility of HDAC1, but also its molecular recognition, consistent with experimental findings. These results could therefore be useful for further structure-based drug design studies addressing new HDAC1 inhibitors.

  13. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 1. An Advanced Protocol for Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Collision Cross-Section Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; J. Valentine, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    Collision cross-section (CCS) measurements with a linear drift tube have been utilized to study the gas-phase conformers of a model peptide (acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK). Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted to derive an advanced protocol for the generation of a comprehensive pool of in-silico structures; both higher energy and more thermodynamically stable structures are included to provide an unbiased sampling of conformational space. MD simulations at 300 K are applied to the in-silico structures to more accurately describe the gas-phase transport properties of the ion conformers including their dynamics. Different methods used previously for trajectory method (TM) CCS calculation employing the Mobcal software [1] are evaluated. A new method for accurate CCS calculation is proposed based on clustering and data mining techniques. CCS values are calculated for all in-silico structures, and those with matching CCS values are chosen as candidate structures. With this approach, more than 300 candidate structures with significant structural variation are produced; although no final gas-phase structure is proposed here, in a second installment of this work, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange data will be utilized as a second criterion to select among these structures as well as to propose relative populations for these ion conformers. Here the need to increase conformer diversity and accurate CCS calculation is demonstrated and the advanced methods are discussed.

  14. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, NBO, UV, NMR, first order hyperpolarizability, analysis of 4-Methoxy-4'-Nitrobiphenyl by density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarasu, K; Kavitha, E

    2014-03-25

    In this study, geometrical optimization, spectroscopic analysis, electronic structure and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 4-Methoxy-4'-Nitrobiphenyl (abbreviated as 4M4'NBPL) were investigated by utilizing HF and DFT/B3LYP with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The equilibrium geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the 4M4'NBPL have been calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1) respectively. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis is also used to explain the molecular stability. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the title compound dissolved in chloroform were recorded in the range of 200-800 cm(-1). The HOMO-LUMO energy gap explains the charge interaction taking place within the molecule. Good correlation between the experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts in chloroform solution and calculated GIAO shielding tensors were found. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability values were also computed. The linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability of the studied molecule indicate that the compound is a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials. The chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of 4M4'NBPL at different temperature are calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Spatial and mass distributions of molecular clouds and spiral structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, J.; Valdes, F.; National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ)

    1987-01-01

    The growth of molecular clouds resulting from cloud-cloud collisions and coalescence in the Galactic ring between 4 and 8 kpc are modeled, taking into account the presence of a spiral potential and the mutual cloud-cloud gravitational attraction. The mean lifetime of molecular clouds is determined to be about 200 million years. The clouds are present in both spiral arm and interarm regions, but a spiral pattern in their spatial distribution is clearly discernible, with the more massive clouds showing a stronger correlation with the spiral arms. As viewed from within the Galactic disk, however, it is very difficult to ascertain that the molecular cloud distribution in longitude-velocity space has a spiral pattern. 19 references

  16. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...... the influence of spectral properties and dimensionality of the molecular system on the algorithm efficiency. We test two algorithms, the MinMax and Lanczos, for spectral estimation from an MD trajectory, and use this to derive a practical scheme of time step adaptation in MD relaxation algorithms to improve...

  17. Molecular conformation and liquid structure of 2-propanol through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The neutron diffraction data analysis of deuterated liquid 2-propanol at room temperature to define its ... is still open in view of differences in diffraction, simulation and other results [1,2,6–. 9]. The neutron diffraction is ... molecular conformation hitherto obtained from X-ray diffraction data [10] has lim- itation since hydrogen ...

  18. Molecular structural changes of plasticized PVC after UV light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankett, Jeanne M; Collin, William R; Chen, Zhan

    2013-12-19

    Plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) materials for industrial, medical, and household use are often intentionally exposed to UV light, though its impact on the molecular integrity and toxicity of the surface and bulk of PVC materials is still not well understood. This paper investigates the surface and bulk molecular changes of plasticized PVC films with 25, 10, or 0 wt % bis-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) plasticizer after exposure to short wave (254 nm) or long wave (365 nm) UV light. Surface analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) revealed short wave UV exposure induced major molecular changes on the plasticized PVC surfaces, resulting in increased surface hydrophilicity and decreased CH3 content with increasing exposure time. Additionally, it was deduced from multiple techniques that the surface and the bulk of the plastic exposed to short wave UV contained phthalic monoesters and phthalic acid formed from multistep radical reactions. In contrast, when exposed to long wave UV, molecular content and ordering on the surfaces of the plastic remained relatively unchanged and the introduction of DEHP in plastic helped protect PVC chains from degradation. Results from this study demonstrate short wave UV exposure will result in plastic surfaces containing phthalates and phthalate-related products accessible to contact by living organisms.

  19. Molecular cloning, structural analysis and expression of a zinc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of prokaryotic expression of ZnBP and overexpression of the ZnBP gene in A. thaliana improve our understanding of the function of this gene. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in gland morphogenesis in cotton. Key words: Gossypium hirsutum, pigment gland, zinc binding ...

  20. Investigating Molecular Structures of Bio-Fuel and Bio-Oil Seeds as Predictors To Estimate Protein Bioavailability for Ruminants by Advanced Nondestructive Vibrational Molecular Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yajing; L Prates, Luciana; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-10-18

    This study was conducted to (1) determine protein and carbohydrate molecular structure profiles and (2) quantify the relationship between structural features and protein bioavailability of newly developed carinata and canola seeds for dairy cows by using Fourier transform infrared molecular spectroscopy. Results showed similarity in protein structural makeup within the entire protein structural region between carinata and canola seeds. The highest area ratios related to structural CHO, total CHO, and cellulosic compounds were obtained for carinata seeds. Carinata and canola seeds showed similar carbohydrate and protein molecular structures by multivariate analyses. Carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly correlated to protein rumen degradation and intestinal digestion characteristics. In conclusion, the molecular spectroscopy can detect inherent structural characteristics in carinata and canola seeds in which carbohydrate-relative structural features are related to protein metabolism and utilization. Protein and carbohydrate spectral profiles could be used as predictors of rumen protein bioavailability in cows.

  1. The Atom in a Molecule: Implications for Molecular Structure and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 February 2016 – 23 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The atom in a molecule: Implications for molecular...For presentation at American Physical Society - Division of Atomic , Molecular, and Optical Physics (May 2016) PA Case Number: #16075; Clearance Date...10 Energy (eV) R C--H (au) R C--H(au) The Atom in a Molecule: Implications for Molecular Structures and Properties P. W. Langhoff, Chemistry

  2. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoichi Tezuka; Tatsuhiko Taguchi; Saman Alavi; Amadeu K. Sum; Ryo Ohmura

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  3. Quantitative Structure-Use Relationship Model thresholds for Model Validation, Domain of Applicability, and Candidate Alternative Selection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This file contains value of the model training set confusion matrix, domain of applicability evaluation based on training set to predicted chemicals structural...

  4. Studies on vibrational structure of diatomic molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Weiguo; Hou Shilin; Ren Weiyi; Feng Hao

    2002-01-01

    Alternative expressions for vibrational and rotational spectrum constants and energies of diatomic molecular electronic states are suggested based on the perturbation theory. An algebraic method (AM) is proposed to generate converged full vibrational spectrum from limited energy data, and a potential variational method (PVM) is suggested to produce the vibrational force constants f n 's and rotational spectrum constants using the perturbation formulae and the AM vibrational constants. Applying this method to several diatomic electronic states, the calculation results show that: 1) the AM E υ max converges to correct molecular dissociation energy; 2) the AM not only reproduce the input energies, but also generate the E υ 's of high vibrational excited states which may be difficult to be obtained experimentally or theoretically; 3) the PVM vibrational force constants f n 's may be used to measure the relative chemical bond strength of different diatomic electronic states for a molecule quantitatively

  5. Structure and dynamics of alkali borate glasses: a molecular dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, A.H; den Hartog, H. W.

    Structural and dynamical properties of lithium, cesium and mixed alkali (i.e., lithium and cesium) borate glasses have been studied by the molecular dynamics method. The calculations yield glass structures consisting of planar BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedrons with no sixfold ring structures at

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  7. Molecular Structures and Functional Relationships in Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan S.

    2011-12-01

    The seven serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (A-G) are the deadliest poison known to humans. They share significant sequence homology and hence possess similar structure-function relationships. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) act via a four-step mechanism, viz., binding and internalization to neuronal cells, translocation of the catalytic domain into the cytosol and finally cleavage of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) causing blockage of neurotransmitter release leading to flaccid paralysis. Crystal structures of three holotoxins, BoNT/A, B and E, are available to date. Although the individual domains are remarkably similar, their domain organization is different. These structures have helped in correlating the structural and functional domains. This has led to the determination of structures of individual domains and combinations of them. Crystal structures of catalytic domains of all serotypes and several binding domains are now available. The catalytic domains are zinc endopeptidases and share significant sequence and structural homology. The active site architecture and the catalytic mechanism are similar although the binding mode of individual substrates may be different, dictating substrate specificity and peptide cleavage selectivity. Crystal structures of catalytic domains with substrate peptides provide clues to specificity and selectivity unique to BoNTs. Crystal structures of the receptor domain in complex with ganglioside or the protein receptor have provided information about the binding of botulinum neurotoxin to the neuronal cell. An overview of the structure-function relationship correlating the 3D structures with biochemical and biophysical data and how they can be used for structure-based drug discovery is presented here.

  8. Composite and Low-Cost Approaches for Molecular Crystal Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Luc M; Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto; Johnson, Erin R

    2018-03-08

    Molecular crystal structure prediction (CSP) requires evaluating differences in lattice energy between candidate crystal structures accurately and efficiently. In this work, we explore and compare several low-cost alternatives to dispersion-corrected density-functional theory (DFT) in the plane-waves/pseudopotential approximation, the most accurate and general approach used for CSP at present. Three types of low-cost methods are considered: DFT with a small basis set of finite-support numerical orbitals (the SIESTA method), dispersion-corrected Gaussian small or minimal-basis-set Hartree-Fock and DFT with additional empirical corrections (HF-3c and PBEh-3c), and self-consistent-charge dispersion-corrected density-functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB3-D3). In addition, we study the performance of composite methods that comprise a geometry optimization using a low-cost approach followed by a single-point calculation using the accurate but comparatively expensive B86bPBE-XDM functional. All methods were tested for their abilities to produce absolute lattice energies, relative lattice energies, and crystal geometries. We show that assessing various methods by their ability to produce absolute lattice energies can be misleading and that relative lattice energies are a much better indicator of performance in CSP. The EE14 set of relative solubilities of homochiral and heterochiral chiral crystals is proposed for relative lattice-energy benchmarking. Our results show that PBE-D2 plus a DZP basis set of numerical orbitals coupled with a final B86bPBE-XDM single-point calculation gives excellent performance at a fraction of the cost of a full B86bPBE-XDM calculation, although the results are sensitive to the particular details of the computational protocol. The B86bPBE-XDM//PBE-D2/DZP method was subsequently tested in a practical CSP application from our recent work on the crystal structure of the enantiopure and racemate forms of 1-aza[6]helicene, a chiral organic

  9. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J., E-mail: fwilliams@qi.fcen.uba.ar [INQUIMAE-CONICET, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química-Física, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina)

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  10. Laser-induced blurring of molecular structure information in high harmonic spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risoud, Francois; Leveque, Camille; Labeye, Marie

    2017-01-01

    High harmonic spectroscopy gives access to molecular structure with Angstrom resolution. Such information is encoded in the destructive interferences occurring between the harmonic emissions from the different parts of the molecule. By solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, either...

  11. Structural Molecular Biology-A Personal Reflection on the Occasion of John Kendrew's 100th Birthday.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Patrick

    2017-08-18

    Here, I discuss the development and future of structural molecular biology, concentrating on the eukaryotic transcription machinery and reflecting on John Kendrew's legacy from a personal perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA: Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-11

    Jan 11, 2015 ... with the protein, characterized in the structures reported here, could be useful for design of inhibitors against. M. tuberculosis RecA. .... rotating anode generator, both using a MAR345 image plate. The crystal to detector ...... structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptidyl-tRNA hydro- lase. J. Mol. Biol.

  13. Application of molecular spectroscopy to the determination of organic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicknam, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Some brief accounts are presented followed by a discussion about various physico-chemical techniques: Raman spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, conformational analysis and polarized Rayleigh diffusion. Applications of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to nucleotide structure in aqueous solution are described as well as some applications of neutron scattering to the study of organic structures [fr

  14. Comparative sequence and structural analyses of G-protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and implications for molecular models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Worth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Up until recently the only available experimental (high resolution structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR was that of bovine rhodopsin. In the past few years the determination of GPCR structures has accelerated with three new receptors, as well as squid rhodopsin, being successfully crystallized. All share a common molecular architecture of seven transmembrane helices and can therefore serve as templates for building molecular models of homologous GPCRs. However, despite the common general architecture of these structures key differences do exist between them. The choice of which experimental GPCR structure(s to use for building a comparative model of a particular GPCR is unclear and without detailed structural and sequence analyses, could be arbitrary. The aim of this study is therefore to perform a systematic and detailed analysis of sequence-structure relationships of known GPCR structures. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed in detail conserved and unique sequence motifs and structural features in experimentally-determined GPCR structures. Deeper insight into specific and important structural features of GPCRs as well as valuable information for template selection has been gained. Using key features a workflow has been formulated for identifying the most appropriate template(s for building homology models of GPCRs of unknown structure. This workflow was applied to a set of 14 human family A GPCRs suggesting for each the most appropriate template(s for building a comparative molecular model. CONCLUSIONS: The available crystal structures represent only a subset of all possible structural variation in family A GPCRs. Some GPCRs have structural features that are distributed over different crystal structures or which are not present in the templates suggesting that homology models should be built using multiple templates. This study provides a systematic analysis of GPCR crystal structures and a consistent method for identifying

  15. Comparative sequence and structural analyses of G-protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and implications for molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Catherine L; Kleinau, Gunnar; Krause, Gerd

    2009-09-16

    Up until recently the only available experimental (high resolution) structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was that of bovine rhodopsin. In the past few years the determination of GPCR structures has accelerated with three new receptors, as well as squid rhodopsin, being successfully crystallized. All share a common molecular architecture of seven transmembrane helices and can therefore serve as templates for building molecular models of homologous GPCRs. However, despite the common general architecture of these structures key differences do exist between them. The choice of which experimental GPCR structure(s) to use for building a comparative model of a particular GPCR is unclear and without detailed structural and sequence analyses, could be arbitrary. The aim of this study is therefore to perform a systematic and detailed analysis of sequence-structure relationships of known GPCR structures. We analyzed in detail conserved and unique sequence motifs and structural features in experimentally-determined GPCR structures. Deeper insight into specific and important structural features of GPCRs as well as valuable information for template selection has been gained. Using key features a workflow has been formulated for identifying the most appropriate template(s) for building homology models of GPCRs of unknown structure. This workflow was applied to a set of 14 human family A GPCRs suggesting for each the most appropriate template(s) for building a comparative molecular model. The available crystal structures represent only a subset of all possible structural variation in family A GPCRs. Some GPCRs have structural features that are distributed over different crystal structures or which are not present in the templates suggesting that homology models should be built using multiple templates. This study provides a systematic analysis of GPCR crystal structures and a consistent method for identifying suitable templates for GPCR homology modelling that will

  16. A parity function for studying the molecular electronic structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmider, Hartmut

    1996-01-01

    Sections through the molecular Wigner function with zero momentum variable are shown to provide important information about the off-diagonal regions of the spinless one-particle reduced density matrix. Since these regions are characteristic for the bonding situation in molecules, the sections...... are qualitatively even more affected by the presence of chemical bonds than a complementary projection, the reciprocal form factor. In this paper we discuss, on the grounds of a variety of examples, how this rather simple function may aid the understanding of the chemical bond on a one-particle level. (C) 1996...

  17. Molecular conformation and structural correlations of liquid D-1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inelasticity parameters: a = 3.22374 × 10−3 Е2, b = 0.404782 × 10−5 Е4. Constant for Debye–Waller terms: λ0 = 0.0384, χ2 = 0.134823 × 10−5. Election. Molecular diffraction [12] parameters. Present. X-ray [5]. (gas phase). MD [6]. rCC (Е). 1.477 ± 0.003. 1.520. 1.540. 1.530. rCO (Е). 1.443 ± 0.012. 1.420. 1.410. 1.430. rCD ...

  18. Molecular-Field Calculation of the Magnetic Structure in Erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1976-01-01

    A molecular-field calculation of the magnetic configurations in Er is found to reproduce the neutron diffraction results of the three different magnetic phases and to give a reasonable fit to the magnetization data at 4.2K. The two-ion coupling is considered to be described by the inter......-planar coupling parameters deduced from the dispersion of the spin waves in the low temperature conical phases. The four (effective) crystal-field parameters are determined by the fit to the experimental data. Projecting the magnetic moments present in the intermediate phase of Er (18-52.4K) to a common origin...

  19. Using vibrational molecular spectroscopy to reveal association of steam-flaking induced carbohydrates molecular structural changes with grain fractionation, biodigestion and biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ningning; Liu, Jianxin; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-04-01

    Advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy has been developed as a rapid and non-destructive tool to reveal intrinsic molecular structure conformation of biological tissues. However, this technique has not been used to systematically study flaking induced structure changes at a molecular level. The objective of this study was to use vibrational molecular spectroscopy to reveal association between steam flaking induced CHO molecular structural changes in relation to grain CHO fractionation, predicted CHO biodegradation and biodigestion in ruminant system. The Attenuate Total Reflectance Fourier-transform Vibrational Molecular Spectroscopy (ATR-Ft/VMS) at SRP Key Lab of Molecular Structure and Molecular Nutrition, Ministry of Agriculture Strategic Research Chair Program (SRP, University of Saskatchewan) was applied in this study. The fractionation, predicted biodegradation and biodigestion were evaluated using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The results show that: (1) The steam flaking induced significant changes in CHO subfractions, CHO biodegradation and biodigestion in ruminant system. There were significant differences between non-processed (raw) and steam flaked grain corn (P < .01); (2) The ATR-Ft/VMS molecular technique was able to detect the processing induced CHO molecular structure changes; (3) Induced CHO molecular structure spectral features are significantly correlated (P < .05) to CHO subfractions, CHO biodegradation and biodigestion and could be applied to potentially predict CHO biodegradation (R2 = 0.87, RSD = 0.74, P < .01) and intestinal digestible undegraded CHO (R2 = 0.87, RSD = 0.24, P < .01). In summary, the processing induced molecular CHO structure changes in grain corn could be revealed by the ATR-Ft/VMS vibrational molecular spectroscopy. These molecular structure changes in grain were potentially associated with CHO biodegradation and biodigestion.

  20. Genetic and molecular analyses of natural variation indicate CBF2 as a candidate gene for underlying a freezing tolerance quantitative trait locus in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Gomez-Mena, C.; Llorente, F.; Koornneef, M.; Salinas, J.; Martinez-Zapater, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural variation for freezing tolerance is a major component of adaptation and geographic distribution of plant species. However, little is known about the genes and molecular mechanisms that determine its naturally occurring diversity. We have analyzed the intraspecific freezing tolerance

  1. Synthesis and molecular structure of manganese complexes with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Manganese-dioxygen complexes are assumed to play significant roles in physiologically important enzymatic reactions including superoxide dismutation, decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen evolution from water catalysed by manganese containing proteins 1. Accordingly, the characterization of structurally ...

  2. Structures of water molecular nanotube induced by axial tensile strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Liew, K.M. [Department of Building and Constructions, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Liu, X.F. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)

    2008-10-06

    Five well-ordered nano-ice structures embedded in carbon nanotubes are obtained in this study. These five nano-ice phases all exhibit single walled tubular morphologies, including the pentagon, hexagon ice nanotubes whose structures are quite different from bulk ice. Our simulation results indicate that water molecules tend to rearrange into surface ring structures to reduce the number of free OH groups. The structural behavior of these ice nanotubes inside CNTs subject to axial stress is also investigated. The ice nanotubes tend to be drawn to ice nanorings or ice nanospring during the mechanical stretching. The distribution function exhibits typical order-to-disorder transition of the water network confined in carbon nanotube during the stretching. By analysis, we suggest that it is unlikely that additional water molecules will enter the tubes because of the increased volume available if the tubes are stretched at contact with a water reservoir.

  3. A biomimetic molecular switch at work: coupling photoisomerization dynamics to peptide structural rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Gueye, Moussa; Léonard, Jérémie; Martínez-López, David; Campos, Pedro J; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Sampedro, Diego; Marazzi, Marco

    2016-03-07

    In spite of considerable interest in the design of molecular switches towards photo-controllable (bio)materials, few studies focused on the major influence of the surrounding environment on the switch photoreactivities. We present a combined experimental and computational study of a retinal-like molecular switch linked to a peptide, elucidating the effects on the photoreactivity and on the α-helix secondary structure. Temperature-dependent, femtosecond UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy and high-level hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods were applied to describe the photoisomerization process and the subsequent peptide rearrangement. It was found that the conformational heterogeneity of the ground state peptide controls the excited state potential energy surface and the thermally activated population decay. Still, a reversible α-helix to α-hairpin conformational change is predicted, paving the way for a fine photocontrol of different secondary structure elements, hence (bio)molecular functions, using retinal-inspired molecular switches.

  4. Molecular Structural Transformation of 2:1 Clay Minerals by a Constant-Pressure Molecular Dynamics Simulation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Gutierre, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of a molecular dynamics simulation study of dehydrated 2:1 clay minerals using the Parrinello-Rahman constant-pressure molecular dynamics method. The method is capable of simulating a system under the most general applied stress conditions by considering the changes of MD cell size and shape. Given the advantage of the method, it is the major goal of the paper to investigate the influence of imposed cell boundary conditions on the molecular structural transformation of 2:1 clay minerals under different normal pressures. Simulation results show that the degrees of freedom of the simulation cell (i.e., whether the cell size or shape change is allowed) determines the final equilibrated crystal structure of clay minerals. Both the MD method and the static method have successfully revealed unforeseen structural transformations of clay minerals upon relaxation under different normal pressures. It is found that large shear distortions of clay minerals occur when full allowance is given to the cell size and shape change. A complete elimination of the interlayer spacing is observed in a static simulation. However, when only the cell size change is allowed, interlayer spacing is retained, but large internal shear stresses also exist.

  5. Advanced understanding on electronic structure of molecular semiconductors and their interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Kouki

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of organic semiconductors and their interfaces is critical to optimizing functionalities for electronics applications, by rational chemical design and appropriate combination of device constituents. The unique electronic structure of a molecular solid is characterized as (i) anisotropic electrostatic fields that originate from molecular quadrupoles, (ii) interfacial energy-level lineup governed by simple electrostatics, and (iii) weak intermolecular interactions that make not only structural order but also energy distributions of the frontier orbitals sensitive to atmosphere and interface growth. This article shows an overview on these features with reference to the improved understanding of the orientation-dependent electronic structure, comprehensive mechanisms of molecular doping, and energy-level alignment. Furthermore, the engineering of ionization energy by the control of the electrostatic fields and work function of practical electrodes by contact-induced doping is briefly described for the purpose of highlighting how the electronic structure impacts the performance of organic devices.

  6. Molecular docking, TG/DTA, molecular structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, natural bond orbital and TD-DFT analysis of diphenyl carbonate by DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, S.; Periandy, S.; Carthigayan, K.; Sebastian, S.

    2016-12-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis of Diphenyl Carbonate (DPC) is carried out by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques. It is found that all vibrational modes are in the expected region. Gaussian computational calculations were performed using B3LYP method with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The computed geometric parameters are in good agreement with XRD data. The observation shows that the structure of the carbonate group is unsymmetrical by ∼5° due to the attachment of the two phenyl rings. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interaction and charge delocalization are analyzed by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) study and the results show the lone pair transition has higher stabilization energy compared to all other. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are calculated using the Gauge-Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) method. The chemical shifts computed theoretically go very closer to the experimental results. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies and Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) exhibit the high reactivity nature of the molecule. The non-linear optical property of the DPC molecule predicted theoretically found to be good candidate for NLO material. TG/DTA analysis was made and decomposition of the molecule with respect to the temperature was studied. DPC having the anthelmintic activity is docked in the Hemoglobin of Fasciola hepatica protein. The DPC has been screened to antimicrobial activity and found to exhibit antibacterial effects.

  7. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    the influence of spectral properties and dimensionality of the molecular system on the algorithm efficiency. We test two algorithms, the MinMax and Lanczos, for spectral estimation from an MD trajectory, and use this to derive a practical scheme of time step adaptation in MD relaxation algorithms to improve...... efficiency. We also discuss the implementation aspects. Secondly, we explore the final state refinement acceleration by a combination with the conjugate gradient technique, where the key ingredient is an implicit corrector step. Finally, we test the feasibility of passive Hessian matrix accumulation from...... an MD trajectory, as another route for final phase acceleration. Our suggestions may be implemented within most MD quench implementations with a few, straightforward lines of code, thus maintaining the appealing simplicity of the MD quench algorithms. In this paper, we also bridge the conceptual gap...

  8. Introductory group theory and its application to molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1969-01-01

    This volume is a consequence of a series of seminars presented by the authors at the Infrared Spectroscopy Institute, Canisius College, Buffalo, New York, over the last nine years. Many participants on an intermediate level lacked a sufficient background in mathematics and quantum mechan­ ics, and it became evident that a non mathematical or nearly nonmathe­ matical approach would be necessary. The lectures were designed to fill this need and proved very successful. As a result of the interest that was developed in this approach, it was decided to write this book. The text is intended for scientists and students with only limited theore­ tical background in spectroscopy, but who are sincerely interested in the interpretation of molecular spectra. The book develops the detailed selection rules for fundamentals, combinations, and overtones for molecules in several point groups. Detailed procedures used in carrying out the normal coordinate treatment for several molecules are also presented. Numerous examples...

  9. Electronic structure, transport, and collective effects in molecular layered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of organic heterostructures for organic device applications is exemplified by the targeted engineering of the electronic properties of phthalocyanine-based systems. The transport properties of two different phthalocyanine systems, a pure copper phthalocyanine (CoPc and a flourinated copper phthalocyanine–manganese phthalocyanine (F16CoPc/MnPc heterostructure, are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF approach. Furthermore, a master-equation-based approach is used to include electronic correlations beyond the mean-field-type approximation of DFT. We describe the essential theoretical tools to obtain the parameters needed for the master equation from DFT results. Finally, an interacting molecular monolayer is considered within a master-equation approach.

  10. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  11. Magnetic structure of molecular magnet Fe[Fe(CN) 6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied the magnetic structure of Fe[Fe(CN)6]·4H2O, prepared by precipitation method, using neutron diffraction technique. Temperature dependent DC magnetization study down to 4.2 K shows that the compound undergoes from a high temperature disordered (paramagnetic) to an ordered magnetic phase ...

  12. Molecular flexibility and structural instabilities in crystalline L-methionine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Jennifer; Lima, Jose A.; Freire, Paulo T. C.; Melo, Francisco E. A.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Mendes Filho, Josue; Broer, Ria; Eckert, Juergen; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics in polycrystalline samples of L-methionine related to the structural transition at about 307 K by incoherent inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering, X-ray powder diffraction as well as ab-initio calculations. L-Methionine is a sulfur amino acid which can be

  13. Efficient synthesis and molecular structure of 2-hydroxyisophthaldehyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, C; van den Beuken, E.K; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Feringa, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    A new highly effective procedure has been developed for the preparation of 2-hydroxyisophthaldehyde from 2,6-dimethylphenol. The X-ray crystal structure shows infinite chains of molecules joined by hydrogen bonds. (C) 1997 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Molecular dynamic study of the U-Mo alloy structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotova, L.N.; Smirnova, D.E.; Starikov, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The method of atomistic simulations was used to study the structure of the quasi-equilibrium tetragonal phase U-Mo, formed during crystallization of the melt. Radial distribution function and bond-angle distribution function were calculated for the analysis of uranium and molybdenum structures in the alloy. The lattice constants of the uranium-molybdenum alloy were obtained for different concentrations of molybdenum. Results of calculations are in good agreement with experimental data and confirm the anisotropy of the lattice at low molybdenum concentrations. Temperature of the transition from anisotropic tetragonal phase to a body-centered cubic phase was calculated for different concentrations of molybdenum. It was found that the anisotropy is a consequence of the local arrangement of uranium atoms in the U-Mo alloy structure. It is shown that the anisotropy disappears with increase of molybdenum concentration not due to changes in the uranium atoms arrangement. It disappears because the number of molybdenum atoms – “stabilization centers of isotropy” increases. Also dependence of the enthalpy of mixing for uranium-molybdenum alloy on molybdenum concentration was calculated. It is shown that anomalous enthalpy of mixing - molybdenum concentration dependence, known from the experiments, can be obtained only when the atomic structure of the alloy is taking into account. [ru

  15. Refining of crystal structures of macromolecules with molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Y.P.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, the refining of crystal structures of macromolecules is discussed. The annealing method is employed and it can be previewed that, this method, will be largely used in the future for protein crystallography. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  16. The crystal and molecular structure of 2,3-diazanaphthalene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiszoon, C.; van de Waal, B.W.; van Egmond, A.B.; Harkema, Sybolt

    1972-01-01

    The structure of 2,3-diazanaphthalene (phthalazine) has been determined by X-ray methods. Cell constants and intensity data were obtained with a single-crystal diffractometer. The space group is Pbca. Cell constants are 13.695, 10.557 and 9.285 A. There are eight nearly planar molecules in the unit

  17. The crystal and molecular structure of 2,7-diazanaphthalene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiszoon, C.; van Hummel, G.J.; van den Ham, D.M.W.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data were collected at 20°C on a computer-controlled Philips diffractometer (PW 1100). The structure was solved by direct methods and refined by the full-matrix least-squares method to an R of 0.065 (weighted R 0.046). The molecule in the crystal is of lower symmetry than C2,.. The

  18. Molecular structure and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 4 ... To understand the substitution effects on the nature of IHB and the electronic structure of the chelated ring system, the vibrational frequencies, 1H chemical shift, topological parameters, natural bond orders and natural charges over atoms involved in the ...

  19. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and structure prediction of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-04-19

    Apr 19, 2012 ... The 3-D protein model in this study was predicted by the comparative protein modeling program SWISS-MODEL automated protein modeling server, based upon deep- sea bacterium Geobacillus sp. strain HTA-462. (2ze0A.pdb) Protein Data Bank structure file (Figure 8). DISCUSSION. The rBAT proteins ...

  20. Molecular structures of viruses from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Hecht, Lutz; Syme, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity to chira...

  1. Molecular structure and DFT investigations on new cobalt(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the new [Co(btmgn)Cl2] complex were charac- terized using different spectroscopic techniques. The. X-ray structure of the [Co(btmgn)Cl2] complex is deter- mined. The electronic and spectroscopic aspects of the ligands as well as the [Co(btmgn)Cl2] were discussed with the aid of DFT quantum chemical calculations.

  2. CNDO/SCF MOLECULAR ORBITAL STRUCTURAL STUDIES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    at 77 oK has been studied using UV and visible spectroscopy [4]. Lahir has studied charge transfer complex formation between, oxytetracycline and tetracycline, with purines, pyrimidines and amino acids [5]. A CNDO study of the tautomeric structure of uracil and its effect on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of mild ...

  3. Rare-earth quinolinates: Infrared-emitting molecular materials with a rich structural chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Van Deun, Rik; Fias, Pascal; Nockemann, Peter; Schepers, An; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2004-01-01

    Near-infrared-emitting rare-earth chelates based on 8-hydroxyquinoline have appeared frequently in recent literature, because they are promising candidates for active components in near-infrared-luminescent optical devices, such as optical amplifiers, organic light-emitting diodes, .... Unfortunately, the absence of a full structural investigation of these rare-earth quinolinates is hampering the further development of rare-earth quinolinate based materials, because the luminescence output ca...

  4. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-01-01

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  5. Structural insights of Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ inhibitors through molecular docking, 3D-QSAR and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballu, Srilata; Itteboina, Ramesh; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2018-02-01

    Filamentous temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ) is a protein encoded by the FtsZ gene that assembles into a Z-ring at the future site of the septum of bacterial cell division. Structurally, FtsZ is a homolog of eukaryotic tubulin but has low sequence similarity; this makes it possible to obtain FtsZ inhibitors without affecting the eukaryotic cell division. Computational studies were performed on a series of substituted 3-arylalkoxybenzamide derivatives reported as inhibitors of FtsZ activity in Staphylococcus aureus. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models (QSAR) models generated showed good statistical reliability, which is evident from r 2 ncv and r 2 loo values. The predictive ability of these models was determined and an acceptable predictive correlation (r 2 Pred ) values were obtained. Finally, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in order to examine the stability of protein-ligand interactions. This facilitated us to compare free binding energies of cocrystal ligand and newly designed molecule B1. The good concordance between the docking results and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA)/comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) contour maps afforded obliging clues for the rational modification of molecules to design more potent FtsZ inhibitors.

  6. Molecular and supra-molecular structure of waxy starches developed from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Sanchez, Teresa; Buléon, Alain; Colonna, Paul; Ceballos, Hernan; Zhao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Peng; Dufour, Dominique

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this work was to characterize the amylopectin of low amylose content cassava starches obtained from transgenesis comparatively with a natural waxy cassava starch (WXN) discovered recently in CIAT (International Center for Tropical Agriculture). Macromolecular features, starch granule morphology, crystallinity and thermal properties of these starches were determined. M¯(w) of amylopectin from the transgenic varieties are lower than WXN. Branched and debranched chain distributions analyses revealed slight differences in the branching degree and structure of these amylopectins, principally on DP 6-9 and DP>37. For the first time, a deep structural characterization of a series of transgenic lines of waxy cassava was carried out and the link between structural features and the mutated gene expression approached. The transgenesis allows to silenced partially or totally the GBSSI, without changing deeply the starch granule ultrastructure and allows to produce clones with similar amylopectin as parental cassava clone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimated molecular structure of a carbon nanotube molecular heater based on binding properties to a target protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Minoru; Yamazaki, Jun

    2015-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit strong absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region and are considered as potent candidates for hyperthermic therapy because they generate significant amounts of heat upon excitation with NIR light. We prepared a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/IgG complex to use as a "smart molecular heater" for hyperthermic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the binding efficiency of DNA-functionalized SWNT/IgG complexes to a target protein. 3 types of complexes with different lengths of spacer arm chain (13.5, 29, and 56 Å) linked to biotinylated IgG were prepared, and we evaluated the effect of the spacer arm length on the specificity, affinity, and capacity of binding to a target protein. Complexes with longer spacer lengths showed increased binding affinity to a target protein. This could be due to a reduction in steric hindrance by increasing the segmental flexibility of the spacer arm. The results of this study suggested that DNA-functionalized SWNT/IgG complexes could act as a heating nano-device for hyperthermic cancer therapy, and the complexes can bind various types of tumor by modifiying the specific antibody.

  8. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Electronic Structure of Polymers and Molecular Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ladik, János

    1975-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Electronic Structure of Polymers and Molecular Crystals" was held at the Facultes Universi­ taires de Namur (F.U.N.) from September 1st till September 14th, 1974. We wish to express our appreciation to the NATO Scientific Affairs Division whose generous support made this Institute possible and to the Facultes Universitaires de Namur and the Societe Chimique de Belgique which provided fellowships and travel grants to a number of students. This volume contains the main lectures about the basic principles of the field and about different recent developments of the theory of the electronic structure of polymers and molecular crystals. The school started with the presentation of the basic SCF-LCAO theory of the electronic structure of periodic polymers and molecular crystals (contributions by Ladik, Andre & Delhalle) showing how a combination of quantum chemical and solid state physical methods can provide band structures for these systems. The numerical aspects of these ...

  9. Relation between molecular electronic structure and nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Štěpánek, Petr; Coriani, Sonia; Sundholm, Dage

    2017-01-01

    with the spatial distribution of the excited states and couplings between them, reflecting changes in molecular structure and conformation. This constitutes a marked difference to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift, which only reflects the local molecular structure in the ground electronic state......The recently theoretically described nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism (NSCD) is a promising method for the optical detection of nuclear magnetization. NSCD involves both optical excitations of the molecule and hyperfine interactions and, thus, it offers a means to realize a spectroscopy...... with spatially localized, high-resolution information. To survey the factors relating the molecular and electronic structure to the NSCD signal, we theoretically investigate NSCD of twenty structures of the four most common nucleic acid bases (adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine). The NSCD signal correlates...

  10. Lead candidates for high-performance organic photovoltaics from high-throughput quantum chemistry – the Harvard Clean Energy Project

    OpenAIRE

    Hachmann, Johannes; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Jinich, Adrian; Appleton, Anthony L.; Blood-Forsythe, Martin; Seress, Laszlo Ryan; Román-Salgado, Carolina; Trepte, Kai; Atahan-Evrenk, Sule; Er, Suleyman; Shrestha, Supriya; Mondal, Rajib; Sokolov, Anatoliy; Bao, Zhenan; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The virtual high-throughput screening framework of the Harvard Clean Energy Project allows for the computational assessment of candidate structures for organic electronic materials – in particular photovoltaics – at an unprecedented scale. We report the most promising compounds that have emerged after studying 2.3 million molecular motifs by means of 150 million density functional theory calculations. Our top candidates are analyzed with respect to their structural makeup in order to identify...

  11. Electronic structure of the candidate 2D Dirac semimetal SrMnSb2: a combined experimental and theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Ramankutty, J. Henke, A. Schiphorst, R. Nutakki, S. Bron, G. Araizi-Kanoutas, S. K. Mishra, Lei Li, Y. K. Huang, T. K. Kim, M. Hoesch, C. Schlueter, T. -L. Lee, A. de Visser, Zhicheng Zhong, Jasper van Wezel, E. van Heumen, M. S. Golden

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available SrMnSb$_2$ is suggested to be a magnetic topological semimetal. It contains square, 2D Sb planes with non-symmorphic crystal symmetries that could protect band crossings, offering the possibility of a quasi-2D, robust Dirac semi-metal in the form of a stable, bulk (3D crystal. Here, we report a combined and comprehensive experimental and theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of SrMnSb$_2$, including the first ARPES data on this compound. SrMnSb$_2$ possesses a small Fermi surface originating from highly 2D, sharp and linearly dispersing bands (the Y-states around the (0,$\\pi$/a-point in $k$-space. The ARPES Fermi surface agrees perfectly with that from bulk-sensitive Shubnikov de Haas data from the same crystals, proving the Y$-$states to be responsible for electrical conductivity in SrMnSb$_2$. DFT and tight binding (TB methods are used to model the electronic states, and both show good agreement with the ARPES data. Despite the great promise of the latter, both theory approaches show the Y-states to be gapped above E$_F$, suggesting trivial topology. Subsequent analysis within both theory approaches shows the Berry phase to be zero, indicating the non-topological character of the transport in SrMnSb$_2$, a conclusion backed up by the analysis of the quantum oscillation data from our crystals.

  12. Dark matter candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of? Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs

  13. Amyloid-β-Secondary Structure Distribution in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Measured by an Immuno-Infrared-Sensor: A Biomarker Candidate for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabers, Andreas; Ollesch, Julian; Schartner, Jonas; Kötting, Carsten; Genius, Just; Hafermann, Henning; Klafki, Hans; Gerwert, Klaus; Wiltfang, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The misfolding of the Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide into β-sheet enriched conformations was proposed as an early event in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Here, the Aβ peptide secondary structure distribution in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma of 141 patients was measured with an immuno-infrared-sensor. The sensor detected the amide I band, which reflects the overall secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides extracted from the body fluid. We observed a significant downshift of the amide I band frequency of Aβ peptides in Dementia Alzheimer type (DAT) patients, which indicated an overall shift to β-sheet. The secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides provides a better marker for DAT detection than a single Aβ misfold or the concentration of a specific oligomer. The discrimination between DAT and disease control patients according to the amide I frequency was in excellent agreement with the clinical diagnosis (accuracy 90% for CSF and 84% for blood). The amide I band maximum above or below the decisive marker frequency appears as a novel spectral biomarker candidate of AD. Additionally, a preliminary proof-of-concept study indicated an amide I band shift below the marker band already in patients with mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The presented immuno-IR-sensor method represents a promising, simple, robust, and label-free diagnostic tool for CSF and blood analysis.

  14. Structure of beryllium isotopes in fermionic molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Bahram Ramin

    2009-02-16

    Modern theoretical nuclear physics faces two major challenges. The first is finding a suitable interaction, which describes the forces between nucleons. The second challenge is the solution of the nuclear many-body problem for a given nucleus while applying a realistic potential. The potential used in the framework of this thesis is based on the Argonne AV18 potential. It was transformed by means of the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) to optimize convergence. The usual phenomenological corrections were applied to improve the potential for the Hilbert space used in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD). FMD is an approach to solve the nuclear many-body problem. It uses a single-particle basis which is a superposition of Gaussian distributions in phase-space. The most simple many-body state is the antisymmetric product of the singleparticle states: a Slater determinant, the so called intrinsic state. This intrinsic state is projected on parity, total angular momentum and a center of mass momentum zero. The Hilbert space is spanned by several of these projected states. The states are obtained by minimizing their energy while demanding certain constraints. The expectation values of Slater determinants, parity projected and additionally total angular momentum projected Slater determinants are used. The states that are relevant in the low energy regime are obtained by diagonalization. The lowest moments of the mass-, proton- or neutron-distribution and the excitation in proton- and neutron-shells of a harmonic oscillator are some of the used constraints. The low energy regime of the Beryllium isotopes with masses 7 to 14 is calculated by using these states. Energies, radii, electromagnetic transitions, magnetic moments and point density distributions of the low lying states are calculated and are presented in this thesis. (orig.)

  15. Structures and magnetism of multinuclear vanadium-pentacene sandwich clusters and their 1D molecular wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Zhu, Liyan; Wu, Qisheng; Yang, Shuo-Wang; Wang, Jinlan

    2012-10-28

    Two types of multinuclear sandwich clusters, (V(3))(n)Pen(n+1), (V(4))(n)Pen(n+1) (Pen = Pentacene; n = 1, 2), and their corresponding infinite one-dimensional (1D) molecular wires ([V(3)Pen](∞), [V(4)Pen](∞)) are investigated theoretically, especially on their magnetic coupling mechanism. These sandwich clusters and molecular wires are found to be of high stability and exhibit intriguing magnetic properties. The intra-layered V atoms in (V(3))(n)Pen(n+1) clusters prefer antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling, while they can be either ferromagnetic (FM) or AFM coupling in (V(4))(n)Pen(n+1) depending on the intra-layered V-V distances via direct exchange or superexchange mechanism. The inter-layered V atoms favor FM coupling in (V(3))(2)Pen(3), whereas they are AFM coupled in (V(4))(2)Pen(3). Such magnetic behaviors are the consequence of the competition between direct exchange and superexchange interactions among inter-layered V atoms. In contrast, the 1D molecular wires, [V(3)Pen](∞) and [V(4)Pen](∞), appear to be FM metallic with ultra high magnetic moments of 6.8 and 4.0 μ(B) per unit cell respectively, suggesting that they can be served as good candidates for molecular magnets.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a candidate human growth-related and time-keeping constitutive cell surface hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziying; Gorenstein, Nina M; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2008-12-30

    ENOX (ECTO-NOX) proteins are growth-related cell surface proteins that catalyze both hydroquinone or NADH oxidation and protein disulfide-thiol interchange and exhibit both prion-like and time-keeping (clock) properties. The two enzymatic activities they catalyze alternate to generate a regular period of 24 min in length. Here we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a human candidate constitutive ENOX (CNOX or ENOX1) protein. The gene encoding this 643 amino acid long protein is located on chromosome 13 (13q 14.11). Functional motifs previously identified by site-directed mutagenesis in a cancer-associated ENOX (tNOX or ENOX2) as adenine nucleotide or copper binding along with essential cysteines are present, but the drug-binding motif (EEMTE) sequence of ENOX2 is absent. The activities of the recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli were not affected by capsaicin, EGCg, and other ENOX2-inhibiting substances. The purified recombinant protein bound ca. 2 mol of copper/mol of protein. Bound copper was necessary for activity. H260 and H579 were required for copper binding as confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, loss of copper-binding capacity, and resultant loss of enzymatic activity. Addition of melatonin phased the 24 min period such that the next complete period began exactly 24 min after the melatonin addition as appears to be characteristic of ENOX1 activities in general. Oxidative activity was exhibited with both NAD(P)H and reduced coenzyme Q as substrate. Concentrated solutions of the purified candidate ENOX1 protein irreversibly formed insoluble aggregates, devoid of enzymatic activity, resembling amyloid.

  17. Study of the molecular structure of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougon, R.

    1967-06-01

    The vibrational spectrum of uranium hexafluoride has been studied in both the gaseous and solid states. The study of gaseous UF 6 confirms the regular octahedral structure of the fluorine atoms around the central U atom and makes it possible to evaluate some of the vibrational frequencies. From these, some new force constants have been determined. A tetragonal distortion is observed on solid UF 6 ; this distortion has only observed up till now by means of X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. (author) [fr

  18. Synthesis, reactivity, and electronic structure of molecular uranium nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaves, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The study of metal-ligand multiple bonding offers insight into the electronic structure and bond of metal systems. Until recently, for uranium, such systems were limited to uranyl, and terminal chalcogenide, imide and carbene complexes. In 2012, this was extended to nitrides with the first preparation of a uranium–nitride (U≡N) species isolable under standard conditions, namely [U(TrenTIPS)(N)][Na(12C4)2] (52), which is prepared by the two-electron reduction of sodium azide with a trivalent u...

  19. FlaME: Flash Molecular Editor - a 2D structure input tool for the web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallakian Pavel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far, there have been no Flash-based web tools available for chemical structure input. The authors herein present a feasibility study, aiming at the development of a compact and easy-to-use 2D structure editor, using Adobe's Flash technology and its programming language, ActionScript. As a reference model application from the Java world, we selected the Java Molecular Editor (JME. In this feasibility study, we made an attempt to realize a subset of JME's functionality in the Flash Molecular Editor (FlaME utility. These basic capabilities are: structure input, editing and depiction of single molecules, data import and export in molfile format. Implementation The result of molecular diagram sketching in FlaME is accessible in V2000 molfile format. By integrating the molecular editor into a web page, its communication with the HTML elements on this page is established using the two JavaScript functions, getMol( and setMol(. In addition, structures can be copied to the system clipboard. Conclusion A first attempt was made to create a compact single-file application for 2D molecular structure input/editing on the web, based on Flash technology. With the application examples presented in this article, it could be demonstrated that the Flash methods are principally well-suited to provide the requisite communication between the Flash object (application and the HTML elements on a web page, using JavaScript functions.

  20. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  1. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  2. Structure activity relationships of quinoxalin-2-one derivatives as platelet-derived growth factor-beta receptor (PDGFbeta R) inhibitors, derived from molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshikazu; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Aoki, Katsuyuki; Satomi, Hisanori; Takeda, Shuichi; Aburada, Masaki; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2008-05-01

    We previously reported a quinoxalin-2-one compound (Compound 1) that had inhibitory activity equivalent to existing platelet-derived growth factor-beta receptor (PDGFbeta R) inhibitors. Lead optimization of Compound 1 to increase its activity and selectivity, using structural information regarding PDGFbeta R-ligand interactions, is urgently needed. Here we present models of the PDGFbeta R kinase domain complexed with quinoxalin-2-one derivatives. The models were constructed using comparative modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) and ligand docking. In particular, conformations derived from MD, and ligand binding site information presented by alpha-spheres in the pre-docking processing, allowed us to identify optimal protein structures for docking of target ligands. By carrying out molecular modeling and MD of PDGFbeta R in its inactive state, we obtained two structural models having good Compound 1 binding potentials. In order to distinguish the optimal candidate, we evaluated the structural activity relationships (SAR) between the ligand-binding free energies and inhibitory activity values (IC50 values) for available quinoxalin-2-one derivatives. Consequently, a final model with a high SAR was identified. This model included a molecular interaction between the hydrophobic pocket behind the ATP binding site and the substitution region of the quinoxalin-2-one derivatives. These findings should prove useful in lead optimization of quinoxalin-2-one derivatives as PDGFb R inhibitors.

  3. Molecular Determinants of Staphylococcal Biofilm Dispersal and Structuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Y Le

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are frequently implicated in human infections, and continue to pose a therapeutic dilemma due to their ability to form deeply seated microbial communities, known as biofilms, on the surfaces of implanted medical devices and host tissues. Biofilm development has been proposed to occur in three stages: 1 attachment, 2 proliferation/structuring, and 3 detachment/dispersal. Although research within the last several decades has implicated multiple molecules in the roles as effectors of staphylococcal biofilm proliferation/structuring and detachment/dispersal, to date, only phenol soluble modulins (PSMs have been consistently demonstrated to serve in this role under both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. PSMs are regulated directly through a density-dependent manner by the accessory gene regulator (Agr system. They disrupt the non-covalent forces holding the biofilm extracellular matrix together, which is necessary for the formation of channels, a process essential for the delivery of nutrients to deeper biofilm layers, and for dispersal/dissemination of clusters of biofilm to distal organs in acute infection. Given their relevance in both acute and chronic biofilm-associated infections, the Agr system and the psm genes hold promise as potential therapeutic targets.

  4. Structured attachment of bacterial molecular motors for defined microflow induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woerdemann Mike

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial rotational motor complexes that propel flagellated bacteria possess unique properties like their size of a few nanometres and the ability of selfreproduction that have led to various exciting applications including biohybrid nano-machines. One mandatory prerequisite to utilize bacterial nano motors in fluid applications is the ability to transfer force and torque to the fluid, which usually can be achieved by attachment of the bacterial cell to adequate surfaces. Additionally, for optimal transfer of force or torque, precise control of the position down to the single cell level is of utmost importance. Based on a PIV (particle image velocimetry evaluation of the induced flow of single bacteria,we propose and demonstrate attachment of arbitrary patterns of motile bacterial cells in a fast light-based two-step process for the first time to our knowledge. First, these cells are pre-structured by holographic optical tweezers and then attached to a homogeneous, polystyrene-coated surface. In contrast to the few approaches that have been implemented up to now and which rely on pre-structured surfaces, our scheme allows for precise control on a single bacterium level, is versatile, interactive and has low requirements with respect to the surface preparation.

  5. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16±2 degree from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94±0.02 Angstrom. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27±0.04 Angstrom, up from 1.10 Angstrom for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25 Angstrom Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20 Angstrom and 15--23 degrees) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16 Angstrom and 19 degrees. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95 Angstrom for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius ∼ 1.5 Angstrom for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS χ(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system

  6. A molecular dynamics study of the role of molecular water on the structure and mechanics of amorphous geopolymer binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Mohammad Rafat; Bringuier, Stefan; Asaduzzaman, Abu; Muralidharan, Krishna; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-10-07

    In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the effect of molecular water and composition (Si/Al ratio) on the structure and mechanical properties of fully polymerized amorphous sodium aluminosilicate geopolymer binders. The X-ray pair distribution function for the simulated geopolymer binder phase showed good agreement with the experimentally determined structure in terms of bond lengths of the various atomic pairs. The elastic constants and ultimate tensile strength of the geopolymer binders were calculated as a function of water content and Si/Al ratio; while increasing the Si/Al ratio from one to three led to an increase in the respective values of the elastic stiffness and tensile strength, for a given Si/Al ratio, increasing the water content decreased the stiffness and strength of the binder phase. An atomic-scale analysis showed a direct correlation between water content and diffusion of alkali ions, resulting in the weakening of the AlO 4 tetrahedral structure due to the migration of charge balancing alkali ions away from the tetrahedra, ultimately leading to failure. In the presence of water molecules, the diffusion behavior of alkali cations was found to be particularly anomalous, showing dynamic heterogeneity. This paper, for the first time, proves the efficacy of atomistic simulations for understanding the effect of water in geopolymer binders and can thus serve as a useful design tool for optimizing composition of geopolymers with improved mechanical properties.

  7. Molecular structure of humin and melanoidin via solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, Judith; Rand, Danielle; Matsuki, Yoh; Daviso, Eugenio; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody; Mamajanov, Irena

    2011-05-19

    Sugar-derived humins and melanoidins figure significantly in food chemistry, agricultural chemistry, biochemistry, and prebiotic chemistry. Despite wide interest and significant experimental attention, the amorphous and insoluble nature of the polymers has made them resistant to conventional structural characterization. Here we make use of solid-state NMR methods, including selective (13)C substitution, (1)H-dephasing, and double quantum filtration. The spectra, and their interpretation, are simplified by relying exclusively on hydronium for catalysis. The results for polymers derived from ribose, deoxyribose, and fructose indicate diverse pathways to furans, suggest a simple route to pyrroles in the presence of amines, and reveal a heterogeneous network-type polymer in which sugar molecules cross-link the heterocycles. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Novel water-mediated hydrogen bonds as the structural basis for the low oxygen affinity of the blood substitute candidate rHb(alpha 96Val-->Trp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puius, Y A; Zou, M; Ho, N T; Ho, C; Almo, S C

    1998-06-30

    One of the most promising approaches for the development of a synthetic blood substitute has been the engineering of novel mutants of human hemoglobin (Hb) A which maintain cooperativity, but possess lowered oxygen affinity. We describe here two crystal structures of one such potential blood substitute, recombinant (r) Hb(alpha 96Val-->Trp), refined to 1.9 A resolution in an alpha-aquomet, beta-deoxy T-state, and to 2.5 A resolution in a carbonmonoxy R-state. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, a particular conformation had been predicted for the engineered Trp residue, and the lowered oxygen affinity had been attributed to a stabilization of the deoxy T-state interface by alpha 96Trp-beta 99Asp hydrogen bonds. Difference Fourier maps of the T-state structure clearly show that alpha 96Trp is in a conformation different from that predicted by the simulation, with its indole side chain directed away from the interface and into the central cavity. In this conformation, the indole nitrogen makes novel water-mediated hydrogen bonds across the T-state interface with beta 101Glu. We propose that these water-mediated hydrogen bonds are the structural basis for the lowered oxygen affinity of rHb(alpha 96Val-->Trp), and discuss the implications of these findings for future molecular dynamics studies and the design of Hb mutants.

  9. Two-dimensional topological insulator molecular networks: dependence on structure, symmetry, and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang Z.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    2D molecular networks can be fabricated from a wide variety of molecular building blocks, arranged in many different configurations. Interactions between neighboring molecular building blocks result in the formation of new 2D materials. Examples of 2D organic topological insulators, that contain molecular building blocks and heavy elements arranged in a hexagonal lattice, have been recently proposed by Feng Liu and coworkers (Nano Lett., 13, 2842 (2013)). In this work, we present a systematic study of the design space of 2D molecular network topological insulators, elucidating the role of structure, symmetry, and composition of the networks. We show that the magnitude and presence of spin-orbit gaps in the electronic band structure is strongly dependent on the symmetry properties and arrangement of the individual components of the molecular lattice. We present general rules to maximize the magnitude of spin-orbit gaps and perform ab-initio calculations on promising structures derived from these guidelines. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR10-1006184, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by the NSF through XSEDE resources at NICS.

  10. Human Skin Barrier Structure and Function Analyzed by Cryo-EM and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, Magnus; Narangifard, Ali; Wennberg, Christian L; Lindahl, Erik; Daneholt, Bertil; Norlén, Lars

    2018-04-24

    In the present study we have analyzed the molecular structure and function of the human skin's permeability barrier using molecular dynamics simulation validated against cryo-electron microscopy data from near native skin. The skin's barrier capacity is located to an intercellular lipid structure embedding the cells of the superficial most layer of skin - the stratum corneum. According to the splayed bilayer model (Iwai et al., 2012) the lipid structure is organized as stacked bilayers of ceramides in a splayed chain conformation with cholesterol associated with the ceramide sphingoid moiety and free fatty acids associated with the ceramide fatty acid moiety. However, knowledge about the lipid structure's detailed molecular organization, and the roles of its different lipid constituents, remains circumstantial. Starting from a molecular dynamics model based on the splayed bilayer model, we have, by stepwise structural and compositional modifications, arrived at a thermodynamically stable molecular dynamics model expressing simulated electron microscopy patterns matching original cryo-electron microscopy patterns from skin extremely closely. Strikingly, the closer the individual molecular dynamics models' lipid composition was to that reported in human stratum corneum, the better was the match between the models' simulated electron microscopy patterns and the original cryo-electron microscopy patterns. Moreover, the closest-matching model's calculated water permeability and thermotropic behaviour were found compatible with that of human skin. The new model may facilitate more advanced physics-based skin permeability predictions of drugs and toxicants. The proposed procedure for molecular dynamics based analysis of cellular cryo-electron microscopy data might be applied to other biomolecular systems. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Coalescence of silver unidimensional structures by molecular dynamics simulation; Coalescencia de estructuras unidimensionales de plata por simulacion dinamica molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.E.; Mondragon, G. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Arenas, J. [IFUNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The study of nanoparticles coalescence and silver nano rods phenomena by means of molecular dynamics simulation under the thermodynamic laws is reported. In this work we focus ourselves to see the conditions under which the one can be given one dimension growth of silver nano rods for the coalescence phenomenon among two nano rods or one nano rod and one particle; what allows us to study those structural, dynamic and morphological properties of the silver nano rods to different thermodynamic conditions. The simulations are carried out using the Sutton-Chen potentials of interaction of many bodies that allow to obtain appropriate results with the real physical systems. (Author)

  12. RECOVERY OF THE CANDIDATE PROTOPLANET HD 100546 b WITH GEMINI/NICI AND DETECTION OF ADDITIONAL (PLANET-INDUCED?) DISK STRUCTURE AT SMALL SEPARATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, Thayne; Kudo, Tomoyuki [NAOJ, Subaru Telescope, 650 N' Aohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogashin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinijuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Honda, Mitsuhiko [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka 259-1293 (Japan); Brandt, Timothy D. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Grady, Carol [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA96002 (United States); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 7 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Janson, Markus [Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kuzuhara, Masayuki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); McElwain, Michael W. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Follette, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Hashimoto, Jun [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Henning, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Morino, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Jun [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kwon, Jungmi; Mede, Kyle, E-mail: currie@naoj.org [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-01

    We report the first independent, second epoch (re-)detection of a directly imaged protoplanet candidate. Using L' high-contrast imaging of HD 100546 taken with the Near-Infrared Coronagraph and Imager on Gemini South, we recover ''HD 100546 b'' with a position and brightness consistent with the original Very Large Telescope/NAos-COnica detection from Quanz et al., although data obtained after 2013 will be required to decisively demonstrate common proper motion. HD 100546 b may be spatially resolved, up to ≈12-13 AU in diameter, and is embedded in a finger of thermal IR-bright, polarized emission extending inward to at least 0.''3. Standard hot-start models imply a mass of ≈15 M{sub J} . However, if HD 100546 b is newly formed or made visible by a circumplanetary disk, both of which are plausible, its mass is significantly lower (e.g., 1-7 M{sub J} ). Additionally, we discover a thermal IR-bright disk feature, possibly a spiral density wave, at roughly the same angular separation as HD 100546 b but 90° away. Our interpretation of this feature as a spiral arm is not decisive, but modeling analyses using spiral density wave theory implies a wave launching point exterior to ≈0.''45 embedded within the visible disk structure: plausibly evidence for a second, hitherto unseen, wide-separation planet. With one confirmed protoplanet candidate and evidence for one to two others, HD 100546 is an important evolutionary precursor to intermediate-mass stars with multiple super-Jovian planets at moderate/wide separations like HR 8799.

  13. Exploring astrobiology using in silico molecular structure generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meringer, Markus; Cleaves, H. James

    2017-11-01

    The origin of life is typically understood as a transition from inanimate or disorganized matter to self-organized, `animate' matter. This transition probably took place largely in the context of organic compounds, and most approaches, to date, have focused on using the organic chemical composition of modern organisms as the main guide for understanding this process. However, it has gradually come to be appreciated that biochemistry, as we know it, occupies a minute volume of the possible organic `chemical space'. As the majority of abiotic syntheses appear to make a large set of compounds not found in biochemistry, as well as an incomplete subset of those that are, it is possible that life began with a significantly different set of components. Chemical graph-based structure generation methods allow for exhaustive in silico enumeration of different compound types and different types of `chemical spaces' beyond those used by biochemistry, which can be explored to help understand the types of compounds biology uses, as well as to understand the nature of abiotic synthesis, and potentially design novel types of living systems. This article is part of the themed issue 'Reconceptualizing the origins of life'.

  14. Crystal and mol-ecular structure of aflatrem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenta, Bruno N; Ngatchou, Jules; Kenfack, Patrice T; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Sewald, Norbert

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, C32H39NO4, confirms the absolute configuration of the seven chiral centres in the mol-ecule. The molecule has a 1,1-dimethylprop-2-enyl substituent on the indole nucleus and this nucleus shares one edge with the five-membered ring which is, in turn, connected to a sequence of three edge-shared fused rings. The skeleton is completed by the 7,7-trimethyl-6,8-dioxabi-cyclo-[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one group connected to the terminal cyclohexene ring. The two cyclohexane rings adopt chair and half-chair conformations, while in the dioxabi-cyclo-[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one unit, the six-membered ring has a half-chair conformation. The indole system of the mol-ecule exhibits a tilt of 2.02 (1)° between its two rings. In the crystal, O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds connect mol-ecules into chains along [010]. Weak N-H⋯π inter-actions connect these chains, forming sheets parallel to (10-1).

  15. Modification of LDPE molecular structure by gamma irradiation for bioapplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L.M. [ITN, Nuclear and Technological Institute, EN 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: ferreira@itn.pt; Falcao, A.N. [ITN, Nuclear and Technological Institute, EN 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Gil, M.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, Polo II - Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2005-07-01

    The surface properties of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) can be modified by the grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). This was done aiming at the production of new materials suitable for bioapplications. Samples with different monomer concentrations were prepared from LDPE particles by gamma irradiation, following different irradiation protocols, including irradiation in presence and absence of air. The samples were characterized by thermal analysis techniques (DSC and TGA) and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results obtained show a decrease in the crystallinity of the supporting matrix for copolymers with high yields of grafting. However, the new materials prepared maintain good structural order resulting from the protective effect of polyHEMA grafted onto LDPE backbone. These effects can improve the diffusion of other species deeper inside the matrix and increase the material hydrophilicity. The studies performed made possible the selection of experimental protocols adequate for the production of new copolymeric materials with high grafting yield. These were used in the production of new LDPE films with enhanced hydrophilic properties.

  16. Theoretical study on molecular packing and electronic structure of bi-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    The molecular aggregation structure of 5,5′-bis(naphthalen-2-yl)-2,2′-bi(1,3,4-oxadiazole) (BOXD-NP) was studied by computing the intermolecular interaction potential energy surface (PES) at density functional theory level based on a dimer model. All B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and M062x functionals can yield a reliable isolated molecular geometry. The conformation of BOXD-NP obtained with all methods is perfectly planar, indicating good conjugation ability between oxadiazole and naphthalene rings. The vibrational frequencies of BOXD-NP were also calculated using the B3LYP/6-311+G∗∗ method, which showed great consistency with the experimental observations and makes the assignments of the IR spectra more solid. It was revealed that the lowest excited state of BOXD-NP should be assigned as a highly allowed π-π∗ state by TD-DFT calculation. Considering the non-covalent interactions in molecular aggregates, the M062x functional was applied in the construction of the PES. Besides the packing structure found in the crystals, PES also predicted several stable structures, indicating that PES has great ability in guiding molecular self-assembly. Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) analysis on these energy-minimum molecular stacking structures revealed that London dispersion forces are the strongest attractive component in the binding. This journal is

  17. Structural determinants of APOBEC3B non-catalytic domain for molecular assembly and catalytic regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Hanjing; Arutiunian, Vagan; Fang, Yao; Besse, Guillaume; Morimoto, Cherie; Zirkle, Brett; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC)

    2017-05-30

    The catalytic activity of human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) has been correlated with kataegic mutational patterns within multiple cancer types. The molecular basis of how the N-terminal non-catalytic CD1 regulates the catalytic activity and consequently, biological function of A3B remains relatively unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a soluble human A3B-CD1 variant and delineate several structural elements of CD1 involved in molecular assembly, nucleic acid interactions and catalytic regulation of A3B. We show that (i) A3B expressed in human cells exists in hypoactive high-molecular-weight (HMW) complexes, which can be activated without apparent dissociation into low-molecular-weight (LMW) species after RNase A treatment. (ii) Multiple surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 mediate the HMW complex assembly and affect the catalytic activity, including one tryptophan residue W127 that likely acts through regulating nucleic acid binding. (iii) One of the highly positively charged surfaces on CD1 is involved in RNA-dependent attenuation of A3B catalysis. (iv) Surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 are involved in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) binding to A3B. The structural and biochemical insights described here suggest that unique structural features on CD1 regulate the molecular assembly and catalytic activity of A3B through distinct mechanisms.

  18. CH5M3D: an HTML5 program for creating 3D molecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Clarke W

    2013-11-18

    While a number of programs and web-based applications are available for the interactive display of 3-dimensional molecular structures, few of these provide the ability to edit these structures. For this reason, we have developed a library written in JavaScript to allow for the simple creation of web-based applications that should run on any browser capable of rendering HTML5 web pages. While our primary interest in developing this application was for educational use, it may also prove useful to researchers who want a light-weight application for viewing and editing small molecular structures. Molecular compounds are drawn on the HTML5 Canvas element, with the JavaScript code making use of standard techniques to allow display of three-dimensional structures on a two-dimensional canvas. Information about the structure (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles) can be obtained using a mouse or other pointing device. Both atoms and bonds can be added or deleted, and rotation about bonds is allowed. Routines are provided to read structures either from the web server or from the user's computer, and creation of galleries of structures can be accomplished with only a few lines of code. Documentation and examples are provided to demonstrate how users can access all of the molecular information for creation of web pages with more advanced features. A light-weight (≈ 75 kb) JavaScript library has been made available that allows for the simple creation of web pages containing interactive 3-dimensional molecular structures. Although this library is designed to create web pages, a web server is not required. Installation on a web server is straightforward and does not require any server-side modules or special permissions. The ch5m3d.js library has been released under the GNU GPL version 3 open-source license and is available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/ch5m3d/.

  19. A Self-Assisting Protein Folding Model for Teaching Structural Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Jodi; Pique, Michael; Getzoff, Elizabeth; Huntoon, Jon; Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2017-04-04

    Structural molecular biology is now becoming part of high school science curriculum thus posing a challenge for teachers who need to convey three-dimensional (3D) structures with conventional text and pictures. In many cases even interactive computer graphics does not go far enough to address these challenges. We have developed a flexible model of the polypeptide backbone using 3D printing technology. With this model we have produced a polypeptide assembly kit to create an idealized model of the Triosephosphate isomerase mutase enzyme (TIM), which forms a structure known as TIM barrel. This kit has been used in a laboratory practical where students perform a step-by-step investigation into the nature of protein folding, starting with the handedness of amino acids to the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. Based on the classroom evidence we collected, we conclude that these models are valuable and inexpensive resource for teaching structural molecular biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Solution structure of NaNO3 in water: diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyes, Tünde; Bálint, Szabolcs; Peter, Emanuel; Grósz, Tamás; Bakó, Imre; Krienke, Hartmut; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2009-04-02

    The structure of a series of aqueous sodium nitrate solutions (1.9-7.6 M) was studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. The results obtained from diffraction (X-ray, neutron) and molecular dynamics simulation have been compared and the capabilities and limitations of the methods in describing solution structure are discussed. For the solutions studied, diffraction methods were found to perform very well in description of hydration spheres of the sodium ion but do not yield detailed structural information on the anion's hydration structure. Molecular dynamics simulations proved to be a suitable tool in the detailed interpretation of the hydration sphere of ions, ion pair formation, and bulk structure of solutions.

  1. Effect of molecular weight on the vibronic structure of a diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Sophia C.

    2016-09-27

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is employed in this study to examine the influence of molecular weight on the optical response of a diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer (DPP-TT-T) in solution. The vibronic structure observed for the ground state absorption of this polymer is found to vary with molecular weight and solvent. Resonance Raman Intensity Analysis (RRIA) revealed that the absorption spectra can be described by at least two dipole-allowed transitions and the vibronic structure variation is due to differing contributions from linear and curved segments of the polymer.

  2. Structure-Activity Relationships on the Molecular Descriptors Family Project at the End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz JÄNTSCHI

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Descriptors Family (MDF on the Structure-Activity Relationships (SAR, a promising approach in investigation and quantification of the link between 2D and 3D structural information and the activity, and its potential in the analysis of the biological active compounds is summarized. The approach, attempts to correlate molecular descriptors family generated and calculated on a set of biological active compounds with their observed activity. The estimation as well as prediction abilities of the approach are presented. The obtained MDF SAR models can be used to predict the biological activity of unknown substrates in a series of compounds.

  3. Molecular structures of various alkyldichlorosilanes in the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagler, Jörg; Gericke, Robert

    2017-07-11

    A series of organodichlorosilanes RR'SiCl 2 (R,R' = (CH 2 ) 3 ; (CH 2 ) 4 ; (CH 2 ) 5 ; Me,Me; Me,H; Me,Cl) was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. At ambient temperature liquid chlorosilanes (melting points in the range of 180-220 K) were transferred into glass capillaries and crystallized in situ on a diffractometer. In the solid state structure these chlorosilanes are monomeric, even in the case of the sterically less demanding 1,1-dichlorosilacyclobutane (CH 2 ) 3 SiCl 2 . Interestingly, regardless the steric demand of the alkyl substituents, the dialkyldichlorosilanes exhibit essentially the same Cl-Si-Cl angle (for (CH 2 ) 3 SiCl 2 , (CH 2 ) 4 SiCl 2 , (CH 2 ) 5 SiCl 2 , Me 2 SiCl 2 : 106.08(3)°, 106.07(4)°/105.86(4)°, 106.91(2)° and 105.59(6)°, respectively). Replacement of one alkyl group by hydrogen has only a marginal influence on the Cl-Si-Cl angle (MeHSiCl 2 106.31(3)°), whereas in MeSiCl 3 slightly wider Cl-Si-Cl angles are found (ranging between 107.04(11)° and 107.86(11)°), in accordance with VSEPR. Computational analyses, i.e., potential energy surface scans of the Cl-Si-Cl angle variation, of (CH 2 ) 3 SiCl 2 , Me 2 SiCl 2 , MeHSiCl 2 and H 2 SiCl 2 reveal essentially identical energy profiles for the Cl-Si-Cl deformation in these four dichlorosilanes with basically superimposed curves for (CH 2 ) 3 SiCl 2 and Me 2 SiCl 2 , whereas with increasing H-substitution the energetic minimum is shifted to a slightly wider Cl-Si-Cl angle. In the crystal packing only MeHSiCl 2 exhibits weak intermolecular SiCl van der Waals contacts, whereas the Si-Cl moieties of the other five chlorosilanes engage in intermolecular ClH and (for (CH 2 ) 3 SiCl 2 , (CH 2 ) 4 SiCl 2 and MeSiCl 3 ) ClCl contacts.

  4. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-12-10

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects.

  5. Lithium diffusion in silicon and induced structure disorder: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanyu Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics method, we investigate the diffusion property of lithium in different silicon structures and silicon structure's disorder extent during lithium's diffusion process. We find that the pathway and the incident angle between the direction of barrier and diffusion of lithium are also the essential factors to the lithium's diffusion property in silicon anode besides the barrier. Smaller incident angle could decrease the scattering of lithium in silicon structure effectively. Moreover, lithium diffuses easier in the Li-Si alloy structure of higher lithium concentration with deeper injection depth. The silicon's structure will be damaged gradually during the charge and discharge process. However, it will also recover to initial state to a great extent after relaxation. Therefore, the damage of lithium diffusion to silicon anode in the structure of low lithium concentration is reversible to a great degree. In addition, the silicon structure of crystal orientation perform better properties in both lithium's diffusivity and structural stability.

  6. Profiling of the Molecular Weight and Structural Isomer Abundance of Macroalgae-Derived Phlorotannins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Natalie; Brunton, Nigel P.; FitzGerald, Richard J.; Smyth, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) unique to macroalgae. These phenolic compounds are integral structural components of the cell wall in brown algae, but also play many secondary ecological roles such as protection from UV radiation and defense against grazing. This study employed Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry to investigate isomeric complexity and observed differences in phlorotannins derived from macroalgae harvested off the Irish coast (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata and Cystoseira nodicaulis). Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content assays were used as an index for producing phlorotannin fractions, enriched using molecular weight cut-off dialysis with subsequent flash chromatography to profile phlorotannin isomers in these macroalgae. These fractions were profiled using UPLC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and the level of isomerization for specific molecular weight phlorotannins between 3 and 16 monomers were determined. The majority of the low molecular weight (LMW) phlorotannins were found to have a molecular weight range equivalent to 4–12 monomers of phloroglucinol. The level of isomerization within the individual macroalgal species differed, resulting in substantially different numbers of phlorotannin isomers for particular molecular weights. F. vesiculosus had the highest number of isomers of 61 at one specific molecular mass, corresponding to 12 phloroglucinol units (PGUs). These results highlight the complex nature of these extracts and emphasize the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds. PMID:25603345

  7. Profiling of the Molecular Weight and Structural Isomer Abundance of Macroalgae-Derived Phlorotannins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Heffernan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene unique to macroalgae. These phenolic compounds are integral structural components of the cell wall in brown algae, but also play many secondary ecological roles such as protection from UV radiation and defense against grazing. This study employed Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC with tandem mass spectrometry to investigate isomeric complexity and observed differences in phlorotannins derived from macroalgae harvested off the Irish coast (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata and Cystoseira nodicaulis. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content assays were used as an index for producing phlorotannin fractions, enriched using molecular weight cut-off dialysis with subsequent flash chromatography to profile phlorotannin isomers in these macroalgae. These fractions were profiled using UPLC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM and the level of isomerization for specific molecular weight phlorotannins between 3 and 16 monomers were determined. The majority of the low molecular weight (LMW phlorotannins were found to have a molecular weight range equivalent to 4–12 monomers of phloroglucinol. The level of isomerization within the individual macroalgal species differed, resulting in substantially different numbers of phlorotannin isomers for particular molecular weights. F. vesiculosus had the highest number of isomers of 61 at one specific molecular mass, corresponding to 12 phloroglucinol units (PGUs. These results highlight the complex nature of these extracts and emphasize the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds.

  8. Determination of molecular-ion structures through the use of accelerated beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this talk we report on recent research on molecular-ion structures using fast molecular-ion beams provided by Argonne's 5-MV Dynamitron accelerator. The method has become known as the ''Coulomb-explosion'' technique. When molecular-ion projectiles travelling at velocities of a few percent of the velocity of light strike a foil, the electrons that bind the molecular projectiles are almost always totally stripped off within the first few Angstroms of penetration into the solid target. This leaves a cluster of bare (or nearly bare) nuclei which separate rapidly as a result of their mutual Coulomb repulsion. This violent dissociation process in which the initial electrostatic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy of relative motion in the center-of-mass, has been termed a ''Coulomb explosion.'' 4 refs., 2 figs

  9. 16O + 16O molecular structures of superdeformed states in S isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Structures of excited states in S isotopes are investigated by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method (GCM). The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter β. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed (SD) bands are predicted in 33-36S except for negative-parity states in 36S. The SD bands have structures of 16O + 16O + valence neutron(s) in molecular orbitals around the two 16O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the valence neutron(s) in the SD states are δ and/or π molecular orbitals.

  10. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Vectorization of Advanced Methods for Molecular Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    That there have been remarkable advances in the field of molecular electronic structure during the last decade is clear not only to those working in the field but also to anyone else who has used quantum chemical results to guide their own investiga­ tions. The progress in calculating the electronic structures of molecules has occurred through the truly ingenious theoretical and methodological developments that have made computationally tractable the underlying physics of electron distributions around a collection of nuclei. At the same time there has been consider­ able benefit from the great advances in computer technology. The growing sophistication, declining costs and increasing accessibi­ lity of computers have let theorists apply their methods to prob­ lems in virtually all areas of molecular science. Consequently, each year witnesses calculations on larger molecules than in the year before and calculations with greater accuracy and more com­ plete information on molecular properties. We can surel...

  11. Automated search-model discovery and preparation for structure solution by molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Ronan M; Winn, Martyn D

    2007-04-01

    A novel automation pipeline for macromolecular structure solution by molecular replacement is described. There is a special emphasis on the discovery and preparation of a large number of search models, all of which can be passed to the core molecular-replacement programs. For routine molecular-replacement problems, the pipeline automates what a crystallographer might do and its value is simply one of convenience. For more difficult cases, the pipeline aims to discover the particular template structure and model edits required to produce a viable search model and may succeed in finding an efficacious combination that would be missed otherwise. The pipeline is described in detail and a number of examples are given. The examples are chosen to illustrate successes in real crystallography problems and also particular features of the pipeline. It is concluded that exploring a range of search models automatically can be valuable in many cases.

  12. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of New Light Molecular Weight Inorganic Oxidizers and Related Derivatives. Volume: 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    results from ab initio calculations and contrary to the VSEPR concept of repelling points on a sphere, the minimum energy structures of these main group...trigonal prism, or a pentagonal bipyramid. 5 According to the VSEPR model of "repelling points on a sphere", 5 the preferred structures should be the...34 VSEPR arguments 5 or classical, directionally localized molecular orbitals, can be rationalized in terms of a bonding scheme, first noticed49 for XeF5

  13. The statistics of molecular motor trajectories on different two-dimensional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, S. M. Ali; Jahanmiri-Nezhad, Faezeh; Martin, Michael; Lastine, Colten

    Molecular motors move on a complex cytoskeleton network to transport material within the cell. In this talk, we investigate different scenarios of transport on two-dimensional network structures. We will study different statistical properties of an ensemble of simulated trajectories such as the frequency of directional changes and diffusion statistics. We will investigate how these statistical measures depend on the geometrical properties of the underlying structure.

  14. Molecular characterization of the piggyBac-like element, a candidate marker for phylogenetic research of Chilo suppressalis (Walker) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guang-Hua; Li, Xiao-Huan; Han, Zhao-Jun; Guo, Hui-Fang; Yang, Qiong; Wu, Min; Zhang, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Bao-Sheng; Qian, Lu; Fang, Ji-Chao

    2014-12-17

    Transposable elements (TEs, transposons) are mobile genetic DNA sequences. TEs can insert copies of themselves into new genomic locations and they have the capacity to multiply. Therefore, TEs have been crucial in the shaping of hosts' current genomes. TEs can be utilized as genetic markers to study population genetic diversity. The rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis Walker is one of the most important insect pests of many subtropical and tropical paddy fields. This insect occurs in all the rice-growing areas in China. This research was carried out in order to find diversity between C. suppressalis field populations and detect the original settlement of C. suppressalis populations based on the piggyBac-like element (PLE). We also aim to provide insights into the evolution of PLEs in C. suppressalis and the phylogeography of C. suppressalis. Here we identify a new piggyBac-like element (PLE) in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis Walker, which is called CsuPLE1.1 (GenBank accession no. JX294476). CsuPLE1.1 is transcriptionally active. Additionally, the CsuPLE1.1 sequence varied slightly between field populations, with polymorphic indels (insertion/deletion) and hyper-variable regions including the identification of the 3' region outside the open reading frame (ORF). CsuPLE1.1 insertion frequency varied between field populations. Sequences variation was found between CsuPLE1 copies and varied within and among field populations. Twenty-one different insertion sites for CsuPLE1 copies were identified with at least two insertion loci found in all populations. Our results indicate that the initial invasion of CsuPLE1 into C. suppressalis occurred before C. suppressalis populations spread throughout China, and suggest that C. suppressalis populations have a common ancestor in China. Additionally, the lower reaches of the Yangtze River are probably the original settlement of C. suppressalis in China. Finally, the CsuPLE1 insertion site appears to be a candidate marker

  15. Molecular Structural Characteristics of Polysaccharide Fractions from Canarium album (Lour.) Raeusch and Their Antioxidant Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongliang; Miao, Song; Zheng, Baodong; Lin, Shan; Jian, Yeye; Chen, Shen; Zhang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the multiple relations between the preliminary molecular structural characteristics and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from Canarium album (Lour.) Raeusch (CPS). Three polysaccharide fractions, CPS1, CPS2, and CPS3, were isolated from CPS by column chromatography. CPS1 and CPS3 were mainly composed of neutral polysaccharides linked by α- and β-glycosidic linkages while CPS2 was pectin polysaccharides mainly linked by β-glycosidic linkages. According to the SEC-MALLS-RI system, the molecular weight of CPS1 was greater compared to CPS2 and CPS3, and the molecular weight and radius of CPS did not display positive correlation. The chain conformation analysis indicated CPS1 and CPS2 were typical highly branched polysaccharides while CPS3 existed as a globular shape in aqueous. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of CPS2 was better than that of CPS3, while that of CPS1 was the weakest. The antioxidant activities of polysaccharide fractions were affected by their monosaccharide composition, glycosidic linkage, molecular weight, and chain conformation. This functional property was a result of a combination of multiple molecular structural factors. CPS2 was the major antioxidant component of CPS and it could be exploited as a valued antioxidant product. The molecular structural characteristics, antioxidant activities, and structure-function relationships of polysaccharide fractions from Canarium album were first investigated in this study. The results provided background and practical knowledge for the deep-processed products of C. album with high added value. CPS2 was the major antioxidant component of CPS, which could be exploited as a valued antioxidant ingredient in food and pharmaceutical industries. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  17. (TMTSF)2X materials and structural implications for low-dimensional polymeric and disordered molecular semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Krebs, Frederik C

    2000-01-01

    The structural characteristics and the relation to the electronic properties of three types of molecular materials are discussed. In TMTSF2X salts a triclinic unit cell it suggested to be important in avoiding a 2k(F) Peierls distortion. In polythiophenes appropriate ordering of microcrystallites...

  18. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  19. Molecular systematics of Barbatosphaeria (Sordariomycetes): multigene phylogeny and secondary ITS structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Réblová, Martina; Réblová, K.; Štěpánek, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, December 2015 (2015), s. 21-38 ISSN 0031-5850 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/12/0038 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Barbatosphaeria * molecular systematic * ITS secondary structures Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 5.725, year: 2015

  20. Fine tuning of the rotary motion by structural modification in light-driven unidirectional molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicario, J; Walko, M; Meetsma, A; Feringa, Ben L.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of bulky substituents at the stereogenic center of light-driven second-generation molecular motors results in an acceleration of the speed of rotation. This is due to a more strained structure with elongated C=C bonds and a higher energy level of the ground state relative to the

  1. Synthesis, molecular structures and ESI-mass studies of copper (I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 10. Synthesis, molecular structures and ESI-mass studies of copper(I) complexes with ligands incorporating N, S and P donor atoms. Tarlok S Lobana Arvinder Kaur Rohit Sharma Madhu Bala Amanpreet K Jassal Courtney E Duff Jerry P Jasinski. Volume ...

  2. Synthesis and molecular structure of chiral metallo-based sterically overcrowded alkenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, Matthijs K.J. ter; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    A four step synthesis of pyridyl-2-yl-thioxanthen-9-ylidene-isoquinolines is described. The corresponding palladium complexes are the first examples of a novel class of chiral, metallo-based, sterically overcrowded alkenes. The crystal and molecular structure of the palladium dichloride complex

  3. Metal-halide systems: From molecular clusters to liquid-state structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario P. Tosi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available I present a short review of the relationship between quantum-mechanical calculations on small molecular clusters of some metal-ion halides and studies of the microscopic structure in the condensed liquid phases of these compounds. The review is dedicated to the memory of Professor Vincenzo Grasso.

  4. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  5. Extrusion of rice, bean, and corn starches: extrudate structure and molecular changes in amylose and amylopectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the effects of starch source and amylose content on expansion ratio, density and texture of expanded extrudates, as well as the structural and molecular changes that occurred in starch granules as a function of extrusion. Rice starches (8%, 20% and 32% amylose), carioca bean sta...

  6. Linear hydrogen adsorbate structures on graphite induced by self-assembled molecular monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Sljivancanin, Zeljko; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Combined scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations reveal a method to induce linear structures of hydrogen adsorbates on graphite by covering the surface with a self-assembled molecular monolayer of cyanuric acid and exposing it to atomic hydrogen...

  7. Origami: A Versatile Modeling System for Visualising Chemical Structure and Exploring Molecular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James; Leslie, Ray; Billington, Susan; Slater, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of "Origami" is presented as an accessible and transferable modeling system through which to convey the intricacies of molecular shape and highlight structure-function relationships. The implementation of origami has been found to be a versatile alternative to conventional ball-and-stick models, possessing the key advantages of being both…

  8. GPU-accelerated analysis and visualization of large structures solved by molecular dynamics flexible fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John E; McGreevy, Ryan; Isralewitz, Barry; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid structure fitting methods combine data from cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography with molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of all-atom structures of large biomolecular complexes. Evaluating the quality-of-fit obtained from hybrid fitting is computationally demanding, particularly in the context of a multiplicity of structural conformations that must be evaluated. Existing tools for quality-of-fit analysis and visualization have previously targeted small structures and are too slow to be used interactively for large biomolecular complexes of particular interest today such as viruses or for long molecular dynamics trajectories as they arise in protein folding. We present new data-parallel and GPU-accelerated algorithms for rapid interactive computation of quality-of-fit metrics linking all-atom structures and molecular dynamics trajectories to experimentally-determined density maps obtained from cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. We evaluate the performance and accuracy of the new quality-of-fit analysis algorithms vis-à-vis existing tools, examine algorithm performance on GPU-accelerated desktop workstations and supercomputers, and describe new visualization techniques for results of hybrid structure fitting methods.

  9. The effect of molecular mass on the polymorphism and crystalline structure of isotactic polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to the investigation of the effect of molecular mass on the α-, β- and γ-crystallization tendency of isotactic polypropylene (iPP. The crystalline structure was studied by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and by polarised light microscopy (PLM. The melting and crystallization characteristics were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The results indicate clearly that iPP with low molecular mass crystallizes essentially in α-modification. However, it crystallizes in β-form in the presence of a highly efficient and selective β-nucleating agent. The α- and β-modifications form in wide molecular mass range. The decreasing molecular mass results in increased structural instability in both α- and β-modifications and consequently enhanced inclination to recrystallization during heating. The formation of γ-modification could not be observed, although some literature sources report that γ-form develops in iPP with low molecular mass.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics investigation of the structure and the noncollinear magnetism in liquid oxygen: Occurrence of O4 molecular units

    OpenAIRE

    Oda, Tatsuki; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The ab initio molecular dynamics was performed toinvestigate the noncollinear magnetism of a system with an evolving atomic structure. As such, application to liquid oxygen provides a picture in which the large majority of colliding O2 molecules assume structural and magnetic configurations which closely resemble those in the O4 molecule. Formation of truly long-living molecular O4 units also occurs but involves a considerably smaller fraction of O2 molecules.

  11. More Than Filaments and Cores: Statistical Study of Structure Formation and Dynamics in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, How-Huan; Goodman, Alyssa

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade, multiple attempts at understanding the connection between filaments and star forming cores have been made using observations across the entire epectrum. However, the filaments and the cores are usually treated as predefined--and well-defined--entities, instead of structures that often come at different sizes, shapes, with substantially different dynamics, and inter-connected at different scales. In my dissertation, I present an array of studies using different statistical methods, including the dendrogram and the probability distribution function (PDF), of structures at different size scales within nearby molecular clouds. These structures are identified using observations of different density tracers, and where possible, in the multi-dimensional parameter space of key dynamic properties--the LSR velocity, the velocity dispersion, and the column density. The goal is to give an overview of structure formation in nearby star-forming clouds, as well as of the dynamics in these structures. I find that the overall statistical properties of a larger structure is often the summation/superposition of sub-structures within, and that there could be significant variations due to local physical processes. I also find that the star formation process within molecular clouds could in fact take place in a non-monolithic manner, connecting potentially merging and/or transient structures, at different scales.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of H2 adsorption in tetramethyl ammonium lithium phthalocyanine crystalline structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamonte, Kevin; Gómez Gualdrón, Diego A; Cabrales-Navarro, Fredy A; Scanlon, Lawrence G; Sandi, Giselle; Feld, William; Balbuena, Perla B

    2008-12-11

    Tetramethyl ammonium lithium phthalocyanine is explored as a potential material for storage of molecular hydrogen. Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the molecular structure and the dimer conformation. Additional scans performed to determine the interactions of a H2 molecule located at various distances from the molecular sites are used to generate a simple force field including dipole-induced-dipole interactions. This force field is employed in molecular dynamics simulations to calculate adsorption isotherms at various pressures. The regions of strongest adsorption are quantified as functions of temperature, pressure, and separation between molecules in the adsorbent phase, and compared to the regions of strongest binding energy as given by the proposed force field. It is found that the total adsorption could not be predicted only from the spatial distribution of the strongest binding energies; the available volume is the other contributing factor even if the volume includes regions of much lower binding energy. The results suggest that the complex anion is primarily involved in the adsorption process with molecular hydrogen, whereas the cation serves to provide access for hydrogen adsorption in both sides of the anion molecular plane, and spacing between the planes.

  13. Citizen Candidates Under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Eguia, Jon X.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we make two contributions to the growing literature on "citizen-candidate" models of representative democracy. First, we add uncertainty about the total vote count. We show that in a society with a large electorate, where the outcome of the election is uncertain and where winning candidates receive a large reward from holding office, there will be a two-candidate equilibrium and no equilibria with a single candidate. Second, we introduce a new concept of equilibrium, which we te...

  14. Formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins in biomass conversion: influence of feedstock and processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandvoort, Ilona; Wang, Yuehu; Rasrendra, Carolus B; van Eck, Ernst R H; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Heeres, Hero J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-09-01

    Neither the routes through which humin byproducts are formed, nor their molecular structure have yet been unequivocally established. A better understanding of the formation and physicochemical properties of humins, however, would aid in making biomass conversion processes more efficient. Here, an extensive multiple-technique-based study of the formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins is presented as a function of sugar feed, the presence of additives (e.g., 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene), and the applied processing conditions. Elemental analyses indicate that humins are formed through a dehydration pathway, with humin formation and levulinic acid yields strongly depending on the processing parameters. The addition of implied intermediates to the feedstocks showed that furan and phenol compounds formed during the acid-catalyzed dehydration of sugars are indeed included in the humin structure. IR spectra, sheared sum projections of solid-state 2DPASS (13) C NMR spectra, and pyrolysis GC-MS data indicate that humins consist of a furan-rich polymer network containing different oxygen functional groups. The structure is furthermore found to strongly depend on the type of feedstock. A model for the molecular structure of humins is proposed based on the data presented. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport.

  16. The diverse and expanding role of mass spectrometry in structural and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lössl, Philip; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Heck, Albert Jr

    2016-12-15

    The emergence of proteomics has led to major technological advances in mass spectrometry (MS). These advancements not only benefitted MS-based high-throughput proteomics but also increased the impact of mass spectrometry on the field of structural and molecular biology. Here, we review how state-of-the-art MS methods, including native MS, top-down protein sequencing, cross-linking-MS, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange-MS, nowadays enable the characterization of biomolecular structures, functions, and interactions. In particular, we focus on the role of mass spectrometry in integrated structural and molecular biology investigations of biological macromolecular complexes and cellular machineries, highlighting work on CRISPR-Cas systems and eukaryotic transcription complexes. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  17. Establishing whether the structural feature controlling the mechanical properties of starch films is molecular or crystalline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Xie, Fengwei; Hasjim, Jovin; Witt, Torsten; Halley, Peter J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2015-03-06

    The effects of molecular and crystalline structures on the tensile mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch (TPS) films from waxy, normal, and high-amylose maize were investigated. Starch structural variations were obtained through extrusion and hydrothermal treatment (HTT). The molecular and crystalline structures were characterized using size-exclusion chromatography and X-ray diffractometry, respectively. TPS from high-amylose maize showed higher elongation at break and tensile strength than those from normal maize and waxy maize starches when processed with 40% plasticizer. Within the same amylose content, the mechanical properties were not affected by amylopectin molecular size or the crystallinity of TPS prior to HTT. This lack of correlation between the molecular size, crystallinity and mechanical properties may be due to the dominant effect of the plasticizer on the mechanical properties. Further crystallization of normal maize TPS by HTT increased the tensile strength and Young's modulus, while decreasing the elongation at break. The results suggest that the crystallinity from the remaining ungelatinized starch granules has less significant effect on the mechanical properties than that resulting from starch recrystallization, possibly due to a stronger network from leached-out amylose surrounding the remaining starch granules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure and atomic correlations in molecular systems probed by XAS reverse Monte Carlo refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cicco, Andrea; Iesari, Fabio; Trapananti, Angela; D'Angelo, Paola; Filipponi, Adriano

    2018-03-01

    The Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) algorithm for structure refinement has been applied to x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) multiple-edge data sets for six gas phase molecular systems (SnI2, CdI2, BBr3, GaI3, GeBr4, GeI4). Sets of thousands of molecular replicas were involved in the refinement process, driven by the XAS data and constrained by available electron diffraction results. The equilibrated configurations were analysed to determine the average tridimensional structure and obtain reliable bond and bond-angle distributions. Detectable deviations from Gaussian models were found in some cases. This work shows that a RMC refinement of XAS data is able to provide geometrical models for molecular structures compatible with present experimental evidence. The validation of this approach on simple molecular systems is particularly important in view of its possible simple extension to more complex and extended systems including metal-organic complexes, biomolecules, or nanocrystalline systems.

  19. Molecules and Models The molecular structures of main group element compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Haaland, Arne

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a systematic description of the molecular structures and bonding in simple compounds of the main group elements with particular emphasis on bond distances, bond energies and coordination geometries. The description includes the structures of hydrogen, halogen and methyl derivatives of the elements in each group, some of these molecules are ionic, some polar covalent. The survey of molecules whose structures conform to well-established trends is followed byrepresentative examples of molecules that do not conform. We also describe electron donor-acceptor and hydrogen bonded co

  20. De Novo generation of molecular structures using optimization to select graphs on a given lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bywater, R.P.; Poulsen, Thomas Agersten; Røgen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    positions. The linkage process takes place on a lattice whose unit step length and overall geometry is designed to match typical architectures of organic molecules. We use an optimization method to select from the many different graphs possible. The approach is demonstrated in an example where crystal......A recurrent problem in organic chemistry is the generation of new molecular structures that conform to some predetermined set of structural constraints that are imposed in an endeavor to build certain required properties into the newly generated structure. An example of this is the pharmacophore...

  1. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-01

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  2. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  3. Structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of amorphous silicon: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Car, R.; Parrinello, M.

    1988-01-18

    An amorphous silicon structure is obtained with a computer simulation based on a new molecular-dynamics technique in which the interatomic potential is derived from a parameter-free quantum mechanical method. Our results for the atomic structure, the phonon spectrum, and the electronic properties are in excellent agreement with experiment. In addition we study details of the microscopic dynamics which are not directly accessible to experiment. We find in particular that structural defects are associated with weak bonds. These may give rise to low-frequency vibrational modes.

  4. Structure of dysprosium monotartrate in aqueous solution according to magnetic double refraction and molecular mechanics data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vul'fson, S.G.; Chevela, V.V.; Matveev, S.N.; Sal'nikov, Yu.I.; Sarvarova, N.N.; Semenov, V.Eh.

    1992-01-01

    The molar constant of magnetic double refraction of disprosium monotartrate DyH 2 L + (H 4 L - tartric acid) had been determined by pH-metry and magnetic double refraction methods. The structures of ligand and hydrate environments of dysprosium in DyH 2 L + were modelated by the method of molecular mechanics (the model of Dashevskii-Plyamovatov). The theoretical molar constants of magnetic double refraction calculated using the molecular mechanics data had been compared with experimental ones, the most probable models of dysprosium environment have been determined

  5. Theoretical Study of Copper Complexes: Molecular Structure, Properties, and Its Application to Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Baldenebro-Lopez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical investigation of copper complexes with potential applications as sensitizers for solar cells. The density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT were utilized, using the M06 hybrid meta-GGA functional with the LANL2DZ (D95V on first row and DZVP basis sets. This level of calculation was used to find the optimized molecular structure, the absorption spectra, the molecular orbitals energies, and the chemical reactivity parameters that arise from conceptual DFT. Solvent effects have been taken into account by an implicit approach, namely, the polarizable continuum model (PCM, using the nonequilibrium version of the IEF-PCM model.

  6. Atomic spectral-product representations of molecular electronic structure: metric matrices and atomic-product composition of molecular eigenfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, M; Mills, J D; Hinde, R J; Winstead, C L; Boatz, J A; Gallup, G A; Langhoff, P W

    2009-07-02

    Recent progress is reported in development of ab initio computational methods for the electronic structures of molecules employing the many-electron eigenstates of constituent atoms in spectral-product forms. The approach provides a universal atomic-product description of the electronic structure of matter as an alternative to more commonly employed valence-bond- or molecular-orbital-based representations. The Hamiltonian matrix in this representation is seen to comprise a sum over atomic energies and a pairwise sum over Coulombic interaction terms that depend only on the separations of the individual atomic pairs. Overall electron antisymmetry can be enforced by unitary transformation when appropriate, rather than as a possibly encumbering or unnecessary global constraint. The matrix representative of the antisymmetrizer in the spectral-product basis, which is equivalent to the metric matrix of the corresponding explicitly antisymmetric basis, provides the required transformation to antisymmetric or linearly independent states after Hamiltonian evaluation. Particular attention is focused in the present report on properties of the metric matrix and on the atomic-product compositions of molecular eigenstates as described in the spectral-product representations. Illustrative calculations are reported for simple but prototypically important diatomic (H(2), CH) and triatomic (H(3), CH(2)) molecules employing algorithms and computer codes devised recently for this purpose. This particular implementation of the approach combines Slater-orbital-based one- and two-electron integral evaluations, valence-bond constructions of standard tableau functions and matrices, and transformations to atomic eigenstate-product representations. The calculated metric matrices and corresponding potential energy surfaces obtained in this way elucidate a number of aspects of the spectral-product development, including the nature of closure in the representation, the general redundancy or

  7. The impact of chemical structure and molecular packing on the electronic polarisation of fullerene arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Sheridan; Chia, Cleaven; Teo, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2017-07-19

    Electronic polarisation contributes to the electronic landscape as seen by separating charges in organic materials. The nature of electronic polarisation depends on the polarisability, density, and arrangement of polarisable molecules. In this paper, we introduce a microscopic, coarse-grained model in which we treat each molecule as a polarisable site, and use an array of such polarisable dipoles to calculate the electric field and associated energy of any arrangement of charges in the medium. The model incorporates chemical structure via the molecular polarisability and molecular packing patterns via the structure of the array. We use this model to calculate energies of charge pairs undergoing separation in finite fullerene lattices of different chemical and crystal structures. The effective dielectric constants that we estimate from this approach are in good quantitative agreement with those measured experimentally in C 60 and phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) films, but we find significant differences in dielectric constant depending on packing and on direction of separation, which we rationalise in terms of density of polarisable fullerene cages in regions of high field. In general, we find lattices containing molecules of more isotropic polarisability tensors exhibit higher dielectric constants. By exploring several model systems we conclude that differences in molecular polarisability (and therefore, chemical structure) appear to be less important than differences in molecular packing and separation direction in determining the energetic landscape for charge separation. We note that the results are relevant for finite lattices, but not necessarily for infinite systems. We propose that the model could be used to design molecular systems for effective electronic screening.

  8. Improving NMR protein structure quality by Rosetta refinement: a molecular replacement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramelot, Theresa A; Raman, Srivatsan; Kuzin, Alexandre P; Xiao, Rong; Ma, Li-Chung; Acton, Thomas B; Hunt, John F; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David; Kennedy, Michael A

    2009-04-01

    The structure of human protein HSPC034 has been determined by both solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Refinement of the NMR structure ensemble, using a Rosetta protocol in the absence of NMR restraints, resulted in significant improvements not only in structure quality, but also in molecular replacement (MR) performance with the raw X-ray diffraction data using MOLREP and Phaser. This method has recently been shown to be generally applicable with improved MR performance demonstrated for eight NMR structures refined using Rosetta (Qian et al., Nature 2007;450:259-264). Additionally, NMR structures of HSPC034 calculated by standard methods that include NMR restraints have improvements in the RMSD to the crystal structure and MR performance in the order DYANA, CYANA, XPLOR-NIH, and CNS with explicit water refinement (CNSw). Further Rosetta refinement of the CNSw structures, perhaps due to more thorough conformational sampling and/or a superior force field, was capable of finding alternative low energy protein conformations that were equally consistent with the NMR data according to the Recall, Precision, and F-measure (RPF) scores. On further examination, the additional MR-performance shortfall for NMR refined structures as compared with the X-ray structure were attributed, in part, to crystal-packing effects, real structural differences, and inferior hydrogen bonding in the NMR structures. A good correlation between a decrease in the number of buried unsatisfied hydrogen-bond donors and improved MR performance demonstrates the importance of hydrogen-bond terms in the force field for improving NMR structures. The superior hydrogen-bond network in Rosetta-refined structures demonstrates that correct identification of hydrogen bonds should be a critical goal of NMR structure refinement. Inclusion of nonbivalent hydrogen bonds identified from Rosetta structures as additional restraints in the structure calculation results in

  9. GAtor: A First-Principles Genetic Algorithm for Molecular Crystal Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Farren; Li, Xiayue; Rose, Timothy; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Ghiringhelli, Luca M; Marom, Noa

    2018-04-10

    We present the implementation of GAtor, a massively parallel, first-principles genetic algorithm (GA) for molecular crystal structure prediction. GAtor is written in Python and currently interfaces with the FHI-aims code to perform local optimizations and energy evaluations using dispersion-inclusive density functional theory (DFT). GAtor offers a variety of fitness evaluation, selection, crossover, and mutation schemes. Breeding operators designed specifically for molecular crystals provide a balance between exploration and exploitation. Evolutionary niching is implemented in GAtor by using machine learning to cluster the dynamically updated population by structural similarity and then employing a cluster-based fitness function. Evolutionary niching promotes uniform sampling of the potential energy surface by evolving several subpopulations, which helps overcome initial pool biases and selection biases (genetic drift). The various settings offered by GAtor increase the likelihood of locating numerous low-energy minima, including those located in disconnected, hard to reach regions of the potential energy landscape. The best structures generated are re-relaxed and re-ranked using a hierarchy of increasingly accurate DFT functionals and dispersion methods. GAtor is applied to a chemically diverse set of four past blind test targets, characterized by different types of intermolecular interactions. The experimentally observed structures and other low-energy structures are found for all four targets. In particular, for Target II, 5-cyano-3-hydroxythiophene, the top ranked putative crystal structure is a Z' = 2 structure with P1̅ symmetry and a scaffold packing motif, which has not been reported previously.

  10. Shear response of grain boundaries with metastable structures by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Cheng; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2018-04-01

    Grain boundaries (GBs) can play a role as the favored locations to annihilate point defects, such as interstitial atoms and vacancies. It is thus highly probable that different boundary structures can be simultaneously present in equilibrium with each other in the same GB, and thus the GB achieves a metastable state. However, the structural transition and deformation mechanism of such GBs are currently not well understood. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the multiple structures of a Σ5(310)/[001] GB in bicrystal Al and to investigate the effect of structural multiplicity on the mechanical and kinetic properties of such a GB. Different GB structures were obtained by changing the starting atomic configuration of the bicrystal model, and the GB structures had significantly different atomic density. For the Σ5(310) GB with metastable structures, GB sliding was the dominant mechanism at a low temperature (T = 10 K) under shear stress. The sliding mechanism resulted from the uncoordinated transformation of the inhomogeneous structural units. The nucleation of voids was observed during GB sliding at the low temperature, and the voids subsequently evolved to a nanocrack at the boundary plane. Increasing the temperature can induce the structural transition of local GB structures and can change their overall kinetic properties. GB migration with occasional GB sliding dominated the deformation mechanism at elevated temperatures (T = 300 and 600 K), and the migration process of the metastable GB structures is closely related to the thermally assisted diffusion mechanism.

  11. Structural and Conformational Chemistry from Electrochemical Molecular Machines. Replicating Biological Functions. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Toribio F

    2017-12-14

    Each constitutive chain of a conducting polymer electrode acts as a reversible multi-step electrochemical molecular motor: reversible reactions drive reversible conformational movements of the chain. The reaction-driven cooperative actuation of those molecular machines generates, or destroys, inside the film the free volume required to lodge/expel balancing counterions and solvent: reactions drive reversible film volume variations, which basic structural components are here identified and quantified from electrochemical responses. The content of the reactive dense gel (chemical molecular machines, ions and water) mimics that of the intracellular matrix in living functional cells. Reaction-driven properties (composition-dependent properties) and devices replicate biological functions and organs. An emerging technological world of soft, wet, reaction-driven, multifunctional and biomimetic devices and the concomitant zoomorphic or anthropomorphic robots is presented. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Complex Molecular Structure and Dynamics with MBN Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Korol, Andrei V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    , and guides readers through its applications in numerous areas of research in bio- and chemical physics and material science - ranging from the nano- to the mesoscale. MBN Explorer is particularly suited to computing the system's energy, to optimizing molecular structure, and to exploring the various facets......This book introduces readers to MesoBioNano (MBN) Explorer - a multi-purpose software package designed to model molecular systems at various levels of size and complexity. In addition, it presents a specially designed multi-task toolkit and interface - the MBN Studio - which enables the set......-up of input files, controls the simulations, and supports the subsequent visualization and analysis of the results obtained. The book subsequently provides a systematic description of the capabilities of this universal and powerful software package within the framework of computational molecular science...

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Complex Molecular Structure and Dynamics with MBN Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Korol, Andrei V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    , and guides readers through its applications in numerous areas of research in bio- and chemical physics and material science - ranging from the nano- to the mesoscale. MBN Explorer is particularly suited to computing the system's energy, to optimizing molecular structure, and to exploring the various facets...... practicalities. MBN Studio enables users to easily construct initial geometries for the molecular, liquid, crystalline, gaseous and hybrid systems that serve as input for the subsequent simulations of their physical and chemical properties using MBN Explorer. Despite its universality, the computational...... efficiency of MBN Explorer is comparable to that of other, more specialized software packages, making it a viable multi-purpose alternative for the computational modeling of complex molecular systems. A number of detailed case studies presented in the second part of this book demonstrate MBN Explorer...

  14. A Cell-Mimicking Structure Converting Analog Volume Changes to Digital Colorimetric Output with Molecular Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijie; Liu, Yibo; Zhang, Xiaohan; Liu, Juewen

    2017-12-13

    We herein report a three-component cell-mimicking structure with a peroxidase-like iron oxide nanozyme as the nucleus, a molecularly imprinted hydrogel shell as cytoplasm, and a lipid bilayer membrane. The structure was characterized by cryo and negative stain TEM and also by a calcein leakage test. By introducing charged monomers, the gel shell can swell or shrink in response to salt concentration. By lowering the salt concentration, the gradual "analog" gel volume change was reflected in a switch-like "digital" colorimetric output by the burst of membrane and oxidation of substrates such as 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB). Controlled access was also achieved by using melittin to insert channels cross the membrane, and selective molecular transport was realized by the molecularly imprinted gel. The functions of each component are coupled, and this sophisticated tripartite structure provides a new platform for modular design of new materials. Our cell-mimicking structure is functional and it is complementary to the current protocell work that aims to understand the origin of life.

  15. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S. [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schreiber, Kathrin [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Becker, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Usón, Isabel [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB–CSIC), Barcelona Science Park, Baldiri Reixach 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de; Steinfeld, Robert, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  16. On the structure of simple molecular liquids SbCl5 and WCl6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, László; McGreevy, Robert L.

    2006-07-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements on liquid antimony pentachloride and tungsten hexachloride have been carried out using the Studsvik liquids and amorphous diffractometer (SLAD) at the Studsvik Neutron Research Laboratory. The corrected structure factors have been interpreted by means of reverse Monte Carlo modeling which provides large structural models, containing thousands of atoms, that are consistent with the experimental data within their uncertainties. From these models, partial structure factors and pair correlation functions can be calculated. It is demonstrated that the intramolecular structure can be determined on the basis of data extending up to 10Å-1. SbCl5 is found to have a trigonal bipyramidal shape in the liquid, while liquid WCl6 consists of octahedral molecules. The intermolecular structure of liquid SbCl5 and WCl6 seems to be determined largely by steric effects (excluded volume and molecular shape).

  17. Ab initio NMR Confirmed Evolutionary Structure Prediction for Organic Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Cong-Huy; Kucukbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio crystal structure prediction of even small organic compounds is extremely challenging due to polymorphism, molecular flexibility and difficulties in addressing the dispersion interaction from first principles. We recently implemented vdW-aware density functionals and demonstrated their success in energy ordering of aminoacid crystals. In this work we combine this development with the evolutionary structure prediction method to study cholesterol polymorphs. Cholesterol crystals have paramount importance in various diseases, from cancer to atherosclerosis. The structure of some polymorphs (e.g. ChM, ChAl, ChAh) have already been resolved while some others, which display distinct NMR spectra and are involved in disease formation, are yet to be determined. Here we thoroughly assess the applicability of evolutionary structure prediction to address such real world problems. We validate the newly predicted structures with ab initio NMR chemical shift data using secondary referencing for an improved comparison with experiments.

  18. DFT study of the molecular and crystal structure and vibrational analysis of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, I; Trendafilova, N; Dodoff, N; Kovacheva, D

    2017-04-05

    DFT and periodic-DFT (PAW-PBE method, code VASP) calculations have been performed to study the structural and vibrational characteristics of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) at molecular and outside molecular level. To estimate the effect of the intermolecular interactions in crystal on the structural and vibrational properties of cisplatin, three theoretical models are considered in the present study: monomer (isolated molecule), hydrogen bonded dimer and periodic solid state structures. The work focused on the role of the theoretical models for correct modeling and prediction of geometrical and vibrational parameters of cisplatin. It has been found that the elaborate three-dimensional intermolecular hydrogen bonding network in the crystalline cisplatin significantly influences the structural and vibrational pattern of cisplatin and therefore the isolated cisplatin molecule is not the correct computational model regardless of the theoretical level used. To account for the whole intermolecular hydrogen bonding network in direction of both a and c axis and for more reliable calculations of structural and vibrational parameters periodic DFT calculations were carried out in the full crystalline periodic environment with the known lattice parameters for each cisplatin polymorph phase. The model calculations performed both at molecular level and for the periodic structures of alpha and beta cisplatin polymorph forms revealed the decisive role of the extended theoretical model for reliable prediction of the structural and vibrational characteristics of cisplatin. The powder diffraction pattern and the calculated IR and Raman spectra predicted beta polymorph form of our cisplatin sample freshly synthesized for the purposes of the present study using the Dhara's method. The various rotamers realized in the polymorph forms of cisplatin were explained by the low population of the large number of rotamers in solution as well as with the high rotamer

  19. Functional proteomic and structural insights into molecular recognition in the nitrilase family enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barglow, Katherine T; Saikatendu, Kumar S; Bracey, Michael H; Huey, Ruth; Morris, Garrett M; Olson, Arthur J; Stevens, Raymond C; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2008-12-23

    Nitrilases are a large and diverse family of nonpeptidic C-N hydrolases. The mammalian genome encodes eight nitrilase enzymes, several of which remain poorly characterized. Prominent among these are nitrilase-1 (Nit1) and nitrilase-2 (Nit2), which, despite having been shown to exert effects on cell growth and possibly serving as tumor suppressor genes, are without known substrates or selective inhibitors. In previous studies, we identified several nitrilases, including Nit1 and Nit2, as targets for dipeptide-chloroacetamide activity-based proteomics probes. Here, we have used these probes, in combination with high-resolution crystallography and molecular modeling, to systematically map the active site of Nit2 and identify residues involved in molecular recognition. We report the 1.4 A crystal structure of mouse Nit2 and use this structure to identify residues that discriminate probe labeling between the Nit1 and Nit2 enzymes. Interestingly, some of these residues are conserved across all vertebrate Nit2 enzymes and, conversely, not found in any vertebrate Nit1 enzymes, suggesting that they are key discriminators of molecular recognition between these otherwise highly homologous enzymes. Our findings thus point to a limited set of active site residues that establish distinct patterns of molecular recognition among nitrilases and provide chemical probes to selectively perturb the function of these enzymes in biological systems.

  20. Recent developments in the study of projectile structure and molecular bond effects on the stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera T, R.; Cruz, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In the penetration of charged particles in matter, the standard Bethe theory of deposition does not consider the projectile electronic structure, thus neglecting the projectile electrons interaction during the collision. Furthermore, in the case of molecular targets, it is customary to use the Bragg rule for the calculation of the stopping power, that is, the sum of the contribution of each atom in the molecule, therefore neglecting the chemical bond effects on the calculation of the energy deposition. In this talk, I will present relevant aspects leading to the development of current studies of energy deposition for projectiles with structure as well as the molecular bond effects on the stopping power of heavy ions. Finally, a discussion is presented on new challenges and possible future landscapes for research in the area of energy deposition. (Author)

  1. Molecular dynamical and structural studies for the bakelite by neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voi, D.L.

    1992-05-01

    Neutron reaction cross sections were determined by transmission and scattering measurements, to study the dynamics and molecular structure of calcined bakelites. Total cross sections were determined, with a deviation smaller than 5%, from the literature values, by neutron transmission method and a specially devised approximation. These cross sections were then correlated with data obtained with infra-red spectroscopy, elemental analysis and other techniques to get the probable molecular formulae of bakelite. Double differential scattering cross sections, scattering law values and frequency distributions were determined with 15% error using the neutron inelastic scattering method. The frequency distributions as well as the overall results from all experimental techniques used in this work allowed to suggest a structural model like polycyclic hydrocarbons, for calcined bakelite at 800 0 C. (author)

  2. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  3. Splitting of α-Helical Structure as Molecular Basis for Abolishing an Amyloid Formation by Multiple Glycosylation: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Youngjin [Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Molecular details played by glycosylation are complicated by the subtle nature of variations in the glycan structure, and this complexity is one of the research barriers to establish structure-function relationship on the protein modification. This is particularly true for understanding the exact structural consequence of the glycosylation of the biological proteins. The present MD simulation revealed molecular-level mechanism of the glycosylation effect on the peptide to understand the experimentally observed phenomenon for inhibiting amyloid formation in the model peptide. The galactose residue on the Ser17 undermined the helical integrity of main protein region by enhancing sugar–amino acid interaction and perturbing natural interactions between amino acid residues.

  4. Molecular level structural analysis of natural organic matter and of humic substances by NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Hertkorn, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) represents an ubiquitous, very complex mixture of organic and (a few) inorganic constituents and occurs in terrestrial, limnic and marine ecosystems. NOM plays immensely important roles in the natural world, and it is a key refractory constituent of the global carbon and other element cycles. The characterization and structural analysis of NOM, which features a substantial extent of both polydispersity and molecular heterogeneity, is most demanding with respect of...

  5. Quantum-chemical investigation of molecular structure of bromopyrogallol red and its complexes with rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivanova, O.V.; Rodnikova, V.N.; Mushtakova, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    The MO LCAO method has been used to study the structure of the molecular and ionized forms of brompyrogallol red (BPGR) and its complex compounds with rare earths. The calculations performed reveal that addition of rare earth ions to BPGR is possible both with respect to the orthooxyquinone group to give a complex with a short wavelength absorption peak and the dioxy group to give a complex compound absorbing in the long wavelength region

  6. Effect of water vapour on the molecular structures of supported vanadium oxide catalysts at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehng, Jih-Mirn; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water vapor on the molecular structures of V2O3-supported catalysts (SiO2, Al2o3, TiO2, and CeO2) was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of temperature (from 500°C to 120°C). Under dry conditions only isolated surface VO4 species are present on the dehydrated SiO2

  7. Crystal and molecular structure of polymeric [MnCl2(bpy)]n

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubben, M; Meetsma, A.; Feringa, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    A crystal and molecular structure determination of MnCl2(bpy) showed that it exists as polymeric octahedral [MnCl2(bpy)](n). [MnCl2(bpy)](n) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group I2/a with a=7.007(1), b=9.200(1), c=16.495(1) Angstrom, beta=91.313(5)degrees and Z=4. On the basis of 979 unique

  8. The structure of Lactococcus lactis thioredoxin reductase reveals molecular features of photo-oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bang, Maria Blanner; Rykær, Martin

    2017-01-01

    been determined. These structures reveal novel molecular features that provide further insight into the mechanisms behind the sensitivity of this enzyme toward visible light. We propose that a pocket on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring accommodates oxygen that reacts with photo-excited FAD...... thus be a widespread feature among bacterial TrxR with the described characteristics, which affords applications in clinical photo-therapy of drug-resistant bacteria....

  9. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Hiroki, E-mail: matsubara@microheat.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp; Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7T{sub c}) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs.

  10. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Allen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  11. Managing the solvent water polarization to obtain improved NMR spectra of large molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, Sebastian; Wider, Gerhard; Etezady-Esfarjani, Touraj; Horst, Reto; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In large molecular structures, the magnetization of all hydrogen atoms in the solute is strongly coupled to the water magnetization through chemical exchange between solvent water and labile protons of macromolecular components, and through dipole-dipole interactions and the associated 'spin diffusion' due to slow molecular tumbling. In NMR experiments with such systems, the extent of the water polarization is thus of utmost importance. This paper presents a formalism that describes the propagation of the water polarization during the course of different NMR experiments, and then compares the results of model calculations for optimized water polarization with experimental data. It thus demonstrates that NMR spectra of large molecular structures can be improved with the use of paramagnetic spin relaxation agents which selectively enhance the relaxation of water protons, so that a substantial gain in signal-to-noise can be achieved. The presently proposed use of a relaxation agent can also replace the water flip-back pulses when working with structures larger than about 30 kDa. This may be a valid alternative in situations where flip-back pulses are difficult to introduce into the overall experimental scheme, or where they would interfere with other requirements of the NMR experiment

  12. Molecular Structure of Feeds in Relation to Nutrient Utilization and Availability in Animals: A Novel Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiqiang Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The invention and development of new research concepts, novel methodologies, and novel bioanalytical techniques are essential in advancing the animal sciences, which include feed and nutrition science. This article introduces a novel approach that shows the potential of advanced synchrotron-based bioanalytical technology for studying the effects of molecular structural changes in feeds induced by various treatments (e.g., genetic modification, gene silencing, heat-related feed processing, biofuel processing in relation to nutrient digestion and absorption in animals. Advanced techniques based on synchrotron radiation (e.g., synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS and synchrotron radiation X-ray techniques have been developed as a fast, noninvasive, bioanalytical technology that, unlike traditional wet chemistry methods, does not damage or destroy the inherent molecular structure of the feed. The cutting-edge and advanced research tool of synchrotron light (which is a million times brighter than sunlight can be used to explore the inherent structure of biological tissue at cellular and molecular levels at ultra-high spatial resolutions. In conclusion, the use of recently developed bioanalytical techniques based on synchrotron radiation along with common research techniques is leading to dramatic advances in animal feed and nutritional research.

  13. Molecular weight dependent structure and charge transport in MAPLE-deposited poly(3-hexylthiophene) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Ban Xuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Smith, Mitchell [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Strzalka, Joseph [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Li, Huanghe [Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; McNeil, Anne J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Stein, Gila E. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996; Green, Peter F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver W Pkwy, Golden Colorado 80401

    2018-02-06

    In this work, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films prepared using the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique are shown to possess morphological structures that are dependent on molecular weight (MW). Specifically, the structures of low MW samples of MAPLE-deposited film are composed of crystallites/aggregates embedded within highly disordered environments, whereas those of high MW samples are composed of aggregated domains connected by long polymer chains. Additionally, the crystallite size along the side-chain (100) direction decreases, whereas the conjugation length increases with increasing molecular weight. This is qualitatively similar to the structure of spin-cast films, though the MAPLE-deposited films are more disordered. In-plane carrier mobilities in the MAPLE-deposited samples increase with MW, consistent with the notion that longer chains bridge adjacent aggregated domains thereby facilitating more effective charge transport. The carrier mobilities in the MAPLE-deposited simples are consistently lower than those in the solvent-cast samples for all molecular weights, consistent with the shorter conjugation length in samples prepared by this deposition technique.

  14. A molecular dynamics study on the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster based structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, Cherno Baba; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Our previous study on one-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster (α-B12) based chain [Bulletin of APS Annual Meeting, p265 (2013)] and ring structures has prompted us to study the two-dimensional (2D) α-B12 based structures. Recently, we have carried out a systematic molecular dynamics study on the structural stabilities and electronic properties of the 2D α-B12 based structures using the SCED-LCAO method [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. We have considered several types of symmetry for these 2D structures such as δ3, δ4, δ6 (flat triangular), and α' types. We have found that the optimized structures are energetically in the order of δ6 < α' < δ3 < δ4 which is different from the energy order of α'< δ6 < δ4 < δ3 found in the 2D boron monolayer sheets [ACS Nano 6, 7443 (2012)]. A detailed discussion of this study will be presented. The first author acknowledges the McSweeny Fellowship for supporting his research in this work.

  15. Quantum chemistry the development of ab initio methods in molecular electronic structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer III, Henry F

    2004-01-01

    This guide is guaranteed to prove of keen interest to the broad spectrum of experimental chemists who use electronic structure theory to assist in the interpretation of their laboratory findings. A list of 150 landmark papers in ab initio molecular electronic structure methods, it features the first page of each paper (which usually encompasses the abstract and introduction). Its primary focus is methodology, rather than the examination of particular chemical problems, and the selected papers either present new and important methods or illustrate the effectiveness of existing methods in predi

  16. Molecular and crystal structure of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-oxo-1-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleshova, L.N.; Khrustalev, V.N.; Struchkov, Yu.T.; Soldatenkov, A.T.; Bekro, I.A.; Mamyrbekova, Zh.A.; Soldatova, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    The molecular and crystal structure of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-oxo-1-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine was determined. The crystal is orthorhombic: sp. gr. Pca21; a=15.764, b=5.635, and c=25.536 A; and Z=8. The structure was solved by direct methods; R1=0.051, for 2643 unique refections. Symmetry-independent molecules are related by a pseudocenter of symmetry. The piperidine cycle has an asymmetric half-chair conformation. The orientation of substituents is determined. In the crystal, intermolecular OH...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules into chains parallel to the Y-axis

  17. The structural molecular biology network of the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A.R.G. Barbosa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the achievements of the Structural Molecular Biology Network (SMolBNet, a collaborative program of structural molecular biology, centered in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, and supported by São Paulo State Funding Agency (FAPESP. It gathers twenty scientific groups and is coordinated by the scientific staff of the Center of Structural Molecular Biology, at the National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (LNLS, in Campinas. The SMolBNet program has been aimed at 1 solving the structure of proteins of interest related to the research projects of the groups. In some cases, the choice has been to select proteins of unknown function or of possible novel structure obtained from the sequenced genomes of the FAPESP genomic program; 2 providing the groups with training in all the steps of the protein structure determination: gene cloning, protein expression, protein purification, protein crystallization and structure determination. Having begun in 2001, the program has been successful in both aims. Here, four groups reveal their participation in the program and describe the structural aspects of the proteins they have selected to study.Esse artigo descreve realizações do Programa SMolBNet (Rede de Biologia Molecular Estrutural do Estado de São Paulo, apoiado pela FAPESP (Fundação de Apoio à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo. Ele reúne vinte grupos de pesquisa e é coordenado pelos pesquisadores do Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS, em Campinas. O Programa SMolBNet tem como metas: Elucidar a estrutura tridimensional de proteínas de interesse aos grupos de pesquisa componentes do Programa; Prover os grupos com treinamento em todas as etapas de determinação de estrutura: clonagem gênica, expressão de proteínas, purificação de proteínas, cristalização de proteínas e elucidação de suas estruturas. Tendo começado em 2001, o Programa alcançou sucesso em ambas as metas. Neste artigo, quatro dos grupos

  18. Atomic and electronic structures of carbon nanotube covalent connecting with graphene by oxygen molecular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianwei; Wei, Qiang; Ma, Zengwei; Zeng, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Based on density functional theories, we have investigated the nanostructure in which boron and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene (GR) were connected by an oxygen molecular. The geometry structure and electronic properties of the system were calculated carefully. The band structures indicate that the impurity state of oxygen transfer the semiconducting co-doped carbon nanotube/graphene into a semimetallic composite material. The results show that the connection can be achieved with energy release under a wider range of distance between the nanotube and graphene. It indicates that the connection between the nanotube and the graphene might be a self-assemble process.

  19. Hierarchical Structure and Molecular Dynamics of Metal-Organic Framework as Characterized by Solid State NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic framework (MOF stands out as a promising material with great potential in application areas, such as gas separation and catalysis, due to its extraordinary properties. In order to fully characterize the structure of MOFs, especially those without single crystal, Solid State NMR (SSNMR is an indispensable tool. As a complimentary analytical technique to X-ray diffraction, SSNMR could provide detailed atomic level structure information. Meanwhile, SSNMR can characterize molecular dynamics over a wide dynamics range. In this review, selected applications of SSNMR on various MOFs are summarized and discussed.

  20. Structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of myasthenia gravis and their therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noridomi, Kaori; Watanabe, Go; Hansen, Melissa N.; Han, Gye Won; Chen, Lin (USC)

    2017-04-25

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a major target of autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disease that causes neuromuscular transmission dysfunction. Despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms underlying MG have not been fully elucidated. Here, we present the crystal structure of the nAChR α1 subunit bound by the Fab fragment of mAb35, a reference monoclonal antibody that causes experimental MG and competes with ~65% of antibodies from MG patients. Our structures reveal for the first time the detailed molecular interactions between MG antibodies and a core region on nAChR α1. These structures suggest a major nAChR-binding mechanism shared by a large number of MG antibodies and the possibility to treat MG by blocking this binding mechanism. Structure-based modeling also provides insights into antibody-mediated nAChR cross-linking known to cause receptor degradation. Our studies establish a structural basis for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic development of MG.

  1. Molecular structure and modeling studies of azobenzene derivatives containing maleimide groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Corneliu; Airinei, Anton; Fifere, Nicusor

    2013-01-01

    The molecular orbital calculations have been carried out to investigate the structure and stability of (E) / (Z) isomers of some azobenzene derivatives containing maleimide groups. A special attention has been devoted to the compound (E)-1, (E)-1-(4-(phenyldiazenyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione, for which the available crystallographic experimental data have been used to validate the modeling structures computed at the theoretical levels AM1, PM3, RHF/6-31+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p). To this end, the discrepancy between experimental and calculated structural parameters has been ascertained in terms of root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). The quantum calculations at the level RHF/6-31+G(d,p) yield the most accurate results on (E)-1 structure giving a deviation error from crystallographic data of about 5.00% for bond lengths and 0.97% for interatomic angles. The theoretical electronic absorption spectra of azobenzene derivatives of concern have been computed by means of configuration-interaction method (CI) at the level of semi-empirical Hamiltonians (AM1 and PM3). Likewise, the molecular energy spectra, electrostatic potential and some quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) properties of studied molecules have been computed and discussed in the paper.

  2. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  3. Molecular dynamics approach to water structure of HII mesophase of monoolein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Vesselin; Ivanova, Anela; Madjarova, Galia; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the present work is to study theoretically the structure of water inside the water cylinder of the inverse hexagonal mesophase (HII) of glyceryl monooleate (monoolein, GMO), using the method of molecular dynamics. To simplify the computational model, a fixed structure of the GMO tube is maintained. The non-standard cylindrical geometry of the system required the development and application of a novel method for obtaining the starting distribution of water molecules. A predictor-corrector schema is employed for generation of the initial density of water. Molecular dynamics calculations are performed at constant volume and temperature (NVT ensemble) with 1D periodic boundary conditions applied. During the simulations the lipid structure is kept fixed, while the dynamics of water is unrestrained. Distribution of hydrogen bonds and density as well as radial distribution of water molecules across the water cylinder show the presence of water structure deep in the cylinder (about 6 Å below the GMO heads). The obtained results may help understanding the role of water structure in the processes of insertion of external molecules inside the GMO/water system. The present work has a semi-quantitative character and it should be considered as the initial stage of more comprehensive future theoretical studies.

  4. ZnO: Hydroquinone superlattice structures fabricated by atomic/molecular layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tynell, Tommi; Karppinen, Maarit

    2014-01-01

    Here we employ atomic layer deposition in combination with molecular layer deposition to deposit crystalline thin films of ZnO interspersed with single layers of hydroquinone in an effort to create hybrid inorganic–organic superlattice structures. The ratio of the ZnO and hydroquinone deposition cycles is varied between 199:1 and 1:1, and the structure of the resultant thin films is verified with X-ray diffraction and reflectivity techniques. Clear evidence of the formation of a superlattice-type structure is observed in the X-ray reflectivity patterns and the presence of organic bonds in the films corresponding to the structure of hydroquinone is confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. We anticipate that hybrid superlattice structures such as the ones described in this work have the potential to be of great importance for future applications where the precise control of different inorganic and organic layers in hybrid superlattice materials is required. - Highlights: • Inorganic–organic superlattices can be made by atomic/molecular layer deposition. • This is demonstrated here for ZnO and hydroquinone (HQ). • The ratio of the ZnO and HQ layers is varied between 199:1 and 14:1. • The resultant thin films are crystalline

  5. The crystal structures of three pyrazine-2,5-dicarb-oxamides: three-dimensional supra-molecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cati, Dilovan S; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen

    2017-05-01

    The complete mol-ecules of the title compounds, N 2 , N 5 -bis-(pyridin-2-ylmeth-yl)pyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C 18 H 16 N 6 O 2 (I), 3,6-dimethyl- N 2 , N 5 -bis-(pyridin-2-yl-meth-yl)pyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C 20 H 20 N 6 O 2 (II), and N 2 , N 5 -bis-(pyridin-4-ylmeth-yl)pyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C 18 H 16 N 6 O 2 (III), are generated by inversion symmetry, with the pyrazine rings being located about centres of inversion. Each mol-ecule has an extended conformation with the pyridine rings inclined to the pyrazine ring by 89.17 (7)° in (I), 75.83 (8)° in (II) and by 82.71 (6)° in (III). In the crystal of (I), mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming layers lying parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supra-molecular structure. In the crystal of (II), mol-ecules are also linked by N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming layers lying parallel to the (10-1) plane. As in (I), the layers are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supra-molecular structure. In the crystal of (III), mol-ecules are again linked by N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, but here form corrugated sheets lying parallel to the bc plane. Within the sheets, neighbouring pyridine rings are linked by offset π-π inter-actions [inter-centroid distance = 3.739 (1) Å]. The sheets are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supra-molecular structure. Compound (I) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P 2 1 / c . Another monoclinic polymorph, space group C 2/ c , has been reported on by Cockriel et al. [ Inorg. Chem. Commun. (2008), 11 , 1-4]. The mol-ecular structures of the two polymorphs are compared.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of matrix deposition. III. Site structure analysis for porphycene in argon and xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Waluk, Jacek

    2005-08-08

    Porphycene (1) and porphyrin (2), two constitutional isomers, reveal completely different electronic spectral patterns in argon and xenon matrices. For the former the spectra recorded in the two solidified gases resemble each other, whereas for the latter they are completely different. This difference can be rationalized by molecular-dynamics simulations of the structure of the microenvironment carried out for the two chromophores embedded in argon and xenon hosts. For 1, the structure of the main substitutional site is the same for Ar and Xe and consists of a hexagonal cavity obtained by removing seven host atoms from the [111] crystallographic plane. An analogous structure is obtained for 2 in xenon. However, in argon the porphyrin chromophore environment is shared between several different sites, with the number of replaced host atoms ranging from seven to ten. These results demonstrate that a relatively minor structural alternation may lead to major changes in the spectral pattern of molecules embedded in rare-gas cryogenic matrices.

  7. Secondary Structure Analysis of Native Cellulose by Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Coarse Grained Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuai; Zhan, Hai-yi; Wang, Hong-ming; Ju, Yan

    2012-04-01

    The secondary structure of different Iβ cellulose was analyzed by a molecular dynamics simulation with MARTINI coarse-grained force field, where each chain of the cellulose includes 40 D-glucoses units. Calculation gives a satisfied description about the secondary structure of the cellulose. As the chain number increasing, the cellulose becomes the form of a helix, with the diameter of screw growing and spiral rising. Interestingly, the celluloses with chain number N 4 of 6, 24 and 36 do show right-hand twisting. On the contrast, the celluloses with N 8 of 12, 16 chains are left-hand twisting. These simulations indicate that the cellulose with chain number larger than 36 will break down to two parts. Besides, the result indicates that 36-chains cellulose model is the most stable among all models. Furthermore, the Lennard-Jones potential determines the secondary structure. In addition, an equation was set up to analyze the twisting structure.

  8. Rare-earth quinolinates: infrared-emitting molecular materials with a rich structural chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deun, Rik; Fias, Pascal; Nockemann, Peter; Schepers, An; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2004-12-27

    Near-infrared-emitting rare-earth chelates based on 8-hydroxyquinoline have appeared frequently in recent literature, because they are promising candidates for active components in near-infrared-luminescent optical devices, such as optical amplifiers, organic light-emitting diodes, .... Unfortunately, the absence of a full structural investigation of these rare-earth quinolinates is hampering the further development of rare-earth quinolinate based materials, because the luminescence output cannot be related to the structural properties. After an elaborate structural elucidation of the rare-earth quinolinate chemistry we can conclude that basically three types of structures can be formed, depending on the reaction conditions: tris complexes, corresponding to a 1:3 metal-to-ligand ratio, tetrakis complexes, corresponding to a 1:4 metal-to-ligand ratio, and trimeric complexes, with a 3:8 metal-to-ligand ratio. The intensity of the emitted near-infrared luminescence of the erbium(III) complexes is highest for the tetrakis complexes of the dihalogenated 8-hydroxyquinolinates.

  9. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1: A nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, R.M.; Harvey, T.S.; Campbell, I.D.

    1991-01-01

    The solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1 has been investigated with a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics methods. The results show that the solution structure is similar to that of insulin, but minor differences exist. The regions homologous to insulin are well-defined, while the remainder of the molecular exhibits greater disorder. The resultant structures have been used to visualize the sites for interaction with a number of physiologically important protein

  10. Testing of the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for a soluble biomarker reflecting structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic literature search on 5 candidate biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syversen, Silje W; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for soluble biomarkers by assessing the strength of literature evidence in support of 5 candidate biomarkers. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted on the 5 soluble biomarkers RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), matrix metallopr......OBJECTIVE: To test the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for soluble biomarkers by assessing the strength of literature evidence in support of 5 candidate biomarkers. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted on the 5 soluble biomarkers RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), matrix...

  11. Effects of molecular structural variants on serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 levels in sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemura Masahiko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6, which is classified as human mucin-1 (MUC1, is used as a marker of sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases. However, there remain some limitations due to a lack of information on the factors contributing to increased levels of serum KL-6. This study was designed to investigate the factors contributing to increased levels of serum KL-6 by molecular analysis. Methods Western blot analysis using anti-KL-6 antibody was performed simultaneously on the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum obtained from 128 subjects with sarcoidosis. Results KL-6/MUC1 in BALF showed three bands and five band patterns. These band patterns were associated with the MUC1 genotype and the KL-6 levels. KL-6/MUC1 band patterns in serum were dependent on molecular size class in BALF. Significantly increased levels of serum KL-6, serum/BALF KL-6 ratio and serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor were observed in the subjects with influx of high molecular size KL-6/MUC1 from the alveoli to blood circulation. The multivariate linear regression analysis involving potentially relevant variables such as age, gender, smoking status, lung parenchymal involvement based on radiographical stage and molecular size of KL-6/MUC1 in serum showed that the molecular size of KL-6/MUC1 in serum was significant independent determinant of serum KL-6 levels. Conclusions The molecular structural variants of KL-6/MUC1 and its leakage behavior affect serum levels of KL-6 in sarcoidosis. This information may assist in the interpretation of serum KL-6 levels in sarcoidosis.

  12. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical modeling of hexane soot structure and interactions with pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubicki JD

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular simulations (energy minimizations and molecular dynamics of an n-hexane soot model developed by Smith and co-workers (M. S. Akhter, A. R. Chughtai and D. M. Smith, Appl. Spectrosc., 1985, 39, 143; ref. 1 were performed. The MM+ (N. L. Allinger, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1977, 395, 157; ref. 2 and COMPASS (H. Sun, J. Phys. Chem., 1998, 102, 7338; ref. 3 force fields were tested for their ability to produce realistic soot nanoparticle structure. The interaction of pyrene with the model soot was simulated. Quantum mechanical calculations on smaller soot fragments were carried out. Starting from an initial 2D structure, energy minimizations are not able to produce the observed layering within soot with either force field. Results of molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the COMPASS force field does a reasonably accurate job of reproducing observations of soot structure. Increasing the system size from a 683 to a 2732 atom soot model does not have a significant effect on predicted structures. Neither does the addition of water molecules surrounding the soot model. Pyrene fits within the soot structure without disrupting the interlayer spacing. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, such as pyrene, may strongly partition into soot and have slow desorption kinetics because the PAH-soot bonding is similar to soot–soot interactions. Diffusion of PAH into soot micropores may allow the PAH to be irreversibly adsorbed and sequestered so that they partition slowly back into an aqueous phase causing dis-equilibrium between soil organic matter and porewater.

  13. Molecular structure and thermodynamic predictions to create highly sensitive microRNA biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkey, Nicholas E.; Brucks, Corinne N.; Lansing, Shan S.; Le, Sophia D.; Smith, Natasha M.; Tran, Victoria; Zhang, Lulu; Burrows, Sean M., E-mail: sean.burrows@oregonstate.edu

    2016-02-25

    Many studies have established microRNAs (miRNAs) as post-transcriptional regulators in a variety of intracellular molecular processes. Abnormal changes in miRNA have been associated with several diseases. However, these changes are sometimes subtle and occur at nanomolar levels or lower. Several biosensing hurdles for in situ cellular/tissue analysis of miRNA limit detection of small amounts of miRNA. Of these limitations the most challenging are selectivity and sensor degradation creating high background signals and false signals. Recently we developed a reporter+probe biosensor for let-7a that showed potential to mitigate false signal from sensor degradation. Here we designed reporter+probe biosensors for miR-26a-2-3p and miR-27a-5p to better understand the effect of thermodynamics and molecular structures of the biosensor constituents on the analytical performance. Signal changes from interactions between Cy3 and Cy5 on the reporters were used to understand structural aspects of the reporter designs. Theoretical thermodynamic values, single stranded conformations, hetero- and homodimerization structures, and equilibrium concentrations of the reporters and probes were used to interpret the experimental observations. Studies of the sensitivity and selectivity revealed 5–9 nM detection limits in the presence and absence of interfering off-analyte miRNAs. These studies will aid in determining how to rationally design reporter+probe biosensors to overcome hurdles associated with highly sensitive miRNA biosensing. - Highlights: • Challenges facing highly sensitive miRNA biosensor designs are addressed. • Thermodynamic and molecular structure design metrics for reporter+probe biosensors are proposed. • The influence of ideal and non-ideal reporter hairpin structures on reporter+probe formation and signal change are discussed. • 5–9 nM limits of detection were observed with no interference from off-analytes.

  14. Molecular structure and interactions of nucleic acid components in nanoparticles: ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Yu.V.; Belous, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Self-associates of nucleic acid components (stacking trimers and tetramers of the base pairs of nucleic acids) and short fragments of nucleic acids are nanoparticles (linear sizes of these particles are more than 10 A). Modern quantum-mechanical methods and softwares allow one to perform ab initio calculations of the systems consisting of 150-200 atoms with enough large basis sets (for example, 6-31G * ). The aim of this work is to reveal the peculiarities of molecular and electronic structures, as well as the energy features of nanoparticles of nucleic acid components. We had carried out ab initio calculations of the molecular structure and interactions in the stacking dimer, trimer, and tetramer of nucleic base pairs and in the stacking (TpG)(ApC) dimer and (TpGpC) (ApCpG) trimer of nucleotides, which are small DNA fragments. The performed calculations of molecular structures of dimers and trimers of nucleotide pairs showed that the interplanar distance in the structures studied is equal to 3.2 A on average, and the helical angle in a trimer is approximately equal to 30 o : The distance between phosphor atoms in neighboring chains is 13.1 A. For dimers and trimers under study, we calculated the horizontal interaction energies. The analysis of interplanar distances and angles between nucleic bases and their pairs in the calculated short oligomers of nucleic acid base pairs (stacking dimer, trimer, and tetramer) has been carried out. Studies of interactions in the calculated short oligomers showed a considerable role of the cross interaction in the stabilization of the structures. The contribution of cross interactions to the horizontal interactions grows with the length of an oligomer. Nanoparticle components get electric charges in nanoparticles. Longwave low-intensity bands can appear in the electron spectra of nanoparticles.

  15. Differential Interaction of Antimicrobial Peptides with Lipid Structures Studied by Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galo E. Balatti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work; we investigated the differential interaction of amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC lipid structures by means of extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By using a coarse-grained (CG model within the MARTINI force field; we simulated the peptide–lipid system from three different initial configurations: (a peptides in water in the presence of a pre-equilibrated lipid bilayer; (b peptides inside the hydrophobic core of the membrane; and (c random configurations that allow self-assembled molecular structures. This last approach allowed us to sample the structural space of the systems and consider cooperative effects. The peptides used in our simulations are aurein 1.2 and maculatin 1.1; two well-known antimicrobial peptides from the Australian tree frogs; and molecules that present different membrane-perturbing behaviors. Our results showed differential behaviors for each type of peptide seen in a different organization that could guide a molecular interpretation of the experimental data. While both peptides are capable of forming membrane aggregates; the aurein 1.2 ones have a pore-like structure and exhibit a higher level of organization than those conformed by maculatin 1.1. Furthermore; maculatin 1.1 has a strong tendency to form clusters and induce curvature at low peptide–lipid ratios. The exploration of the possible lipid–peptide structures; as the one carried out here; could be a good tool for recognizing specific configurations that should be further studied with more sophisticated methodologies.

  16. Structural and vibrational dynamics of molecular solids under variable temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatschneider, Bohdan Hindulak

    An ultra-high resolution FTIR study (0.01cm-1) coupled with molecular simulations of para-terphenyl (PTP) under variable temperatures and pressures has been conducted in an effort to better understand the molecular dynamics (MD) of organic molecular crystals. PTP's use as an electrooptic material and as a host matrix for single molecular spectroscopy has created significant interest into the systems dynamics under variable conditions. Our high resolution study reveals many structure and dynamics changes in the PTP matrix as a result of changes in temperature and pressure. Further spectroscopic analysis using MD verifies these structural and dynamics alterations. Accurately modeled pressure and temperature phase transitions between the low-temperature low-pressure triclinic phase and the high-pressure high-temperature monoclinic phase of PTP was accomplished by a one-parameter optimization of the torsion potential component of the polymer consistent force field (PCFF) along with incorporation of COMPASS' (Condensed-phase Optimized Molecular Potentials for Atomistic Simulation Studies) non-bond parameters. Initial MD simulations implementing the universal force field COMPASS could not adequately model the experimental crystal structure at 113K, nor could it reproduce the known transition temperature at ambient pressure or yield a well-defined transition pressure at low temperature. Therefore, we needed to create a new potential which was shown to reproduce the solid-solid phase transitions. The previously never simulated pressure induced solid-solid phase transition of PTP at low temperature (20K) and varying pressures (0-1GPa) was modeled. The symmetry based crystal/molecular rearrangement shows a compression and distortion of the unit cell and corresponding angles along with a flattening of the once twisted PTP molecules at high pressures (>0.5GPa). A fourth crystal phase (Phase IV) has been successfully identified through analysis of the individual molecule

  17. Surface-Bound Molecular Film Structure Effects on Electronic and Magnetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronschinske, Alex M.

    This thesis dissertation will discuss the importance of understanding the driving forces of molecular assembly on surfaces and the need to characterize the electronic and magnetic properties of the resulting organic films. Furthermore, experimental results on model organic molecular assemblies, benzoate on Cu(110) and Fe[(H2BPz2)2bpy] ("Fe-bpy") on Au(111), and their novel film properties will be presented. The primary experimental techniques used in this work are scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM, STS), and so a theoretical characterization of constant current distance-voltage STS (z(V)-STS) will also be developed. Deposition of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) on to Cu(110) will be used to create a diverse molecular environment of benzoate molecules (C6H5COO+). In this film we will utilize structural phases consisting of co-existing orientation (alpha-phase) and uniform molecular orientation (c(8x2) phase) to probe electric potential variation across the surface of the film. Using z( V)-STS find that the electron affinity level of a molecule's near-neighbor will exert a substrate-mediated influence on the energy of the molecule's image potential state; which we describe using a 1-D dielectric continuum model. Motivated by the unique utility of z(V)-STS for gentle probing of molecular electronic structure and electric potential we perform a thorough theoretical characterize of z( V)-STS. We derive a differential equation for simulating z(V)-STS spectra under the standard approximation of a square tunneling barrier. Moreover, we derive an equation for sample density of states (DOS) that is applicable for all modes of STS. The central result of this work for interpretation of z(V)-STS results is a characterization of systematic error between state energy and z(V)-STS peak location, as well we show that empirical normalization procedure for removing background distortion from constant height current-voltage STS, (V/I)dI/dV, is also applicable to z(V)-STS is

  18. Studies of the surface structures of molecular crystals and of adsorbed molecular monolayers on the (111) crystal faces of platinum and silver by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firment, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    The structures of molecular crystal surfaces were investigated for the first time by the use of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The experimental results from a variety of molecular crystals were examined and compared as a first step towards understanding the properties of these surfaces on a microscopic level. The method of sample preparation employed, vapor deposition onto metal single-crystal substrates at low temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum, allowed concurrent study of the structures of adsorbed monolayers on metal surfaces and of the growth processes of molecular films on metal substrates. The systems investigated were ice, ammonia, naphthalene, benzene, the n-paraffins (C 3 to C 8 ), cyclohexane, trioxane, acetic acid, propionic acid, methanol, and methylamine adsorbed and condensed on both Pt(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. Electron-beam-induced damage of the molecular surfaces was observed after electron exposures of 10 -4 A sec cm -2 at 20 eV. Aromatic molecular crystal samples were more resistant to damage than samples of saturated molecules. The quality and orientation of the grown molecular crystal films were influenced by substrate preparation and growth conditions. Forty ordered monolayer structures were observed. 110 figures, 22 tables, 162 references

  19. Correlation between the molecular structure and the inhibiting effect of some benzimidazole derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niamien, P.M., E-mail: niamienfr@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de chimie physique, Universite de Cocody-Abidjan, 22 BP 582 Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire); Essy, F.K.; Trokourey, A.; Yapi, A.; Aka, H.K. [Laboratoire de chimie physique, Universite de Cocody-Abidjan, 22 BP 582 Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire); Diabate, D. [Laboratoire de chimie physique, Universite de Cocody-Abidjan, 22 BP 582 Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire); Institut UTINAM-UMR CNRS 6213 Equipe capteurs et membranes 25013 Besancon cedex, 22 BP 582 Abidjan 22 (Cote d' Ivoire)

    2012-09-14

    Quantum chemical parameters of 2-thiobenzylbenzimidazole (TBBI), 2-thiomethylbenzimidazole (TMBI), and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) were calculated. The correlation between molecular structure of these compounds and their inhibition efficiency IE (%) against copper corrosion in 1 M HNO{sub 3} was found by considering Density Functional Theory DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level. The properties most relevant to their potential action as corrosion inhibitors have been calculated: highest occupied molecular orbital energy (E{sub HOMO}), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (E{sub LUMO}), energy gap ({Delta}E), dipole moment ({mu}) and parameters that provide informations about the chemical reactivity: electronegativity ({chi}), global hardness ({eta}), global softness ({sigma}) and electrophilicity index ({omega}). All calculations have been performed using the Gaussian 03W suite of programs. It was found that theoretical data support experimental results. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Benzimidazole derivatives (TBBI, TMBI, MBI) as corrosion inhibitors of copper in 1 M HNO{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibition process evaluated by weight loss indicates that the investigated compounds are good inhibitors of copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibition efficiency is found to be in the following order: TBBI > TMBI > MBI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The studied molecules adsorbed on the metal surface according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the calculated molecular parameters by DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) show excellent correlation with the inhibition efficiency.

  20. Multiscale modeling of complex molecular structure and dynamics with MBN Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    Solov’yov, Ilia A; Solov’yov, Andrey V

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces readers to MesoBioNano (MBN) Explorer – a multi-purpose software package designed to model molecular systems at various levels of size and complexity. In addition, it presents a specially designed multi-task toolkit and interface – the MBN Studio – which enables the set-up of input files, controls the simulations, and supports the subsequent visualization and analysis of the results obtained. The book subsequently provides a systematic description of the capabilities of this universal and powerful software package within the framework of computational molecular science, and guides readers through its applications in numerous areas of research in bio- and chemical physics and material science – ranging from the nano- to the meso-scale. MBN Explorer is particularly suited to computing the system’s energy, to optimizing molecular structure, and to exploring the various facets of molecular and random walk dynamics. The package allows the use of a broad variety of interatomic potenti...

  1. Molecular and Structural Characterization of a Novel Escherichia coli Interleukin Receptor Mimic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriel, Danilo G; Heras, Begoña; Paxman, Jason J; Lo, Alvin W; Tan, Lendl; Sullivan, Matthew J; Dando, Samantha J; Beatson, Scott A; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-03-15

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a disease of extremely high incidence in both community and nosocomial settings. UTIs cause significant morbidity and mortality, with approximately 150 million cases globally per year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of UTI and is generally treated empirically. However, the rapidly increasing incidence of UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant UPEC strains has led to limited available treatment options and highlights the urgent need to develop alternative treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis to define the regulation, structure, function, and immunogenicity of recently identified UPEC vaccine candidate C1275 (here referred to as IrmA). We showed that the irmA gene is highly prevalent in UPEC, is cotranscribed with the biofilm-associated antigen 43 gene, and is regulated by the global oxidative stress response OxyR protein. Localization studies identified IrmA in the UPEC culture supernatant. We determined the structure of IrmA and showed that it adopts a unique domain-swapped dimer architecture. The dimeric structure of IrmA displays similarity to those of human cytokine receptors, including the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R), and interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) binding domains, and we showed that purified IrmA can bind to their cognate cytokines. Finally, we showed that plasma from convalescent urosepsis patients contains high IrmA antibody titers, demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of IrmA. Taken together, our results indicate that IrmA may play an important role during UPEC infection. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), a disease of major significance to human health. Globally, the incidence of UPEC-mediated UTI is strongly associated with increasing antibiotic resistance, making this extremely common infection a major public health concern. In this report, we describe

  2. Molecular characterization of pouched amphistome parasites (Trematoda: Gastrothylacidae) using ribosomal ITS2 sequence and secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatani, S; Shylla, J A; Tandon, V; Chatterjee, A; Roy, B

    2012-03-01

    Members of the family Gastrothylacidae (Trematoda: Digenea: Paramphistomata) are parasitic in ruminants throughout Africa and Asia. In north-east India, five species of pouched amphistomes, namely Fischoederius cobboldi, F. elongatus, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Carmyerius spatiosus and Velasquezotrema tripurensis, belonging to this family have been reported so far. In the present study, the molecular phylogeny of these five gastrothylacid species is derived using the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) sequence and secondary structure analyses. ITS2 sequence analysis was carried out to see the occurrence of interspecific variations among the species. Phylogenetic analyses were performed for primary sequence data alone as well as the combined sequence-structure information using neighbour-joining and Bayesian approaches. The sequence analysis revealed that there exist considerable interspecific variations among the various gastrothylacid fluke species. In contrast, the inferred secondary structures for the five species using minimum free energy modelling showed structural identities, in conformity with the core four-helix domain structure that has been recently identified as common to almost all eukaryotic taxa. The phylogenetic tree reconstructed using combined sequence-structure data showed a better resolution, as compared to the one using sequence data alone, with the gastrothylacid species forming a monophyletic group that is well separated from members of the other family, Paramphistomidae, of the amphistomid flukes group. The study provides the molecular characterization based on primary sequence data of the rDNA ITS2 region of the gastrothylacid amphistome flukes. Results also demonstrate the phylogenetic utility of the ITS2 sequence-secondary structure data for inferences at higher taxonomic levels.

  3. The Use of Gene Modification and Advanced Molecular Structure Analyses towards Improving Alfalfa Forage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yaogeng; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-29

    Alfalfa is one of the most important legume forage crops in the world. In spite of its agronomic and nutritive advantages, alfalfa has some limitations in the usage of pasture forage and hay supplement. High rapid degradation of protein in alfalfa poses a risk of rumen bloat to ruminants which could cause huge economic losses for farmers. Coupled with the relatively high lignin content, which impedes the degradation of carbohydrate in rumen, alfalfa has unbalanced and asynchronous degradation ratio of nitrogen to carbohydrate (N/CHO) in rumen. Genetic engineering approaches have been used to manipulate the expression of genes involved in important metabolic pathways for the purpose of improving the nutritive value, forage yield, and the ability to resist abiotic stress. Such gene modification could bring molecular structural changes in alfalfa that are detectable by advanced structural analytical techniques. These structural analyses have been employed in assessing alfalfa forage characteristics, allowing for rapid, convenient and cost-effective analysis of alfalfa forage quality. In this article, we review two major obstacles facing alfalfa utilization, namely poor protein utilization and relatively high lignin content, and highlight genetic studies that were performed to overcome these drawbacks, as well as to introduce other improvements to alfalfa quality. We also review the use of advanced molecular structural analysis in the assessment of alfalfa forage for its potential usage in quality selection in alfalfa breeding.

  4. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-05-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials.

  5. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  6. Molecular characterization of myoglobin from Sciurus vulgaris meridionalis: Primary structure, kinetics and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giuseppe, Antonella M A; Russo, Luigi; Russo, Rosita; Ragucci, Sara; Caso, J Valentina; Isernia, Carla; Chambery, Angela; Di Maro, Antimo

    2017-05-01

    Myoglobins (Mbs) are heme-proteins involved in dioxygen storage necessary for metabolic respiration. Mbs are intensely investigated as archetype to investigate structure/function relationship in globular proteins. In this work, the myoglobin from Sciurus vulgaris meridionalis has been for the first time isolated and purified with a high yield and homogeneity. The primary structure characterization has been performed by applying a strategy based on high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Proximal (position 93, α-helix F8) and distal (position 64, α-helix E7) histidinyl residues as well as most of the amino acid residues (i.e., Leu29, Lys45, Thr67, Val68) involved in the autoxidation mechanism are conserved in the squirrel Mb. The structural and dynamical properties of the squirrel Mb have been also deeply investigated by CD, NMR. Furthermore, molecular dynamics studies of Mbs from different species have been performed. In addition, the functional properties of squirrel Mb have been characterized by determining its autoxidation kinetic and thermal stability in comparison with crested porcupine and reindeer Mbs. Interestingly, a higher autoxidation rate was revealed for squirrel Mb with respect to reindeer and crested porcupine Mbs. Even considering the very similar structural fold, molecular dynamics data show a higher conformational mobility of squirrel Mb with respect to reindeer and crested porcupine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Debora Lika, E-mail: dmakino@biochem.mpg.de; Conti, Elena [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented.

  8. Crystal Structure of the New Investigational Drug Candidate VT-1598 in Complex with Aspergillus fumigatus Sterol 14α-Demethylase Provides Insights into Its Broad-Spectrum Antifungal Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Garvey, Edward P.; Hoekstra, William J.; Yates, Christopher M.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Rachakonda, Girish; Villalta, Fernando; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2017-05-01

    ABSTRACT

    Within the past few decades, the incidence and complexity of human fungal infections have increased, and therefore, the need for safer and more efficient, broad-spectrum antifungal agents is high. In the study described here, we characterized the new tetrazole-based drug candidate VT-1598 as an inhibitor of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51B) from the filamentous fungusAspergillus fumigatus. VT-1598 displayed a high affinity of binding to the enzyme in solution (dissociation constant, 13 ± 1 nM) and in the reconstituted enzymatic reaction was revealed to have an inhibitory potency stronger than the potencies of all other simultaneously tested antifungal drugs, including fluconazole, voriconazole, ketoconazole, and posaconazole. The X-ray structure of the VT-1598/A. fumigatusCYP51 complex was determined and depicts the distinctive binding mode of the inhibitor in the enzyme active site, suggesting the molecular basis of the improved drug potency and broad-spectrum antifungal activity. These data show the formation of an optimized hydrogen bond between the phenoxymethyl oxygen of VT-1598 and the imidazole ring nitrogen of His374, the CYP51 residue that is highly conserved across fungal pathogens and fungus specific. Comparative structural analysis ofA. fumigatusCYP51/voriconazole andCandida albicansCYP51/VT-1161 complexes supports the role of H bonding in fungal CYP51/inhibitor complexes and emphasizes the importance of an optimal distance between this interaction and the inhibitor-heme iron interaction. Cellular experiments using twoA. fumigatusstrains (strains 32820 and 1022) displayed a direct

  9. Structural and spectroscopic properties of the second generation phosphorus-viologen "molecular asterisk".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furer, V L; Vandukov, A E; Katir, N; Majoral, J P; El Kadib, A; Caminade, A M; Bousmina, M; Kovalenko, V I

    2013-11-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the second generation phosphorus-viologen "molecular asterisk" G2 built from cyclotriphosphazene core with 12 viologen units and 6 terminal phosphonate groups have been recorded and analyzed. The experimental X-ray data of 1,1-bis(4-formylbenzyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium bis(hexaflurophosphate) was used in molecular modeling studies. The optimization of isolated 1,1-bis(4-formylbenzyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium (BFBP) molecule without counter ions PF6(-) does not lead to significant changes of dihedral angles, thus the molecular conformation does not depend on interactions with the counter ions. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for G2 on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that G2 has a kind of "egg timer" structure with planar OC6H4CHNN(CH3) fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of G2 were interpreted by means of potential energy distribution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. New Diethyl Ammonium Salt of Thiobarbituric Acid Derivative: Synthesis, Molecular Structure Investigations and Docking Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assem Barakat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the new diethyl ammonium salt of diethylammonium(E-5-(1,5-bis(4-fluorophenyl-3-oxopent-4-en-1-yl-1,3-diethyl-4,6-dioxo-2-thioxohexaydropyrimidin-5-ide 3 via a regioselective Michael addition of N,N-diethylthiobarbituric acid 1 to dienone 2 is described. In 3, the carboanion of the thiobarbituric moiety is stabilized by the strong intramolecular electron delocalization with the adjacent carbonyl groups and so the reaction proceeds without any cyclization. The molecular structure investigations of 3 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction as well as DFT computations. The theoretically calculated (DFT/B3LYP geometry agrees well with the crystallographic data. The effect of fluorine replacement by chlorine atoms on the molecular structure aspects were investigated using DFT methods. Calculated electronic spectra showed a bathochromic shift of the π-π* transition when fluorine is replaced by chlorine. Charge decomposition analyses were performed to study possible interaction between the different fragments in the studied systems. Molecular docking simulations examining the inhibitory nature of the compound show an anti-diabetic activity with Pa (probability of activity value of 0.229.

  11. Enhanced production of pleuromutilin by Pleurotus mutilus and study on its molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shujing; Ai, Liuying; Zhang, Haiyang; Weng, Caihong; Lai, Chunfen; Liu, Li

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to enhance the accumulation of pleuromutilin by Pleurotus mutilus and to analyze the molecular structure of pleuromutilin. The results showed that a novel three-stage DO control strategy (60% DO, 1-3d; 45% DO, 4-6d; 30% DO, 7-9d) was very effective for improving the pleuromutilin accumulation and the highest production reached 12g/L, a 4-fold increase over a constant DO strategy. Furthermore, the flow behavior of fermentation broth appeared Newtonian with a maximum μ ap of 3.9×10 -3 Pa·s. Meanwhile the molecular formula (C 22 H 34 O 5 ), molecular weight (378.5) and structural formula of pleuromutilin were concluded based on spectroscopy and element assay. The main components were hydroxyl, methyl, methylene, carbonyl, carboxyl, and polycyclic hydrocarbon. This work demonstrated that DO strategy was suitable for scalable production of pleuromutilin, which makes pleuromutilin more affordable as materials in food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Briceño, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Structural and spectroscopic properties of the second generation phosphorus-viologen “molecular asterisk”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandukov, A. E.; Katir, N.; Majoral, J. P.; El Kadib, A.; Caminade, A. M.; Bousmina, M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2013-11-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the second generation phosphorus-viologen "molecular asterisk" G2 built from cyclotriphosphazene core with 12 viologen units and 6 terminal phosphonate groups have been recorded and analyzed. The experimental X-ray data of 1,1-bis(4-formylbenzyl)-4,4‧-bipyridinium bis(hexaflurophosphate) was used in molecular modeling studies. The optimization of isolated 1,1-bis(4-formylbenzyl)-4,4‧-bipyridinium (BFBP) molecule without counter ions PF6- does not lead to significant changes of dihedral angles, thus the molecular conformation does not depend on interactions with the counter ions. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for G2 on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that G2 has a kind of "egg timer" structure with planar Osbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd N(CH3)sbnd fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of G2 were interpreted by means of potential energy distribution.

  14. Molecular simulations of electrolyte structure and dynamics in lithium-sulfur battery solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chanbum; Kanduč, Matej; Chudoba, Richard; Ronneburg, Arne; Risse, Sebastian; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The performance of modern lithium-sulfur (Li/S) battery systems critically depends on the electrolyte and solvent compositions. For fundamental molecular insights and rational guidance of experimental developments, efficient and sufficiently accurate molecular simulations are thus in urgent need. Here, we construct a molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation model of representative state-of-the art electrolyte-solvent systems for Li/S batteries constituted by lithium-bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) and LiNO3 electrolytes in mixtures of the organic solvents 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) and 1,3-dioxolane (DOL). We benchmark and verify our simulations by comparing structural and dynamic features with various available experimental reference systems and demonstrate their applicability for a wide range of electrolyte-solvent compositions. For the state-of-the-art battery solvent, we finally calculate and discuss the detailed composition of the first lithium solvation shell, the temperature dependence of lithium diffusion, as well as the electrolyte conductivities and lithium transference numbers. Our model will serve as a basis for efficient future predictions of electrolyte structure and transport in complex electrode confinements for the optimization of modern Li/S batteries (and related devices).

  15. Molecular mechanics of DNA bricks: in situ structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slone, Scott Michael; Li, Chen-Yu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Yoo, Jejoong

    2016-01-01

    The DNA bricks method exploits self-assembly of short DNA fragments to produce custom three-dimensional objects with subnanometer precision. In contrast to DNA origami, the DNA brick method permits a variety of different structures to be realized using the same library of DNA strands. As a consequence of their design, however, assembled DNA brick structures have fewer interhelical connections in comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures. Although the overall shape of the DNA brick objects has been characterized and found to conform to the features of the target designs, the microscopic properties of DNA brick objects remain yet to be determined. Here, we use the all-atom molecular dynamics method to directly compare the structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity of DNA brick and DNA origami structures different only by internal connectivity of their consistituent DNA strands. In comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures, the DNA brick structures are found to be less rigid and less dense and have a larger cross-section area normal to the DNA helix direction. At the microscopic level, the junction in the DNA brick structures are found to be right-handed, similar to the structure of individual Holliday junctions (HJ) in solution, which contrasts with the left-handed structure of HJ in DNA origami. Subject to external electric field, a DNA brick plate is more leaky to ions than an equivalent DNA origami plate because of its lower density and larger cross-section area. Overall, our results indicate that the structures produced by the DNA brick method are fairly similar in their overall appearance to those created by the DNA origami method but are more compliant when subject to external forces, which likely is a consequence of their single crossover design. (paper)

  16. Applications of the Information Theory to Problems of Molecular Electronic Structure and Chemical Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman F. Nalewajski

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Recent studies on applications of the information theoretic concepts to molecular systems are reviewed. This survey covers the information theory basis of the Hirshfeld partitioning of molecular electron densities, its generalization to many electron probabilities, the local information distance analysis of molecular charge distributions, the charge transfer descriptors of the donor-acceptor reactive systems, the elements of a “thermodynamic” description of molecular charge displacements, both “vertical” (between molecular fragments for the fixed overall density and “horizontal” (involving different molecular densities, with the entropic representation description provided by the information theory. The average uncertainty measures of bond multiplicities in molecular “communication” systems are also briefly summarized. After an overview of alternative indicators of the information distance (entropy deficiency, missing information between probability distributions the properties of the “stockholder” densities, which minimize the entropy deficiency relative to the promolecule reference, are summarized. In particular, the surprisal analysis of molecular densities is advocated as an attractive information-theoretic tool in the electronic structure theory, supplementary to the familiar density difference diagrams. The subsystem information density equalization rules satisfied by the Hirshfeld molecular fragments are emphasized: the local values of alternative information distance densities of subsystems are equal to the corresponding global value, characterizing the molecule as a whole. These local measures of the information content are semi-quantitatively related to the molecular density difference function. In the density functional theory the effective external potentials of molecular fragments are defined, for which

  17. MesoBioNano Explorer-A Universal Program for Multiscale Computer Simulations of Complex Molecular Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Nikolaev, Pavel V.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multipurpose computer code MesoBioNano Explorer (MBN Explorer). The package allows to model molecular systems of varied level of complexity. In particular, MBN Explorer is suited to compute system's energy, to optimize molecular structure as well as to consider the molecular and random...... higher) than the computational efficiency of other software packages, making MBN Explorer a possible alternative to the available codes....

  18. Changes in molecular structure and properties of irradiated polymers of different compositions - ESR and NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carswell-Pomerantz, T.; Babanalbandi, A.; Dong, L.; Hill, D.J.T.; Perera, M.C.S.; Pomery, P.J.; Saadat, G.; Whittaker, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of molecular structural changes in polymers during exposure to high energy radiation is the long term interest of the Polymer Materials and Radiation Group at the University of Queensland. Recently, the group had looked at a range of polymers including natural and synthetic rubbers, methacrylates and polyesters. The objective of the work has been to investigate the relationships between polymer structure and sensitivity towards high energy radiation, including gamma radiation. This report will focus on the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of the effects of gamma irradiation on these polymers. Other methods such as Gas Chromatography (GC), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) have also been used as these methods combine with ESR and NMR, to provide a more complete picture of the mechanism of the structural changes. (author)

  19. Structure of solvent-free grafted nanoparticles: Molecular dynamics and density-functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2011-01-01

    The structure of solvent-free oligomer-grafted nanoparticles has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and density-functional theory. At low temperatures and moderate to high oligomer lengths, the qualitative features of the core particle pair probability, structure factor, and the oligomer brush configuration obtained from the simulations can be explained by a density-functional theory that incorporates the configurational entropy of the space-filling oligomers. In particular, the structure factor at small wave numbers attains a value much smaller than the corresponding hard-sphere suspension, the first peak of the pair distribution function is enhanced due to entropic attractions among the particles, and the oligomer brush expands with decreasing particle volume fraction to fill the interstitial space. At higher temperatures, the simulations reveal effects that differ from the theory and are likely caused by steric repulsions of the expanded corona chains. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Theoretical Structures of Triflic Acid-Water Clusters and the Molecular Mechanism of Proton Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddison, S.J.; Pratt, L.R.; Zawodzinski, T.A.

    1998-11-01

    Structural and energetic information required for recently proposed quasi-chemical theories of solution chemistry have been obtained for clusters of water with triflic acid, CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}H(H{sub 2}O){sub n} for n=1-6. Quantum mechanical calculations on the clusters indicate that the acid proton does not dissociate with n=1 or 2 hydrating water molecules, but does dissociate for n>=3 water molecule partners. The computed minimum energy structures indicate that both ''Eigen'' (H{sub 9}O{sub 4}{sup +}) (n=3,4,6) and ''Zundel'' (H{sub 5}O{sub 2}{sup +}) (n=5) structures are likely to play a role in the molecular mechanism of acid dissociation in Nafion{reg_sign}.

  1. Molecular scale structure and dynamics at an ionic liquid/electrode interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, Peter; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Brandt van Driel, Tim

    2018-01-01

    After a century of research, the potential-dependent ion distribution at electrode/electrolyte interfaces is still under debate. In particular for solvent-free electrolytes such as room-temperature ionic liquids, classical theories for the electrical double layer are not applicable. Using...... a combination of in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity and impedance spectroscopy measurements, we determined this distribution with sub-molecular resolution. We find oscillatory charge density profiles consisting of alternating anion- and cation-enriched layers at both cathodic and anodic potentials....... This structure is shown to arise from the same ion-ion correlations dominating the liquid bulk structure. The relaxation dynamics of the interfacial structure upon charging/discharging were studied by impedance spectroscopy and time resolved X-ray reflectivity experiments with sub-millisecond resolution...

  2. Di- and sesquiterpenoids from Cystoseira genus: structure, intra-molecular transformations and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Vera; Seca, Ana M L; Barreto, M Carmo; Pinto, Diana C G A

    2013-06-01

    Natural products have been the single most productive source of leads for the development of drugs, because of the great variety of their chemical structures. Previous chemical investigation of members of the genus Cystoseira resulted in the discovery of various bioactive secondary metabolites. The secondary metabolites isolated and characterized are very interesting, both from the biological activity and structural complexity points of view, which make this genus an attractive target for further investigations. The present review covers the research progress on natural products isolated from this genus since January 1995 until now, concerning the isolation and structural elucidation of the secondary metabolites from Cystoseira species. In this contribution significant biological properties are briefly discussed. Simultaneously, we gradually construct an intra-molecular pathway that logically interrelates the isolated compounds.

  3. The Static and Molecular Structure of Barium Dibromide: A Theoretical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerbuez, H.

    2004-01-01

    The geometry of barium dibromide was first determined by electron diffraction by Akishin and Spiridov. That study concluded that the molecule is linear, but recent modern electron diffraction and quantum chemical studies of BaBr 2 indicated that its equilibrium geometry is bent. The geometrical parameters, namely, bond lengths and bond angles of barium dibromide were calculated from different levels of computation and experimentally. In this work we have calculated the molecular structure of the BaCl 2 using the Interionic Force model. On the other hand, we have calculated the interionic potentials with two different rigid ion model potentials (RIM) which one is the Vashista-Rahman (VR) semi-empirical potential and second one is the RIM potential with parametrization of Tatlipinar. These two model potential are compared with each other by reproducing the experimental static structure. The structure calculations have been performed by solving numerically the hypernetted chain approximate of liquids

  4. Study of atomic structure of liquid Hg-In alloys using ab-initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Nalini; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla(HP)-171005 (India); Thakur, Anil [Department of Physics, Govt. P. G. College Solan (HP)-173212 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the structural properties of liquid Hg-In alloys. The interatomic interactions are described by ab-initio pseudopotentials given by Troullier and Martins. Five liquid Hg-In mixtures (Hg{sub 10}In{sub 90}, Hg{sub 30}In{sub 70}, Hg{sub 50}In{sub 50}, Hg{sub 70}In{sub 30} and Hg{sub 90}In{sub 10}) at 299K are considered. The radial distribution function g(r) and structure factor S(q) of considered alloys are compared with respective experimental results for liquid Hg (l-Hg) and (l-In). The radial distribution function g(r) shows the presence of short range order in the systems considered. Smooth curves of Bhatia-Thornton partial structure factors factor shows the presence of liquid state in the considered alloys.

  5. Quantitative structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies on designing inhibitors of the perforin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fucheng; Cui, Lianhua; Piao, Jinmei; Liang, Hui; Si, Hongzong; Duan, Yunbo; Zhai, Honglin

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed on a series of 5-arylidene-2thioxoimidazolidin-4-ones derivatives as the inhibitors of perforin and to gain insights about the structural determinants for designing new drug molecules. The heuristic method could explore the descriptors responsible for bioactivity and gain a best linear model with R 2 .82. Gene expression programming method generated a novel nonlinear function model with R 2 .92 for training set and R 2 .85 for test set. The predicted IC 50 by QSAR, molecular docking analysis, and property explorer applet show that 42a acts as a well-pleasing potent inhibitor for perforin. This study may lay a reliable theoretical foundation for the development of designing perforin inhibitor structures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of structural changes during the collision of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas T, Justo; Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima; Copa, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with embedded-atom potential (EAM) have been performed to study the energetic and structural changes during the collision and coalescence of two Cu n nanoparticles. We simulated collision of nanoparticles at several temperatures below the melting point and with different impact energy. Analyzing the potential energy change during the collision we identify three clearly defined stages. The pair correlation function and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural changes in the collision process. The variation in the time of the population of different pairs has been quantified, being observed diverse structural transformations. During the collision of two equal icosahedral nanoparticles ( Cu 55 ) has been observed different behavior of 1551 pairs depending on the impact velocity. (author).

  7. Structural characterization of a recombinant fusion protein by instrumental analysis and molecular modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Wu

    Full Text Available Conbercept is a genetically engineered homodimeric protein for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD that functions by blocking VEGF-family proteins. Its huge, highly variable architecture makes characterization and development of a functional assay difficult. In this study, the primary structure, number of disulfide linkages and glycosylation state of conbercept were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis. Molecular modeling was then applied to obtain the spatial structural model of the conbercept-VEGF-A complex, and to study its inter-atomic interactions and dynamic behavior. This work was incorporated into a platform useful for studying the structure of conbercept and its ligand binding functions.

  8. Structures of Human Pumilio with Noncognate RNAs Reveal Molecular Mechanisms for Binding Promiscuity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta,Y.; Nair, D.; Wharton, R.; Aggarwal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Pumilio is a founder member of the evolutionarily conserved Puf family of RNA-binding proteins that control a number of physiological processes in eukaryotes. A structure of human Pumilio (hPum) Puf domain bound to a Drosophila regulatory sequence showed that each Puf repeat recognizes a single nucleotide. Puf domains in general bind promiscuously to a large set of degenerate sequences, but the structural basis for this promiscuity has been unclear. Here, we describe the structures of hPum Puf domain complexed to two noncognate RNAs, CycBreverse and Puf5. In each complex, one of the nucleotides is ejected from the binding surface, in effect, acting as a 'spacer.' The complexes also reveal the plasticity of several Puf repeats, which recognize noncanonical nucleotides. Together, these complexes provide a molecular basis for recognition of degenerate binding sites, which significantly increases the number of mRNAs targeted for regulation by Puf proteins in vivo.

  9. Synthesis and molecular structure of (monoaqua) oxovanadium (IV) thiosemicarbazide-diacetate monohydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbeleu, N.V.; Bologa, A.O.; Burshtein, I.F.; Filippova, I.G.; Kiosse, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the structure for a new complex of oxovanadium (IV) with H 2 L. This compound was obtained by mixing warm aqueous solutions containing 1.0 g VOSO 4 .2H 2 O and H 2 L at room temperature. The coordinates and the individual temperature factors of the basis atoms in the structure VOLH 2 O .H 2 O are presented. It is shown that the vanadium atom in both complexes has a distorted octahedral environment. The geometrical isomerism is accompanied by differences in the conformations of the molecular ligand. Two geometrical isomers of a previously unknown type are concurrently present in the VOLH 2 O structure. The formation of these isomers is made possible by the different arrangement of inequivalent branches of the organic ligand. This type of isomerism should be expected in the complexes of other metals with H 2 L and in the coordination compounds of metals with other B-type tripod ligands

  10. Physicochemical properties of the modeled structure of astacin metalloprotease moulting enzyme NAS-36 and mapping the druggable allosteric space of Heamonchus contortus, Brugia malayi and Ceanorhabditis elegans via molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Agrawal, Sonali; Kumar, M Suresh

    2013-12-01

    Nematodes represent the second largest phylum in the animal kingdom. It is the most abundant species (500,000) in the planet. It causes chronic, debilitating infections worldwide such as ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm, enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis and trichinosis, among others. Molecular modeling tools can play an important role in the identification and structural investigation of molecular targets that can act as a vital candidate against filariasis. In this study, sequence analysis of NAS-36 from H. contortus (Heamonchus contortus), B. malayi (Brugia malayi) and C. elegans (Ceanorhabditis elegans) has been performed, in order to identify the conserved residues. Tertiary structure was developed for an insight into the molecular structure of the enzyme. Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) studies have been carried out to analyze the stability and the physical properties of the proposed enzyme models in the H. contortus, B. malayi and C. elegans. Moreover, the drug binding sites have been mapped for inhibiting the function of NAS-36 enzyme. The molecular identity of this protease could eventually demonstrate how ex-sheathment is regulated, as well as provide a potential target of anthelmintics for the prevention of nematode infections.

  11. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemarchand, Claire; Bailey, Nicholas; Daivis, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear are investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity, normal stress differences, and pressure of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear...... of the viscosity with temperature at different shear rates is also related to the size and relative composition of the nanoaggregates. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified. Finally, the position of bitumen mixtures in the broad literature of complex...... rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid at all temperatures. In addition, the Cooee model is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules in bitumen. These nanoaggregates...

  12. Cooperativity in Molecular Dynamics Structural Models and the Dielectric Spectra of 1,2-Ethanediol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usacheva, T. M.

    2018-05-01

    Linear relationships are established between the experimental equilibrium correlation factor and the molecular dynamics (MD) mean value of the O-H···O bond angle and the longitudinal component of the unit vector of the mean statistical dipole moment of the cluster in liquid 1,2-ethanediol (12ED). The achievements of modern MD models in describing the experimental dispersion of the permittivity of 12ED by both continuous and discrete relaxation time spectra are analyzed. The advantage computer MD experiments have over dielectric spectroscopy for calculating relaxation time and determining the molecular diffusion mechanisms of the rearrangement of the network 12ED structure, which is more complex than water, is demonstrated.

  13. Polysaccharides As Viscosupplementation Agents: Structural Molecular Characteristics but Not Rheology Appear Crucial to the Therapeutic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita C. Machado

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMost clinical studies and basic research document viscosupplementation (VS in terms of effectiveness and safety, but only a few highlight its molecular mechanisms of action. Besides, there is generally focus on hyaluronic acid (HA as being the most relevant polysaccharide to reach the clinical endpoints, attributing its effect mainly to its unique viscoelastic properties, related to a high-molecular weight and gel formulation. Usually, studies do not approach the possible biological pathways where HA may interfere, and there is a lack of reports on other biocompatible polysaccharides that could be of use in VS.AimWe briefly review the main proposed mechanisms of action of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (IA-HA treatment and discuss its effectiveness focusing on the role of rheological and intrinsic structural molecular properties of polysaccharides in providing a therapeutic effect.MethodsWe conducted a literature search using PubMed database to find articles dealing with the mechanisms of action of IA-HA treatment and/or emphasizing how the structural properties of the polysaccharide used influenced the clinical outcomes.Discussion/conclusionHA is involved in numerous biochemical interactions that may explain the clinical benefits of VS, most of them resulting from HA–cluster of differentiation 44 receptor interaction. There are other important aspects apart from the molecular size or the colloidal state of the IA-HA involved in VS efficiency that still need to be consolidated. Indeed, it seems that clinical response may be dependent on the intrinsic properties of the polysaccharide, regardless of being HA, rather than to rheology, posing some controversy to previous beliefs.

  14. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program

  15. Supramolecular macrocycles based on porphyrins- correlation of molecular structure and biological photoactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, R. M.; Oprea, F.; Bacinschi, Z.; Scarlat, F.; Scarlat, Fl.; Niculescu, V.I.R.

    2002-01-01

    Porphyrins and phthalocyanines are organic dyes which can be used as highly fluorescent species in laser technology, in photography, as radiation power indicators, as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy of cancerous disease. Porphyrins constitute a class of the molecules which contain four pyrrole rings linked by the methane carbon bridges whereas the phthalocyanine molecules are composed of four indole units - pyrrole rings linked by nitrogen atoms conjugated with benzene rings. A large group of porphyrins and phthalocyanines can be chemically modified by introducing metal in the center of the pyrrole rings or by attaching the peripheral groups to the outer rings of the methane bridges or isoindole units, respectively. In this study five groups of tetraphenylporphyrins (TPP) and phthalocyanines (Pc) were investigated: - metal (Me)-free dyes without any substitutes, - non-substituted porphyrins and phthalocyanines but complexed with metal (Me) - Zn, Mg, Mn, Co, Cu, Pt, Pd, Pb and others, - metal-complexed dyes substituted with aromatic rings, - metal-complexed dyes substituted with fluorines, - metal-complexed dyes substituted with long organic chains (alkyl or alkyloxy). The difference in the TPP and Pc molecular structure, the kind of metal incorporated into the main molecular core or the variation in the peripheral groups attached to the molecular skeleton are expected to affect the effectiveness of dyes in photocurrent generation. Since there is a competition between the charge separation process and other deactivation processes in the molecule, in our study photochemical investigations (photodynamic action) are usually accompanied with the spectroscopic examinations (absorption, fluorescence- which give information on the (non-) radiative processes) of dyes. In the paper we have presented the review of our study on the correlation between the molecular structure of dyes and their photoactive properties. (authors)

  16. Nanomaterials under extreme environments: A study of structural and dynamic properties using reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Adarsh

    Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important with the continuing advances in experimental techniques. As researchers around the world are trying to expand the current understanding of the behavior of materials at the atomistic scale, the limited resolution of equipment, both in terms of time and space, act as roadblocks to a comprehensive study. Numerical methods, in general and molecular dynamics, in particular act as able compliment to the experiments in our quest for understanding material behavior. In this research work, large scale molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechano-chemical behavior under extreme conditions of a variety of systems with many real world applications. The body of this work is divided into three parts, each covering a particular system: 1) Aggregates of aluminum nanoparticles are good solid fuel due to high flame propagation rates. Multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the mechanism underlying higher reaction rate in a chain of aluminum nanoparticles as compared to an isolated nanoparticle. This is due to the penetration of hot atoms from reacting nanoparticles to an adjacent, unreacted nanoparticle, which brings in external heat and initiates exothermic oxidation reactions. 2) Cavitation bubbles readily occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163,840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate chemical and mechanical damages caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near amorphous silica. Collapse of an empty nanobubble generates high-speed nanojet, resulting in the formation of a pit on the surface. The pit contains a large number of silanol groups and its volume is found to be directly proportional to the volume of the nanobubble. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and consequently the damage on the silica surface is mitigated. 3) The structure and dynamics of water confined in

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dissipation in rhizosphere based on molecular structure and effect size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Chen, Huaihai; Xu, Minmin; Hayat, Tahir; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming

    2010-08-01

    Rhizoremediation is a significant form of bioremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study examined the role of molecular structure in determining the rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. Effect size in meta-analysis was employed as activity dataset for building quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models and accumulative effect sizes of 16 PAHs were used for validation of these models. Based on the genetic algorithm combined with partial least square regression, models for comprehensive dataset, Poaceae dataset, and Fabaceae dataset were built. The results showed that information indices, calculated as information content of molecules based on the calculation of equivalence classes from the molecular graph, were the most important molecular structural indices for QSAR models of rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. The QSAR model, based on the molecular structure indices and effect size, has potential to be used in studying and predicting the rhizosphere effect of PAHs dissipation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure-function features of a Mycoplasma glycolipid synthase derived from structural data integration, molecular simulations, and mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-García, Javier; Francisco, Carles; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Glycoglycerolipids are structural components of mycoplasma membranes with a fundamental role in membrane properties and stability. Their biosynthesis is mediated by glycosyltransferases (GT) that catalyze the transfer of glycosyl units from a sugar nucleotide donor to diacylglycerol. The essential function of glycolipid synthases in mycoplasma viability, and the absence of glycoglycerolipids in animal host cells make these GT enzymes a target for drug discovery by designing specific inhibitors. However, rational drug design has been hampered by the lack of structural information for any mycoplasma GT. Most of the annotated GTs in pathogenic mycoplasmas belong to family GT2. We had previously shown that MG517 in Mycoplasma genitalium is a GT-A family GT2 membrane-associated glycolipid synthase. We present here a series of structural models of MG517 obtained by homology modeling following a multiple-template approach. The models have been validated by mutational analysis and refined by long scale molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the models, key structure-function relationships have been identified: The N-terminal GT domain has a GT-A topology that includes a non-conserved variable region involved in acceptor substrate binding. Glu193 is proposed as the catalytic base in the GT mechanism, and Asp40, Tyr126, Tyr169, Ile170 and Tyr218 define the substrates binding site. Mutation Y169F increases the enzyme activity and significantly alters the processivity (or sequential transferase activity) of the enzyme. This is the first structural model of a GT-A glycoglycerolipid synthase and provides preliminary insights into structure and function relationships in this family of enzymes.

  19. Advances in the molecular modeling and quantitative structure-activity relationship-based design for antihistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Jorge; Galvez-Llompart, Maria; Zanni, Riccardo; Garcia-Domenech, Ramon

    2013-03-01

    Nowadays the use of antihistamines (AH) is increasing steadily. These drugs are able to act on a variety of pathological conditions of the organism. A number of computer-aided (in silico) approaches have been developed to discover and develop novel AH drugs. Among these methods stand the ones based on drug-receptor docking, thermodynamics, as well as the quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). This review collates the most recent advances in the use of computer approaches for the search and characterization of novel AH drugs. Within the QSAR methods, particular attention will be paid to those based on molecular topology (MT) because of their demonstrated efficacy in discovering new drugs. Collateral topics will also be dealt with including: docking studies, thermodynamic aspects, molecular modeling and so on. These issues will be treated to the extent that they have interest as complementary to QSAR-MT. Given the importance of the use of AHs, the search for new drugs in this field has become imperative today. In this regard, the use of QSAR methods based on MT, namely QSAR-MT, has proven to be a powerful tool when the goal is discovering new hit or lead structures. It has been shown that antihistaminic activity is complex and different for the four known types of receptors (H1 to H4) and that electronic, steric and physicochemical issues determine drug activity. These factors, along with the purely structural ones, can be deduced from topological and topochemical information.

  20. Bulk and interfacial structures of reline deep eutectic solvent: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Supreet; Sharma, Shobha; Kashyap, Hemant K.

    2017-11-01

    We apply all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to describe the bulk morphology and interfacial structure of reline, a deep eutectic solvent comprising choline chloride and urea in 1:2 molar ratio, near neutral and charged graphene electrodes. For the bulk phase structural investigation, we analyze the simulated real-space radial distribution functions, X-ray/neutron scattering structure functions, and their partial components. Our study shows that both hydrogen-bonding and long-range correlations between different constituents of reline play a crucial role to lay out the bulk structure of reline. Further, we examine the variation of number density profiles, orientational order parameters, and electrostatic potentials near the neutral and charged graphene electrodes with varying electrode charge density. The present study reveals the presence of profound structural layering of not only the ionic components of reline but also urea near the electrodes. In addition, depending on the electrode charge density, the choline ions and urea molecules render different orientations near the electrodes. The simulated number density and electrostatic potential profiles for reline clearly show the presence of multilayer structures up to a distance of 1.2 nm from the respective electrodes. The observation of positive values of the surface potential at zero charge indicates the presence of significant nonelectrostatic attraction between the choline cation and graphene electrode. The computed differential capacitance (Cd) for reline exhibits an asymmetric bell-shaped curve, signifying different variation of Cd with positive and negative surface potentials.

  1. Microwave measurements of the spectra and molecular structure for phthalic anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Sun, Ming; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2014-05-01

    The microwave rotational spectrum for phthalic anhydride (PhA) has been measured in the 4-14 GHz microwave region using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform (PBFT) Flygare-Balle type microwave spectrometer. Initially, the molecular structure was calculated using Gaussian 09 suite with mp2/6-311++G** basis and the calculations were used in predicting spectra for the measured isotopologues. The experimental rotational transition frequencies were measured and used to calculate the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. The rotational constants for the normal isotopologue, four unique 13C substituted isotopologues and two 18O isotologues, were used in a least squares fit to determine nearly all structural parameters for this molecule. Since no substitutions were made at hydrogen sites, the calculated positions of the hydrogen atoms relative to the bonded carbon atoms were used in the structure determination. The rotational constants for the parent isotopologue were determined to be A = 1801.7622(9) MHz, B = 1191.71816(26) MHz, C = 717.44614(28) MHz. Small values for the centrifugal distortion constants were obtained; DJ = 0.0127 kHz, DJK = 0.0652 kHz, and DK = -0.099 kHz, indicating a fairly rigid structure. The structure of PhA is planar with a negative inertial defect of Δ = -0.154 amu Å2. Structural parameters from the mp2 and DFT calculations are in quite good agreement with measured parameters.

  2. Effects of surface proteins and lipids on molecular structure, thermal properties, and enzymatic hydrolysis of rice starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan HU

    Full Text Available Abstract Rice starches with different amylose contents were treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS to deplete surface proteins and lipids, and the changes in molecular structure, thermal properties, and enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated. SDS treatment did not significantly change the molecular weight distribution, crystalline structure, short-range ordered degree, and gelatinization properties of starch, but significantly altered the pasting properties and increased the swelling power of starch. The removal of surface proteins and lipids increased the enzymatic hydrolysis and in vitro digestion of starch. The influences of removing surface proteins and lipids from starch on swelling power, pasting properties, and enzymatic hydrolysis were different among the various starches because of the differences in molecular structures of different starch styles. The aforementioned results indicated that removing the surface proteins and lipids from starch did not change the molecular structure but had significant effects on some functional properties.

  3. Influence of the molecular structure on indentation size effect in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chung-Souk

    2010-01-01

    Size dependent deformation of polymers has been observed by various researchers in various experimental settings including micro beam bending, foams and indentation testing. Here in this article the indentation size effect in polymers is examined which manifests itself in increased hardness at decreasing indentation depths. Based on previously suggested rationale of size dependent deformation and depth dependent hardness model the depth dependent hardness of various polymers are analyzed. It is found that polymers containing aromatic rings in their molecular structure exhibit depth dependent hardness above the micron length scale. For polymers not containing aromatic rings polymers the indentation size effect starts at smaller indentation depths if they are present at all.

  4. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  5. Are the program packages for molecular structure calculations really black boxes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MRAKOVIC

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this communication it is shown that the widely held opinion that compact program packages for quantum–mechanical calculations of molecular structure can safely be used as black boxes is completely wrong. In order to illustrate this, the results of computations of equilibrium bond lengths, vibrational frequencies and dissociation energies for all homonuclear diatomic molecules involving the atoms from the first two rows of the Periodic Table, performed using the Gaussian program package are presented. It is demonstrated that the sensible use of the program requires a solid knowledge of quantum chemistry.

  6. X-ray diffraction and molecular-dynamics studies: Structural analysis of phases in diglyceride monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Larsen, Niels Bent; Bjørnholm, T.

    1998-01-01

    We report a detailed structural analysis of the phases of 1,2-sn-dipalmitoylglycerol Langmuir monolayers at room temperature. Pressure-induced transitions have been investigated by combination of molecular-dynamics simulations and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (XRD). The diglyceride film......; At the lowest pressure the tilt angle reaches approximate to 14 degrees in a direction close to a nearest neighbor direction. Both arrangements of the alkyl chains are confirmed by XRD. For higher order and fractional order Bragg peaks, simulations predict higher intensities than observed with XRD. This may...

  7. On the influence of molecular structure on the conductivity of electrolyte solutions - sodium nitrate in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Krienke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations of the conductivity of sodium nitrate in water are presented and compared with experimental measurements. The method of direct correlation force in the framework of the interionic theory is used for the calculation of transport properties in connection with the associative mean spherical approximation (AMSA. The effective interactions between ions in solutions are derived with the help of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics calculations on the Born-Oppenheimer level. This work is based on earlier theoretical and experimental studies of the structure of concentrated aqueous sodium nitrate solutions.

  8. Photoinduced Structural Dynamics of Molecular Systems Mapped by Time-Resolved X-ray Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed; Collet, Eric

    2017-08-23

    We review the tremendous advances in ultrafast X-ray science, over the past 15 years, making the best use of new ultrashort X-ray sources including table-top or large-scale facilities. Different complementary X-ray-based techniques, including spectroscopy, scattering, and diffraction, are presented. The broad and expanding spectrum of these techniques in the ultrafast time domain is delivering new insight into the dynamics of molecular systems, of solutions, of solids, and of biosystems. Probing the time evolution of the electronic and structural degrees of freedom of these systems on the time scales of femtosecond to picoseconds delivers new insight into our understanding of dynamical matter.

  9. Theoretical studies on the molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlak, Piotr; Berski, Sławomir; Latajka, Zdzisław

    2016-01-01

    The molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin has been investigated at two different approaches. Calculations have been carried out on static (DFT and MP2) levels with an assortment of Dunning's basis sets and dynamic CPMD simulations. In this both case within the isolated molecule approximation. The results point out that at least twenty different conformers coexist on the PES as confirmed by the flexible character of this molecule. The topological analysis of ELF showed very similar nature of the Ssbnd S and Ssbnd O bonds. The infrared spectrum has been calculated, and a comparative vibrational analysis has been performed.

  10. Structure, functions, and evolution of the third complement component and viral molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, A; Sunyer, J O; Moore, W T; Sarrias, M R; Soulika, A M; Lambris, J D

    1998-01-01

    The third component of the complement system, C3, is a common denominator in the activation of the classical, alternative, and lectin pathways. The ability of C3 molecule to interact with at least 20 different proteins makes it the most versatile component of this system. Since these interactions are important for phagocytic, immunoregulatory, and immune evasion mechanisms, the analysis of its structure and functions has been a subject of intense research. Here we review our current work on the C3-ligand interactions, C3-related viral molecular mimicry, evolution of the complement system, and identification of C3-based complement inhibitors.

  11. Relationship between Molecular Structure Characteristics of Feed Proteins and Protein Digestibility and Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingmei Bai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional value of feed proteins and their utilization by livestock are related not only to the chemical composition but also to the structure of feed proteins, but few studies thus far have investigated the relationship between the structure of feed proteins and their solubility as well as digestibility in monogastric animals. To address this question we analyzed soybean meal, fish meal, corn distiller’s dried grains with solubles, corn gluten meal, and feather meal by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy to determine the protein molecular spectral band characteristics for amides I and II as well as α-helices and β-sheets and their ratios. Protein solubility and in vitro digestibility were measured with the Kjeldahl method using 0.2% KOH solution and the pepsin-pancreatin two-step enzymatic method, respectively. We found that all measured spectral band intensities (height and area of feed proteins were correlated with their the in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.003; moreover, the relatively quantitative amounts of α-helices, random coils, and α-helix to β-sheet ratio in protein secondary structures were positively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.004. On the other hand, the percentage of β-sheet structures was negatively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility (p<0.001 and solubility (p = 0.002. These results demonstrate that the molecular structure characteristics of feed proteins are closely related to their in vitro digestibility at 28 h and solubility. Furthermore, the α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio can be used to predict the nutritional value of feed proteins.

  12. xMDFF: molecular dynamics flexible fitting of low-resolution X-ray structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGreevy, Ryan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Li, Qufei; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Perozo, Eduardo; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    A new real-space refinement method for low-resolution X-ray crystallography is presented. The method is based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting protocol targeted at addressing large-scale deformations of the search model to achieve refinement with minimal manual intervention. An explanation of the method is provided, augmented by results from the refinement of both synthetic and experimental low-resolution data, including an independent electrophysiological verification of the xMDFF-refined crystal structure of a voltage-sensor protein. X-ray crystallography remains the most dominant method for solving atomic structures. However, for relatively large systems, the availability of only medium-to-low-resolution diffraction data often limits the determination of all-atom details. A new molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF)-based approach, xMDFF, for determining structures from such low-resolution crystallographic data is reported. xMDFF employs a real-space refinement scheme that flexibly fits atomic models into an iteratively updating electron-density map. It addresses significant large-scale deformations of the initial model to fit the low-resolution density, as tested with synthetic low-resolution maps of d-ribose-binding protein. xMDFF has been successfully applied to re-refine six low-resolution protein structures of varying sizes that had already been submitted to the Protein Data Bank. Finally, via systematic refinement of a series of data from 3.6 to 7 Å resolution, xMDFF refinements together with electrophysiology experiments were used to validate the first all-atom structure of the voltage-sensing protein Ci-VSP

  13. Dynamic and structural studies of molecular or atomic systems through the generation of high order harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuet, J.

    2010-10-01

    High harmonic generation is a well known phenomenon explained by a three step model: because of the high intensity field generated by an ultrashort laser pulse, an atom or a molecule can be tunnel ionized. The ejected electron is then accelerated by the intense electric field, and eventually can recombine on its parent ion, leading to the emission of a XUV photon. Because of the generating process in itself, this light source is a promising candidate to probe the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, with an atto-second/sub-nanometer potential resolution (1 as=10 -18 s). In this work, we have studied the sensitivity of the emitted light (in terms of amplitude, but also phase and polarization) towards the electronic structure of the generating medium. We have first worked on atomic medium, then on molecules (N 2 , CO 2 , O 2 ). Comparing the experimental results with numerical simulations shows the necessity to model finely the generation process and to go beyond commonly used approximations. We have also shown the possibility to perform high harmonic spectroscopy in order to measure dynamics of complex molecules, such as Nitrogen Dioxide (NO 2 ). This technic has obtained complementary results compared to classical spectroscopy and has revealed dynamics of the electronic wave packet along a conical intersection. In this experiment, we have adapted conventional optical spectroscopy technic to the XUV spectral area, which significantly improved the signal over noise ratio. (author)

  14. Beyond the continuum: how molecular solvent structure affects electrostatics and hydrodynamics at solid-electrolyte interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Netz, Roland R

    2013-10-03

    Standard continuum theory fails to predict several key experimental results of electrostatic and electrokinetic measurements at aqueous electrolyte interfaces. In order to extend the continuum theory to include the effects of molecular solvent structure, we generalize the equations for electrokinetic transport to incorporate a space dependent dielectric profile, viscosity profile, and non-electrostatic interaction potential. All necessary profiles are extracted from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We show that the MD results for the ion-specific distribution of counterions at charged hydrophilic and hydrophobic interfaces are accurately reproduced using the dielectric profile of pure water and a non-electrostatic repulsion in an extended Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The distributions of Na(+) at both surface types and Cl(-) at hydrophilic surfaces can be modeled using linear dielectric response theory, whereas for Cl(-) at hydrophobic surfaces it is necessary to apply nonlinear response theory. The extended Poisson-Boltzmann equation reproduces the experimental values of the double-layer capacitance for many different carbon-based surfaces. In conjunction with a generalized hydrodynamic theory that accounts for a space dependent viscosity, the model captures the experimentally observed saturation of the electrokinetic mobility as a function of the bare surface charge density and the so-called anomalous double-layer conductivity. The two-scale approach employed here-MD simulations and continuum theory-constitutes a successful modeling scheme, providing basic insight into the molecular origins of the static and kinetic properties of charged surfaces, and allowing quantitative modeling at low computational cost.

  15. Comparative studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizabilies of NLO chromophore Ethyl 4-Dimethylaminobenzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalanathan, M.; Jasmine, G. Femina; Roy, S. Dawn Dharma

    2017-08-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational spectra and polarizabilities of Ethyl 4-Dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB) was investigated by density functional theory employing Becke's three parameter hybrid exchange functional with Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) co-relational functional involving 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and compared with some other levels. A detailed interpretation of the IR and Raman spectra of EDBA have been reported and analyzed. Complete vibrational assignments of the vibrational modes have been done on the basis of the potential energy distribution (TED) using VEDA software. The molecular electrostatic potential mapped onto total density surface has been obtained. A study on the electronic properties, such as absorption wavelength, and frontier molecular orbitals energy, was performed using DFT approach. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and accompanying charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The natural and Mulliken charge also calculated and compared with different level of calculation. The dipole moment, polarizability and first, second order hyperpolarizabilities of the title molecule were calculated and compared with the experimental values. The energy gap between frontier orbitals has been used along with electric moments and first order hyperpolarizability, to understand the non linear optical (NLO) activity of the molecule. The NLO activity of molecule was confirmed by SHG analysis.

  16. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR, are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa. But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7α-substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  17. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Han, Rui; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Hongli; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR), are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa). But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7 α -substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  18. Relationship between molecular structure of cereal dietary fiber and health effects: focus on glucose/insulin response and gut health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemen, Raymond; de Vries, Jan F; Slavin, Joanne L

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal data show associations between whole grain and dietary fiber intakes and disease risk reduction. Dietary fiber can be considered a "black box" since its molecular structure can vary significantly. Limited data are available linking the health effects of dietary fiber to certain molecular structures. The present review was conducted to examine the existing knowledge of structure/effect relationships with a focus on human intervention studies that examined the relationships between the molecular structure of cereal dietary fiber and both the blood glucose and insulin responses and gut health. An extensive search of the existing literature was conducted using the PubMed database for the period 1993-2008. Of 48 publications originally identified using the search criteria, 13 provided molecular information in conjunction with fiber type. Several indications show a link between molecular structure and physiological effects. Limited data from human intervention trials are available to verify hypotheses derived from in vitro studies that relate the molecular structure of cereal dietary fiber to both insulin and glucose response and gut health. © 2011 International Life Sciences Institute.

  19. Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Modeling: An Integration to Teach Drug Structure-Activity Relationship and the Molecular Basis of Drug Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ivone; Borges, Aurea D. L.; Bernardes, Lilian S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of computational chemistry and the protein data bank (PDB) to understand and predict the chemical and molecular basis involved in the drug-receptor interactions is discussed. A geometrical and chemical overview of the great structural similarity in the substrate and inhibitor is provided.

  20. Determining the influence of molecular structure on the physical properties of complex solvent : Experiment, equation of state modeling and molecular simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schacht, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with the molecular influence of structure on the phase behavior of mixtures. Systems of hyperbranched (dendric) polymers in solution are studied experimentally. The results are compared to systems where the polymeric substance has a linear architecture in order to assess the

  1. Molecular dynamics investigation into the structural features and transport properties of C60 in liquid argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kuan-Chuan; Weng, Cheng-I

    2007-07-05

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the structural features and transport properties of C60 in liquid argon. The results reveal that an organized structure shell of liquid argon is formed close to the surface of a C60 fullerene molecule, thereby changing the solid/liquid interfacial structure. Furthermore, the simulation indicates that the C60-liquid argon fluid becomes structurally more stable as the C60 molecule volume fraction and the temperature increase. The viscosity of the fluid increases significantly as the C60 molecule loading is increased, particularly at a lower temperature. The thermal conductivity enhancement of the fluid in the present simulations is anomalously an order of magnitude higher than the theoretical predictions from either the Maxwell or the Lu and Liu models, and is found to vary approximately linearly with the C60 molecule volume fraction. The increased thermal conductivity is attributed to the nature of heat conduction in C60 molecule suspensions and an organized structure at the solid/liquid interface.

  2. Structural Origins of Conductance Fluctuations in Gold–Thiolate Molecular Transport Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    French, William R.

    2013-03-21

    We report detailed atomistic simulations combined with high-fidelity conductance calculations to probe the structural origins of conductance fluctuations in thermally evolving Au-benzene-1,4-dithiolate-Au junctions. We compare the behavior of structurally ideal junctions (where the electrodes are modeled as flat surfaces) to structurally realistic, experimentally representative junctions resulting from break-junction simulations. The enhanced mobility of metal atoms in structurally realistic junctions results in significant changes to the magnitude and origin of the conductance fluctuations. Fluctuations are larger by a factor of 2-3 in realistic junctions compared to ideal junctions. Moreover, in junctions with highly deformed electrodes, the conductance fluctuations arise primarily from changes in the Au geometry, in contrast to results for junctions with nondeformed electrodes, where the conductance fluctuations are dominated by changes in the molecule geometry. These results provide important guidance to experimentalists developing strategies to control molecular conductance, and also to theoreticians invoking simplified structural models of junctions to predict their behavior. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Response and sensitivity of lipid related molecular structure to wet and dry heating in Canola tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Samadi; Yu, Peiqiang

    2012-05-01

    Heat treatments are used to manipulate nutrient utilization, availability and functional properties. The objective of this study was to characterize any molecular level changes of the functional groups associated with lipid structure in canola (Brassica) seed, as affected during the wet and dry heat treatment processes using molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH3 asymmetric (ca. 2970-2946 cm-1), CH2 asymmetric (ca. 2945-2880 cm-1), CH3 symmetric (ca. 2881-2864 cm-1) and CH2 symmetric (ca. 2864-2770 cm-1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester group (ca. 1774-1711 cm-1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C-C) (ca. 3007 cm-1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Raw canola seeds were used for the control or autoclaved at 120 °C for 1 h (HT-1: wet heating) or dry roasted at 120 °C for 1 h (HT-2: dry heating). Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios were not significantly changed (P > 0.05) in the CH2 asymmetric to CH3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for canola seed. Both wet (HT-1) and dry heating method (HT-2) had no significant effect (P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to Cdbnd C). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH3 and CH2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2992-2770 cm-1), unsaturated lipids band region (ca. 3025-2993 cm-1) and lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester band region (ca. 1774-1711 cm-1). The results indicated that both dry and wet heating of given intense had no impact to the molecular spectrum in lipid related functional groups of canola seed, and was not strong enough to elicit heat-induced changes in lipid conformation.

  4. Synthesis, molecular modeling and structural characterization of vanillin derivatives as antimicrobial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan; Yin, Yong; Sheng, Gui-Hua; Yang, Zhi-Bo; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2013-05-01

    Two vanillin derivatives have been designed and synthesized and their biological activities were also evaluated for antimicrobial activity. Their chemical structures are characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, 1H NMR, MS, and elemental analysis. Structural stabilization of them followed by intramolecular as well as intermolecular H-bonds makes these molecules as perfect examples in molecular recognition with self-complementary donor and acceptor units within a single molecule. Docking simulations have been performed to position compounds into the FtsZ active site to determine their probable binding model. Compound 3a shows the most potent biological activity, which may be a promising antimicrobial leading compound for the further research.

  5. Structure and dynamics of photosynthetic proteins studied by neutron scattering and molecular dynamic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellerue, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Understand the structure-dynamics-function relation in the case of proteins is essential. But few experimental techniques allow to have access to knowledge of fast internal movements of biological macromolecules. With the neutron scattering method, it has been possible to study the reorientation dynamics of side chains and of polypeptide skeleton for two proteins in terms of water or detergent and of temperature. With the use of the molecular dynamics method, essential for completing and interpreting the experimental data, it has been possible to assess the different contributions of the whole structure of proteins to the overall dynamics. It has been shown that the polypeptide skeleton presents an energy relaxation comparable to those of the side chains. Moreover, it has been explained that the protein dynamics can only be understood in terms of relaxation time distribution. (author) [fr

  6. Structural modeling of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates by molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, John C; Hannon, Alex C; Iijima, S; Yudasaka, M; Ohba, T; Kaneko, K; Burian, A

    2013-09-19

    The structure of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates has been modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations, and the validity of the model has been verified by neutron diffraction. Computer-generated models consisted of an outer part formed from single-walled carbon nanohorns with diameters of 20-50 Å and a length of 400 Å and an inner turbostratic graphite-like core with a diameter of 130 Å. The diffracted intensity and the pair correlation function computed for such a constructed model are in good agreement with the neutron diffraction experimental data. The proposed turbostratic inner core explains the occurrence of the additional (002) and (004) graphitic peaks in the diffraction pattern of the studied sample and provides information about the interior structure of the dahlia-type aggregates.

  7. The effect of hot multistage drawing on molecular structure and optical properties of polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminoddin Haji

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, mechanical and structural parameters related to the optical properties of polyethylene terephthalate (PET fibers drawn at hot multistage have been investigated. The changes in optical parameters upon changing draw ratio are used to obtain the mechanical orientation factors and , various orientation functions f2(θ, f4(θ and f6(θ, and amorphous and crystalline orientation functions (f a and f c. Also, the numbers of random links between the network junction points (N1, the average optical orientation (Fav, and the distribution function of segment ω(cos θ were calculated. In addition, an empirical formula was suggested to correlate changes in the birefringence with the draw ratio and its constants were determined. The study demonstrated change on the molecular orientation functions and structural parameters upon hot multistage drawing. Significant variations in the characteristic properties of the drawn PET fibers were due to reorientation of the molecules caused by applied heat and external tension.

  8. Structural properties of iron nitride on Cu(100): An ab-initio molecular dynamics study

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi

    2011-01-01

    Due to their potential applications in magnetic storage devices, iron nitrides have been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical investigations. Thin films of iron nitride have been successfully grown on different substrates. To study the structural properties of a single monolayer film of FeN we have performed an ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of its formation on a Cu(100) substrate. The iron nitride layer formed in our simulation shows a p4gm(2x2) reconstructed surface, in agreement with experimental results. In addition to its structural properties, we are also able to determine the magnetization of this thin film. Our results show that one monolayer of iron nitride on Cu(100) is ferromagnetic with a magnetic moment of 1.67 μ B. © 2011 Materials Research Society.

  9. Structure and properties of sodium aluminosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiang, Ye; Du, Jincheng; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    2013-01-01

    Addition of alumina to sodium silicate glasses considerably improves the mechanical properties and chemical durability and changes other properties such as ionic conductivity and melt viscosity. As a result, aluminosilicate glasses find wide industrial and technological applications including....... In addition, the mechanical properties including bulk, shear, and Young's moduli have been calculated and compared with experimental data. It is found that aluminum ions are mainly four-fold coordinated in peralkaline compositions (Al/Na glass network...... the recent Corning® Gorilla® Glass. In this paper, the structures of sodium aluminosilicate glasses with a wide range of Al/Na ratios (from 1.5 to 0.6) have been studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations in a system containing around 3000 atoms, with the aim to understand the structural role...

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Castanon, J.; Bomboi, F. [Sapienza–Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Rovigatti, L. [Rudolf Peierls C.T.P., University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zanatta, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Perugia, Via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR-ISC, UOS Sapienza–Università di Roma, I-00186 Roma (Italy); Paciaroni, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Perugia, Via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Comez, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Perugia, Via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); IOM-CNR, UOS Perugia c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Porcar, L. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Jafta, C. J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Fadda, G. C. [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, LLB, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bellini, T. [Department of Medical Biotechnology and Translational Medicine, Università di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Sciortino, F., E-mail: francesco.sciortino@uniroma1.it [Sapienza–Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); CNR-ISC, UOS Sapienza–Università di Roma, I-00186 Roma (Italy)

    2016-08-28

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed of 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nanostar concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor numerically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature-independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  11. Population structure of Aggarwals of north India as revealed by molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipin; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Ng, Hon Keung Tony; Kumar, Satish; Rao, Vadlamudi Raghavendra; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal

    2010-12-01

    Using molecular genetic data on Aggarwals (Vaish/Vysya), an endogamous population group of north India, we provide evidence of its homogeneous unstratified population structure. We found the mean average heterozygosity value of 0.33 for 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms belonging to four genes (TCF7L2-, HHEX-, KCNJ11-, and ADIPOQ-) in the Aggarwal population (sample of 184 individuals) and tried to evaluate the genomic efficiency of endogamy in this population with the help of clan-based stratified analysis. We concluded that the sociocultural identity of the endogamous population groups could act as a robust proxy maker for inferring their homogeneity and population structure in India, which is ideal also for population selection for future genome-wide association studies in the country.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on layer structured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on graphite was simulated using molecular dynamics. Especially, the layer structure of the graphite was maintained by interlayer intermolecular interaction. Three kinds of graphite surfaces, flat (0 0 0 1) surface, armchair (1 1 2-bar 0) surface and zigzag (1 0 1-bar 0) surface, are dealt with as targets of hydrogen atom bombardment. In the case of the flat surface, graphene layers were peeled off one by one and yielded molecules had chain structures. On the other hand, C 2 H 2 and H 2 are dominant yielded molecules on the armchair and zigzag surfaces, respectively. In addition, the interaction of a single hydrogen isotope on a single graphene is investigated. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates are obtained as functions of incident energy and explain hydrogen retention on layered graphite. (author)

  13. The structure of Lactococcus lactis thioredoxin reductase reveals molecular features of photo-oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bang, Maria Blanner; Rykær, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent homodimeric flavoenzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) provides reducing equivalents to thioredoxin, a key regulator of various cellular redox processes. Crystal structures of photo-inactivated thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis have...... been determined. These structures reveal novel molecular features that provide further insight into the mechanisms behind the sensitivity of this enzyme toward visible light. We propose that a pocket on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring accommodates oxygen that reacts with photo-excited FAD...... thus be a widespread feature among bacterial TrxR with the described characteristics, which affords applications in clinical photo-therapy of drug-resistant bacteria....

  14. Molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a natural neurotoxin from the star fruit: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a neurotoxin recently isolated from the star fruit Averroha carambola. Among the seven conformers that exist within an energy window of ∼16.0 kcal/mol, two of them are the most favored ones with an energy difference of less than 2.0 kcal/mol. The computed chemical shifts of these two low-energy conformers are in good agreement with the experimental values determined in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide thus confirming the 2D chemical structure assigned to the neurotoxin. A topological analysis of the theoretical electronic charge density of four caramboxin conformers reveals the existence of intramolecular CH⋯O/N interactions which, in addition to the classical OH⋯O/N H-bonding interactions, contribute to decrease the conformational freedom of the neurotoxin.

  15. Supramolecular Structure and Mechanical Characteristics of Ultrahigh-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene-Inorganic Nanoparticle Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okhlopkova, T. A.; Borisova, R. V.; Nikiforov, L. A.; Spiridonov, A. M.; Okhlopkova, A. A.; Cho, Jin-Ho [North-Eastern Federal University, Yakutsk (Russian Federation); Jeong, Dae-Yong [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    We investigated the mechanical properties and structure of polymeric nanocomposites (PNCs) with anultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) matrix and aluminum and silicon oxide and nitride nanoparticle (NP) fillers. Mixing with a paddle mixer or by joint mechanical activation in a planetary mill was used for the PNC preparation. Joint mechanical activation afforded PNCs with better mechanical properties than paddle mixing. Scanning electron microscopy suggested that the poorer mechanical properties can be attributed to the disordered regions and imperfect spherulites in the PNC supramolecular structure arising from paddle mixing. The better mechanical properties observed with joint mechanical activation may derive from the uniform NP distribution in the polymer matrix and absence of disordered regions.

  16. Equilibrium Structures and Absorption Spectra for SixOy Molecular Clusters using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--17-9724 Equilibrium Structures and Absorption Spectra for SixOy Molecular Clusters...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Equilibrium Structures and Absorption...Introduction……………………………………………………………………….………………..1 Calculation of Absorption Spectra using DFT ……………………………………………..…..….1 DFT Calculation of Equilibrium

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations to study the solvent influence on protein structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Hector

    2016-05-01

    Molecular simulations were carried out to study the influence of different water models in two protein systems. Most of the solvents used in protein simulations, e.g., SPC/E or TIP3P, fail to reproduce the bulk water static dielectric constant. Recently a new water model, TIP4P/ɛ, which reproduces the experimental dielectric constant was reported. Therefore, simulations for two different proteins, Lysozyme and Ubiquitin with SPC/E, TIP3P and TIP4P/ɛ solvents were carried out. Dielectric constants and structural properties were calculated and comparisons were conducted. The structural properties between the three models are very similar, however, the dielectric constants are different in each case.

  18. Crystal Structures of Human and Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase and Molecular Insights into the Carboxyltransfer Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang,S.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the biotin-dependent production of oxaloacetate and has important roles in gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, insulin secretion and other cellular processes. PC contains the biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains. We report here the crystal structures at 2.8-Angstroms resolution of full-length PC from Staphylococcus aureus and the C-terminal region (missing only the BC domain) of human PC. A conserved tetrameric association is observed for both enzymes, and our structural and mutagenesis studies reveal a previously uncharacterized domain, the PC tetramerization (PT) domain, which is important for oligomerization. A BCCP domain is located in the active site of the CT domain, providing the first molecular insights into how biotin participates in the carboxyltransfer reaction. There are dramatic differences in domain positions in the monomer and the organization of the tetramer between these enzymes and the PC from Rhizobium etli.

  19. Analysis of Decomposition for Structure I Methane Hydrate by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na; Sun, Wan-Tong; Meng, Ying-Feng; Liu, An-Qi; Zhou, Shou-Wei; Guo, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Lv, Xin

    2018-05-01

    Under multi-nodes of temperatures and pressures, microscopic decomposition mechanisms of structure I methane hydrate in contact with bulk water molecules have been studied through LAMMPS software by molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation system consists of 482 methane molecules in hydrate and 3027 randomly distributed bulk water molecules. Through analyses of simulation results, decomposition number of hydrate cages, density of methane molecules, radial distribution function for oxygen atoms, mean square displacement and coefficient of diffusion of methane molecules have been studied. A significant result shows that structure I methane hydrate decomposes from hydrate-bulk water interface to hydrate interior. As temperature rises and pressure drops, the stabilization of hydrate will weaken, decomposition extent will go deep, and mean square displacement and coefficient of diffusion of methane molecules will increase. The studies can provide important meanings for the microscopic decomposition mechanisms analyses of methane hydrate.

  20. Probing the molecular structures of plasma-damaged and surface-repaired low-k dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N; Lin, Qinghuang; Bielefeld, Jeffery D; Chen, Zhan

    2015-10-21

    Fully understanding the effect and the molecular mechanisms of plasma damage and silylation repair on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials is essential to the design of low-k dielectrics with defined properties and the integration of low-k dielectrics into advanced interconnects of modern electronics. Here, analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle goniometry (CA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to provide a comprehensive characterization of the surface and bulk structure changes of poly(methyl)silsesquioxane (PMSQ) low-k thin films before and after O2 plasma treatment and silylation repair. O2 plasma treatment altered drastically both the molecular structures and water structures at the surfaces of the PMSQ film while no bulk structural change was detected. For example, ∼34% Si-CH3 groups were removed from the PMSQ surface, and the Si-CH3 groups at the film surface tilted toward the surface after the O2 plasma treatment. The oxidation by the O2 plasma made the PMSQ film surface more hydrophilic and thus enhanced the water adsorption at the film surface. Both strongly and weakly hydrogen bonded water were detected at the plasma-damaged film surface during exposure to water with the former being the dominate component. It is postulated that this enhancement of both chemisorbed and physisorbed water after the O2 plasma treatment leads to the degradation of low-k properties and reliability. The degradation of the PMSQ low-k film can be recovered by repairing the plasma-damaged surface using a silylation reaction. The silylation method, however, cannot fully recover the plasma induced damage at the PMSQ film surface as evidenced by the existence of hydrophilic groups, including C-O/C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and residual Si-OH groups. This work provides a molecular level picture on the surface structural changes of low