WorldWideScience

Sample records for candidate microelectrode material

  1. Biocompatibility and characterisation of a candidate microelectrode material for biosensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in microcircuit technology have enabled the fabrication of Multiple Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for investigating the characteristics of networks of neuronal cells either in vivo or in vitro. When producing a MEA materials used must be corrosion resistant, have low electrical impedance and the materials must be biocompatible. Existing MEA's have limited life spans, relatively high impedance values and limited uses. Thus creating a requirement for new MEA technology. TiN thin films have become increasingly useful in a wide variety of applications, due to their nature, which includes chemical stability, high hardness, excellent wear and electrical properties and also biocompatibility. The favourable electrical and biocompatibility characteristics of thin films of TiN make them a possible candidate for use in a MEA. TiN thin films can be deposited by a number of methods including evaporation, ion plating and sputtering. The method of deposition, along with process parameters used can have a marked effect on the characteristics of TiN films, including changes in preferred orientation, hardness and wear and also biocompatibility. TiN thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering of a Ti target, with Argon and nitrogen gas mixtures and labelled Type I TiN films. Also industrial TIN films deposited by Arc Ion plating were carefully selected for comparison and labelled Type II TiN films. The microstructure, composition, surface chemistry, surface topography and roughness were studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Profilometry. Type I TIN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone I and Type II TiN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone 2 of the Movchan and Dernchishin structure zone model for sputtered films. XPS showed that the surface composition of all TiN films was predominantly TiO2, TiN and TiNxOy. Significant differences in

  2. Neural signal recording using microelectrode arrays fabricated on liquid crystal polymer material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong Jae; Oh, Seung Jae; Song, Jong Keun; Kim, Sung June

    2004-01-05

    Microelectrode arrays have been developed for simultaneous multi-channel recordings from nervous systems, typically using silicon substrates. However, it has been known that it is difficult to meet the biocompatibility and durability requirements using silicon and other dielectric materials (SiO{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), due to environmental moisture and ions. Additional disadvantage of silicon being the rigid material makes it hard to apply these materials in chronic recording situations. Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) was recently introduced as a candidate material for electronic packaging purposes. The material acts as efficient barrier against ions and moisture, a desirable feature for a substrate material of microelectrode arrays. In this paper, we report on the neural recording performed using the LCP-based microelectrode arrays. The cell adhesion on the new material was compared very favorably with that using silicon, SiO{sub 2}, or polyimide material. The microelectrode arrays were patterned with Ti (500 Angst)/Au (3500 Angst) on the LCP film and were employed in both stimulation and recording from rat sciatic nerve. The electrical characteristic of the recorded signal was as good as those using other substrate materials, proving this material as an excellent candidate for next generation microelectrode arrays.

  3. Evaluation of microelectrode materials for direct-current electrocorticography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Narayan, Raj K.; Wu, Pei-Ming; Rajan, Neena; Wu, Zhizhen; Mehan, Neal; Golanov, Eugene V.; Ahn, Chong H.; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG) allows a more complete characterization of brain states and pathologies than traditional alternating-current recordings (AC-ECoG). However, reliable recording of DC signals is challenging because of electrode polarization-induced potential drift, particularly at low frequencies and for more conducting materials. Further challenges arise as electrode size decreases, since impedance is increased and the potential drift is augmented. While microelectrodes have been investigated for AC-ECoG recordings, little work has addressed microelectrode properties for DC-signal recording. In this paper, we investigated several common microelectrode materials used in biomedical application for DC-ECoG. Approach. Five of the most common materials including gold (Au), silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl), platinum (Pt), Iridium oxide (IrOx), and platinum-iridium oxide (Pt/IrOx) were investigated for electrode diameters of 300 μm. The critical characteristics such as polarization impedance, AC current-induced polarization, long-term stability and low-frequency noise were studied in vitro (0.9% saline). The two most promising materials, Pt and Pt/lrOx were further investigated in vivo by recording waves of spreading depolarization, one of the most important applications for DC-ECoG in clinical and basic science research. Main results. Our experimental results indicate that IrOx-based microelectrodes, particularly with composite layers of nanostructures, are excellent in all of the common evaluation characteristics both in vitro and in vivo and are most suitable for multimodal monitoring applications. Pt electrodes suffer high current-induced polarization, but have acceptable long-term stability suitable for DC-ECoG. Major significance. The results of this study provide quantitative data on the electrical properties of microelectrodes with commonly-used materials and will be valuable for development of neural recordings inclusive of

  4. Scattering Properties of Candidate Planetary Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.; Hapke, B. W.; Hale, A. S.; Piatek, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The laboratory investigation of the scattering properties of candidate planetary regolith materials is an important technique for understanding the physical properties of a planetary regolith. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Characterization of nanoparticles as candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the characterization of three different nanoparticles (silica, silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) as candidate reference material. We focus our analysis on the size distribution of those particles as measured by different microscopy techniques. (author)

  6. Characterization of nanoparticles as candidate reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins Ferreira, E.H.; Robertis, E. de; Landi, S.M.; Gouvea, C.P.; Archanjo, B.S.; Almeida, C.A.; Araujo, J.R. de; Kuznetsov, O.; Achete, C.A., E-mail: smlandi@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    We report the characterization of three different nanoparticles (silica, silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) as candidate reference material. We focus our analysis on the size distribution of those particles as measured by different microscopy techniques. (author)

  7. Corrosion resistance of candidate transportation container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy is currently remediating several sites that have been contaminated over the years with hazardous, mixed waste and radioactive materials. Regulatory guidelines require strict compliance demonstrating public safety during remediation and the transport of these hazardous, mixed waste and radioactive materials. The compatibility of the metallic transportation containers with the contents they are designed to transport is an ultimate concern that must be satisfied to ensure public safety. The transportation issue is inherently complicated due to the complex, varied, and unknown composition of the hazardous, mixed and radioactive waste that is being, considered for transport by the DOE facilities. Never before have the interactions between the waste being transported and the materials that comprise the transportation packages been more important. Therefore, evaluation of material performance when subjected to a simulated waste will ensure that all regulatory issues and requirements for transportation of hazardous, mixed, and radioactive wastes are satisfied. The tasks encompassed by this study include defining criteria for candidate material selection, defining a test matrix that will provide pertinent information on the material compatibility with the waste stimulant, and evaluation of material performance when subjected to a stimulant waste. Our goal is to provide package design engineers with a choice of materials which exhibit enhanced performance upon exposure to hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste that is similar in composition to the waste stimulant used in this study. Due to the fact that there are many other possible waste compositions, additional work needs to be done to broaden our materials compatibility/waste stream data base

  8. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Mirtich, Michael; Difilippo, Frank; Hotes, Deborah; Labed, Richard; Dever, Terese; Kussmaul, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for Kapton solar array blanket protection, graphite epoxy structural member protection, and high temperature radiators was performed in an RF plasma asher. Ashing rates for Kapton were correlated with rates measured on STS-8 to determine the exposure time equivalent to one year in low Earth orbit (LEO) at a constant density space station orbital flux. Protective coatings on Kapton from Tekmat, Andus Corporation, and LeRC were evaluated in the plasma asher and mass loss rates per unit area were measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface but ion beam sputter deposited samples of SiO2 and SiO2 with 8% polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) showed no evidence of degradation after 47 hours of exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite epoxy structural members. Mica appears to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen but only offers some limited protection as a paint because the paint vehicles evaluated to date were not resistant to atomic oxygen. Four materials were selected for evaluation as candidate radiator materials: stainless steel, copper, niobium-1% zirconium, and titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium. These materials were surface textured by various means to improve their emittance. Emittances as high as 0.93 at 2.5 microns for stainless steel and 0.89 at 2.5 microns for Nb-1 Zr were obtained from surface texturing. There were no significant changes in emittance after asher exposure.

  9. Biocompatibility and characterisation of a candidate microelectrode material for biosensor applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cyster, L A

    2001-01-01

    TiN films. Results demonstrated how the deposition parameters could influence the crystallographic nature of TiN films. The 0.2 and 1.0 mu m Type I TiN and both Type II TiN films were selected to allow comparison oj the influence of surface chemistry versus topography on the biocompatibility of TiN films. Biocompatibility testing using 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and C6 Glial cells showed that at early time points TiN films with increased surface interstitial nitrogen content were more favourable for the attachment of increased numbers of cells. At later time points increased cell spreading was observed on the Type II TiN films indicating that increased grain size and topographical features resulted in increased cell spreading. Investigation of the biocompatibility of the 0.2 and 1.0 mu m Type I TiN films and both Type II TiN films with primary hippocampal neurones showed that surface chemistry with predominantly interstitial nitrogen resulted in neuronal network formation similar to the control substrate. Increased n...

  10. Canister filling materials -- Design requirements and evaluation of candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB has been evaluating a copper/steel canister for use in the disposal of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Once the canister is breached by corrosion, it is possible that the void volume inside the canister might fill with water. Water inside the canister would moderate the energy of the neutrons emitted by spontaneous fission in the fuel. It the space in the canister between and around the fuel pins is occupied by canister filling materials, the potential for criticality is avoided. The authors have developed a set of design requirements for canister filling material for the case where it is to be used alone, with no credit for burnup of the fuel or other measures, such as the use of neutron absorbers. Requirements were divided into three classes: essential requirements, desirable features, and undesirable features. The essential requirements are that the material fill at least 60% of the original void space, that the solubility of the filling material be less than 100 mg/l in pure water or expected repository waters at 50 C, and that the material not compact under its own weight by more than 10%. In this paper they review the reasons for these requirements, the desirable and undesirable features, and evaluate 11 candidate materials with respect to the design requirements and features. The candidate materials are glass beads, lead shot, copper spheres, sand, olivine, hematite, magnetite, crushed rock, bentonite, other clays, and concrete. Emphasis is placed on the determination of whether further work is needed to eliminate uncertainties in the evaluation of the ability of a particular filling material to be successfully used under actual conditions, and on the ability to predict the long-term performance of the material under the repository conditions

  11. Characterizing the Material Properties of Polymer-Based Microelectrode Arrays for Retinal Prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C S; Maghribi, M

    2003-05-10

    The Retinal Prosthesis project is a three year project conducted in part at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and funded by the Department of Energy to create an epiretinal microelectrode array for stimulating retinal cells. The implant must be flexible to conform to the retina, robust to sustain handling during fabrication and implantation, and biocompatible to withstand physiological conditions within the eye. Using poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), LLNL aims to use microfabrication techniques to increase the number of electrodes and integrate electronics. After the initial designs were fabricated and tested in acute implantation, it became obvious that there was a need to characterize and understand the mechanical and electrical properties of these new structures. This knowledge would be imperative in gaining credibility for polymer microfabrication and optimizing the designs. Thin composite microfabricated devices are challenging to characterize because they are difficult to handle, and exhibit non-linear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic properties. The objective of this research is to device experiments and protocols, develop an analytical model to represent the composite behavior, design and fabricate test structures, and conduct experimental testing to determine the mechanical and electrical properties of PDMS-metal composites. Previous uniaxial stretch tests show an average of 7% strain before failure on resistive heaters of similar dimensions deposited on PDMS. Lack of background information and questionable human accuracy demands a more sophisticated and thorough testing method. An Instron tensile testing machine was set up to interface with a digital multiplexor and computer interface to simultaneously record and graph position, load, and resistance across devices. With a compliant load cell for testing polymers and electrical interconnect grips designed and fabricated to interface the sample to the electronics, real-time resistance measurements

  12. An annotated history of container candidate material selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper documents events in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project that have influenced the selection of metals and alloys proposed for fabrication of waste package containers for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The time period from 1981 to 1988 is covered in this annotated history. The history traces the candidate materials that have been considered at different stages of site characterization planning activities. At present, six candidate materials are considered and described in the 1988 Consultation Draft of the NNWSI Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The six materials are grouped into two alloy families, copper-base materials and iron to nickel-base materials with an austenitic structure. The three austenitic candidates resulted from a 1983 survey of a longer list of candidate materials; the other three candidates resulted from a special request from DOE in 1984 to evaluate copper and copper-base alloys. 24 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Candidate materials to prevent brittle fracture - (186)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For heavy transport or dual purpose casks, selecting the appropriate materials for the body is a key decision. To get a Type B(U) approval, it is necessary to demonstrate that the mechanical strength of the material is good enough at temperature as low as -40 C so as to prevent the cask from any risk of brittle fracture in regulatory accident conditions. Different methods are available to provide such a demonstration and can lead to different choices. It should be noted also that the material compositions given by national or international standards display relatively wide tolerances and therefore are not necessarily sufficient to guarantee a required toughness. It is therefore necessary to specify to the fabricator the minimum value for toughness, and to verify it. This paper gives an overview of the different methods and materials that are used in several countries. Although the safety is strongly linked to the choice of the material, it is shown that many other parameters are important, such as the design, the fabrication process (multi layer, cast or forged body), the welding material and process, the ability to detect flaws, and the measured and/or calculated stress level, including stress concentration, in particular when bolts are used. The paper will show that relying exclusively on high toughness at low temperature does not necessarily deliver the maximum safety as compared with other choices. It follows that differences in approaches to licensing by different competent authorities may bias the choice of material depending on the country of application, even though B(U) licenses are meant to guarantee unilaterally a uniform minimum level of safety

  14. Recent production of candidate reference materials at IRMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, G.N.; Pauwels, J.; Le Guern, L.; Schimmel, H.; Trapmann, S. [Commission of the European Communities, Geel (Belgium). Joint Research Centre

    2001-06-01

    In the execution of its mission to promote a common European measurement system in support of EU policies, IRMM's Reference Materials Unit is currently involved in preparation of proficiency-testing samples and candidate reference materials. Recent work related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cows, genetically modified organisms, and a variety of environmental materials is described. (orig.)

  15. Tests of candidate materials for particle bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhenium metal hot frits and zirconium carbide-coated fuel particles appear suitable for use in flowing hydrogen to at least 2000 K, based on previous tests. Recent tests on alternate candidate cooled particle and frit materials are described. Silicon carbide-coated particles began to react with rhenium frit material at 1600 K, forming a molten silicide at 2000 K. Silicon carbide was extensively attacked by hydrogen at 2066 K for 30 minutes, losing 3.25% of its weight. Vitrous carbon was also rapidly attacked by hydrogen at 2123 K, losing 10% of its weight in two minutes. Long term material tests on candidate materials for closed cycle helium cooled particle bed fuel elements are also described. Surface imperfections were found on the surface of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles after ninety days exposure to flowing (∼500 ppM) impure helium at 1143 K. The imperfections were superficial and did not affect particle strength

  16. Simultaneous recording of brain extracellular glucose, spike and local field potential in real time using an implantable microelectrode array with nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Fan, Xinyi; Zhang, Song; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengwei; Wang, Mixia; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the main substrate for neurons in the central nervous system. In order to efficiently characterize the brain glucose mechanism, it is desirable to determine the extracellular glucose dynamics as well as the corresponding neuroelectrical activity in vivo. In the present study, we fabricated an implantable microelectrode array (MEA) probe composed of platinum electrochemical and electrophysiology microelectrodes by standard micro electromechanical system (MEMS) processes. The MEA probe was modified with nano-materials and implanted in a urethane-anesthetized rat for simultaneous recording of striatal extracellular glucose, local field potential (LFP) and spike on the same spatiotemporal scale when the rat was in normoglycemia, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. During these dual-mode recordings, we observed that increase of extracellular glucose enhanced the LFP power and spike firing rate, while decrease of glucose had an opposite effect. This dual mode MEA probe is capable of examining specific spatiotemporal relationships between electrical and chemical signaling in the brain, which will contribute significantly to improve our understanding of the neuron physiology.

  17. Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1990-12-01

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project`s high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250{degree}C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project's high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250 degree C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab

  19. Oxygen-Diffused Titanium as a Candidate Brake Rotor Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are one of several candidate materials for the next generation of truck disk brake rotors. Despite their advantages of lightweight relative to cast iron and good strength and corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are unlikely to be satisfactory brake rotor materials unless their friction and wear behavior can be significantly improved. In this study, a surface engineering process oxygen diffusion was applied to titanium rotors and has shown very encouraging results. The oxygen diffused Ti-6Al-4V (OD-Ti) was tested on a sub-scale brake tester against a flat block of commercial brake lining material and benchmarked against several other Ti-based materials, including untreated Ti-6Al-4V, ceramic particle-reinforced Ti composites (MMCs), and a thermal-spray-coated Ti alloy. With respect to friction, the OD-Ti outperformed all other candidate materials under the imposed test conditions with the friction coefficient remaining within a desirable range of 0.35-0.50, even under the harshest conditions when the disk surface temperature reached nearly 600 C. In addition, the OD-Ti showed significantly improved wear-resistance over the non-treated one and was even better than the Ti-based composite materials.

  20. Homogeneity study of candidate reference material in fish matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A material is perfectly homogeneous with respect to a given characteristic, or composition, if there is no difference between the values obtained from one part to another. Homogeneity is usually evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). However, the requirement that populations of data to be processed must have a normal distribution and equal variances greatly limits the use of this statistical tool. A more suitable test for assessing the homogeneity of RMs, known as sufficient homogeneity, was proposed by Fearn and Thompson. In this work, we evaluate the performance of the two statistical treatments for assessing homogeneity of methylmercury (MeHg) in candidate reference material of fish tissue

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs

  2. Soldering of Nanotubes onto Microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina;

    2003-01-01

    Suspended bridges of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were fabricated inside a scanning electron microscope by soldering the nanotube onto microelectrodes with highly conducting gold-carbon material. By the decomposition of organometallic vapor with the electron beam, metal-containing solder...... bonds were formed at the intersection of the nanotube and the electrodes. Current-voltage curves indicated metallic conduction of the nanotubes, with resistances in the range of 9-29 kOmega. Bridges made entirely of the soldering material exhibited resistances on the order of 100 Omega, and the solder...... bonds were consistently found to be mechanically stronger than the carbon nanotubes....

  3. Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept. The objective of the proposed research was to investigate degradation of materials in the supercritical water environment (SCW). First, representative alloys from the important classes of candidate materials were studied for their corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance in supercritical water. These included ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Ni-base alloys. Corrosion and SCC tests were conducted at various temperatures and exposure times, as well as in various water chemistries. Second, emerging plasma surface modification and grain boundary engineering technologies were applied to modify the near surface chemistry, microstructure, and stress-state of the alloys prior to corrosion testing. Third, the effect of irradiation on corrosion and SCC of alloys in the as-received and modified/engineered conditions were examined by irradiating samples using high-energy protons and then exposing them to SCW

  4. Material Properties of Three Candidate Elastomers for Space Seals Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Oswald, Jay J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A next-generation docking system is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to support Constellation Space Exploration Missions to low Earth orbit (LEO), to the Moon, and to Mars. A number of investigations were carried out to quantify the properties of candidate elastomer materials for use in the main interface seal of the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). This seal forms the gas pressure seal between two mating spacecraft. Three candidate silicone elastomer compounds were examined: Esterline ELA-SA-401, Parker Hannifin S0383-70, and Parker Hannifin S0899-50. All three materials were characterized as low-outgassing compounds, per ASTM E595, so as to minimize the contamination of optical and solar array systems. Important seal properties such as outgas levels, durometer, tensile strength, elongation to failure, glass transition temperature, permeability, compression set, Yeoh strain energy coefficients, coefficients of friction, coefficients of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and diffusivity were measured and are reported herein.

  5. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  6. Surface segregation in binary alloy first wall candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studying the conditions necessary to produce a self-sustaining stable lithium monolayer on a metal substrate as a means of creating a low-Z film which sputters primarily as secondary ions. It is expected that because of the toroidal field, secondary ions originating at the first wall will be returned and contribute little to the plasma impurity influx. Aluminum and copper have, because of their high thermal conductivity and low induced radioactivity, been proposed as first wall candidate materials. The mechanical properties of the pure metals are very poorly suited to structural applications and an alloy must be used to obtain adequate hardness and tensile strength. In the case of aluminum, mechanical properties suitable for aircraft manufacture are obtained by the addition of a few at% Li. In order to investigate alloys of a similar nature as candidate structural materials for fusion machines we have prepared samples of Li-doped aluminum using both a pyro-metallurgical and a vapor-diffusion technique. The sputtering properties and surface composition have been studied as a function of sample temperature and heating time, and ion beam mass. The erosion rate and secondary ion yield of both the sputtered Al and Li have been monitored by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger analysis providing information on surface segregation, depth composition profiles, and diffusion rates. The surface composition ahd lithium depth profiles are compared with previously obtained computational results based on a regular solution model of segregation, while the partial sputtering yields of Al and Li are compared with results obtained with a modified version of the TRIM computer program. (orig.)

  7. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5-6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS NO4400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS NO6022 Ni-Cr- MO-W alloy, UN's NO6625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30400 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 umyr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni. Key words: MIC, container materials, YM bacteria, de-alloying, Ni-depletion, Cr-depletion, polarization resistance, anodic polarization,

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

  9. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5--6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS N04400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS N06022 Ni-Cr-Mo- W alloy, UNS N06625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30430 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 microm/yr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS), Incoloy 825, Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al have been selected as candidate materials for the containment of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. The susceptibility of these materials to stress corrosion cracking has been investigated by slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in water which simulates that from well J-13 (J-13 water) and is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. The SSRTs were performed on specimens exposed to simulated J-13 water at 93 degree C and at a strain rate 10-7 s-1 under crevice conditions and at a strain rate of 10-8 s-1 under both crevice and noncrevice conditions. All the tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strains of 1--4%. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed some crack initiation in virtually all specimens. Optical microscopy of metallographically prepared transverse sections of Type 304L SS suggests that the crack depths are small (<10 μm). Preliminary results suggest that a lower strain rate increases the severity of cracking of Types 304L and 316L SS, Incoloy 825, and Cu but has virtually no effect on Cu-30%Ni and Cu-7%Al. Differences in susceptibility to cracking were evaluated in terms of a stress ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the increase in stress after local yielding in the environment to the corresponding stress increase in an identical test in air, both computed at the same strain. On the basis of this stress ratio, the ranking of materials in order of increasing resistance to cracking is: Types 304L SS < 316L SS < Incoloy 825 congruent Cu-30%Ni < Cu congruent Cu-7%Al. 9 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  11. Stretchable Micro-Electrode Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, M; Hamilton, J; Polla, D; Rose, K; Wilson, T; Krulevitch, P

    2002-03-08

    This paper focuses on the design consideration, fabrication processes and preliminary testing of the stretchable micro-electrode array. We are developing an implantable, stretchable micro-electrode array using polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The device will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces and electroplated electrodes. The metal features are embedded within a thin ({approx}50 micron) substrate fabricated using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible elastomeric material that has very low water permeability. The conformable nature of PDMS is critical for ensuring uniform contact with the curved surface of the retina. To fabricate the device, we developed unique processes for metalizing PDMS to produce robust traces capable of maintaining conductivity when stretched (5%, SD 1.5), and for selectively passivating the conductive elements. An in situ measurement of residual strain in the PDMS during curing reveals a tensile strain of 10%, explaining the stretchable nature of the thin metalized devices.

  12. Compatibility of ITER candidate materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion tests have been conducted to determine the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) first wall/blanket systems, e.g., Type 316 stainless steel (SS), Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr. The results indicate that Type 316 SS is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 C, corrosion rates for Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy are ∼ 4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr, respectively. Iron, nickel, and chromium react rapidly with gallium. Iron shows greater corrosion than nickel at 400 C (≥ 88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively). The present study indicates that at temperatures up to 400 C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The growth of intermetallic compounds may control the overall rate of corrosion

  13. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized

  14. Humid air corrosion of YMP waste package candidate material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating candidate materials for high level nuclear waste containers (Waste Packages) for a potential deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The potential repository is located above the water table in the unsaturated zone. The rock contains nominally 10% by volume water and gas pressure in the emplacement drifts of the repository is expected to remain near the ambient atmospheric pressure. The heat generated by the radioactive decay of the waste will raise the temperature of the waste packages and the surrounding rock. Waste Package temperatures above the ambient boiling point of water are anticipated for the waste emplacement scenarios. Because the repository emplacement drifts are expected to remain at the ambient atmospheric pressure, the maximum relative humidity obtainable decreases above the boiling point of water. Temperatures of the Waste Packages and the surrounding rock are expected to reach maximum temperature within 100`s of years and then gradually decrease with time. Episodic liquid water contact with the WPs is also expected; this will result in the deposition of salts and mineral scale.

  15. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Emnéus

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements.

  16. Toward a comparison of microelectrodes for acute and chronic recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew P; Rajdev, Pooja; Ellison, Casey; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2009-07-28

    Several variations of microelectrode arrays are used to record and stimulate intracortical neuronal activity. Bypassing the immune response to maintain a stable recording interface remains a challenge. Companies and researchers are continuously altering the material compositions and geometries of the arrays in order to discover a combination that allows for a chronic and stable electrode-tissue interface. From this interface, they wish to obtain consistent quality recordings and a stable, low impedance pathway for charge injection over extended periods of time. Despite numerous efforts, no microelectrode array design has managed to evade the host immune response and remain fully functional. This study is an initial effort comparing several microelectrode arrays with fundamentally different configurations for use in an implantable epilepsy prosthesis. Specifically, NeuroNexus (Michigan) probes, Cyberkinetics (Utah) Silicon and Iridium Oxide arrays, ceramic-based thin-film microelectrode arrays (Drexel), and Tucker-Davis Technologies (TDT) microwire arrays are evaluated over a 31-day period in an animal model. Microelectrodes are compared in implanted rats through impedance, charge capacity, signal-to-noise ratio, recording stability, and elicited immune response. Results suggest significant variability within and between microelectrode types with no clear superior array. Some applications for the microelectrode arrays are suggested based on data collected throughout the longitudinal study. Additionally, specific limitations of assaying biological phenomena and comparing fundamentally different microelectrode arrays in a highly variable system are discussed with suggestions on how to improve the reliability of observed results and steps needed to develop a more standardized microelectrode design. PMID:19486899

  17. Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi;

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained...

  18. LEO effects on candidate solar-cell cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) test samples discussed within are part of the Solar Array Materials Passive (SAMPLE) LDEF experiment, which included contributions from NASA and Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL). Only the JPL portion is described in this paper. The JPL test plate contains 30 individual thin silicon solar cell/cover samples. It was the intent of the experiment to evaluate the stability and protective capability of various cover materials such as conventional fused silica and potential alternative materials such as Teflon, silicone RTV's, glass resins, polyimides, and a copolymer encapsulate. Examination of the recovered experiment shows extensive physical changes have occurred. Approximately 150 micrometeoroid/debris impact were noted, some directly on the solar cells. Of particular interest are the results of ultraviolet and atomic oxygen interactions with the various cover materials. Initial results show that the fused silica cover is the most stable and protective, with performance of other materials varying widely. Electrical measurements of the cell/cover samples are presented as part of the evaluation of cover materials to protect cells in low earth orbit environments

  19. Characterization of Candidate Materials for Remote Recession Measurements of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Bradley D.; Winter, Michael; Panerai, Francesco; Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Danehy, Paul M.; Splinter, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A method of remotely measuring surface recession of a material sample in a plasma flow through emission spectroscopy of the post shock layer was characterized through experiments in the NASA Langley HYMETS arc jet facility. Different methods for delivering the seed products into the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material samples were investigated. Three samples were produced by seeding the PICA material with combinations of Al, Si, HfO2, VB2, Al2O3, SiO2, TiC, HfC, NaCl, and MgCl2 through infusing seed materials into a core of PICA, or through encapsulating seed material in an epoxy disk, mechanically bonding the disk to a PICA sample. The PICA samples seeded with the candidate tracers were then tested at surface temperatures near 2400 K under low pressure air plasma. The emission of Al, Ti, V, Na, and Mg in the post-shock layer was observed in the UV with a high resolution imaging spectrometer viewing the whole stagnation line from the side, and from UV to NIR with a fiber-coupled miniaturized spectrometer observing the sample surface in the wavelength range from 200 nm to 1,100 nm from the front through a collimator. Al, Na, and Mg were found to be emitting in the post-shock spectra even before the recession reached the seeding depth - therefore possibly characterizing the pyrolysis process rather than the recession itself. The appearance of Ti and V emission in the spectra was well correlated with the actual recession which was monitored through a video of the front surface of the sample. The applicability of a seed material as an indicator for recession appears to be related to the melting temperature of the seed material. Future parametric studies will be carried out in low power plasma facilities at the University of Kentucky.

  20. Biofunctionalization of diamond microelectrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitinger, Andreas Adam; Lud, Simon Quartus; Stutzmann, Martin; Garrido, Jose Antonio [Walter Schottky Institut, TU Muenchen (Germany); Hutter, Naima Aurelia; Richter, Gerhard; Jordan, Rainer [WACKER-Chair of Macromolecular Chemistry, TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In this work we present two main routes for the biofunctionalization of nanocrystalline diamond films, aiming at the application of diamond microelectrodes as amperometric biosensors. We report on direct covalent grafting of biomolecules on nanocrystalline diamond films via diazonium monophenyls and biphenyls as well as other linker molecules, forming self-assembled monolayers on the diamond surface. Monolayers with different functional head groups have been characterized. Patterning of the available functional groups using electron beam-induced chemical lithography allows the selective preparation of well-localized docking sites for the immobilization of biomolecules. Furthermore, polymer brushes are expected to enable novel paths for designing more advanced biosensing schemes, incorporating multifunctional groups and a higher loading capacity for biomolecules. Here, we focus on the preparation of polymer grafts by self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization. Further chemical modification of the grafted polymer brushes results in the introduction of additional functional molecules, paving the way for the incorporation of more complex molecular structures such as proteins. In a comparative study we investigate the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches.

  1. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  2. Neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic breeder materials of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the European programs for the future fusion reactors, the Process Chemistry Department of ENEA, Casaccia Center (Rome), has been involved in preparing ceramic blanket materials as tritium breeders; a special consideration has been addressed to the nuclear characterization of LiAlO2 and Li2ZrO3. In this paper are reported neutron irradiation of ceramic specimens in TRIGA reactor and γ-spectrometric measurements for INAA purposes; and isothermal annealing of the irradiated samples and tritium extraction, by using an 'out of pile' system. (author) 3 refs.; 4 figs.; 4 tabs

  3. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-01

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  4. High temperature indentation tests on fusion reactor candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flat-top cylinder indenter for mechanical characterization (FIMEC) is an indentation technique employing cylindrical punches with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm. The test gives pressure-penetration curves from which the yield stress can be determined. The FIMEC apparatus was developed to test materials in the temperature range from -180 to +200 oC. Recently, the heating system of FIMEC apparatus has been modified to operate up to 500 oC. So, in addition to providing yield stress over a more extended temperature range, it is possible to perform stress-relaxation tests at temperatures of great interest for several nuclear fusion reactor (NFR) alloys. Data on MANET-II, F82H mod., Eurofer-97, EM-10, AISI 316 L, Ti6Al4V and CuCrZr are presented and compared with those obtained by mechanical tests with standard methods

  5. Preliminary cleaning tests on candidate materials for APS beamline and front end UHV components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative cleaning tests have been done on four candidate materials for use in APS beamline and front-end vacuum components. These materials are 304 SS, 304L SS, OFHC copper, and Glidcop* (Cu-Al2O3)- Samples of each material were prepared and cleaned using two different methods. After cleaning, the sample surfaces were analyzed using ESCA (Electron Spectography for Chemical Analysis). Uncleaned samples were used as a reference. The cleaning methods and surface analysis results are further discussed

  6. Progress towards biocompatible intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-02-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Candidate Materials for Hot Gas Duct of VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot gas duct of VHTR is operated at 950 .deg.. Ni based superalloys, such as Hastelloy XR, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, for hot gas duct have been candidate material because of good strength and corrosion properties at high temperature. Mechanical properties of these alloys are tested at high temperature to apply to hot gas duct of VHTR

  8. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for extracellular recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueggemann, Dorothea; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhaeusser, Andreas [CNI Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology and Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems 2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Electrophysiological activity of electrogenic cells is currently recorded with planar bioelectronic interfaces such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs). In this work, a novel concept of biocompatible nanostructured gold MEAs for extracellular signal recording is presented. MEAs were fabricated using clean room technologies, e.g. photolithography and metallization. Subsequently, they were modified with gold nanopillars of approximately 300 to 400 nm in height and 60 nm width. The nanostructuring process was carried out with a template-assisted approach using nanoporous aluminium oxide. Impedance spectroscopy of the resulting nanostructures showed higher capacitances compared to planar gold. This confirmed the expected increase of the surface area via nanostructuring. We used the nanostructured microelectrodes to record extracellular potentials from heart muscle cells (HL1), which were plated onto the chips. Good coupling between the HL1 cells and the nanostructured electrodes was observed. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio of nanopillar-MEAs was increased by a factor of 2 compared to planar MEAs. In future applications this nanopillar concept can be adopted for distinct interface materials and coupling to cellular and molecular sensing components.

  9. Pyrolytic 3D Carbon Microelectrodes for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Amato, Letizia;

    2016-01-01

    coated, SB at 50C for 6h and UV exposed (E2 – 149mJ cm-2) (figure 1.A.b). A second partial exposure E3 – 28mJ cm-2 is performed to obtain a suspended layer followed by a PEB at 50C for 8h (figure 1.A.c). The partial exposure dose at wavelength 365nm and the low temperature (50C) baking steps plays...... be fabricated (figure 1.B). Figure 1.C shows the electrochemical characterization of a three electrodes system, comparing planar and 3D carbon working electrodes. The cyclic voltammograms performed in 10mM ferri-ferrocyanide show higher peak current (2 folds higher) for the 3D microelectrodes compared to the 2D...... ones (figure 1.C). The 3D microelectrodes potentially increase the overall sensitivity in amperometric monitoring of cell response due to the increase surface area and enhanced interaction with cells [3]. Reference: [1] R. L. McCreery, “Advanced carbon electrode materials for molecular electrochemistry...

  10. Characteristics study of bentonite as candidate of buffer materials for radioactive waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature studies on bentonite characteristic of, as candidate for radioactive waste disposal system, have been conducted. Several information have been obtained from references, which would be contributed on performance assessment of engineered barrier. The functions bentonite includes the buffering of chemical and physical behavior, i.e. swelling property, self sealing, hydraulic conductivities and gas permeability. This paper also presented long-term stability of bentonite in natural condition related to the illitisazation, which could change its buffering capacities. These information, showed that bentonite was satisfied to be used for candidate of buffer materials in radioactive waste disposal system. (author)

  11. Analysis of candidate micro-reference materials of lichen and algae by SRXRF and PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two micro-analysis techniques, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and macro-proton induced X-ray emission (macro-PIXE), were used in a homogeneity test of two candidate reference materials (RMs), lichen IAEA-338 and algae IAEA-413 (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA), in the present work. The two candidate RMs had good homogeneity with the minimum sampling mass of 10 mg required for micro-analytical nuclear techniques. The elemental content in the RMs was also determined by macro-PIXE. The relative homogeneity factors HE of elements in the RMs were estimated on the base of our macro-PIXE results

  12. Element content and particle size characterization of a mussel candidate reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A., E-mail: emoreira@ipen.b, E-mail: mbvascon@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro do Reator de Pesquisas; Santos, Rafaela G. dos; Martinelli, Jose R., E-mail: jroberto@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Materiais

    2011-07-01

    The use of certified reference materials is an important tool in the quality assurance of analytical measurements. To assure reliability on recently prepared powder reference materials, not only the characterization of the property values of interest and their corresponding uncertainties, but also physical properties such as the particle size distribution must be well evaluated. Narrow particle size distributions are preferable than larger ones; as different size particles may have different analyte content. Due to this fact, the segregation of the coarse and the fine particles in a bottle may lead to inhomogeneity of the reference material, which should be avoided. In this study the element content as well as the particle size distribution of a mussel candidate reference material produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP was investigated. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis was applied to the determination of 15 elements in seven fractions of the material with different particle size distributions. Subsamples of the materials were irradiated simultaneously with elemental standards at the IEA-R1 research nuclear reactor and the induced gamma ray energies were measured in a hyperpure germanium detector. Three vials of the candidate reference material and three coarser fractions, collected during the preparation, were analyzed by Laser Diffraction Particle Analysis to determine the particle size distribution. Differences on element content were detected for fractions with different particle size distribution, indicating the importance of particle size control for biological reference materials. From the particle size analysis, Gaussian particle size distribution was observed for the candidate reference material with mean particle size {mu} = 94.6 {+-} 0.8 {mu}m. (author)

  13. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys and three copper-based alloys are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The austenitic alloys are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and the high-nickel material Alloy 825. The copper-based alloys are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). Waste in the forms of both spent fuel assemblies from reactors and borosilicate glass will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking; and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Problems specific to welds, such as hot cracking, may also occur. A survey of the literature has been prepared as part of the process of selecting, from among the candidates, a material that is adequate for repository conditions. The modes of degradation are discussed in detail in the survey to determine which apply to the candidate alloys and the extent to which they may actually occur. The eight volumes of the survey are summarized in Sections 1 through 8 of this overview. The conclusions drawn from the survey are also given in this overview

  14. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance

  15. Fusible heat sink materials - Evaluation of alternate candidates. [for PLSS cooling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.; Lomax, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. Materials with greater thermal storage capability than water could enable both an extension of time between recharging and/or a reduction in size and/or mass. An extensive literature search identified 1,215 candidates with a solid-liquid transformation within the temperature range of -13 C to 5 C. Based on data available in the literature, several candidates with a cooling capacity significantly greater than water were identified. Measurements of the transformation temperature and enthalpy of transformation were then undertaken with a differential scanning calorimeter in order to confirm the accuracy of the literature. Laboratory measurements have thus far not been able to corroborate the extremely high values found from the literature. This paper presents the approach for materials selection utilized in this study, the experimental procedure, and the results of the measurements thus far undertaken.

  16. Preliminary corrosion studies of candidate materials for supercritical water oxidation reactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Orzalli, John Clarke

    1994-01-01

    An experimental test facility has been designed and constructed for investigation of the corrosion behavior of candidate materials in a supercritical water oxidation environment. The high temperatures (500 deg C) and high pressures (300 atm) required in this process, made the experimental apparatus construction and control a complex engineering problem. The facility consists of two systems. The first is an exposure autoclave internal volume 850 ml, with associated monitoring and control syste...

  17. Inner material requirements and candidates screening for spent fuel disposal canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the present Spanish 'once-through' nuclear fuel cycle, the need arises to complete the geological repository reference concept with a spent fuel canister final design. One of the main issues in its design is selecting the inner material to be placed inside the canister, between the steel walls and the spent fuel assemblies. The primary purpose of this material will be to avoid the possibility of a criticality event once the canister walls have been finally breached by corrosion and the spent fuel is flooded with groundwater. That is an important role because the increase in heat generation from such an event would act against spent fuel stability and compromise bentonite barrier functions, negatively affecting overall repository performance. To prevent this possibility a detailed set of requirements for a material to fulfil this role in the repository environment have been devised and presented in this paper. With these requirements in view, eight potentially interesting candidates were selected and evaluated: cast iron or steel, borosilicate glass, spinel, depleted uranium, dehydrated zeolites, haematite, phosphates, and olivine. Among these, the first four materials or material families are found promising for this application. In addition, other relevant non-performance-related aspects of candidate materials, which could help on decision making, are also considered and evaluated. (authors)

  18. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  19. Corrosion tests of candidate fuel cladding and reactor internal structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion screening tests were conducted on candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and reactor internals of supercritical water reactor (SCWR) in static and flowing supercritical water (SCW) autoclave at the temperatures of 550, 600 and 650°C, pressure of about 25MPa, deaerated or saturated dissolved hydrogen (STP). Samples are nickel base alloy type Hastelloy C276, austenitic stainless steels type 304NG and AL-6XN, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel type P92, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956. This paper focuses on the formation and breakdown of corrosion oxide scales, and proposes the future trend for the development of SCWR fuel cladding materials. (author)

  20. Corrosion tests of candidate fuel cladding and reactor internal structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Zhu, F.; Bao, Y. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai (China); Tang, R. [Nuclear Power Inst. of China, National Key Lab. for Nuclear Fuel and Materials, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2010-07-01

    Corrosion screening tests were conducted on candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and reactor internals of supercritical water reactor (SCWR) in static and flowing supercritical water (SCW) autoclave at the temperatures of 550, 600 and 650°C, pressure of about 25MPa, deaerated or saturated dissolved hydrogen (STP). Samples are nickel base alloy type Hastelloy C276, austenitic stainless steels type 304NG and AL-6XN, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel type P92, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956. This paper focuses on the formation and breakdown of corrosion oxide scales, and proposes the future trend for the development of SCWR fuel cladding materials. (author)

  1. Value determination of ZrO2 in-house reference material (RM) candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value determination of zirconium oxide in-house reference materials (RM) candidate has been done by referring to ISO:35-2006 standard. The raw material of RM was 4 kg of ZrO2, Merck, that was dried at 90°C for 2×6 hours in a closed room. The samples were crushed with stainless steel (SS) pestle to pass ≤ 200 mesh sieve, homogenized in a homogenizer for 3×6 hours to obtain the powdered, dried and homogenous samples. The gravimetric method was performed to test the moisture content, while XRF and AAS methods were used to test the homogeneity and stability of samples candidates. Reference material (RM) candidates of ZrO2 powder were put into polyethylene bottles, each weighing 100 g. Samples were distributed to 10 testing laboratories that have been accredited for testing the composition of the oxide contents and loss of ignition (LOI) using variety of analytical methods that have been validated such as AAS, XRF, NAA, and UV-Vis. The testing results of oxide content and loss of ignition parameters from various laboratories were analyzed using statistical methods. The testing data of oxide concentration in zirconium oxide RM candidates obtained from various laboratories were ZrO2: 97.7334 ± 0.0016%, HfO2: 1.7329 ± 0.0024%, SiO2: 30.1224 ± 0.0053%, Al2O3: 0.0245 ± 0.0015%, TiO2: 0.0153 ± 0.0006%, Fe2O3: 0.0068 ± 0.0005%, CdO: 3.1798 ± 0.00006 ppm, and the LOI results was = 0.0217 ± 0.00022%. (author)

  2. A feasibility study for producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for the polyether ionophore salinomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rosana Gomes; Monteiro, Mychelle Alves; Pereira, Mararlene Ulberg; da Costa, Rafaela Pinto; Spisso, Bernardete Ferraz; Calado, Veronica

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for salinomycin. Preservation techniques investigated were freeze-drying and spray drying dehydration. Homogeneity and stability studies of the produced batches were conducted according to ISO Guides 34 and 35. The results showed that all produced batches were homogeneous and both freeze-drying and spray drying techniques were suitable for matrix dehydrating, ensuring the material stability. In order to preserve the material integrity, it must be transported within the temperature range of -20 up to 25°C. The results constitute an important step towards the development of an egg matrix reference material for salinomycin is possible. PMID:27216677

  3. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are being considered along with three austenitic candidates as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level reprocessing wastes in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain mechanical integrity for 50 yr after emplacement to allow for retrieval of waste during the preclosure phase of repository operation. Containment is required to be substantially complete for up to 300 to 1000 yr. During the early period, the containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. The final closure joint will be critical to the integrity of the containers. This volume surveys the available data on the metallurgy of the copper-based candidate alloys and the welding techniques employed to join these materials. The focus of this volume is on the methods applicable to remote-handling procedures in a hot-cell environment with limited possibility of postweld heat treatment. The three copper-based candidates are ranked on the basis of the various closure techniques. On the basis of considerations regarding welding, the following ranking is proposed for the copper-based alloys: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 102 > CDA 613 (worst). 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  4. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA)); Weiss, H. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are being considered along with three austenitic candidates as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level reprocessing wastes in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain mechanical integrity for 50 yr after emplacement to allow for retrieval of waste during the preclosure phase of repository operation. Containment is required to be substantially complete for up to 300 to 1000 yr. During the early period, the containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. The final closure joint will be critical to the integrity of the containers. This volume surveys the available data on the metallurgy of the copper-based candidate alloys and the welding techniques employed to join these materials. The focus of this volume is on the methods applicable to remote-handling procedures in a hot-cell environment with limited possibility of postweld heat treatment. The three copper-based candidates are ranked on the basis of the various closure techniques. On the basis of considerations regarding welding, the following ranking is proposed for the copper-based alloys: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 102 > CDA 613 (worst). 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Biologically-Induced Micropitting of Alloy 22, a Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of potential microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on candidate packaging materials for nuclear waste containment are being assessed. Coupons of Alloy 22, the outer barrier candidate for waste packaging, were exposed to a simulated, saturated repository environment (or microcosm) consisting of crushed rock (tuff) from the Yucca Mountain repository site and a continual flow of simulated groundwater for periods up to five years at room temperature and 30 C. Coupons were incubated with YM tuff under both sterile and non-sterile conditions. Surfacial analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the biotically-incubated coupons show development of both submicron-sized pinholes and pores; these features were not present on either sterile or untreated control coupons. Room temperature, biotically-incubated coupons show a wide distribution of pores covering the coupon surface, while coupons incubated at 30 C show the pores restricted to polishing ridges

  6. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Provisional Assessment of Candidate High-Temperature Thermal Conductivity Reference Materials in the EMRP “Thermo” Project

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, J.; Morrell, R; T. Fry; Gnaniah, S.; Gohil, D.; Dawson, A.; Hameury, J.; Koenen, Alain; Hammerschmidt, U.; Turzó-András, E.; Strnad, R.; Blahut, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the provisional assessment of a short list of four candidate high-temperature thermal conductivity reference materials in a European research project, “Thermo.” These four candidate materials are low-density calcium silicate, amorphous silica, high-density calcium silicate, and exfoliated vermiculite. Based on initial tests on material composition and microstructure changes, dimensional stability, mechanical stability, chemical stability and uniformity, the best two can...

  9. A study on homogeneity of the IAEA candidate reference materials for microanalysis and analytical support in the certification of these materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a study on homogeneity of new IAEA candidate reference materials: IAEA 338 Lichen and IAEA 413 Algae in small (ca.10 mg) samples as well as some data contributing to certification of these materials are presented. (author)

  10. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ''excess'' nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist

  11. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.W.

    1996-01-08

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ``excess`` nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist.

  12. A quantitative assessment of microbiological contributions to corrosion of candidate nuclear waste package materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy is contributing to the design of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A system to predict the contribution of Yucca Mountain (YM) bacteria to overall corrosion rates of candidate waste package (WP) materials was designed and implemented. DC linear polarization resistance techniques were applied to candidate material coupons that had been inoculated with a mixture of YM-derived bacteria with potentially corrosive activities, or left sterile. Inoculated bacteria caused a 5- to 6-fold increase in corrosion rate of carbon steel C1020 (to approximately 7--8 microm/yr), and an almost 100-fold increase in corrosion rate of Alloy 400 (to approximately 1 microm/yr) was observed due to microbiological activities. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) rates on more resistant materials (CRMs: Alloy 625, Type 304 Stainless Steel, and Alloy C22) were on the order of hundredths of micrometers per year (microm/yr). Bulk chemical and surfacial endpoint analyses of spent media and coupon surfaces showed preferential dissolution of nickel from Alloy 400 coupons and depletion of chromium from CRMs after incubation with YM bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy also showed greater damage to the Alloy 400 surface than that indicated by electrochemical detection methods

  13. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  14. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ∼3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  15. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  16. Experimental results of angular neutron flux spectra leaking from slabs of fusion reactor candidate materials, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes experimental data of angular neutron flux spectra measured on the slab assemblies of fusion reactor candidate materials using the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method. These experiments have been performed for graphite (carbon), beryllium and lithium-oxide. The obtained data are very suitable for the benchmark tests to check the nuclear data and calculational code systems. For use of that purpose, the experimental conditions, definitions of key terms and results obtained are compiled in figures and numerical tables. (author)

  17. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free, high-purity copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are candidates for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass, and will be sent to the prospective repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluxes of gamma radiation outside the containers. In this environment, container materials might degrade by atmospheric oxidation, general aqueous phase corrosion, localized corrosion (LC), and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This volume is a critical survey of available data on pitting and crevice corrosion of the copper-based candidates. Pitting and crevice corrosion are two of the most common forms of LC of these materials. Data on the SCC of these alloys is surveyed in Volume 4. Pitting usually occurs in water that contains low concentrations of bicarbonate and chloride anions, such as water from Well J-13 at the Nevada Test Site. Consequently, this mode of degradation might occur in the repository environment. Though few quantitative data on LC were found, a tentative ranking based on pitting corrosion, local dealloying, crevice corrosion, and biofouling is presented. CDA 102 performs well in the categories of pitting corrosion, local dealloying, and biofouling, but susceptibility to crevice corrosion diminishes its attractiveness as a candidate. The cupronickel alloy, CDA 715, probably has the best overall resistance to such localized forms of attack. 123 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Study on corrosion behavior of candidate materials in 650℃ supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general corrosion behavior of three candidate materials (347, HR3C and In-718) was investigated in 650 ℃/25 MPa deionized water. Morphology and composition of the surface oxide film with different exposure time were observed through FEG-SEM and EDS. The phase constitute was analyzed by GIXRD. For all the test materials, the weight loss follows typical parabolic law and the weight loss of 347 shows more than 40 times higher than that of HR3C and In-718. The oxide film of three alloys mainly consists of Ni(Cr, Fe)2O4. In-718 shows severe pitting and the oxide film of 347 appears significant spalling, while HR3C has compact oxide film. In the high temperature supercritical water, the high Cr content may enhance the general corrosion property of the alloys, while addition of Nb may be detrimental to the pitting resistance of alloys. (authors)

  19. Creep rupture behavior of candidate materials for nuclear process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creep and stress rupture properties are determined for the candidate materials to be used in hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The materials and test methods are briefly described based on experimental results of test durations of about20000 h. The medium creep strengths of the alloys Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, Hastelloy-S, Manaurite-36X, IN-519, and Incoloy-800H are compared showing that Inconel-617 has the best creep rupture properties in the temperature range above 8000C. The rupture time of welded joints is in the lower range of the scatterband of the parent metal. The properties determined in different simulated HTGR atmospheres are within the scatterband of the properties obtained in air. Extrapolation methods are discussed and a modified minimum commitment method is favored

  20. Voltammetric microelectrodes for biocorrosion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, K.; Dexter, S.C.; Luther, G.W. III [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States). Coll. of Marine Studies

    1998-10-01

    Understanding various biocorrosion mechanisms requires direct measurement of chemical concentrations and profiles within thin biofilms or discrete biodeposits. A gold-based mercury microelectrode was developed for simultaneous measurement of dissolved O{sub 2}, Mn, Fe, S(-II), and low pH using square wave voltammetry. It was constructed by electroreducing Hg(II) on a gold wire of 25-{micro}m diameter encased in glass. By mounting the electrode on a computerized micromanipulator, vertical microprofiles of the key redox species were measured with 10-{micro}m depth resolution across marine biofilms formed on metal coupons. Various interfering factors and experimental parameters of the voltammetric measurements were reviewed. Results revealed the heterogeneous nature of the biofilm and complex microbially mediated heavy metal (Mn and Fe) cycles within the film system. Data interpretation provided further insight into the mechanism of microbiologically influenced metal corrosion.

  1. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six alloys are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of containers for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Three of these candidate materials are copper-based alloys: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The other three are iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. Radioactive waste will include spent-fuel assemblies from reactors as well as waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, the containers must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after emplacement of the containers in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This radiation will promote the radiolytic decomposition of moist air to hydrogen. This volume surveys the available data on the effects of hydrogen on the six candidate alloys for fabrication of the containers. For copper, the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is discussed, and the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of the copper-based alloys are reviewed. The solubilities and diffusivities of hydrogen are documented for these alloys. For the austenitic materials, the degradation of mechanical properties by hydrogen is documented. The diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in these alloys are also presented. For the copper-based alloys, the ranking according to resistance to detrimental effects of hydrogen is: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 613 > CDA 102 (worst). For the austenitic alloys, the ranking is: Type 316L stainless steel ∼ Alloy 825 > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 87 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27

  3. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.W.; Nutt, W.M.; Bullen, D.B. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27.

  4. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Six alloys are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of containers for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Three of these candidate materials are copper-based alloys: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The other three are iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. Radioactive waste will include spent-fuel assemblies from reactors as well as waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, the containers must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after emplacement of the containers in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This radiation will promote the radiolytic decomposition of moist air to hydrogen. This volume surveys the available data on the effects of hydrogen on the six candidate alloys for fabrication of the containers. For copper, the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is discussed, and the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of the copper-based alloys are reviewed. The solubilities and diffusivities of hydrogen are documented for these alloys. For the austenitic materials, the degradation of mechanical properties by hydrogen is documented. The diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in these alloys are also presented. For the copper-based alloys, the ranking according to resistance to detrimental effects of hydrogen is: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 613 > CDA 102 (worst). For the austenitic alloys, the ranking is: Type 316L stainless steel {approx} Alloy 825 > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 87 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Candidate BCR reference materials for arsenic and selenium determinations in human serum and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pilot production of candidate reference materials for the quality assurance and statistical control of methods to determine toxic trace elements in biological samples is described. In the initial phase the project concerns a lyophilized human blood material containing Cd and Pb, a lyophilized human urine material containing As, Cd, Co and Cr, and a liquid human serum material with Al, Se and Zn at three different levels, representative of environmental and occupational exposure. The homogeneity and stability of the pilot batches were investigated by determining Al and Zn in serum, As in urine, Cd and Pb in blood at the medium level. The pilot batches produced were deemed to be homogeneous with respect to all the trace elements tested, and there was no indication of thermal instability except that the arsenic levels decreased significantly with time at 200 deg., 370 deg. and 450 deg. C. Thirty-two laboratories from 12 different countries participated in an intercomparison round organized to test the suitability of the reference material and validate the methodological approaches for certification purposes. Focusing on the neutron activation results, the outcome of this first intercomparison exercise demonstrates that the comparability of the calibration standards needs improvement. Therefore, for the certification round stronger efforts will be undertaken to document the spiked concentrations and to reduce their uncertainties, and the laboratories will be required to meet defined quality criteria for the checking and documentation of traceability. (author)

  6. Electrochemical Fabrication and Electrocatalytic Properties of Nanostructured Mesoporous Platinum Microelectrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengyan NIE; Joanne M. Elliott

    2005-01-01

    Electrodeposition from a lyotropic liquid crystal template medium was used to produce nanostructured platinum microelectrodes with high specific surface area and high mass transport efficiency. Compared to polished and conventional platinized microelectrodes, well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic properties for oxygen and ascorbic acid, whilst well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes offered improved electrocatalytic properties for oxygen reduction compared to disordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes.

  7. Application of INAA complementary gamma ray photopeaks to homogeneity study of candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization and certification of reference materials, RMs, is a complex task involving many steps. One of them is the homogeneity testing to assure that key property values will not present variation among RM bottles. Good precision is the most important figure of merit of an analytical technique to allow it to be used in the homogeneity testing of candidate RMs. Due to its inherent characteristics, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, INAA, is an analytical technique of choice for homogeneity testing. Problems with sample digestion and contamination from reagents are not an issue in INAA, as solid samples are analyzed directly. For element determination via INAA, the activity of a suitable gamma ray decay photopeak for an element is chosen and it is compared to the activity of a standard of the element. An interesting possibility is the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks (for the elements that present them) to confirm the homogeneity test results for an element. In this study, an investigation of the use of the complementary gamma ray photopeaks of 110mAg, 82Br, 60Co, 134Cs, 152Eu, 59Fe, 140La, 233Pa (for Th determination), 46Sc and 75Se radionuclides was undertaken in the between bottle homogeneity study of a mussel candidate RM under preparation at IPEN - CNEN/SP. Although some photopeaks led to biased element content results, the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks proved to be helpful in supporting homogeneity study conclusions of new RMs. (author)

  8. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials (CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)), which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials [CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)], which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  10. Preparation and evaluation of the homogeneity of milk as a candidate reference material for carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot project was initiated to study the feasibility of preparing milk as a candidate reference material for 14C near environmental levels. Two materials, MK-B at natural level of 14C and MK-C4 at an elevated level, have been prepared from pasteurized 2% dairy milk. MK-C4 was spiked with an appropriate amount of 14C-methylated casein tracer to achieve the elevated level. Several samples from MK-B and MK-C4 have been analyzed to test the homogeneity of these materials for the distribution of 14C. The samples were combusted in oxygen under 20 atmospheres pressure using a Parr bomb. The 14C concentrations were determined by liquid scintillation counting using Carbo-Sorb/Permafluor E+ cocktail. The results indicate that these materials are homogeneous with respect to 14C concentration even in sub-sample sizes of 0.25 g of the freeze-dried material. The precision of our 14C measurements, as expressed by the % relative standard deviation, is within 5%. The accuracy has been tested by analyzing replicate samples of the IAEA 14C quality assurance materials, C-3 (cellulose) and C-6 (ANU sucrose) and found to be within 3%. The lower limits of detection are 0.08, 0.05 and 0.02 Bq.g-1 of carbon for 20 ml of liquid scintillation mixture (Carbo-Sorb/Permafluor E+ = ∼0.67) loaded with up to 0.4g of carbon from the sample and counted for 3 cycles of 60, 180 and 1000 min each, respectively. Our measurements of 14C specific activities of MK-B and MK-C4 are 0.26 ± 0.01 and 15.3 ± 0.4 Bq.g-1 of carbon, respectively. (author)

  11. Robust penetrating microelectrodes for neural interfaces realized by titanium micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Patrick T; Otto, Kevin J; Rao, Masaru P

    2011-06-01

    Neural prosthetic interfaces based upon penetrating microelectrode devices have broadened our understanding of the brain and have shown promise for restoring neurological functions lost to disease, stroke, or injury. However, the eventual viability of such devices for use in the treatment of neurological dysfunction may be ultimately constrained by the intrinsic brittleness of silicon, the material most commonly used for manufacture of penetrating microelectrodes. This brittleness creates predisposition for catastrophic fracture, which may adversely affect the reliability and safety of such devices, due to potential for fragmentation within the brain. Herein, we report the development of titanium-based penetrating microelectrodes that seek to address this potential future limitation. Titanium provides advantage relative to silicon due to its superior fracture toughness, which affords potential for creation of robust devices that are resistant to catastrophic failure. Realization of these devices is enabled by recently developed techniques which provide opportunity for fabrication of high-aspect-ratio micromechanical structures in bulk titanium substrates. Details are presented regarding the design, fabrication, mechanical testing, in vitro functional characterization, and preliminary in vivo testing of devices intended for acute recording in rat auditory cortex and thalamus, both independently and simultaneously. PMID:21360044

  12. IDMS studies on sodalite - a candidate material for nuclear waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste management is one of the important aspects of nuclear fuel cycle from environmental and safety considerations. Different forms of waste storage matrices are known to be applicable for different kinds of nuclear wastes. Glass bonded sodalite (GBS) (Na8(AISiO4)6Cl2), a glass-ceramic, is a promising candidate for the immobilization of the chloride waste resulting from pyrometallurgical reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Characterization of individual components is essential for the development of this waste storage material which is expected to encounter different physicochemical conditions. For this purpose, we have undertaken studies to determine the concentrations of individual components in GBS employing Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) owing to its capability to ensure precise and accurate data for multi element analysis in a matrix

  13. Thermo-Optical and Mechanical Property Testing of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerman, WIlliam A.; Stanaland, T. L.; Womack, F.; Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Semmel, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra-lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. Solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic front layer, a thin polymeric substrate, and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate sails to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to electrons. This poster will discuss the preliminary results of this research.

  14. Global blending optimization of laminated composites with discrete material candidate selection and thickness variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren N.; Stolpe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    distinct choice among predefined numbers of candidates. The laminate thickness is variable but the number of plies must be integer. We solve the convex mixed binary non-linear programming problem by an outer approximation cutting-plane method augmented with a few heuristics to accelerate the convergence...... but is, however, convex in the original mixed binary nested form. Convexity is the foremost important property of optimization problems, and the proposed method can guarantee the global or near-global optimal solution; unlike most topology optimization methods. The material selection is limited to a...... rate. The capabilities of the method and the effect of active versus inactive manufacturing constraints are demonstrated on several numerical examples of limited size, involving at most 320 binary variables. Most examples are solved to guaranteed global optimality and may constitute benchmark examples...

  15. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strum, M.J.; Weiss, H.; Farmer, J.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-06-01

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Preliminary Investigation of Candidate Materials for Use in Accident Resistant Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Lessing; Blair H. Park; Jakeob Maupin

    2013-09-01

    As part of a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with industry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating several options for accident resistant uranium compounds including silicides, and nitrides for use in future light water reactor (LWR) fuels. This work is part of a larger effort to create accident tolerant fuel forms where changes to the fuel pellets, cladding, and cladding treatment are considered. The goal fuel form should have a resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, have an equal to or larger thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide, a melting temperature that allows the material to stay solid under power reactor conditions, and a uranium loading that maintains or improves current LWR power densities. During the course of this research, fuel fabricated at INL will be characterized, irradiated at the INL Advanced Test Reactor, and examined after irradiation at INL facilities to help inform industrial partners on candidate technologies.

  18. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  19. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan (1) has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  20. Short-term stability test for thorium soil candidate a reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clain, Almir F.; Fonseca, Adelaide M.G.; Dantas, Vanessa V.D.B.; Braganca, Maura J.C.; Souza, Poliana S., E-mail: almir@ird.gov.br, E-mail: adelaide@ird.gov.br, E-mail: vanessa@ird.gov.br, E-mail: maura@ird.gov.br, E-mail: poliana@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work describes a methodology to determine the soil short-term stability after the steps of production in laboratory. The short-term stability of the soil is an essential property to be determined in order to producing a reference material. The soil is a candidate of reference material for chemical analysis of thorium with metrological traceability to be used in environmental analysis, equipment calibration, validation methods, and quality control. A material is considered stable in a certain temperature if the property of interest does not change with time, considering the analytical random fluctuations. Due to this, the angular coefficient from the graphic of Th concentration versus elapsed time must be near to zero. The analytical determinations of thorium concentration were performed by Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis. The slopes and their uncertainties were obtained from the regression lines at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, with control temperature of -20 deg C. From the obtained data a t-test was applied. In both temperatures the calculated t-value was lower than the critical value, so we can conclude with 95% confidence level that no significant changes happened during the period studied concerning thorium concentration in soil at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, showing stability at these temperatures. (author)

  1. LONG-TERM CORROSION TESTING OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE CONTAINMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results are presented from the long-term corrosion test program of candidate materials for the high-level radioactive waste packages that would be emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The present waste package design is based on a multi-barrier concept having an inner container of a corrosion resistant material and an outer container of a corrosion allowance material. Test specimens have been exposed to simulated bounding environments that may credibly develop in the vicinity of the waste packages. Corrosion rates have been calculated for weight loss and crevice specimens, and U-bend specimens have been examined for evidence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Galvanic testing has been started recently and initial results are forthcoming. Pitting characterization of test specimens will be conducted in the coming year. This test program is expected to continue for a minimum of five years so that long-term corrosion data can be determined to support corrosion model development, performance assessment, and waste package design

  2. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Cao, Guoping; Kulcinski, Gerald

    2011-07-25

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan [1] has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  3. Short-term stability test for thorium soil candidate a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a methodology to determine the soil short-term stability after the steps of production in laboratory. The short-term stability of the soil is an essential property to be determined in order to producing a reference material. The soil is a candidate of reference material for chemical analysis of thorium with metrological traceability to be used in environmental analysis, equipment calibration, validation methods, and quality control. A material is considered stable in a certain temperature if the property of interest does not change with time, considering the analytical random fluctuations. Due to this, the angular coefficient from the graphic of Th concentration versus elapsed time must be near to zero. The analytical determinations of thorium concentration were performed by Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis. The slopes and their uncertainties were obtained from the regression lines at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, with control temperature of -20 deg C. From the obtained data a t-test was applied. In both temperatures the calculated t-value was lower than the critical value, so we can conclude with 95% confidence level that no significant changes happened during the period studied concerning thorium concentration in soil at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, showing stability at these temperatures. (author)

  4. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The austenitic materials are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr, and they must be retrievable from the disposal site during the first 50 yr after emplacement. The containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on the phase stability of both groups of candidate alloys. The austenitic alloys are reviewed in terms of the physical metallurgy of the iron-chromium-nickel system, martensite transformations, carbide formation, and intermetallic-phase precipitation. The copper-based alloys are reviewed in terms of their phase equilibria and the possibility of precipitation of the minor alloying constituents. For the austenitic materials, the ranking based on phase stability is: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) (best), and then both CDA 715 and CDA 613. 75 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Physical oceanographic processes at candidate dredged-material disposal sites B1B and 1M offshore San Francisco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, C.R.; Denbo, D.W.; Downing, J.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Coats, D.A. (Marine Research Specialists, Ventura, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, has identified two candidate sites for ocean disposal of material from several dredging projects in San Francisco Bay. The disposal site is to be designated under Section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act. One of the specific criteria in the Ocean Dumping Act is that the physical environments of the candidate sites be considered. Toward this goal, the USACE requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct a study of physical oceanographic and sediment transport processes at the candidate sites, B1B and 1M. The results of that study are presented in this report. 40 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of C/C-SiC Composites as Potential Candidate Materials for High Performance Braking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed at evaluating the characteristic and performance of C/C-SiC composites as potential candidate materials for high performance braking system. A set of material specifications had been derived from specific engineering design requirements. Analysis was performed by formulating the function(s), constraint(s), and objective(s) of design and materials selection. Function of a friction material is chiefly to provide friction, absorb and dissipate energy. It is done while withstanding load and maintaining the structural adequacy and characteristic of tribology at high temperature. Objective of the material selection and design is to maximize the absorption and dissipation of energy and to minimize weight and cost. Candidate materials were evaluated based on their friction and wear, thermal capacity and conductivity, structural properties, manufacturing properties, and densities. The present paper provides a state of the art example on how materials - function - geometry - design, are all interrelated.

  7. Assessment of commutability for candidate certified reference material ERM-BB130 "chloramphenicol in pork".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleny, Reinhard; Emteborg, Håkan; Schimmel, Heinz

    2010-10-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP), an effective antibiotic against many microorganisms, is meanwhile banned in the EU for treatment of food-producing animals due to adverse health effects. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) is currently developing a certified reference material (CRM) for CAP in pork, intended for validation and method performance verifications of analytical methods. The material will be certified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and has a target CAP level around the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 microg/kg. To prove that the material can be applied as a quality control tool for screening methods, a commutability study was conducted, involving five commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and one biosensor assay (BiaCore kit). Meat homogenates (cryo-milled wet tissue) with CAP concentrations around the MRPL and the candidate CRM (lyophilised powder) were measured by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS as well as the six screening methods. Pairwise method comparisons of results obtained for the two sample types showed that the CRM can successfully be applied as quality control (QC) sample to all six screening methods. The study suggests that ERM-BB130 is sufficiently commutable with the investigated assays and that laboratories applying one of the investigated kits therefore benefit from using ERM-BB130 to demonstrate the correctness of their results. However, differences among the assays were observed, either in the abundance of bias between screening and confirmatory LC and GC methods, the repeatability of test results, or goodness of fit between the methods. PMID:20665007

  8. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  9. Superconducting Gamma/Neutron Spectrometer Task 1 Completion Report Evaluation of Candidate Neutron-Sensitive Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W

    2002-01-01

    A review of the scientific literature regarding boron- and lithium-containing compounds was completed. Information such as Debye temperature, heat capacity, superconductivity properties, physical and chemical characteristics, commercial availability, and recipes for synthesis was accumulated and evaluated to develop a list of neutron-sensitive materials likely to perform properly in the spectrometer. The best candidate borides appear to be MgB sub 2 (a superconductor with T sub c = 39 K), B sub 6 Si, B sub 4 C, and elemental boron; all are commercially available. Among the lithium compounds are LiH, LiAl, Li sub 1 sub 2 Si sub 7 , and Li sub 7 Sn sub 2. These materials have or are expected to have high Debye temperatures and sufficiently low heat capacities at 100 mK to produce a useful signal. The responses of sup 1 sup 0 B and sup 6 Li to a fission neutron spectrum were also estimated. These demonstrated that the contribution of scattering events is no more than 3% in a boron-based system and 1.5% in a lith...

  10. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  11. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of candidate structural materials in supercritical pressurized water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, Hwanil, E-mail: hwanil.je@gmail.com; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-15

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW) was investigated for the candidate structural steels of advanced fusion and fission nuclear system, which are SUS316L austenitic steel, F82H ferritic–martensitic steel and SOC-16 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel. In order to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC with those materials, slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out at 773 K, under a pressure of 25 MPa of SCPW with deaerated condition. High temperature tensile test in vacuum at 773 K was also performed to compare the deformation and fracture behavior between corrosive environment of SCPW and non-corrosive environment. Although SUS316L showed a change in the fracture mode in the deaerated SCPW from an entire ductile fracture at higher strain rate to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture at lower one, the fracture mode of ODS steel and F82H was not changed in the tested strain rate range. Both the IGSCC and TGSCC were observed in SUS316L. And F82H steel suffered from much severer oxidation than SUS316L and SOC-16.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of candidate structural materials in supercritical pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW) was investigated for the candidate structural steels of advanced fusion and fission nuclear system, which are SUS316L austenitic steel, F82H ferritic–martensitic steel and SOC-16 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel. In order to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC with those materials, slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out at 773 K, under a pressure of 25 MPa of SCPW with deaerated condition. High temperature tensile test in vacuum at 773 K was also performed to compare the deformation and fracture behavior between corrosive environment of SCPW and non-corrosive environment. Although SUS316L showed a change in the fracture mode in the deaerated SCPW from an entire ductile fracture at higher strain rate to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture at lower one, the fracture mode of ODS steel and F82H was not changed in the tested strain rate range. Both the IGSCC and TGSCC were observed in SUS316L. And F82H steel suffered from much severer oxidation than SUS316L and SOC-16

  13. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential ENP and the protection potential EPP. The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  14. Development of a candidate certified reference material of cypermethrin in green tea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A cypermethrin CRM in green tea was developed. ► Using two isotope dilution mass spectrometry techniques for characterization. ► Certified value of 148 μg kg−1 with expanded uncertainty of ±9.2%. ► Support quality assurance of pesticide residue analysis in tea to testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the preparation of a candidate certified reference material (CRM) of cypermethrin in green tea, GLHK-11-01a according to the requirements of ISO Guide 34 and 35. Certification of the material was performed using a newly developed isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) approach, with gas chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (GC–HRMS) and gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (GC–MS/MS). Statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA) showed excellent agreement of the analytical data sets generated from the two mass spectrometric detections. The characterization methods have also been satisfactorily applied in an Asia-Pacific Metrology Program (APMP) interlaboratory comparison study. Both the GC–HRIDMS and GC–IDMS/MS methods proved to be sufficiently reliable and accurate for certification purpose. The certified value of cypermethrin in dry mass fraction was 148 μg kg−1 and the associated expanded uncertainty was 14 μg kg−1. The uncertainty budget was evaluated from sample in homogeneity, long-term and short-term stability and variability in the characterization procedure. GLHK-11-01a is primarily developed to support the local and wider testing community on need basis in quality assurance work and in seeking accreditation.

  15. Certification of a new biological reference material - Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) and homogeneity study by NAA on this and other candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the laboratory's participation in the interlaboratory comparison run where the laboratory applied neutron activation analysis aimed at certification of the candidate reference material. Data evaluation and statistical treatment steps are discussed. The report also describes homogeneity study on the reference material and provides details of the analytical procedures

  16. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, ν). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m3. The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  17. Preparation of candidate reference materials for the determination of phosphorus containing flame retardants in styrene-based polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Urpi Bertran, Raquel; Latza, Andreas; Andörfer-Lang, Katrin; Hügelschäffer, Claudia; Pöhlein, Manfred; Puchta, Ralph; Placht, Christian; Maid, Harald; Bauer, Walter; van Eldik, Rudi

    2015-04-01

    Candidate reference materials (RM) for the analysis of phosphorus-based flame retardants in styrene-based polymers were prepared using a self-made mini-extruder. Due to legal requirements of the current restriction for the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, focus now is placed on phosphorus-based flame retardants instead of the brominated kind. Newly developed analytical methods for the first-mentioned substances also require RMs similar to industrial samples for validation and verification purposes. Hence, the prepared candidate RMs contained resorcinol-bis-(diphenyl phosphate), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate), triphenyl phosphate and triphenyl phosphine oxide as phosphorus-based flame retardants. Blends of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-co-butadiene-co-styrene as well as blends of high-impact polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide were chosen as carrier polymers. Homogeneity and thermal stability of the candidate RMs were investigated. Results showed that the candidate RMs were comparable to the available industrial materials. Measurements by ICP/OES, FTIR and NMR confirmed the expected concentrations of the flame retardants and proved that analyte loss and degradation, respectively, was below the uncertainty of measurement during the extrusion process. Thus, the candidate RMs were found to be suitable for laboratory use. PMID:25410641

  18. Determination of butoxyacetic acid (biomarker of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether exposure) in human urine candidate reference material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sperlingova, I.; Dabrowská, L.; Stránský, V.; Duskova, S.; Kučera, Jan; Tvrdíková, M.; Tichý, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 397, č. 2 (2010), s. 433-438. ISSN 1618-2642. [12th International Symposium on Biological and Environmental Reference Materials Keble Coll. Oxford, 07.07.2009-10.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Candidate reference material * Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether * Metabolite Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.841, year: 2010

  19. A review of candidate ceramic materials for use as heat shield tiles in a supercritical-water-cooled-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Canadian supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR) utilizes a reactor shell made of a zirconium alloy insulated with a ceramic tile heat shield. The main consideration in the selection of a tile material will be resistance to corrosion in supercritical water and long term microstructure stability, in addition to thermal conductivity. This paper provides a review of the literature on corrosion behaviours of ceramic materials in supercritical water and ranks candidate ceramic materials accordingly. Materials reviewed include alumina, zirconia, silica glasses, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, sialon, mullite, and aluminum nitride. (author)

  20. Phase stability effects on the corrosion behavior of the metal barrier candidate materials for the nuclear waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six candidate materials are currently under consideration by the Nuclear Waste Management Program (NWMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as potential metal barrier materials for high-level nuclear waste storage. The waste package, which must meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing requirements for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI), will contain spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants PWR and BWR fuel assemblies, commercial high level waste (CHLW) in the form of borosilicate glass containing commercial spent fuel reprocessing wastes and defense high level waste (DHLW) contained in borosilicate glass. The waste package is being designed for emplacement in the unsaturated zone above the water table at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. This location should result in a slightly oxidizing repository environment. The Metal Barrier Selection and Testing Task is responsible for the selection of the materials to be employed in the waste package container. The candidate materials include three iron to nickel-based austenitic materials and three copper-based alloy materials. The austenitic materials are AISI 304L stainless steel, AISI 316L stainless steel and alloy 825. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (OFHC copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al) and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The selection of the final metal barrier material is dependent upon the expected behavior of these materials in the repository environment

  1. Batch fabrication of nanotubes suspended between microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Stöckli, T.; Knapp, H. F.;

    2007-01-01

    done with a simple lift-off process with standard photolithographic resist. An applied electric field is sustained between the microelectrodes during CVD to guide the nanotube growth. Comparison with simulations shows that the location and the orientation of the grown carbon nanotubes (CNT) correspond...

  2. Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for SCWR in superheated steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of cold work on oxidation kinetics was clearly observed for 15Cr–20Ni SS. • The tube-shaped 15Cr–20Ni SS showed very good oxidation resistance. • The machined layer by cold drawing has a significant role to mitigate oxidation. - Abstract: Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR), including three types of 15Cr–20Ni stainless steels (1520 SSs), in the temperature range of 700–780 °C superheated steam have been investigated. Effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), degree of cold work (CW), and machined layer by cold drawing process on the oxidation kinetics assuming power-law kinetics are discussed. Characteristics of oxide layers and its relation to oxidation behaviors are also discussed. The effect of DO on the weight gain behavior in superheated steam at 700 °C was minor for all specimens at least up to 200 ppb DO. The tube-shaped specimens of 1520 SSs showed very good oxidation resistance at 700–780 °C. There was no clear difference in the oxidation kinetics among the three investigated types of 1520 SSs. The machined layer formed at the tube surface has a significant role to mitigate oxidation in superheated steam. A fine-grained microstructure near the surface due to recrystallization by cold drawing process is effective to form the protective Cr2O3 layer. It has been suggested that since Cr diffusion in the outside surface of tubes is accelerated as a result of an increased dislocation density and/or grain refinement by cold drawing, tube specimens show very slow oxidation kinetics. Breakdown of the protective Cr2O3 layer and nodule oxide formation were partly observed on the tube-shaped specimens of 15Cr–20Ni SSs. The reliability of Cr2O3 layer has to be carefully examined to predict the oxidation kinetics after long-term exposure

  3. Cytotoxicity of implantable microelectrode arrays produced by laser micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rylie A; Ordonez, Juan S; Schuettler, Martin; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Lovell, Nigel H; Suaning, Gregg J

    2010-02-01

    Implantable high-density microelectrode arrays have been successfully fabricated using laser micromachining of conventional implant materials, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and platinum (Pt) foil. This study investigates the impact of modifying PDMS and Pt with high power laser beams and the possible toxicity of by-products that may remain on the implantable device. Materials were characterised both chemically and biologically through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cell growth inhibition assays and a direct contact cell proliferation assay. It was found that laser micromachining produces oxides of silicon and platinum on the PDMS and Pt respectively. While the chemical properties of materials were altered, there was negligible change in the biological response to either extracts or cell growth directly on the composite electrode array. PMID:19833388

  4. Surface Catalytic Efficiency of Advanced Carbon Carbon Candidate Thermal Protection Materials for SSTO Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for advanced ceramic thermal protection systems was calculated using arc-jet data. Coefficients for both oxygen and nitrogen atom recombination on the surfaces of these systems were obtained to temperatures of 1650 K. Optical and chemical stability of the candidate systems to the high energy hypersonic flow was also demonstrated during these tests.

  5. Charge, spin and orbital order in the candidate multiferroic material LuFe2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is a detailed study of the magnetic, structural and orbital order parameters of the candidate multiferroic material LuFe2O4. Multiferroic oxides with a strong magnetoelectric coupling are of high interest for potential information technology applications, but they are rare because the traditional mechanism of ferroelectricity is incompatible with magnetism. Consequently, much attention is focused on various unconventional mechanisms of ferroelectricity. Of these, ferroelectricity originating from charge ordering (CO) is particularly intriguing because it potentially combines large electric polarizations with strong magneto-electric coupling. However, examples of oxides where this mechanism occurs are exceedingly rare and none is really well understood. LuFe2O4 is often cited as the prototypical example of CO-based ferroelectricity. In this material, the order of Fe valences has been proposed to render the triangular Fe/O bilayers polar by making one of the two layers rich in Fe2+ and the other rich in Fe3+, allowing for a possible ferroelectric stacking of the individual bilayers. Because of this new mechanism for ferroelectricity, and also because of the high transition temperatures of charge order (TCO ∝320K) and ferro magnetism (TN∝240 K) LuFe2O4 has recently attracted increasing attention. Although these polar bilayers are generally accepted in the literature for LuFe2O4, direct proof is lacking. An assumption-free experimental determination of whether or not the CO in the Fe/O bilayers is polar would be crucial, given the dependence of the proposed mechanism of ferroelectricity from CO in LuFe2O4 on polar bilayers. This thesis starts with a detailed characterization of the macroscopic magnetic properties, where growing ferrimagnetic contributions observed in magnetization could be ascribed to increasing oxygen off-stoichiometry. The main focus is on samples exhibiting a sharp magnetic transition to long-range spin order at TN∝240 K

  6. Modeling and Simulation of Enzymatic Biofuel Cells with Three-Dimensional Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs are considered as an attractive candidate for powering future implantable medical devices. In this study, a computational model of EBFCs based on three-dimensional (3-D interdigitated microelectrode arrays was conducted. The main focus of this research is to investigate the effect of different designs and spatial distributions of the microelectrode arrays on mass transport of fuels, enzymatic reaction rate, open circuit output potential and current density. To optimize the performance of the EBFCs, numerical simulations have been performed for cylindrical electrodes with various electrode heights and well widths. Optimized cell performance was obtained when the well width is half of the height of the 3-D electrode. In addition, semi-elliptical shaped electrode is preferred based on the results from current density and resistive heating simulation.

  7. Production of candidate natural matrix reference materials for micro-analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneity is considered to be the most vital prerequisite for a certified reference material (CRM); more stringent requirements exist for the analysis of small subsamples. Many of the natural matrix CRMs are prepared from bulk samples by grinding and milling them to a certain particle size, which is expected to provide a more homogenous material; however recommended sample sizes for biological and environmental reference materials are found to be more than 100 mg. Since the milling of materials is costly and has some drawbacks, natural materials that already occur as small particles such as air particulate matter, certain sediments, and cellular biological materials may form the basis of the required reference materials. The nature of these materials, i.e. naturally occurring particles, may provide ideal model reference material. We describe here the production of the materials and preliminary tests, the evaluation for the micro-analytical techniques

  8. Development of miniaturized specimens for the study of neutron irradiation/plasma exposure synergistic effects on candidate fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to choose a miniaturized specimen version relevant for testing candidate fusion reactor materials including mechanical testing after combined neutron irradiation/plasma exposure in a fission reactor. The material examined was reactor pressure vessel type steel in irradiated and aged (unirradiated) conditions. Comparative standard impact, three point bend and small punch tests were conducted. It is established that there is a possibility of miniaturization of irradiated steel experimental specimens by means of proper specimens type choice with mass reducing from ∼40 (Charpy) to 0.4 g (small plates). (orig.)

  9. Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} as a candidate material for lead cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utili, M., E-mail: marco.utili@enea.i [Universita degli studi di Bologna, Facolta di Ingegneria, Via Risorgimento, 2 DIENCA, Bologna (Italy); Agostini, M.; Coccoluto, G. [ENEA CR Brasimone, Fis Ing, Camugnano (Italy); Lorenzini, E. [Universita degli studi di Bologna, Facolta di Ingegneria, Via Risorgimento, 2 DIENCA, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    One of the main issues regarding the design of LFR is the corrosion-erosion behaviour of materials in contact with high temperature and high velocity lead, such as pump impeller and bearing materials. Those materials will worked in lead at about 480 {sup o}C with a velocity relative to impeller blade in the magnitude of 10 m/s. Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}, a ternary compound was selected as one of the most promising candidate material, the most significant aspect of Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} is that it combines some of the most attractive proprieties of ceramics with those of metals. This material was already applied in industry but more effort is needed to qualify its performance when compared with candidate structural stainless steel available in Europe. With the purpose of evaluating the corrosion resistance of Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}, a preliminary screening test was carried out at ENEA Brasimone in fluent lead under oxidation conditions (oxygen concentration of about 10{sup -6} wt% in the melt), with an average temperature of 500 {sup o}C and a stream velocity of about 1 m/s.

  10. Adaptable Holders for Arc-Jet Screening Candidate Thermal Protection System Repair Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Joe; Milhoan, Jim D.

    2010-01-01

    Reusable holders have been devised for evaluating high-temperature, plasma-resistant re-entry materials, especially fabrics. Typical material samples tested support thermal-protection-system damage repair requiring evaluation prior to re-entry into terrestrial atmosphere. These tests allow evaluation of each material to withstand the most severe predicted re-entry conditions.

  11. Two spruce shoot candidate reference materials from the German environmental specimen bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new materials are introduced that might serve as useful aids for the harmonisation of analytical results. Spruce shoots, cryogenically homogenized and characterized for 50 elements from two sampling sites of the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) are presented as possible third generation reference materials that might also act as calibrating materials in speciation analysis. (author)

  12. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  13. Evaluation of Landfill Site Candidate for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Norm) and Hazardous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refers to co-location concept, Kabil site, where located at the southeast end of low hills in Batam Island, will be sited as an integrated industrial waste management center including landfill. So that, it is necessary an evaluation of the landfill site candidate for NORM and hazardous waste. The evaluation includes geological and non-geological aspects, to determine the suitability or capability in supporting the function as landfill facility. The site candidate was evaluated by serial sreps as follows: 1) criteria formulation; 2) selecting the parameter for evaluation; 3) Positive screening or evaluation of the land having potentiality for landfill site by descriptive method: and 4) determine the land suitability or capability for landfill site. The evaluation of geological and non- geological aspects include topography, litology, seismicity, groundwater and surface water, climate, hydro-oceanography, flora and fauna, spatial pattern and transportation system. The most of the parameters evaluated show the fulfilling to the site criteria, and can be mentioned that the land is suitable for landfill site. Some parameters are not so suitable for that purpose, especially on permeability and homogeneity of the rocks/soils, distance to surface water body, depth of groundwater, the flow rate of groundwater, precipitation, and humidity of the air. The lack of suitability showed by some parameters can be compensated by improving the appropriate engineered barrier in order to fulfill the landfill performance in providing the supporting capacity, long live stability and waste containment. (author)

  14. Assessment of Commutability for Candidate Certified Reference Material ERM-BB130 "Chloramphenicol in Pork"

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleny, Reinhard; EMTEBORG Per; Schimmel, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP), an effective antibiotic against many microorganisms, is meanwhile banned in the EU for treatment of food-producing animals due to adverse health effects. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) is currently developing a certified reference material (CRM) for CAP in pork, intended for validation and method performance verifications of analytical methods. The material will be certified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) a...

  15. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  16. Collection of radiation irradiation study reports for the candidate materials and instruments in the J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the collected reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials and instruments to be used in the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility, J-PARC. The examinations were executed at the gamma-ray irradiation facility in JAEA Takasaki Institute. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. This report shows the subject of the instruments or the materials in the J-PARC facility, the theme of the irradiation study, the results of examination and the selected decision of the policy for usage. (author)

  17. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials FY 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Xie, YuLong; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wang, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    This annual report presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Dr. Fei Gao. This project is divided into three tasks, namely (1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; (2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and (3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonlinearity, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the findings and insights obtained in each of these three tasks are provided in this report. Additionally, papers published this fiscal year or currently in review are included in Appendix together with presentations given this fiscal year.

  18. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  19. In situ corrosion studies on candidate container materials for the underground disposal of high level radioactive waste in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK·CEN has developed in the early 1980's, with the support of NIRAS/ONDRAF and EC, an extensive in situ corrosion program to evaluate the long-term corrosion behavior of various candidate container materials for the disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. The in situ corrosion experiments were performed in the underground research facility, HADES, situated in the Boom Clay formation at a depth of 225 meters below ground level. These experiments place the samples either in direct contact with clay (type I), in a humid clay atmosphere (type 2), or in a concrete saturated clay atmosphere (type 3). During the period 1985--1994, twelve in situ corrosion experiments were installed in the underground laboratory. The exploitation of these experiments ended in 1996. All samples were recuperated and analyzed. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the type 1 corrosion experiments (samples in direct contact with Boom Clay). Surface analyses tend to indicate that the so-called corrosion-resistant materials, e.g. stainless steels, Ni- and Ti-alloys, remain intact after exposure to Boom Clay between 16 and 170 C, whereas carbon steel presents significant pitting corrosion. Carbon steel seems to be unsuitable for the Belgian repository concept (pits up to 240microm deep are detected after direct exposure to the argillaceous environment for 2 years at 90 C). The stainless steels look very promising candidate container materials

  20. Search for a circum-planetary material and orbital period variations of short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Z; Budaj, J; Stellingwerf, R F

    2014-01-01

    A unique short-period Mercury-size Kepler exoplanet candidate KIC012557548b has been discovered recently by Rappaport et al. (2012). This object is a transiting disintegrating exoplanet with a circum-planetary material - comet-like tail. Close-in exoplanets, like KIC012557548b, are subjected to the greatest planet-star interactions. This interaction may have various forms. In certain cases it may cause formation of the comet-like tail. Strong interaction with the host star, and/or presence of an additional planet may lead to variations in the orbital period of the planet. Our main aim is to search for comet-like tails similar to KIC012557548b and for long-term orbital period variations. We are curious about frequency of comet-like tail formation among short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates. We concentrate on a sample of 20 close-in candidates with a period similar to KIC012557548b from the Kepler mission.

  1. Thermal characteristics of non-edible oils as phase change materials candidate to application of air conditioning chilled water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad, M.; Indartono, Y. S.; Suwono, A.; Pasek, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    The addition of phase change material in the secondary refrigerant has been able to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioning systems in chilled water system. This material has a high thermal density because its energy is stored as latent heat. Based on material melting and freezing point, there are several non-edible oils that can be studied as a phase change material candidate for the application of chilled water systems. Forests and plantations in Indonesia have great potential to produce non-edible oil derived from the seeds of the plant, such as; Calophyllum inophyllum, Jatropha curcas L, and Hevea braziliensis. Based on the melting temperature, these oils can further studied to be used as material mixing in the secondary refrigerant. Thermal characteristics are obtained from the testing of T-history, Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) and thermal conductivity materials. Test results showed an increase in the value of the latent heat when mixed with water with the addition of surfactant. Thermal characteristics of each material of the test results are shown completely in discussion section of this article.

  2. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  3. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Nuclear Waste Container Materials in Repository Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua; J. Sarver; W. Mohn

    2001-11-08

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) have been proposed as the corrosion resistant materials for fabricating the waste package outer barrier and the drip shield, respectively for the proposed nuclear waste repository Yucca Mountain Project. In this work, the susceptibility of welded and annealed Alloy 22 (N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) to crevice corrosion was studied by the Multiple Crevice Assembly (ASTM G78) method combined with surface morphological observation after four and eight weeks of exposure to the Basic Saturated Water (BSW-12) in a temperature range from 60 to 105 C. The susceptibility of the materials to crevice corrosion was evaluated based on the appearance of crevice attack underneath the crevice formers and the weight loss data. The results showed that, after exposed to BSW-12 for four and eight weeks, no obvious crevice attack was observed on these materials. The descaled weight loss increased with the increase in temperature for all materials. The weight loss, however, is believed to be caused by general corrosion, rather than crevice corrosion. There was no significant difference between the annealed and welded materials either. On the other hand, to conclude that these materials are immune to crevice corrosion in BSW-12 will require longer term testing.

  4. LSM Microelectrodes: Kinetics and Surface Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Norrman, Kion; Jacobsen, Torben;

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanum strontium manganite microelectrodes with the nominal composition of (La0.75Sr0.25)0.95MnO3 and a thickness of ca 500 nm was electrochemically characterized in situ at temperatures from 660 to 850◦C using a controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope. Impedance...... spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed on electrodes with diameters of 20–100 μm in oxygen, air and nitrogen both at open circuit voltage and at anodic and cathodic polarization. In situ conductance mapping, ex situ surface analysis by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and scanning...

  5. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials: FY 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.

    2014-10-01

    This annual reports presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project is divided into three tasks: 1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; 2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and 3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonproportionality, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the three tasks is provided in this Annual Report. Furthermore, peer-reviewed articles published this FY or currently under review and presentations given this FY are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  6. Localized corrosion of a candidate container material for high-level nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localized corrosion is one of the important considerations in the design of metallic containers used for the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. This paper addresses the effect of environmental factors on the localized corrosion behavior of alloy 825, one of the candidate alloys for containers in the Yucca Mountain repository site. A two-level, full factorial experimental design was used to examine the main effects and interactions of chloride, sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, and temperature. This was augmented by additional experiments involving chloride and temperature at several levels. Cyclic, potentiodynamic polarization tests were used to determine the relative susceptibility of the alloy to localized corrosion. Crevice corrosion was detected at chloride levels as low as 20 ppm, and both pitting and crevice corrosion were observed at higher chloride levels. Among the environmental factors, chloride and sulfate were found to be promoters of localized corrosion, while nitrate and fluoride were inhibitors of localized corrosion. The experiments indicated that the electrochemical parameters (e.g., pitting potential, repassivation potential, or the difference between them) were not sufficient indicators of localized corrosion. Instead, the visual observation and electrochemical parameters were combined into an index, termed localized corrosion index (LCI), to quantify the extent of localized corrosion

  7. Relativistic electron gas: A candidate for nature's left-handed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, C. A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The electric permittivities and magnetic permeabilities for a relativistic electron gas are calculated from quantum electrodynamics at finite temperature and density as functions of temperature, chemical potential, frequency, and wave vector. The polarization and the magnetization depend linearly on both electric and magnetic fields, and are the sum of a zero-temperature and zero-density vacuum part with a temperature- and chemical-potential-dependent medium part. Analytic calculations lead to generalized expressions that depend on three scalar functions. In the nonrelativistic limit, results reproduce the Lindhard formula. In the relativistic case, and in the long wavelength limit, we obtain the following: (i) for ω =0 , generalized susceptibilities that reduce to known nonrelativistic limits; (ii) for ω ≠0 , Drude-type responses at zero temperature. The latter implies that both the electric permittivity ɛ and the magnetic permeability μ may be simultaneously negative, a behavior characteristic of metamaterials. This unambiguously indicates that the relativistic electron gas is one of nature's candidates for the realization of a negative index of refraction system. Moreover, Maxwell's equations in the medium yield the dispersion relation and the index of refraction of the electron gas. Present results should be relevant for plasma physics, astrophysical observations, synchrotrons, and other environments with fast-moving electrons.

  8. Candidate coffee reference material for element content: production and certification schemes adopted at CENA/USP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a fundamental role in analytical chemistry establishing the traceability of measurement results and assuring accuracy and reliability. In spite of the huge importance of measurements in the food sector, Brazil does not produce CRMs to supply the demand. Consequently the acquisition of CRMs depends on imports at high costs. The coffee sector needs CRMs, however there is no material that represents the coffee composition. Since 1998, the Laboratorio de Radioisotopos (LRi) of CENA/USP has been involved in analysis of coffee. During this period, knowledge has been accumulated about several aspects of coffee, such as system of cultivation, elemental composition, homogeneity of the material, possible contaminants and physical properties of beans. Concomitantly, LRi has concentrated efforts in the field of metrology in chemistry, and now all this expertise is being used as the basis for the production of a coffee certified reference material (CRM) for inorganic element content. The scheme developed for the preparation and certification of coffee RM relies on the ISO Guides 34 and 35. The approaches for selection, collection and preparation of the material, moisture determination method, homogeneity testing, certification and long-term stability testing are discussed and a time frame for the expected accomplishments is provided. (author)

  9. Candidate coffee reference material for element content: production and certification schemes adopted at CENA/USP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliaferro, Fabio Sileno; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Radioisotopos], e-mail: fabiotag@cena.usp.br, e-mail: lis@cena.usp.br, e-mail: mabacchi@cena.usp.br, e-mail: ejfranca@cena.usp.br; Bode, Peter; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.], e-mail: P.Bode@iri.tudelft.nl

    2003-07-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a fundamental role in analytical chemistry establishing the traceability of measurement results and assuring accuracy and reliability. In spite of the huge importance of measurements in the food sector, Brazil does not produce CRMs to supply the demand. Consequently the acquisition of CRMs depends on imports at high costs. The coffee sector needs CRMs, however there is no material that represents the coffee composition. Since 1998, the Laboratorio de Radioisotopos (LRi) of CENA/USP has been involved in analysis of coffee. During this period, knowledge has been accumulated about several aspects of coffee, such as system of cultivation, elemental composition, homogeneity of the material, possible contaminants and physical properties of beans. Concomitantly, LRi has concentrated efforts in the field of metrology in chemistry, and now all this expertise is being used as the basis for the production of a coffee certified reference material (CRM) for inorganic element content. The scheme developed for the preparation and certification of coffee RM relies on the ISO Guides 34 and 35. The approaches for selection, collection and preparation of the material, moisture determination method, homogeneity testing, certification and long-term stability testing are discussed and a time frame for the expected accomplishments is provided. (author)

  10. Spectral emissivity measurements of candidate materials for very high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G.; Weber, S.J.; Martin, S.O.; Anderson, M.H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K., E-mail: kumars@cae.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, T.R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Heat dissipation by radiation is an important consideration in VHTR components, particularly the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), because of the fourth power temperature dependence of radiated heat. Since emissivity is the material property that dictates the ability to radiate heat, measurements of emissivities of materials that are being specifically considered for the construction of VHTR become important. Emissivity is a surface phenomenon and therefore compositional, structural, and topographical changes that occur at the surfaces of these materials as a result of their interactions with the environment at high temperatures will alter their emissivities. With this background, an experimental system for the measurement of spectral emissivity has been designed and constructed. The system has been calibrated in conformance with U.S. DoE quality assurance standards using inert ceramic materials, boron nitride, silicon carbide, and aluminum oxide. The results of high temperature emissivity measurements of potential VHTR materials such as ferritic steels SA 508, T22, T91 and austenitic alloys IN 800H, Haynes 230, IN 617, and 316 stainless steel have been presented.

  11. Spectral emissivity measurements of candidate materials for very high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat dissipation by radiation is an important consideration in VHTR components, particularly the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), because of the fourth power temperature dependence of radiated heat. Since emissivity is the material property that dictates the ability to radiate heat, measurements of emissivities of materials that are being specifically considered for the construction of VHTR become important. Emissivity is a surface phenomenon and therefore compositional, structural, and topographical changes that occur at the surfaces of these materials as a result of their interactions with the environment at high temperatures will alter their emissivities. With this background, an experimental system for the measurement of spectral emissivity has been designed and constructed. The system has been calibrated in conformance with U.S. DoE quality assurance standards using inert ceramic materials, boron nitride, silicon carbide, and aluminum oxide. The results of high temperature emissivity measurements of potential VHTR materials such as ferritic steels SA 508, T22, T91 and austenitic alloys IN 800H, Haynes 230, IN 617, and 316 stainless steel have been presented.

  12. Testing the homogeneity of candidate reference materials by solid sampling - AAS and INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessity to quantify a natural material's homogeneity with respect to its elemental distribution prior to chemical analysis of a given aliquot is emphasised. Available instruments and methods to obtain the relevant information are described. Additionally the calculation of element specific, relative homogeneity factors, HE, and of a minimum sample mass M5% to achieve 5% precision on a 95% confidence level is given. Especially, in the production and certification of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) this characteristic information should be determined in order to provide the user with additional inherent properties of the CRM to enable more economical use of the expensive material and to evaluate further systematic bias of the applied analytical technique. (author)

  13. Quality assessment of organic coffee beans for the preparation of a candidate reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A random sampling was carried out in the coffee beans collected for the preparation of the organic green coffee reference material in view of assessing the homogeneity and the presence of soil as impurity. Fifteen samples were taken for the between-sample homogeneity evaluation. One of the samples was selected and 10 test portions withdrawn for the within-sample homogeneity evaluation. Br, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, K, Na, Rb, Sc and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The F-test demonstrated that the material is homogeneous for Ca, Co, Cs, K and Sc, but not homogeneous for Br, Fe, Na, Rb and Zn. Results of terrigenous elements suggested negligible soil contamination in the raw material. (author)

  14. Fe-Au and Fe-Ag composites as candidates for biodegradable stent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Jian; Bian, Dong; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-02-01

    In this study, Fe-Ag and Fe-Au composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy using spark plasma sintering. Their microstructures, mechanical properties, and biocorrosion behavior were investigated by using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, environment scanning electronic microscopy, compressive test, electrochemical measurements, and immersion tests. Microstructure characterization indicated that the as-sintered iron-based materials obtained much finer grains than that of as-cast pure iron. Phase analysis showed that the Fe-Ag composites were composed of α-Fe and pure Ag phases, and Fe-Au composites consisted of α-Fe and Au phases. Compressive test showed that the improved mechanical strengths were obtained in as-sintered iron-based materials, among which the Fe-5 wt %Ag exhibited the best mechanical properties. The electrochemical and immersion tests revealed that the addition of Ag and Au could increase the corrosion rate of the iron matrix and change the corrosion mode into more uniform one. Based on the results of cytotoxicity evaluation, it was found that all the experimental material extracts performed no significant toxicity on the L-929 cells and EA. hy-926 cells, whereas a considerable inhibition on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells was observed. The hemocompatibility tests showed that the hemolysis of all the experimental materials was within the range of 5%, which is the criteria value of biomaterials with good hemocomaptibility. The amount of platelet adhered on the surface of as-sintered iron-based materials was lower than that of as-cast pure iron, and the morphology of platelets kept smoothly spherical on the surface of all the experimental materials. PMID:25727071

  15. Effects of surface condition on the corrosion of candidate structural materials in a simulated HTGR-GT environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment was used to study the effects of surface finish conditions on the subsequent elevated-temperature corrosion behavior of key candidate structural materials. The environment contained helium with 500 μatm H2/50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH4/2O at 9000C with total test exposure durations of 3000 hours. Specimens with lapped, grit-blasted, pickled, and preoxidized surface conditions were studied. Materials tested included two cast superalloys, IN 100 and IN 713LC; one centrifugally cast high-temperature alloy, HK 40 one oxice-dispersion-strengthened alloy, Inconel MA 754; and three wrought high-temperature alloys, Hastelloy Alloy X, Inconel Alloy 617, and Alloy 800H

  16. A new candidate as the cathode material for intermediate and low temperature SOFCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song; SUN Xueli; WEN Zhongsheng; SUN Juncai

    2006-01-01

    In order to develop the new cathode materials suitable for intermediate and low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT/LTSOFCs), LaNi1-xFexO3(x=0.4-0.8) (LNF) materials were synthesized using coprecipitation method. Their structures and morphologies were investigated by XRD and SEM, and their electronic conductivities at different temperatures were measured by dc four terminal method. Fuel cells were fabricated to evaluate the electrochemical properties of the LNF materials as cathodes at different temperatures. The performance of 450-497 mW·cm-2 was obtained in the temperature region of 580-650 ℃ for the LaNi0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode, and of 209-227 mW·cm-2 at 400-500 ℃ for the LaNi0.4Fe0.6O3. The excellent fuel cell performances indicate that the LNF materials are good cathodes for IT/LTSOFCs.

  17. Determination of cadmium, lead and zinc in a candidate reference materials using isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing demands placed on analytical laboratories to ensure the reliability of their results, due to the introduction of systems of quality and to the increasing use of metrology in chemical measurements has led most laboratories to validate their methodologies and to control them statistically. One of the techniques used most often for these purposes is based on the use of reference materials. The proper use of these materials means that laboratory results may be traced to the International System of Units, analytical methodologies can be validated, instruments calibrated and chemical measurements harmonized. One of the biggest challenges in developing reference materials is that of certifying their properties, a process that has been defined as assigning a concentration value that is as close as possible to the true value together with its uncertainty. Organizations that produce reference materials use several options for their certification process, and among these is the use of a primary method. Among the primary methods recognized by the International Office of Weights and Measures is the Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry technique. The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, through its Reference Materials Program, has prepared a reference material of clam tissue, which has been chemically defined by different analytical methodologies applied in different national and international laboratories. This work describes the methodology developed with the CIEMAT for determining the elements lead, cadmium and zinc in the clam tissue reference material using the primary technique of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry. The calculation is described for obtaining the spike amounts to be added to the sample and the procedure is explained for carrying out the isotopic exchange. The isotopic relationships 204Pb/205Pb, 111Cd/114Cd and 66Zn/67Zn were determined in an atomic emission spectrometer with a plasma source with the following characteristics: plasma ionization

  18. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Introduction, history, and current candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is to evaluate Yucca Mountain for its suitability as a potential site for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been occupied for a number of years with developing and evaluating the performance of waste packages for the potential repository. In recent years this work has been carried out under the guidance of and in collaboration with the Management and Operating contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., which in turn reports to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes the history of the selection and characterization of materials to be used in the engineered barrier system for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, describes the current candidate materials, presents a compilation of their properties, and summarizes available corrosion data and modeling. The term ''engineered materials'' is intended to distinguish those materials that are used as part of the engineered barrier system from the natural, geologic materials of the site

  19. Homogeneity study on biological candidate reference materials: the role of neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniel P.; Moreira, Edson G., E-mail: dsilva.pereira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis (INAA) is a mature nuclear analytical technique able to accurately determine chemical elements without the need of sample digestion and, hence, without the associated problems of analyte loss or contamination. This feature, along with its potentiality use as a primary method of analysis, makes it an important tool for the characterization of new references materials and in the assessment of their homogeneity status. In this study, the ability of the comparative method of INAA for the within-bottle homogeneity of K, Mg, Mn and V in a mussel reference material was investigated. Method parameters, such as irradiation time, sample decay time and distance from sample to the detector were varied in order to allow element determination in subsamples of different sample masses in duplicate. Sample masses were in the range of 1 to 250 mg and the limitations of the detection limit for small sample masses and dead time distortions for large sample masses were investigated. (author)

  20. Homogeneity study on biological candidate reference materials: the role of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis (INAA) is a mature nuclear analytical technique able to accurately determine chemical elements without the need of sample digestion and, hence, without the associated problems of analyte loss or contamination. This feature, along with its potentiality use as a primary method of analysis, makes it an important tool for the characterization of new references materials and in the assessment of their homogeneity status. In this study, the ability of the comparative method of INAA for the within-bottle homogeneity of K, Mg, Mn and V in a mussel reference material was investigated. Method parameters, such as irradiation time, sample decay time and distance from sample to the detector were varied in order to allow element determination in subsamples of different sample masses in duplicate. Sample masses were in the range of 1 to 250 mg and the limitations of the detection limit for small sample masses and dead time distortions for large sample masses were investigated. (author)

  1. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  2. Testing of candidate waste-package backfill and canister materials for basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) is developing a multiple-barrier waste package to contain high-level nuclear waste as part of an overall system (e.g., waste package, repository sealing system, and host rock) designed to isolate the waste in a repository located in basalt beneath the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The three basic components of the waste package are the waste form, the canister, and the backfill. An extensive testing program is under way to determine the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of potential canister and backfill materials. The data derived from this testing program will be used to recommend those materials that most adequately perform the functions assigned to the canister and backfill

  3. Composition and long-term safety of salt deposits as candidate sites for toxic material dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the evaluation of the long-term safety of toxic material dumps in salt bodies, it is necessary to understand also the potential processes in the rock and to evaluate their effects on the dump. The scientific fundamentals are observations on the geological situation as well as the mineralogical and chemical composition of the rock in which the dump is planned to be constructed. Knowledge on the existing geological, mineralogical and physico-chemical conditions of formation and transformation of evaporite allow a quantitative interpretation of mineral reactions and material transfers, which have taken place in the geological past. This working principle is independent of location. It is exemplarily applied to the Gorleben salt dome. (orig./DG)

  4. Inorganic material candidates to replace a metallic or non-metallic concrete containment liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal liners for concrete containments are generally organic or metals. They have to be able to inhibit radioactive leakage into the environment, but both types have shortcomings. The results of research to develop a better liner are published in this paper. The best material found was fibre-reinforced mortar. Of the fibres considered, steel, kevlar and glass were the best, each showing advantages and disadvantages. 1 ref., 9 tabs., 12 figs

  5. Systematic Study of Trace Radioactive Impurities in Candidate Construction Materials for EXO-200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, D.S.; Grinberg, P.; Weber, P.; Baussan, E.; Djurcic, Z.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Akimov, D.; Bellerive, A.; Bowcock, M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W.; Danilov, M.; DeVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolgolenko, A.; /Alabama U. /NRC-INMS /Neuchatel U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Maryland U. /UC, Irvine

    2007-10-24

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  6. Study of Clay Materials as Host Rock for Candidate of Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally some rock types such as crystalline, volcanic and clay materials have been using as host rock for radwaste disposal site. Objective of the paper is to completing the clays study for radwaste disposal through literature study which has related to information of clay. The characteristic of clay rocks, both physically and chemically has good potential for radwaste disposal site, due to this reason the clay rocks has been used for radwaste disposal in another countries. (author)

  7. A Straightforward and Automated Open Database Analysis as a First Sweep for Candidate Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Breternitz; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2015-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen is considered as the bottleneck in the implementation of portable fuel cell power generating systems. The necessary experimental studies to discover and develop appropriate storage materials are always time-limited. We discuss herein the approach of an uncomplicated and accessible computationally based analysis of database knowledge towards the identification of promising storage systems. The open access policy of the Crystallography Open Database (COD) invites researc...

  8. Systematic study of trace radioactive impurities in candidate construction materials for EXO-200

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, D S; Weber, P; Baussan, E; Djurcic, Z; Keefer, G; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Vuilleumier, J -L; Vuilleumier, J -M; Akimov, D; Bellerive, A; Bowcock, M; Breidenbach, M; Burenkov, A; Conley, R; Craddock, W; Danilov, M; DeVoe, R; Dixit, M; Dolgolenko, A; Ekchtout, I; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Flatt, B; Gratta, G; Green, M; Hall, C; Hall, K; Hallman, D; Hargrove, C; Herbst, R; Hodgson, J; Jeng, S; Kolkowitz, S; Kovalenko, A; Kovalenko, D; LePort, F; Mackay, D; Moe, M; Díez, M Montero; Neilson, R; Odian, A; O'Sullivan, K; Ounalli, L; Prescott, C Y; Rowson, P C; Schenker, D; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K; Smirnov, G; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Virtue, C; Wamba, K; Wodin, J

    2007-01-01

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  9. Tritium retention in candidate next-step protection materials: Engineering key issues and research requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although a considerable volume of valuable data on the behavior of tritium in beryllium and carbon-based armors exposed to hydrogenic fusion plasmas has been compiled over the past years both from operation of present-day tokamaks and from laboratory simulations, knowledge is far from being complete and tritium inventory predictions for these materials remain highly uncertain. In this paper the authors elucidate the main mechanisms responsible for tritium trapping and release in next step D-T tokamaks, as well as the applicability of some of the presently known database for design purposes. Due to their strong anticipated implications on the design, attention is focused mainly on codeposition and neutron damage effects. Some preliminary quantitative estimates are presented based on most recent experimental findings and latest modeling developments as well. The influence of important working conditions such as target temperature, loading particle fluxes, erosion and redeposition rates, as well as material characteristics such as the type of morphology of the protection material (i.e., amorphous plasma-sprayed beryllium vs. solid forms), and design dependent parameters are discussed in this paper. Remaining issues which require additional effort are identified

  10. Tritium retention in candidate next-step protection materials: engineering key issues and research requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although a considerable volume of valuable data on the behaviour of tritium in beryllium and carbon-based armours exposed to hydrogenic fusion plasmas has been compiled over the past years both from operation of present-day tokamaks and from laboratory simulations, knowledge is far from complete and tritium inventory predictions for these materials remain highly uncertain. In this paper we elucidate the main mechanisms responsible for tritium trapping and release in next-step D-T tokamaks, as well as the applicability of some of the presently known data bases for design purposes. Owing to their strong anticipated implications on tritium uptake and release, attention is focused mainly on the interaction of tritium with neutron damage induced defects, on tritium codeposition with eroded carbon and on the effects of oxide and surface contaminants. Some preliminary quantitative estimates are presented based on most recent experimental findings and latest modelling developments as well. The influence of important working conditions such as target temperature, loading particle fluxes, erosion and redeposition rates, as well as material characteristics such as the type of morphology of the protection material (i.e. amorphous plasma-sprayed beryllium vs. solid forms), and design dependent parameters are discussed in this paper. Remaining issues which require additional effort are identified. (orig.)

  11. Albedo calculations for candidate fusion reactor materials used in the inboard side of a compact tokamak reactor and the effects of using such materials on the tritium breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the total neutron albedo and associated energy distributions for 10 candidate fusion reactor materials have been calculated. The angular distributions of reflected neutrons for monodirectional 14.1 MeV neutrons incident on slabs of Pb, Be, and W are presented and the dependence of albedo on neutron energy and incident angle has been investigated. Finally, the impact on the tritium breeding of the outboard blanket of the choice of material used in the inboard side of the reactor has been assessed. Tritium breeding ratio (TBR) calculations have shown the inadequacy of the neutron albedo concept in predicting the impact of inboard materials on the TBR of the reactor. (author)

  12. PEDOT–CNT Composite Microelectrodes for Recording and Electrostimulation Applications: Fabrication, Morphology, and Electrical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gerwig, Ramona; Fuchsberger, Kai; Schroeppel, Birgit; Link, Gordon Steve; Heusel, Gerhard; Kraushaar, Udo; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Stett, Alfred; Stelzle, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Composites of carbon nanotubes and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT) and layers of PEDOT are deposited onto microelectrodes by electropolymerization of ethylenedioxythiophene in the presence of a suspension of carbon nanotubes and polystyrene sulfonate. Analysis by FIB and SEM demonstrates that CNT–PEDOT composites exhibit a porous morphology whereas PEDOT layers are more compact. Accordingly, capacitance and charge injection capacity of the composite material exceed those of pure PEDOT...

  13. Optimization on electrochemical synthesis of HKUST-1 as candidate catalytic material for Green diesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, W. W.; Nugraha, R. E.; Winarni, I. D.; Adreane, M.; Rahmawati, F.

    2016-04-01

    In the effort to support the discovery of new renewable energy sources in Indonesia, biofuel is one of promising options. The conversion of vegetable oil into ready-biofuel, especially green diesel, needs several steps, one of which is a hydrogenation or hydro-deoxygenation reaction. In this case, the catalyst plays a very important role regarding to its activity and selectivity, and Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) becoming a new generation of heterogeneous catalyst in this area. In this research, a preliminary study to optimize electrochemical synthesis of the catalytic material based on MOFs, namely HKUST-1 [Cu3(BTC)2], has been conducted. Some electrochemical reaction parameters were tested, for example by modifying the electrochemical synthetic conditions, i.e. by performing variation of voltages (12, 13, 14, and 15 Volt), temperatures (RT, 40, 60, and 80 °C) and solvents (ethanol, water, methanol and dimethyl-formamide (DMF)). Material characterization was carried out by XRD, SEM, FTIR, DTA/TG and SAA. The results showed that the optimum synthetic conditions of HKUST-1 are performed at room temperature in a solvent combination of water: ethanol (1: 1) and a voltage of 15 Volt for 2 hours. The XRD-analysis revealed that the resulted peaks are identical to the simulated powder pattern generated from single crystal data and comparable to the peaks of solvothermal method. However, the porosity of the resulting material through electrochemical method is still in the range of micro-pore according to IUPAC and 50% smaller than the porosity resulted from solvothermal synthesis. The corresponding compounds are thermally stable until 300 °C according to TG/DTA.

  14. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three copper-based alloys --- CDA 102 (OFHC copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni) --- are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for emplacement. The three copper-based alloys discussed here are being considered in addition to the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials discussed in Volume 3. The decay of radionuclides will result in substantial heat generation and in fluxes of gamma radiation. In this environment, container materials may degrade by atmospheric oxidation, uniform aqueous phase corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in tarnishing environments, or intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in nontarnishing environments. This report is a critical survey of available data on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three copper-based alloys. The requisite conditions for TGSCC and IGSCC include combinations of stress, oxygen, ammonia or nitrite, and water. Note that nitrite is generated by gamma radiolysis of moisture films in air but that ammonia is not. TGSCC has been observed in CDA 102 and CDA 613 exposed to moist ammonia-containing environments whereas SCC has not been documented for CDA 715 under similar conditions. SCC is also promoted in copper by nitrite ions. Furthermore, phosphorus-deoxidized copper is unusually susceptible to embrittlement in such environments. The presence of tin in CDA 613 prevents IGSCC. It is believed that tin segregates to grain boundaries, where it oxidizes very slowly, thereby inhibiting the oxidation of aluminum. 117 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs

  15. New π-Conjugated Materials Based on Furylenevinylene Candidate for Organic Solar Cells Application: A DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Alamy Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific properties of organic-conjugated molecules and polymers are of great importance since they have become the most promising materials for the optoelectronic device technology such as solar cells. The use of low band gap materials is a viable method for better harvesting of the solar spectrum and increasing its efficiency. The control of the parameters of these materials is a research issue of ongoing interest. In this work, a quantum chemical investigation was performed to explore the optical and electronic properties of a series of different compounds based on furylenevinylene. Different electron side groups were introduced to investigate their effects on the electronic structure. The theoretical knowledge of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO energy levels of the components is basic in studying organic solar cells; so the HOMO, LUMO, Gap energy and open circuit voltage (Voc of the studied compounds have been calculated and reported. These properties suggest that these materials behave as good candidate for organic solar cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i4.763 

  16. Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables

  17. Compatibility of candidate overpack materials with deep argillaceous HLW disposal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Belgian R and D programme on the disposal of high level radioactive waste has been focused on the qualification of deep argillaceous formations for HLW disposal, because they have a number of inherent attractive characteristics and also because they are sufficiently abundant to cover the Belgian needs. A large number of corrosion resistant materials as well as some corrosion allowance materials have been tested. The laboratory test program included accelerated tests as well as exposure tests in simulated repository conditions. Initial ''field'' experiments have been performed in a near surface clay quarry. However, in order to obtain realistic corrosion rate estimates corrosion experiments with simultaneous monitoring of the clay environment parameters have been started in a 230 meters deep underground laboratory constructed in the Boom clay formation at Mol. Two types of experimental devices have been designed. In the first type coupons are mounted on an internally heated tubular holder and are directly exposed to the solid clay. In a second type of test a purge gas is used to extract corrosive products from the clay and circulate them subsequently over a number of metal coupons. Relevant parameters such as pH and Eh are continuously monitored for evaluating the evolution of soil agressivity after the initial chemical and mechanical disturbance of the clay, caused by the operations required for the introduction of the experimental devices. (author)

  18. Microfabrication, characterization and in vivo MRI compatibility of diamond microelectrodes array for neural interfacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hébert, Clément, E-mail: clement.hebert@cea.fr [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Warnking, Jan; Depaulis, Antoine [INSERM, U836, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Garçon, Laurie Amandine [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); CEA/INAC/SPrAM/CREAB, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mermoux, Michel [Université Grenoble Alpes, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Eon, David [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mailley, Pascal [CEA-LETI-DTBS Minatec, 17 rue des Martyres, 38054 Grenoble (France); Omnès, Franck [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing still requires highly stable and biocompatible materials, in particular for in vivo applications. Indeed, most of the currently used materials are degraded and/or encapsulated by the proximal tissue leading to a loss of efficiency. Here, we considered boron doped diamond microelectrodes to address this issue and we evaluated the performances of a diamond microelectrode array. We described the microfabrication process of the device and discuss its functionalities. We characterized its electrochemical performances by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in saline buffer and observed the typical diamond electrode electrochemical properties, wide potential window and low background current, allowing efficient electrochemical detection. The charge storage capacitance and the modulus of the electrochemical impedance were found to remain in the same range as platinum electrodes used for standard commercial devices. Finally we observed a reduced Magnetic Resonance Imaging artifact when the device was implanted on a rat cortex, suggesting that boron doped-diamond is a very promising electrode material allowing functional imaging. - Highlights: • Microfabrication of all-diamond microelectrode array • Evaluation of as-grown nanocrystalline boron-doped diamond for electrical neural interfacing • MRI compatibility of nanocrystalline boron-doped diamond.

  19. Hot carrier solar cell absorbers: investigation of carrier cooling properties of candidate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conibeer, G.; Shrestha, Santosh; Huang, Shujuan; Patterson, Robert; Xia, Hongze; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Gupta, Neeti; Smyth, Suntrana; Liao, Yuanxun; Lin, Shu; Wang, Pei; Dai, Xi; Chung, Simon; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The hot carrier cell aims to extract the electrical energy from photo-generated carriers before they thermalize to the band edges. Hence it can potentially achieve a high current and a high voltage and hence very high efficiencies up to 65% under 1 sun and 86% under maximum concentration. To slow the rate of carrier thermalisation is very challenging, but modification of the phonon energies and the use of nanostructures are both promising ways to achieve some of the required slowing of carrier cooling. A number of materials and structures are being investigated with these properties and test structures are being fabricated. Initial measurements indicate slowed carrier cooling in III-Vs with large phonon band gaps and in multiple quantum wells. It is expected that soon proof of concept of hot carrier devices will pave the way for their development to fully functioning high efficiency solar cells.

  20. Evaluation of the mechanical and physical properties of nuclear fuel candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most reliable material for the research and test reactor fuel is found to be U3Si2 so far. Aluminum can be added to improve the corrosion resistance when the fuel is designed in rod shape and the fuel is restrained in compressive stress. It is proposed that further development should be put forward to the study of U3Six alloy with small addition of Cu. Thus, Seven different alloys were made and fabricated in our laboratory, and the fundamental techniques related to the variation of fabrication parameters were developed in this study. Results from the heat treatment, density measurement, hardness tests and the observation of the microstructures have shown to be very close to those of other countries. These data shall be applied as a fundamental to the development of the fabrication technology for the domestic supply of KMRR nuclear fuel. (Author)

  1. The future supply of and demand for candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the findings of a literature survey carried out to assess the future world supply of and demand for titanium, copper and lead. These metals are candidate materials for the fabrication of containers for the immobilization and disposal of Canada's nuclear used-fuel waste for a reference Used-fuel Disposal Centre. Such a facility may begin operation by approximately 2020, and continue for about 40 years. The survey shows that the world has abundant supplies of titanium minerals (mostly in the form of ilmenite), which are expected to last up to at least 2110. However, for copper and lead the balance between supply and demand may warrant increased monitoring beyond the year 2000. A number of factors that can influence future supply and demand are discussed in the report

  2. Haynes 230 Mini-Can Welding to Support Planned irradiation Testing of Candidate Space Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Space MICE-3B irradiation testing was to test uranium dioxide (UO2) and uranium nitride (UN) fuel pellets under conditions anticipated in a prototypic space reactor application. One goal of the test program was to optimize the accuracy of UN and UO2 fuel sample temperature measurement during testing. The fuel samples were required to be canned to (1) prevent sample dissociation, (2) prevent release of fission products in excess of test reactor emission thresholds, and (3) prevent chemical interaction with impurities in the helium-neon gas stream [A]. Haynes 230, a nickel-chromium-tungsten (Ni-Cr-W) high creep strength structural alloy was selected as the encapsulation material that could be easily hermetically sealed and meet material property requirements at 1550 F (1116 K), the maximum design temperature of the mini-can. Laser welding was pursued to minimize weld distortion and meet ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code weld qualification standards [2]. The mini-can design contained a 0.050 inch (1.3 mm) thick can lid that was to be welded to a 0.050 inch thick lip on the base can such that the lid overlapped the base lip as a lap joint (Figure la). The circumferential flat lap joint weld required a minimum depth of penetration of 0.050 inches (1.3 mm). Initially, a maximum diametrical distortion of 0.002-0.003 inches (50-75 microns) of the outside diameter of the can after welding was specified to allow for close proximity of a thermocouple near the external wall of the mini-can containing UN samples and result in improved fuel sample temperature measurement accuracy during testing. For the encapsulation of UO2 specimens a 0.01 0 inch (250 micron) diametrical distortion was allowed due to lower heat generation expected within the capsule and greater flexibility on thermocouple location. Manual gas tungsten arc welding was then developed with a V-groove weld lap joint design (Figures 1b). All welding was done in a high purity helium cover gas

  3. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO2, 20 mass % Na2O, 10 mass % Al2O3, 8 mass % B2O3, and 1.5 mass % K2O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  4. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for Fuel Cladding in Canadian SCWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yimin; Guzonas, David

    2016-02-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative next generation reactor that offers many promising features, but the high-temperature high-pressure coolant introduces unique challenges to the long-term safe and reliable operation of in-core components, in particular the fuel cladding. To achieve high thermal efficiency, the Canadian SCWR concept has a coolant core outlet temperature of 625°C at 25 MPa with a peak cladding temperature as high as 800°C. International and Canadian research programs on corrosion issues in supercritical water have been conducted to support the SCWR concept. This paper provides a brief review of corrosion in supercritical water and summarizes the Canadian corrosion assessment work on potential fuel cladding materials. Five alloys, SS 347H, SS310S, Alloy 800H, Alloy 625 and Alloy 214, have been shown to have sufficient corrosion resistance to be used as the fuel cladding. Additional work, including tests in an in-reactor loop, is needed to confirm that these alloys would work as the fuel cladding in the Canadian SCWR.

  5. Laboratory scale development of coating for improving characteristics of candidate materials for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of coatings of refractory low atomic number materials on to different components of Tokamak type controlled thermonuclear reactor are expected to provide a degree of design flexibility. The project envisages to deal with the challenging problem on laboratory scale. Coatings investigated include carbon, beryllium, boron, titanium carbide and alumina and substrates chosen have been 304, 316 stainless steels, monel-400, molybdenum, copper, graphite, etc. For their deposition, different techniques (e.g. evaporation, sputtering and their different variants) have been tried, appropriate ones chosen and their parameters optimized. The coating composition has been analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Surface morphology has been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sebastian coating adherence tester has been used for adhesion measurement and Wilson's Tukon microhardness tester for their microhardness measurement. The coatings have been subjected to pulses from YAG laser to evaluate their thermal cycling behaviour. Deuterium ion bombardment (Energy: 20-120 keV; doses: 1019-9.3x1020 ions/cm2) behaviour has also been studied. In general, adherent and hard coatings capable of withstanding thermal cycling could be deposited. Out of the coatings studied, titanium carbide shows best results. The following pages are reprints and not mircrofiched: p. 25-32, 39-41, 57-81. Bibliographic description is on page 13

  6. Impact property at cryogenic temperature of candidate materials for fusion reactor and their electron beam welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impact properties at cryogenic temperature of candidate materials for fusion reactor and their electron beam welded joints are investigated by using instrumented Charpy impact testing apparatus. Material used are aluminum alloys (A7N01, A5083, A6061), JFMS (Japanese Ferritic Martensitic Steel) and two kinds of high manganese steels. Although JFMS is a steel for high temperature use, the impact test is conducted at low temperature same as the cases of the other materials. Testing results are obtained as follows. 1. Base metals and welded joint of aluminum alloys exhibit high absorbed energy at low temperature. Ductility of each base metal and welded joint gradually decreases with decreasing of testing temperature. 2. Base metal and welded joint of JFMS exhibit an absorbed energy transition temperature at near a room temperature. 3. Base metal and welded joint of high manganese steel A-T (18Mn) exhibit abrupt decreasing of absorbed energy at 77K, but base metal and welded joint of high manganese steel B-T (22Mn-0.2N) exhibit gradual increasing of maximum strength and decreasing of ductility with decreasing of testing temperature. (author)

  7. Transient Scuffing of Candidate Diesel Engine Materials at Temperatures up to 600oC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.

    2003-06-20

    This milestone report summarizes the general characteristics of scuffing damage to solid surfaces, then describes transient effects on scuffing observed during oscillating sliding wear tests of candidate material pairs for high-temperature diesel engine applications, like waste-gate bushings in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems. It is shown that oxidation and the formation of wear particle layers influence the friction of such components. In the case of metallic materials in cylindrical contacts where there is a generous clearance, debris layers can form which reduce the torque over time. For ceramic combinations, the opposite effect is observed. Here, the accumulation of wear debris leads to an increase in the turning torque. High-temperature transient scuffing behavior is considered in terms of a series of stages in which the composition and morphology of the contact is changing. These changes are used to explain the behavior of 11 material pairs consisting of stainless steels, Ni-based alloys, Co-based alloys, and structural ceramics.

  8. Investigation on candidates of principal facilities for exposure dose to public for the facilities using nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HTTR holds the nuclear fuel material use facilities in its reactor facilities, for the purpose of study on the fracture behavior of fuel and release behavior of fission products, development of high-performance fuel, and measurement of neutron flux. Due to the revision of the 'Act on the regulation of nuclear source material, nuclear fuel material and reactor', the facilities having the 'Important safety-related facilities' among the facilities applicable to the Enforcement Ordinance Article 41 (Article 41 facilities) has come to need to conform to the 'Regulations concerning standards for the location, structure, and equipment of used facilities and others'. In this case, actions such as modification by all possible means are required. The nuclear fuel substance use facilities of HTTR correspond to Article 41 facilities. So, whether it is a candidate for the 'Important safety-related facilities' has been examined. As a result, it is confirmed that the facilities are not correspond to the 'Important safety-related facilities', and it has been concluded that modification measures for the purpose of conforming to this approval standard rule are not necessary as of the present. (A.O.)

  9. The effects of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages has been comprehensively reviewed. The comparison of corrosion of the various materials was compared in three distinct environments: Environment A; Mg2+-enriched brines in which hydrolysis of the cation produces acidic environments and the Mg2+ interferes with the formation of protective films; Environment B; saline environments with a low Mg2+ content which remain neutral; Environment C; moist aerated conditions.The reference design of nuclear waste package for emplacement in the proposed waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, employs a dual wall arrangement, in which a 2 cm thick nickel alloy inner barrier is encapsulated within a 10 cm thick mild steel outer barrier. It is felt that this arrangement will give considerable containment lifetimes, since no common mode failure exists for the two barriers. The corrosion performance of this waste package will be determined by the exposure environment established within the emplacement drifts. Key features of the Yucca Mountain repository in controlling waste package degradation are expected to be the permanent availability of oxygen and the limited presence of water. When water contacts the surface of the waste package, its gamma radiolysis could produce an additional supply of corrosive agents. the gamma field will be produced by the radioactive decay of radionuclides within the waste form, and its magnitude will depend on the nature and age of the waste form as well as the material and wall thickness of the waste package

  10. Thermal emittance measurements on candidate refractory materials for application in nuclear space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a highly efficient General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) space power system requires that all of the available thermal energy from the GPHS modules be utilized in the most thermally efficient manner. This includes defining the heat transfer/thermal gradient profile between the surface of the GPHS's and the surface of the energy converter's hot end whose geometry is dependent on the converter technology selected. Control of the radiant heat transfer between these two surfaces is done by regulating how efficiently the selected converter's hot end surface can reject heat compared to a perfect blackbody, i.e. its infrared emittance. Several refractory materials of interest including niobium-1% zirconium, molybdenum-44.5% rhenium and L-605 (a cobalt-based alloy) were subjected to various surface treatments (grit blasting with either SiC or WC particulates) and heat treatments (up to 1198 K for up to 3000 hours). Room temperature infrared emittance values were then obtained using two different infrared reflectometers. Grit blasting with either SiC or WC tended to increase the emittance of flat or curved L-605 coupons by ∼0.2-0.3 independent of heat treatment. Heat treating L-605 coupons under 773 K for up to 2000 hours had only a slight effect on their emittance, while heat treating L-605 coupons at 973 K for over 150 hours appeared to significantly increase their emittance. For the temperatures and times studied here, the emittance values obtained on niobium-1% zirconium and molybdenum-44.5% rhenium coupons were independent of heat treat times and temperatures (except for the niobium-1% zirconium coupon that was heat treated at 1198 K for 150 hours)

  11. Joining Characteristics of Intermediate Heat Exchanger Candidate Materials in Very High Temperature Reactor(VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide studies have shown an increasing need for energy with the use of all energy sources, ranging from renewable sources through nuclear power, gas, to a limited extent oil and finally to the most prolific fossil fuel, coal. Although this increased need for generation capacity can met with different fuel sources, maybe the main fuel worldwide for next generation is hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor(VHTR) can produce hydrogen from only heat and water by using thermochemical iodine-sulfur(I-S) process or from heat, water, and natural gas by applying the steam reformer technology to core outlet temperatures greater than about 950 .deg. C. An intermediate heat exchanger(IHX) is the component in which the heat from the primary circuit helium is transferred to the secondary circuit helium(about 950 .deg. at 1000psi), thus keeping the secondary circuit free of radioactive contamination. The IHX will be located with a pressure vessel within the reactor containment that will be attached to the reactor pressure vessel by the cross-vessel. Therefore, an intermediate heat exchanger(IHX) especially is a key component in a VHTR. The Status of the IHX design will probably be a compact, counter-flow heat exchanger design consisting of metallic plate construction with small channels etched into each plate and assembled into a module. This heat exchanger design is refereed to as a 'printed circuit heat exchanger'. Printed circuit type heat exchanger are constructed from flat metal plates into which fluid flow channels are chemically milled. The milled plates are stacked and diffusion bonded together. In this study, the effects of the brazing temperature and homogenizing time for brazed specimens on the joint and base material microstructures, elemental distribution within the microstructures and the resulting joint tensile strength and micro hardness of Ni-based superalloy such as Haynes 230 were investigated

  12. Impedance Characterization of the Degradation of Insulating Layer Patterned on Interdigitated Microelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Sohee; Cho, Sungbo

    2015-10-01

    Life-time and functionality of planar microelectrode-based devices are determined by not only the corrosion-resistance of the electrode, but also the durability of the insulation layer coated on the transmission lines. Degradation of the insulating layer exposed to a humid environment or solution may cause leakage current or signal loss, and a decrease in measurement sensitivity. In this study, degradation of SU-8, an epoxy-based negative photoresist and insulating material, patterned on Au interdigitated microelectrode (IDE) for long-term (>30 days) immersion in an electrolyte at 37 °C was investigated by electrical impedance spectroscopy and theoretical equivalent circuit modeling. From the experiment and simulation results, it was found that the degradation level of the insulating layer of the IDE electrode can be characterized by monitoring the resistance of the insulating layer among the circuit parameters of the designed equivalent circuit modeling. PMID:26726374

  13. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the 63 μm. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K2O) of the Na>Mg>>K. The 2O) which indicates that also this smectite may be interstratified with a few percent illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite but in this case Fe predominates over Mg in the octahedral sheet. The structural formula suggests that this smectite has the lowest total layer charge of the smectites examined. Kutch BF 04 contains essentially no particles >63 μm. The bentonite has a high content of titanium and iron-rich accessory minerals, such as anatase, magnetite, hematite and goethite. Other accessory minerals of significance are feldspars and quartz, whereas the content of sulphur

  14. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  15. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Siv; Karnland, Ola (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the <1mum fraction were analyzed when relevant. Prior to the chemical analyses the <1 mum fractions were converted to homo-ionic clays and purified by dialysis. The chemical data were used for calculating the structural formula of the smectites. Milos BF 04 contains ca. 10% particles >63 mum. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K{sub 2}O) of the <1 mum fraction suggest that the smectite is interstratified with ca. 10% illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite and according to the structural formula, Mg predominates over Fe in the octahedral sheet. However, remnants of Mg-carbonates, if present, may be a source of error in the formula calculation. Milos BF 08 has a

  16. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  17. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  18. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most significant factors impacting the performance of waste package container materials under repository relevant conditions is the thermal environment. This environment will be affected by the areal power density of the repository, which is dictated by facility design, and the dominant heat transfer mechanism at the site. The near-field environment will evolve as radioactive decay decreases the thermal output of each waste package. Recent calculations (Buscheck and Nitao, 1994) have addressed the importance of thermal loading conditions on waste package performance at the Yucca Mountain site. If a relatively low repository thermal loading design is employed, the temperature and relative humidity near the waste package may significantly affect the degradation of corrosion allowance barriers due to moist air oxidation and radiolytically enhanced corrosion. The purpose this report is to present a literature review of the potential degradation modes for moderately corrosion resistant nickel copper and nickel based candidate materials that may be applicable as alternate barriers for the ACD systems in the Yucca Mountain environment. This report presents a review of the corrosion of nickel-copper alloys, summaries of experimental evaluations of oxidation and atmospheric corrosion in nickel-copper alloys, views of experimental studies of aqueous corrosion in nickel copper alloys, a brief review of galvanic corrosion effects and a summary of stress corrosion cracking in these alloys

  19. High-strength reaction-sintered SiC: a new candidate material for large spaceborne telescope systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Yukari Y.; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Tange, Yoshio

    2004-11-01

    The high-strength reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) developed and manufactured by Toshiba and NEC-Toshiba Space Systems, NT-SiC, is one of the most promising, excellent and feasible candidates for light-weighted large-diameter space-borne optics that are applied to geostationary earth observations and astronomical observations. Small NT-SiC sample mirrors were manufactured to study basic physical parameters and features, and optical performances of the material, such as the surface conditions of polished NT-SiC, the condition of inner crystal grains, the correlation between the surface roughness and polishing, scattering characteristics, absorbance of solar light and infrared emissivity, and adhesiveness of metal coating. The current state of the art of the development of the NT-SiC mirror and the feasibility of light-weighted large-diameter NT-SiC mirrors for space-borne optics are described. Although technical challenges to achieve the surface roughness that is applicable to ultraviolet mirrors still remain, the optical performance and the physical properties of the present NT-SiC show that it is one of the most excellent mirror material in optical-infrared wavelength region.

  20. Sonochemically Fabricated Microelectrode Arrays for Use as Sensing Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart D. Collyer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The development, manufacture, modification and subsequent utilisation of sonochemically-formed microelectrode arrays is described for a range of applications. Initial fabrication of the sensing platform utilises ultrasonic ablation of electrochemically insulating polymers deposited upon conductive carbon substrates, forming an array of up to 70,000 microelectrode pores cm–2. Electrochemical and optical analyses using these arrays, their enhanced signal response and stir-independence area are all discussed. The growth of conducting polymeric “mushroom” protrusion arrays with entrapped biological entities, thereby forming biosensors is detailed. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this approach, lending itself ideally to mass fabrication coupled with unrivalled sensitivity and stir independence makes commercial viability of this process a reality. Application of microelectrode arrays as functional components within sensors include devices for detection of chlorine, glucose, ethanol and pesticides. Immunosensors based on microelectrode arrays are described within this monograph for antigens associated with prostate cancer and transient ischemic attacks (strokes.

  1. Form-function relations in cone-tipped stimulating microelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Steve Yaeli; Einat Binyamin; Shy Shoham

    2009-01-01

    Metal micro-electrodes are widely used in neuroscience research, and could potentially replace macro-electrodes in various neuro-stimulation applications where their small size, specificity, and their ability to also measure unit activity are desirable. The design of stimulating microelectrodes for specific applications requires knowledge on how tip geometry affects function, but several fundamental aspects of this relationship are not yet well understood. This study uses a combined experimen...

  2. Form-Function Relations in Cone-Tipped Stimulating Microelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Yaeli, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Metal microelectrodes are widely used in neuroscience research, and could potentially replace macroelectrodes in various neuro-stimulation applications where their small size, specificity, and their ability to also measure unit activity are desirable. The design of stimulating microelectrodes for specific applications requires knowledge on how tip geometry affects function, but several fundamental aspects of this relationship are not yet well understood. This study uses a combined experimenta...

  3. Antifouling Self-assembled Monolayers on Microelectrodes for Patterning Biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Noel, John; Teizer, Winfried; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for forming a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) trimethoxysilane self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a silicon substrate with gold microelectrodes. The PEG-SAM is formed in a single assembly step and prevents biofouling on silicon and gold surfaces. The SAM is used to coat microelectrodes patterned with standard, positive-tone lithography. Using the microtubule as an example, we apply a DC voltage to induce electrophoretic migration to the SAM-coated electrode in a reversible m...

  4. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM. The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA, due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors.

  5. Form-function relations in cone-tipped stimulating microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Yaeli

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal micro-electrodes are widely used in neuroscience research, and could potentially replace macro-electrodes in various neuro-stimulation applications where their small size, specificity, and their ability to also measure unit activity are desirable. The design of stimulating microelectrodes for specific applications requires knowledge on how tip geometry affects function, but several fundamental aspects of this relationship are not yet well understood. This study uses a combined experimental and physical finite-elements simulation approach to formulate three new relationships between the geometrical and electrical properties of stimulating cone-tipped tungsten microelectrodes: 1. The empirical relationship between microelectrode 1kHz impedance and the exposed tip surface area is best approximated by an inverse square-root function (as expected for a cone-tipped resistive interface. 2. Tip angle plays a major role in determining current distribution along the tip, and as a consequence crucially affects the charge injection capacity of a microelectrode. 3. The critical current for the onset of corrosion is independent of tip surface area in sharp microelectrodes.

  6. Erosion and redeposition behavior of selected net-candidate materials under high-flux hydrogen, deuterium plasma bombardment in PISCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma erosion and redeposition behavior of selected candidate materials for plasma-facing components in the NET-machine have been investigated using the PISCES-A facility. Materials studied include SiC-impregnated graphite, 2D graphite weaves with and without CVD- SiC coatings, and isotropic graphite. These specimens were exposed to continuous hydrogen or deuterium plasmas under the following conditions: electron temperature range from 5 to 35eV; plasma density range from 5 x 1011 to 1 x 1012 cm-3; flux range from 5 x 1017 to 2 x 1018 ions cm-2 s-1; fluence of the order from 1021 to 1022 ions/cm2; bombarding energies of 50 and 100eV; target temperature range from 300 to 1000/degree/C. The erosion yield of SiC-impregnated graphite due to deuterium plasma bombardment is found to be a factor of 2 to 3 less than that of isotropic graphite materials. A further factor of 2-3 reduction in the erosion yield is observed in when redeposition associated with reionization of sputtered particle becomes significant. From postbombardment surface analysis with AES, the surface composition in terms of the Si/C of SiC-impregnated graphite ratio is found to increase from 0.15 to 0.7 after hydrogen plasma bombardment to a fluence around 4 x 1021 ions/cm2 at 350/degree/C. However, the final surface composition appears to remain unchanged up to 4 x 1022 ions/cm2, the highest fluence in the present study. Significant surface morphological modifications of SiC-impregnated graphite are observed after the high-fluence plasma exposure. Several structural problems such as coating-substrate adhesion have been pointed out for SiC-coated 2D graphite weave. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  7. The effects of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada); King, F

    1999-07-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on the corrosion of candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste packages has been comprehensively reviewed. The comparison of corrosion of the various materials was compared in three distinct environments: Environment A; Mg{sup 2+}-enriched brines in which hydrolysis of the cation produces acidic environments and the Mg{sup 2+} interferes with the formation of protective films; Environment B; saline environments with a low Mg{sup 2+} content which remain neutral; Environment C; moist aerated conditions.The reference design of nuclear waste package for emplacement in the proposed waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, employs a dual wall arrangement, in which a 2 cm thick nickel alloy inner barrier is encapsulated within a 10 cm thick mild steel outer barrier. It is felt that this arrangement will give considerable containment lifetimes, since no common mode failure exists for the two barriers. The corrosion performance of this waste package will be determined by the exposure environment established within the emplacement drifts. Key features of the Yucca Mountain repository in controlling waste package degradation are expected to be the permanent availability of oxygen and the limited presence of water. When water contacts the surface of the waste package, its gamma radiolysis could produce an additional supply of corrosive agents. the gamma field will be produced by the radioactive decay of radionuclides within the waste form, and its magnitude will depend on the nature and age of the waste form as well as the material and wall thickness of the waste package.

  8. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-11-01

    The high resistance of cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure is one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate such deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisted of a high-resolution video camera, light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources, and the in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. In this study eleven (11) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., 6 FeCrAl alloys and 5 nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800°C while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys and/or for relatively thick wall specimens.

  9. HCV INFECTION THROUGH PERFORATING AND CUTTING MATERIAL AMONG CANDIDATES FOR BLOOD DONATION IN BELÉM, BRAZILIAN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubenilson Caldas Valois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated epidemiological factors for HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments among candidates for blood donation (CBD in the city of Belém, Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Two definitions of HCV infection cases were used: anti-HCV positivity shown by EIA, and HCV-RNA detection by PCR. Infected and uninfected CBD completed a questionnaire about possible risk factors associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments. The information was evaluated using simple and multiple logistic regressions. Between May and November 2010, 146 (1.1% persons with anti-HCV antibodies and 106 (0.8% with HCV-RNA were detected among 13,772 CBD in Belém. Risk factors associated with HCV infection based on the EIA (model 1 and PCR (model 2 results were: use of needles and syringes sterilized at home; shared use of razors at home, sharing of disposable razors in barbershops, beauty salons etc.; and sharing manicure and pedicure material. The models of HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments should be taken into account by local and regional health authorities and by those of other countries with similar cultural practices, in order to provide useful information to guide political and public strategies to control HCV transmission.

  10. Impact of phase stability on the corrosion behavior of the austenitic candidate materials for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for the development of the waste package design to meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing requirements for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. The metallic container component of the waste package is required to assist in providing substantially complete containment of the waste for a period of up to 1000 years. Long term phase stability of the austenitic candidate materials (304L and 316L stainless steels and alloy 825) over this time period at moderate temperatures (100-2500C) can impact the mechanical and corrosion behavior of the metal barrier. A review of the technical literature with respect to phase stability of 304L, 316L and 825 is presented. The impact of martensitic transformations, carbide precipitation and intermediate (σ, chi, and eta) phase formation on the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these alloys at repository relevant conditions is discussed. The effect of sensitization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of each alloy is also addressed. A summary of the impact of phase stability on the degradation of each alloy in the proposed repository environment is included. 32 refs., 6 figs

  11. Narrow gap HST welding process and its application to candidate pipe material for 700 C USC boiler component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Gang; Sato, Takashi; Fukuda, Yuji [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Research Lab.; Mitsuhata, Koichi [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Div.

    2008-07-01

    Increasing steam temperature and pressure conditions of 700 C USC (Ultra Super Critical) power plants under consideration require the adoption of Ni-based alloys. One of the most crucial issues for the application of 700 C USC power plants is the establishment of welding technology for the thick-walled components. This paper reports the research results on the practicability of candidate material for the thickwalled components. The weld test was conducted on Ni-based Alloy617 (52Ni-22Cr- 13Co-9Mo-Ti-Al) by using the narrow gap HST (Hot wire Switching TIG) welding process developed by Babcock-Hitachi K.K with the matching filler wire of Alloy617. The weldability and strength properties of weld joint were examined. The sound weld joint was achieved. The advantages of narrow gap HST welding process for the thick-walled components of Ni-based alloy were discussed from the viewpoints of weld metal chemical composition and creep rupture strength. Due to the good shielding effect, the melting loss of alloy elements in the weld consumable during the narrow gap HST welding procedure was suppressed successfully. The narrow gap HST weld joint showed comparable strength with the parent metal. (orig.)

  12. Electrochemical Kinetic Study of LiFePO4 Using Cavity Microelectrode

    OpenAIRE

    Come, Jérémy; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Hamelet, Stéphane; Masquelier, Christian; Simon, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Lithium cation insertion and extraction in LiFePO4 were electrochemically studied with a cavity microelectrode (CME). Cyclic voltammetry measurements were used to characterize the kinetics of the material. LiFePO4 was successfully cycled from 0.1 mV s-1 up to 1 V s-1 and is therefore a suitable material to be used in high power applications, such as asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. Several kinetic behaviors were observed depending on the sweep rate. The LiFePO4 was found to follow different...

  13. Glass pipette-carbon fiber microelectrodes for evoked potential recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes M.F.D.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methods for recording field potentials with tungsten electrodes make it virtually impossible to use the same recording electrode also as a lesioning electrode, for example for histological confirmation of the recorded site, because the lesioning procedure usually wears off the tungsten tip. Therefore, the electrode would have to be replaced after each lesioning procedure, which is a very high cost solution to the problem. We present here a low cost, easy to make, high quality glass pipette-carbon fiber microelectrode that shows resistive, signal/noise and electrochemical coupling advantages over tungsten electrodes. Also, currently used carbon fiber microelectrodes often show problems with electrical continuity, especially regarding electrochemical applications using a carbon-powder/resin mixture, with consequent low performance, besides the inconvenience of handling such a mixture. We propose here a new method for manufacturing glass pipette-carbon fiber microelectrodes with several advantages when recording intracerebral field potentials

  14. A 96-channel neural stimulation system for driving AIROF microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P; Cogan, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and testing of a 96-channel stimulation system to drive activated iridium oxide (AIROF) microelectrodes within safe charge-injection limits. Our system improves upon the traditional capacitively coupled, symmetric charge-balanced biphasic stimulation waveform so as to maximize charge-injection capacity without endangering the microelectrodes. It can deliver computer-controlled cathodic current pulse for to up to 96 AIROF microelectrodes and positively bias them during the inter-pulse interval. The stimulation system is comprised of (1) 12 custom-designed PCB boards each hosting an 8-channel ASIC chip, (2) a motherboard to communicate between these 12 boards and the PC, (3) the PC interface equipped with a DIO card and the corresponding software. We plan to use this system in animal experiments for intracortical neural stimulation of implanted electrodes within our visual prosthesis project. PMID:17271241

  15. Microelectrode-guided Technique for Treatment of Parkinson's Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈坚; 杨正明; 郭东生; 牛洪泉

    2002-01-01

    From May, 2000 to June, 2001, 27 patients with Parkinson disease (PD), including 10cases of rigidity, 13 cases of tremor, 4 cases of rigidity and tremor, were treated by microelectrodeguided technique. Among them, phlebotomy was carried out in 17 cases and thalamotomy in 10 cases. All the targets of lesion were anatomically located by using MR and neurophysiological signals on microelectrode. Our results showed that the efficiency of microelectrode-guided technique for treatment of PD was 98 %. The postoperative unified parkinson disease rating scale were 12.3+ 9.1 and 13. 2± 8. 9 respectively, which significantly improved as compared with those before operation. It was concluded that by recognizing special electrical signals in neurons microelectrode-guided neuropsychological techniques can locate target at cellular level, which overcomes the individual difference in anatomy and function, and allow more accuracy, safety and efficiency of operation. This is especially true of PD patients who fail to respond to medical treatment.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  17. Development of a Microelectrode Array Sensing System for Water Quality Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis reports the design and fabrication of a low-cost reliable microelectrode array sensing platform and its application toward water quality monitoring, including heavy metal ion detection. Individually addressable microelectrodes were designed in a planar array on a nonconductive glass substrate by a photolithography method. The size, shape, composition, and functionality of the microelectrodes were theoretically explored in order to maximize performance. The microelectrode array se...

  18. Characterization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate conductive polymer microelectrodes for transmitter detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon T.; Vreeland, Richard F.; Heien, Michael L.;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the physical and electrochemical properties of micropatterned poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate (PEDOT:tosylate) microelectrodes for neurochemical detection. PEDOT:tosylate is a promising conductive polymer electrode material for chip-based bioanalytical...... applications such as capillary electrophoresis, high-performance liquid chromatography, and constant potential amperometry at living cells. Band electrodes with widths down to 3 μm were fabricated on polymer substrates using UV lithographic methods. The electrodes are electrochemically stable in a range...

  19. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...... were carried out with aerobic glucose and starch degrading biofilms. The well described aerobic glucose degradation biofilm system was used to test the combined reactor set-up. Results predicted from known biofilm kinetics were obtained. In the starch degrading biofilm, basic assumptions were tested...

  20. Novel 3D microelectrodes and pipettes by wet and dry etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria; Vazquez, Patricia; Aimone, Alessandro;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop novel 3D micro- and nanoelectrodes and pipettes by use of carefully optimised standard microfabrication techniques such as wet (by KOH) and dry silicon etching. Two types of electrodes have been fabricated and characterized: small nanoelectrodes to be used for...... localised measurements on cell cultures and high aspect ratio scalloped microelectrodes for measurements in brain slices. This paper presents improved fabrication processes for both types of electrodes and the pipettes, as well as the electrical and electrochemical characterization of the small electrodes...... in order to confirm their functionality. Although functional, an increase in the electrode surface area is needed if they are to be used for electrophysiological measurements. Finally, the pipettes fabricated have openings of the order of 500nm, which makes them ideal candidates for localised...

  1. Micro-Field Evoked Potentials Recorded from the Porcine Sub-Dural Cortical Surface Utilizing a Microelectrode Array

    OpenAIRE

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P.; Hansford, Derek J.; Fortin, Linda D.; Obrietan, Karl H.; Bergdall, Valerie K.; Beversdorf, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    A sub-dural surface microelectrode array designed to detect microfield evoked potentials has been developed. The device is comprised of an array of 350-micron square gold contacts, with bi-directional spacing of 150 microns, contained within a polyimide Kapton material. Cytotoxicity testing suggests that the device is suitable for use with animal and human patients. Implementation of the device in animal studies revealed that reliable evoked potentials could be acquired. Further work will be ...

  2. Head-to-Head Comparisons of Carbon Fiber Microelectrode Coatings for Sensitive and Selective Neurotransmitter Detection by Voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Yogesh S.; Sawarynski, Lauren E.; Dabiri, Pasha D.; Choi, Wonwoo R.; Andrews, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltammetry is widely used to investigate neurotransmission and other biological processes but is limited by poor chemical selectivity and fouling of commonly used carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMs). We performed direct comparisons of three key coating materials purported to impart selectivity and fouling resistance to electrodes: Nafion, base-hydrolyzed cellulose acetate (BCA), and fibronectin. We systematically evaluated the impact on a range of electrode parameters. Fouling due to exposur...

  3. Fabrication of PMMA nanofluidic electrochemical chips with integrated microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junshan; Wang, Liang; Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Qin, Jun; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Shenbo; Ge, Dan; Wang, Longchang; Liu, Chong; Wang, Liding

    2015-10-15

    A novel method based on plasma etching was proposed for monolithically integrating planar nanochannels and microelectrodes on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plate, and complete PMMA nanofluidic electrochemical chips with integrated microelectrodes were constructed by bonding with another PMMA plate containing microchannels. The fabrication sequences of nanochannels and microelectrodes were optimized. The oxygen plasma etching rate of PMMA nanochannels was studied, and the average rate was 15 nm/min under optimal conditions. An UV-ozone assisted thermal bonding method was developed to realize a low-temperature chip bonding, and the variations in width and depth of nanochannels before and after bonding were 2% and 5%, respectively. As a demonstration, a nanoparticle crystal (NPC)-based nanofluidic biosensor with integrated Ag microelectrodes was designed and fabricated. Sub-microchannel arrays with a depth of 400 nm and a width of 30 μm on the biosensor functioned as filters, and trapped 540 nm silica nanoparticles modified with streptavidin inside the connected microchannel to assemble the NPC. The interspaces in the NPC formed a three-dimensional nanochannel network with an equivalent diameter of 81 nm. By measuring the conductance across the NPC, a high quality nanofluidic sensing of biotin was achieved. The limit of detection was 1 aM, and the detection range was from 1 aM to 0.1 nM. PMID:26000461

  4. Microelectrodes as novel research tools for environmental biofilm studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilm processes are widely utilized in environmental engineering for biodegradation of contaminated waters, gases and soils. It is important to understand the structure and functions of biofilms. Microelectrodes are novel experimental tools for environmental biofilm studies. The authors reviewed the techniques of oxygen, sulfide, redox potential and pH microelectrode. These microelectrodes have tip diameters of 3 to 20 μm, resulting a high spatial resolution. They enable us directly measure the chemical conditions as results of microbial activities in biofilms. The authors also reported the laboratory and field studies of wastewater biofilms using microelectrode techniques. The results of these studies provided experimental evidence on the stratification of microbial processes and the associated redox potential change in wastewater biofilms: (1) The oxygen penetration depth was only a fraction of the biofilm thickness. This observation, first made under laboratory conditions, has been confirmed under field conditions. (2) The biofilms with both aerobic oxidation and sulfate reduction had a clearly stratified structure. This was evidenced by a sharp decrease of redox potential near the interface between the aerobic zone and the sulfate reduction zone within the biofilm. In this type of biofilms, aerobic oxidation took place only in a shallow layer near the biofilm surface and sulfate reduction occurred in the deeper anoxic zone. (3) The redox potential changed with the shift of primary microbial process in biofilms, indicating that it is possible to use redox potential to help illustrate the structure and functions of biofilms. (author)

  5. Comparison of lithium and the eutectic lead-lithium alloy, two candidate liquid metal breeder materials for self-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid metals are attractive candidates for both near-term and long-term fusion applications. The subjects of this comparison are the differences between the two candidate liquid metal breeder materials Li and LiPb for use in breeding blankets in the areas of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, tritium control, compatibility with structural materials, heat extraction system, safety and required research and development program. Both candidates appear to be promising for use in self-cooled breeding blankets which have inherent simplicity with the liquid metal serving as both breeder and coolant. Each liquid metal breeder has advantages and concerns associated with it, and further development is needed to resolve these concerns. The remaining feasibility question for both breeder materials is the electrical insulation between the liquid metal and the duct walls. Different ceramic coatings are required for the two breeders, and their crucial issues, namely self-healing of insulator cracks and tolerance to radiation-induced electrical degradation, have not yet been demonstrated. (orig.)

  6. Charge, spin and orbital order in the candidate multiferroic material LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Joost de

    2012-06-28

    This thesis is a detailed study of the magnetic, structural and orbital order parameters of the candidate multiferroic material LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Multiferroic oxides with a strong magnetoelectric coupling are of high interest for potential information technology applications, but they are rare because the traditional mechanism of ferroelectricity is incompatible with magnetism. Consequently, much attention is focused on various unconventional mechanisms of ferroelectricity. Of these, ferroelectricity originating from charge ordering (CO) is particularly intriguing because it potentially combines large electric polarizations with strong magneto-electric coupling. However, examples of oxides where this mechanism occurs are exceedingly rare and none is really well understood. LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is often cited as the prototypical example of CO-based ferroelectricity. In this material, the order of Fe valences has been proposed to render the triangular Fe/O bilayers polar by making one of the two layers rich in Fe{sup 2+} and the other rich in Fe{sup 3+}, allowing for a possible ferroelectric stacking of the individual bilayers. Because of this new mechanism for ferroelectricity, and also because of the high transition temperatures of charge order (T{sub CO} {proportional_to}320K) and ferro magnetism (T{sub N}{proportional_to}240 K) LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} has recently attracted increasing attention. Although these polar bilayers are generally accepted in the literature for LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, direct proof is lacking. An assumption-free experimental determination of whether or not the CO in the Fe/O bilayers is polar would be crucial, given the dependence of the proposed mechanism of ferroelectricity from CO in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on polar bilayers. This thesis starts with a detailed characterization of the macroscopic magnetic properties, where growing ferrimagnetic contributions observed in magnetization could be ascribed to increasing oxygen off-stoichiometry. The

  7. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices.

  8. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices

  9. All-Diamond Microelectrodes as Solid State Probes for Localized Electrochemical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Eduardo L; Gouvêa, Cristol P; Quevedo, Marcela C; Neto, Miguel A; Archanjo, Braulio S; Fernandes, António J S; Achete, Carlos A; Silva, Rui F; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L; Oliveira, Filipe J

    2015-07-01

    The fabrication of an all-diamond microprobe is demonstrated for the first time. This ME (microelectrode) assembly consists of an inner boron doped diamond (BDD) layer and an outer undoped diamond layer. Both layers were grown on a sharp tungsten tip by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a stepwise manner within a single deposition run. BDD is a material with proven potential as an electrochemical sensor. Undoped CVD diamond is an insulating material with superior chemical stability in comparison to conventional insulators. Focused ion beam (FIB) cutting of the apex of the ME was used to expose an electroactive BDD disk. By cyclic voltammetry, the redox reaction of ferrocenemethanol was shown to take place at the BDD microdisk surface. In order to ensure that the outer layer was nonelectrically conductive, a diffusion barrier for boron atoms was established seeking the formation of boron-hydrogen complexes at the interface between the doped and the undoped diamond layers. The applicability of the microelectrodes in localized corrosion was demonstrated by scanning amperometric measurements of oxygen distribution above an Al-Cu-CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) galvanic corrosion cell. PMID:26057348

  10. The Candidate

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, John C

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The Candidate is an attempt to marry elements of journalism and gaming into a format that both entertains and educates the player. The Google-AP Scholarship, a new scholarship award that is given to several journalists a year to work on projects at the threshold of technology and journalism, funded the project. The objective in this prototype version of the game is to put the player in the shoes of a congressional candidate during an off-year election, specificall...

  11. Optimization and electrochemical characterization of RF-sputtered iridium oxide microelectrodes for electrical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactively sputtered iridium oxide (IrOx) thin film has been developed as electrochemical modification material for microelectrodes to obtain high stability and charge storage capacity (CSC) in functional electrical stimulation. The effect of the oxygen flow and oxygen to argon ratio during sputtering process on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the IrOx film is characterized. After optimization, the activated IrOx microelectrode shows the highest CSC of 36.15 mC cm−2 at oxygen flow of 25 sccm and oxygen to argon ratio of (2.5:1). Because the deposition process of the reactively sputtered iridium oxide is an exothermic reaction, it is difficult to form film patterning by the lift-off process. The lift-off process was focused on the partially carbonized photoresist (PR) and normal PR. The higher of the carbonization degree of PR reaches, the longer the immersion duration. However, the patterning process of the iridium oxide film becomes feasible when the sputtering pressure is increasing. The experimental results show that the iridium oxide films forms the pattern with the lowest duration of ultrasonic agitation when the deposition pressure is 4.2 Pa and pressure ratio between O2 and Ar pressure is 3:4. (paper)

  12. Nanoporous gold supported cobalt oxide microelectrodes as high-performance electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Xing-You; Fu, Hong-Ying; Hou, Chao; Han, Gao-Feng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous demands for electrochemical biosensors with high sensitivity and reliability, fast response and excellent selectivity have stimulated intensive research on developing versatile materials with ultrahigh electrocatalytic activity. Here we report flexible and self-supported microelectrodes with a seamless solid/nanoporous gold/cobalt oxide hybrid structure for electrochemical nonenzymatic glucose biosensors. As a result of synergistic electrocatalytic activity of the gold skeleton and cobalt oxide nanoparticles towards glucose oxidation, amperometric glucose biosensors based on the hybrid microelectrodes exhibit multi-linear detection ranges with ultrahigh sensitivities at a low potential of 0.26 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The sensitivity up to 12.5 mA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² with a short response time of less than 1 s gives rise to ultralow detection limit of 5 nM. The outstanding performance originates from a novel nanoarchitecture in which the cobalt oxide nanoparticles are incorporated into pore channels of the seamless solid/nanoporous Au microwires, providing excellent electronic/ionic conductivity and mass transport for the enhanced electrocatalysis. PMID:23851924

  13. Quantitative mineralogy and preliminary pore-water chemistry of candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative mineralogy of seven candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault is presented. Two of the materials were coarse grained: one a blended very pure silica sand, and the other a crushed plagioclase-rich granite or granodiorite. Five materials were fine-grained soils containing abundant clay minerals. Of these, three were fairly pure, Cretaceous, ash-derived bentonites that contained up to 3 percent of soluble sulphates; one was a freshwater glacial clay containing 59 percent interlayered smectite-illite; and one was a crushed Paleozoic shale containing abundant illite and chlorite. The adsorbed cation regimes and the pore-water chemistry of the clays are discussed

  14. Development of a candidate reference material for adventitious virus detection in vaccine and biologicals manufacturing by deep sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Edward T Mee; Preston, Mark D.; Minor, Philip D.; ,; Huang, Xuening; Nguyen, Jenny; Wall, David; Hargrove, Stacey; Fu, Thomas; Xu, George; Li, Li; Cote, Colette; Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Background Unbiased deep sequencing offers the potential for improved adventitious virus screening in vaccines and biotherapeutics. Successful implementation of such assays will require appropriate control materials to confirm assay performance and sensitivity. Methods A common reference material containing 25 target viruses was produced and 16 laboratories were invited to process it using their preferred adventitious virus detection assay. Results Fifteen laboratories returned results, obtai...

  15. Stretchable microelectrode array using room-temperature liquid alloy interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a stretchable microelectrode array for studying cell behavior under mechanical strain. The electrode array consists of gold-plated nail-head pins (250 µm tip diameter) or tungsten micro-wires (25.4 µm in diameter) inserted into a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) platform (25.4 × 25.4 mm2). Stretchable interconnects to the outside were provided by fusible indium-alloy-filled microchannels. The alloy is liquid at room temperature, thus providing the necessary stretchability and electrical conductivity. The electrode platform can withstand strains of up to 40% and repeated (100 times) strains of up to 35% did not cause any failure in the electrodes or the PDMS substrate. We confirmed biocompatibility of short-term culture, and using the gold pin device, we demonstrated electric field pacing of adult murine heart cells. Further, using the tungsten microelectrode device, we successfully measured depolarizations of differentiated murine heart cells from embryoid body clusters

  16. Electrochemical measurements on a droplet using gold microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabi, Amin; Souri, Asma; Rastkhadiv, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Facile methods of ion recognition are important for the fabrication of electronic tongue systems. In this work, we demonstrate performing pulsed conductometry on microliter electrolyte droplets dropped on gold microelectrodes vapor deposited on soda lime glass slides. A droplet is dropped between two microelectrodes when a voltage waveform from a preprogramed power supply is applied on them. The temporal variation of the electric current passing through the droplet is recorded, digitized and stored. The obtained data are compared with the database formed out of the previous experiences for the classification of the sample electrolytes. It is shown that the shape of the voltage waveform is the important parameter of the process. We devised a method for the optimization of the voltage waveform profile for obtaining the maximum of discriminating information from the recorded current variations.

  17. Antifouling self-assembled monolayers on microelectrodes for patterning biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, John; Teizer, Winfried; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for forming a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) trimethoxysilane self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a silicon substrate with gold microelectrodes. The PEG-SAM is formed in a single assembly step and prevents biofouling on silicon and gold surfaces. The SAM is used to coat microelectrodes patterned with standard, positive-tone lithography. Using the microtubule as an example, we apply a DC voltage to induce electrophoretic migration to the SAM-coated electrode in a reversible manner. A flow chamber is used for imaging the electrophoretic migration and microtubule patterning in situ using epifluorescence microscopy. This method is generally applicable to biomolecule patterning, as it employs electrophoresis to immobilize target molecules and thus does not require specific molecular interactions. Further, it avoids problems encountered when attempting to pattern the SAM molecules directly using lithographic techniques. The compatibility with electron beam lithography allows this method to be used to pattern biomolecules at the nanoscale. PMID:19707178

  18. Ion-selective microelectrode arrays for cell culture monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Generelli, Silvia; De Rooij, Nicolas-F.

    2008-01-01

    The design, microfabrication and characterization of a platform comprising an array of ion-selective microelectrodes (µISE) aimed at in vitro cellular physiology and toxicology is described. This study focusses on K+ and Ca2+ monitoring in cell culture environments. A potential promising application of such a platform is based on recent findings in molecular biology, revealing connections between certain diseases, as for example some types of cancer or parkinsonism, and a malfunction in cellu...

  19. Progress Towards Biocompatible Intracortical Microelectrodes for Neural Interfacing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from tra...

  20. Discovery of Undescribed Brain Tissue Changes Around Implanted Microelectrode Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshi Desai

    2012-01-01

    Brain-implantable microelectrode arrays are devicesdesigned to record or electrically stimulate the activity ofneurons in the brain. These devices hold the potential tohelp treat epilepsy, paralysis, blindness, and deafness, andalso provide researchers with insights into a varietyof neural processes, such as memory formation.While these devices have a very promising future,researchers are discovering that their long-termfunctionality is greatly limited by the brain’s naturalimmune response to...

  1. Microelectrode measurements of the activity distribution in nitrifying bacterial aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Beer, de, VHJ Vincent; Heuvel, van den, J.; Ottengraf, SPP Simon

    1993-01-01

    Microelectrodes for ammonium, oxygen, nitrate, and pH were used to study nitrifying aggregates grown in a fluidized-bed reactor. Local reactant fluxes and distribution of microbial activity could be determined from the microprofiles. The interfacial fluxes of the reactants closely reflected the stoichiometry of bacterial nitrification. Both ammonium consumption and nitrate production were localized in the outer shells, with a thickness of approximately 100 to 120 μm, of the aggregates. Under ...

  2. Pencil lead microelectrode and the application on cell dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microelectrode was fabricated by electrochemical etching of a pencil lead (0.5 mm in diameter) in 1.0 M NaOH aqueous solution. The pencil lead was dipped into the solution and then an ac voltage (3.0 Vrms for 10 min) was imposed against a stainless plate under mild stirring (450 rpm). The electrochemically sharpened pencil tip was about 10 μm in diameter (12 ± 3 μm, n = 5), and the lateral part was insulated within a polypropylene micro-pipette tip (2-200 μL volume range). The cyclic voltammograms conducted in 2.0 mM ferricyanide/ferrocyanide buffer solution (pH 7.0) are with low capacitive current and a typical sigmoidal signal of micro-sized electrodes. The microelectrode was used to perform dielectrophoresis of polystyrene latex microbeads (nominal diameter of 3 μm) and human red blood cells. A conducting glass (indium tin oxide coated glass, 40 mm x 40 mm x 1 mm) served as the counter electrode (0.5 mm beneath the microelectrode) to generate the asymmetrical electric field and also as the window for microscopic observation. With the sinusoidal bias voltage (30 Vrms) ranged from 20 Hz to 2 MHz, positive and negative dielectrophoretic phenomena were identified.

  3. Pencil lead microelectrode and the application on cell dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Bo-Chuan; Cheng, Tzong-Jih; Shih, Syuan-He [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 136 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Richie L.C., E-mail: rlcchen@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 136 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-30

    A microelectrode was fabricated by electrochemical etching of a pencil lead (0.5 mm in diameter) in 1.0 M NaOH aqueous solution. The pencil lead was dipped into the solution and then an ac voltage (3.0 V{sub rms} for 10 min) was imposed against a stainless plate under mild stirring (450 rpm). The electrochemically sharpened pencil tip was about 10 {mu}m in diameter (12 {+-} 3 {mu}m, n = 5), and the lateral part was insulated within a polypropylene micro-pipette tip (2-200 {mu}L volume range). The cyclic voltammograms conducted in 2.0 mM ferricyanide/ferrocyanide buffer solution (pH 7.0) are with low capacitive current and a typical sigmoidal signal of micro-sized electrodes. The microelectrode was used to perform dielectrophoresis of polystyrene latex microbeads (nominal diameter of 3 {mu}m) and human red blood cells. A conducting glass (indium tin oxide coated glass, 40 mm x 40 mm x 1 mm) served as the counter electrode (0.5 mm beneath the microelectrode) to generate the asymmetrical electric field and also as the window for microscopic observation. With the sinusoidal bias voltage (30 V{sub rms}) ranged from 20 Hz to 2 MHz, positive and negative dielectrophoretic phenomena were identified.

  4. Development of a candidate reference material for adventitious virus detection in vaccine and biologicals manufacturing by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Edward T.; Preston, Mark D.; Minor, Philip D.; Schepelmann, Silke; Huang, Xuening; Nguyen, Jenny; Wall, David; Hargrove, Stacey; Fu, Thomas; Xu, George; Li, Li; Cote, Colette; Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin; Hewlett, Indira; Simonyan, Vahan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Alin, Voskanian-Kordi; Mermod, Nicolas; Hill, Christiane; Ottenwälder, Birgit; Richter, Daniel C.; Tehrani, Arman; Jacqueline, Weber-Lehmann; Cassart, Jean-Pol; Letellier, Carine; Vandeputte, Olivier; Ruelle, Jean-Louis; Deyati, Avisek; La Neve, Fabio; Modena, Chiara; Mee, Edward; Schepelmann, Silke; Preston, Mark; Minor, Philip; Eloit, Marc; Muth, Erika; Lamamy, Arnaud; Jagorel, Florence; Cheval, Justine; Anscombe, Catherine; Misra, Raju; Wooldridge, David; Gharbia, Saheer; Rose, Graham; Ng, Siemon H.S.; Charlebois, Robert L.; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; Mallet, Laurent; Dorange, Fabien; Chiu, Charles; Naccache, Samia; Kellam, Paul; van der Hoek, Lia; Cotten, Matt; Mitchell, Christine; Baier, Brian S.; Sun, Wenping; Malicki, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unbiased deep sequencing offers the potential for improved adventitious virus screening in vaccines and biotherapeutics. Successful implementation of such assays will require appropriate control materials to confirm assay performance and sensitivity. Methods A common reference material containing 25 target viruses was produced and 16 laboratories were invited to process it using their preferred adventitious virus detection assay. Results Fifteen laboratories returned results, obtained using a wide range of wet-lab and informatics methods. Six of 25 target viruses were detected by all laboratories, with the remaining viruses detected by 4–14 laboratories. Six non-target viruses were detected by three or more laboratories. Conclusion The study demonstrated that a wide range of methods are currently used for adventitious virus detection screening in biological products by deep sequencing and that they can yield significantly different results. This underscores the need for common reference materials to ensure satisfactory assay performance and enable comparisons between laboratories. PMID:26709640

  5. The LDCE Particle Impact Experiment as flown on STS-46. [limited duration space environment candidate materials exposure (LDCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, Carl R.; Tanner, William G.; Borg, Janet; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Alexander, W. Merle; Maag, Andrew J.

    1992-01-01

    Many materials and techniques have been developed by the authors to sample the flux of particles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Though regular in-site sampling of the flux in LEO the materials and techniques have produced data which compliment the data now being amassed by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) research activities. Orbital debris models have not been able to describe the flux of particles with d sub p less than or = 0.05 cm, because of the lack of data. Even though LDEF will provide a much needed baseline flux measurement, the continuous monitoring of micron and sub-micron size particles must be carried out. A flight experiment was conducted on the Space Shuttle as part of the LDCE payload to develop an understanding of the Spatial Density (concentration) as a function of size (mass) for particle sizes 1 x 10(exp 6) cm and larger. In addition to the enumeration of particle impacts, it is the intent of the experiment that hypervelocity particles be captured and returned intact. Measurements will be performed post flight to determine the flux density, diameters, and subsequent effects on various optical, thermal control and structural materials. In addition to these principal measurements, the Particle Impact Experiment (PIE) also provides a structure and sample holders for the exposure of passive material samples to the space environment, e.g., thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen, etc. The experiment will measure the optical property changes of mirrors and will provide the fluence of the ambient atomic oxygen environment to other payload experimenters. In order to augment the amount of material returned in a form which can be analyzed, the survivability of the experiment as well as the captured particles will be assessed. Using Sandia National Laboratory's hydrodynamic computer code CTH, hypervelocity impacts on the materials which comprise the experiments have been investigated and the progress of these studies are reported.

  6. Feature and use of microelectrode; Maikuro denkyoku no tokucho to oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsue, T.; Uchida, I. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-05

    An electrode of the order of micrometers or less is usually called a microelectrode. The microelectrodes can be roughly classified into disc (ring) type microelectrodes and band type microelectrodes formed on silicon or glass substrates. This paper places the focus on the disc type microelectrodes, and gives an outline of the feature and use of the same. The paper first describes the behavior of a microelectrode and a microdisc array electrode. The paper then gives examples of in-vivo measurement using a microelectrode as the evaluation of a local reaction using a microelectrode. The paper introduces, as an example of application, a trace multi-item measuring method (SECM-ELISA) in which a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) and an enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) are combined, as which is a development of practical use of the SECM. The paper further introduces an electrophoresion system for injecting a prescribed quantity of genes and medicine into a cell, as an example of particulate manipulation utilizing microelectrodes. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Effects of carbon nanotube and conducting polymer coated microelectrodes on single-unit recordings in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Knaack, Gretchen L; Mandal, Himadri S; Keefer, Edward W; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been utilized as biosensors that can detect all or nothing extracellular action potentials, or spikes. Coating the microelectrodes with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either pristine or conjugated with a conductive polymer, has been previously reported to improve extracellular recordings presumably via reduction in microelectrode impedance. The goal of this work was to examine the basis of such improvement in vitro. Every other microelectrode of in vitro MEAs was electrochemically modified with either conducting polymer, poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) or a blend of CNT and PEDOT. Mouse cortical tissue was dissociated and cultured on the MEAs to form functional neuronal networks. The performance of the modified and unmodified microelectrodes was evaluated by activity measures such as spike rate, spike amplitude, burst duration and burst rate. We observed that the yield, defined as percentage of microelectrodes with neuronal activity, was significantly higher by 55% for modified microelectrodes compared to the unmodified sites. However, the spike rate and burst parameters were similar for modified and unmodified microelectrodes suggesting that neuronal networks were not physiologically altered by presence of PEDOT or PEDOT-CNT. Our observations from immunocytochemistry indicated that neuronal cells were more abundant in proximity to modified microelectrodes. PMID:25569998

  8. Stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes on thin-film microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Jouko; Heimala, Päivi; Hokkanen, Ari; Iljin, Kristiina; Kerkelä, Erja; Kolari, Kai; Kattelus, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    We describe successful long-term stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters on thin-film microelectrode structures in vitro. Interdigitated electrode structures were constructed using plain titanium on glass as the electrode material. Titanium rapidly oxidizes in atmospheric conditions to produce an insulating TiO(χ) layer with high relative permittivity. Capacitive coupling to the incubation medium and to the cells adherent to the electrodes was still efficient, and the dielectric layer prevented electrolysis, allowing a wider window of possible stimulation amplitudes to be used, relative to conducting surfaces. A common hypothesis suggests that to achieve proper differentiation of electroactive cells from the stem cells electrical stimuli are also needed. Spontaneously beating cardiomyocyte clusters were seeded on the glass-electrode surfaces, and we successfully altered and resynchronized a clearly different beat interval. The new pace was reliably maintained for extended periods of several tens of minutes. PMID:21416608

  9. PEDOT-CNT composite microelectrodes for recording and electrostimulation applications: fabrication, morphology and electrical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Gerwig

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Composites of carbon nanotubes and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT and layers of PEDOT are deposited onto microelectrodes by electropolymerization of ethylenedioxythiophene in the presence of a suspension of carbon nanotubes and polystyrenesulfonate. Analysis by FIB and SEM demonstrate that CNT-PEDOT composites exhibit a porous morphology whereas PEDOT layers are more compact. Accordingly, capacitance and charge injection capacity of the composite material exceed those of pure PEDOT layers. In vitro cell culture experiments reveal excellent biocompatibility and mechanical stability of both PEDOT and PEDOT-CNT electrodes. Signals recorded from heart muscle cells demonstrate the high S/N ratio achievable with these electrodes. Long-term pulsing experiments confirm stability of charge injection capacity. In conclusion, a robust fabrication procedure for composite PEDOT-CNT electrodes is demonstrated and results show that these electrodes are well suited for stimulation and recording in cardiac and neurophysiological research.

  10. Nanoporous gold microelectrode prepared from potential modulated electrochemical alloying–dealloying in ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A green chemistry method for producing nanoporous gold microelectrode was studied. • An ionic liquid plating bath was utilized for electrochemical alloying–dealloying. • Nanostructures of gold surface layers can be tuned by modulating potential. • Nanoporous gold microelectrode has high surface area and merit of a microelectrode. • Nitrite oxidation and reduction on nanoporous gold microelectrode were studied. -- Abstract: Nanoporous gold (NPG) microelectrodes with high surface area and open pore network were successfully prepared by applying modulated potential to a polycrystalline Au-disk microelectrode in ionic liquid electrolyte containing ZnCl2 at elevated temperature. During cathodic process, Zn is electrodeposited and interacted with Au microdisk substrate to form a AuZn alloy phase. During subsequent anodic process, Zn is selectively dissolved from the alloy phase, leading to the formation of a NPG layer which can grow with repetitive potential modulation. Scanning-electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray microscope measurements show that the NPG microelectrodes possessing nanoporous structures can be tuned via potential modulation, and chemically contain a small amount of Zn whose presence has no obvious influence on electrochemical responses of the electrodes. Steady-state and cyclic voltammetric studies suggest that the NPG microelectrodes have high surface area and keep diffusional properties of a microelectrode. Electrochemical nitrite reduction and oxidation are studied as model reactions to demonstrate potential applications of the NPG microelectrodes in electrocatalysis and electroanalysis. These facts suggest that the potential-modulated electrochemical alloying/dealloying in ionic liquid electrolyte offers a convenient green-chemistry method for the preparation of nanoporous microelectrodes

  11. Experimental studies on interactions of molten LiF-NaF salt with some candidate structural materials for components of advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of molten 60 LiF - 40 NaF (% mol) salt with candidate structural materials for components of advanced nuclear reactors has been studied using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The corrosion of structural materials (stainless steel, Ni base alloy, nickel), which was induced by the molten salt melt, has been examined in dependence on the time of exposure at operating temperature of 680 deg C. The above choice of the two analytical techniques made it possible to assess on the whole the extent of corrosion. The corrosion phenomena in structural materials were investigated using EPMA. Corrosion-released elements dissolved in solidified molten salt were determined after salt dissolution by means of ICP-OES. The LiF-NaF melt produced corrosion, which proved as a surficial modification of a structural material and a trace contamination of the melt itself. The X-ray maps by EPMA with its 1-μm lateral resolution revealed compositional changes in structural materials, such as, e. g. regular depletion of Cr in alloy A686 to the depth of 10 - 25 μm. While the lateral resolution of LA-ICP-MS with the applied laser spot diameter of 25 μm was not exactly adequate to mapping of the corroded material section and, consequently, yielded less information in comparison with EPMA, this technique was quite sufficient for the mapping of elemental content changes in solidified salt profile. Finally, nickel was proved to be the most resistant material. It was concluded that: (i) EPMA study, involving semi-quantitative elemental mapping / content profiling and detailed spot quantitative analyses makes it possible to obtain quantitative assessment of the corrosion process; (ii) qualitative profiles are provided by LA-ICP-MS, which needs further development on quantification procedure based on matched calibration samples. (author)

  12. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute α grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase (α and β) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase α and near-α (Ti Gr 12) alloys

  13. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1997-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute {alpha} grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase ({alpha} and {beta}) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase {alpha} and near-{alpha} (Ti Gr 12) alloys.

  14. Synthesis of Narrow Molecular Weight Distribution Norbornene-Lactone Functionalized Polymers by Nitroxide-Mediated Polymerization: Candidates for 193-nm Photoresist Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Jun Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One hundred ninety three-nanometer candidate photoresist materials were synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP. Statistical copolymerizations of 5-methacryloyloxy-2,6-norboranecarbolactone (NLAM with 5–10 mol% of controlling co-monomers (which are necessary for controlled polymerizations of methacrylates by NMP with the initiator used in the feed, such as styrene (ST, p-acetoxystyrene (AcOST, 2-vinyl naphthalene (VN and pentafluorostyrene (PFS, using the unimolecular BlocBuilder® initiator in 35 wt% dioxane solution at 90 °C were performed. As little as 5 mol% controlling comonomer in the feed was demonstrated to be sufficient to lead to linear evolution of number average molecular weight  with respect to conversion up to 50%, and the resulting copolymers had dispersities  of ~1.3 in most cases, an attractive feature for reducing line width roughness (LWR in photoresists. The copolymers generally showed relatively low absorbance at 193 nm, comparable to other 193-nm candidate photoresists reported previously, despite the inclusion of a small amount of the styrenic co-monomers in the copolymer.

  15. Validation of induced radioactivity calculations for candidate fusion materials through measurements in a graphite-centered assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induced radioactivity measurements were carried out jointly by the USA and Japan in a graphite-centered assembly, in the framework of ITER Task T-218 entitled 'Shielding Blanket Neutronics Experiments'. An intense, accelerator-based D-T rotating target neutron source JAERI, with a nominal intensity of 5 x 1012 s-1, was used. Two locations, providing different neutron energy spectra, were chosen for irradiating samples of a range of materials of interest to ITER. Three independent experimental campaigns were conducted so as to accommodate a large number of samples, on one hand, and as many short and long half-life products as possible, on the other. The total neutron fluence ranged from 4.7 x 1011 to 1.5 x 1014 n cm-2. Altogether, samples of Mg, Al, SiO2, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, FH82 steel, SS316LN steel (ITER grade), Cu, Zn, KCl, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ag, ln, Sn, Dy, Ta, Hf, Re, Au, Ir, and Pb were irradiated. The irradiated samples were cooled for variable periods ranging from 30 s to 250 days before their decay gamma-ray spectra were counted on high purity intrinsic germanium detectors. The half lives of the observed radioisotopes have ranged from 18.7 s (46mSc from Ti) to 5.3 years (60Co from Ni). The neutron energy spectra for the two locations were calculated using Monte Carlo code MCNP with FENDL-1 and ENDF/B-VI data libraries. The analysis of isotopic activities, expressed in Bq cc-1, of the irradiated materials has been carried out using REAC-3 radioactivity code, with FENDL-2A and FENDL-1A activation cross-section and decay data libraries. Typically, C/E lies in a band of 0.5-1.5 for the results being reported. (orig.)

  16. Validation of a liquid chromatographic method for determination of related substances in a candidate certified reference material of captopril

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the validation of a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography method (RP-HPLC with diode array detection (DAD for determination of related substances (impurities from organic synthesis and degradation products of captopril according to the Brazilian Pharmacopeia IV. The aim of this study was to guarantee the method accuracy for quantification of related substances, an essential requisite to determine, using the mass balance approach, the captopril content in the first Brazilian certified reference material (CRM of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, developed by Inmetro. The captopril instability in solution is discussed and the captopril content determined by mass balance is compared to the results from titration and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC.Este artigo descreve a validação de método de cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência em fase reversa (CLAE-RP com detector de fotodiodos (DAD para determinação de substâncias relacionadas (impurezas orgânicas de síntese e produtos de degradação de captopril segundo Farmacopéia Brasileira IV ed. Este estudo teve como objetivo garantir que o método é capaz de quantificar com exatidão o teor de substâncias relacionadas, um requisito essencial para que o teor de captopril seja determinado por balanço de massa no primeiro material de referência certificado (MRC de fármacos brasileiro, o qual foi desenvolvido pelo Inmetro. A instabilidade do captopril em solução é discutida em detalhes e o teor de captopril determinado por balanço de massa é comparado com aqueles obtidos por titulação e por calorimetria exploratória diferencial (DSC.

  17. Modification of Carbon Nanotube Powder Microelectrode and Nitrite Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the carbon nanotube powder microelectrodes (denoted CNTPME) are remarkably altered by anodic pretreatment and preadsorption of mediators. It seems that anodic pretreatment leads the long and tangled carbon nanotubes to be partially cut shorter, resulting in more openings as shown by TEM. Besides, the anodic pretreatment may adjust the hydrophobicity of nanotubes to match with that of Os(bpy)32+. As a result, the real surface area and the ability of adsorbing mediator Os(bpy)32+ of the nanotubes are markedly increased so as to effectively catalyze NO2- reduction in acidic solution.

  18. Effects on the Benthic Diffusive Boundary-Layer Imposed by Microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GLUD, RN; GUNDERSEN, JK; REVSBECH, NP; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen microgradients and fluxes were studied in a 0.3-0.6-mm-thick diffusive boundary layer (DBL) of aquatic sediments by the use of O2 microelectrodes with sensing tips of 5 mum. One microelectrode was introduced vertically from above while another was introduced along the same vertical axis fr...

  19. A Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Array for Improvement of Dielectrophoresis-Based Particle Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Ramdzan Buyong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the dielectrophoretic force (FDEP response of Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays with tapered profile is investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. A standard CMOS processing technique with a step for the formation of a tapered profile resist is implemented in the fabrication of Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays (TAMA. The FDEP is investigated through analysis of the Clausius-Mossotti factor (CMF and cross-over frequency (fxo. The performance of TAMA with various side wall angles is compared to that of microelectrodes with a straight cut sidewall profile over a wide range of frequencies through FEM numerical simulations. Additionally, electric field measurement (EFM is performed through scanning probe microscopy (SPM in order to obtain the region of force focus in both platforms. Results showed that the tapered profile microelectrodes with angles between 60° and 70° produce the highest electric field gradient on the particles. Also, the region of the strongest electric field in TAMA is located at the bottom and top edge of microelectrode while the strongest electric field in microelectrodes with straight cut profile is found at the top corner of the microelectrode. The latter property of microelectrodes improves the probability of capturing/repelling the particles at the microelectrode’s side wall.

  20. Assessment of homogeneity of candidate reference material at the nanogram level and investigation on representativeness of single particle analysis using electron probe X ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particulate samples of a candidate reference material are evaluated on their homogeneity from bottle to bottle using electron probe X ray microanalysis technique. The evaluation on the homogeneity is done by the utilization of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics to the processing of the quantitative electron probe X ray microanalysis data. Due to a limitation, existing even in computer controlled electron probe X ray microanalysis, in terms of analysis time and expenses, the number of particles analyzed is much smaller compared to that in the sample. Therefore, it is investigated whether this technique provides representative analysis results for the characteristics of the sample, even though a very small portion of the sample is really analyzed. Furthermore, the required number of particles for the analysis, to insure a certain level of reproducibility, e.g. 5% relative standard deviation, is determined by the application of the Ingamells sampling theory. (author)

  1. Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Candidate SNS Target Container Materials after Proton and Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, T.S.

    2001-11-09

    This report presents the tensile properties of EC316LN austenitic stainless steel and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel after 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses in the range 0.54 to 2.53 dpa. Irradiation temperatures were in the range 30 to 100 C. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature (20 C) and 164 C to study the effects of test temperature on the tensile properties. Test materials displayed significant radiation-induced hardening and loss of ductility due to irradiation. The EC316LN stainless steel maintained notable strain-hardening capability after irradiation, while the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel posted negative strain hardening. In the EC316LN stainless steel, increasing the test temperature from 20 C to 164 C decreased the strength by 13 to 18% and the ductility by 8 to 36%. The tensile data for the EC316LN stainless steel irradiated in spallation conditions were in line with the values in a database for 316 stainless steels for doses up to 1 dpa irradiated in fission reactors at temperatures below 200 C. However, extra strengthening induced by helium and hydrogen contents is evident in some specimens irradiated to above about 1 dpa. The effect of test temperature for the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel was less significant than for the EC316LN stainless steel. In addition, strain-hardening behaviors were analyzed for EC316LN and 316L stainless steels. The strain-hardening rate of the 316 stainless steels was largely dependent on test temperature. It was estimated that the 316 stainless steels would retain more than 1% true stains to necking at 164 C after irradiation to 5 dpa. A calculation using reduction of area (RA) measurements and stress-strain data predicted positive strain hardening during plastic instability.

  2. Long-term neural recordings using MEMS based moveable microelectrodes in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Jackson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the critical requirements of the emerging class of neural prosthetic devices is to maintain good quality neural recordings over long time periods. We report here a novel (Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems based technology that can move microelectrodes in the event of deterioration in neural signal to sample a new set of neurons. Microscale electro-thermal actuators are used to controllably move microelectrodes post-implantation in steps of approximately 9 µm. In this study, a total of 12 moveable microelectrode chips were individually implanted in adult rats. Two of the 12 moveable microelectrode chips were not moved over a period of 3 weeks and were treated as control experiments. During the first three weeks of implantation, moving the microelectrodes led to an improvement in the average SNR from 14.61 ± 5.21 dB before movement to 18.13 ± 4.99 dB after movement across all microelectrodes and all days. However, the average RMS values of noise amplitudes were similar at 2.98 ± 1.22 µV and 3.01 ± 1.16 µV before and after microelectrode movement. Beyond three weeks, the primary observed failure mode was biological rejection of the PMMA (dental cement based skull mount resulting in the device loosening and eventually falling from the skull. Additionally, the average SNR for functioning devices beyond three weeks was 11.88 ± 2.02 dB before microelectrode movement and was significantly different (p<0.01 from the average SNR of 13.34 ± 0.919 dB after movement. The results of this study demonstrate that MEMS based technologies can move microelectrodes in rodent brains in long-term experiments resulting in improvements in signal quality. Further improvements in packaging and surgical techniques will potentially enable movable microelectrodes to record cortical neuronal activity in chronic experiments.

  3. Highly-compliant, conformal and stretchable microelectrode arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongzhi; Xie Lei; Yu Mei; Liu Zhiyuan; Li Yuchun; Yu Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Most biological tissues are supple and elastic,While current electronic devices fabricated by semiconductors and metals are usually stiff and brittle.As a result,implanted electronic devices can irritate and damage surrounding tissues,causing immune reaction and scarring.In this work,we develop stretchable microelectrode arrays,with the development of a novel soft lithography technology,which are designed and fabricated with a polymer/stretchable metal/polymer sandwich structure.With the great deformability of stretch,compression,bend and twisting,while preserving electrical property,this technology overcomes the fundamental mismatch of mechanical properties between biological tissues and electronic devices,and provides highly-compliant,conformal and stretchable bio-electronic interfaces.Here we also describe the following three applications of the stretchable electrode arrays:a.monitoring intracranial electroencephalography (EEG); b.stimulating peripheral nerves to drive muscles; c.monitoring epicardial electrocardiography (ECG).Stretchable microelectrode arrays create a promising field in biomedical applications for its better modulus match with biological tissues and robust mechanical and electrical properties.They allow for construction of electronic integrated circuits spread over on complex and dynamic curved surfaces,providing a much friendlier bio-electronic interface for diagnosis,treatment and intelligent bio-control.

  4. A Single Platinum Microelectrode for Identifying Soft Drink Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Bueno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic voltammograms recorded with a single platinum microelectrode were used along with a non-supervised pattern recognition, namely, Principal Component Analysis, to conduct a qualitative analysis of sixteen different brands of carbonated soft drinks (Kuat, Soda Antarctica, H2OH!, Sprite 2.0, Guarana Antarctica, Guarana Antarctica Zero, Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola Zero, Coca-Cola Plus, Pepsi, Pepsi Light, Pepsi Twist, Pepsi Twist Light, Pepsi Twist 3, Schin Cola, and Classic Dillar’s. In this analysis, soft drink samples were not subjected to pre-treatment. Good differentiation among all the analysed soft drinks was achieved using the voltammetric data. An analysis of the loading plots shows that the potentials of −0.65 V, −0.4 V, 0.4 V, and 0.750 V facilitated the discrimination process. The electrochemical processes related to this potential are the reduction of hydrogen ions and inhibition of the platinum oxidation by the caffeine adsorption on the electrode surface. Additionally, the single platinum microelectrode was useful for the quality control of the soft drink samples, as it helped to identify the time at which the beverage was opened.

  5. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations. PMID:22149873

  6. Design of 3D Active Multichannel Silicon Neural Microelectrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Di; ZHANG Guoxiong; LI Xingfei

    2006-01-01

    To find a design method for 3D active multichannel silicon microelectrode,a microstructure of active neural recording system is presented,where two 2D probes,two integrated circuits and two spacers are microassembled on a 5 mm ×7 mm silicon platform,and 32 sites neural signals can be operated simultaneously.A theoretical model for measuring the neural signal by the silicon microelectrode is proposed based on the structure and fabrication process of a single-shank probe.The method of determining the dimensional parameters of the probe shank is discussed in the following three aspects,i.e.the structures of pallium and endocranium,coupled interconnecters noise,and strength characteristic of neural probe.The design criterion is to minimize the size of the neural probe as well as that the probe has enough stiffness to pierce the endocranium.The on-chip unity-gain bandpass amplifier has an overall gain of 42 dB over a bandwidth from 60 Hz to 10 kHz;and the DC-baseline stability circuit is of high input resistance above 30 MΩ to guarantee a cutoff frequency below 100 Hz.The circuit works in stimulating or recording modes.The conversion of the modes depends on the stimulating control signal.

  7. Development of voltammetric microelectrodes for use in corrosion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, K.; Dexter, S.C.; Luther, G.W. III [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A gold-based mercury microelectrode was prepared by electroreducing Hg{sup 2+} on a gold wire of 25 {micro}m diameter encased in glass. The electrode reaction and analytical sensitivity for dissolved O{sub 2}, Mn, Fe, S ({minus}II), and H{sup +} using square wave voltammetry are investigated. The use of this voltammetric microelectrode takes advantage of fast scan voltammetric methods for the simultaneous measurement of the key redox species during a single potential scan from {minus}0.1 V to {minus}1.7 V (SCE). Various interfering factors and experimental parameters of the voltammetric measurements are discussed. By mounting the working electrode on a computerized micromanipulator, vertical microprofiles of the redox species were measured at 10 {micro}m depth resolution across seawater biofilms formed on metal coupons. Results revealed the heterogeneous nature of the biofilm and complex microbially mediated heavy metal (Mn and Fe) cycles within the biofilm system. Data interpretation provided further insight into the mechanism of the microbially influenced metal corrosion. 47 refs.

  8. Quantifying long-term microelectrode array functionality using chronic in vivo impedance testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2012-04-01

    Long-term acquisition of high-quality neural recordings is a cornerstone of neuroprosthetic system design. Mitigating the experimental variability of chronically implanted arrays has been a formidable task because the sensor recording sites can be influenced by biotic and abiotic responses. Several studies have implicated changes in electrical interface impedance as a preliminary marker to infer electrode viability. Microelectrode impedance plays an important role in the monitoring of low amplitude and high-resolution extracellular neural signals. In this work, we seek to quantify long-term microelectrode array functionality and derive an impedance-based predictor for electrode functionality that correlates the recording site electrical properties with the functional neuronal recordings in vivo. High temporal resolution metrics of this type would allow one to assess, predict, and improve electrode performance in the future. In a large cohort of animals, we performed daily impedance measurements and neural signal recordings over long periods (up to 21 weeks) of time in rats using tungsten microwire arrays implanted into the somatosensory cortex. This study revealed that there was a time-varying trend in the modulation of impedance that was related to electrode performance. Single units were best detected from electrodes at time points when the electrode entered into the 40-150 KΩ impedance range. This impedance trend was modeled across the full cohort of animals to predict future electrode performance. The model was tested on data from all animals and was able to provide predictions of electrode performance chronically. Insight from this study can be combined with knowledge of electrode materials and histological analysis to provide a more comprehensive predictive model of electrode failure in the future.

  9. Simultaneous/Selective Detection of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid at Synthetic Zeolite-Modified/Graphite-Epoxy Composite Macro/Quasi-Microelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Rodica Pode; Elida Cristina Ilinoiu; Pier Andrea Serra; Florica Manea

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims to miniaturize a graphite-epoxy and synthetic zeolite-modified graphite-epoxy composite macroelectrode as a quasi-microelectrode aiming in vitro and also, envisaging in vivo simultaneous electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) neurotransmitters, or DA detection in the presence of AA. The electrochemical behavior and the response of the designed materials to the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid without any protective membranes were studied...

  10. Synthesis and characterization of polymer matrix composite material with combination of ZnO filler and nata de coco fiber as a candidate of semiconductor material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Asep Handaya; Anindita, Hana Nabila

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of semiconductor composite using acrylic matrix filled with ZnO and nata de coco fiber has been conducted in this research. The purpose of this research is to obtain semiconductor composite material that has a good mechanical strength and thermal resistance. In situ polymerization method is used in this research and the composites are ready to be characterized after 12 hours. The main parameter that is characterized is the electric conductivity of the composite. Additional parameters are also characterized such as composite's elastic modulus and glass transition temperature. The composites that has been made in this research can be classified as semiconductor material because the conductivity is in the range of 10-8-103 S/cm. In general the addition of ZnO and nata de coco filler can increase the conductivity of the composite. The highest semiconductor characteristic in acrylic/ZnO composite is obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 3.4 x 10-7 S/cm. Similar with acrylic/ZnO composite, in acrylic/nata de coco fiber composite the highest semiconductor characteristic is also obtained from 30% volume filler that reach 1.15 x 10-7 S/cm. Combination of 20% volume of ZnO, 10% volume of nata de coco, and 70% volume of acrylic resulting in composite with electric conductivity of 1.92 x 10-7 S/cm. In addition, combination of ZnO and nata de coco fiber as filler in composite can also improve the characteristic of composite where composite with 20% volume of ZnO filler and 10% volume of nata de coco fiber resulting in composite with elastic modulus of 1.79 GPa and glass transition temperature of 175.73°C which is higher than those in acrylic/ZnO composite.

  11. Microelectrode array with integrated nanowire FET switches for high-resolution retinal prosthetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a novel microelectrode array integrated with nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) switches is developed for retinal prosthetic systems. Retinal prosthetic systems require many electrodes (generally more than several hundreds) and this paper presents a novel method of integrating silicon nanowire-FET switches with microelectrodes that can significantly reduce wiring complexity. Also, in order to fit the curvature of an eyeball, the silicon nanowire FETs are transferred to a flexible substrate. In order to demonstrate the concept of using FETs for switching collocated retinal microelectrodes, a microelectrode array with 32 × 32 pixels is fabricated, which has 1,024 microelectrodes. Using the FET switches in a two-dimensional array addressing configuration, 1,024 microelectrodes are addressed by only 64 lines (32 for scan and 32 for data), as compared to requiring 1,024 lines in the conventional one-to-one configuration. With the gate voltage of −5 V, the threshold voltage, current on/off ratio, and on-resistance of the fabricated silicon nanowire-FET switch are −0.4 V, 1 × 107, and 37–47 kΩ, respectively. The maximum allowable current injection limit of the silicon nanowire-FET switch integrated microelectrode is 44 μA with a pulse duration of 1 ms. These results show an excellent potential for high-resolution retinal prosthetic systems. (paper)

  12. Experiments on pumping of liquids using arrays of microelectrodes subjected to travelling wave potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sanchez, P; Ramos, A [Dpto. de Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Green, Nicolas G; Morgan, H [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pablogarcia@us.es

    2008-12-01

    Net fluid flow of electrolytes driven on an array of microelectrodes subjected to a travelling-wave potential is presented. Two sizes of platinum microelectrodes have been studied. In both arrays, at low voltages the liquid flows according to the prediction given by ac electroosmotic theory. At voltages above a threshold the fluid flow is reversed. Measurements of the electrical current when the microelectrode array is pumping the liquid are also reported. Transient behaviours in both electrical current and fluid velocity have been observed.

  13. Fabrication of a 3D interdigitated double-coil microelectrode chip by MEMS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated an interdigitated double-coil microelectrode chip for the determination of traces of phosphate by making use of a MEMS technique and enzyme immobilization technology. The chip is composed of two 3-dimensional strip microelectrodes which form a double coil microelectrode configuration with steep sidewalls and high aspect ratio. This novel configuration results in a high current response during amplification by redox cycling. The enzyme pyruvate oxidase was immobilized on the chip using gold nanoparticles as a support. Phosphate can be determined by using this chip with good sensitivity and linearity and in concentrations ranging from 0.5 μM to 7 μM. (author)

  14. Experiments on pumping of liquids using arrays of microelectrodes subjected to travelling wave potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Net fluid flow of electrolytes driven on an array of microelectrodes subjected to a travelling-wave potential is presented. Two sizes of platinum microelectrodes have been studied. In both arrays, at low voltages the liquid flows according to the prediction given by ac electroosmotic theory. At voltages above a threshold the fluid flow is reversed. Measurements of the electrical current when the microelectrode array is pumping the liquid are also reported. Transient behaviours in both electrical current and fluid velocity have been observed.

  15. Microscopic measurement of pH with iridium oxide microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipf; Ge; Spaine; Baur

    2000-10-15

    Microscopic pH electrodes were produced by deposition of hydrous iridium oxide onto carbon fiber microelectrodes. The electrodes exhibit two linear regions of potentiometric response between pH 2-6 and pH 6-12. The electrodes respond to pH changes within 50 ms, and an equilibrium value is reached within 30 s. By using these electrodes as probes in the scanning electrochemical microscope, dynamic pH changes occurring at or near a surface can be measured and pH maps of the surface can be generated. Vertical pH profiles and images of pH were obtained at substrates where electrochemical (oxidation and reduction of H2O2, hydrogen evolution) or enzymatic (glucose oxidase) reactions involving proton transfers occur. PMID:11055710

  16. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: Sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reaction, and volatility issues of a 3-cell stack with LSM-based cells. After 6000 h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO7 showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  17. Use of neutron activation analysis and LC-ICP-MS in the development of candidate reference materials for As species determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (As) is widely found in marine organisms, mainly as organic arsenical compounds. With the introduction of regulations for As species in foodstuffs and for environmental control, it has become more important to quantify the amount of arsenic species present. To address this concern new reference materials (RMs) for validation and quality assurance of As speciation measurements are being developed, including a tuna fish tissue and a robalo liver tissue. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is used in this work as a proven analytical tool for As determinations and for validating the As mass fraction determined by liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) in extracts of the candidate RMs and other fish samples including certified RMs. Various methods for the extraction of water-soluble As species were evaluated. The best results were acquired after methanol/acetone/water extraction yielding in 93 % extractable As in the tuna RM. This procedure was used for the LC-ICP-MS studies. The results demonstrate that INAA can account for 100 % of the distribution of As species in analytical processes. It complements LC-ICP-MS for the validation of the characterization of As species in the development of RMs for such species. Excellent agreement of measured results in certified RMs with the reported values confirms the validity of the applied procedures. (author)

  18. Effects of a range of machined and ground surface finishes on the simulated reactor helium corrosion of several candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the corrosion behavior of several candidate reactor structural alloys in a simulated advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environment over a range of lathe-machined and centerless-ground surface finishes. The helium environment contained 50 Pa H2/5 Pa CO/5 Pa CH4/2O (500 μatm H2/50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH4/2O) at 9000C for a total exposure of 3000 h. The test alloys included two vacuum-cast superalloys (IN 100 and IN 713LC); a centrifugally cast austenitic alloy (HK 40); three wrought high-temperature alloys (Alloy 800H, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 617); and a nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy (Inconel MA 754). Surface finish variations did not affect the simulated advanced-HTGR corrosion behavior of these materials. Under these conditions, the availability of reactant gaseous impurities controls the kinetics of the observed gas-metal interactions. Variations in the near-surface activities and mobilities of reactive solute elements, such as chromium, which might be expected to be affected by changes in surface finish, do not seem to greatly influence corrosion in this simulated advanced HTGR environment. 18 figures, 4 tables

  19. Study of the effects of interleakage of ammonia and seawater on corrosion and scaling of candidate materials for OTEC heat exchngers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, W D; Schrieber, C F; Manning, J A

    1980-07-01

    Assessment has been made on the effect of small concentrations of ammonia in seawater and varying concentrations of seawater in anhydrous ammonia upon corrosion and scaling of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials - A1-5052, Alclad 3003, copper alloys 706, 715 and 722, AL-6X stainless steel and CP titanium. Results are presented. AL-6X stainless steel and CP titanium showed exceptional corrosion resistance to all test environments. Alclad alloy 3003 showed satisfactory performance in seawater and seawater plus ammonia environments. Only minimal pitting was observed and this was limited to the sacrificial cladding in seawater plus ammonia only. Cladding alloy 7072 showed unacceptable corrosion resistance in anhydrous ammonia containing low seawater concentrations. Al-5052 tubes showed unsatisfactory corrosion behavior in the presence of seawater flow with ammonia interleakage. Copper alloys considered showed unacceptable corrosion resistance in all seawater environments containing ammonia. Low pressure differentials between seawater and anhydrous ammonia in the tube testing unit resulted in scaling and moderately efficient plug seal formation at the artificial leak sites of the tubes. It is recommended that Alclad 3003, CP titanium and AL-6X stainless steel tubes be assessed for suitability in the presence of probable OTEC cleaning systems.

  20. Microfabrication of an Implantable silicone Microelectrode array for an epiretinal prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, M

    2003-06-10

    Millions of people suffering from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are legally blind due to the loss of photoreceptor function. Fortunately a large percentage of the neural cells connected to the photoreceptors remain viable, and electrical stimulation of these cells has been shown to result in visual perception. These findings have generated worldwide efforts to develop a retinal prosthesis device, with the hope of restoring vision. Advances in microfabrication, integrated circuits, and wireless technologies provide the means to reach this challenging goal. This dissertation describes the development of innovative silicone-based microfabrication techniques for producing an implantable microelectrode array. The microelectrode array is a component of an epiretinal prosthesis being developed by a multi-laboratory consortium. This array will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces. Because the array is intended as a long-term implant, vital biological and physical design requirements must be met. A retinal implant poses difficult engineering challenges due to the size of the intraocular cavity and the delicate retina. Not only does it have to be biocompatible in terms of cytotoxicity and degradation, but it also has to be structurally biocompatible, with regard to smooth edges and high conformability; basically mimicking the biological tissue. This is vital to minimize stress and prevent physical damage to the retina. Also, the device must be robust to withstand the forces imposed on it during fabrication and implantation. In order to meet these biocompatibility needs, the use of non-conventional microfabrication materials such as silicone is required. This mandates the enhancement of currently available polymer-based fabrication techniques and the development of new microfabrication methods. Through an iterative process, devices

  1. Fabrication, calibration and evaluation of a phosphate ion-selective microelectrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, John J., E-mail: johnwang1974@gmail.co [University of Cincinnati, 12716 Ginger Wood Lane, Clarksburg, MD 20871 (United States); Bishop, Paul L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, PO Box 210071, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0071 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    To conduct the micro-environment study of flocs in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, a phosphate ion-selective microelectrode was developed. The cobalt-based microelectrodes have tip diameters of 5-20 {mu}m and respond to all the three forms of phosphate ions, namely, H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}, HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. The calibration curve at pH 7.5 had a slope of 31.5 mV per decade change of concentration and a R{sup 2} value of 0.99. Other characteristics of this microelectrode, such as response time, interferences from pH, ion strength, DO and other anions were also evaluated. - This paper presents the first phosphate ion-selective microelectrode in the world used for micro-level phorphorus removal studies.

  2. Fabrication, calibration and evaluation of a phosphate ion-selective microelectrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To conduct the micro-environment study of flocs in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, a phosphate ion-selective microelectrode was developed. The cobalt-based microelectrodes have tip diameters of 5-20 μm and respond to all the three forms of phosphate ions, namely, H2PO4-, HPO42-, and PO43-. The calibration curve at pH 7.5 had a slope of 31.5 mV per decade change of concentration and a R2 value of 0.99. Other characteristics of this microelectrode, such as response time, interferences from pH, ion strength, DO and other anions were also evaluated. - This paper presents the first phosphate ion-selective microelectrode in the world used for micro-level phorphorus removal studies.

  3. High-sensitivity electrochemical enzyme-linked assay on a microfluidic interdigitated microelectrode

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, I-Jane; White, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel enzyme-linked DNA hybridization assay on an interdigitated array (IDA) microelectrode integrated into a microfluidic channel is demonstrated with sub-nM detection limit. To improve the detection limit as compared to conventional electrochemical biosensors, a recyclable redox product, 4-aminophenol (PAP) is used with an IDA microelectrode. The IDA has a modest and easily fabricated inter-digit spacing of 10 μm, yet we were able to demonstrate 97% recycling efficiency of PAP due to the ...

  4. A Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Array for Improvement of Dielectrophoresis-Based Particle Manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Muhamad Ramdzan Buyong; Farhad Larki; Mohd Syafiq Faiz; Azrul Azlan Hamzah; Jumrail Yunas; Burhanuddin Yeop Majlis

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) response of Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays with tapered profile is investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. A standard CMOS processing technique with a step for the formation of a tapered profile resist is implemented in the fabrication of Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays (TAMA). The FDEP is investigated through analysis of the Clausius-Mossotti factor (CMF) and cross-over frequency (fxo). The performan...

  5. Fast prototyping of conducting polymer microelectrodes using resistance-controlled high precision drilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kafka, Jan Robert; Geschke, Oliver; Skaarup, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    We present a straightforward method for fast prototyping of microelectrode arrays in the highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). Microelectrode arrays were produced by electrical resistance-controlled microdrilling through an insulating polymer layer (TOPAS® 5013...... of 130μm and 300μm, respectively, were fabricated. Their functionality was verified by chronoamperometry on potassium ferro-/ferricyanide. Comparison of the experimentally obtained results to finite element modeling of the respective electrode configurations shows that the conducting polymer...

  6. Theoretical and experimental comparison of microelectrode sensing configurations for impedimetric cell monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carminati, M.; Caviglia, Claudia; Heiskanen, Arto; Vergani, Marco; Ferrari, G.; Sampietro, M.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Emnéus, Jenny

    microelectrodes using a versatile custom-made monitoring platform including a 24-channel miniaturized potentiostat. The characterization of bare microelectrodes in buffer and tracking experiments with HeLa cells over 16 hours demonstrate that the coplanar configuration provides a higher sensitivity to cell...... adhesion and spreading (Cell Index = 1.6 vs. 0.4) albeit at a higher frequency of maximum sensitivity (100 kHz vs. 24 kHz) shifting over time. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group....

  7. Electrical Detection of TATA Binding Protein at DNA-Modified Microelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Ebrahim, Ali; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for the electrochemical detection of TATA-binding protein is demonstrated at DNA-modified microelectrodes. The assay is general and based on the interruption of DNA-mediated charge transport to Nile Blue, a redox-active probe covalently attached to the DNA base pair stack. Nanomolar quantities of TATA binding protein can be detected on the microelectrodes even in the presence of micromolar amounts of bovine serum albumin, EndonucleaseIII, or Bam HI methyltransferase. The schem...

  8. Dark matter candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of? Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs

  9. In vitro comparison of sputtered iridium oxide and platinum-coated neural implantable microelectrode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neural interfaces connect signal processing electronics to the nervous system via implanted microelectrode arrays such as the Utah electrode array (UEA). The active sites of the UEA are coated with thin films of either platinum (Pt) or iridium oxide (IrOx). Pt and IrOx have attracted attention as a stimulating or recording material due to their ability to transfer between ionic and electronic current and to resist corrosion. The physical, mechanical, chemical, electrical and optical properties of thin films depend on the method and deposition parameters used to deposit the films. In this work, surface morphology, impedance and charge capacity of Pt and sputtered iridium oxide film (SIROF) were investigated and compared with each other. UEAs with similar electrode area and shape were employed in this study. DC sputtering was used to deposit Pt films and pulsed-dc reactive sputtering was used to deposit SIROF. The electrodes coated with SIROF and Pt were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potential transient measurements to measure charge injection capacity (CIC). SIROF and Pt selectively deposited on the electrode tip had dendrite and granular microstructure, respectively. The CIC of unbiased SIROF and Pt was 2 and 0.3 mC cm-2, respectively. The average impedance at 1 kHz, of SIROF and Pt electrodes, was 6 kΩ and 125 kΩ, respectively. Low impedance and high CIC make SIROF promising stimulation/recording material for neural prosthetic applications.

  10. A novel stretchable micro-electrode array (SMEA) design for directional stretching of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stretchable micro-electrode arrays (SMEAs) are useful tools to study the electrophysiology of living cells seeded on the devices under mechanical stimulation. For such applications, the SMEAs are used as cell culture substrates; therefore, the surface topography and mechanical properties of the devices should be minimally affected by the embedded stretchable electrical interconnects. In this paper, a novel design and micro-fabrication technology for a pneumatically actuated SMEA are presented to achieve stretchability with minimal surface area dedicated to the electrical interconnects and a well-defined surface strain distribution combined with integrated diverse micro-patterns to enable alignment and directional stretching of cells. The special mechanical design also enables the SMEA to have a prolonged electro-mechanical fatigue life time required for long-term cyclic stretching of the cell cultures (stable resistance of electrical interconnects for more than 160 thousand cycles of 20% stretching and relaxing). The proposed fabrication method is based on the state of the art micro-fabrication techniques and materials and circumvents the processing problems associated with using unconventional methods and materials to fabricate stretchable electrode arrays. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterization of the SMEA shows 4.5 MΩ impedance magnitude at 1 kHz for a TiN electrode 12 um in diameter. Cell culture experiments demonstrate the robustness of the SMEAs for long-term culturing experiments and compatibility with inverted fluorescent microscopy. (paper)

  11. Enhanced Flexible Tubular Microelectrode with Conducting Polymer for Multi-Functional Implantable Tissue-Machine Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hong-Chang; Liu, Jing-Quan; Kang, Xiao-Yang; Tang, Long-Jun; Wang, Ming-Hao; Ji, Bo-Wen; Yang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Implantable biomedical microdevices enable the restoration of body function and improvement of health condition. As the interface between artificial machines and natural tissue, various kinds of microelectrodes with high density and tiny size were developed to undertake precise and complex medical tasks through electrical stimulation and electrophysiological recording. However, if only the electrical interaction existed between electrodes and muscle or nerve tissue without nutrition factor delivery, it would eventually lead to a significant symptom of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. In this paper, we developed a novel flexible tubular microelectrode integrated with fluidic drug delivery channel for dynamic tissue implant. First, the whole microelectrode was made of biocompatible polymers, which could avoid the drawbacks of the stiff microelectrodes that are easy to be broken and damage tissue. Moreover, the microelectrode sites were circumferentially distributed on the surface of polymer microtube in three dimensions, which would be beneficial to the spatial selectivity. Finally, the in vivo results confirmed that our implantable tubular microelectrodes were suitable for dynamic electrophysiological recording and simultaneous fluidic drug delivery, and the electrode performance was further enhanced by the conducting polymer modification. PMID:27229174

  12. Enhanced Flexible Tubular Microelectrode with Conducting Polymer for Multi-Functional Implantable Tissue-Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hong-Chang; Liu, Jing-Quan; Kang, Xiao-Yang; Tang, Long-Jun; Wang, Ming-Hao; Ji, Bo-Wen; Yang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Implantable biomedical microdevices enable the restoration of body function and improvement of health condition. As the interface between artificial machines and natural tissue, various kinds of microelectrodes with high density and tiny size were developed to undertake precise and complex medical tasks through electrical stimulation and electrophysiological recording. However, if only the electrical interaction existed between electrodes and muscle or nerve tissue without nutrition factor delivery, it would eventually lead to a significant symptom of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. In this paper, we developed a novel flexible tubular microelectrode integrated with fluidic drug delivery channel for dynamic tissue implant. First, the whole microelectrode was made of biocompatible polymers, which could avoid the drawbacks of the stiff microelectrodes that are easy to be broken and damage tissue. Moreover, the microelectrode sites were circumferentially distributed on the surface of polymer microtube in three dimensions, which would be beneficial to the spatial selectivity. Finally, the in vivo results confirmed that our implantable tubular microelectrodes were suitable for dynamic electrophysiological recording and simultaneous fluidic drug delivery, and the electrode performance was further enhanced by the conducting polymer modification.

  13. Simultaneous/Selective Detection of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid at Synthetic Zeolite-Modified/Graphite-Epoxy Composite Macro/Quasi-Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Pode

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to miniaturize a graphite-epoxy and synthetic zeolite-modified graphite-epoxy composite macroelectrode as a quasi-microelectrode aiming in vitro and also, envisaging in vivo simultaneous electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA and ascorbic acid (AA neurotransmitters, or DA detection in the presence of AA. The electrochemical behavior and the response of the designed materials to the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid without any protective membranes were studied by cyclic voltammetry and constant-potential amperometry techniques. The catalytic effect towards dopamine detection was proved for the synthetic zeolite-modified graphite-epoxy composite quasi-microelectrode, allowing increasing the sensitivity and selectivity for this analyte detection, besides a possible electrostatic attraction between dopamine cation and the negative surface of the synthetic zeolite and electrostatic repulsion with ascorbic acid anion. Also, the synthetic zeolite-modified graphite-epoxy composite quasi-microelectrode gave the best electroanalytical parameters for dopamine detection using constant-potential amperometry, the most useful technique for practical applications.

  14. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  15. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-11-04

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Selection of candidate alloys. Vol. 1. Advanced gas cooled reactor systems definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candidate alloys for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heal (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications in terms of the effect of the primary coolant exposure and thermal exposure were evaluated

  18. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Selection of candidate alloys. Vol. 1. Advanced gas cooled reactor systems definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvin, M.D.

    1978-10-31

    Candidate alloys for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heal (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications in terms of the effect of the primary coolant exposure and thermal exposure were evaluated. (FS)

  19. Magnesium microelectrode corrosion product transport modelling in relation to chloride induced pitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high magnesium alloy Magnox is used as a fuel clad for the UK gas cooled, graphite moderated reactors of the same name. The fuel is metallic uranium (typically natural enrichment), so a low neutron absorption cross-section clad is required. Following discharge from reactor, spent fuel is stored in water, which acts as an effective heat transfer medium and biological shield. The chemistry of these ponds is carefully controlled to ensure that the Magnox clad remains in a passive state. This is primarily through the maintenance of a high pH and very low anion concentration. Of particular concern is the presence of chloride ions as even very low levels may allow localised corrosion to initiate. Although extensive work has been undertaken historically considering the behaviour of Magnox clad and the acceptable storage envelopes, the challenges of ageing plant and aspirations for accelerated decommissioning give value to further understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of this material. Recently, electrochemical techniques have been employed to characterise performance in a variety of chemistries and microelectrodes have been produced which have shown characteristics of salt film corrosion at moderate chloride concentrations under polarisation. A characteristic of the electrochemical response observed during the mass transport limited (potential independent) salt film regime has been periodic transients which correspond to emission of microscopic hydrogen bubbles from the microelectrode cavity. A simple finite element multi-physics model has been employed to assist in understanding the dominant processes of corrosion product transport away from a magnesium electrode surface which is dissolving under a salt film and this shows that characteristic transients observed in electrochemical tests may be simulated with reasonable agreement by consideration of convection from laminar flow around hydrogen micro-bubbles in the pit cavity combined with aqueous diffusion in the

  20. An active, flexible carbon nanotube microelectrode array for recording electrocorticograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Chan; Hsu, Hui-Lin; Lee, Yu-Tao; Su, Huan-Chieh; Yen, Shiang-Jie; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Yew, Tri-Rung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Yao, Da-Jeng; Chang, Yen-Chung; Chen, Hsin

    2011-06-01

    A variety of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) has been developed for monitoring intra-cortical neural activity at a high spatio-temporal resolution, opening a promising future for brain research and neural prostheses. However, most MEAs are based on metal electrodes on rigid substrates, and the intra-cortical implantation normally causes neural damage and immune responses that impede long-term recordings. This communication presents a flexible, carbon-nanotube MEA (CMEA) with integrated circuitry. The flexibility allows the electrodes to fit on the irregular surface of the brain to record electrocorticograms in a less invasive way. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) further improve both the electrode impedance and the charge-transfer capacity by more than six times. Moreover, the CNTs are grown on the polyimide substrate directly to improve the adhesion to the substrate. With the integrated recording circuitry, the flexible CMEA is proved capable of recording the neural activity of crayfish in vitro, as well as the electrocorticogram of a rat cortex in vivo, with an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the proposed CMEA can be employed as a less-invasive, biocompatible and reliable neuro-electronic interface for long-term usage.

  1. Investigating brain functional evolution and plasticity using microelectrode array technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Alessandro; Obeid, Iyad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate long and short-term plasticity responsible for memory formation in dissociated neuronal networks. In order to address this issue, a set of experiments was designed and implemented in which the microelectrode array electrode grid was divided into four quadrants, two of which were chronically stimulated, every two days for one hour with a stimulation paradigm that varied over time. Overall network and quadrant responses were then analyzed to quantify what level of plasticity took place in the network and how this was due to the stimulation interruption. The results demonstrate that there were no spatial differences in the stimulus-evoked activity within quadrants. Furthermore, the implemented stimulation protocol induced depression effects in the neuronal networks as demonstrated by the consistently lower network activity following stimulation sessions. Finally, the analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of the stimulation decreased over time, thus suggesting a habituation phenomenon. These findings are sufficient to conclude that electrical stimulation is an important tool to interact with dissociated neuronal cultures, but localized stimuli are not enough to drive spatial synaptic potentiation or depression. On the contrary, the ability to modulate synaptic temporal plasticity was a feasible task to achieve by chronic network stimulation. PMID:26476356

  2. Discovery of Undescribed Brain Tissue Changes Around Implanted Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshi Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-implantable microelectrode arrays are devicesdesigned to record or electrically stimulate the activity ofneurons in the brain. These devices hold the potential tohelp treat epilepsy, paralysis, blindness, and deafness, andalso provide researchers with insights into a varietyof neural processes, such as memory formation.While these devices have a very promising future,researchers are discovering that their long-termfunctionality is greatly limited by the brain’s naturalimmune response to foreign objects. To improve thefunctional lifetime of these devices, one solution lies infully characterizing and understanding this tissue response.Roles for microglia and astrocytes in this biologicalresponse have been characterized. However, changesto oligodendrocytes, cells that myelinate axons, remainpoorly understood. These cells provide insulationto the axons, which is required for proper neuralfunctioning. Here we report on the changes that occurwith oligodendrocyte processes in tissue aroundmicroelectrode implants in the brain.Six rats were surgically implanted with microelectrodearrays and allowed to recover for 1, 2, or 4 weeks.Subjects were then sacrificed and the brain tissue wasprocessed using our recently developed method, Device-Capture Histology. Immunohistochemistry and confocalmicroscopy was employed to assess the responsearound the device. Results indicated a decrease inoligodendrocyte density and a loss in typical directionalorientation of oligodendrocyte processes in tissue near thedevice. These results suggest alterations in the underlyingneuronal networks around these devices, which maygreatly impact the current functional utility of thesepromising devices.

  3. Performance of ultra-high-density microelectrode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging the electrical output activity of biological cells is important to gain an understanding of how cell networks process information. This has implications for the understanding of brain processing, such as that performed by the retina in encoding the visual scene. The performance and electrical quality of a state-of-the-art high-density 519-microelectrode array, that recorded simultaneously from hundreds of live retinal output cells (ganglion cells) is reported on. The fabrication process for these devices has been optimised and their electrical characteristics examined. The electrode arrays typically exhibit an impedance of ∼200 kΩ at 1 kHz and the RMS noise of the whole recording system is 7 μV with a signal to noise ratio of 20:1. With a view to direct stimulation of retinal ganglion cells, a low impedance Z=300 kΩ iridium oxide interface capable of delivering large currents Q cap=4 mC/cm2 to cells was also developed

  4. Study of the Behavior of the Mercury on Diverse Microelectrodes with Cell of Continuous Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study of six types of microelectrodes in two different support electrolytes was developed using a new analytic technique for analysis of mercury in liquid samples in the ambit of parts by million. For it, a new system of cell of continuous flow and platinum microelectrodes and of platinum with gold film was implemented using volt-amperemetry of anodized spoil with square wave. In a preliminary study, some parameters that characterize the analysis with this new cell were optimized, for example the sample's speed flow and the time of electrodeposition. The calibration curves were made for the different types of microelectrode that were used in an ambit of concentrations of 1-10 ppm. According to the obtained results, the microelectrode that better works is the platinum disk for possessing bigger superficial area exposed to the dissolution, which increases the analite's currents of pick. And as a support electrolyte, potassium tiocianato is recommended because of its effectiveness to solve the analytic sign of the mercury. Studies of answer of the current of mercury regarding the quantity of the placed sample and studies of interferences of the analysis with this type of microelectrode were also carried out. With regard to the study of the quantity of sample, it was obtained that the electrochemical answer of the cell is directly proportional to the concentration of the analite placed in it. In the study of interference, it was found that the copper, lead, and zinc ions affect the analysis of mercury in concentrations of 0.1 ppm and on in the case of the microelectrode of platinum disk. And in case that the same microelectrode is used recovered with gold, it only affects the copper in concentrations over 5 ppm, for what is necessary to take into account a previous treatment of the sample in the event of containing some of the interfering ions

  5. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozel, Rifat Emrah [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, 8 Clarkson Ave, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States); Wallace, Kenneth N. [Department of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States); Andreescu, Silvana, E-mail: eandrees@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, 8 Clarkson Ave, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Graphical abstract: Chitosan coated fiber electrodes are sensitive to serotonin detection while rejecting physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences. - Abstract: We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/{mu}M, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5% for n = 6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels.

  6. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Chitosan coated fiber electrodes are sensitive to serotonin detection while rejecting physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences. - Abstract: We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/μM, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5% for n = 6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels.

  7. Microelectrode Arrays with Overlapped Diffusion Layers as Electroanalytical Detectors: Theory and Basic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tomčík

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given.

  8. Microelectrode Array Microscopy: Investigation of Dynamic Behavior of Localized Corrosion at Type 304 Stainless Steel Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and a recently developed microelectrode array microscope have been used to study localized corrosion and electron-transfer characteristics of native oxide layers of type 304 stainless steels. The I-/I3- redox couple was employed as a mediator and allowed sensitive detection of oxide breakdown events. In solutions containing I-, a signal at the microelectrode was observed on type 304 stainless steel surfaces at active pitting corrosion sites. Under conditions where pitting corrosion occurs, SECM was used to track the temporal characteristics of the reaction in a spatial manner. However, because of the time required to create an image, much of the temporal information was not obtained. To improve the temporal resolution of the measurement, microelectrode array microscopy (MEAM) was developed as a parallel method of performing SECM. The demonstration shown reveals the potential of MEAM for analysis of surface chemistry on temporal and spatial domains

  9. Simulation of an ac electro-osmotic pump with step microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Rezazadeh, Soghra; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-05-01

    Pumps with step microelectrodes subjected to an ac voltage are known to have faster pumping rates than those with planar asymmetric microelectrodes. The driving force for pumping in these systems is ac electro-osmosis. This paper aims to understand the flow behaviors of pumps with step microelectrodes by using a realistic model applicable to high external voltages. This model takes the steric effect due to the finite sizes of ions into account and copes with the exponential sensitivity of the counterion concentration to voltage. The effects on the pumping flow rate of varying the pump parameters were investigated. The geometrical parameters were optimized, and the effects of varying the ac frequency and amplitude were examined. The electrical potential of the fluid and the electrical charge at the electrode surface were solved simultaneously, and the Stokes equation was used to describe the fluid flow.

  10. Controlling the Electrochemically Active Area of Carbon Fiber Microelectrodes by the Electrodeposition and Selective Removal of an Insulating Photoresist

    OpenAIRE

    Lambie, Bradley A.; Orwar, Owe; Weber, Stephen G

    2006-01-01

    A new and simple method permits control of the electrochemically active area of a carbon fiber microelectrode. An electrophoretic photoresist insulates the 10 μm diameter carbon fiber microelectrodes. Photolysis of the photoresist followed by immersion of the exposed area into a developing solution reveals electroactive carbon fiber surface. The electroactive surface area exposed can be controlled with a good degree of reproducibility.

  11. Correlations between histology and neuronal activity recorded by microelectrodes implanted chronically in the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Douglas; Cogan, Stuart; Kane, Sheryl; Pikov, Victor

    2016-06-01

    Objective. To quantify relations between the neuronal activity recorded with chronically-implanted intracortical microelectrodes and the histology of the surrounding tissue, using radial distance from the tip sites and time after array implantation as parameters. Approach. ‘Utah’-type intracortical microelectrode arrays were implanted into cats’ sensorimotor cortex for 275–364 days. The brain tissue around the implants was immuno-stained for the neuronal marker NeuN and for the astrocyte marker GFAP. Pearson’s product-moment correlations were used to quantify the relations between these markers and the amplitudes of the recorded neuronal action potentials (APs) and their signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). Main results. S/N was more stable over post-implant time than was AP amplitude, but its increased correlation with neuronal density after many months indicates ongoing loss of neurons around the microelectrodes. S/N was correlated with neuron density out to at least 140 μm from the microelectrodes, while AP amplitude was correlated with neuron density and GFAP density within ∼80 μm. Correlations between AP amplitude and histology markers (GFAP and NeuN density) were strongest immediately after implantation, while correlation between the neuron density and S/N was strongest near the time the animals were sacrificed. Unlike AP amplitude, there was no significant correlation between S/N and density of GFAP around the tip sites. Significance. Our findings indicate an evolving interaction between changes in the tissue surrounding the microelectrodes and the microelectrode’s electrical properties. Ongoing loss of neurons around recording microelectrodes, and the interactions between their delayed electrical deterioration and early tissue scarring around the tips appear to pose the greatest threats to the microelectrodes’ long-term functionality.

  12. BioMEMS for medicine: On-chip cell characterization and implantable microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Karen C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2006-04-01

    This paper surveys a few of the emerging bioMEMS technologies at EPFL for improved, inexpensive health care. The lab-on-a-chip systems use dielectrophoretic forces to direct cell movement within microfluidic networks and impedance spectroscopy for label-free in-flow characterization of living cells. The implantable microelectrodes for neural applications are based on thin-film polymer foils with embedded microelectrodes for both recording and stimulation. Applications for these biomedical microdevices will include stem cell research, cancer cell characterization, drug discovery, treatments for neurological disorders, and neuroprosthetic devices.

  13. Microelectrode for energy and current control of nanotip field electron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerging experiments and applications in electron microscopy, holography, and diffraction benefit from miniaturized electron guns for compact experimental setups. We present a highly compact microelectrode integrated field emitter that consists of a tungsten nanotip coated with a few micrometers thick polyimide film followed by a several nanometers thick gold film, both positioned behind the exposed emitter apex by approximately 10–30 μm. The control of the electric field strength at the nanometer scale tip apex allows suppression, extraction, and energy tuning of field-emitted electrons. The performance of the microelectrode is demonstrated experimentally and supported by numerical simulations

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrese, James C.; Aceros, Juan; Donoghue, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Signal attenuation is a major problem facing intracortical sensors for chronic neuroprosthetic applications. Many studies suggest that failure is due to gliosis around the electrode tips, however, mechanical and material causes of failure are often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to progressive signal decline by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize structural changes in chronically implanted arrays and histology to examine the tissue response at corresponding implant sites. Approach. We examined eight chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) explanted from non-human primates at times ranging from 37 to 1051 days post-implant. We used SEM, in vivo neural recordings, and histology (GFAP, Iba-1, NeuN). Three MEAs that were never implanted were also imaged as controls. Main results. SEM revealed progressive corrosion of the platinum electrode tips and changes to the underlying silicon. The parylene insulation was prone to cracking and delamination, and in some instances the silicone elastomer also delaminated from the edges of the MEA. Substantial tissue encapsulation was observed and was often seen growing into defects in the platinum and parylene. These material defects became more common as the time in vivo increased. Histology at 37 and 1051 days post-implant showed gliosis, disruption of normal cortical architecture with minimal neuronal loss, and high Iba-1 reactivity, especially within the arachnoid and dura. Electrode tracts were either absent or barely visible in the cortex at 1051 days, but were seen in the fibrotic encapsulation material suggesting that the MEAs were lifted out of the brain. Neural recordings showed a progressive drop in impedance, signal amplitude, and viable channels over time. Significance. These results provide evidence that signal loss in MEAs is truly multifactorial. Gliosis occurs in the first few months after implantation but does

  15. Fabrication of a flexible penetrating microelectrode array for use on curved surfaces of neural tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Donghak; Cho, Sung Joon; Kim, Sohee

    2013-12-01

    Conventionally, invasive neural microelectrodes for recording neuronal signals or stimulating the nervous system have been fabricated based on silicon substrate mainly due to well-established manufacturing processes. However, these silicon-based microelectrode devices have an issue of mechanical stability caused by the absence of flexibility when implanted onto curved surfaces of tissues. In this paper, a flexible and penetrating microelectrode array, a hybrid structure composed of silicon and elastomer, was devised and fabricated by bulk micromachining technologies. The structure uses individual silicon needles as independent electrodes in a square array and polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) as a base to support the needles. The dimensions of the electrode array and the needles are adjustable, depending on the number of needles, the pitch between the needles and the targeted penetration depth of the neural tissue. For mechanical characterization, the adhesion between PDMS and silicon was evaluated and the flexibility and integrity of the fabricated structure were investigated through flexural test and insertion test. Also, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the electrodes was measured. The results suggest that the proposed microelectrode array is promising for use in neuronal recording and stimulation over curved surfaces such as cortical surface and peripheral nerves with larger curvatures.

  16. Performance Improvement by Layout Designs of Conductive Polymer Microelectrode Based Impedimetric Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosati, Giulio; Daprà, Johannes; Cherré, Solène;

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a theoretical, computational, and experimental evaluation of the performance of an impedimetric biosensor based on interdigitated conductive polymer (PEDOT:TsO) microelectrodes in a microfluidic system. The influence of the geometry of the electrodes and microchannels on t...

  17. Printed microelectrodes for scalable, high-areal-capacity lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Craig; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2016-03-10

    Printed microelectrodes for lithium-sulfur cathodes are produced with aqueous inks and a one-step printing process. The cathodes exhibit high areal capacities of ≥5 mA h cm(-2) for 50 cycles and withstand ≥500 cycles. This performance meets energy-storage benchmarks for powering microdevices, and presents a strategic option for future microbatteries. PMID:26833188

  18. Metal microelectrode nanostructuring using nanosphere lithography and photolithography with optimization of the fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured metal microelectrodes were fabricated using a combination of nanosphere lithography, conventional photolithography and physical vapour deposition techniques. Specifically, Pt and Ag microelectrodes, patterned by hexagonal nanotriangular Ag arrays were prepared, introducing Ag and bimetallic Ag on Pt microelectrode nanostructured systems. Enhancement of surface hydrophilicity was achieved via electric discharge on the electrode surface or via physicochemical interactions (dipping the substrates into NaOH solution). Following removal of the nanospheres, uniform hexagonal arrays of metal nanostructures were revealed and characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy analysis. Parameters relevant to the self-assembly of the colloid arrays and the fabrication methodology employed is discussed with respect to process optimization. - Highlights: • We present fabrication of nanostructured Ag and bimetallic Ag on Pt microelectrodes. • Nanosphere lithography was employed together with photolithography. • Nanosphere ordering promoted via surface hydrophilicity enhancement by two approaches • Devices were characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. • Nanostructuring was optimised via appropriate selection of experimental conditions

  19. Conductive Polymer Microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of transmitter release from living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Matteucci, Marco; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present techniques to trap a group of neuronal cells (PC 12) close to band microelectrodes and quantitatively measure cellular transmitter release. Different trapping approaches were investigated including coating of electrodes by layers enhancing cell attachment and by pressure...

  20. Effects of Organophosphorus Flame Retardants on Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks Grown on Microelectrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    EFFECTS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON SPONTANEOUS ACTIVITY IN NEURONAL NETWORKS GROWN ON MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS TJ Shafer1, K Wallace1, WR Mundy1, M Behl2,. 1Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA, 2National Toxicology Program, NIEHS, RTP, NC...

  1. Impedance measurements on Au microelectrodes using controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yuehua; Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben;

    2011-01-01

    High temperature impedance measurements on Au microelectrodes deposited on polished yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pellets were demonstrated using a newly designed controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope (CAHT-SPM). Probes based on Pt0.8Ir0.2 were fabricated and employed...

  2. Physicochemical properties of peptide-coated microelectrode arrays and their in vitro effects on neuroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane-Motlagh, Bahareh; Javanbakht, Taraneh; Shoghi, Fatemeh; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Martel, Richard; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Silicon micromachined neural electrode arrays, which act as an interface between bioelectronic devices and neural tissues, play an important role in chronic implants, in vivo. The biological compatibility of chronic microelectrode arrays (MEA) is an essential factor that must be taken into account in their design and fabrication. In order to improve biocompatibility of the MEAs, the surface of the electrodes was coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and parylene-C, which are biocompatible polymers. An in vitro study was performed to test the capacity of poly-d-lysine (PDL) to improve neural-cell adhesion and proliferation. Increased proliferation of the neuroblast cells on the microelectrodes was observed in the presence of the PDL. The presence of the peptide on the electrode surface was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The impedance of the electrodes was not changed significantly before and after PDL deposition. Mouse neuroblast cells were seeded and cultured on the PDL coated and uncoated neural MEAs with different tip-coatings such as platinum, molybdenum, gold, sputtered iridium oxide, and carbon nanotubes. The neuroblast cells grew preferentially on and around peptide coated-microelectrode tips, as compared to the uncoated microelectrodes. PMID:27524064

  3. Micro-homogeneity of candidate reference materials: Results from an intercomparison study for the Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) has made available two single cell algae materials IAEA-392 and IAEA-393 as well as an urban dust IAEA-396 to study their use for analytical sample sizes in the milligram range and below. Micro-analytical techniques such as PIXE and μ-PIXE, solid sampling AAS, scanning electron microprobe X-ray analysis and INAA were applied to the determination of trace elements on the basis of μg to mg amounts of the selected materials. The comparability of the mean values as well as the reproducibility of successive measurements is being evaluated in order to compare relative homogeneity factors for many elements in the investigated materials. From the reported results it seems that the algae materials IAEA-392 and IAEA-393 are extremely homogeneous biological materials for a number of elements with an extraordinary sharp particle size distribution below 10 μm. A similar situation seems to hold for the urban dust material IAEA-396 which had been air-jet milled to a particle size distribution around 4 μm. The introduction of these materials as CRMs with very small amounts needed to determine the certified concentrations will help to meet the needs of micro-analytical techniques for natural matrix reference materials. (author)

  4. Implications of chronic daily anti-oxidant administration on the inflammatory response to intracortical microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Stewart, Wade G.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Wong, Chun T.; Meador, William D.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Oxidative stress events have been implicated to occur and facilitate multiple failure modes of intracortical microelectrodes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a sustained concentration of an anti-oxidant and to reduce oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. Approach. Non-functional microelectrodes were implanted into the cortex of male Sprague Dawley rats for up to sixteen weeks. Half of the animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of the natural anti-oxidant resveratrol, at 30 mg kg-1. The study was designed to investigate the biodistribution of the resveratrol, and the effects on neuroinflammation/neuroprotection following device implantation. Main results. Daily maintenance of a sustained range of resveratrol throughout the implantation period resulted in fewer degenerating neurons in comparison to control animals at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Initial and chronic improvements in neuronal viability in resveratrol-dosed animals were correlated with significant reductions in local superoxide anion accumulation around the implanted device at two weeks after implantation. Controls, receiving only saline injections, were also found to have reduced amounts of accumulated superoxide anion locally and less neurodegeneration than controls at sixteen weeks post-implantation. Despite observed benefits, thread-like adhesions were found between the liver and diaphragm in resveratrol-dosed animals. Significance. Overall, our chronic daily anti-oxidant dosing scheme resulted in improvements in neuronal viability surrounding implanted microelectrodes, which could result in improved device performance. However, due to the discovery of thread-like adhesions, further work is still required to optimize a chronic anti-oxidant dosing regime for the application of intracortical microelectrodes.

  5. Microelectrode array in mixed alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers: Electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an efficient alternative to obtain recessed microelectrodes device on gold electrode surface, in which mixed self-assembled monolayer of long and short carbon alkanethiol chains was used for this purpose. Development of the modified electrodes included the chemical adsorption of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 2-mercaptoethanol solution, as well as their mixtures, on gold surface, resulting in the final mixed self-assembled monolayer configuration. For comparison, the electrochemical performance of self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, 4-mercapto-1-butanol and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol modified electrodes was also investigated. It was verified that, in the mixed self-assembled monolayer, the 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid acts as a barrier for electron transfer while the short alkanethiol chair is deposited in an island-like shape through which electrons can be freely transferred to ions in solution, allowing electrochemical reactions to occur. The performance of the modified electrodes toward microelectrode behavior was investigated via cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements using [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− redox couple as a probe. In this case, sigmoidal voltammetric responses were obtained, very similar to those observed for microelectrodes. Such behavior reinforces the proposition of electron transfer through the short alkanethiol chain layer and surface blockage by the long chain one. Electrochemical impedance results allowed calculated the mean radius value of each microelectrode disks of 3.8 μm with about 22 μm interval between them. The microelectrode environment provided by the mixed self-assembled monolayer can be conveniently used to provide an efficient catalytic conversion in biosensing applications.

  6. Collaborative study on the determination of trace elements in two candidate reference materials: Tea Leaves (INCT-TL-1) and Mixed Polish Herbs (INCT-MPH-2). Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of two new polish candidate reference materials is described. The consecutive steps involved collection of appropriately large quantities of Tea Leaves (INCT-TL-1) and Mixed Polish Herbs (INCT-MPH-2) respectively, comminution, sieving, homogenization, preliminary homogeneity testing, distribution into containers, final homogeneity testing, and radiation sterilization followed microbiological investigation. methods of determination of moisture content were established and various approaches to the determination of particle size distribution were investigated. Worldwide interlaboratory comparison was organised in which 109 laboratories from 19 countries participated. Laboratory averages from all participants (over 1400 results for each of the materials for over 70 elements) are presented. The method of data evaluation is briefly outlined and preliminary strategy of certification which be the subject of final report(s) published at a later date is announced. (author)

  7. A single-source precursor route to anisotropic halogen-doped zinc oxide particles as a promising candidate for new transparent conducting oxide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Daniela; Wagner, Markus R; Flock, Johanna; Reparaz, Julian S; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M; Klaiber, Alexander; Dekorsy, Thomas; Polarz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Numerous applications in optoelectronics require electrically conducting materials with high optical transparency over the entire visible light range. A solid solution of indium oxide and substantial amounts of tin oxide for electronic doping (ITO) is currently the most prominent example for the class of so-called TCOs (transparent conducting oxides). Due to the limited, natural occurrence of indium and its steadily increasing price, it is highly desired to identify materials alternatives containing highly abundant chemical elements. The doping of other metal oxides (e.g., zinc oxide, ZnO) is a promising approach, but two problems can be identified. Phase separation might occur at the required high concentration of the doping element, and for successful electronic modification it is mandatory that the introduced heteroelement occupies a defined position in the lattice of the host material. In the case of ZnO, most attention has been attributed so far to n-doping via substitution of Zn(2+) by other metals (e.g., Al(3+)). Here, we present first steps towards n-doped ZnO-based TCO materials via substitution in the anion lattice (O(2-) versus halogenides). A special approach is presented, using novel single-source precursors containing a potential excerpt of the target lattice 'HalZn·Zn3O3' preorganized on the molecular scale (Hal = I, Br, Cl). We report about the synthesis of the precursors, their transformation into halogene-containing ZnO materials, and finally structural, optical and electronic properties are investigated using a combination of techniques including FT-Raman, low-T photoluminescence, impedance and THz spectroscopies. PMID:26665089

  8. A single-source precursor route to anisotropic halogen-doped zinc oxide particles as a promising candidate for new transparent conducting oxide materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lehr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous applications in optoelectronics require electrically conducting materials with high optical transparency over the entire visible light range. A solid solution of indium oxide and substantial amounts of tin oxide for electronic doping (ITO is currently the most prominent example for the class of so-called TCOs (transparent conducting oxides. Due to the limited, natural occurrence of indium and its steadily increasing price, it is highly desired to identify materials alternatives containing highly abundant chemical elements. The doping of other metal oxides (e.g., zinc oxide, ZnO is a promising approach, but two problems can be identified. Phase separation might occur at the required high concentration of the doping element, and for successful electronic modification it is mandatory that the introduced heteroelement occupies a defined position in the lattice of the host material. In the case of ZnO, most attention has been attributed so far to n-doping via substitution of Zn2+ by other metals (e.g., Al3+. Here, we present first steps towards n-doped ZnO-based TCO materials via substitution in the anion lattice (O2− versus halogenides. A special approach is presented, using novel single-source precursors containing a potential excerpt of the target lattice 'HalZn·Zn3O3' preorganized on the molecular scale (Hal = I, Br, Cl. We report about the synthesis of the precursors, their transformation into halogene-containing ZnO materials, and finally structural, optical and electronic properties are investigated using a combination of techniques including FT-Raman, low-T photoluminescence, impedance and THz spectroscopies.

  9. Solid-contact potentiometric polymer membrane microelectrodes for the detection of silver ions at the femtomole level

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinova, Nastassia; Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin; Bakker, Eric

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, ion-selective electrodes based on polymer membranes have been shown to exhibit detection limits that are often in the nanomolar concentration range, and thus drastically lower than traditionally accepted. Since potentiometry is less dependent on scaling laws that other established analytical techniques, their performance in confined sample volumes is explored here. Solid-contact silver-selective microelectrodes, with a sodium-selective microelectrode as a reference, were inse...

  10. Direct fabrication of microelectrodes on a polymer substrate using selective ultrashort pulsed laser ablation of inkjet-printed Ag lines

    OpenAIRE

    LEE S.H.; Lee, D.J.; Lee, C. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Wereley, Steven T.; Oh, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    An inkjet-based ultrashort pulsed laser patterning on a polymer substrate is presented with high-laser scanning speeds. The effects of the laser processing parameters on the ablation characteristics were studied to accomplish damage-free laser ablation. Laser ablation characteristics depend on input energy, scanning speed, and number of scans. Final width of micro-electrodes can be flexibly controlled by multiple selective ablations. Well-defined, uniform microelectrodes without damaging thei...

  11. Flexible complementary metal oxide semiconductor microelectrode arrays with applications in single cell characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajouhi, H.; Jou, A. Y.; Jain, R.; Ziabari, A.; Shakouri, A.; Savran, C. A.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-11-01

    A highly flexible microelectrode array with an embedded complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation amplifier suitable for sensing surfaces of biological entities is developed. The array is based on ultrathin CMOS islands that are thermally isolated from each other and are interconnected by meandered nano-scale wires that can adapt to cellular surfaces with micro-scale curvatures. CMOS temperature sensors are placed in the islands and are optimally biased to have high temperature sensitivity. While no live cell thermometry is conducted, a measured temperature sensitivity of 0.15 °C in the temperature range of 35 to 40 °C is achieved by utilizing a low noise CMOS lock-in amplifier implemented in the same technology. The monolithic nature of CMOS sensors and amplifier circuits and their versatile flexible interconnecting wires overcome the sensitivity and yield limitations of microelectrode arrays fabricated in competing technologies.

  12. Monitoring Ion Activities In and Around Cells Using Ion-Selective Liquid-Membrane Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Parker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study.

  13. The Fabrication of PDMS mould for Microelectrode Array Biochip using NIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Khi Khim; Samsuri, Fahmi; Lee, Tze Pin; Mohamed, Khairudin

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, low-cost micro and nano fabrication process have gain intention from the manufacturing industry. Biochip is a platform of miniaturized microarrays arranged on a solid substrate that allows various biological tests to achieve immediate results. The development of biochip has established a new platform in biomedical industry. However, to fulfill the demands and availability in the market with affordable cost requires high volume manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of the biochips. In this article we will discuss the fabrication of PDMS mould for replicating microelectrode array of biochip. The fabrication of the microelectrodes utilizes the Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique. Finally, the fabrication of PDMS mould has been demonstrated successfully for using Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique and achieved 13% of size difference in overall.

  14. Highly sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide at a carbon nanotube fiber microelectrode coated with palladium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber microelectrode coated with palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) and enabling electrochemical sensing of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The synergistic effects of the CNT fibers (good mechanical strength and large surface area) and of the PdNPs (high electrocatalytic activity) result in a microelectrode for H2O2 that exhibits a 2-s response time, a detection limit as low as 2 μM, a sensitivity of 2.75 A cm−2 M−1, and a linear response range from 2 μM to 1.3 mM (R = 0.9994). The sensor is also selective and not interfered by potentially competing species in biological fluids, thus representing an inexpensive but highly sensitive and selective microsensor for H2O2. (author)

  15. Thin film microelectrodes for electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard

    An important signaling process in the nervous system is the release of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters from neurons. In this thesis alternative thin film electrode materials for applications targeting electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters in chip devices were evaluated...

  16. Selective Functionalization of Independently Addressed Microelectrodes by Electrochemical Activation and Deactivation of a Coupling Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Devaraj, Neal. K.; Dinolfo, Peter H.; Chidsey, Christopher E. D.; Collman, James P.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate selective functionalization of independently addressed microelectrodes by electrochemical activation and deactivation of a coupling catalyst. 1,2,3-Triazole formation between terminal acetylenes and organic azides is efficiently catalyzed by copper(I) complexes (a Sharpless “click” reaction) while the oxidized copper (II) complexes are inactive. By electrochemically activating or deactivating the catalyst by switching its redox state, we demonstrate control over triazole format...

  17. A Comparison of Neuroinflammation to Implanted Microelectrodes in Rat and Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Burke, Alan A.; Meador, William D.; Householder, Kyle T.; Buck, Amy C.; Sunil, Smrithi; Stewart, Wade G.; Anna, Jake P.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Rat models have emerged as a common tool to study neuroinflammation to intracortical microelectrodes. While a number of studies have attempted to understand the factors resulting in neuroinflammation using rat models, a complete understanding of key mechanistic pathways remains elusive. Transgenic mouse models, however, could facilitate a deeper understanding of mechanistic pathways due to an ease of genetic alteration. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to compare neuroinflammation ...

  18. A novel electroporation system for efficient molecular delivery into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a 3-dimensional microelectrode

    OpenAIRE

    Seongsu Kang; Kwon-Ho Kim; Yeu-Chun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation is one of the most widely used transfection methods because of its high efficiency and convenience among the various transfection methods. Previous micro-electroporation systems have some drawbacks such as limitations in height and design, time-consuming and an expensive fabrication process due to technical constraints. This study fabricates a three dimensional microelectrode using the 3D printing technique. The interdigitated microstructure consisting of poly lactic acid was ...

  19. Nanowire-templated microelectrodes for high-sensitivity pH detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antohe, V.A.; Radu, Adrian; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Mária;

    2009-01-01

    A highly sensitive pH capacitive sensor has been designed by confined growth of vertically aligned nanowire arrays on interdigited microelectrodes. The active surface of the device has been functionalized with an electrochemical pH transducer (polyaniline). We easily tune the device features by...... combining lithographic techniques with electrochemical synthesis. The reported electrical LC resonance measurements show considerable sensitivity enhancement compared to conventional capacitive pH sensors realized with microfabricated interdigited electrodes. The sensitivity can be easily improved by...

  20. Dynamic behavior of impurities and native components in model LSM microelectrodes on YSZ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion; Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    -doped lanthanum manganite ((La0.75Sr0.25)0.95MnO3) microelectrodes with a diameter of 100 μm and a thickness of ∼500 nm on an yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte were analyzed post-mortem after ∼200 h at temperatures up to 850 °C. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to study the dynamic...

  1. Streaming potentials in gramicidin channels measured with ion-selective microelectrodes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, S; Hladky, S B

    1998-01-01

    Streaming potentials have been measured for gramicidin channels with a new method employing ion-selective microelectrodes. It is shown that ideally ion-selective electrodes placed at the membrane surface record the true streaming potential. Using this method for ion concentrations below 100 mM, approximately seven water molecules are transported whenever a sodium, potassium, or cesium ion, passes through the channel. This new method confirms earlier measurements (Rosenberg, P.A., and A. Finke...

  2. Selective Stimulation of the Spinal Cord Surface Using a Conformable Microelectrode Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Williams Meacham

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available By electrically stimulating the spinal cord, it is possible to activate functional populations of neurons that modulate motor and sensory function. One method for accessing these neurons is via their associated axons, which project as functionally-segregated longitudinal columns of white- matter funiculi (i.e., spinal tracts. To stimulate spinal tracts without penetrating the cord, we have recently developed technology that enables close-proximity, multi-electrode contact with the spinal cord surface. Our stretchable microelectrode arrays (sMEAs are fabricated using an elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS substrate and can be wrapped circumferentially around the spinal cord to optimize electrode contact. Here, sMEAs were used to stimulate the surfaces of rat spinal-cords maintained in vitro, and their ability to selectively activate axonal surface tracts was compared to rigid bipolar tungsten microelectrodes pressed firmly onto the cord surface. Along dorsal column tracts, the axonal response to sMEA stimulation was compared to that evoked by rigid microelectrodes through measurement of their evoked axonal compound action potentials (CAPs. Paired t-tests failed to reveal significant differences between the sMEA’s and the rigid microelectrode’s stimulus resolution, or in their ranges of evoked CAP conduction velocities. Additionally, dual-site stimulation using sMEA electrodes recruited spatially-distinct populations of spinal axons. Site-specific stimulation of the ventrolateral funiculus—a tract capable of evoking locomotor-like activity—recruited ventral-root efferent activity that spanned several spinal segments. These findings indicate that the sMEA stimulates the spinal cord surface with selectivity similar to that of rigid microelectrodes, while possessing potential advantages concerning circumferential contact and mechanical compatibility with the cord surface.

  3. Profiling of oxygen in biofilms using individually addressable disk microelectrodes on a microfabricated needle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel microelectrode array sensor was fabricated using MEMS technology on a needle, and then applied to real-time measurement of dissolved oxygen (DO) inside biofilms. The sensor consists of eleven gold disk microelectrodes, a rectangular auxiliary electrode along them, and an external and internal reference electrode. Three kinds of sensors were designed and their responses were characterized and evaluated under various conditions. The arrays exhibit a linear response to DO in the 0–8 mg·L−1 concentration range in water, high sensitivity, repeatability, and low limits of detection (<0.11 mg·L−1 of DO) and quantification (0.38 mg·L−1 DO). The sensors were validated against a commercial Clark-type microelectrode and applied to profiling of DO in a heterotrophic biofilm cultivated in a flat-plate bioreactor. It is shown that the sensor array can provide a multipoint, simultaneous snapshot profile of DO inside a biofilm with high spatial resolution due to its micrometric dimensions. We conclude that this new sensor array represents a powerful tool for sensing of DO biofilms and in numerous bioprocesses. (author)

  4. Substrate arrays of iridium oxide microelectrodes for in vitro neuronal interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawad, Shady; Giugliano, Michele; Heuschkel, Marc; Wessling, Börge; Markram, Henry; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Renaud, Philippe; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    The design of novel bidirectional interfaces for in vivo and in vitro nervous systems is an important step towards future functional neuroprosthetics. Small electrodes, structures and devices are necessary to achieve high-resolution and target-selectivity during stimulation and recording of neuronal networks, while significant charge transfer and large signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate time resolution. In addition, the physical properties of the interface should remain stable across time, especially when chronic in vivo applications or in vitro long-term studies are considered, unless a procedure to actively compensate for degradation is provided. In this short report, we describe the use and fabrication of arrays of 120 planar microelectrodes (MEAs) of sputtered Iridium Oxide (IrOx). The effective surface area of individual microelectrodes is significantly increased using electrochemical activation, a procedure that may also be employed to restore the properties of the electrodes as required. The electrode activation results in a very low interface impedance, especially in the lower frequency domain, which was characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The increase in the roughness of the microelectrodes surface was imaged using digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy. Aging of the activated electrodes was also investigated, comparing storage in saline with storage in air. Demonstration of concept was achieved by recording multiple single-unit spike activity in acute brain slice preparations of rat neocortex. Data suggests that extracellular recording of action potentials can be achieved with planar IrOx MEAs with good signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:19194527

  5. Effects of adsorbed proteins, an antifouling agent and long-duration DC voltage pulses on the impedance of silicon-based neural microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommakia, Salah; Rickus, Jenna L; Otto, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    The successful use of implantable neural microelectrodes as neuroprosthetic devices depends on the mitigation of the reactive tissue response of the brain. One of the factors affecting the ultimate severity of the reactive tissue response and the in vivo electrical properties of the microelectrodes is the initial adsorption of proteins onto the surface of the implanted microelectrodes. In this study we quantify the increase in microelectrode impedance magnitude at physiological frequencies following electrode immersion in a 10% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. We also demonstrate the efficacy of a common antifouling molecule, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), in preventing a significant increase in microelectrode impedance. In addition, we show the feasibility of using long-duration DC voltage pulses to remove adsorbed proteins from the microelectrode surface. PMID:19963693

  6. Considerations on the performance and fabrication of candidate materials for the Yucca Mountain repository waste packages highly corrosion resistant nickel-base and titanium-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E; Goldberg, A

    1995-11-30

    Among the metallurgical factors that affect the performance of a material in a given environment are alloy composition, alloy segregation, depletion of alloying elements, non-uniform microstructures, precipitation leading to an increase in susceptibility to corrosion as well as decreases in ductility, residual plastic deformation, and residual stresses. Precipitation often occurs preferentially at grain boundaries, causing depletion of critical elements in regions adjacent to these boundaries. Continuous grain-boundary precipitates can lead to drops in ductility and toughness. The presence of non-metallic inclusions, if excessive and/or segregated, can also cause embrittlement. Segregation of alloying elements can result in localized galvanic action. Depletion of alloying elements as well as segregation can result in reductions in the concentrations of critical elements below those necessary to resist localized corrosion. Segregation and alloy depletion can also facilitate precipitation that could lead to embrittlement.

  7. Development of Microelectrode Arrays Using Electroless Plating for CMOS-Based Direct Counting of Bacterial and HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Ota, Shoko; Gamo, Kohei; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The development of two new types of high-density, electroless plated microelectrode arrays for CMOS-based high-sensitivity direct bacteria and HeLa cell counting are presented. For emerging high-sensitivity direct pathogen counting, two technical challenges must be addressed. One is the formation of a bacteria-sized microelectrode, and the other is the development of a high-sensitivity and high-speed amperometry circuit. The requirement for microelectrode formation is that the gold microelectrodes are required to be as small as the target cell. By improving a self-aligned electroless plating technique, the dimensions of the microelectrodes on a CMOS sensor chip in this work were successfully reduced to 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm. This is 1/20th of the smallest size reported in the literature. Since a bacteria-sized microelectrode has a severe limitation on the current flow, the amperometry circuit has to have a high sensitivity and high speed with low noise. In this work, a current buffer was inserted to mitigate the potential fluctuation. Three test chips were fabricated using a 0.6- μm CMOS process: two with 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm (1024 × 1024 and 4 × 4) sensor arrays and one with 6- μm square (16 × 16) sensor arrays; and the microelectrodes were formed on them using electroless plating. The uniformity among the 1024 × 1024 electrodes arranged with a pitch of 3.6 μm × 4.45 μm was optically verified. For improving sensitivity, the trenches on each microelectrode were developed and verified optically and electrochemically for the first time. Higher sensitivity can be achieved by introducing a trench structure than by using a conventional microelectrode formed by contact photolithography. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements obtained using the 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm 4 × 4 and 6- μm square 16 × 16 sensor array with electroless-plated microelectrodes successfully demonstrated direct counting of the bacteria-sized microbeads and HeLa cells. PMID:26561481

  8. Localized corrosion resistance of high nickel alloys as candidate materials for nuclear waste repository. Effect of alloy and weldment aging at 427 C for up to 40,000 h

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys (e.g. C-22, C-4 and C-276) are considered candidate materials for nuclear waste containers because they offer excellent resistance to localized attack in conditions that can be encountered at the permanent repository site. Electrochemical and standard immersion tests showed that the most resistant of the studied alloys to localized attack was C-22 alloy and the less resistant was C-4 alloy. It was important to determine if long time exposure to low temperatures (below 500 C) would be detrimental in the resistance of these alloys to localized attack (pitting and crevice corrosion). After aging for 40,000 h at 427 C none of these alloys showed precipitation of a second phase (such as carbides or μ phase) that could promote a higher corrosion susceptibility of the alloys. Moreover, immersion and electrochemical tests showed that, after the same long term aging, the susceptibility to corrosion of both the base material and weldments remained unchanged. The effects of alloying elements on the resistance of the alloys to localized attack is discussed

  9. Microelectrode investigation of the reactions between metallic pipe materials and monochloramine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality parameters (i.e., pH, dissolved oxygen [DO], and phosphate) are known to impact metal reactivity with disinfectants and therefore corrosion and metals release into drinking water supplies. With various water utilities switching from free chlorine to chloramines for ...

  10. Substrate arrays of iridium oxide microelectrodes for in vitro neuronal interfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shady Gawad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of novel bidirectional interfaces for in vivo and in vitro nervous systems is an important step towards future functional neuroprosthetics. Small electrodes, structures and devices are necessary to achieve high-resolution and target-selectivity during stimulation and recording of neuronal networks, while significant charge transfer and large signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate time resolution. In addition, the physical properties of the interface should remain stable across time, especially when chronic in vivo applications or in vitro long-term studies are considered, unless a procedure to actively compensate for degradation is provided. In this short report, we describe the use and fabrication of arrays of 120 planar microelectrodes (MEAs of sputtered Iridium Oxide (IrOx. The effective surface area of individual microelectrodes is significantly increased using electrochemical activation, a procedure that may also be employed to restore the properties of the electrodes as required. The electrode activation results in a very low interface impedance, especially in the lower frequency domain, which was characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The increase in the roughness of the microelectrodes surface was imaged using digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy. Aging of the activated electrodes was also investigated, comparing storage in saline with storage in air. Demonstration of concept was achieved by recording multiple single-unit spike activity in acute brain slice preparations of rat neocortex. Data suggests that extracellular recording of action potentials can be achieved with planar IrOx MEAs with good signal-to-noise ratios.

  11. Characterization of optimized Na+ and Cl? liquid membranes for use with extracellular, self-referencing microelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Messerli, Mark A; Kurtz, Ira; Smith, Peter J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Self-referencing with ion-selective microelectrodes (ISMs) is a useful approach for monitoring near-real-time ion flux near single cells and across epithelia. While ISMs for H+, Ca2+, and K+ have been optimized for use with self-referencing, ISMs for two other primary inorganic ions, Na+ and Cl-, have not. In this study, we have characterized ISMs based on three Na+ ionophores (I, VI, and X) and one Cl- ionophore to assess their suitability for use with self-referencing. ISMs constructed with...

  12. Highly Sensitive and Long Term Stable Electrochemical Microelectrodes for Implantable Glucose Monitoring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Liangliang

    A miniature wireless implantable electrochemical glucose system for continuous glucose monitoring with good selectivity, sensitivity, linearity and long term stability was developed. First, highly sensitive, long-term stable and reusable planar H2O2 microelectrodes have been fabricated by microlithography. These electrodes composed of a 300 nm Pt black layer situated on a 5 um thick Au layer, provide effective protection to the underlying chromium adhesion layer. Using repeated cyclic voltammetric sweeps in flowing buffer solution, highly sensitive Pt black working electrodes were realized with five-decade linear dynamic range and low detection limit (10 nM) for H2O2 at low oxidation potentials. Second, a highly sensitive, low cost and flexible microwire biosensor was described using 25-mum thick gold wire as working electrode together with 125-mum thick Pt/Ir and Ag wires as counter and reference electrode, embedded within a PDMS-filled polyethylene tube. Surface area and activity of sensor was enhanced by converting gold electrode to nanoporous configuration followed by electrodeposition of platinum black. Glucose oxidase based biosensors by electrodeposition of poly(o-phenylenediamine) and glucose oxidase on the working electrode, displayed a higher glucose sensitivity (1.2 mA mM-1 cm-2) than highest literature reported. In addition it exhibits wide detection range (up to 20 mM) and selectivity (>95%). Third, novel miniaturized and flexible microelectrode arrays with 8 of 25 mum electrodes displayed the much needed 3D diffusion profiles similar to a single 25 mum microelectrode, but with one order increase in current levels. These microelectrode arrays displayed a H2O2 sensitivity of 13 mA mM-1 cm-2, a wide dynamic range of 100 nM to 10 mM, limit of detection of 10 nM. These microwire based edge plane microsensors incorporated flexibility, miniaturization and low operation potential are an promising approach for continuous in vivo metabolic monitoring. Fourth

  13. Electrohydrodynamic actuation of co-flowing liquids by means of microelectrode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Pablo; Ferney, Mathieu; Ramos, Antonio, E-mail: pablogarcia@us.es [Depto. de Electronica y Electromagnetismo, University of Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-06-23

    Electric fields induce forces at the interface between liquids with different electrical properties (conductivity and/or permittivity). We explore how to use these forces for manipulating two coflowing streams of liquids in a microchannel. A microelectrode array is fabricated at the bottom of the channel and one of the two liquids is labelled with a fluorescent dye for observing the phenomenon. The diffuse interface between the two liquids is deflected depending on the ac signal and conductivity (or permittivity) ratio between the liquids. Only a few volts are needed for observing the interface destabilization, in contrast with other electrode configurations where hundreds of volts are applied.

  14. Comparative measurements of membrane potentials with microelectrodes and voltage-sensitive dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Bräuner, Thomas; Hülser, Dieter F.; Strasser, Reto J.

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of a new voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye, the membrane permeant negatively charged oxonol dye diBA-C4-(3)−, was evaluated by measuring the membrane potentials of BICR/M1R-k and L cells with glass microelectrodes and simultaneously recording the fluorescence of the stained cells. The membrane potential of BICR/M1R-k cells was varied between −25 mV and −90 mV by changing the bicarbonate concentration in the medium or by voltage clamping. To avoid any interfere...

  15. Boron-doped diamond microelectrodes for use in capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvacka, Josef; Quaiserová, Veronika; Park, JinWoo; Show, Yoshiyuki; Muck, Alexander; Swain, Greg M

    2003-06-01

    The fabrication and characterization of boron-doped diamond microelectrodes for use in electrochemical detection coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE-EC) is discussed. The microelectrodes were prepared by coating thin films of polycrystalline diamond on electrochemically sharpened platinum wires (76-, 25-, and 10-microm diameter), using microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The diamond-coated wires were attached to copper wires (current collectors), and several methods were explored to insulate the cylindrical portion of the electrode: nail polish, epoxy, polyimide, and polypropylene coatings. The microelectrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. They exhibited low and stable background currents and sigmoidally shaped voltammetric curves for Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) and Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) at low scan rates. The microelectrodes formed with the large diameter Pt and sealed in polypropylene pipet tips were employed for end-column detection in CE. Evaluation of the CE-EC system and the electrode performance were accomplished using a 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, run buffer, and a 30-cm-long fused-silica capillary (75-microm i.d.) with dopamine, catechol, and ascorbic acid serving as test analytes. The background current (approximately 100 pA) and noise (approximately 3 pA) were measured at different detection potentials and found to be very stable with time. Reproducible separation (elution time) and detection (peak current or area) of dopamine, catechol, and ascorbic acid were observed with response precisions of 4.1% or less. Calibration curves constructed from the peak area were linear over 4 orders of magnitude, up to a concentration between 0.1 and 1 mM. Mass limits of detection for dopamine and catechol were 1.7 and 2.6 fmol, respectively (S/N = 3). The separation efficiency was approximately 33,000, 56,000, and 98,000 plates/m for dopamine, catechol, and ascorbic acid, respectively. In

  16. Electrochemical Activation of Diamond Microelectrodes: Implications for the In Vitro Measurement of Serotonin in the Bowel

    OpenAIRE

    Duran, Boris; Brocenschi, Ricardo F.; France, Marion; Galligan, James J.; Swain, Greg M.

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical pretreatment of diamond microelectrodes was investigated for the purpose of learning how an anodic, cathodic or a combined anodic + cathodic polarization affects the charge-transfer kinetics for two surface-sensitive redox systems: ferri/ferrocyanide and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The pretreatments were performed in 0.5 mol L−1 H2SO4. The anodic pretreatment was performed galvanically for 30 s at 250 mA cm−2. The 10 cathodic pretreatment was performed for 180 s...

  17. Novel carbon-fiber microelectrode batch fabrication using a 3D-printed mold and polyimide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikantzopoulos, Elefterios; Yang, Cheng; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Wang, Ying; Venton, B Jill

    2016-09-21

    Glass insulated carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are standard tools for the measurement of neurotransmitters. However, electrodes are fabricated individually and the glass can shatter, limiting application in higher order mammals. Here, we developed a novel microelectrode batch fabrication method using a 3D-printed mold and polyimide resin insulating agent. The 3D-printed mold is low cost, customizable to change the electrode shape, and allows 40 electrodes to be made simultaneously. The polyimide resin is biocompatible, quick to cure, and does not adhere to the plastic mold. The electrodes were tested for the response to dopamine with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry both in vitro and in vivo and performed similarly to traditional glass-insulated electrodes, but with lower background currents. Thus, polyimide-insulated electrodes can be mass-produced using a 3D-printed mold and are an attractive alternative for making cheap, biocompatible microelectrodes. PMID:27536741

  18. Rapid subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation lead placement utilising CT/MRI fusion, microelectrode recording and test stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become an established treatment strategy for patients with medically refractory Parkinson's disease (PD). There are however numerous strategies employed for STN lead placement. Variations include method of STN localisation, use of microelectrode recording, number of microelectrode recording passes and time taken for the procedure. We describe a relatively simple and rapid technique of STN lead placement utilising CT/ MRI image fusion, microelectrode recording and test stimulation. The first 58 consecutive patients undergoing STN DBS were assessed pre- and post-operatively. UPDRS scores, medication use and any surgical complication were assessed. Bilateral STN DBS was an efficacious treatment option for medically refractory PD. We have described a technique which can be performed with effect and low morbidity, and in a time which is well tolerated by patients. (author)

  19. The Measurement of Membrane Potential and NO3 Activity in Root Cells Using Ion-Selective Microelectrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiao-rong; Anthony J Miller; SHEN Qi-rong

    2003-01-01

    Remobilisation of nitrate in plants, especially in vacuole of plant, is mostly related to the qua-lity of agricultural products and the high nitrogen use efficiency in plants. Ion-selective microelectrodes offer anon-destructive and non-interruptive method to measure NO-3 gradients and electric potential differences acrossboth the plasma membrane and tonoplast. Thus, a double-barrelled microelectrode backfilled with a mem-brane sensor for NO-3 embedded in poly vinyl chloride (PVC) can record the NO-3 activity in cytoplasm and vac-uole of a cell. This paper presented how to make this kind of microelectrode and how to do the intracellularmeasurements on intact plants. Our result showed that nitrate activity was about 2.7 mmol L-1 in cytoplasmwhile 70 mmol L-1 in vacuole, which implicated that vacuole was a pool of nitrate in plants.

  20. Fabrication of gas sensor based on field ionization from SWCNTs with tripolar microelectrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the nanofabrication of a sulfur dioxide (SO2) sensor with a tripolar on-chip microelectrode utilizing a film of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the field ionization cathode, where the ion flow current and the partial discharge current generated by the field ionization process of gaseous molecules can be gauged to gas species and concentration. The variation of the sensitivity is less than 4% for all of the tested devices, and the sensor has selectivity against gases such as He, NO2, CO, H2, SO2 and O2. Further, the sensor response presents well-defined and reproducible linear behavior with regard to concentration in the range investigated and a detection limitation of <∼0.5 ppm for SO2. More importantly, a tripolar on-chip microelectrode with SWCNTs as a cathode exhibits an impressive performance with respect to stability and anti-oxidation behavior, which are significantly better than had been possible before in the traditional bipolar sensor under explicit circumstances at room temperature. (paper)

  1. A novel electroporation system for efficient molecular delivery into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a 3-dimensional microelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seongsu; Kim, Kwon-Ho; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation is one of the most widely used transfection methods because of its high efficiency and convenience among the various transfection methods. Previous micro-electroporation systems have some drawbacks such as limitations in height and design, time-consuming and an expensive fabrication process due to technical constraints. This study fabricates a three dimensional microelectrode using the 3D printing technique. The interdigitated microstructure consisting of poly lactic acid was injected by a 3D printer and coated with silver and aluminum with a series of dip-coatings. With the same strength of electric field (V cm(-1)), a higher efficiency for molecular delivery and a higher cellular viability are achieved with the microelectrode than with a standard cuvette. In addition, this study investigates chemicophysical changes such as Joule heating and dissolved metal during electroporation and showed the micro-electroporation system had less chemicophysical changes. It was concluded that the proposed micro-electroporation system will contribute to genetic engineering as a promising delivery tool, and this combination of 3D printing and electroporation has many potential applications for diverse designs or systems. PMID:26522846

  2. Biomechanical analysis of silicon microelectrode-induced strain in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjung; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.; Sun, Wei; Levenston, Marc E.

    2005-12-01

    The ability to successfully interface the brain to external electrical systems is important both for fundamental understanding of our nervous system and for the development of neuroprosthetics. Silicon microelectrode arrays offer great promise in realizing this potential. However, when they are implanted into the brain, recording sensitivity is lost due to inflammation and astroglial scarring around the electrode. The inflammation and astroglial scar are thought to result from acute injury during electrode insertion as well as chronic injury caused by micromotion around the implanted electrode. To evaluate the validity of this assumption, the finite element method (FEM) was employed to analyze the strain fields around a single Michigan Si microelectrode due to simulated micromotion. Micromotion was mimicked by applying a force to the electrode, fixing the boundaries of the brain region and applying appropriate symmetry conditions to nodes lying on symmetry planes. Characteristics of the deformation fields around the electrode including maximum electrode displacement, strain fields and relative displacement between the electrode and the adjacent tissue were examined for varying degrees of physical coupling between the brain and the electrode. Our analysis demonstrates that when physical coupling between the electrode and the brain increases, the micromotion-induced strain of tissue around the electrode decreases as does the relative slip between the electrode and the brain. These results support the use of neuro-integrative coatings on electrode arrays as a means to reduce the micromotion-induced injury response.

  3. Voltammetric studies on the electrochemical determination of methylmercury in chloride medium at carbon microelectrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, F. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Neto, M.M.M. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal) and Departamento de Quimica Agricola e Ambiental, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mm.neto@netcabo.pt; Rocha, M.M. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Fonseca, I.T.E. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-10-10

    Electroanalytical techniques have been used to determine methylmercury at low levels in environmental matrices. The electrochemical behaviour of methylmercury at carbon microelectrodes in a hydrochloric acid medium using cyclic, square wave and fast-scan linear-sweep voltammetric techniques has been investigated. The analytical utility of the methylmercury reoxidation peak has been explored, but the recorded peak currents were found to be poorly reproducible. This is ascribed to two factors: the adsorption of insoluble chloromercury compounds on the electrode surface, which appears to be an important contribution to hinder the voltammetric signal of methylmercury; and the competition between the reoxidation of the methylmercury radical and its dimerization reaction, which limits the reproducibility of the methylmercury peak. These problems were successfully overcome by adopting the appropriate experimental conditions. Fast-scan rates were employed and an efficient electrochemical regeneration procedure of the electrode surface was achieved, under potentiostatic conditions in a mercury-free solution containing potassium thiocyanate-a strong complexing agent. The influence of chloride ion concentration was analysed. Interference by metals, such as lead and cadmium, was considered. Calibration plots were obtained in the micromolar and submicromolar concentration ranges, allowing the electrochemical determination of methylmercury in trace amounts. An estuarine water sample was analysed using the new method with a glassy carbon microelectrode.

  4. Three-dimensional micro-electrode array for recording dissociated neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, Katherine; Khatami, David; Wheeler, Bruce C

    2009-07-21

    This work demonstrates the design, fabrication, packaging, characterization, and functionality of an electrically and fluidically active three-dimensional micro-electrode array (3D MEA) for use with neuronal cell cultures. The successful function of the device implies that this basic concept-construction of a 3D array with a layered approach-can be utilized as the basis for a new family of neural electrode arrays. The 3D MEA prototype consists of a stack of individually patterned thin films that form a cell chamber conducive to maintaining and recording the electrical activity of a long-term three-dimensional network of rat cortical neurons. Silicon electrode layers contain a polymer grid for neural branching, growth, and network formation. Along the walls of these electrode layers lie exposed gold electrodes which permit recording and stimulation of the neuronal electrical activity. Silicone elastomer micro-fluidic layers provide a means for loading dissociated neurons into the structure and serve as the artificial vasculature for nutrient supply and aeration. The fluidic layers also serve as insulation for the micro-electrodes. Cells have been shown to survive in the 3D MEA for up to 28 days, with spontaneous and evoked electrical recordings performed in that time. The micro-fluidic capability was demonstrated by flowing in the drug tetrotodoxin to influence the activity of the culture. PMID:19568672

  5. A novel electroporation system for efficient molecular delivery into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a 3-dimensional microelectrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seongsu; Kim, Kwon-Ho; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2015-11-01

    Electroporation is one of the most widely used transfection methods because of its high efficiency and convenience among the various transfection methods. Previous micro-electroporation systems have some drawbacks such as limitations in height and design, time-consuming and an expensive fabrication process due to technical constraints. This study fabricates a three dimensional microelectrode using the 3D printing technique. The interdigitated microstructure consisting of poly lactic acid was injected by a 3D printer and coated with silver and aluminum with a series of dip-coatings. With the same strength of electric field (V cm-1), a higher efficiency for molecular delivery and a higher cellular viability are achieved with the microelectrode than with a standard cuvette. In addition, this study investigates chemicophysical changes such as Joule heating and dissolved metal during electroporation and showed the micro-electroporation system had less chemicophysical changes. It was concluded that the proposed micro-electroporation system will contribute to genetic engineering as a promising delivery tool, and this combination of 3D printing and electroporation has many potential applications for diverse designs or systems.

  6. Application of EIS with Au-Hg microelectrode in determining electron transfer mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, X. [College of Marine Studies, University of Delaware, Lewes, DE 19958 (United States); Dexter, S.C. [College of Marine Studies, University of Delaware, Lewes, DE 19958 (United States)]. E-mail: dexter@udel.edu; Luther, G.W. [College of Marine Studies, University of Delaware, Lewes, DE 19958 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    The objective of this study was to investigate the application of microelectrodes with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for distinguishing between one- and two-electron transfer electrochemical reactions occurring within marine microbial biofilms. In our study, both gold and gold-mercury amalgam microelectrodes with tip diameters of 100 {mu}m were used. EIS measurements were performed at the half-wave potentials of the chemicals of interest in 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solutions containing 100 {mu}M each of FeCl{sub 3}, [Fe(Cat){sub 2}]{sup -}, [Fe(Cat){sub 3}]{sup 3-}, [Fe(4NCat){sub 3}]{sup 3-}, MnCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2} and mixed solutions with two of those chemicals in NaCl solution or seawater. The results showed that there was a linear relationship between the impedance Z {sub re}, Z {sub im} and angular frequency {omega} {sup -1/2} obtained at phase angle of 45{sup o} for both one- and two-electron transfer reactions. One-electron transfer reactions could then be distinguished from two-electron transfer reactions by the slopes.

  7. Dielectrophoresis of DNA: time- and frequency-dependent collections on microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakewell, David J; Morgan, Hywel

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports measurements that characterize the collection of DNA onto interdigitated microelectrodes by high-frequency dielectrophoresis. Measurements of time-dependent collection of 12 kilobase pair plasmid DNA onto microelectrodes by dielectrophoresis show significant reduction in the response as the frequency increases from 100 kHz to 20 MHz. Collection time profiles are quantitatively measured using fluorescence microscopy over the range 100 kHz to 5 MHz and are represented in terms of two parameters: the initial dielectrophoretic collection rate, and the initial to steady-state collection transition. Measured values for both parameters are consistent with trends in the frequency-dependent real part of the effective polarizability measured for the same plasmid DNA using dielectric spectroscopy. The experimentally measured parameters are qualitatively compared with trends predicted by theory that takes into account dielectrophoretic particle movement and diffusion. The differences between experiment and theory are discussed with suggested improvements to theoretical models, for example, including the effects of electrohydrodynamically driven fluid motion. PMID:16805110

  8. Fabrication of microelectrodes deeply embedded in LiNbO3 using a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel technique to fabricate deeply embedded microelectrodes in LiNbO3 using femtosecond pulsed laser ablation and selective electroless plating. The fabrication process mainly consists of four steps, which are (1) micromachining of microgrooves on the surface of LiNbO3 by femtosecond laser ablation; (2) formation of AgNO3 films on substrates; (3) scanning the femtosecond laser beam in the fabricated microgrooves for modification of the inner surfaces; and (4) electroless copper plating. The void-free electroless copper plating is obtained with appropriate cross section of microgrooves and uniform initiation of the autocatalytic deposition on the inner surface of grooves. The dimension and shape of the microelectrodes could be accurately controlled by changing the conditions of femtosecond laser ablation, which in turn can control the distribution of electric field inside LiNbO3 crystal for various applications, opening up a new approach to fabricate three-dimensional integrated electro-optic devices

  9. Promising new cryogenic seal candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the five seal candidates considered for the main propellant system of the Space Shuttle, only one candidate, the fluoroplastic Halar, satisfied all tests including the critical LO2 impact test and the cryogenic compression sealability test. Radiation-cross-linked Halar is a tough, strong thermoplastic that not only endured one hundred 2200 N compression cycles at 83 K while mounted in a standard military O-ring gland without cracking or deforming, but improved in sealability as a result of this cycling. Although these Halar O-rings require much higher sealing forces (approximately 500 N) at room temperature than rubber O-rings, on cooling to cryogenic temperatures the required sealing force only doubles, whereas the sealing force for rubber O-rings increases eightfold. Although these Halar O-rings were inadequately cross-linked, they still exhibited promise as LO2-compatible cryogenic seals. It is expected that their high-temperature properties can be greatly improved by higher degrees of cross-linking (e.g., by 20 mrad of radiation) without compromising their already excellent low-temperature properties. A direct comparison should then be obtained between the best of the cross-linked Halar compounds and the current commercial cryogenic seal materials, filled Teflon and Kel-F

  10. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  11. Further Evaluation of DNT Hazard Screening using Neural Networks from Rat Cortical Neurons on Multi-well Microelectrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of chemicals have not been characterized for their DNT potential. Due to the need for DNT hazard identification, efforts to develop screening assays for DNT potential is a high priority. Multi-well microelectrode arrays (MEA) measure the spontaneous activity of electr...

  12. Secondary Teacher Candidates' Lesson Planning Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, Christina; Zhang, Shaoan

    2016-01-01

    Teacher candidates (TCs) use clinical experiences to enact concepts taught in their university courses; therefore field experiences may be the most important component of teacher preparation (Hammerness et al., 2005). TCs require support and guidance as they learn to adapt curriculum materials for effective use in the classroom (Davis, 2006). They…

  13. Particle Dark Matter Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Scopel, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    I give a short overview on some of the favorite particle Cold Dark Matter candidates today, focusing on those having detectable interactions: the axion, the KK-photon in Universal Extra Dimensions, the heavy photon in Little Higgs and the neutralino in Supersymmetry. The neutralino is still the most popular, and today is available in different flavours: SUGRA, nuSUGRA, sub-GUT, Mirage mediation, NMSSM, effective MSSM, scenarios with CP violation. Some of these scenarios are already at the level of present sensitivities for direct DM searches.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation. PMID:26510475

  15. Automated navigation of a glass micropipette on a high-density microelectrode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing Lin; Obien, Marie Engelene J; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Urs

    2015-08-01

    High-density microelectrode arrays (HDMEAs) provide the capability to monitor the extracellular electric potential of multiple neurons at subcellular resolution over extended periods of time. In contrast, patch clamp allows for intracellular, sub-threshold recordings from a single patched neuron for very limited time on the order of an hour. Therefore, it will be beneficial to combine HDMEA and patch clamp for simultaneous intra- and extracellular recording of neuronal activity. Previously, it has been shown that the HDMEA can be used to localize and steer a glass micropipette towards a target location without using an optical microscope [1]. Here, we present an automated system, implemented in LabVIEW, which automatically locates and moves the glass micropipette towards a user-defined target. The presented system constitutes a first step towards developing an automated system to navigate a pipette to patch a neuron in vitro. PMID:26736403

  16. Simultaneous recording of rat auditory cortex and thalamus via a titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode device

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, P. T.; Rao, M. P.; Otto, K. J.

    2011-08-01

    Direct recording from sequential processing stations within the brain has provided opportunity for enhancing understanding of important neural circuits, such as the corticothalamic loops underlying auditory, visual, and somatosensory processing. However, the common reliance upon microwire-based electrodes to perform such recordings often necessitates complex surgeries and increases trauma to neural tissues. This paper reports the development of titanium-based, microfabricated, microelectrode devices designed to address these limitations by allowing acute recording from the thalamic nuclei and associated cortical sites simultaneously in a minimally invasive manner. In particular, devices were designed to simultaneously probe rat auditory cortex and auditory thalamus, with the intent of recording auditory response latencies and isolated action potentials within the separate anatomical sites. Details regarding the design, fabrication, and characterization of these devices are presented, as are preliminary results from acute in vivo recording.

  17. Doped Overoxidized Polypyrrole Microelectrodes as Sensors for the Detection of Dopamine Released from Cell Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi; Heiskanen, Arto; Diazzi, Francesco;

    2013-01-01

    A surface modification of interdigitated gold microelectrodes (IDEs) with a doped polypyrrole (PPy) film for detection of dopamine released from populations of differentiated PC12 cells is presented. A thin PPy layer was potentiostatically electropolymerized from an 10 aqueous pyrrole solution onto...... electrode surfaces. The conducting polymer film was doped during electropolymerization by introducing counter ions in the monomer solution. Several counter ions were tested and the resulting electrode modifications were characterized electrochemically to find the optimal dopant that increases sensitivity in...... dopamine detection. Overoxidation of the PPy films was shown to contribute to a significant enhancement in sensitivity to dopamine. The changes caused by overoxidation in the electrochemical behavior and electrode morphology were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and SEM as well as AFM, respectively...

  18. Design and Fabrication of a Flow Delivery Microdevice with Asymmetric Microelectrodes Pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microdevice using AC electrokinetic flow and negative dielectrophoresis for cell delivery is proposed, designed and fabricated. The device is made from an unequal width interdigitated microelectrode located at the bottom of microchannels, with AC voltage applied to the small and large electrode. Negative dielectrophoresis is used to prevent the cells from sinking down to the bottom of delivery channel. The flow rate is affected by the electrode pair dimensions, applied frequency and voltage and are analysed. The device electrode width is from 4μm to 20μm and it is microfabricated on glass wafer using gold thin film. 3 microchannels connected to 2 reservoirs are covered by the electrode pair for the delivery channel. SU-8 micromold is used for the channels' PDMS fabrication

  19. Microelectrode Arrays and the Use of PEG-Functionalized Diblock Copolymer Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Uppal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PEG-modified diblock copolymer surfaces have been examined for their compatibility with microelectrode array based analytical methods. The use of PEG-modified polymer surfaces on the arrays was initially problematic because the redox couples used in the experiments were adsorbed by the polymer. This led the current measured by cyclic voltammetry for the redox couple to be unstable and increase with time. However, two key findings allow the experiments to be successful. First, after multiple cyclic voltammograms the current associated with the redox couple does stabilize so that a good baseline current can be established. Second, the rate at which the current stabilizes is consistent every time a particular coated array is used. Hence, multiple analytical experiments can be conducted on an array coated with a PEG-modified diblock copolymer and the data obtained is comparable as long as the data for each experiment is collected at a consistent time point.

  20. Research on Electric Impedance Spectroscopy of Living Cell Suspensions by a Chip with Microelectrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Yang; Zhaoying Zhou; Mingfei Xiao; Ying Wu; Shangfeng Liu

    2006-01-01

    A microfabricated electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) chip with microelectrodes was developed. The substrate and the electrodes of the chip were made of glass and gold, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the EIS-chip could distinguish different solutions (physiological saline, culture medium, living cell suspension etc.) by scanning from 10Hz to 45kHz. A 6-element circuit model was used for fitting the real part and the imaginary part admittance curves of the living cell suspension. An actual circuit was also built and tested to verify the 6-element circuit model proposed. The micro-EIS chip has several advantages including the use of small sample volumes, high resolution and ease of operation. It shows good application prospects in the areas of cellular electrophysiology, drug screening and bio-sensors etc.

  1. Microfabrication of new microelectrode arrays equipped with a ground surface configuration for focal neural microstimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular electrical stimulation of the central nervous system has been used empirically for decades, with both fundamental and clinical goals. Currently, microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer new possibilities for CNS microstimulation, allowing in principle to activate only neurons located in the vicinity of the stimulation sites. To overcome the lack of focality of monopolar stimulations, multipolar approaches are commonly used, multiplying therefore the number of electrodes of the arrays and the complexity of the connection system behind. To overcome these limitations, we developed a ground surface configuration consisting in surrounding all the electrodes with a conductive surface laying over the MEA substrate, and using it for the stimulation current return. We first report the microfabrication of a prototype of MEA equipped with this configuration. We also perform experimental recordings of the potential field induced by microstimulations and confirm the expected increased focality with the ground surface configuration. This will open the way to focal 'pixel-like' microstimulation of neural networks using MEAs

  2. Optical durability testing of candidate solar mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G.; Kennedy, C.; King, D.; Terwilliger, K.

    2000-03-24

    Durability testing of a variety of candidate solar reflector materials at outdoor test sites and in laboratory accelerated weathering chambers is the main activity within the Advanced Materials task of the Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Program. Outdoor exposure testing (OET) at up to eight outdoor, worldwide exposure sites has been underway for several years. This includes collaboration under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Power and Chemical Energy Systems (SolarPACES) agreement. Outdoor sites are fully instrumented in terms of monitoring meteorological conditions and solar irradiance. Candidate materials are optically characterized prior to being subjected to exposure in real and simulated weathering environments. Optical durability is quantified by periodically re-measuring hemispherical and specular reflectance as a function of exposure time. By closely monitoring the site- and time-dependent environmental stress conditions experienced by the material samples, site-dependent loss of performance may be quantified. In addition, accelerated exposure testing (AET) of these materials in parallel under laboratory-controlled conditions may permit correlating the outdoor results with AET, and subsequently predicting service lifetimes. Test results to date for a large number of candidate solar reflector materials are presented in this report. Acronyms are defined. Based upon OET and AET results to date, conclusions can be drawn about the optical durability of the candidate reflector materials. The optical durability of thin glass, thick glass, and two metallized polymers can be characterized as excellent. The all-polymeric construction, several of the aluminized reflectors, and a metallized polymer can be characterized as having intermediate durability and require further improvement, testing and evaluation, or both.

  3. Impedimetric microbial biosensor based on single wall carbon nanotube modified microelectrodes for trichloroethylene detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We propose an impedimetric microbial biosensor for trichloroethylene detection. ► A new transducer modified with carbon nanotubes and Pseudomonas putida is evaluated. ► Functionalization steps are controlled by impedance spectroscopy and AFM. ► The biosensor offers good sensitivity, selectivity, linear range and stability. ► The biosensor is successfully applied to spiked natural water samples. - Abstract: Contamination of soils and groundwaters with persistent organic pollutants is a matter of increasing concern. The most common organic pollutants are chlorinated hydrocarbons such as perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene (TCE). In this study, we developed a bacterial impedimetric biosensor for TCE detection, based on the immobilization of Pseudomonas putida F1 strain on gold microelectrodes functionalized with single wall carbon nanotubes covalently linked to anti-Pseudomonas antibodies. The different steps of microelectrodes functionalization were characterized by electrochemical impedance and atomic force spectroscopies, and analytical performances of the developed microbial biosensor were determined. The impedimetric biosensor response was linear with TCE concentration up to 150 μg L−1 and a low limit of detection (20 μg L−1) was achieved. No significant loss of signal was observed after 4 weeks of storage at 4 °C in phosphate buffer saline pH 7 (three to four measurements a week). After 5 weeks, 90% of the initial value still remained. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene and vinylchloride, the main TCE degradation products, did not significantly interfere with TCE. The microbial sensor was finally applied to the determination of TCE in natural water samples spiked at the 30, 50 and 75 μg L−1 levels. Recoveries were very good, ranging from 100 to 103%.

  4. BBB leakage, astrogliosis, and tissue loss correlate with silicon microelectrode array recording performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolta, Nicholas F; Christensen, Michael B; Crane, Paul D; Skousen, John L; Tresco, Patrick A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of brain machine interfaces that employ penetrating silicon microelectrode arrays is limited by inconsistent performance at chronic time points. While it is widely believed that elements of the foreign body response (FBR) contribute to inconsistent single unit recording performance, the relationships between the FBR and recording performance have not been well established. To address this shortfall, we implanted 4X4 Utah Electrode Arrays into the cortex of 28 young adult rats, acquired electrophysiological recordings weekly for up to 12 weeks, used quantitative immunohistochemical methods to examine the intensity and spatial distribution of neural and FBR biomarkers, and examined whether relationships existed between biomarker distribution and recording performance. We observed that the FBR was characterized by persistent inflammation and consisted of typical biomarkers, including presumptive activated macrophages and activated microglia, astrogliosis, and plasma proteins indicative of blood-brain-barrier disruption, as well as general decreases in neuronal process distribution. However, unlike what has been described for recording electrodes that create only a single penetrating injury, substantial brain tissue loss generally in the shape of a pyramidal lesion cavity was observed at the implantation site. Such lesions were also observed in stab wounded animals indicating that the damage was caused by vascular disruption at the time of implantation. Using statistical approaches, we found that blood-brain barrier leakiness and astrogliosis were both associated with reduced recording performance, and that tissue loss was negatively correlated with recording performance. Taken together, our data suggest that a reduction of vascular damage at the time of implantation either by design changes or use of hemostatic coatings coupled to a reduction of chronic inflammatory sequela will likely improve the recording performance of high density

  5. Comparative measurements of potassium and chloride with ion-sensitive microelectrodes and x-ray microanalysis in cultured skeletal muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data of the intracellular electrolyte concentration of potassium and chloride in cultured muscle cells measured by x-ray analysis were compared by using the different activity coefficients with intracellular potassium and chloride activities measured with double-barrelled microelectrodes. By using an activity coefficient of 0.6, 95% of the potassium microelectrode measurements are in accordance with the x-ray analysis values, in spite of a scattering of the values. Membrane potential and intracellular potassium values are linearly related. x-ray analysis and ion-sensitive microelectrodes measured the cytoplasmic chloride in the same range. Taking into account known activity coefficients, an error of 25% must be assumed with the intracellular chloride measurements. However, x-ray analysis and ion-sensitive microelectrode investigations are reliable tools to study intracellular potassium and chloride changes, which play an important role in membrane characteristics

  6. In-Vivo Characterization of Glassy Carbon Micro-Electrode Arrays for Neural Applications and Histological Analysis of the Brain Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomero, Maria

    The aim of this work is to fabricate and characterize glassy carbon Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for sensing and stimulating neural activity, and conduct histological analysis of the brain tissue after the implant to determine long-term performance. Neural applications often require robust electrical and electrochemical response over a long period of time, and for those applications we propose to replace the commonly used noble metals like platinum, gold and iridium with glassy carbon. We submit that such material has the potential to improve the performances of traditional neural prostheses, thanks to better charge transfer capabilities and higher electrochemical stability. Great interest and attention is given in this work, in particular, to the investigation of tissue response after several weeks of implants in rodents' brain motor cortex and the associated materials degradation. As part of this work, a new set of devices for Electrocorticography (ECoG) has been designed and fabricated to improve durability and quality of the previous generation of devices, designed and manufactured by the same research group in 2014. In-vivo long-term impedance measurements and brain activity recordings were performed to test the functionality of the neural devices. In-vitro electrical characterization of the carbon electrodes, as well as the study of the adhesion mechanisms between glassy carbon and different substrates is also part of the research described in this book.

  7. Nanostructured silver and platinum modified carbon fiber microelectrodes coated with nafion for H2O2 determination

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Halouzka; Petr Jakubec; Cenek Gregor; Dalibor Jancik; Gabriela Valaskova; Kyriakos Papadopoulos; Theodor Triantis; Jan Hrbac

    2010-01-01

    Carbon fiber microelectrodes equipped with nanostructured metals(platinum and silver) and covered with a Nafion layer constitutesensitive H2O2 sensors. Metallic layers on carbon fibers wereprepared by surfactant assisted electrodeposition. In the case ofsilver, the procedure leads to coating which is composed of porous,partially aggregated and crystalline deposits containing silvernanoparticles. The electrodeposition of platinum leads to carbonfiber decorated with clusters of platinum nanopar...

  8. Effect of island shape on dielectrophoretic assembly of metal nanoparticle chains in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Conductive island shape influences the dynamic process occurring in DEP assembly of 10 nm gold nanoparticles in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system. • The DEP-assembled nanoparticle wires form a straighter conduction path with the increase in the geometric angle of conductive island tip. • The different island shapes distort the DEP force distribution and increase the local electrothermally induced fluid flow to different extents, which is important for the morphology and electrical conductance quality of the DEP-assembled metal nanoparticle chains. - Abstract: The electrical conduction quality of an electric circuit connection formed by dielectrophoretic (DEP)-assembled metal nanoparticle wires between small conductive elements plays a significant role in electronic devices. One of the major challenges for improving the electrical conductance of nanowires is optimizing their geometric morphology. So far, the electrical conduction quality has been enhanced by optimizing the AC frequency and conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions. Herein, the effect of the conductive island shapes on the dynamic process occurring in a DEP assembly of 10 nm gold nanoparticles was investigated in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system. The nanoparticle wires between the microelectrodes were assembled in situ from colloidal suspensions. The wires were grown in a much straighter route by increasing the geometric angle of the conductive-island tip. To validate the experiments, the effects of mutual DEP interactions and electrothermally induced fluid flow on the dynamic behavior of particle motion for different island geometric configurations in the conductive-island-based microelectrode system were determined by numerical simulations. The simulation results are consistent with those of experiments. This indicates that different conductive island shapes change the distribution of DEP force and increase the electrothermally induced fluid flow to

  9. Effect of island shape on dielectrophoretic assembly of metal nanoparticle chains in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Haitao; Shao, Jinyou, E-mail: jyshao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ding, Yucheng; Liu, Weiyu; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Zhou, Yaopei

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • Conductive island shape influences the dynamic process occurring in DEP assembly of 10 nm gold nanoparticles in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system. • The DEP-assembled nanoparticle wires form a straighter conduction path with the increase in the geometric angle of conductive island tip. • The different island shapes distort the DEP force distribution and increase the local electrothermally induced fluid flow to different extents, which is important for the morphology and electrical conductance quality of the DEP-assembled metal nanoparticle chains. - Abstract: The electrical conduction quality of an electric circuit connection formed by dielectrophoretic (DEP)-assembled metal nanoparticle wires between small conductive elements plays a significant role in electronic devices. One of the major challenges for improving the electrical conductance of nanowires is optimizing their geometric morphology. So far, the electrical conduction quality has been enhanced by optimizing the AC frequency and conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions. Herein, the effect of the conductive island shapes on the dynamic process occurring in a DEP assembly of 10 nm gold nanoparticles was investigated in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system. The nanoparticle wires between the microelectrodes were assembled in situ from colloidal suspensions. The wires were grown in a much straighter route by increasing the geometric angle of the conductive-island tip. To validate the experiments, the effects of mutual DEP interactions and electrothermally induced fluid flow on the dynamic behavior of particle motion for different island geometric configurations in the conductive-island-based microelectrode system were determined by numerical simulations. The simulation results are consistent with those of experiments. This indicates that different conductive island shapes change the distribution of DEP force and increase the electrothermally induced fluid flow to

  10. Platinum nanowire microelectrode arrays for neurostimulation applications: Fabrication, characterization, and in-vitro retinal cell stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, John J., III

    Implantable electrical neurostimulating devices are being developed for a number of applications, including artificial vision through retinal stimulation. The epiretinal prosthesis will use a two-dimensional array microelectrodes to address individual cells of the retina. MEMS fabrication processes can produce arrays of microelectrodes with these dimensions, but there are two critical issues that they cannot satisfy. One, the stimulating electrodes are the only part of the implanted electrical device that penetrate through the water impermeable package, and must do so without sacrificing hermeticity. Two, As electrode size decreases, the current density (A cm-2 ) increases, due to increased electrochemical impedance. This reduces the amount of charge that can be safely injected into the tissue. To date, MEMS processing method, cannot produce electrode arrays with good, prolonged hermetic properties. Similarly, MEMS approaches do not account for the increased impedance caused by decreased surface area. For these reasons there is a strong motivation for the development of a water-impermeable, substrate-penetrating electrode array with low electrochemical impedance. This thesis presents a stimulating electrode array fabricated from platinum nanowires using a modified electrochemical template synthesis approach. Nanowires are electrochemically deposited from ammonium hexachloroplatinate solution into lithographically patterned nanoporous anodic alumina templates to produce microarrays of platinum nanowires. The platinum nanowires penetrating through the ceramic aluminum oxide template serve as parallel electrical conduits through the water impermeable, electrically insulating substrate. Electrode impedance can be adjusted by either controlling the nanowire hydrous platinum oxide content or by partially etching the alumina template to expose additional surface area. A stepwise approach to this project was taken. First, the electrochemistry of ammonium

  11. Nanocrystalline diamond microelectrode arrays fabricated on sapphire technology for high-time resolution of quantal catecholamine secretion from chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, V; Gosso, S; Marcantoni, A; Xu, Y; Colombo, E; Gao, Z; Vittone, E; Kohn, E; Pasquarelli, A; Carbone, E

    2010-09-15

    The quantal release of oxidizable molecules can be successfully monitored by means of polarized carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) positioned in close proximity to the cell membrane. To partially overcome certain CFE limitations, mainly related to their low spatial resolution and lack of optical transparency, we developed a planar boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) prototype, grown on a transparent sapphire wafer. Responsiveness to applied catecholamines as well as the electrochemical and optical properties of the NCD-based device were first characterized by cyclic voltammetry and optical transmittance measurements. By stimulating chromaffin cells positioned on the device with external KCl, well-resolved quantal exocytotic events could be detected either from one NCD microelectrode, or simultaneously from an array of four microelectrodes, indicating that the chip is able to monitor secretory events (amperometric spikes) from a number of isolated chromaffin cells. Spikes detected by the planar NCD device had comparable amplitudes, kinetics and vesicle diameter distributions as those measured by conventional CFEs from the same chromaffin cell. PMID:20570501

  12. Magnetic resonance compatibility of multichannel silicon microelectrode systems for neural recording and stimulation: design criteria, tests, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Santiesteban, Francisco M; Swanson, Scott D; Noll, Douglas C; Anderson, David J

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of biomedical implants and devices represents a challenge for designers and potential risks for users. This paper addresses these problems and presents the first MR-compatible multichannel silicon chronic microelectrode system, used for recording and electrical stimulation of the central nervous system for animal models. A standard chronic assembly, from the Center for Neural Communication Technology at the University of Michigan, was tested on a 2 Tesla magnet to detect forces, heating, and image distortions, and modified to minimize or eliminate susceptibility artifacts, tissue damage, and electrode displacement, maintaining good image quality and safety to the animals. Multiple commercial connectors were tested for MR compatibility and several options for the reference electrode were also tested to minimize image artifacts and provide a stable biocompatible reference for shortand long-term neural recordings. Different holding screws were tested to anchor the microelectrode assembly on the top of the skull. The final selection of this part was based on MR-compatibility, biocompatibility, durability, and mechanical and chemical stability. The required adaptor to interconnect the MR-compatible microelectrode with standard data acquisition systems was also designed and fabricated. The final design is fully MR-compatible and has been successfully tested on guinea pigs. PMID:16532782

  13. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for SERS and EIS measurements by incorporating ZnO nanorod growth with electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xianli; Zhu, Rong; Guo, Xiaoliang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a fine gold nanostructure synthesized on selective planar microelectrodes in micro-chip is realized by using an advanced hybrid fabrication approach incorporating growth of nanorods (NRs) with gold electroplating. By this developed nanostructure, integration of in-situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement for label-free, nondestructive, real-time and rapid monitoring on a single cell has been achieved. Moreover, parameters of Au nanostructures such as size of nanoholes/nanogaps can be controllably adjusted in the fabrication. We have demonstrated a SERS enhancement factor of up to ~2.24 × 106 and double-layer impedance decrease ratio of 90% ~ 95% at low frequency range below 200 kHz by using nanostructured microelectrodes. SERS detection and in-situ EIS measurement of a trapped single cell by using planar microelectrodes are realized to demonstrate the compatibility, multi-functions, high-sensitivity and simplicity of the micro-chip system. This dual function platform integrating SERS and EIS is of great significance in biological, biochemical and biomedical applications.

  14. Use of palladium touch microelectrodes under field conditions for in vivo assessment of dental plaque pH in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheie, A A; Fejerskov, O; Lingström, P; Birkhed, D; Manji, F

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of palladium touch microelectrodes, connected to battery-run pH meters, for in vivo plaque pH measurements in children. The pH was assessed in 20 7-year-old and in 19 14-year-old caries-active and caries-inactive rural Kenyan children. The resting pH was measured at non-carious interproximal and occlusal sites and in open dentine cavities. Independent repeated measurements were performed at given sites at intervals of 15 s and 5 min and on different days. The resting plaque pH varied widely among the children, and there was no significant difference between caries-active and caries-inactive groups. The most striking feature was the considerable erratic fluctuations of pH at a given site with time, both in resting and in sucrose-challenged plaque. These fluctuations were sensitively recorded by palladium touch microelectrodes. After a sucrose rinse, not all sites in the same mouth behaved in a similar fashion, and thus the classical 'Stephan curve' was not always apparent. In conclusion, the palladium touch microelectrodes are highly applicable for plaque pH measurements in children, even under extreme field conditions. PMID:1568236

  15. Electoral Systems and Candidate Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazan, Reuven Y.; Voerman, Gerrit

    2006-01-01

    Electoral systems at the national level and candidate selection methods at the party level are connected, maybe not causally but they do influence each other. More precisely, the electoral system constrains and conditions the parties' menu of choices concerning candidate selection. Moreover, in ligh

  16. Highly sensitive three-dimensional interdigitated microelectrode for microparticle detection using electrical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fu-Yu; Chen, Ming-Kun; Wang, Min-Haw; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Cell impedance analysis is widely used for monitoring biological and medical reactions. In this study, a highly sensitive three-dimensional (3D) interdigitated microelectrode (IME) with a high aspect ratio on a polyimide (PI) flexible substrate was fabricated for microparticle detection (e.g. cell quantity detection) using electroforming and lithography technology. 3D finite element simulations were performed to compare the performance of the 3D IME (in terms of sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio) to that of a planar IME for particles in the sensing area. Various quantities of particles were captured in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium and their impedances were measured. With the 3D IME, the particles were arranged in the gap, not on the electrode, avoiding the noise due to particle position. For the maximum particle quantities, the results show that the 3D IME has at least 5-fold higher sensitivity than that of the planar IME. The trends of impedance magnitude and phase due to particle quantity were verified using the equivalent circuit model. The impedance (1269 Ω) of 69 particles was used to estimate the particle quantity (68 particles) with 98.6% accuracy using a parabolic regression curve at 500 kHz.

  17. Extracellular Recording from Neuronal Networks Cultured on Hydrogel-coated Microelectrode Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Miho; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Yuzo; Saito, Aki; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Microelectrode array (MEA) has been widely used for ensemble recording. One of the advantages of MEA recording is its capability of studying correlation between network structures and the ensemble activity-patterns. Simple neuronal networks, from which activities of individual cells can be identified, are promising for this purpose. We have developed a mask-free cell-patterning method named “micropipette drawing”. In this method, a thin hydrogel layer is formed on the surface of MEA substrates, which acts as the support for growth-guidance patterns. Here in this work, we tested whether electrical signals could be detected through this gel layer. Rat cortical neurons were cultured on substrates with guiding patterns. Electrical activities could be detected after 7 days in vitro (DIV) in both patterned and normal cell cultures, though the signal to noise ratio in the normal culture was clearly higher than that in the patterned culture. Frequency analysis demonstrated that the difference of the power spectra between these cultures was particularly significant in high frequency regions. Decreases in high-frequency components were more prominent in the signals obtained from the patterned cultures. This result suggested that the hydrogel layer acted as low-pass filters probably due to its capacitive properties. The next step is to establish a method to form hydrogel layers, which maintain growth-guidance properties and have better frequency characteristics.

  18. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO32-) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl62- ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m2 g-1), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg-1), high current density (20.0 mA cm-2), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells.

  19. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Ellese; Hall, Diana; Wallace, Kathleen; Mundy, William R.; Eglen, Stephen J.; Shafer, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined neural network ontogeny using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multiwell MEA (mwMEA) plates over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures, action potential spiking activity developed rapidly between DIV 5 and 12. Spiking was sporadic and unorganized at early DIV, and became progressively more organized with time, with bursting parameters, synchrony, and network bursting increasing between DIV 5 and 12. We selected 12 features to describe network activity; principal components analysis using these features demonstrated segregation of data by age at both the well and plate levels. Using random forest classifiers and support vector machines, we demonstrated that four features (coefficient of variation [CV] of within-burst interspike interval, CV of interburst interval, network spike rate, and burst rate) could predict the age of each well recording with >65% accuracy. When restricting the classification to a binary decision, accuracy improved to as high as 95%. Further, we present a novel resampling approach to determine the number of wells needed for comparing different treatments. Overall, these results demonstrate that network development on mwMEA plates is similar to development in single-well MEAs. The increased throughput of mwMEAs will facilitate screening drugs, chemicals, or disease states for effects on neurodevelopment. PMID:27028607

  20. Reusable conductimetric array of interdigitated microelectrodes for the readout of low-density microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallén, Maria; Díaz-González, María; Bonilla, Diana; Salvador, Juan P; Marco, María P; Baldi, Antoni; Fernández-Sánchez, César

    2014-06-17

    Low-density protein microarrays are emerging tools in diagnostics whose deployment could be primarily limited by the cost of fluorescence detection schemes. This paper describes an electrical readout system of microarrays comprising an array of gold interdigitated microelectrodes and an array of polydimethylsiloxane microwells, which enabled multiplexed detection of up to thirty six biological events on the same substrate. Similarly to fluorescent readout counterparts, the microarray can be developed on disposable glass slide substrates. However, unlike them, the presented approach is compact and requires a simple and inexpensive instrumentation. The system makes use of urease labeled affinity reagents for developing the microarrays and is based on detection of conductivity changes taking place when ionic species are generated in solution due to the catalytic hydrolysis of urea. The use of a polydimethylsiloxane microwell array facilitates the positioning of the measurement solution on every spot of the microarray. Also, it ensures the liquid tightness and isolation from the surrounding ones during the microarray readout process, thereby avoiding evaporation and chemical cross-talk effects that were shown to affect the sensitivity and reliability of the system. The performance of the system is demonstrated by carrying out the readout of a microarray for boldenone anabolic androgenic steroid hormone. Analytical results are comparable to those obtained by fluorescent scanner detection approaches. The estimated detection limit is 4.0 ng mL(-1), this being below the threshold value set by the World Anti-Doping Agency and the European Community. PMID:24890693

  1. Incorporation of the electrode electrolyte interface into finite-element models of metal microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Donald R.; Inayat, Samsoon; Taflove, Allen; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Troy, John B.

    2008-03-01

    An accurate description of the electrode-electrolyte interfacial impedance is critical to the development of computational models of neural recording and stimulation that aim to improve understanding of neuro-electric interfaces and to expedite electrode design. This work examines the effect that the electrode-electrolyte interfacial impedance has upon the solutions generated from time-harmonic finite-element models of cone- and disk-shaped platinum microelectrodes submerged in physiological saline. A thin-layer approximation is utilized to incorporate a platinum-saline interfacial impedance into the finite-element models. This approximation is easy to implement and is not computationally costly. Using an iterative nonlinear solver, solutions were obtained for systems in which the electrode was driven at ac potentials with amplitudes from 10 mV to 500 mV and frequencies from 100 Hz to 100 kHz. The results of these simulations indicate that, under certain conditions, incorporation of the interface may strongly affect the solutions obtained. This effect, however, is dependent upon the amplitude of the driving potential and, to a lesser extent, its frequency. The solutions are most strongly affected at low amplitudes where the impedance of the interface is large. Here, the current density distribution that is calculated from models incorporating the interface is much more uniform than the current density distribution generated by models that neglect the interface. At higher potential amplitudes, however, the impedance of the interface decreases, and its effect on the solutions obtained is attenuated.

  2. Classification of intended phoneme production from chronic intracortical microelectrode recordings in speech motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Brumberg

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a neurophysiological study of attempted speech production in a paralyzed human volunteer using chronic microelectrode recordings. The volunteer suffers from locked-in syndrome leaving him in a state of near-total paralysis, though he maintains good cognition and sensation. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of supervised classification techniques for prediction of intended phoneme production in the absence of any overt movements including speech. Such classification or decoding ability has the potential to greatly improve the quality-of-life of many people who are otherwise unable to speak by providing a direct communicative link to the general community. We examined the performance of three classifiers on a multi-class discrimination problem in which the items were 38 American English phonemes including monophthong and diphthong vowels and consonants. The three classifiers differed in performance, but averaged between 16-21% overall accuracy (chance-level is 1/38 or 2.6%. Further, the distribution of phonemes classified statistically above chance was non-uniform though 20 of 38 phonemes were classified with statistical significance for all three classifiers. These preliminary results suggest supervised classification techniques are capable of performing large scale multi-class discrimination for attempted speech production and may provide the basis for future communication prostheses.

  3. Interdigitated microelectrode based impedance biosensor for detection of salmonella enteritidis in food samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks continue to occur, and S. enteritidis-related outbreaks from various food sources have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Conventional methods for pathogens detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Some immunological rapid assays are developed, but these assays still require prolonged enrichment steps. Recently developed biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. To develop the biosensor, an interdigitated microelectrode (IME) was fabricated by using semiconductor fabrication process. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized based on avidin-biotin binding on the surface of the IME to form an active sensing layer. To increase the sensitivity of the sensor, three types of sensors that have different electrode gap sizes (2 μm, 5 μm, 10 μm) were fabricated and tested. The impedimetric biosensor could detect 103 CFU/mL of Salmonella in pork meat extract with an incubation time of 5 minutes. This method may provide a simple, rapid and sensitive method to detect foodborne pathogens

  4. Leptin counteracts the hypoxia-induced inhibition of spontaneously firing hippocampal neurons: a microelectrode array study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O(2)). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  5. Investigations of redox magnetohydrodynamic fluid flow at microelectrode arrays using microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily C; Weston, Melissa C; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2010-04-01

    Microbeads are used to track fluid flow over microband electrode arrays to investigate fundamentals of redox magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD) in a confined solution. The results may lead toward the design of micro total analysis systems with microfluidics based on the redox-MHD concept. Ion flux was generated by reduction and oxidation of electroactive potassium ferri- and ferrocyanide at selected individually addressable microelectrodes in the array. An external magnetic field was produced by a small, permanent magnet (0.38 T) placed directly below the array with its field perpendicular to the plane of the array. The cross product of ion flux and magnetic field produces a magnetic force (a portion of the Lorentz force equation) that causes the fluid to rotate around the active electrodes. Velocities up to 1.4 mm/s are demonstrated here. The effects on velocities were obtained for different concentrations of redox species, widths of electrodes, gaps between electrodes, and combinations of anodically- and cathodically polarized electrodes. The microbeads allowed mapping of flow patterns and velocities, both parallel and perpendicular to the array chip. The influence of counteracting shear forces, drag along the walls, and reinforcing flow are discussed. A significant result is the fairly flat flow profile across 650 microm, attained between electrodes that are oppositely biased. PMID:20210341

  6. Brain Computer Interface Learning for Systems Based on Electrocorticography and Intracortical Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivayogi V Hiremath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  7. A comparison of microelectrodes for a visual cortical prosthesis using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Kate Brunton

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Altering the geometry of microelectrodes for use in a cortical neural prosthesis modifies the electric field generated in tissue, thereby affecting electrode efficacy and tissue damage. Commonly, electrodes with an active region located at the tip (conical electrodes are used for stimulation of cortex but there is argument to believe this geometry may not be the best. Here we use finite element analysis to compare the electric fields generated by three types of electrodes, a conical electrode with exposed active tip, an annular electrode with active area located up away from the tip, and a striped annular electrode where the active annular region has bands of insulation interrupting the full active region. The results indicate that current density on the surface of the conical electrodes can be up to ten times greater than current density on annular electrodes of the same height, which may increase the propensity for tissue damage. However choosing the most efficient electrode geometry in order to reduce power consumption is dependent on the distance of the electrode to the target neurons. If neurons are located within 10 micrometers of the electrode, then a small conical electrode would be more power efficient. On the other hand if the target neuron is greater than 500 micrometers away – as happens normally when insertion of an array of electrodes into cortex results in a kill zone around each electrode due to insertion damage and inflammatory responses - then a large annular electrode would be more efficient.

  8. AC electric sensing of slug-flow properties with exposed gold microelectrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for slug-flow (segmented flow) characterization by means of ac electric sensing is proposed. Water segments regularly dispersed in kerosene are used as an experimental system. The sensing procedure is carried out in a plexiglass microchip with embedded gold microelectrodes. The presence of passing slugs over a measurement spot is determined from impedance variations. A square-shaped signal resulting from the slug flow is acquired and flow properties such as the mean velocity and length of the slugs are calculated. Complex behaviour of the corresponding electrochemical system is studied. Dependence of the impedance signal on the flow rate, ion concentration in the dispersed water slug and electric field strength are discussed and explained in detail. Advantages and disadvantages of the suggested method, in comparison with existing capacitive noncontact methods, are also clarified. Unlike the noncontact methods of electric sensing, with the insulation dielectric layer over the electrodes, our electrodes are in a direct contact with the carrier phase. The results show that the method is promising for process applications and will be further improved. (paper)

  9. Properties of Retinal Precursor Cells Grown on Vertically Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Generated for the Modification of Retinal Implant-Embedded Microelectrode Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnen, Sandra; Meißner, Frank; Krug, Mario; Baltz, Thomas; Endler, Ingolf; Mokwa, Wilfried; Walter, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. To analyze the biocompatibility of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), used as nanomodification to optimize the properties of prostheses-embedded microelectrodes that induce electrical stimulation of surviving retinal cells. Methods. MWCNT were synthesized on silicon wafers. Their growth was achieved by iron particles (Fe) or mixtures of iron-platinum (Fe-Pt) and iron-titanium (Fe-Ti) acting as catalysts. Viability, growth, adhesion, and gene expression of L-929 and retinal precursor (R28) cells were analyzed after nondirect and direct contact. Results. Nondirect contact had almost no influence on cell growth, as measured in comparison to reference materials with defined levels of cytotoxicity. Both cell types exhibited good proliferation properties on each MWCNT-coated wafer. Viability ranged from 95.9 to 99.8%, in which better survival was observed for nonfunctionalized MWCNT generated with the Fe-Pt and Fe-Ti catalyst mixtures. R28 cells grown on the MWCNT-coated wafers showed a decreased gene expression associated with neural and glial properties. Expression of the cell cycle-related genes CCNC, MYC, and TP53 was slightly downregulated. Cultivation on plasma-treated MWCNT did not lead to additional changes. Conclusions. All tested MWCNT-covered slices showed good biocompatibility profiles, confirming that this nanotechnology is a promising tool to improve prostheses bearing electrodes which connect with retinal tissue. PMID:27200182

  10. The use of microelectrodes for the In-situ monitoring of the chemistry of aqueous coolants in heat-transport systems of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to conventional amperometric electrodes, amperometric microelectrodes exhibit certain unique characteristics that make them well suited as sensors in the dilute aqueous electrolytes. The heat-transport systems (HTSs) of thermal power plants employ such electrolytes as coolants at elevated temperatures and pressures. Thus, amperometric microelectrodes are in principle well suited for the in-situ monitoring of HTS coolant chemistry. This report describes the experimental evaluation of a platinum microdisc electrode for one such application. The results of these experiments demonstrate that microelectrodes can be used to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen in simulated HTS coolants at 150 degrees C in the concentration range of 10-1000 ppb. Measurements of open-circuit potential, commonly referred to as ECP, are currently being made from platinum electrodes installed in the HTSs of a number of nuclear reactors. The availability of platinum microelectrodes capable of functioning under HTS conditions offers the prospect of replacing the conventional electrodes with microelectrodes. Such a strategy would allow the use of a variety of more advanced electrochemical techniques that involve the polarization of the electrode from its open-circuit potential through the external application of potential. Thus, the utility of electrochemical monitors could be significantly enhanced for minimal additional expense while maintaining probe and system reliability. (author)

  11. Electrochemiluminescence Behavior of Ru(bpy)3^2+/ Carbofuran System on an Electrically Heated Microelectrode Chip%Electrochemiluminescence Behavior of Ru(bpy)3^2+/ Carbofuran System on an Electrically Heated Microelectrode Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶瑞洪; 陈晓萍; 邱彬; 林振宇

    2011-01-01

    An electrically heated microelectrode chip (HMEC) was designed and the Ru(bpy)3^2+/carbofuran electro- chemiluminescence (ECL) systems were applied to characterize the performance of the HMEC. The ECL intensities increase at elevated electrode temperature, and the detection limit at 60℃ (electrode surface temperature) was about 10 times lower than that at 30℃. The results indicate that new heated electrode can be handled easily and can be mass produced, the difference between the electrodes was little. The stability of the HMEC was good since the electrode surface can hardly be destroyed during detection and storage.

  12. Real-time monitoring of extracellular adenosine using enzyme-linked microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzman, Jason M; Gibson, Justin L; Tackla, Ryan D; Costello, Mark S; Burmeister, Jason J; Quintero, Jorge E; Gerhardt, Greg A; Hartings, Jed A

    2015-12-15

    Throughout the central nervous system extracellular adenosine serves important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory functions. However, current understanding of the in vivo regulation and effects of adenosine is limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of available measurement techniques. Here, we describe an enzyme-linked microelectrode array (MEA) with high spatial (7500 µm(2)) and temporal (4 Hz) resolution that can selectively measure extracellular adenosine through the use of self-referenced coating scheme that accounts for interfering substances and the enzymatic breakdown products of adenosine. In vitro, the MEAs selectively measured adenosine in a linear fashion (r(2)=0.98±0.01, concentration range=0-15 µM, limit of detection =0.96±0.5 µM). In vivo the limit of detection was 0.04±0.02 µM, which permitted real-time monitoring of the basal extracellular concentration in rat cerebral cortex (4.3±1.5 µM). Local cortical injection of adenosine through a micropipette produced dose-dependent transient increases in the measured extracellular concentration (200 nL: 6.8±1.8 µM; 400 nL: 19.4±5.3 µM) [P<0.001]. Lastly, local injection of dipyridamole, which inhibits transport of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporter, raised the measured extracellular concentration of adenosine by 120% (5.6→12.3 µM) [P<0.001]. These studies demonstrate that MEAs can selectively measure adenosine on temporal and spatial scales relevant to adenosine signaling and regulation in normal and pathologic states. PMID:26183072

  13. Microelectrode study of intracellular pH in frog skin: dependence on serosal Cl-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replacing external Cl- reduces Na+ transport across frog skin, but the sidedness and mechanisms have been unclear. We have monitored current (l/sub T/), resistance (R/sub T/) and basolateral membrane potential, both with reference micropipettes (psi/sup sc/) and pH-selective microelectrodes (E/sub H//sup sc/), in short-circuited epithelial sheets isolated from frog skins; removal of the dermis facilitates basolateral exchange. Intracellular pH was 7.25 +- 0.03 (mean +- SE) when the pH of the external Cl- Ringer's solution was 7.60 +- 0.01, in reasonable agreement with estimates from 31P and 19F NMR analyses. Complete mucosal replacement of Cl- by gluconate had variable effects on l/sub T/ and R/sub T/. However, serosal Cl- substitution uniformly increased R/sub T/ and markedly decreased l/sub T/, absolute value phi/sup sc/ and absolute value E/sub A//sup sc/. The membrane depolarization was usually preceded by a small hyperpolarization (0.5-3.5 mV). The serosal Cl- replacement also produced an intracellular alkalinization of 0.4 +- 0.1 U. These data suggest that: (1) serosal Cl- substitution alkalinizes the cells by either enhancing HCO- entry or blocking HCO- loss through a basolateral Cl/HCO antiport, and (2) the fall in absolute value phi/sup sc/ and l/sub T/ may partly reflect inhibition of apical Na+ entry, produced indirectly by membrane depolarization resulting from altered basolateral ionic conductances

  14. Microelectrode array recordings of cardiac action potentials as a high throughput method to evaluate pesticide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, A; Molnar, P; Sieverdes, K; Jamshidi, A; Hickman, J J

    2006-04-01

    The threat of environmental pollution, biological warfare agent dissemination and new diseases in recent decades has increased research into cell-based biosensors. The creation of this class of sensors could specifically aid the detection of toxic chemicals and their effects in the environment, such as pyrethroid pesticides. Pyrethroids are synthetic pesticides that have been used increasingly over the last decade to replace other pesticides like DDT. In this study we used a high-throughput method to detect pyrethroids by using multielectrode extracellular recordings from cardiac cells. The data from this cell-electrode hybrid system was compared to published results obtained with patch-clamp electrophysiology and also used as an alternative method to further understand pyrethroid effects. Our biosensor consisted of a confluent monolayer of cardiac myocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEA) composed of 60 substrate-integrated electrodes. Spontaneous activity of these beating cells produced extracellular field potentials in the range of 100 microV to nearly 1200 microV with a beating frequency of 0.5-4 Hz. All of the tested pyrethroids; alpha-Cypermethrin, Tetramethrin and Tefluthrin, produced similar changes in the electrophysiological properties of the cardiac myocytes, namely reduced beating frequency and amplitude. The sensitivity of our toxin detection method was comparable to earlier patch-clamp studies, which indicates that, in specific applications, high-throughput extracellular methods can replace single-cell studies. Moreover, the similar effect of all three pyrethroids on the measured parameters suggests, that not only detection of the toxins but, their classification might also be possible with this method. Overall our results support the idea that whole cell biosensors might be viable alternatives when compared to current toxin detection methods. PMID:16198528

  15. Continuous-Flow Electrokinetic-Assisted Plasmapheresis by Using Three-Dimensional Microelectrodes Featuring Sidewall Undercuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaoxing; He, Minghao; Qiu, Huihe; Yobas, Levent

    2016-05-17

    We present a novel plasmapheresis device designed for a fully integrated point-of-care blood analysis microsystem. In the device, fluidic microchannels exhibit a characteristic cross-sectional profile arising from distinct three-dimensional (3D) microelectrodes featuring sidewall undercuts readily integrated through a single-mask process. The structure leverages mainly electrothermal convective rolls that efficiently manifest themselves in physiological fluids and yet have received inadequate attention for the application of plasmapheresis due to concerns over Joule heating. Using this device, we show that such convective rolls not only lead to plasma extraction at a high yield and purity but also deliver plasma at an acceptable quality with no evidence of hemolytic stress or protein denaturation. Specifically, plasma from 1.5 μL of whole blood diluted to 4% hematocrit in a high-conductivity buffer (1.5 S/m) is extracted in a continuous flow at a fraction of 70% by using a peak voltage of ±10 Vp applied at 650 kHz; the extracted plasma is nearly 99% pure, as shown by a rigorous assessment using flow cytometry. The plasmas obtained using this device and using conventional centrifugation and sedimentation are of comparable quality as revealed by absorbance and circular dichroism spectra despite thermal gradients; however, these gradients effectively drive electrothermal bulk flows, as assessed using the microparticle image velocity technique. The device achieves high target molecule recovery efficiency, delivering about 97% of the proteins detected in the plasma obtained using sedimentation. The utility of the extracted plasma is further validated based on the detection of prostate-specific antigen at clinically relevant levels. PMID:27094711

  16. 蓝牙程控微电极拉制仪的研制%Horizontal Microelectrode Puller Based on Bluetooth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘向明; 王威; 李享元

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel horizontal microelectrode puller based on Bluetooth technology, discusses the mechanical structure and hardware circuit for the micropipette puller, and the control software was developed by using LabVIEW platform. The software interface was dedicated to set the microelectrode parameters and indicate the pulling progress on PC. The BlueCore4 Bluetooth module transmitted the setting parameters to a microcontroller in the puller. The experiment results showed that the microelectrodes produced by the instrument were featured with good tip profile and low serial impedance for patch clamp experimental requirements. This puller is easy to operate and set pulling parameter, produce two symmetrical electrodes in each one progress. It's a good tool for electroDhvsioloav experiments.%研制了一种基于蓝牙的二步式水平微电极拉制仪,给出了系统的机械结构和硬件电路设计方案.采用LabVIEW编写了拉制参数设置和拉制进度显示的PC软件界面,利用BlueCore4蓝牙模块实现了拉制过程中的数据无线传输、参数保存功能.测试结果显示:系统拉制出来的玻璃电极在外形、尖端形状以及电极阻抗都已达到膜片钳实验要求.该仪器操作简单,拉制参数设置和保存容易,一次拉制出两根对称电极,为电生理、膜片钳以及其它神经生物实验提供了一个可靠的工具.

  17. Heterogeneous distribution of exocytotic microdomains in adrenal chromaffin cells resolved by high-density diamond ultra-microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosso, Sara; Turturici, Marco; Franchino, Claudio; Colombo, Elisabetta; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe the ability of a high-density diamond microelectrode array targeted to resolve multi-site detection of fast exocytotic events from single cells. The array consists of nine boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond ultra-microelectrodes (9-Ch NCD-UMEA) radially distributed within a circular area of the dimensions of a single cell. The device can be operated in voltammetric or chronoamperometric configuration. Sensitivity to catecholamines, tested by dose-response calibrations, set the lowest detectable concentration of adrenaline to ∼5 μm. Catecholamine release from bovine or mouse chromaffin cells could be triggered by electrical stimulation or external KCl-enriched solutions. Spikes detected from the cell apex using carbon fibre microelectrodes showed an excellent correspondence with events measured at the bottom of the cell by the 9-Ch NCD-UMEA, confirming the ability of the array to resolve single quantal secretory events. Subcellular localization of exocytosis was provided by assigning each quantal event to one of the nine channels based on its location. The resulting mapping highlights the heterogeneous distribution of secretory activity in cell microdomains of 12-27 μm2. In bovine chromaffin cells, secretion was highly heterogeneous with zones of high and medium activity in 54% of the cell surface and zones of low or no activity in the remainder. The 'non-active' ('silent') zones covered 24% of the total and persisted for 6-8 min, indicating stable location. The 9-Ch NCD-UMEA therefore appears suitable for investigating the microdomain organization of neurosecretion with high spatial resolution. PMID:24879870

  18. On detecting determinism and nonlinearity in microelectrode recording signals: Approach based on non-stationary surrogate data methods

    CERN Document Server

    Guarín, D; Delgado, E; Guijarro, E

    2010-01-01

    Two new surrogate methods, the Small Shuffle Surrogate (SSS) and the Truncated Fourier Transform Surrogate (TFTS), have been proposed to study whether there are some kind of dynamics in irregular fluctuations and if so whether these dynamics are linear or not, even if this fluctuations are modulated by long term trends. This situation is theoretically incompatible with the assumption underlying previously proposed surrogate methods. We apply the SSS and TFTS methods to microelectrode recording (MER) signals from different brain areas, in order to acquire a deeper understanding of them. Through our methodology we conclude that the irregular fluctuations in MER signals possess some determinism.

  19. On-line observation of cell growth in a three-dimensional matrix on surface modified microelectrode arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Kyriakides, Themis R.; Chen, Jia-Jin J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite many successful applications of microelectrode arrays (MEAs), typical two-dimensional in-vitro cultures do not project the full scale of the cell growth environment in the three-dimensional (3D) in-vivo setting. This study aims to on-line monitor in-vitro cell growth in a 3D matrix on the surface-modified MEAs with a dynamic perfusion culture system. A 3D matrix consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel supplemented with poly-D-lysine was subsequently synthesized in-situ on the sel...

  20. Nanostructured silver and platinum modified carbon fiber microelectrodes coated with nafion for H2O2 determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Halouzka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber microelectrodes equipped with nanostructured metals(platinum and silver and covered with a Nafion layer constitutesensitive H2O2 sensors. Metallic layers on carbon fibers wereprepared by surfactant assisted electrodeposition. In the case ofsilver, the procedure leads to coating which is composed of porous,partially aggregated and crystalline deposits containing silvernanoparticles. The electrodeposition of platinum leads to carbonfiber decorated with clusters of platinum nanoparticles. Aftercoating the electrodes with protective and antiinterference barriermade of Nafion, the sensing properties of the preparedmicroelectrodes towards hydrogen peroxide are investigated.

  1. Neurotoxicity screening of (illicit) drugs using novel methods for analysis of microelectrode array (MEA) recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondebrink, L; Verboven, A H A; Drega, W S; Schmeink, S; de Groot, M W G D M; van Kleef, R G D M; Wijnolts, F M J; de Groot, A; Meulenbelt, J; Westerink, R H S

    2016-07-01

    Annual prevalence of the use of common illicit drugs and new psychoactive substances (NPS) is high, despite the often limited knowledge on the health risks of these substances. Recently, cortical cultures grown on multi-well microelectrode arrays (mwMEAs) have been used for neurotoxicity screening of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and toxins with a high sensitivity and specificity. However, the use of mwMEAs to investigate the effects of illicit drugs on neuronal activity is largely unexplored. We therefore first characterised the cortical cultures using immunocytochemistry and show the presence of astrocytes, glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Neuronal activity is concentration-dependently affected following exposure to six neurotransmitters (glutamate, GABA, serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine and nicotine). Most neurotransmitters inhibit neuronal activity, although glutamate and acetylcholine transiently increase activity at specific concentrations. These transient effects are not detected when activity is determined during the entire 30min exposure window, potentially resulting in false-negative results. As expected, exposure to the GABAA-receptor antagonist bicuculline increases neuronal activity. Exposure to a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA-receptor (diazepam) or to glutamate receptor antagonists (CNQX and MK-801) reduces neuronal activity. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to common drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and amphetamine) and NPS (1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP), 4-fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) and methoxetamine (MXE)) decreases neuronal activity. MXE most potently inhibits neuronal activity with an IC50 of 0.5μM, whereas 4-FA is least potent with an IC50 of 113μM. Our data demonstrate the importance of analysing neuronal activity within different time windows during exposure to prevent false-negative results. We also show that cortical cultures grown on mwMEAs can successfully be applied to investigate the effects of

  2. Creation of defined single cell resolution neuronal circuits on microelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirlo, Russell Kirk

    2009-12-01

    The way cell-cell organization of neuronal networks influences activity and facilitates function is not well understood. Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) and advancing cell patterning technologies have enabled access to and control of in vitro neuronal networks spawning much new research in neuroscience and neuroengineering. We propose that small, simple networks of neurons with defined circuitry may serve as valuable research models where every connection can be analyzed, controlled and manipulated. Towards the goal of creating such neuronal networks we have applied microfabricated elastomeric membranes, surface modification and our unique laser cell patterning system to create defined neuronal circuits with single-cell precision on MEAs. Definition of synaptic connectivity was imposed by the 3D physical constraints of polydimethylsiloxane elastomeric membranes. The membranes had 20mum clear-through holes and 2-3mum deep channels which when applied to the surface of the MEA formed microwells to confine neurons to electrodes connected via shallow tunnels to direct neurite outgrowth. Tapering and turning of channels was used to influence neurite polarity. Biocompatibility of the membranes was increased by vacuum baking, oligomer extraction, and autoclaving. Membranes were bound to the MEA by oxygen plasma treatment and heated pressure. The MEA/membrane surface was treated with oxygen plasma, poly-D-lysine and laminin to improve neuron attachment, survival and neurite outgrowth. Prior to cell patterning the outer edge of culture area was seeded with 5x10 5 cells per cm and incubated for 2 days. Single embryonic day 7 chick forebrain neurons were then patterned into the microwells and onto the electrodes using our laser cell patterning system. Patterned neurons successfully attached to and were confined to the electrodes. Neurites extended through the interconnecting channels and connected with adjacent neurons. These results demonstrate that neuronal circuits can be

  3. Importance of Thickness in Human Cardiomyocyte Network for Effective Electrophysiological Stimulation Using On-Chip Extracellular Microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tomoyo; Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a three-dimensionally controlled in vitro human cardiomyocyte network assay for the measurements of drug-induced conductivity changes and the appearance of fatal arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation for more precise in vitro predictive cardiotoxicity. To construct an artificial conductance propagation model of a human cardiomyocyte network, first, we examined the cell concentration dependence of the cell network heights and found the existence of a height limit of cell networks, which was double-layer height, whereas the cardiomyocytes were effectively and homogeneously cultivated within the microchamber maintaining their spatial distribution constant and their electrophysiological conductance and propagation were successfully recorded using a microelectrode array set on the bottom of the microchamber. The pacing ability of a cardiomyocyte's electrophysiological response has been evaluated using microelectrode extracellular stimulation, and the stimulation for pacing also successfully regulated the beating frequencies of two-layered cardiomyocyte networks, whereas monolayered cardiomyocyte networks were hardly stimulated by the external electrodes using the two-layered cardiomyocyte stimulation condition. The stability of the lined-up shape of human cardiomyocytes within the rectangularly arranged agarose microchambers was limited for a two-layered cardiomyocyte network because their stronger force generation shrunk those cells after peeling off the substrate. The results indicate the importance of fabrication technology of thickness control of cellular networks for effective extracellular stimulation and the potential concerning thick cardiomyocyte networks for long-term cultivation.

  4. Functional localization and visualization of the subthalamic nucleus from microelectrode recordings acquired during DBS surgery with unsupervised machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S.; Baltuch, G. H.; Jaggi, J. L.; Danish, S. F.

    2009-04-01

    Microelectrode recordings are a useful adjunctive method for subthalamic nucleus localization during deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease. Attempts to quantitate and standardize this process, using single computational measures of neural activity, have been limited by variability in patient neurophysiology and recording conditions. Investigators have suggested that a multi-feature approach may be necessary for automated approaches to perform within acceptable clinical standards. We present a novel data visualization algorithm and several unique features that address these shortcomings. The algorithm extracts multiple computational features from the microelectrode neurophysiology and integrates them with tools from unsupervised machine learning. The resulting colour-coded map of neural activity reveals activity transitions that correspond to the anatomic boundaries of subcortical structures. Using these maps, a non-neurophysiologist is able to achieve sensitivities of 90% and 95% for STN entry and exit, respectively, to within 0.5 mm accuracy of the current gold standard. The accuracy of this technique is attributed to the multi-feature approach. This activity map can simplify and standardize the process of localizing the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for neurostimulation. Because this method does not require a stationary electrode for careful recording of unit activity for spike sorting, the length of the operation may be shortened.

  5. In situ monitoring of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm growth on gold electrodes by using a Pt microelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Han; Zheng, Zhanwang; Yang, Bin; Liu, Ding; Li, Feifang; Zhang, Xingwang; Li, Zhongjian; Lei, Lecheng

    2016-06-01

    Much attention has been focused on electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) in the application of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Studying the EAB biofilm growth mechanism as well as electron transfer mechanism provides a route to upgrade BES performance. But an effective bacterial growth monitoring method on the biofilm scale is still absent in this field. In this work, electrode-attached bacterial biofilms formed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were dynamically monitored through a microelectrode method. For S. oneidensis MR-1, a respiratory electron transport chain is associated with the secretion of riboflavin, severing as the cofactor to the outer membrane c-type cytochromes. The biofilm growth was monitored through adopting riboflavin as an electrochemical probe during the approach of the microelectrode to the biofilm external surface. This method allows in vivo and in situ biofilm monitoring at different growth stages without destructive manipulation. Furthermore, the biofilm growth monitoring results have been proved to be relatively accurate through observation under confocal laser scanning microscopy. We further applied this method to investigate the effects of four environmental factors (the concentrations of dissolved oxygen, sodium lactate, riboflavin as well as the electrode potential) on S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm development. PMID:26850925

  6. Electrical control of deep NV centers in diamond by means of sub-superficial graphitic micro-electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Forneris, J; Tengattini, A; Enrico, E; Grilj, V; Skukan, N; Amato, G; Boarino, L; Jakšić, M; Olivero, P

    2016-01-01

    The control of the charge state of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is of primary importance for the stabilization of their quantum-optical properties, in applications ranging from quantum sensing to quantum computing. To this purpose, in this work current-injecting micro-electrodes were fabricated in bulk diamond for NV charge state control. Buried (i.e. 3 {\\mu}m in depth) graphitic micro-electrodes with spacing of 9 {\\mu}m were created in single-crystal diamond substrates by means of a 6 MeV C scanning micro-beam. The high breakdown field of diamond was exploited to electrically control the variation in the relative population of the negative (NV-) and neutral (NV0) charge states of sub-superficial NV centers located in the inter- electrode gap regions, without incurring into current discharges. Photoluminescence spectra acquired from the biased electrodes exhibited an electrically induced increase up to 40% in the NV- population at the expense of the NV0 charge state. The variation in the relative ...

  7. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/. PMID:27131783

  8. Empathy Development in Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Using a grounded theory research design, the author examined 180 reflective essays of teacher candidates who participated in a "Learning Process Project," in which they were asked to synthesize and document their discoveries about the learning process over the course of a completely new learning experience as naive learners. This study explored…

  9. Candidate Prediction Models and Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Madsen, Henrik;

    2005-01-01

    This document lists candidate prediction models for Work Package 3 (WP3) of the PSO-project called ``Intelligent wind power prediction systems'' (FU4101). The main focus is on the models transforming numerical weather predictions into predictions of power production. The document also outlines the...

  10. Monochloramine-sensitive amperometric microelectrode: optimization of gold, platinum, and carbon fiber sensing materials for removal of dissolved oxygen interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amperometric monochloramine detection using newly fabricated gold, platinum, and carbon-fiber microsensors was investigated to optimize sensor operation and eliminate oxygen interference. Gold and platinum microsensors exhibited no oxygen interference during monochloramine measu...

  11. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of spontaneous network activity in cortical networks grown on multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used...

  12. IAEA Director General candidates announced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The IAEA today confirms receipt of the nomination of five candidates for Director General of the IAEA. Nominations of the following individuals have been received by the Chairperson of the IAEA Board of Governors, Ms. Taous Feroukhi: Mr. Jean-Pol Poncelet of Belgium; Mr. Yukiya Amano of Japan; Mr. Ernest Petric of Slovenia; Mr. Abdul Samad Minty of South Africa; and Mr. Luis Echavarri of Spain. The five candidates were nominated in line with a process approved by the Board in October 2008. IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei's term of office expires on 30 November 2009. He has served as Director General since 1997 and has stated that he is not available for a fourth term of office. (IAEA)

  13. VALUE ORIENTATIONS OF TEACHER CANDIDATES

    OpenAIRE

    YAPICI, Asım; KUTLU, M.Oğuz; BİLİCAN, F.Işıl

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional, descriptive study examined the change in values in time among teacher candidates. The Schwartz Values Inventory was administered to 708 freshmen and senior students studying at Cukurova University, Education Faculty. The results have shown that the students at the department of Science Education valued power, achievement, stimulation; the department of English Teaching Education valued hedonism; and the department of Education of Religious Culture valued un...

  14. Synthesis, characterization and application of electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, L.

    1995-07-07

    It has been known that significant advances in electrochemistry really depend on improvements in the sensitivity, selectivity, convenience, and/or economy of working electrodes, especially through the development of new working electrode materials. The advancement of solid state chemistry and materials science makes it possible to provide the materials which may be required as satisfactory electrode materials. The combination of solid state techniques with electrochemistry expands the applications of solid state materials and leads to the improvement of electrocatalysis. The study of Ru-Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} and Pt-Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} microelectrode arrays as introduced in paper 1 and paper 4, respectively, focuses on their synthesis and characterization. The synthesis is described by high temperature techniques for Ru or Pt microelectrode arrays within a conductive Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} ceramic matrix. The characterization is based on the data obtained by x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, voltammetry and amperometry. These microelectrode arrays show significant enhancement in current densities in comparison to solid Ru and Pt electrodes. Electrocatalysis at pyrochlore oxide Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7.3} and Bi{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} electrodes are described in paper 2 and paper 3, respectively. Details are reported for the synthesis and characterization of composite Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7.3} electrodes. Voltammetric data are examined for evidence that oxidation can occur with transfer of oxygen to the oxidation products in the potential region corresponding to anodic discharge of H{sub 2}O with simultaneous evolution of O{sub 2}. Paper 3 includes electrocatalytic activities of composite Bi{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} disk electrodes for the oxidation of I{sup -} and the reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup -}.

  15. Real-Time, Selective Detection of Copper(II) Using Ionophore-Grafted Carbon-Fiber Microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Ibrahim, Ahmad A; Hashemi, Parastoo; Stockdill, Jennifer L

    2016-07-19

    Rapid, selective detection of metals in complex samples remains an elusive goal that could provide critical analytical information for biological and environmental sciences and industrial waste management. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMs) is an emerging technique for metal analysis with broad potential applicability because of its rapid response to changes in analyte concentration and minimal disturbance to the analysis medium. In this communication, we report the first effective application of covalently modified CFMs to achieve highly selective, subsecond Cu(II) measurements using FSCV. A two-part strategy is employed for maximum selectivity: Cu(II) binding is augmented by a covalently grafted ionophore, while binding of other metals is prevented by chemical blocking of nonselective surface adsorption sites. The resulting electrodes selectively detect Cu(II) in a complex medium comprising several interfering metals. Overall, this strategy represents a transformative innovation in real-time electrochemical detection of metal analytes. PMID:27079730

  16. Application of double pulse theory for hemispherical microelectrodes to the experimental study of slow charge transfer processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborda, Eduardo [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Espinardo 30100, Murcia (Spain); Rogers, Emma I. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Martinez-Ortiz, Francisco [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Espinardo 30100, Murcia (Spain); Molina, Angela, E-mail: amolina@um.e [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Espinardo 30100, Murcia (Spain); Compton, Richard G., E-mail: richard.compton@chem.ox.ac.u [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-01

    Differential Pulse Voltammetry and Reverse Pulse Voltammetry are applied to the study of the electrode kinetics of slow charge transfer processes at hemispherical microelectrodes of ca. 25 {mu}m radius. The electrochemical reversibility of three redox systems: 3-nitrophenolate{sup -/2-{center_dot}}, 3-nitrophthalate{sup 2-/3-{center_dot}} and europium{sup 3+/2+}, are evaluated with both techniques by determining the heterogeneous rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient as well as the formal potential for each. The experimental results show the value of these techniques for the characterization of the electrode kinetics by means of simple diagnostic criteria and single-point fit to general working curves. Further, theory developed for double potential pulse under radial diffusion conditions is validated.

  17. Direct determination of thickness of sea surface microlayer using a pH microelectrode at original location

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张正斌; 蔡卫君; 刘莲生; 刘春颖; 陈飞舟

    2003-01-01

    By using a pH microelectrode and ultramicro-vernier shift equipment,a new method to determine directly the thickness of the sea surface microlayer (SML) at original location, is advanced and founded, which is an important innovation on the SML sampling method and the SML research. Applying the intersecting straight line method, the SML thickness was found to be approximately 60 μm. This result is consistent not only with the measurement result, (50±10) μm, obtained with the conventional glass plate method, but also with the sudden change layer of physical and chemical properties of seawater, and with the results reported in the literature. The determination method will have the ocean biogeochemistry significance on marine chemistry.

  18. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  19. Planar potentiometric sensors based on Au and Ag microelectrodes and conducting polymers for flow-cell analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back-side contact Au and Ag microelectrodes were used as transducers to construct planar all-solid-state electrodes suitable for flow-through analysis. The microsensors were based on plasticized PVC potassium-selective membranes containing ion-electron conducting polymer-polypyrrole doped with di(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate. The proposed technique allowed simple construction of microsensors in one step, by membrane solution casting directly on the surface of the planar metallic transducers. The performance of the microsensors based on Au and Ag transducers were determined and compared with planar sensors based on internal electrolyte immobilized in polyHEMA. The addition of the polypyrrole to the membrane composition did not influence on the selectivity, reproducibility and long-term stability of the microsensors but improved their standard potential stability in time in comparison with coated-wire type sensors. Moreover, all-solid-state microsensors based on Au transducers exhibited better signal stability than Ag based sensors

  20. Rapid capacitive detection of femtomolar levels of bisphenol A using an aptamer-modified disposable microelectrode array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A label-free and single-step method is reported for rapid and highly sensitive detection of bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous samples. It utilizes an aptamer acting as a probe molecule immobilized on a commercially available array of interdigitated aluminum microelectrodes. BPA was quantified by measuring the interfacial capacitance change rate caused by the specific binding between bisphenol A and the immobilized aptamer. The AC signal also induces an AC electrokinetic effect to generate microfluidic motion for enhanced binding. The capacitive aptasensor achieves a limit of detection as low as 10 fM(2.8 fg ⋅ mL−1) with a 20 s response time. The method is inexpensive, highly sensitive, rapid and therefore provides a promising technology for on-site detection of BPA in food and water samples. (author)

  1. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V. (paper)

  2. Inhibitory effects of ZnO nanoparticles on aerobic wastewater biofilms from oxygen concentration profiles determined by microelectrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Jun [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Miao, Lingzhan, E-mail: mlz1988@126.com [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Wang, Chao, E-mail: hhuhjy973@126.com [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Wang, Peifang; Ao, Yanhui; Qian, Jin; Dai, Shanshan [Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resources Development on Shallow Lakes, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Temporal and spatial inhibitory effects of ZnO NPs on biofilms were investigated. • 50 mg/L nano-ZnO inhibited the microbial activities only in biofilm outer layer. • Adsorbed ZnO NPs had no adverse effects on the cell membrane integrity of biofilms. • Dissolution of ZnO NPs to toxic zinc ions was the main mechanism of toxicity. - Abstract: The presence of ZnO NPs in waste streams can negatively affect the efficiency of biological nutrient removal from wastewater. However, details of the toxic effects of ZnO NPs on microbial activities of wastewater biofilms have not yet been reported. In this study, the temporal and spatial inhibitory effects of ZnO NPs on the O{sub 2} respiration activities of aerobic wastewater biofilms were investigated using an O{sub 2} microelectrode. The resulting time–course microelectrode measurements demonstrated that ZnO NPs inhibited O{sub 2} respiration within 2 h. The spatial distributions of net specific O{sub 2} respiration were determined in biofilms with and without treatment of 5 or 50 mg/L ZnO NPs. The results showed that 50 mg/L of nano-ZnO inhibited the microbial activities only in the outer layer (∼200 μm) of the biofilms, and bacteria present in the deeper parts of the biofilms became even more active. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the ZnO NPs were adsorbed onto the biofilm, but these NPs had no adverse effects on the cell membrane integrity of the biofilms. It was found that the inhibition of O{sub 2} respiration induced by higher concentrations of ZnO NPs (50 mg/L) was mainly due to the release of zinc ions by dissolution of the ZnO NPs.

  3. Inhibitory effects of ZnO nanoparticles on aerobic wastewater biofilms from oxygen concentration profiles determined by microelectrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Temporal and spatial inhibitory effects of ZnO NPs on biofilms were investigated. • 50 mg/L nano-ZnO inhibited the microbial activities only in biofilm outer layer. • Adsorbed ZnO NPs had no adverse effects on the cell membrane integrity of biofilms. • Dissolution of ZnO NPs to toxic zinc ions was the main mechanism of toxicity. - Abstract: The presence of ZnO NPs in waste streams can negatively affect the efficiency of biological nutrient removal from wastewater. However, details of the toxic effects of ZnO NPs on microbial activities of wastewater biofilms have not yet been reported. In this study, the temporal and spatial inhibitory effects of ZnO NPs on the O2 respiration activities of aerobic wastewater biofilms were investigated using an O2 microelectrode. The resulting time–course microelectrode measurements demonstrated that ZnO NPs inhibited O2 respiration within 2 h. The spatial distributions of net specific O2 respiration were determined in biofilms with and without treatment of 5 or 50 mg/L ZnO NPs. The results showed that 50 mg/L of nano-ZnO inhibited the microbial activities only in the outer layer (∼200 μm) of the biofilms, and bacteria present in the deeper parts of the biofilms became even more active. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the ZnO NPs were adsorbed onto the biofilm, but these NPs had no adverse effects on the cell membrane integrity of the biofilms. It was found that the inhibition of O2 respiration induced by higher concentrations of ZnO NPs (50 mg/L) was mainly due to the release of zinc ions by dissolution of the ZnO NPs

  4. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program: Topical report I, selection of candidate alloys. Volume 3. Selection of surface coating/substrate systems for screening creep and structural stability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-20

    Considering the high temperature, low O/sub 2/, high C environment of operation in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Systems, the utilization of coatings is envisaged to hold potential for extending component lifetimes through the formation of stable and continuous oxide films with enhanced resistance to C diffusion. A survey of the current state of technology for high temperature coatings has been performed. The usefulness of these coatings on the Mo, Ni, and Fe base alloys is discussed. Specifically, no coating substitute was identified for TZM other than the well known W-3 (pack silicide) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ forming coatings were recommended for the Fe and Ni base structural materials. Recommendations as to coating types and processng have been made based on the predicted VHTR component size, shape, base metal and operational environment. Four tests designed to evaluate the effects of selected combinations of coatings and substrate matrices are recommended for consideration.

  5. A- and B-site doping effect on physicochemical properties of Sr2‑xBaxMMoO6 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe) double perovskites — candidate anode materials for SOFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kun; Świerczek, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we evaluate the physicochemical properties of Sr2‑xBaxMMoO6 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe) double perovskites as alternative anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells, for which the effect of substitution of strontium by barium in a full range of compositions is studied. The crystal structure, microstructure, characterization of transport properties (electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient) and oxygen content as a function of temperature, as well as chemical stability in oxidizing and reducing conditions are discussed. Fe- and Mo-containing Sr2‑xBaxFeMoO6 oxides show very high total conductivities with values of 100-1000 Sṡcm‑1, while Sr2‑xBaxMgMoO6 present good redox stability.

  6. Operational support and analysis a guide for ITIL exam candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Sansbury, John

    2014-01-01

    This user-friendly book aims to assist candidates pass the ITIL® OSA Intermediate examination. It references material from the core ITIL texts and gives practical guidance. This new edition includes the latest ITIL guidance as well as additional insights from the author's own experience of developing effective solutions. An ITIL® licensed product.

  7. Resistive and reactive changes to the impedance of intracortical microelectrodes can be mitigated with polyethylene glycol under acute in vitro and in vivo settings

    OpenAIRE

    Salah eSommakia; Janak eGaire; Rickus, Jenna L.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The reactive response of brain tissue to implantable intracortical microelectrodes is thought to negatively affect their recordable signal quality and impedance, resulting in unreliable longitudinal performance. The relationship between the progression of the reactive tissue into a glial scar and the decline in device performance is unclear. We show that exposure to a model protein solution in vitro and acute implantation result in both resistive and capacitive changes to electrode impedance,...

  8. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Giulia Regalia; Stefania Coelli; Emilia Biffi; Giancarlo Ferrigno; Alessandra Pedrocchi

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms’ performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly perfor...

  9. 3-D flexible nano-textured high-density microelectrode arrays for high-performance neuro-monitoring and neuro-stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabran, S R I; Salam, Muhammad Tariqus; Dian, Joshua; El-Hayek, Youssef; Perez Velazquez, J L; Genov, Roman; Carlen, Peter L; Salama, M M A; Mansour, Raafat R

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a new 3-D flexible microelectrode array for high performance electrographic neural signal recording and stimulation. The microelectrode architecture maximizes the number of channels on each shank and minimizes its footprint. The electrode was implemented on flexible polyimide substrate using microfabrication and thin-film processing. The electrode has a planar layout and comprises multiple shanks. Each shank is three mm in length and carries six gold pads representing the neuro-interfacing channels. The channels are used in recording important precursors with potential clinical relevance and consequent electrical stimulation to perturb the clinical condition. The polyimide structure satisfied the mechanical characteristics required for the proper electrode implantation and operation. Pad postprocessing technique was developed to improve the electrode electrical performance. The planar electrodes were used for creating 3-D "Waterloo Array" microelectrode with controlled gaps using custom designed stackers. Electrode characterization and benchmarking against commercial equivalents demonstrated the superiority of the Flex electrodes. The Flex and commercial electrodes were associated with low-power implantable responsive neuro-stimulation system. The electrodes performance in recording and stimulation application was quantified through in vitro and in vivo acute and chronic experiments on human brain slices and freely-moving rodents. The Flex electrodes exhibited remarkable drop in the electric impedance (100 times at 100 Hz), improved electrode-electrolyte interface noise (dropped by four times) and higher signal-to-noise ratio (3.3 times). PMID:24876130

  10. A new high-density (25 electrodes/mm2) penetrating microelectrode array for recording and stimulating sub-millimeter neuroanatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, H. A. C.; Sharma, R.; Mathews, K. S.; Fernandez, E.; Yoo, J.; Christensen, B.; Tresco, P.; Rieth, L.; Solzbacher, F.; Normann, R. A.; Tathireddy, P.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Among the currently available neural interface devices, there has been a need for a penetrating electrode array with a high electrode-count and high electrode-density (the number of electrodes/mm2) that can be used for electrophysiological studies of sub-millimeter neuroanatomical structures. We have developed such a penetrating microelectrode array with both a high electrode-density (25 electrodes/mm2) and high electrode-count (up to 96 electrodes) for small nervous system structures, based on the existing Utah Slanted Electrode Array (USEA). Such high electrode-density arrays are expected to provide greater access to nerve fibers than the conventionally spaced USEA especially in small diameter nerves. Approach. One concern for such high density microelectrode arrays is that they may cause a nerve crush-type injury upon implantation. We evaluated this possibility during acute (peripheral nerves of anesthetized rats (sciatic nerve) and cats (pudendal nerve). Main results. Successful intrafascicular implantation and viable nerve function was demonstrated via microstimulation, single-unit recordings and histological analysis. Measurements of the electrode impedances and quantified electrode dimensions demonstrated fabrication quality. The results of these experiments show that such high density neural interfaces can be implanted acutely into neural tissue without causing a complete nerve crush injury, while mediating intrafascicular access to fibers in small diameter peripheral nerves. Significance. This new penetrating microelectrode array has characteristics un-matched by other neural interface devices currently available for peripheral nervous system neurophysiological research.

  11. Materials for Fusion Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Matějíček

    2013-01-01

    An overview of materials foreseen for use or already used in fusion devices is given. The operating conditions, material requirements and characteristics of candidate materials in several specific application segments are briefly reviewed. These include: construction materials, electrical insulation, permeation barriers and plasma facing components. Special attention will be paid to the latter and to the issues of plasma-material interaction, materials joining and fuctionally graded interlayers.

  12. Silicon Wafer-Based Platinum Microelectrode Array Biosensor for Near Real-Time Measurement of Glutamate in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel T. Maidment

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS technologies, we have developed silicon wafer-based platinum microelectrode arrays (MEAs modified with glutamate oxidase (GluOx for electroenzymatic detection of glutamate in vivo. These MEAs were designed to have optimal spatial resolution for in vivo recordings. Selective detection of glutamate in the presence of the electroactive interferents, dopamine and ascorbic acid, was attained by deposition of polypyrrole and Nafion. The sensors responded to glutamate with a limit of detection under 1μM and a sub-1-second response time in solution. In addition to extensive in vitro characterization, the utility of these MEA glutamate biosensors was also established in vivo. In the anesthetized rat, these MEA glutamate biosensors were used for detection of cortically-evoked glutamate release in the ventral striatum. The MEA biosensors also were applied to the detection of stress-induced glutamate release in the dorsal striatum of the freely-moving rat.

  13. Reverse Pulse Voltammetry at Spherical and Disc Microelectrodes: Characterization of Homogeneous Chemical Equilibria and Their Impact on the Species Diffusivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of the electrochemical technique Reverse Pulse Voltammetry (RPV) for the characterization of chemical equilibria in solution is theoretically investigated. For this, the RPV response of the square scheme is studied at spherical and disc electrodes of any size assuming that the chemical reactions are at equilibrium. When the effective diffusion coefficients of the oxidized and reduced species are the same, analytical solutions are reported for both electrode geometries. Otherwise, a rigorous analytical solution is derived for spherical electrodes whereas the case of microdiscs is addressed by numerical simulations. The theory for the square scheme enables the study of the RPV response in very different situations, including the cases where the electrochemical and/or chemical transformations alter significantly the species diffusivity such as in electron transfer processes in room temperature ionic liquids or in the association of the electroactive species with (bio) macromolecules and nanoparticles. It is found that, when medium-size (disc or spherical) microelectrodes are employed, the RPV method enables the simultaneous determination of the effective diffusion coefficients of the oxidized and reduced species as well as the apparent formal potential. These magnitudes make it possible a sound physicochemical characterization of the system

  14. Dual microelectrodes for distance control and detection of nitric oxide from endothelial cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Sonnur; Etienne, Mathieu; Oni, Joshua; Blöchl, Andrea; Reiter, Sabine; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Dual Pt disk microelectrodes consisting of a 10-microm distance sensor and a 50-microm nitric oxide sensor were prepared. The 50-microm electrode was modified with Ni(4-N-tetramethyl)pyridyl porphyrin enclosed in the polymer network of a negatively charged electrodeposition paint. This paint prevented the dissolution of the otherwise soluble porphyrin in the aqueous test medium due to charge interactions. It also denied negatively charged ions in the analyte solution access to the electrode surface by electrostatic repulsion, thereby preventing interference from anions such as nitrite, nitrate, and ascorbate. With the aid of a scanning electrochemical microscope, it was possible to use the distance sensor by recording the negative feedback effect on the reduction of molecular oxygen to "guide" the nitric oxide sensor to various known distances from a layer of adherently growing human umbilical vein endothelial cells for the detection of nitric oxide released from the cells upon stimulation with bradykinin. The use of the distance sensor made it possible to preserve the integrity of the adherently growing cells concomitantly with the modified electrode by preventing the deterioration of the modifying layer during the distance adjustment step. PMID:15516132

  15. On-line observation of cell growth in a three-dimensional matrix on surface-modified microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Kyriakides, Themis R; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2009-06-01

    Despite many successful applications of microelectrode arrays (MEAs), typical two-dimensional in-vitro cultures do not project the full scale of the cell growth environment in the three-dimensional (3D) in-vivo setting. This study aims to on-line monitor in-vitro cell growth in a 3D matrix on the surface-modified MEAs with a dynamic perfusion culture system. A 3D matrix consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel supplemented with poly-D-lysine was subsequently synthesized in situ on the self-assembled monolayer modified MEAs. FTIR spectrum analysis revealed a peak at 2100 cm(-1) due to the degradation of the structure of the 3D matrix. After 2 wks, microscopic examination revealed that the non-degraded area was around 1500 microm(2) and provided enough space for cell growth. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the degraded 3D matrix was non-cytotoxic allowing the growth of NIH3T3 fibroblasts and cortical neurons in vitro. Time-course changes of total impedance including resistance and reactance were recorded for 8 days to evaluate the cell growth in the 3D matrix on the MEA. A consistent trend reflecting changes of reactance and total impedance was observed. These in-vitro assays demonstrate that our 3D matrix can construct a biomimetic system for cell growth and analysis of cell surface interactions. PMID:19344948

  16. High-throughput cardiac safety evaluation and multi-parameter arrhythmia profiling of cardiomyocytes using microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Kristin H; Lewis, Gregory F; Gay, Elaine A; Sellgren, Katelyn L; Grego, Sonia

    2015-10-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) recording extracellular field potentials of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) provide a rich data set for functional assessment of drug response. The aim of this work is the development of a method for a systematic analysis of arrhythmia using MEAs, with emphasis on the development of six parameters accounting for different types of cardiomyocyte signal irregularities. We describe a software approach to carry out such analysis automatically including generation of a heat map that enables quick visualization of arrhythmic liability of compounds. We also implemented signal processing techniques for reliable extraction of the repolarization peak for field potential duration (FPD) measurement even from recordings with low signal to noise ratios. We measured hiPS-CM's on a 48 well MEA system with 5minute recordings at multiple time points (0.5, 1, 2 and 4h) after drug exposure. We evaluated concentration responses for seven compounds with a combination of hERG, QT and clinical proarrhythmia properties: Verapamil, Ranolazine, Flecainide, Amiodarone, Ouabain, Cisapride, and Terfenadine. The predictive utility of MEA parameters as surrogates of these clinical effects were examined. The beat rate and FPD results exhibited good correlations with previous MEA studies in stem cell derived cardiomyocytes and clinical data. The six-parameter arrhythmia assessment exhibited excellent predictive agreement with the known arrhythmogenic potential of the tested compounds, and holds promise as a new method to predict arrhythmic liability. PMID:26232523

  17. pHEMA Encapsulated PEDOT-PSS-CNT Microsphere Microelectrodes for Recording Single Unit Activity in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, Elisa; Maggiolini, Emma; Ceseracciu, Luca; Ciarpella, Francesca; Zucchini, Elena; De Faveri, Sara; Fadiga, Luciano; Ricci, Davide

    2016-01-01

    The long-term reliability of neural interfaces and stability of high-quality recordings are still unsolved issues in neuroscience research. High surface area PEDOT-PSS-CNT composites are able to greatly improve the performance of recording and stimulation for traditional intracortical metal microelectrodes by decreasing their impedance and increasing their charge transfer capability. This enhancement significantly reduces the size of the implantable device though preserving excellent electrical performances. On the other hand, the presence of nanomaterials often rises concerns regarding possible health hazards, especially when considering a clinical application of the devices. For this reason, we decided to explore the problem from a new perspective by designing and testing an innovative device based on nanostructured microspheres grown on a thin tether, integrating PEDOT-PSS-CNT nanocomposites with a soft synthetic permanent biocompatible hydrogel. The pHEMA hydrogel preserves the electrochemical performance and high quality recording ability of PEDOT-PSS-CNT coated devices, reduces the mechanical mismatch between soft brain tissue and stiff devices and also avoids direct contact between the neural tissue and the nanocomposite, by acting as a biocompatible protective barrier against potential nanomaterial detachment. Moreover, the spherical shape of the electrode together with the surface area increase provided by the nanocomposite deposited on it, maximize the electrical contact and may improve recording stability over time. These results have a good potential to contribute to fulfill the grand challenge of obtaining stable neural interfaces for long-term applications. PMID:27147944

  18. 75 FR 1831 - Seeks Qualified Candidates for the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... least 10 years of broad experience in nuclear engineering coupled with operational exposure to issues... multinational design certifications, material and structural engineering, nuclear analysis and reactor core... engineering, or radiation protection. Candidates with pertinent graduate level experience will be...

  19. An Efficient Approach for Candidate Set Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Nawar Malhis; Arden Ruttan; Hazem H. Refai

    2005-01-01

    When Apriori was first introduced as an algorithm for discovering association rules in a database of market basket data, the problem of generating the candidate set of the large set was a bottleneck in Apriori's performance, both in space and computational requirements. At first, many unsuccessful attempts were made to improve the generation of a candidate set. Later, other algorithms that out performed Apriori were developed that generate association rules without using a candidate set. They...

  20. Cardiac evaluation of liver transplant candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Mandell, Mercedes Susan; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Zimmerman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Physicians previously thought that heart disease was rare in patients with end stage liver disease. However, recent evidence shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy is increased in transplant candidates compared to most other surgical candidates. Investigators estimate that up to 26% of all liver transplant candidates have at least one critical coronary artery stenosis and that at least half of these patients will die perioperatively of cardiac complications. Ca...

  1. Virus-like particles as nanovaccine candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, G.; Aguilar, J. C.; Dueñas, S.; Hermida, L.; Iglesias, E.; Penton, E.; Lobaina, Y.; Lopez, M.; Mussachio, A.; Falcon, V.; Alvarez, L.; Martinez, G.; Gil, L.; Valdes, I.; Izquierdo, A.; Lazo, L.; Marcos, E.; Guzman, G.; Muzio, V.; Herrera, L.

    2013-03-01

    The existing vaccines are mainly limited to the microorganisms we are able to culture and produce and/or to those whose killing is mediated by humoral response (antibody mediated). It has been more difficult to develop vaccines capable of inducing a functional cellular response needed to prevent or cure chronic diseases. New strategies should be taken into account in the improvement of cell-based immune responses in order to prevent and control the infections and eventually clear the virus. Preclinical and clinical results with vaccine candidates developed as a vaccine platform based on virus-like particles (VLPs) evidenced their ability to stimulate mucosal as well as systemic immunity. Particles based on envelope, membrane or nucleocapsid microbial proteins induce a strong immune response after nasal or parenteral administration in mice, non-human primates and humans. In addition, the immune response obtained was modulated in a Th1 sense. The VLPs were also able to immunoenhance the humoral and cellular immune responses against several viral pathogens. Studies in animals and humans with nasal and systemic formulations evidenced that it is possible to induce functional immune response against HBV, HCV, HIV and dengue virus. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October - 2 November 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  2. Special Education Teacher Candidate Assessment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Zach; McHatton, Patricia Alvarez; Shealey, Monika Williams

    2014-01-01

    Teacher preparation has been under intense scrutiny in recent years. In order for preparation of special education teacher candidates to remain viable, candidate assessment practices must apply practices identified in the extant literature base, while special education teacher education researchers must extend this base with rigorous efforts to…

  3. Do People 'Like' Candidates on Facebook?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    The online popularity of a few exceptional candidates has led many to suggest that social media have given politicians powerful ways of communicating directly with voters. In this paper, we examine whether this is happening on a significant scale and show, based on analysis of 224 candidates invo...

  4. Assessment of potential solder candidates for high temperature applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    package with different solders of different melting temperatures. High Pb containing alloys where the lead levels can be above 85% by weight, is one of the solders currently being used in this technology. Responding to market pressure i.e. need for green electronic products there is now an increasing...... pressure to eliminate lead containing materials despite the fact that materials for high Pb containing alloys are currently not affected by any legislations. A tentative assessment was carried out to determine the potential solder candidates for high temperature applications based on the solidification...

  5. Frictional Behavior of Fe-based Cladding Candidates for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the recent nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi reactors, there is a growing consensus on the development of new fuel systems (i.e., accident-tolerant fuel, ATF) that have high safety margins under design-basis accident (DBA) and beyond design-basis accident (BDBA). A common objective of various developing candidates is to archive the outstanding corrosion-resistance under severe accidents such as DBA and DBDA conditions for decreasing hydrogen production and increasing coping time to respond to severe accidents. ATF could be defined as new fuel/cladding system with enhanced accident tolerant to loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period under severe accidents while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations. This means that, in normal operating conditions, new fuel systems should be applicable to current operating PWRs for suppressing various degradation mechanisms of current fuel assembly without excessive design changes. When considering that one of the major degradation mechanisms of PWR fuel assemblies is a grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), it is necessary to examine the tribological behavior of various ATF candidates at initial development stage. In this study, friction and reciprocating wear behavior of two kinds of Fe-based ATF candidates were examined with a reciprocating wear tests at room temperature (RT) air and water. The objective is to examine the compatibilities of these Fe-based alloys against current Zr-based alloy properties, which is used as major structural materials of PWR fuel assemblies. The reciprocating wear behaviors of Fe-based accident-tolerant fuel cladding candidates against current Zr-based alloy has been studied using a reciprocating sliding wear tester in room temperature air and water. Frictional behavior and wear depth were used for evaluating the applicability and compatibilities of Fe-based candidates without significant design changes of PWR fuel assemblies

  6. Frictional Behavior of Fe-based Cladding Candidates for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Thak Sang [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge (United States)

    2014-10-15

    After the recent nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi reactors, there is a growing consensus on the development of new fuel systems (i.e., accident-tolerant fuel, ATF) that have high safety margins under design-basis accident (DBA) and beyond design-basis accident (BDBA). A common objective of various developing candidates is to archive the outstanding corrosion-resistance under severe accidents such as DBA and DBDA conditions for decreasing hydrogen production and increasing coping time to respond to severe accidents. ATF could be defined as new fuel/cladding system with enhanced accident tolerant to loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period under severe accidents while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations. This means that, in normal operating conditions, new fuel systems should be applicable to current operating PWRs for suppressing various degradation mechanisms of current fuel assembly without excessive design changes. When considering that one of the major degradation mechanisms of PWR fuel assemblies is a grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), it is necessary to examine the tribological behavior of various ATF candidates at initial development stage. In this study, friction and reciprocating wear behavior of two kinds of Fe-based ATF candidates were examined with a reciprocating wear tests at room temperature (RT) air and water. The objective is to examine the compatibilities of these Fe-based alloys against current Zr-based alloy properties, which is used as major structural materials of PWR fuel assemblies. The reciprocating wear behaviors of Fe-based accident-tolerant fuel cladding candidates against current Zr-based alloy has been studied using a reciprocating sliding wear tester in room temperature air and water. Frictional behavior and wear depth were used for evaluating the applicability and compatibilities of Fe-based candidates without significant design changes of PWR fuel assemblies

  7. Facilitated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella loihica PV-4 by antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles as active microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Liu, Huan; Wang, Jinrong; Ren, Guangyuan; Xie, Beizhen; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and microbial fuel/electrolysis cells. However, the low EET efficiency remains one of the major bottlenecks for its practical application. We report firstly that the microbial current generated by Shewanella loihica PV-4 (S. loihica PV-4) could be greatly improved that is up to ca. 115 fold, by adding antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles in the electrochemical reactor. The results demonstrate that the biocompatible, electrically conductive ATO nanoparticles acted as active microelectrodes could facilitate the formation of a cells/ATO composite biofilm and the reduction of the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) that are beneficial for the electron transfer from cells to electrode. Meanwhile, a synergistic effect between the participation of OM c-Cyts and the accelerated EET mediated by cell-secreted flavins may play an important role for the enhanced current generation in the presence of ATO nanoparticles. Moreover, it is worth noting that the TCA cycle in S. loihica PV-4 cells is activated by adding ATO nanoparticles, even if the potential is poised at +0.2 V, thereby also improving the EET process. The results presented here may provide a simple and effective strategy to boost the EET of S. loihica PV-4 cells, which is conducive to providing potential applications in bioelectrochemical systems.Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and

  8. Comparison of electrically evoked cortical potential thresholds generated with subretinal or suprachoroidal placement of a microelectrode array in the rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yasuyuki; Franco, Luisa M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Naber, John F.; Ofer Ziv, R.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Kaplan, Henry J.; Enzmann, Volker

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the study was to directly compare the threshold electrical charge density of the retina (retinal threshold) in rabbits for the generation of electrical evoked potentials (EEP) by delivering electrical stimulation with a custom-made microelectrode array (MEA) implanted into either the subretinal or suprachoroidal space. Nine eyes of seven Dutch-belted rabbits were studied. The electroretinogram (ERG), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and EEP were recorded. Electrodes for the VEP and EEP were placed on the dura mater overlying the visual cortex. The EEP was recorded following electrical stimulation of the MEA placed either subretinally beneath the visual streak of the retina or in the suprachoroidal space in the rabbit eye. An ab externo approach was used for placement of the MEA. Liquid perfluorodecaline (PFCL; 0.4 ml) was placed within the vitreous cavity to flatten the neurosensory retina on the MEA after subretinal implantation. The retinal threshold for generation of an EEP was determined for each MEA placement by three consecutive measurements consisting of 100 computer-averaged recordings. Animals were sacrificed at the conclusion of the experiment and the eyes were enucleated for histological examination. The retinal threshold to generate an EEP was 9 ± 7 nC (0.023 ± 0.016 mC cm-2) within the subretinal space and 150 ± 122 nC (0.375 ± 0.306 mC cm-2) within the suprachoroidal space. Histology showed disruption of the outer retina with subretinal but not suprachoroidal placement. The retinal threshold to elicit an EEP is significantly lower with subretinal placement of the MEA compared to suprachoroidal placement (P Biomed. Eng. 39 424-6). Supported in part by The Charles D Kelman, MD Postdoctoral Scholar Award 2003 (YY); Boston VA Hospital (V523P-7278); Research to Prevent Blindness, New York City, NY and Kentucky Research Challenge Trust Fund (HJK).

  9. QSpike tools: a generic framework for parallel batch preprocessing of extracellular neuronal signals recorded by substrate microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Mufti; Pulizzi, Rocco; Vasilaki, Eleni; Giugliano, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) have emerged as a mature technique to investigate brain (dys)functions in vivo and in in vitro animal models. Often referred to as "smart" Petri dishes, MEAs have demonstrated a great potential particularly for medium-throughput studies in vitro, both in academic and pharmaceutical industrial contexts. Enabling rapid comparison of ionic/pharmacological/genetic manipulations with control conditions, MEAs are employed to screen compounds by monitoring non-invasively the spontaneous and evoked neuronal electrical activity in longitudinal studies, with relatively inexpensive equipment. However, in order to acquire sufficient statistical significance, recordings last up to tens of minutes and generate large amount of raw data (e.g., 60 channels/MEA, 16 bits A/D conversion, 20 kHz sampling rate: approximately 8 GB/MEA,h uncompressed). Thus, when the experimental conditions to be tested are numerous, the availability of fast, standardized, and automated signal preprocessing becomes pivotal for any subsequent analysis and data archiving. To this aim, we developed an in-house cloud-computing system, named QSpike Tools, where CPU-intensive operations, required for preprocessing of each recorded channel (e.g., filtering, multi-unit activity detection, spike-sorting, etc.), are decomposed and batch-queued to a multi-core architecture or to a computers cluster. With the commercial availability of new and inexpensive high-density MEAs, we believe that disseminating QSpike Tools might facilitate its wide adoption and customization, and inspire the creation of community-supported cloud-computing facilities for MEAs users. PMID:24678297

  10. QSpike Tools: a Generic Framework for Parallel Batch Preprocessing of Extracellular Neuronal Signals Recorded by Substrate Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufti eMahmud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs have emerged as a mature technique to investigate brain (dysfunctions in vivo and in in vitro animal models. Often referred to as smart Petri dishes, MEAs has demonstrated a great potential particularly for medium-throughput studies in vitro, both in academic and pharmaceutical industrial contexts. Enabling rapid comparison of ionic/pharmacological/genetic manipulations with control conditions, MEAs are often employed to screen compounds by monitoring non-invasively the spontaneous and evoked neuronal electrical activity in longitudinal studies, with relatively inexpensive equipment. However, in order to acquire sufficient statistical significance, recordings last up to tens of minutes and generate large amount of raw data (e.g., 60 channels/MEA, 16 bits A/D conversion, 20kHz sampling rate: ~8GB/MEA,h uncompressed. Thus, when the experimental conditions to be tested are numerous, the availability of fast, standardized, and automated signal preprocessing becomes pivotal for any subsequent analysis and data archiving. To this aim, we developed an in-house cloud-computing system, named QSpike Tools, where CPU-intensive operations, required for preprocessing of each recorded channel (e.g., filtering, multi-unit activity detection, spike-sorting, etc., are decomposed and batch-queued to a multi-core architecture or to computer cluster. With the commercial availability of new and inexpensive high-density MEAs, we believe that disseminating QSpike Tools might facilitate its wide adoption and customization, and possibly inspire the creation of community-supported cloud-computing facilities for MEAs users.

  11. Micro-electrode array recordings reveal reductions in both excitation and inhibition in cultured cortical neuron networks lacking Shank3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C; Chen, Q; Zhou, T; Bozic, D; Fu, Z; Pan, J Q; Feng, G

    2016-02-01

    Numerous risk genes have recently been implicated in susceptibility to autism and schizophrenia. Translating such genetic findings into disease-relevant neurobiological mechanisms is challenging due to the lack of throughput assays that can be used to assess their functions on an appropriate scale. To address this issue, we explored the feasibility of using a micro-electrode array (MEA) as a potentially scalable assay to identify the electrical network phenotypes associated with risk genes. We first characterized local and global network firing in cortical neurons with MEAs, and then developed methods to analyze the alternation between the network active period (NAP) and the network inactive period (NIP), each of which lasts tens of seconds. We then evaluated the electric phenotypes of neurons derived from Shank3 knockout (KO) mice. Cortical neurons cultured on MEAs displayed a rich repertoire of spontaneous firing, and Shank3 deletion led to reduced firing activity. Enhancing excitation with CX546 rescued the deficit in the spike rate in the Shank3 KO network. In addition, the Shank3 KO network produced a shorter NIP, and this altered network firing pattern was normalized by clonazepam, a positive modulator of the GABAA receptor. MEA recordings revealed electric phenotypes that displayed altered excitation and inhibition in the network lacking Shank3. Thus, our study highlights MEAs as an experimental framework for measuring multiple robust neurobiological end points in dynamic networks and as an assay system that could be used to identify electric phenotypes in cultured neuronal networks and to analyze additional risk genes identified in psychiatric genetics. PMID:26598066

  12. A novel pattern transfer technique for mounting glassy carbon microelectrodes on polymeric flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomero, Maria; van Niekerk, Pieter; Nguyen, Vivian; Gong, Nick; Hirabayashi, Mieko; Cinopri, Alessio; Logan, Kyle; Moghadasi, Ali; Varma, Priya; Kassegne, Sam

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel technology for transferring glassy carbon microstructures, originally fabricated on a silicon wafer through a high-temperature process, to a polymeric flexible substrate such as polyimide. This new transfer technique addresses a major barrier in Carbon-MEMS technology whose widespread use so has been hampered by the high-temperature pyrolysis process (⩾900 °C), which limits selection of substrates. In the new approach presented, patterning and pyrolysis of polymer precursor on silicon substrate is carried out first, followed by coating with a polymer layer that forms a hydrogen bond with glassy carbon and then releasing the ensuing glassy carbon structure; hence, transferring it to a flexible substrate. This enables the fabrication of a unique set of glassy carbon microstructures critical in applications that demand substrates that conform to the shape of the stimulated/actuated or sensed surface. Our findings based on Fourier transform infared spectroscopy on the complete electrode set demonstrate—for the first time—that carbonyl groups on polyimide substrate form a strong hydrogen bond with hydroxyl groups on glassy carbon resulting in carboxylic acid dimers (peaks at 2660 and 2585 cm-1). This strong bond is further confirmed by a tensile test that demonstrated an almost perfect bond between these materials that behave as an ideal composite material. Further, mechanical characterization shows that ultimate strain for such a structure is as high as 15% with yield stress of ~20 MPa. We propose that this novel technology not only offers a compelling case for the widespread use of carbon-MEMS, but also helps move the field in new and exciting directions.

  13. A novel pattern transfer technique for mounting glassy carbon microelectrodes on polymeric flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel technology for transferring glassy carbon microstructures, originally fabricated on a silicon wafer through a high-temperature process, to a polymeric flexible substrate such as polyimide. This new transfer technique addresses a major barrier in Carbon-MEMS technology whose widespread use so has been hampered by the high-temperature pyrolysis process (⩾900 °C), which limits selection of substrates. In the new approach presented, patterning and pyrolysis of polymer precursor on silicon substrate is carried out first, followed by coating with a polymer layer that forms a hydrogen bond with glassy carbon and then releasing the ensuing glassy carbon structure; hence, transferring it to a flexible substrate. This enables the fabrication of a unique set of glassy carbon microstructures critical in applications that demand substrates that conform to the shape of the stimulated/actuated or sensed surface. Our findings based on Fourier transform infared spectroscopy on the complete electrode set demonstrate—for the first time—that carbonyl groups on polyimide substrate form a strong hydrogen bond with hydroxyl groups on glassy carbon resulting in carboxylic acid dimers (peaks at 2660 and 2585 cm−1). This strong bond is further confirmed by a tensile test that demonstrated an almost perfect bond between these materials that behave as an ideal composite material. Further, mechanical characterization shows that ultimate strain for such a structure is as high as 15% with yield stress of ∼20 MPa. We propose that this novel technology not only offers a compelling case for the widespread use of carbon-MEMS, but also helps move the field in new and exciting directions. (paper)

  14. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  15. Development of Simple Bacterial Biosensor for Phenol Detection in Water at Medium Concentration using Glass Microelectrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyawan Purnomo Sakti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water is one of the most fundamental natural resources in earth. The availability of clean water becomes a global interest. Many human activities result in water pollution. One from many pollution substances in water is phenol. Phenol is a very common residual compound in industrial activity. Extensive use of phenol in industry degrades water quality. Regulation has been set in many countries to prevent further damage to the water resource caused by phenol and limiting phenol concentration in water before released into the environment. Therefor it is importance to develop a sensor which can detect phenol concentration in water to be used as a wastewater quality control system. This paper presents a development of bacterial biosensor using Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens as a biological sensitive material. The sensor was made from glass micro electrode using Ag/AgCl electrode as reference electrode, silver electrode and cellulose ester. The Pseudomonas putida was entrapped inside the nutrient solution and separated by cellulose ester membrane from water containing phenol. It was found that the Pseudomonas putida in used must be growth in 10 hours to reach its optimum growth condition. Linear relationship between biosensor output voltages to phenol concentration was measured for phenol concentration below 200 ppm. The sensitivity of the developed biosensor was 72mV/ppm for Pseudomonas putida and 68.8 mV/ppm for Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  16. Effect of pH and dye concentration on the n-octanol/water distribution ratio of phenothiazine dyes: a microelectrode voltammetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microelectrode voltammetry was employed to gain information on the n-octanol/water partition ratio of phenothiazine dyes. The data were obtained as a function of pH and dye concentration in aqueous solutions. All the dyes present hydrophobic behavior at pH above 7.0. The analysis of the results shows not only the formation of neutral species in alkaline solution but the association of cationic form of these dyes with OH− play important roles in the partitioning of molecules from aqueous solution to n-octanol

  17. A comparison of electrochemically pre-treated and spark-platinized carbon fiber microelectrode. Measurement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in human urine and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosova, Z; Riman, D; Halouzka, V; Vostalova, J; Simanek, V; Hrbac, J; Jirovsky, D

    2016-09-01

    A novel method of carbon fiber microelectrode activation using spark discharge was demonstrated and compared to conventional electrochemical pretreatment by potential cycling. The spark discharge was performed at 800 V between the microelectrode connected to positive pole of the power supply and platinum counter electrode. Spark discharge led both to trimming of the fiber tip into conical shape and to the modification of carbon fiber microelectrode with platinum, as proven by scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. After the characterization of electrochemical properties using ferricyanide voltammetry, the activated electrodes were used for electrochemical analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker. Subnanomolar detection limits (0.55 nmol L(-1)) in high-performance liquid chromatography were achieved for spark platinized electrodes incorporated into the flow detection cell. PMID:27543016

  18. 微电极引导立体定向手术治疗帕金森病的研究%Management of Parkinson's Diseases with Microelectrode-guided Stereotactic Pallidotomy and Thalamotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔高宇; 冯华; 王宪荣; 吴国材; 陈志

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the methods and outcome of 71 patients with Parkinson's disease treated with microelectrode-guided stereotactic pallidotomy and thalamotomy. Method Pallidal and thalamal target sites are chosen by supervision of microelectrode recording technique in 71 patients with Parkinson's disease. The UPDRS motor score was used to evaluate the outcomes 12 weeks before and after operation Result After 12 months follow-up, tremor disappeared completely or nearly completely in 12 patients who underwent unilateral and l bilateral ventrolateral thalamotomy. Dramatic improvement of tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia were observed in 57 patients underwent posteroventral pallidotomy,including 6 underwent bilateral posteroventral pallidotomy. Intracerebral hemorrhage was observed in l patient. Conclusion Microelectrode-guided stereotactic pallidotomy and thalamotomy are effective in treatmenting Parkinson's disease, but with serious complications

  19. Cattle Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlec,Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to make an overview of important candidate genes affecting milk yield and milk quality parameters, with an emphasis on genes associated with the quantity and quality of milk proteins and milk fat.

  20. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P;

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these...... genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these...... genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why...

  1. 76 FR 4896 - Call for Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... accepted accounting principles for federal government entities. Generally, non-federal Board members are... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Call for Candidates AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board. ACTION:...

  2. 76 FR 36130 - Call for Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... establish generally accepted accounting principles for federal government entities. Generally, non- federal... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Call for Candidates AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board. ACTION: Request...

  3. Vaccine candidates for malaria: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Eizo; Morita, Masayuki; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Although it is more than a decade since the parasite genome information was obtained, standardized novel genome-wide selection/prioritization strategies for candidacy of malaria vaccine antigens are still sought. In the quest to systematically identify candidates, it is impossible to overemphasize the usefulness of wheat germ cell-free technology in expressing quality proteins for the post-genome vaccine candidate discovery. PMID:26559316

  4. Cardiac evaluation of liver transplant candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes Susan Mandell; JoAnn Lindenfeld; Mei-Yung Tsou; Michael Zimmerman

    2008-01-01

    Physicians previously thought that heart disease was rare in patients with end stage liver disease. However, recent evidence shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy is increased in transplant candidates compared to most other surgical candidates. Investigators estimate that up to 26% of all liver transplant candidates have at least one critical coronary artery stenosis and that at least half of these patients will die perioperatively of cardiac complications. Cardiomyopathy also occurs in greater frequency. While all patients with advanced cardiac disease have defects in cardiac performance, a larger than expected number of patients have classical findings of dilated, restrictive and hypertropic cardiomyopathy. This may explain why up to 56% of patients suffer from hypoxemia due to pulmonary edema following transplant surgery. There is considerable controversy on how to screen transplant candidates for the presence of heart disease. Questions focus upon, which patients should be screened and what tests should be used. This review examines screening strategies for transplant candidates and details the prognostic value of common tests used to identify ischemic heart disease. We also review the physiological consequences of cardiomyopathy in transplant candidates and explore the specific syndrome of "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy".

  5. Multisite electrophysiological recordings by self-assembled loose-patch-like junctions between cultured hippocampal neurons and mushroom-shaped microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmoel, Nava; Rabieh, Noha; Ojovan, Silviya M; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Spira, Micha E

    2016-01-01

    Substrate integrated planar microelectrode arrays is the "gold standard" method for millisecond-resolution, long-term, large-scale, cell-noninvasive electrophysiological recordings from mammalian neuronal networks. Nevertheless, these devices suffer from drawbacks that are solved by spike-detecting, spike-sorting and signal-averaging techniques which rely on estimated parameters that require user supervision to correct errors, merge clusters and remove outliers. Here we show that primary rat hippocampal neurons grown on micrometer sized gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμE) functionalized simply by poly-ethylene-imine/laminin undergo self-assembly processes to form loose patch-like hybrid structures. More than 90% of the hybrids formed in this way record monophasic positive action potentials (APs). Of these, 34.5% record APs with amplitudes above 300 μV and up to 5,085 μV. This self-assembled neuron-gMμE configuration improves the recording quality as compared to planar MEA. This study characterizes and analyzes the electrophysiological signaling repertoire generated by the neurons-gMμE configuration, and discusses prospects to further improve the technology. PMID:27256971

  6. A silicon based implantable microelectrode array for electrophysiological and dopamine recording from cortex to striatum in the non-human primate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Song, Yilin; Wang, Mixia; Zhang, Zhiming; Fan, Xinyi; Song, Xianteng; Zhuang, Ping; Yue, Feng; Chan, Piu; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-11-15

    Dual-mode, multielectrode recordings have become routine in rodent neuroscience research and have recently been adapted to the non-human primate. However, robust and reliable application of acute, multielectrode recording methods in monkeys especially for deep brain nucleus research remains a challenge. In this paper, We described a low cost silicon based 16-site implantable microelectrode array (MEA) chip fabricated by standard lithography technology for in vivo test. The array was 25mm long and designed to use in non-human primate models, for electrophysiological and electrochemical recording. We presented a detailed protocol for array fabrication, then showed that the device can record Spikes, LFPs and dopamine (DA) variation continuously from cortex to striatum in an esthetized monkey. Though our experiment, high-quality electrophysiological signals were obtained from the animal. Across any given microelectrode, spike amplitudes ranged from 70 to 300μV peak to peak, with a mean signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. Calibration results showed the MEA probe had high sensitivity and good selectivity for DA. The DA concentration changed from 42.8 to 481.6μM when the MEA probe inserted from cortex into deep brain nucleus of striatum, which reflected the inhomogeneous distribution of DA in brains. Compared with existing methods allowing single mode (electrophysiology or electrochemistry) recording. This system is designed explicitly for dual-mode recording to meet the challenges of recording in non-human primates. PMID:27155116

  7. Fabrication of a 3D micro/nano dual-scale carbon array and its demonstration as the microelectrodes for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An easily accessible method is proposed for the fabrication of a 3D micro/nano dual-scale carbon array with a large surface area. The process mainly consists of three critical steps. Firstly, a hemispherical photoresist micro-array was obtained by the cost-effective nanoimprint lithography process. Then the micro-array was transformed into hierarchical structures with longitudinal nanowires on the microstructure surface by oxygen plasma etching. Finally, the micro/nano dual-scale carbon array was fabricated by carbonizing these hierarchical photoresist structures. It has also been demonstrated that the micro/nano dual-scale carbon array can be used as the microelectrodes for supercapacitors by the electrodeposition of a manganese dioxide (MnO2) film onto the hierarchical carbon structures with greatly enhanced electrochemical performance. The specific gravimetric capacitance of the deposited micro/nano dual-scale microelectrodes is estimated to be 337 F g−1 at the scan rate of 5 mV s−1. This proposed approach of fabricating a micro/nano dual-scale carbon array provides a facile way in large-scale microstructures’ manufacturing for a wide variety of applications, including sensors and on-chip energy storage devices. (paper)

  8. Non-invasive microelectrode cadmium flux measurements reveal the spatial characteristics and real-time kinetics of cadmium transport in hyperaccumulator and nonhyperaccumulator ecotypes of Sedum alfredii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Wang, Ruigang; Liu, Zhongqi; Ding, Yongzhen; Li, Tingqiang

    2013-02-15

    This study aims to determine the spatial characteristics and real-time kinetics of cadmium transport in hyperaccumulator (HE) and non hyperaccumulator (NHE) ecotypes of Sedum alfredii using a non-invasive Cd-selective microelectrode. Compared with the NHE S. alfredii, the HE S. alfredii showed a higher Cd influx in the root apical region and root hair cells, as well as a significantly higher Cd efflux in the leaf petiole after root pre-treatment with cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)). Thus, HE S. alfredii has a higher capability for the translocation of absorbed Cd to the shoot. Moreover, the mesophyll tissues, isolated mesophyll protoplasts, and intact vacuoles from HE S. alfredii exhibited an instantaneous influx of Cd in response to CdCl(2) treatment with mean rates that are markedly higher than those from NHE S. alfredii. Therefore, the hyper-accumulating trait of HE S. alfredii is characterized by the rapid Cd uptake in specific root regions, including the apical region and root hair cells, as well as by the rapid root-to-shoot translocation and the highly efficient Cd-permeable transport system in the plasma membrane and mesophyll cell tonoplast. We suggest that the non-invasive Cd-selective microelectrode is an excellent method with a high degree of spatial resolution for the study of Cd transport at the tissue, cellular, and sub-cellular levels in plants. PMID:23261265

  9. Label-free immunosensor based on one-step electrodeposition of chitosan-gold nanoparticles biocompatible film on Au microelectrode for determination of aflatoxin B1 in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haihua; Sun, Jizhou; Zhang, Yuan; Bian, Chao; Xia, Shanhong; Zhen, Tong

    2016-06-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) embedded in chitosan (CHI) film, well-dispersed and smaller in size (about 10 nm), were fabricated by one-step electrodeposion on Au microelectrode in solution containing chitosan and chloride trihydrate. The nano-structure CHI-AuNPs composite film offers abundant amine groups, good conductivity, excellent biocompatibility and stability for antibody immobilization. The combination of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) with immobilized antibody introduces a barrier to electron transfer, resulting in current decreasement. The morphologies and characterizations of modified microelectrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The proposed non-enzyme and label-free immunosensor exhibited high sensitive amperometric response to AFB1 concentration in two linear ranges of 0.1 to 1 ng mL(-1) and 1 to 30 ng mL(-1), with the detection limit of 0.06 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). The immunoassay was also applied for analysis of maize samples spiked with AFB1. Considering the sample extraction procedure, the linear range and limit of detection were assessed to be 1.6-16 ng mL(-1) and 0.19 ng mL(-1) respectively. The simple method showed good fabrication controllability and reproducibility for immunosensor design. PMID:26851579

  10. THE EVALUATION OF THE MOTIVATIONS OF TEACHER CANDIDATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal ÇELİKTÜRK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim in this study is to define the reading profiles of teacher candidates in terms of text/reading types and reading purposes. The study is designed as a screening type, qualitative research. 65 teacher candidates from Mehmet Akif Ersoy University are selected with random sampling to take place in the study. The data is collected by the interview method, which is a qualitative research method. An interview form named “Motivation to Read Profile”, that is adapted by researchers, is used as the tool for data collection. Data is analyzed by content analyzing. At the end of the study it’s determined that, 80% of the teacher candidates have high motivations to read; and they usually read to acquire information, get the help of their teachers ad friends to choose books, use internet a lot for finding reading materials, and they don’t usually carry books with themselves, yet they read at home and library. Also, the results show that the readings at home are usually news/newspapers on the internet, and the readings at library are more generally for research and homework; because of this, readings at library are more focused on books and magazines.

  11. Examining My Assessment Literacy Instruction Practices with Teacher Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Rice

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this self-study, the author examines her teacher education practices in preparing teacher candidates to assess the literacy of English learners (ELs. According to Lee (2007, disciplinary literary is essential to supporting students in becoming active in democratic pursuits. Conceptualizing literacy in this broader way for teacher candidates and then promoting the exclusive use of tools like fluency exercises and comprehension inventories for their classroom practice seems like a mixed message. The author identified three concepts from the course materials that she determined were important for teacher candidates to consider in assessing literacy development in ELs. These were (a notions of ELs preexisting literacy in their native languages, in particularly in content area subject matter for curriculum-making, (b fundamental understandings about second language acquisition, and (c knowledge of measurement practices as an avenue for advocacy. These three ideas framed the literature reviewed for this study and positioned the author to use narrative accounts of her teaching as data which yielded findings.

  12. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia. PMID:25754081

  13. Closing the door on dark matter candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cold dark matter candidates - if they exist - will be present in, and perhaps dominate the mass density of, the halo of our Galaxy. As they pass the vicinity of the Sun, such halo particles will be focussed gravitationally, pass through the Sun and - occasionally - be captured and accumulate in the solar core. When the density in the core of the Sun of dark matter candidates has increased sufficiently, they will annihilate and among the annihilation products will be energetic (≥ GeV) ''ordinary'' neutrinos (νe, νμ, ντ) which are detectable in deep underground experiments. The event rates in such detectors from the capture and annihilation of various dark matter candidates (Dirac and Majorana neutrinos, Sneutrinos and Photinos) are presented and it is shown how comparison with data may lead to constraints on (or, the exclusion of) the masses of these particles. 6 refs

  14. Cattle Candidate Genes for Meat Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Bláhová, Alice

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compile a summary of the most important candidate genes for meat production. The studied genes were: GH, GHR, MSTN, MyoD family, leptin, IGF, TG5, SCD, DGAT and STAT5A. Growth hormone (GH) is involved in physiological processes of growth and metabolism. Growth hormone receptor (GHR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for meat production in cattle. Myostatin is a significant marker. It affects the amount of muscle, reduces marbling and elevate meat tendern...

  15. Hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated carbon fiber: in situ electrochemical synthesis and use as microelectrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurhman, Abduraouf Alamer Mohamed; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Guoan; Wang, Shuai

    2015-10-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a new type of nanohybrid microelectrode based on a hierarchical nanostructured Au/MnO2/graphene-modified carbon fiber (CF) via in situ electrochemical synthesis, which leads to better structural integration of different building blocks into the CF microelectrode. Our finding demonstrates that wrapping CF with graphene nanosheets has dramatically increased the surface area and electrical conductivity of the CF microelectrode. The subsequent template-free electrodeposition of MnO2 on graphene-wrapped CF gives rise to a porous nanonest architecture built up from twisted and intersectant MnO2 nanowires, which serves as an ideal substrate for the direct growth of Au nanoparticles. Owing to the structural merit and synergy effect between different components, the hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated CF demonstrates dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity. When used for nonenzymatic H2O2 sensing, the resultant modified microelectrode exhibits acceptable sensitivity, reproducibility, stability, and selectivity, which enable it to be used for real-time tracking H2O2 secretion in human cervical cancer cells. Graphical abstract A schematic illustration of preparation of hierarchical Au/MnO2/ERGO/CF nanohybrid electrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells. PMID:26359235

  16. Materials for breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified

  17. Promoting Team Leadership Skills in Doctoral Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Whetton, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral programs can serve as an optimal opportunity for candidates to engage in tasks and activities to transform them and their schools. The paradigm shifts in such preparation involve moving from sitting and getting to making and taking. Most importantly, it requires building leadership skills and styles necessary to bring about desired change…

  18. The Responsibility Education of Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toremen, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to take the views and suggestions of academicians working at the faculty of education on what can be done about teacher candidates' responsibility education. This study was designed on the basis of qualitative research approach and purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected by unstructured interview method…

  19. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing ...

  20. FAME's Search for Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, K.

    FAME is a five year survey mission to observe the positions, proper motions, and parallaxes of 40,000,000 stars down to 15th magnitude with accuracies of 50 microarcseconds at 9th magnitude. In addition to producing an astrometric and photometric catalog unparalleled for its accuracy and size, the survey will provide significant astrophysics results and search for extrasolar planet candidates.