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Sample records for candidate gene variants

  1. Association between Variants in Atopy-Related Immunologic Candidate Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk.

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    Michelle Cotterchio

    Full Text Available Many epidemiology studies report that atopic conditions such as allergies are associated with reduced pancreas cancer risk. The reason for this relationship is not yet understood. This is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the association between variants in atopy-related candidate genes and pancreatic cancer risk.A population-based case-control study of pancreas cancer cases diagnosed during 2011-2012 (via Ontario Cancer Registry, and controls recruited using random digit dialing utilized DNA from 179 cases and 566 controls. Following an exhaustive literature review, SNPs in 180 candidate genes were pre-screened using dbGaP pancreas cancer GWAS data; 147 SNPs in 56 allergy-related immunologic genes were retained and genotyped. Logistic regression was used to estimate age-adjusted odd ratio (AOR for each variant and false discovery rate was used to adjust Wald p-values for multiple testing. Subsequently, a risk allele score was derived based on statistically significant variants.18 SNPs in 14 candidate genes (CSF2, DENND1B, DPP10, FLG, IL13, IL13RA2, LRP1B, NOD1, NPSR1, ORMDL3, RORA, STAT4, TLR6, TRA were significantly associated with pancreas cancer risk. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, two LRP1B SNPs remained statistically significant; for example, LRP1B rs1449477 (AA vs. CC: AOR=0.37, 95% CI: 0.22-0.62; p (adjusted=0.04. Furthermore, the risk allele score was associated with a significant reduction in pancreas cancer risk (p=0.0007.Preliminary findings suggest certain atopy-related variants may be associated with pancreas cancer risk. Further studies are needed to replicate this, and to elucidate the biology behind the growing body of epidemiologic evidence suggesting allergies may reduce pancreatic cancer risk.

  2. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  3. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

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    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  4. Copy number variants in candidate genes are genetic modifiers of Hirschsprung disease.

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    Qian Jiang

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a neurocristopathy characterized by absence of intramural ganglion cells along variable lengths of the gastrointestinal tract. The HSCR phenotype is highly variable with respect to gender, length of aganglionosis, familiality and the presence of additional anomalies. By molecular genetic analysis, a minimum of 11 neuro-developmental genes (RET, GDNF, NRTN, SOX10, EDNRB, EDN3, ECE1, ZFHX1B, PHOX2B, KIAA1279, TCF4 are known to harbor rare, high-penetrance mutations that confer a large risk to the bearer. In addition, two other genes (RET, NRG1 harbor common, low-penetrance polymorphisms that contribute only partially to risk and can act as genetic modifiers. To broaden this search, we examined whether a set of 67 proven and candidate HSCR genes harbored additional modifier alleles. In this pilot study, we utilized a custom-designed array CGH with ∼33,000 test probes at an average resolution of ∼185 bp to detect gene-sized or smaller copy number variants (CNVs within these 67 genes in 18 heterogeneous HSCR patients. Using stringent criteria, we identified CNVs at three loci (MAPK10, ZFHX1B, SOX2 that are novel, involve regulatory and coding sequences of neuro-developmental genes, and show association with HSCR in combination with other congenital anomalies. Additional CNVs are observed under relaxed criteria. Our research suggests a role for CNVs in HSCR and, importantly, emphasizes the role of variation in regulatory sequences. A much larger study will be necessary both for replication and for identifying the full spectrum of small CNV effects.

  5. Alternative splicing of DENND1A, a PCOS candidate gene, generates variant 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Meng Kian; Speek, Mart; Legeza, Balázs; Modi, Bhavi; Teves, Maria Eugenia; McAllister, Janette M; Strauss, Jerome F; Miller, Walter L

    2016-10-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy characterized by hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders. The excess androgens may be of both ovarian and adrenal origin. PCOS has a strong genetic component, and genome-wide association studies have identified several candidate genes, notably DENND1A, which encodes connecdenn 1, involved in trafficking of endosomes. DENND1A encodes two principal variants, V1 (1009 amino acids) and V2 (559 amino acids). The androgen-producing ovarian theca cells of PCOS women over-express V2. Knockdown of V2 in these cells reduces androgen production, and overexpression of V2 in normal theca cells confers upon them a PCOS phenotype of increased androgen synthesis. We report that human adrenal NCI-H295A cells express V1 and V2 mRNA and that the V2 isoform is produced by exonization of sequences in intron 20, which generates a unique exon 20A, encoding the C-terminus of V2. As in human theca cells from normal women, forced expression of V2 in NCI-H295A cells resulted in increased abundance of CYP17A1 and CYP11A1 mRNAs. We also found genetic variation in the intronic region 330 bp upstream from exon 20A, which could have the potential to drive the selective expression of V2. There was no clear association with these variants with PCOS when we analyzed genomc DNA from normal women and women with PCOS. Using minigene expression vectors in NCI-H295A cells, this variable region did not consistently favor splicing of the V2 transcript. These findings suggest increased V2 expression in PCOS theca cells is not the result of genomic sequence variation in intron 20.

  6. Candidate gene resequencing to identify rare, pedigree-specific variants influencing healthy aging phenotypes in the long life family study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Druley, Todd E; Wang, Lihua; Lin, Shiow J;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Long Life Family Study (LLFS) is an international study to identify the genetic components of various healthy aging phenotypes. We hypothesized that pedigree-specific rare variants at longevity-associated genes could have a similar functional impact on healthy phenotypes. METHODS...... that was significantly associated with three phenotypes (GSK3B with the Healthy Aging Index, NOTCH1 with diastolic blood pressure and TP53 with serum HDL). CONCLUSIONS: Sequencing analysis of family-based associations for age-related phenotypes can identify rare or novel variants.......: We performed custom hybridization capture sequencing to identify the functional variants in 464 candidate genes for longevity or the major diseases of aging in 615 pedigrees (4,953 individuals) from the LLFS, using a multiplexed, custom hybridization capture. Variants were analyzed individually...

  7. Candidate gene resequencing to identify rare, pedigree-specific variants influencing healthy aging phenotypes in the long life family study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Druley, Todd E; Wang, Lihua; Lin, Shiow J;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Long Life Family Study (LLFS) is an international study to identify the genetic components of various healthy aging phenotypes. We hypothesized that pedigree-specific rare variants at longevity-associated genes could have a similar functional impact on healthy phenotypes. METHODS......: We performed custom hybridization capture sequencing to identify the functional variants in 464 candidate genes for longevity or the major diseases of aging in 615 pedigrees (4,953 individuals) from the LLFS, using a multiplexed, custom hybridization capture. Variants were analyzed individually...... that was significantly associated with three phenotypes (GSK3B with the Healthy Aging Index, NOTCH1 with diastolic blood pressure and TP53 with serum HDL). CONCLUSIONS: Sequencing analysis of family-based associations for age-related phenotypes can identify rare or novel variants....

  8. Functional complementation studies identify candidate genes and common genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer survival

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    Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Ramus, Susan J;

    2009-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation and/or somatic alterations in tumours may be associated with survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The successful identification of genetic associations relies on a suitable strategy for identifying and testing candidate genes. We used microcell-mediat...

  9. A cytogenetic abnormality and rare coding variants identify ABCA13 as a candidate gene in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.

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    Knight, Helen M; Pickard, Benjamin S; Maclean, Alan; Malloy, Mary P; Soares, Dinesh C; McRae, Allan F; Condie, Alison; White, Angela; Hawkins, William; McGhee, Kevin; van Beck, Margaret; MacIntyre, Donald J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Visscher, Peter M; Porteous, David J; Cannon, Ronald E; St Clair, David; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are leading causes of morbidity across all populations, with heritability estimates of approximately 80% indicating a substantial genetic component. Population genetics and genome-wide association studies suggest an overlap of genetic risk factors between these illnesses but it is unclear how this genetic component is divided between common gene polymorphisms, rare genomic copy number variants, and rare gene sequence mutations. We report evidence that the lipid transporter gene ABCA13 is a susceptibility factor for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After the initial discovery of its disruption by a chromosome abnormality in a person with schizophrenia, we resequenced ABCA13 exons in 100 cases with schizophrenia and 100 controls. Multiple rare coding variants were identified including one nonsense and nine missense mutations and compound heterozygosity/homozygosity in six cases. Variants were genotyped in additional schizophrenia, bipolar, depression (n > 1600), and control (n > 950) cohorts and the frequency of all rare variants combined was greater than controls in schizophrenia (OR = 1.93, p = 0.0057) and bipolar disorder (OR = 2.71, p = 0.00007). The population attributable risk of these mutations was 2.2% for schizophrenia and 4.0% for bipolar disorder. In a study of 21 families of mutation carriers, we genotyped affected and unaffected relatives and found significant linkage (LOD = 4.3) of rare variants with a phenotype including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. These data identify a candidate gene, highlight the genetic overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, and suggest that rare coding variants may contribute significantly to risk of these disorders.

  10. Pooled Sequencing of Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Variants in the Development of Asthma Following Severe RSV Bronchiolitis in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgerson, Dara G.; Giri, Tusar; Druley, Todd E.; Zheng, Jie; Huntsman, Scott; Seibold, Max A.; Young, Andrew L.; Schweiger, Toni; Yin-Declue, Huiqing; Sajol, Geneline D.; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Randolph, Adrienne G.; Bacharier, Leonard B.; Castro, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) during infancy is strongly associated with the development of asthma. To identify genetic variation that contributes to asthma following severe RSV bronchiolitis during infancy, we sequenced the coding exons of 131 asthma candidate genes in 182 European and African American children with severe RSV bronchiolitis in infancy using anonymous pools for variant discovery, and then directly genotyped a set of 190 nonsynonymous variants. Association testing was performed for physician-diagnosed asthma before the 7th birthday (asthma) using genotypes from 6,500 individuals from the Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) as controls to gain statistical power. In addition, among patients with severe RSV bronchiolitis during infancy, we examined genetic associations with asthma, active asthma, persistent wheeze, and bronchial hyperreactivity (methacholine PC20) at age 6 years. We identified four rare nonsynonymous variants that were significantly associated with asthma following severe RSV bronchiolitis, including single variants in ADRB2, FLG and NCAM1 in European Americans (p = 4.6x10-4, 1.9x10-13 and 5.0x10-5, respectively), and NOS1 in African Americans (p = 2.3x10-11). One of the variants was a highly functional nonsynonymous variant in ADRB2 (rs1800888), which was also nominally associated with asthma (p = 0.027) and active asthma (p = 0.013) among European Americans with severe RSV bronchiolitis without including the ESP. Our results suggest that rare nonsynonymous variants contribute to the development of asthma following severe RSV bronchiolitis in infancy, notably in ADRB2. Additional studies are required to explore the role of rare variants in the etiology of asthma and asthma-related traits following severe RSV bronchiolitis. PMID:26587832

  11. Pooled Sequencing of Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Variants in the Development of Asthma Following Severe RSV Bronchiolitis in Infancy.

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    Dara G Torgerson

    Full Text Available Severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV during infancy is strongly associated with the development of asthma. To identify genetic variation that contributes to asthma following severe RSV bronchiolitis during infancy, we sequenced the coding exons of 131 asthma candidate genes in 182 European and African American children with severe RSV bronchiolitis in infancy using anonymous pools for variant discovery, and then directly genotyped a set of 190 nonsynonymous variants. Association testing was performed for physician-diagnosed asthma before the 7th birthday (asthma using genotypes from 6,500 individuals from the Exome Sequencing Project (ESP as controls to gain statistical power. In addition, among patients with severe RSV bronchiolitis during infancy, we examined genetic associations with asthma, active asthma, persistent wheeze, and bronchial hyperreactivity (methacholine PC20 at age 6 years. We identified four rare nonsynonymous variants that were significantly associated with asthma following severe RSV bronchiolitis, including single variants in ADRB2, FLG and NCAM1 in European Americans (p = 4.6x10-4, 1.9x10-13 and 5.0x10-5, respectively, and NOS1 in African Americans (p = 2.3x10-11. One of the variants was a highly functional nonsynonymous variant in ADRB2 (rs1800888, which was also nominally associated with asthma (p = 0.027 and active asthma (p = 0.013 among European Americans with severe RSV bronchiolitis without including the ESP. Our results suggest that rare nonsynonymous variants contribute to the development of asthma following severe RSV bronchiolitis in infancy, notably in ADRB2. Additional studies are required to explore the role of rare variants in the etiology of asthma and asthma-related traits following severe RSV bronchiolitis.

  12. Candidate gene linkage approach to identify DNA variants that predispose to preterm birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bream, Elise N A; Leppellere, Cara R; Cooper, Margaret E;

    2013-01-01

    genes with evidence of linkage: ENPP1 (P = 0.003), IGFBP3 (P = 0.006), DHCR7 (P = 0.009), and TRAF2 (P = 0.01). DNA sequence analysis of the coding exons and splice sites for CRHR1 and TRAF2 identified no new likely etiologic variants.Conclusion:These findings suggest the involvement of six genes acting...... used. Premature infants and mothers of premature infants were defined as affected cases in independent analyses.Results:Analyses with the infant as the case identified two genes with evidence of linkage: CRHR1 (P = 0.0012) and CYP2E1 (P = 0.0011). Analyses with the mother as the case identified four...

  13. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diogo, Dorothee; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome

  14. Candidate colorectal cancer predisposing gene variants in Chinese early-onset and familial cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.X.; Fu, L.; Voer, R.M. de; Hahn, M.M.; Jin, P.; Lv, C.X.; Verwiel, E.T.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kuiper, R.P.; Sheng, J.Q.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether whole-exome sequencing may serve as an efficient method to identify known or novel colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposing genes in early-onset or familial CRC cases. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing in 23 Chinese patients from 21 families with non-polyposis CRC

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study with Sequence Variants Identifies Candidate Genes for Mastitis Resistance in Dairy Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Bendixen, Christian;

    Effect Predictor (VEP) vers. 2.6 using ENSEMBL vers. 67 databases. Candidate polymorphisms affecting clinical mastitis were selected based on their association with the traits and functional annotations. A strong positional candidate gene for mastitis resistance on chromosome-6 is the NPFFR2 which...

  16. Computational analysis of candidate disease genes and variants for Salt-sensitive hypertension in indigenous Southern Africans

    KAUST Repository

    Tiffin, Nicki

    2010-09-27

    Multiple factors underlie susceptibility to essential hypertension, including a significant genetic and ethnic component, and environmental effects. Blood pressure response of hypertensive individuals to salt is heterogeneous, but salt sensitivity appears more prevalent in people of indigenous African origin. The underlying genetics of salt-sensitive hypertension, however, are poorly understood. In this study, computational methods including text- and data-mining have been used to select and prioritize candidate aetiological genes for salt-sensitive hypertension. Additionally, we have compared allele frequencies and copy number variation for single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes between indigenous Southern African and Caucasian populations, with the aim of identifying candidate genes with significant variability between the population groups: identifying genetic variability between population groups can exploit ethnic differences in disease prevalence to aid with prioritisation of good candidate genes. Our top-ranking candidate genes include parathyroid hormone precursor (PTH) and type-1angiotensin II receptor (AGTR1). We propose that the candidate genes identified in this study warrant further investigation as potential aetiological genes for salt-sensitive hypertension. © 2010 Tiffin et al.

  17. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Dorothée; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). First, we assessed the contribution of rare coding variants in the 25 genes to the risk of RA in a pooled sequencing study of 500 RA cases and 650 controls of European ancestry. We observed an accumulation of rare nonsynonymous variants exclusive to RA cases in IL2RA and IL2RB (burden test: p = 0.007 and p = 0.018, respectively). Next, we assessed the aggregate contribution of low-frequency and common coding variants to the risk of RA by dense genotyping of the 25 gene loci in 10,609 RA cases and 35,605 controls. We observed a strong enrichment of coding variants with a nominal signal of association with RA (p A [p.His266Gln]), and a noncoding variant, rs624988, reside on distinct haplotypes and independently contribute to the risk of RA (p = 4.6 × 10−6). Overall, our results indicate that variants (distributed across the allele-frequency spectrum) within the protein-coding portion of a subset of biological candidate genes identified by GWASs contribute to the risk of RA. Further, we have demonstrated that very large sample sizes will be required for comprehensively identifying the independent alleles contributing to the missing heritability of RA. PMID:23261300

  18. A functional variant in MIR137, a candidate gene for schizophrenia, affects Stroop test performance in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; González-Reyes, Rodrigo E; Forero, Diego A

    2016-02-28

    MIR137, a brain expressed miRNA, has been identified as a top novel susceptibility gene for schizophrenia (SZ). 230 healthy participants completed the Stroop test and were genotyped for a functional Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) in MIR137 gene. MIR137 VNTR genotypes were associated with differences in Stroop facilitation and accuracies in congruent trials and for the total number of errors. This is the first study of the functional VNTR in MIR137 gene and Stroop test performance in healthy subjects. Our results could have important implications for the identification of genetic candidates for endophenotypes for SZ.

  19. Variants of the IL-10 gene associate with muscle strength in elderly from rural Africa: A candidate gene study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G.M. Beenakker (Karel); J.J.E. Koopman (Jacob); D. van Bodegom (David); M. Kuningas (Maris); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); J.J. Meij (Johannes); A.B. Maier (Andrea); R.G.J. Westendorp (Rudi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecently, it has been shown that the capacity of the innate immune system to produce cytokines relates to skeletal muscle mass and strength in older persons. The interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene regulates the production capacities of IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In rural Ghana,

  20. A candidate gene approach identifies an IL33 genetic variant as a novel genetic risk factor for GCA.

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    Ana Márquez

    Full Text Available Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition.A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays.A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (P(MH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78-0.99 and recessive (P(MH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35-0.80 models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis.Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA.

  1. Candidate genes for congenital diaphragmatic hernia from animalmodels: sequencing of fog2 and pdgfra reveals rare variants indiaphragmatic hernia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleyl, S.B.; Moshrefi, A.; Shaw, G.M.; Saijoh, Y.; Schoenwolf,G.C.; Pennacchio, L.A.; Slavotinek, A.M.

    2007-05-11

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common, lifethreatening birth defect. Although there is strong evidence implicatinggenetic factors in its pathogenesis, few causative genes have beenidentified, and in isolated CDH, only one de novo, nonsense mutation hasbeen reported in FOG2 in a female with posterior diaphragmaticeventration. We report here that the homozygous null mouse for the Pdgfragene has posterolateral diaphragmatic defects and thus is a model forhuman CDH. We hypothesized that mutations in this gene could cause humanCDH. We sequenced PDGFRa and FOG2 in 96 patients with CDH, of which 53had isolated CDH (55.2 percent), 36 had CDH and additional anomalies(37.5 percent), and 7 had CDH and known chromosome aberrations (7.3percent). For FOG2, we identified novel sequence alterations predictingp.M703L and p.T843A in two patients with isolated CDH that were absent in526 and 564 control chromosomes respectively. These altered amino acidswere highly conserved. However, due to the lack of available parental DNAsamples we were not able to determine if the sequence alterations were denovo. For PDGFRa, we found a single variant predicting p.L967V in apatient with CDH and multiple anomalies that was absent in 768 controlchromosomes. This patient also had one cell with trisomy 15 on skinfibroblast culture, a finding of uncertain significance. Although ourstudy identified sequence variants in FOG2 and PDGFRa, we have notdefinitively established the variants as mutations and we found noevidence that CDH commonly results from mutations in thesegenes.

  2. A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies an IL33 Genetic Variant as a Novel Genetic Risk Factor for GCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Ana; Solans, Roser; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.; Castañeda, Santos; Ramentol, Marc; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Narváez, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Palm, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Braun, Niko; Moosig, Frank; Witte, Torsten; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Vaglio, Augusto; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition. Methods A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway) were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays. Results A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (PMH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78–0.99) and recessive (PMH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35–0.80) models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis. Conclusions Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA. PMID:25409453

  3. Identification of the novel candidate genes and variants in boar liver tissues with divergent skatole levels using RNA deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Gunawan

    Full Text Available Boar taint is the unpleasant odour of meat derived from non-castrated male pigs, caused by the accumulation of androstenone and skatole in fat. Skatole is a tryptophan metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria in gut and catabolised in liver. Since boar taint affects consumer's preference, the aim of this study was to perform transcriptome profiling in liver of boars with divergent skatole levels in backfat by using RNA-Seq. The total number of reads produced for each liver sample ranged from 11.8 to 39.0 million. Approximately 448 genes were differentially regulated (p-adjusted 1.5. Differentially regulated genes in the high skatole liver samples were enriched in metabolic processes such as small molecule biochemistry, protein synthesis, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Pathway analysis identified the remodeling of epithelial adherens junction and TCA cycle as the most dominant pathways which may play important roles in skatole metabolism. Differential gene expression analysis identified candidate genes in ATP synthesis, cytochrome P450, keratin, phosphoglucomutase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and solute carrier family. Additionally, polymorphism and association analysis revealed that mutations in ATP5B, KRT8, PGM1, SLC22A7 and IDH1 genes could be potential markers for skatole levels in boars. Furthermore, expression analysis of exon usage of three genes (ATP5B, KRT8 and PGM1 revealed significant differential expression of exons of these genes in different skatole levels. These polymorphisms and exon expression differences may have impacts on the gene activity ultimately leading to skatole variation and could be used as genetic marker for boar taint related traits. However, further validation is required to confirm the effect of these genetic markers in other pig populations in order to be used in genomic selection against boar taint in pig breeding programs.

  4. Two variants in the KIT gene as candidate causative mutations for a dominant white and a white spotting phenotype in the donkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, B; Rieder, S; Leeb, T

    2015-06-01

    White spotting phenotypes have been intensively studied in horses, and although similar phenotypes occur in the donkey, little is known about the molecular genetics underlying these patterns in donkeys. White spotting in donkeys can range from only a few white areas to almost complete depigmentation and is characterised by a loss of pigmentation usually progressing from a white spot in the hip area. Completely white-born donkeys are rare, and the phenotype is characterised by the complete absence of pigment resulting in pink skin and a white coat. A dominant mode of inheritance has been demonstrated for spotting in donkeys. Although the mode of inheritance for the completely white phenotype in donkeys is not clear, the phenotype shows similarities to dominant white in horses. As variants in the KIT gene are known to cause a range of white phenotypes in the horse, we investigated the KIT gene as a potential candidate gene for two phenotypes in the donkey, white spotting and white. A mutation analysis of all 21 KIT exons identified a missense variant in exon 4 (c.662A>C; p.Tyr221Ser) present only in a white-born donkey. A second variant affecting a splice donor site (c.1978+2T>A) was found exclusively in donkeys with white spotting. Both variants were absent in 24 solid-coloured controls. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study investigating genetic mechanisms underlying white phenotypes in donkeys. Our results suggest that two independent KIT alleles are probably responsible for white spotting and white in donkeys.

  5. Evaluation of 41 candidate gene variants for obesity in the EPIC-Potsdam cohort by multi-locus stepwise regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Knüppel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity has become a leading preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in many parts of the world. It is thought to originate from multiple genetic and environmental determinants. The aim of the current study was to introduce haplotype-based multi-locus stepwise regression (MSR as a method to investigate combinations of unlinked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for obesity phenotypes. METHODS: In 2,122 healthy randomly selected men and women of the EPIC-Potsdam cohort, the association between 41 SNPs from 18 obesity-candidate genes and either body mass index (BMI, mean=25.9 kg/m(2, SD=4.1 or waist circumference (WC, mean=85.2 cm, SD=12.6 was assessed. Single SNP analyses were done by using linear regression adjusted for age, sex, and other covariates. Subsequently, MSR was applied to search for the 'best' SNP combinations. Combinations were selected according to specific AICc and p-value criteria. Model uncertainty was accounted for by a permutation test. RESULTS: The strongest single SNP effects on BMI were found for TBC1D1 rs637797 (β = -0.33, SE=0.13, FTO rs9939609 (β=0.28, SE=0.13, MC4R rs17700144 (β=0.41, SE=0.15, and MC4R rs10871777 (β=0.34, SE=0.14. All these SNPs showed similar effects on waist circumference. The two 'best' six-SNP combinations for BMI (global p-value= 3.45⋅10(-6 and 6.82⋅10(-6 showed effects ranging from -1.70 (SE=0.34 to 0.74 kg/m(2 (SE=0.21 per allele combination. We selected two six-SNP combinations on waist circumference (global p-value = 7.80⋅10(-6 and 9.76⋅10(-6 with an allele combination effect of -2.96 cm (SE=0.76 at maximum. Additional adjustment for BMI revealed 15 three-SNP combinations (global p-values ranged from 3.09⋅10(-4 to 1.02⋅10(-2. However, after carrying out the permutation test all SNP combinations lost significance indicating that the statistical associations might have occurred by chance. CONCLUSION: MSR provides a tool to search for risk-related SNP

  6. Genetic variants determining survival and fertility in an adverse African environment: a population-based large-scale candidate gene association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Pijpe, Jeroen; Böhringer, Stefan; van Bodegom, David; Eriksson, Ulrika K; Sanchez-Faddeev, Hernando; Ziem, Juventus B; Zwaan, Bas; Slagboom, P Eline; de Knijff, Peter; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2016-07-01

    Human survival probability and fertility decline strongly with age. These life history traits have been shaped by evolution. However, research has failed to uncover a consistent genetic determination of variation in survival and fertility. As an explanation, such genetic determinants have been selected in adverse environments, in which humans have lived during most of their history, but are almost exclusively studied in populations in modern affluent environments. Here, we present a large-scale candidate gene association study in a rural African population living in an adverse environment. In 4387 individuals, we studied 4052 SNPs in 148 genes that have previously been identified as possible determinants of survival or fertility in animals or humans. We studied their associations with survival comparing newborns, middle-age adults, and old individuals. In women, we assessed their associations with reported and observed numbers of children. We found no statistically significant associations of these SNPs with survival between the three age groups nor with women's reported and observed fertility. Population stratification was unlikely to explain these results. Apart from a lack of power, we hypothesise that genetic heterogeneity of complex phenotypes and gene-environment interactions prevent the identification of genetic variants explaining variation in survival and fertility in humans.

  7. Alcoholism and alternative splicing of candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabe, Toshikazu; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2010-04-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins and

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie M O'Brien

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT. Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836 and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836. CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively. Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic

  10. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia.

  11. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine ... variant of the gene for the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) with a decreased risk for addiction to ...

  12. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-08

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/.

  13. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Sasabe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  14. Molecular Characterization of the Tumor Suppressor Candidate 5 Gene: Regulation by PPARγ and Identification of TUSC5 Coding Variants in Lean and Obese Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina A. Knotts

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor candidate 5 (TUSC5 is a gene expressed abundantly in white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT, and peripheral afferent neurons. Strong adipocyte expression and increased expression following peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ agonist treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes suggested a role for Tusc5 in fat cell proliferation and/or metabolism. However, the regulation of Tusc5 in WAT and its potential association with obesity phenotypes remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the TUSC5 gene is a bona fide PPARγ target and evaluated whether its WAT expression or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the TUSC5 coding region are associated with human obesity. Induction of Tusc5 mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by troglitazone and GW1929 followed a dose-response consistent with these agents' binding affinities for PPARγ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments confirmed that PPARγ protein binds a ∼−1.1 kb promotor sequence of murine TUSC5 transiently during 3T3-L1 adipogenesis, concurrent with histone H3 acetylation. No change in Tusc5 mRNA or protein levels was evident in type 2 diabetic patients treated with pioglitazone. Tusc5 expression was not induced appreciably in liver preparations overexpressing PPARs, suggesting that tissue-specific factors regulate PPARγ responsiveness of the TUSC5 gene. Finally, we observed no differences in Tusc5 WAT expression or prevalence of coding region SNPs in lean versus obese human subjects. These studies firmly establish the murine TUSC5 gene locus as a PPARγ target, but the significance of Tusc5 in obesity phenotypes or in the pharmacologic actions of PPARγ agonists in humans remains equivocal.

  15. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  16. Cattle Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlec, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to make an overview of important candidate genes affecting milk yield and milk quality parameters, with an emphasis on genes associated with the quantity and quality of milk proteins and milk fat.

  17. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, M.A. van; Brunner, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information i

  18. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of thes...

  19. Genes that affect brain structure and function identified by rare variant analyses of Mendelian neurologic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ender; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Erdin, Serkan; Bayram, Yavuz; Campbell, Ian M.; Hunter, Jill V.; Atik, Mehmed M.; Van Esch, Hilde; Yuan, Bo; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Isikay, Sedat; Yesil, Gozde; Yuregir, Ozge O.; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Aslan, Huseyin; Aydin, Hatip; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Jain, Preti; Geckinli, B. Bilge; Sezer, Ozlem; Gul, Davut; Durmaz, Burak; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Topcu, Vehap; Candan, Sukru; Cebi, Alper Han; Ikbal, Mevlit; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Gezdirici, Alper; Koparir, Erkan; Ekici, Fatma; Coskun, Salih; Cicek, Salih; Karaer, Kadri; Koparir, Asuman; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Kirat, Emre; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ulucan, Hakan; Seven, Mehmet; Guran, Tulay; Elcioglu, Nursel; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Aktas, Dilek; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Ture, Mehmet; Yakut, Tahsin; Overton, John D.; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa; Muzny, Donna M.; Adams, David R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chung, Wendy K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human nervous system involves complex interactions between fundamental cellular processes and requires a multitude of genes, many of which remain to be associated with human disease. We applied whole exome sequencing to 128 mostly consanguineous families with neurogenetic disorders that often included brain malformations. Rare variant analyses for both single nucleotide variant (SNV) and copy number variant (CNV) alleles allowed for identification of 45 novel variants in 43 known disease genes, 41 candidate genes, and CNVs in 10 families, with an overall potential molecular cause identified in >85% of families studied. Among the candidate genes identified, we found PRUNE, VARS, and DHX37 in multiple families, and homozygous loss of function variants in AGBL2, SLC18A2, SMARCA1, UBQLN1, and CPLX1. Neuroimaging and in silico analysis of functional and expression proximity between candidate and known disease genes allowed for further understanding of genetic networks underlying specific types of brain malformations. PMID:26539891

  20. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Driel Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information is the usual strategy by which candidate disease genes are selected. Enrichment for candidate disease genes, however, depends on the skills of the operating researcher. Over the past few years, a number of bioinformatics methods that enrich for the most likely candidate disease genes have been developed. Such in silico prioritisation methods may further improve by completion of datasets, by development of standardised ontologies across databases and species and, ultimately, by the integration of different strategies.

  1. CANDIDATE GENE ANALYSIS IN ISRAELI SOLDIERS WITH STRESS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Yanovich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of polymorphisms within candidate genes which we hypothesized may contribute to stress fracture predisposition, a case-control, cross- sectional study design was employed. Genotyping 268 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms- SNPs within 17 genes in 385 Israeli young male and female recruits (182 with and 203 without stress fractures. Twenty-five polymorphisms within 9 genes (NR3C1, ANKH, VDR, ROR2, CALCR, IL6, COL1A2, CBG, and LRP4 showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 in the distribution between stress fracture cases and non stress fracture controls. Seventeen genetic variants were associated with an increased stress fracture risk, and eight variants with a decreased stress fracture risk. None of the SNP associations remained significant after correcting for multiple comparisons (false discovery rate- FDR. Our findings suggest that genes may be involved in stress fracture pathogenesis. Specifically, the CALCR and the VDR genes are intriguing candidates. The putative involvement of these genes in stress fracture predisposition requires analysis of more cases and controls and sequencing the relevant genomic regions, in order to define the specific gene mutations

  2. Candidate genes for behavioural ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitzpatrick, M.J.; Ben-Sahar, Y.; Smid, H.M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Sokolowski, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of millions of years of evolutionary divergence, the conservation of gene function is common across distant lineages. As such, genes that are known to influence behaviour in one organism are likely to influence similar behaviours in other organisms. Recent studies of the evolution of behavi

  3. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Toshikazu Sasabe; Shoichi Ishiura

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports sugg...

  4. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liset Rietman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify new candidate genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity. To this aim, we combined previously obtained data from recombinant inbred BXD strains on ocular dominance (OD plasticity and gene expression levels in the neocortex. We validated our approach using a list of genes which alter OD plasticity when inactivated. The expression levels of one fifth of these genes correlated with the amount of OD plasticity. Moreover, the two genes with the highest relative inter-strain differences were among the correlated genes. This suggests that correlation between gene expression levels and OD plasticity is indeed likely to point to genes with a causal role in modulating or generating plasticity in the visual cortex. After this validation on known plasticity genes, we identified new candidate genes by a multi-step approach. First, a list was compiled of all genes of which the expression level in BXD strains correlate with the amount of OD plasticity. To narrow this list to the more promising candidates, we took its cross-section with a list of genes co-regulated with the sensitive period for OD plasticity and a list of genes associated with pathways implicated in OD plasticity. This analysis resulted in a list of 32 candidate genes. The list contained unproven, but not surprising, candidates, such as the genes for IGF-1, NCAM1, NOGO-A, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A receptor, acetylcholine esterase and the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. This was indicative of the viability of our approach, but more interesting were the novel candidate genes: Akap7, Akt1, Camk2d, Cckbr, Cd44, Crim1, Ctdsp2, Dnajc5, Gnai1, Itpka, Mapk8, Nbea, Nfatc3, Nlk, Npy5r, Phf21a, Phip, Ppm1l, Ppp1r1b, Rbbp4, Slc1a3, Slit2, Socs2, Spock3, St8sia1, Zfp207. The possible role of some of these candidates is discussed in the article.

  5. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Rietman; J.-P. Sommeijer; C.N. Levelt; J.A. Heimel; A.B. Brussaard; J.G.G. Borst; Y. Elgersma; N. Galjart; G.T. van der Horst; C.M. Pennartz; A.B. Smit; B.M. Spruijt; M. Verhage; C.I. de Zeeuw

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to the identification of genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. To discover new candidate genes, we have reexamined data from one such study on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in recombinant inbred BXD mouse strains. We have correlated

  6. Searching for candidate genes for male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.N.Truong; E.K.Moses; J.E.Armes; D.J.Venter; H.W.G.Baker

    2003-01-01

    Aim: We describe an approach to search for candidate genes for male infertility using the two human genome databases: the public University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and private Celera databases which list known and predicted gene sequences and provide related information such as gene function, tissue expression,known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods and Results: To demonstrate this in silico research, the following male infertility candidate genes were selected: (1) human BOULE, mutations of which may lead to germ cell arrest at the primary spermatocyte stage, (2) mutations of casein kinase 2 alpha genes which may cause globozoospermia, (3) DMR-N9 which is possibly involved in the spermatogenic defect of myotonic dystrophy and (4) several testes expressed genes at or near the breakpoints of a balanced translocation associated with hypospermatogenesis. We indicate how information derived from the human genome databases can be used to confirm these candidate genes may be pathogenic by studying RNA expression in tissue arrays using in situ hybridization and gene sequencing. Conclusion: The paper explains the new approach to discovering genetic causes of male infertility using information about the human genome. ( Asian J Andro1 2003 Jun; 5:137-147 )

  7. Gene Variant from Africa Linked to Black Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Gene Variant From Africa Linked to Black Obesity Study sees first biological pathway to weight gain ... identified an Africa-specific gene variant associated with obesity. The team found that about 1 percent of ...

  8. Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauers, Anna; Wang, Jingwen; Einarsdottir, Elisabet;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity affecting approximately 3% of otherwise healthy children or adolescents. The etiology is still largely unknown but has an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of common genetic variants...... that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study...... of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants. STUDY DESIGN: This was a case control study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 1,739 patients...

  9. Phenol sulfotransferases: Candidate genes for Batten disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, T.P.; Probst, P.; Obermoeller, R.D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-05

    Batten disease (juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the cytosomal accumulation of autofluorescent protolipopigments in neurons and other cell types. The Batten disease gene (CLN3) has not yet been identified, but has been mapped to a small region of human chromosome area 16p12.1-p11.2. We recently reported the fortuitous discovery that the cytosolic phenol sulfotransferase gene (STP) is located within this same interval of chromosome 16p. Since phenol sulfotransferase is expressed in neurons, can sulfate lipophilic phenolic compounds, and is mapped near CLN3, STP is considered as a candidate gene for Batten disease. YAC and cosmid cloning results have further substantiated the close proximity of STP and a highly related sulfotransferase (STM), encoding the catecholamine-preferring enzyme, to the CLN3 region of chromosome 16p. In this report, we summarize some of the recent progress in the identification of two phenol sulfotransferase genes (STP and STM) as positional candidate genes for Batten disease. 42 refs., 1 tab.

  10. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moolman-Smook Johanna C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, a genetic disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response. Results The coding regions of KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNE4, and KCNE5 were examined, by direct DNA sequencing, in a cohort of 93 unrelated HCM probands and 188 blood donor controls. Fifteen genetic variants, four previously unknown, were identified in the HCM probands. Eight variants were non-synonymous and one was located in the 3'UTR-region of KCNE4. No disease-causing mutations were found and no significant difference in the frequency of genetic variants was found between HCM probands and controls. Two variants of likely functional significance were found in controls only. Conclusions Mutations in KCNE genes are not a common cause of HCM and polymorphisms in these genes do not seem to be associated with a propensity to develop arrhythmia

  11. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Somatic Mutations and Candidate Genetic Risk Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Katie M O'Brien; Irene Orlow; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Karla Ballman; Linda McCall; Ronald DeMatteo; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated w...

  12. Targeted sequencing of 351 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in a large cohort of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Brilstra, Eva H; van Kempen, Marjan J A;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many genes are candidates for involvement in epileptic encephalopathy (EE) because one or a few possibly pathogenic variants have been found in patients, but insufficient genetic or functional evidence exists for a definite annotation. METHODS: To increase the number of validated EE...

  13. Functional characterisation of polymorphisms in candidate genes for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a multifactorial disorder. Several important risk factors, in particular cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration and hyperglycaemia, have been defined. It appears that most risk factors are influenced by genetic components, suggesting that genetic variants in candidate genes play an important role in the development of CHD. In view of the importance of transcripti...

  14. Bioinformatics-Driven Identification and Examination of Candidate Genes for Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne M.; Hornbak, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Candidate genes for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) identified by a bioinformatics approach were examined for variant associations to quantitative traits of NAFLD-related phenotypes. Research Design and Methods: By integrating public database text mining, trans-organism protein...

  15. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Analysis Identifies Novel Variants for Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, Adam S.; Braund, Peter S.; Farrall, Martin; Hardwick, Robert J.; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Soranzo, Nicole; Chambers, John C.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Kleber, Marcus E.; Keating, Brendan; Qasim, Atif; Klopp, Norman; Erdmann, Jeanette; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Basart, Hanneke; Baumert, Jens; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Brocheton, Jessy; Bugert, Peter; Cambien, Francois; Clarke, Robert; Codd, Veryan; Collins, Rory; Couper, David; Cupples, L. Adrienne; de Jong, Jonas S.; Diemert, Patrick; Ejebe, Kenechi; Elbers, Clara C.; Elliott, Paul; Fornage, Myriam; Franzosi, Maria-Grazia; Frossard, Philippe; Garner, Stephen; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Klueter, Harald; Koch, Kerstin; Koenig, Inke R.; Kooner, Angad S.; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Liu, Kiang; McPherson, Ruth; Musameh, Muntaser D.; Musani, Solomon; Nelson, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ongen, Halit; Papanicolaou, George; Peters, Annette; Peters, Bas J. M.; Potter, Simon; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qu, Liming; Rader, Daniel J.; Rasheed, Asif; Rice, Catherine; Scott, James; Seedorf, Udo; Sehmi, Joban S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tomaszewski, Maciej; van der Harst, Pim; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Willenborg, Christina; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Zaidi, Moazzam; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Maerz, Winfried; Trip, Mieke D.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Hamsten, Anders; Hall, Alistair S.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Thompson, Simon G.; Thompson, John R.; Deloukas, Panos; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Watkins, Hugh; Danesh, John; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. W

  16. Large-scale gene-centric analysis identifies novel variants for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, A.S.; Braund, P.S.; Hardwick, R.J.; Saleheen, D.; Peden, J.F.; Soranzo, N.; Chambers, J.C.; Kleber, M.E.; Keating, B.; Qasim, A.; Klopp, N.; Erdmann, J.; Basart, H.; Baumert, J.H.; Bezzina, C.R.; Boehm, B.O.; Brocheton, J.; Bugert, P.; Cambien, F.; Collins, R.; Couper, D.; Jong, J.S. de; Diemert, P.; Ejebe, K.; Elbers, C.C.; Elliott, P.; Fornage, M.; Frossard, P.; Garner, S.; Hunt, S.E.; Kastelein, J.J.; Klungel, O.H.; Kluter, H.; Koch, K.; Konig, I.R.; Kooner, A.S.; Liu, K.; McPherson, R.; Musameh, M.D.; Musani, S.; Papanicolaou, G.; Peters, A.; Peters, B.J.; Potter, S.; Psaty, B.M.; Rasheed, A.; Scott, J.; Seedorf, U.; Sehmi, J.S.; Sotoodehnia, N.; Stark, K.; Stephens, J.; Schoot, C.E. van der; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Harst, P. van der; Vasan, R.S.; Wilde, A.A.; Willenborg, C.; Winkelmann, B.R.; Zaidi, M.; Zhang, W.; Ziegler, A.; Koenig, W.; Matz, W.; Trip, M.D.; Reilly, M.P.; Kathiresan, S.; Schunkert, H.; Hamsten, A.; Hall, A.S.; Kooner, J.S.; Thompson, S.G.; Thompson, J.R.; Watkins, H.; Danesh, J.; Barnes, T.; Rafelt, S.; Codd, V.; Bruinsma, N.; Dekker, L.R.; Henriques, J.P.; Koch, K.T.; Winter, R.J. de; Alings, M.; Allaart, C.F.; Gorgels, A.P.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Mueller, M.; Meisinger, C.; DerOhannessian, S.; Mehta, N.N.; Ferguson, J.; Hakonarson, H.; Matthai, W.; Wilensky, R.; Hopewell, J.C.; Parish, S.; Linksted, P.; Notman, J.; Gonzalez, H.; Young, A.; Ostley, T.; Munday, A.; Goodwin, N.; Verdon, V.; Shah, S.; Edwards, C.; Mathews, C.; Gunter, R.; Benham, J.; Davies, C.; Cobb, M.; Cobb, L.; Crowther, J.; Richards, A.; Silver, M.; Tochlin, S.; Mozley, S.; Clark, S.; Radley, M.; Kourellias, K.; Olsson, P.; Barlera, S.; Tognoni, G.; Rust, S.; Assmann, G.; Heath, S.; Zelenika, D.; Gut, I.; Green, F.; Farrall, M.; Peden, J.; Goel, A.; Ongen, H.; Franzosi, M.G.; Lathrop, M.; Clarke, R.; Aly, A.; Anner, K.; Bjorklund, K.; Blomgren, G.; Cederschiold, B.; Danell-Toverud, K.; Eriksson, P.; Grundstedt, U.; Heinonen, M.; Hellenius, M.L.; Hooft, F. van 't; Husman, K.; Lagercrantz, J.; Larsson, A.; Larsson, M.; Mossfeldt, M.; Malarstig, A.; Olsson, G.; Sabater-Lleal, M.; Sennblad, B.; Silveira, A.; Strawbridge, R.; Soderholm, B.; Ohrvik, J.; Zaman, K.S.; Mallick, N.H.; Azhar, M.; Samad, A.; Ishaq, M.; Shah, N.; Samuel, M.; Kathiresan, S.C.; Reilly, M.; Assimes, T.L.; Holm, H.; Preuss, M.; Stewart, A.F.; Barbalic, M.; Gieger, C.; Absher, D.; Aherrahrou, Z.; Allayee, H.; Altshuler, D.; Anand, S.; Andersen, K.; Anderson, J.L.; Ardissino, D.; Ball, S.G.; Balmforth, A.J.; Barnes, T.A.; Becker, L.C.; Becker, D.M.; Berger, K.; Bis, J.C.; Boekholdt, S.M.; Boerwinkle, E.; Brown, M.J.; Burnett, M.S.; Buysschaert, I.; Carlquist, J.F.; Chen, L.; Davies, R.W.; Dedoussis, G.; Dehghan, A.; Demissie, S.; Devaney, J.; Do, R.; Doering, A.; El Mokhtari, N.E.; Ellis, S.G.; Elosua, R.; Engert, J.C.; Epstein, S.; Faire, U. de; Fischer, M.; Folsom, A.R.; Freyer, J.; Gigante, B.; Girelli, D.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Gudnason, V.; Gulcher, J.R.; Tennstedt, S.; Halperin, E.; Hammond, N.; Hazen, S.L.; Hofman, A.; Horne, B.D.; Illig, T.; Iribarren, C.; Jones, G.T.; Jukema, J.W.; Kaiser, M.A.; Kaplan, L.M.; Khaw, K.T.; Knowles, J.W.; Kolovou, G.; Kong, A.; Laaksonen, R.; Lambrechts, D.; Leander, K.; Li, M.; Lieb, W.; Lettre, G.; Loley, C.; Lotery, A.J.; Mannucci, P.M.; Martinelli, N.; McKeown, P.P.; Meitinger, T.; Melander, O.; Merlini, P.A.; Mooser, V.; Morgan, T.; Muhleisen T.W., .; Muhlestein, J.B.; Musunuru, K.; Nahrstaedt, J.; Nothen, M.M.; Olivieri, O.; Peyvandi, F.; Patel, R.S.; Patterson, C.C.; Qu, L.; Quyyumi, A.A.; Rader, D.J.; Rallidis, L.S.; Rice, C.; Roosendaal, F.R.; Rubin, D.; Salomaa, V.; Sampietro, M.L.; Sandhu, M.S.; Schadt, E.; Schafer, A.; Schillert, A.; Schreiber, S.; Schrezenmeir, J.; Schwartz, S.M.; Siscovick, D.S.; Sivananthan, M.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, T.B.; Snoep, J.D.; Spertus, J.A.; Stefansson, K.; Stirrups, K.; Stoll, M.; Tang, W.H.; Thorgeirsson, G.; Thorleifsson, G.; Tomaszewski, M.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rij, A.M. van; Voight, B.F.; Wareham, N.J.; AWells, G.; Wichmann, H.E.; Witteman, J.C.; Wright, B.J.; Ye, S.; Cupples, L.A.; Quertermous, T.; Marz, W.; Blankenberg, S.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Roberts, R.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Onland-Moret, N.C.; Setten, J. van; Bakker, P.I. de; Verschuren, W.M.; Boer, J.M.; Wijmenga, C.; Hofker, M.H.; Maitland-van der Zee, A.H.; Boer, A. de; Grobbee, D.E.; Attwood, T.; Belz, S.; Cooper, J.; Crisp-Hihn, A.; Deloukas, P.; Foad, N.; Goodall, A.H.; Gracey, J.; Gray, E.; Gwilliams, R.; Heimerl, S.; Hengstenberg, C.; Jolley, J.; Krishnan, U.; Lloyd-Jones, H.; Lugauer, I.; Lundmark, P.; Maouche, S.; Moore, J.S.; Muir, D.; Murray, E.; Nelson, C.P.; Neudert, J.; Niblett, D.; O'Leary, K.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Pollard, H.; Rankin, A.; Rice, C.M.; Sager, H.; Samani, N.J.; Sambrook, J.; Schmitz, G.; Scholz, M.; Schroeder, L.; Syvannen, A.C.; Wallace, C.

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. W

  17. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmagid, Nada; Bereczky-Veress, Biborka; Atanur, Santosh; Musilová, Alena; Zídek, Václav; Saba, Laura; Warnecke, Andreas; Khademi, Mohsen; Studahl, Marie; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Hjalmarsson, Anders; Garcia-Diaz, Ana; Denis, Cécile V; Bergström, Tomas; Sköldenberg, Birgit; Kockum, Ingrid; Aitman, Timothy; Hübner, Norbert; Olsson, Tomas; Pravenec, Michal; Diez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway). Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains), displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus) named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb) containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor) gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008) after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  18. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway. Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains, displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism. Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008 after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  19. Variant of Rett syndrome and CDKL5 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt;

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. The Hanefeld variant, or early-onset seizure variant, has been associated with mutations in CDKL5 gene. AIMS: In recent years more than 60 patients with mutations in the CDKL5 gene have b...

  20. X-Linked Candidate Genes for a Ciliopathy-Like Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavey, Ashleigh R; Vilboux, Thierry; Babcock, Holly E; Ahronovich, Margot; Solomon, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    The ability to interrogate the genome via chromosomal microarray and sequencing-based technologies has accelerated the ability to rapidly and accurately define etiologies as well as new candidate genes related to genetic conditions. We describe a male patient with a lethal presentation of a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome that appeared consistent with a ciliopathy phenotype. The patient was found to have a novel maternally inherited 1.9-Mb X chromosome deletion including 4 known genes. Presently, the biological functions of these genes are not well delineated. However, at least one of these genes may be a promising candidate gene for this pattern of anomalies based on the function of related genes and information from publicly available copy number variant databases of control and affected individuals. These genes would bear further scrutiny in larger cohorts of patients with similar phenotypes.

  1. Pathogenic Network Analysis Predicts Candidate Genes for Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Xia Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of our study was to predicate candidate genes in cervical cancer (CC using a network-based strategy and to understand the pathogenic process of CC. Methods. A pathogenic network of CC was extracted based on known pathogenic genes (seed genes and differentially expressed genes (DEGs between CC and normal controls. Subsequently, cluster analysis was performed to identify the subnetworks in the pathogenic network using ClusterONE. Each gene in the pathogenic network was assigned a weight value, and then candidate genes were obtained based on the weight distribution. Eventually, pathway enrichment analysis for candidate genes was performed. Results. In this work, a total of 330 DEGs were identified between CC and normal controls. From the pathogenic network, 2 intensely connected clusters were extracted, and a total of 52 candidate genes were detected under the weight values greater than 0.10. Among these candidate genes, VIM had the highest weight value. Moreover, candidate genes MMP1, CDC45, and CAT were, respectively, enriched in pathway in cancer, cell cycle, and methane metabolism. Conclusion. Candidate pathogenic genes including MMP1, CDC45, CAT, and VIM might be involved in the pathogenesis of CC. We believe that our results can provide theoretical guidelines for future clinical application.

  2. Association and mutation analyses of 16p11.2 autism candidate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinesh A Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autism is a complex childhood neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong genetic basis. Microdeletion or duplication of a approximately 500-700-kb genomic rearrangement on 16p11.2 that contains 24 genes represents the second most frequent chromosomal disorder associated with autism. The role of common and rare 16p11.2 sequence variants in autism etiology is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify common 16p11.2 variants with a potential role in autism, we performed association studies using existing data generated from three microarray platforms: Affymetrix 5.0 (777 families, Illumina 550 K (943 families, and Affymetrix 500 K (60 families. No common variants were identified that were significantly associated with autism. To look for rare variants, we performed resequencing of coding and promoter regions for eight candidate genes selected based on their known expression patterns and functions. In total, we identified 26 novel variants in autism: 13 exonic (nine non-synonymous, three synonymous, and one untranslated region and 13 promoter variants. We found a significant association between autism and a coding variant in the seizure-related gene SEZ6L2 (12/1106 autism vs. 3/1161 controls; p = 0.018. Sez6l2 expression in mouse embryos was restricted to the spinal cord and brain. SEZ6L2 expression in human fetal brain was highest in post-mitotic cortical layers, hippocampus, amygdala, and thalamus. Association analysis of SEZ6L2 in an independent sample set failed to replicate our initial findings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified sequence variation in at least one candidate gene in 16p11.2 that may represent a novel genetic risk factor for autism. However, further studies are required to substantiate these preliminary findings.

  3. The rs3857059 variant of the SNCA gene is associated with Parkinson’s disease in Mexican Mestizos

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among the candidate genes for Parkinson’s disease (PD), SNCA has replicated association in different populations. Besides other known mutations in the SNCA gene, the rs3857059 variant has also been linked to various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to search for association of this variant and sporadic PD in Mexican Mestizo patients. A case-control study was performed including 241 individuals, 106 patients, and 135 healthy controls. Geno...

  4. Myostatin: genetic variants, therapy and gene doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Katayama Yamada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, myostatin (MSTN has been at the forefront of muscle therapy research because intrinsic mutations or inhibition of this protein, by either pharmacological or genetic means, result in muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. In addition to muscle growth, MSTN inhibition potentially disturbs connective tissue, leads to strength modulation, facilitates myoblast transplantation, promotes tissue regeneration, induces adipose tissue thermogenesis and increases muscle oxidative phenotype. It is also known that current advances in gene therapy have an impact on sports because of the illicit use of such methods. However, the adverse effects of these methods, their impact on athletic performance in humans and the means of detecting gene doping are as yet unknown. The aim of the present review is to discuss biosynthesis, genetic variants, pharmacological/genetic manipulation, doping and athletic performance in relation to the MSTN pathway. As will be concluded from the manuscript, MSTN emerges as a promising molecule for combating muscle wasting diseases and for triggering wide-ranging discussion in view of its possible use in gene doping.Desde sua descoberta, a miostatina (MSTN entrou na linha de frente em pesquisas relacionadas às terapias musculares porque mutações intrínsecas ou inibição desta proteína tanto por abordagens farmacológicas como genéticas resultam em hipertrofia muscular e hiperplasia. Além do aumento da massa muscular, a inibição de MSTN potencialmente prejudica o tecido conectivo, modula a força muscular, facilita o transplante de mioblastos, promove regeneração tecidual, induz termogênese no tecido adiposo e aumenta a oxidação na musculatura esquelética. É também sabido que os atuais avanços em terapia gênica têm uma relação com o esporte devido ao uso ilícito de tal método. Os efeitos adversos de tal abordagem, seus efeitos no desempenho de atletas e métodos para detectar doping genético s

  5. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Ashbrook

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium’s bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis.We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1 and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum.

  6. Renin-Angiotensin System Gene Variants and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence of Angiotensinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce-Tan, Siew Mei; Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Abdul Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully used to call for variants associated with diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, some variants are not included in the GWAS to avoid penalty in multiple hypothetic testing. Thus, candidate gene approach is still useful even at GWAS era. This study attempted to assess whether genetic variations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and their gene interactions are associated with T2DM risk. We genotyped 290 T2DM patients and 267 controls using three genes of the RAS, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). There were significant differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls for AGT variants (P = 0.05) but not for ACE and AGTR1. Haplotype TCG of the AGT was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15-3.20, permuted P = 0.012); however, no evidence of significant gene-gene interactions was seen. Nonetheless, our analysis revealed that the associations of the AGT variants with T2DM were independently associated. Thus, this study suggests that genetic variants of the RAS can modestly influence the T2DM risk.

  7. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... July 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, ... factors. Population-Based Autism Genetics and Environment Study Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from ...

  8. FTO gene variants are associated with growth and carcass traits in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevsinek Skok, D; Kunej, T; Kovac, M; Malovrh, S; Potocnik, K; Petric, N; Zgur, S; Dovc, P; Horvat, S

    2016-04-01

    An important aim in animal breeding is the improvement of growth and meat quality traits. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene have a relatively large effect on human obesity as well as on body composition in rodents and, more recently, in livestock. Here, we examined the effects of the FTO gene variants on growth and carcass traits in the Slovenian population of Simmental (SS) and Brown (SB) cattle. To validate and identify new polymorphisms, we used sequencing, PCR-RFLP analysis and TaqMan assays in the SS breed and FTO gene variants data from the Illumina BovineSNP50 v1 array for the SB breed. Sequencing of the eight samples of progeny-tested SS sires detected 108 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the bovine FTO gene. Statistical analyses between growth and carcass traits and 34 FTO polymorphisms revealed significant association of FTO variants with lean meat percentage in both breeds. Additionally, FTO SNPs analyzed in SS cattle were associated with fat percentage, bone weight and live weight at slaughter. The FTO gene can thus be regarded as a candidate gene for the marker-assisted selection programs in our and possibly other populations of cattle. Future studies in cattle might reveal novel roles for the FTO gene in shaping carcass traits in livestock species as well as body composition control in other mammals.

  9. Candidate sequence variants and fetal hemoglobin in children with sickle cell disease treated with hydroxyurea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy S Green

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fetal hemoglobin level is a heritable complex trait that strongly correlates swith the clinical severity of sickle cell disease. Only few genetic loci have been identified as robustly associated with fetal hemoglobin in patients with sickle cell disease, primarily adults. The sole approved pharmacologic therapy for this disease is hydroxyurea, with effects largely attributable to induction of fetal hemoglobin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a multi-site observational analysis of children with sickle cell disease, candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with baseline fetal hemoglobin levels in adult sickle cell disease were examined in children at baseline and induced by hydroxyurea therapy. For baseline levels, single marker analysis demonstrated significant association with BCL11A and the beta and epsilon globin loci (HBB and HBE, respectively, with an additive attributable variance from these loci of 23%. Among a subset of children on hydroxyurea, baseline fetal hemoglobin levels explained 33% of the variance in induced levels. The variant in HBE accounted for an additional 13% of the variance in induced levels, while variants in the HBB and BCL11A loci did not contribute beyond baseline levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings clarify the overlap between baseline and hydroxyurea-induced fetal hemoglobin levels in pediatric disease. Studies assessing influences of specific sequence variants in these and other genetic loci in larger populations and in unusual hydroxyurea responders are needed to further understand the maintenance and therapeutic induction of fetal hemoglobin in pediatric sickle cell disease.

  10. Arrhythmogenic KCNE gene variants: current knowledge and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn M Crump

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are twenty-five known inherited cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility genes, all of which encode either ion channel pore-forming subunits or proteins that regulate aspects of ion channel biology such as function, trafficking and localization. The human KCNE gene family comprises five potassium channel regulatory subunits, sequence variants in each of which are associated with cardiac arrhythmias. KCNE gene products exhibit promiscuous partnering and in some cases ubiquitous expression, hampering efforts to unequivocally correlate each gene to specific native potassium currents. Likewise, deducing the molecular etiology of cardiac arrhythmias in individuals harboring rare KCNE gene variants, or more common KCNE polymorphisms, can be challenging. In this review we provide an update on putative arrhythmia-causing KCNE gene variants, and discuss current thinking and future challenges in the study of molecular mechanisms of KCNE-associated cardiac rhythm disturbances.

  11. Genome-wide screen identifies new candidate genes associated with artemisinin susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Borrmann, Steffen; Straimer, Judith; Mwai, Leah; Abdi, Abdirahman; Rippert, Anja; Okombo, John; Muriithi, Steven; Sasi, Philip; Kortok, Moses Mosobo; LOWE, BRETT; Campino, Susana; Assefa, Samuel; Auburn, Sarah; Manske, Magnus; Maslen, Gareth

    2013-01-01

    Early identification of causal genetic variants underlying antimalarial drug resistance could provide robust epidemiological tools for timely public health interventions. Using a novel natural genetics strategy for mapping novel candidate genes we analyzed >75,000 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from high-resolution whole-genome sequencing data in 27 isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. We identified genetic variants associated with susceptibility to dihydroartemisinin tha...

  12. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Trubicka Joanna; Grabowska-Kłujszo Ewa; Suchy Janina; Masojć Bartłomiej; Serrano-Fernandez Pablo; Kurzawski Grzegorz; Cybulski Cezary; Górski Bohdan; Huzarski Tomasz; Byrski Tomasz; Gronwald Jacek; Złowocka Elżbieta; Kładny Józef; Banaszkiewicz Zbigniew; Wiśniowski Rafał

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be ...

  13. DAZLA: an important candidate gene in male subfertility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, R.J.T. van; Tuerlings, J.H.A.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Schoute, F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the role of the autosomal candidate gene DAZLA (Deleted in AZoospermia Like Autosome) in male subfertility. METHODS: We reviewed clinical data of subfertile men with oligozoospermia or azoospermia, mostly candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Mutation detection wa

  14. The Important Candidate Genes in Goats - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    China SUPAKORN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 271 candidate genes have been detected in goats. However, comprehensive investigations have been carried out on the polymorphism of some genes, involved in the control of economic traits. Candidate genes have an effect on the physiological pathway, metabolism and expression of phenotypes. For growth traits, growth hormone (GH, growth hormone receptor (GHR, insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I, leptin (LEP, caprine pituitary specific transcription factor-1 (POU1F1, caprine myostatin (MSTN and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP genes are necessary for bone formation, birth weight, weaning weight, body condition and muscle growth. For reproduction, forkhead box L 2 (FOXL2, melatonin receptor 1A (MTNR1A, sex determination region of Y chromosome (SRY and amelogenin (AMEL genes influence sex determination and proliferation. The major candidate genes for milk yield and milk composition traits are the casein gene and their family. Keratin associated protein (KAP and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R genes are candidate genes for wool traits. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC gene is considered important for the immune system and disease resistance traits. The functions of these genes on economically important traits are different. Some genes have synergistic or antagonistic effects in nature for expression of phenotypic traits. On the other hand, some genes could control more than one trait. Also, the producers should be concerned with these effects because selection of a single trait by using only a gene could affect other traits. Therefore, the identification of candidate genes and their mutations which cause variations of gene expression and phenotype of economic traits will help breeders to search some genetic markers for these economic traits. It may be used as an aid in the selection of parent stock at an early age in the future.

  15. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  16. PIN1 gene variants in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siedlecki Janusz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1 plays a significant role in the brain and is implicated in numerous cellular processes related to Alzheimer's disease (AD and other neurodegenerative conditions. There are confounding results concerning PIN1 activity in AD brains. Also PIN1 genetic variation was inconsistently associated with AD risk. Methods We performed analysis of coding and promoter regions of PIN1 in early- and late-onset AD and frontotemporal dementia (FTD patients in comparison with healthy controls. Results Analysis of eighteen PIN1 common polymorphisms and their haplotypes in EOAD, LOAD and FTD individuals in comparison with the control group did not reveal their contribution to disease risk. In six unrelated familial AD patients four novel PIN1 sequence variants were detected. c.58+64C>T substitution that was identified in three patients, was located in an alternative exon. In silico analysis suggested that this variant highly increases a potential affinity for a splicing factor and introduces two intronic splicing enhancers. In the peripheral leukocytes of one living patient carrying the variant, a 2.82 fold decrease in PIN1 expression was observed. Conclusion Our data does not support the role of PIN1 common polymorphisms as AD risk factor. However, we suggest that the identified rare sequence variants could be directly connected with AD pathology, influencing PIN1 splicing and/or expression.

  17. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate; Wijsman, Ellen M; Nato, Alejandro Q; Matsushita, Mark M; Chapman, Kathy L; Stanaway, Ian B; Wolff, John; Oda, Kaori; Gabo, Virginia B; Raskind, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1) on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS.

  18. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  19. Targeted sequencing of 351 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in a large cohort of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Brilstra, Eva H; van Kempen, Marjan J A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many genes are candidates for involvement in epileptic encephalopathy (EE) because one or a few possibly pathogenic variants have been found in patients, but insufficient genetic or functional evidence exists for a definite annotation. METHODS: To increase the number of validated EE......, intellectual disability gene can lead to phenotypes that get classified as EE in the clinic. We confirmed existing literature reports that de novo loss-of-function HNRNPUmutations lead to severe developmental delay and febrile seizures in the first year of life....

  20. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Gaudio, Francesca Di [Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Antonio, E-mail: lab-oncobiologia@usa.net [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-09-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance.

  1. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense...

  2. Utilization of Gene Mapping and Candidate Gene Mutation Screening for Diagnosing Clinically Equivocal Conditions:A Norrie Disease Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliki Chini; Danai Stambouli; Florina Mihaela Nedelea; George Alexandru Filipescu; Diana Mina; Marios Kambouris; Hatem El-Shanti

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis was requested for an undiagnosed eye disease showing X-linked inheritance in a family. No medical records existed for the affected family members..Mapping of the X chromosome and candidate gene mutation screening i-dentified a c.C267A[p.F89L] mutation in NPD previously de-scribed as possibly causing Norrie disease..The detection of the c.C267A[p.F89L] variant in another unrelated family con-firms the pathogenic nature of the mutation for the Norrie dis-ease phenotype. Gene mapping, haplotype analysis, and can-didate gene screening have been previously utilized in research applications but were applied here in a diagnostic setting due to the scarcity of available clinical information..The clinical diagnosis and mutation identification were critical for provid-ing proper genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for this family.

  3. Generating Genome-Scale Candidate Gene Lists for Pharmacogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niclas Tue; Brunak, Søren; Altman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    A critical task in pharmacogenomics is identifying genes that may be important modulators of drug response. High-throughput experimental methods are often plagued by false positives and do not take advantage of existing knowledge. Candidate gene lists can usefully summarize existing knowledge...

  4. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  5. Candidate genes for idiopathic epilepsy in four dog breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickelson James R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic epilepsy (IE is a naturally occurring and significant seizure disorder affecting all dog breeds. Because dog breeds are genetically isolated populations, it is possible that IE is attributable to common founders and is genetically homogenous within breeds. In humans, a number of mutations, the majority of which are genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters, or their regulatory subunits, have been discovered to cause rare, specific types of IE. It was hypothesized that there are simple genetic bases for IE in some purebred dog breeds, specifically in Vizslas, English Springer Spaniels (ESS, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs (GSMD, and Beagles, and that the gene(s responsible may, in some cases, be the same as those already discovered in humans. Results Candidate genes known to be involved in human epilepsy, along with selected additional genes in the same gene families that are involved in murine epilepsy or are expressed in neural tissue, were examined in populations of affected and unaffected dogs. Microsatellite markers in close proximity to each candidate gene were genotyped and subjected to two-point linkage in Vizslas, and association analysis in ESS, GSMD and Beagles. Conclusions Most of these candidate genes were not significantly associated with IE in these four dog breeds, while a few genes remained inconclusive. Other genes not included in this study may still be causing monogenic IE in these breeds or, like many cases of human IE, the disease in dogs may be likewise polygenic.

  6. BRCA Share: A Collection of Clinical BRCA Gene Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béroud, Christophe; Letovsky, Stanley I; Braastad, Corey D; Caputo, Sandrine M; Beaudoux, Olivia; Bignon, Yves Jean; Bressac-De Paillerets, Brigitte; Bronner, Myriam; Buell, Crystal M; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle; Coulet, Florence; Derive, Nicolas; Divincenzo, Christina; Elzinga, Christopher D; Garrec, Céline; Houdayer, Claude; Karbassi, Izabela; Lizard, Sarab; Love, Angela; Muller, Danièle; Nagan, Narasimhan; Nery, Camille R; Rai, Ghadi; Revillion, Françoise; Salgado, David; Sévenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga; Sobol, Hagay; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Toulas, Christine; Trautman, Edwin; Vaur, Dominique; Vilquin, Paul; Weymouth, Katelyn S; Willis, Alecia; Eisenberg, Marcia; Strom, Charles M

    2016-12-01

    As next-generation sequencing increases access to human genetic variation, the challenge of determining clinical significance of variants becomes ever more acute. Germline variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes can confer substantial lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Assessment of variant pathogenicity is a vital part of clinical genetic testing for these genes. A database of clinical observations of BRCA variants is a critical resource in that process. This article describes BRCA Share™, a database created by a unique international alliance of academic centers and commercial testing laboratories. By integrating the content of the Universal Mutation Database generated by the French Unicancer Genetic Group with the testing results of two large commercial laboratories, Quest Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp), BRCA Share™ has assembled one of the largest publicly accessible collections of BRCA variants currently available. Although access is available to academic researchers without charge, commercial participants in the project are required to pay a support fee and contribute their data. The fees fund the ongoing curation effort, as well as planned experiments to functionally characterize variants of uncertain significance. BRCA Share™ databases can therefore be considered as models of successful data sharing between private companies and the academic world.

  7. Identification of candidate genes for dissecting complex branch number trait in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Das, Shouvik; Kumar, Vinod; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-04-01

    The present study exploited integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy for genetic dissection of complex branch number quantitative trait in chickpea. Candidate gene-based association analysis in a branch number association panel was performed by utilizing the genotyping data of 401 SNP allelic variants mined from 27 known cloned branch number gene orthologs of chickpea. The genome-wide association study (GWAS) integrating both genome-wide GBS- (4556 SNPs) and candidate gene-based genotyping information of 4957 SNPs in a structured population of 60 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions (with 350-400 kb LD decay), detected 11 significant genomic loci (genes) associated (41% combined PVE) with branch number in chickpea. Of these, seven branch number-associated genes were further validated successfully in two inter (ICC 4958 × ICC 17160)- and intra (ICC 12299 × ICC 8261)-specific mapping populations. The axillary meristem and shoot apical meristem-specific expression, including differential up- and down-regulation (4-5 fold) of the validated seven branch number-associated genes especially in high branch number as compared to the low branch number-containing parental accessions and homozygous individuals of two aforesaid mapping populations was apparent. Collectively, this combinatorial genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in seven potential known/candidate genes [PIN1 (PIN-FORMED protein 1), TB1 (teosinte branched 1), BA1/LAX1 (BARREN STALK1/LIKE AUXIN1), GRAS8 (gibberellic acid insensitive/GAI, Repressor of ga13/RGA and Scarecrow8/SCR8), ERF (ethylene-responsive element-binding factor), MAX2 (more axillary growth 2) and lipase] governing chickpea branch number. The useful information generated from this study have potential to expedite marker-assisted genetic enhancement by developing high-yielding cultivars with more number of productive (pods and seeds) branches in chickpea.

  8. Validation of candidate genes associated with cardiovascular risk factors in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose; Goethe, John W; Schwartz, Harold I; Woolley, Stephen; Susce, Margaret; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Holford, Theodore R; Seip, Richard L; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2012-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants predictive of cardiovascular risk factors in a psychiatric population treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGA). 924 patients undergoing treatment for severe mental illness at four US hospitals were genotyped at 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Patients were assessed for fasting serum lipid (low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDLc], high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLc], and triglycerides) and obesity phenotypes (body mass index, BMI). Thirteen candidate genes from previous studies of the same phenotypes in non-psychiatric populations were tested for association. We confirmed 8 of the 13 candidate genes at the 95% confidence level. An increased genetic effect size was observed for triglycerides in the psychiatric population compared to that in the cardiovascular population.

  9. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA variant at HVI region as a candidate of genetic markers of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumilar, Gun Gun; Purnamasari, Yunita; Setiadi, Rahmat

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is maternally inherited. mtDNA mutations which can contribute to the excess of maternal inheritance of type 2 diabetes. Due to the high mutation rate, one of the areas in the mtDNA that is often associated with the disease is the hypervariable region I (HVI). Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the genetic variants of human mtDNA HVI that related to the type 2 diabetes in four samples that were taken from four generations in one lineage. Steps being taken include the lyses of hair follicles, amplification of mtDNA HVI fragment using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), detection of PCR products through agarose gel electrophoresis technique, the measurement of the concentration of mtDNA using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, determination of the nucleotide sequence via direct sequencing method and analysis of the sequencing results using SeqMan DNASTAR program. Based on the comparison between nucleotide sequence of samples and revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS) obtained six same mutations that these are C16147T, T16189C, C16193del, T16127C, A16235G, and A16293C. After comparing the data obtained to the secondary data from Mitomap and NCBI, it were found that two mutations, T16189C and T16217C, become candidates as genetic markers of type 2 diabetes even the mutations were found also in the generations of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The results of this study are expected to give contribution to the collection of human mtDNA database of genetic variants that associated to metabolic diseases, so that in the future it can be utilized in various fields, especially in medicine.

  11. Gene Variants Associated With Deep Vein Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, Irene D.; Bare, Lance A.; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Arellano, Andre R.; Tong, Carmen; Rowland, Charles M.; Catanese, Joseph; Young, Bradford A.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Devlin, James J.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2008-01-01

    Context The genetic causes of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are not fully understood. Objective To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with DVT. Design, Setting, and Patients We used 3 case-control studies of first DVT. A total of 19 682 gene-centric SNPs were genotyped in 44

  12. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  13. SEMG1 may be the candidate gene for idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Zhou, Q; Wei, Q; Li, J; Feng, C; Mao, X

    2014-03-01

    Asthenozoospermia (AZS) is a major cause of male infertility, aetiology of which is reported to be related with gene mutation or deletion. However, studies on candidate genes for AZS are very scarce. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles of asthenozoosperm. Gene expression profile analyses with microarray on spermatozoa specimens from 12 asthenozoosperm patients and 12 age-matched volunteers were performed; data analysis was performed with bioinformatics tools. Data analysis revealed that 1265 and 262 genes were significantly (P < 0.05) and differently expressed (≥2-fold) between groups performed with GeneSpring and BRB-ArrayTools respectively. Of these differently expressed genes, 71 were identified as molecular signatures of asthenozoosperm, of which most involved in primary metabolic process and cellular metabolic process. Molecular signatures were filtered performed with NextBio, 21 genes were identified to be specially expressed in asthenozoosperm. We used Finding Associated Concepts with Text Analysis to match the specially expressed genes against the MEDLINE database and found SEMG1 and PGAP1 were related to male fertility. Validation of the microarray data of SEMG1 was carried out using real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that SEMG1 was significantly changed in asthenozoosperm, which could be the candidate gene for the development of diagnostic marker and provided the opportunity to further illustrate the biological mechanisms of asthenozoosperm.

  14. Gene-gene interaction between tuberculosis candidate genes in a South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Erika; van der Merwe, Lize; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2011-02-01

    In a complex disease such as tuberculosis (TB) it is increasingly evident that gene-gene interactions play a far more important role in an individual's susceptibility to develop the disease than single polymorphisms on their own, as one gene can enhance or hinder the expression of another gene. Gene-gene interaction analysis is a new approach to elucidate susceptibility to TB. The possibility of gene-gene interactions was assessed, focusing on 11 polymorphisms in nine genes (DC-SIGN, IFN-γ, IFNGR1, IL-8, IL-1Ra, MBL, NRAMP1, RANTES, and SP-D) that have been associated with TB, some repeatedly. An optimal model, which best describes and predicts TB case-control status, was constructed. Significant interactions were detected between eight pairs of variants. The models fitted the observed data extremely well, with p activation is greatly enhanced by IFN-γ and IFN-γ response elements that are present in the human NRAMP1 promoter region, providing further evidence for their interaction. This study enabled us to test the theory that disease outcome may be due to interaction of several gene effects. With eight instances of statistically significant gene-gene interactions, the importance of epistasis is clearly identifiable in this study. Methods for studying gene-gene interactions are based on a multilocus and multigene approach, consistent with the nature of complex-trait diseases, and may provide the paradigm for future genetic studies of TB.

  15. Discovery and characterization of antibody variants using mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis for biosimilar candidates of monoclonal antibody drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhua; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Dongmei; Xu, Jun; Ke, Zhi; Suen, Wen-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the most commonly used technique for the characterization of antibody variants. MAb-X and mAb-Y are two approved IgG1 subtype monoclonal antibody drugs recombinantly produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We report here that two unexpected and rare antibody variants have been discovered during cell culture process development of biosimilars for these two approved drugs through intact mass analysis. We then used comprehensive mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis including reduced light, heavy chains, and domain-specific mass as well as peptide mapping analysis to fully characterize the observed antibody variants. The "middle-up" mass comparative analysis demonstrated that the antibody variant from mAb-X biosimilar candidate was caused by mass variation of antibody crystalline fragment (Fc), whereas a different variant with mass variation in antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab) from mAb-Y biosimilar candidate was identified. Endoproteinase Lys-C digested peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry analysis further revealed that a leucine to glutamine change in N-terminal 402 site of heavy chain was responsible for the generation of mAb-X antibody variant. Lys-C and trypsin coupled non-reduced and reduced peptide mapping comparative analysis showed that the formation of the light-heavy interchain trisulfide bond resulted in the mAb-Y antibody variant. These two cases confirmed that mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis plays a critical role for the characterization of monoclonal antibody variants, and biosimilar developers should start with a comprehensive structural assessment and comparative analysis to decrease the risk of the process development for biosimilars.

  16. Bioinformatics-driven identification and examination of candidate genes for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Banasik

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Candidate genes for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD identified by a bioinformatics approach were examined for variant associations to quantitative traits of NAFLD-related phenotypes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: By integrating public database text mining, trans-organism protein-protein interaction transferal, and information on liver protein expression a protein-protein interaction network was constructed and from this a smaller isolated interactome was identified. Five genes from this interactome were selected for genetic analysis. Twenty-one tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs which captured all common variation in these genes were genotyped in 10,196 Danes, and analyzed for association with NAFLD-related quantitative traits, type 2 diabetes (T2D, central obesity, and WHO-defined metabolic syndrome (MetS. RESULTS: 273 genes were included in the protein-protein interaction analysis and EHHADH, ECHS1, HADHA, HADHB, and ACADL were selected for further examination. A total of 10 nominal statistical significant associations (P<0.05 to quantitative metabolic traits were identified. Also, the case-control study showed associations between variation in the five genes and T2D, central obesity, and MetS, respectively. Bonferroni adjustments for multiple testing negated all associations. CONCLUSIONS: Using a bioinformatics approach we identified five candidate genes for NAFLD. However, we failed to provide evidence of associations with major effects between SNPs in these five genes and NAFLD-related quantitative traits, T2D, central obesity, and MetS.

  17. Medical sequencing of candidate genes for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre R Vieira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic or isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P occurs in wide geographic distribution with an average birth prevalence of 1/700. We used direct sequencing as an approach to study candidate genes for CL/P. We report here the results of sequencing on 20 candidate genes for clefts in 184 cases with CL/P selected with an emphasis on severity and positive family history. Genes were selected based on expression patterns, animal models, and/or role in known human clefting syndromes. For seven genes with identified coding mutations that are potentially etiologic, we performed linkage disequilibrium studies as well in 501 family triads (affected child/mother/father. The recently reported MSX1 P147Q mutation was also studied in an additional 1,098 cleft cases. Selected missense mutations were screened in 1,064 controls from unrelated individuals on the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH diversity cell line panel. Our aggregate data suggest that point mutations in these candidate genes are likely to contribute to 6% of isolated clefts, particularly those with more severe phenotypes (bilateral cleft of the lip with cleft palate. Additional cases, possibly due to microdeletions or isodisomy, were also detected and may contribute to clefts as well. Sequence analysis alone suggests that point mutations in FOXE1, GLI2, JAG2, LHX8, MSX1, MSX2, SATB2, SKI, SPRY2, and TBX10 may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and the linkage disequilibrium data support a larger, as yet unspecified, role for variants in or near MSX2, JAG2, and SKI. This study also illustrates the need to test large numbers of controls to distinguish rare polymorphic variants and prioritize functional studies for rare point mutations.

  18. Medical Sequencing of Candidate Genes for Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic or isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P occurs in wide geographic distribution with an average birth prevalence of 1/700. We used direct sequencing as an approach to study candidate genes for CL/P. We report here the results of sequencing on 20 candidate genes for clefts in 184 cases with CL/P selected with an emphasis on severity and positive family history. Genes were selected based on expression patterns, animal models, and/or role in known human clefting syndromes. For seven genes with identified coding mutations that are potentially etiologic, we performed linkage disequilibrium studies as well in 501 family triads (affected child/mother/father. The recently reported MSX1 P147Q mutation was also studied in an additional 1,098 cleft cases. Selected missense mutations were screened in 1,064 controls from unrelated individuals on the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH diversity cell line panel. Our aggregate data suggest that point mutations in these candidate genes are likely to contribute to 6% of isolated clefts, particularly those with more severe phenotypes (bilateral cleft of the lip with cleft palate. Additional cases, possibly due to microdeletions or isodisomy, were also detected and may contribute to clefts as well. Sequence analysis alone suggests that point mutations in FOXE1, GLI2, JAG2, LHX8, MSX1, MSX2, SATB2, SKI, SPRY2, and TBX10 may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and the linkage disequilibrium data support a larger, as yet unspecified, role for variants in or near MSX2, JAG2, and SKI. This study also illustrates the need to test large numbers of controls to distinguish rare polymorphic variants and prioritize functional studies for rare point mutations.

  19. Association of an ACSL1 gene variant with polyunsaturated fatty acids in bovine skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widmann Philipp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intramuscular fat deposition and the fatty acid profiles of beef affect meat quality. High proportions of unsaturated fatty acids are related to beef flavor and are beneficial for the nutritional value of meat. Moreover, a variety of clinical and epidemiologic studies showed that particularly long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from animal sources have a positive impact on human health and disease. Results To screen for genetic factors affecting fatty acid profiles in beef, we initially performed a microsatellite-based genome scan in a F2 Charolais × German Holstein resource population and identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL for fatty acid composition in a region on bovine chromosome 27 where previously QTL affecting marbling score had been detected in beef cattle populations. The long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1 gene was identified as the most plausible functional and positional candidate gene in the QTL interval due to its direct impact on fatty acid metabolism and its position in the QTL interval. ACSL1 is necessary for synthesis of long-chain acyl-CoA esters, fatty acid degradation and phospholipid remodeling. We validated the genomic annotation of the bovine ACSL1 gene by in silico comparative sequence analysis and experimental verification. Re-sequencing of the complete coding, exon-flanking intronic sequences, 3' untranslated region (3'UTR and partial promoter region of the ACSL1 gene revealed three synonymous mutations in exons 6, 7, and 20, six noncoding intronic gene variants, six polymorphisms in the promoter region, and four variants in the 3' UTR region. The association analysis identified the gene variant in intron 5 of the ACSL1 gene (c.481-233A>G to be significantly associated with the relative content of distinct fractions and ratios of fatty acids (e.g., n-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated, n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, trans vaccenic acid in skeletal muscle. A tentative association

  20. Testing of candidate single nucleotide variants associated with paclitaxel neuropathy in the trial NCCTG N08C1 (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boora, Ganesh K; Kanwar, Rahul; Kulkarni, Amit A; Abyzov, Alexej; Sloan, Jeff; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Banck, Michaela S; Loprinzi, Charles L; Beutler, Andreas S

    2016-04-01

    Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy (PIPN) cannot be predicted from clinical parameters and might have a pharmacogenomic basis. Previous studies identified single nucleotide variants (SNV) associated with PIPN. However, only a subset of findings has been confirmed to date in more than one study, suggesting a need for further re-testing and validation in additional clinical cohorts. Candidate PIPN-associated SNVs were identified from the literature. SNVs were retested in 119 patients selected by extreme phenotyping from 269 in NCCTG N08C1 (Alliance) as previously reported. SNV genotyping was performed by a combination of short-read sequencing analysis and Taqman PCR. These 22 candidate PIPN SNVs were genotyped. Two of these, rs7349683 in the EPHA5 and rs3213619 in ABCB1 were found to be significantly associated with PIPN with an Odds ratios OR = 2.07 (P = 0.02) and OR = 0.12 (P = 0.03), respectively. In addition, three SNVs showed a trend toward a risk- or protective effect that was consistent with previous reports. The rs10509681 and rs11572080 in the gene CYP2C8*3 showed risk effect with an OR = 1.49 and rs1056836 in CYP1B1 showed a protective effect with an OR = 0.66. None of the other results supported the previously reported associations, including some SNVs displaying an opposite direction of effect from previous reports, including rs1058930 in CYP2C8, rs17222723 and rs8187710 in ABCC2, rs10771973 in FGD4, rs16916932 in CACNB2 and rs16948748 in PITPNA. Alliance N08C1 validated or supported a minority of previously reported SNV-PIPN associations. Associations previously reported by multiple studies appeared to have a higher likelihood to be validated by Alliance N08C1.

  1. Type 1 Diabetes Candidate Genes Linked to Pancreatic Islet Cell Inflammation and Beta-Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic immune-mediated disease resulting from the selective destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. Susceptibility to the disease is the result of complex interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 50 genetic regions that affect the risk of developing T1D. Most of these susceptibility loci, however, harbor several genes, and the causal variant(s) and gene(s) for most of the loci remain to be established. A significant part of the genes located in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human islets and β cells and mounting evidence suggests that some of these genes modulate the β-cell response to the immune system and viral infection and regulate apoptotic β-cell death. Here, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on pancreatic islet cell inflammation and β-cell apoptosis. PMID:28212332

  2. Type 1 Diabetes Candidate Genes Linked to Pancreatic Islet Cell Inflammation and Beta-Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-02-16

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic immune-mediated disease resulting from the selective destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. Susceptibility to the disease is the result of complex interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 50 genetic regions that affect the risk of developing T1D. Most of these susceptibility loci, however, harbor several genes, and the causal variant(s) and gene(s) for most of the loci remain to be established. A significant part of the genes located in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human islets and β cells and mounting evidence suggests that some of these genes modulate the β-cell response to the immune system and viral infection and regulate apoptotic β-cell death. Here, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on pancreatic islet cell inflammation and β-cell apoptosis.

  3. Genetic variants in epigenetic genes and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrian, Arancha; Pharoah, Paul D; Ahmed, Shahana; Ropero, Santiago; Fraga, Mario F; Smith, Paula L; Conroy, Don; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Esteller, Manel; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2006-08-01

    Epigenetic events, resulting changes in gene expression capacity, are important in tumour progression, and variation in genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms might therefore be important in cancer susceptibility. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined common variants in 12 genes coding for DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetyltransferases, histone methyltrasferases and methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, for association with breast cancer in a large case-control study (N cases = 4474 and N controls = 4580). We identified 63 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that efficiently tag all the known common variants in these genes, and are also expected to tag any unknown SNP in each gene. We found some evidence for association for six SNPs: DNMT3b-c31721t [P (2 df) = 0.007], PRDM2-c99243 t [P (2 df) = 0.03] and t105413c [P-recessive = 0.05], EHMT1-g-9441a [P (2df) = 0.05] and g41451t (P-trend = 0.04), and EHMT2-S237S [P (2df) = 0.04]. The most significant result was for DNMT3b-c31721t (P-trend = 0.124 after adjusting for multiple testing). However, there were three other results with P variants in histone methyltransferases, and warrant the design of larger epidemiological and biochemical studies to establish the true meaning of these findings.

  4. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  5. A novel splice variant of the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene in the wild silkworm, Bombyx mandarina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Woori; Choi, Jung-Won; Ryul Kim, Seong; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Kee-Young; Goo, Tae-Won; Park, Seung-Won

    2015-10-23

    Decapentaplegic (dpp) is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. Although the dpp gene and related pathways are known to play important roles in insect development, few studies have examined its function in Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina. To date, there have been no previous reports on novel splice variants of dpp in silkworm. In the present study, we conducted RT-PCR to examine dpp expression in the mid-gut tissue of B. mandarina and discovered a novel dpp isoform. The isoform sequence was confirmed using sequencing analysis and found to have 333 bp deletion compared to full-length cDNA encoding dpp. The deleted sequence encodes a region of the latency associated peptide (LAP) region of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), which may affect the activity and specificity of TGF-β. Using variant calling analyses, we detected 7 candidate single nucleotide variants (SNVs) for different alternative splicing in dpp. This is the first report of a novel splice variant of the dpp gene in B. mandarina and these results provide insight about the domestication process and distinct phenotypic traits of B. mori and B. mandarina.

  6. The rs3857059 variant of the SNCA gene is associated with Parkinson's disease in Mexican Mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, S; Chavira-Hernández, G; Gallegos-Arreola, M P; Dávila-Maldonado, L; García Martínez, F; Montes Almanza, L A; Palma-Flores, C; Mondragón-Terán, P; Alcaraz Estrada, S L; López-Hernández, L B

    2016-06-01

    Among the candidate genes for Parkinson's disease (PD), SNCA has replicated association in different populations. Besides other known mutations in the SNCA gene, the rs3857059 variant has also been linked to various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to search for association of this variant and sporadic PD in Mexican Mestizo patients. A case-control study was performed including 241 individuals, 106 patients, and 135 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using real-time PCR. The rs3857059 variant demonstrated an association with PD in Mexican Mestizos (OR = 2.40, CI, 1.1 to 5.1, p = 0.02) under the recessive model. In addition, a gender effect was found for the GG genotype in females (OR = 1.31, CI, 1.01 to 1.7, p = 0.037). This is the first study to confirm an association of the rs3857059 variant with PD and also to show a gender effect. Our data contribute to the elucidation of the link between rs3857059 and susceptibility to PD observed in the Mexican Mestizo population.

  7. Rare coding variants in the phospholipase D3 gene confer risk for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimer's disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimer's disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid-β peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex

  8. Identification of candidate genes for dyslexia susceptibility on chromosome 18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Scerri

    Full Text Available Six independent studies have identified linkage to chromosome 18 for developmental dyslexia or general reading ability. Until now, no candidate genes have been identified to explain this linkage. Here, we set out to identify the gene(s conferring susceptibility by a two stage strategy of linkage and association analysis.Linkage analysis: 264 UK families and 155 US families each containing at least one child diagnosed with dyslexia were genotyped with a dense set of microsatellite markers on chromosome 18. Association analysis: Using a discovery sample of 187 UK families, nearly 3000 SNPs were genotyped across the chromosome 18 dyslexia susceptibility candidate region. Following association analysis, the top ranking SNPs were then genotyped in the remaining samples. The linkage analysis revealed a broad signal that spans approximately 40 Mb from 18p11.2 to 18q12.2. Following the association analysis and subsequent replication attempts, we observed consistent association with the same SNPs in three genes; melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R, dymeclin (DYM and neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4-like (NEDD4L.Along with already published biological evidence, MC5R, DYM and NEDD4L make attractive candidates for dyslexia susceptibility genes. However, further replication and functional studies are still required.

  9. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  10. Candidate gene markers for sperm quality and fertility in bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmoy Mishra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fertility is one of the primary traits of reproduction in bulls. Decrease in fertility is a multifactorial condition and is verydifficult to diagnose. Among various causes genetic abnormality holds a major share. By identifying various genes that haveeffects on fertility the genetic cause behind subferility can be explored and also other non genetic factors can be identified.Advancement of molecular genetic tools now easily enables us to explore individual genes in animals. Identification of thesegenes will eventually lead to genome assembly and development of novel tools for analysing complex genetic traits. Thispaper gives a brief idea about the candidate genes for bull fertility, including genes encoding hormones and their receptors,proteins of the seminal plasma, proteins involved in spermatozoa-ovum binding and genes influencing sexual development.The chromosomal location and gene structure are described, based on the bovine genome assembly.

  11. Candidate chemosensory genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides.

  12. No Evidence for Association between Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Candidate Genes

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    M Ghandehari Motlagh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is an inherited tooth disorder. Despite the fact that up to now, several gene muta­tions in MMP20, ENAM, AMELX and KLK4 genes have been reported to be associated with AI, many other genes sug­gested to be involved. The main objective of this study was to find the mutations in three major candidate genes including MMP20, ENAM and KLK4 responsible for AI from three Iranian families with generalized hypoplastic phenotype in all teeth. "nMethods: All exon/intron boundaries of subjected genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct sequencing."nResults: One polymorphisms was identified in KLK4 exon 2, in one family a homozygous mutation was found in the third base of codon 22 for serine (TCG>TCT, but not in other families. Although these base substitutions have been occurred in the signaling domain, they do not seem to influence the activity of KLK4 protein."nConclusion: Our results might support the further evidence for genetic heterogeneity; at least, in some AI cases are not caused by a gene in these reported candidate genes.

  13. Speeding disease gene discovery by sequence based candidate prioritization

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    Porteous David J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regions of interest identified through genetic linkage studies regularly exceed 30 centimorgans in size and can contain hundreds of genes. Traditionally this number is reduced by matching functional annotation to knowledge of the disease or phenotype in question. However, here we show that disease genes share patterns of sequence-based features that can provide a good basis for automatic prioritization of candidates by machine learning. Results We examined a variety of sequence-based features and found that for many of them there are significant differences between the sets of genes known to be involved in human hereditary disease and those not known to be involved in disease. We have created an automatic classifier called PROSPECTR based on those features using the alternating decision tree algorithm which ranks genes in the order of likelihood of involvement in disease. On average, PROSPECTR enriches lists for disease genes two-fold 77% of the time, five-fold 37% of the time and twenty-fold 11% of the time. Conclusion PROSPECTR is a simple and effective way to identify genes involved in Mendelian and oligogenic disorders. It performs markedly better than the single existing sequence-based classifier on novel data. PROSPECTR could save investigators looking at large regions of interest time and effort by prioritizing positional candidate genes for mutation detection and case-control association studies.

  14. An Excess of Deleterious Variants in VEGF-A Pathway Genes in Down-Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Christine; Locke, Adam E.; Feingold, Eleanor; Reshey, Benjamin; Espana, Karina; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Bean, Lora J.H.; Dooley, Kenneth J.; Cua, Clifford L.; Reeves, Roger H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    About half of people with trisomy 21 have a congenital heart defect (CHD), whereas the remainder have a structurally normal heart, demonstrating that trisomy 21 is a significant risk factor but is not causal for abnormal heart development. Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are the most commonly occurring heart defects in Down syndrome (DS), and ∼65% of all AVSD is associated with DS. We used a candidate-gene approach among individuals with DS and complete AVSD (cases = 141) and DS with no CHD (controls = 141) to determine whether rare genetic variants in genes involved in atrioventricular valvuloseptal morphogenesis contribute to AVSD in this sensitized population. We found a significant excess (p < 0.0001) of variants predicted to be deleterious in cases compared to controls. At the most stringent level of filtering, we found potentially damaging variants in nearly 20% of cases but fewer than 3% of controls. The variants with the highest probability of being damaging in cases only were found in six genes: COL6A1, COL6A2, CRELD1, FBLN2, FRZB, and GATA5. Several of the case-specific variants were recurrent in unrelated individuals, occurring in 10% of cases studied. No variants with an equal probability of being damaging were found in controls, demonstrating a highly specific association with AVSD. Of note, all of these genes are in the VEGF-A pathway, even though the candidate genes analyzed in this study represented numerous biochemical and developmental pathways, suggesting that rare variants in the VEGF-A pathway might contribute to the genetic underpinnings of AVSD in humans. PMID:23040494

  15. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune H; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan;

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approach...... validate the relevance of the prioritized genes by showing that they are enriched for rare disruptive variants and de novo variants from schizophrenia sequencing studies (odds ratio 1.67, P=0.039), and are enriched for genes encoding members of mouse and human postsynaptic density proteomes (odds ratio 4......, we show that genes in associated loci: (1) are highly expressed in cortical brain areas; (2) are enriched for ion channel pathways (false discovery ratesgenes that are functionally related to each other and hence represent promising candidates for experimental follow up. We...

  16. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  17. Reranking candidate gene models with cross-species comparison for improved gene prediction

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    Pereira Fernando CN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most gene finders score candidate gene models with state-based methods, typically HMMs, by combining local properties (coding potential, splice donor and acceptor patterns, etc. Competing models with similar state-based scores may be distinguishable with additional information. In particular, functional and comparative genomics datasets may help to select among competing models of comparable probability by exploiting features likely to be associated with the correct gene models, such as conserved exon/intron structure or protein sequence features. Results We have investigated the utility of a simple post-processing step for selecting among a set of alternative gene models, using global scoring rules to rerank competing models for more accurate prediction. For each gene locus, we first generate the K best candidate gene models using the gene finder Evigan, and then rerank these models using comparisons with putative orthologous genes from closely-related species. Candidate gene models with lower scores in the original gene finder may be selected if they exhibit strong similarity to probable orthologs in coding sequence, splice site location, or signal peptide occurrence. Experiments on Drosophila melanogaster demonstrate that reranking based on cross-species comparison outperforms the best gene models identified by Evigan alone, and also outperforms the comparative gene finders GeneWise and Augustus+. Conclusion Reranking gene models with cross-species comparison improves gene prediction accuracy. This straightforward method can be readily adapted to incorporate additional lines of evidence, as it requires only a ranked source of candidate gene models.

  18. Candidate gene copy number analysis by PCR and multicapillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szantai, Eszter; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Guttman, András; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria

    2009-04-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are often considered as risk factors of complex diseases serving as valuable and easily detectable biomarkers, also stable during the whole lifespan. A novel type of genetic polymorphism has been identified just recently, referred to as gene copy number variation (CNV) or copy number polymorphism. CNV of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and its adjacent gene, Nr1i2 (pregnane X receptor isoform), has been reported to associate with bipolar depression. In our study we introduced multicapillary electrophoresis for gene copy number analysis as an affordable alternative to real-time PCR quantification with TaqMan gene probes. Our results show the reliability of the developed method based on conventional PCR followed by separation of products by multicapillary electrophoresis with quantitative evaluation. This method can be readily implemented for the analysis of candidate gene CNVs in high throughput clinical laboratories and also in personalized medicine care of depression-related risk factors.

  19. Cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes implicated in a nicotine dependence association study targeting 348 candidate genes with 3713 SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Scott F; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Nancy L; Chase, Gary A; Konvicka, Karel; Madden, Pamela A F; Breslau, Naomi; Johnson, Eric O; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Pomerleau, Ovide; Swan, Gary E; Goate, Alison M; Rutter, Joni; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fox, Louis; Fugman, Douglas; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Wang, Jen C; Ballinger, Dennis G; Rice, John P; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is one of the world's leading causes of preventable death. To discover genetic variants that influence risk for nicotine dependence, we targeted over 300 candidate genes and analyzed 3713 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1050 cases and 879 controls. The Fagerström test for nicotine dependence (FTND) was used to assess dependence, in which cases were required to have an FTND of 4 or more. The control criterion was strict: control subjects must have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetimes and had an FTND of 0 during the heaviest period of smoking. After correcting for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate, several cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes dominated the top signals. The strongest association was from an SNP representing CHRNB3, the beta3 nicotinic receptor subunit gene (P = 9.4 x 10(-5)). Biologically, the most compelling evidence for a risk variant came from a non-synonymous SNP in the alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunit gene CHRNA5 (P = 6.4 x 10(-4)). This SNP exhibited evidence of a recessive mode of inheritance, resulting in individuals having a 2-fold increase in risk of developing nicotine dependence once exposed to cigarette smoking. Other genes among the top signals were KCNJ6 and GABRA4. This study represents one of the most powerful and extensive studies of nicotine dependence to date and has found novel risk loci that require confirmation by replication studies.

  20. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

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    Stefanie Krüger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1 identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2 assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3 connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities.We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses

  1. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  2. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  3. Patterns of population differentiation of candidate genes for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Keyue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basis for ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease (CVD susceptibility is not fully understood. We investigated patterns of population differentiation (FST of a set of genes in etiologic pathways of CVD among 3 ethnic groups: Yoruba in Nigeria (YRI, Utah residents with European ancestry (CEU, and Han Chinese (CHB + Japanese (JPT. We identified 37 pathways implicated in CVD based on the PANTHER classification and 416 genes in these pathways were further studied; these genes belonged to 6 biological processes (apoptosis, blood circulation and gas exchange, blood clotting, homeostasis, immune response, and lipoprotein metabolism. Genotype data were obtained from the HapMap database. Results We calculated FST for 15,559 common SNPs (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.10 in at least one population in genes that co-segregated among the populations, as well as an average-weighted FST for each gene. SNPs were classified as putatively functional (non-synonymous and untranslated regions or non-functional (intronic and synonymous sites. Mean FST values for common putatively functional variants were significantly higher than FST values for nonfunctional variants. A significant variation in FST was also seen based on biological processes; the processes of 'apoptosis' and 'lipoprotein metabolism' showed an excess of genes with high FST. Thus, putative functional SNPs in genes in etiologic pathways for CVD show greater population differentiation than non-functional SNPs and a significant variance of FST values was noted among pairwise population comparisons for different biological processes. Conclusion These results suggest a possible basis for varying susceptibility to CVD among ethnic groups.

  4. Linkage and candidate gene studies of autism spectrum disorders in European populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Richard; Barnby, Gabrielle; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Brocklebank, Denise; Sousa, Inês; Mulder, Erik J; Kantojärvi, Katri; Järvelä, Irma; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Fritz; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has focused on linkage and candidate gene studies. This research has implicated various chromosomal loci and genes. Candidate gene studies have proven to be particularly intractable, with many studies failing to replicate previously reported associations. In this paper, we investigate previously implicated genomic regions for a role in ASD susceptibility, using four cohorts of European ancestry. Initially, a 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array was used to examine linkage at six previously implicated loci. We identify linkage approaching genome-wide suggestive levels on chromosome 2 (rs2885116, MLOD=1.89). Association analysis showed significant associations in MKL2 with ASD (rs756472, P=4.31 × 10−5) and between SND1 and strict autism (rs1881084, P=7.76 × 10−5) in the Finnish and Northern Dutch populations, respectively. Subsequently, we used a second 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array to examine the association in seven candidate genes, and evidence for association was found in RELN (rs362780, P=0.00165). Further increasing the sample size strengthened the association with RELN (rs362780, P=0.001) and produced a second significant result in GRIK2 (rs2518261, P=0.008). Our results strengthen the case for a more detailed study of the role of RELN and GRIK2 in autism susceptibility, as well as identifying two new potential candidate genes, MKL2 and SND1. PMID:20442744

  5. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Polonikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase and PON2 (paraoxonase 2 as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma.

  6. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  7. Tagging Blast Resistance Gene Pi 1 in Rice (Oryza sativa) Using Candidate Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ai-hong; WU Jian-li; XU Xin-ping; Menchu BERNADO; DAI Zheng-yuan; ZHUANG Jie-yun; CHEN Zong-xiang; ZHENG Kang-le; LI Bao-jian; Hei LEUNG; ZHANG Hong-xi; PAN Xue-biao

    2004-01-01

    An F3 population derived from C101LAC/CO39 containing 90 lines was analyzed for blast resistance with 48 candidate genes developed from resistance gene analogs (RGA) and suppression subtractive library. Genetic analysis confirmed that blast resistance of the population was controlled by a single gene Pi 1. One of the candidate genes, R10 was identified as associated with the blast resistance gene on the long arm of chromosome 11 and mapped using a DH population derived from Azucena/IR64.A pair of PCR based primers was designed based on the sequence of R10 for marker-aided selection of the blast resistance gene.The recombination frequency between Pi 1 and the marker was estimated as 1.28%. It suggested that strategy of employing candidate genes is useful for gene identification and mapping. A new RFLP marker and the corresponding PCR marker for tagging of Pi 1 were provided.

  8. CEACAM6 gene variants in inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Jürgen Glas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC and its ileal expression is increased in patients with Crohn's disease (CD. Given its contribution to the pathogenesis of CD, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic variants in the CEACAM6 region in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. METHODOLOGY: In this study, a total of 2,683 genomic DNA samples (including DNA from 858 CD patients, 475 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, and 1,350 healthy, unrelated controls was analyzed for eight CEACAM6 SNPs (rs10415946, rs1805223 = p.Pro42Pro, rs4803507, rs4803508, rs11548735 = p.Gly239Val, rs7246116 = pHis260His, rs2701, rs10416839. In addition, a detailed haplotype analysis and genotype-phenotype analysis were performed. Overall, our genotype analysis did not reveal any significant association of the investigated CEACAM6 SNPs and haplotypes with CD or UC susceptibility, although certain CEACAM6 SNPs modulated CEACAM6 expression in intestinal epithelial cell lines. Despite its function as receptor of AIEC in ileal CD, we found no association of the CEACAM6 SNPs with ileal or ileocolonic CD. Moreover, there was no evidence of epistasis between the analyzed CEACAM6 variants and the main CD-associated NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 variants. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents the first detailed analysis of CEACAM6 variants in IBD patients. Despite its important role in bacterial attachment in ileal CD, we could not demonstrate a role for CEACAM6 variants in IBD susceptibility or regarding an ileal CD phenotype. Further functional studies are required to analyze if these gene variants modulate ileal bacterial attachment.

  9. Molecular basis of albinism in India: evaluation of seven potential candidate genes and some new findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, M; Sengupta, M; Samanta, S; Sil, A; Ray, K

    2012-12-15

    Albinism represents a group of genetic disorders with a broad spectrum of hypopigmentary phenotypes dependent on the genetic background of the patients. Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) patients have little or no pigment in their eyes, skin and hair, whereas ocular albinism (OA) primarily presents the ocular symptoms, and the skin and hair color may vary from near normal to very fair. Mutations in genes directly or indirectly regulating melanin production are responsible for different forms of albinism with overlapping clinical features. In this study, 27 albinistic individuals from 24 families were screened for causal variants by a PCR-sequencing based approach. TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, SLC45A2, SLC24A5, TYRP2 and SILV were selected as candidate genes. We identified 5 TYR and 3 OCA2 mutations, majority in homozygous state, in 8 unrelated patients including a case of autosomal recessive ocular albinism (AROA). A homozygous 4-nucleotide novel insertion in SLC24A5 was detected in a person showing with extreme cutaneous hypopigmentation. A potential causal variant was identified in the TYRP2 gene in a single patient. Haplotype analyses in the patients carrying homozygous mutations in the classical OCA genes suggested founder effect. This is the first report of an Indian AROA patient harboring a mutation in OCA2. Our results also reveal for the first time that mutations in SLC24A5 could contribute to extreme hypopigmentation in humans.

  10. Gene Variants Are Associated with PCOS Susceptibility and Hyperandrogenemia in Young Korean Women

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    Do Kyeong Song

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO gene is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obesity and insulin resistance are also common features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Therefore, the FTO gene might be a candidate gene for PCOS susceptibility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of FTO gene variants on PCOS susceptibility and metabolic and reproductive hormonal parameters.MethodsWe recruited 432 women with PCOS (24±5 years and 927 healthy women with regular menstrual cycles (27±5 years and performed a case-control association study. We genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8050136 in the FTO gene and collected metabolic and hormonal measurements.ResultsLogistic regression revealed that the G/G genotype (rs1421085, 1.6%, the C/C genotype (rs17817449, 1.6%, and the A/A genotype (rs8050136, 1.6% were strongly associated with an increased risk of PCOS (odds ratio, 2.551 to 2.559; all P<0.05. The strengths of these associations were attenuated after adjusting for age and BMI. The women with these genotypes were more obese and exhibited higher free androgen indices (P<0.05 and higher free testosterone levels (P=0.053 to 0.063 compared to the other genotypes. However the significant differences disappeared after adjusting for body mass index (BMI. When we analyzed the women with PCOS and the control groups separately, there were no significant differences in the metabolic and reproductive hormonal parameters according to the FTO gene variants.ConclusionThe rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8050136 variants of the FTO gene were associated with PCOS susceptibility and hyperandrogenemia in young Korean women. These associations may be mediated through an effect of BMI.

  11. DOCK4 and CEACAM21 as novel schizophrenia candidate genes in the Jewish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkelai, Anna; Lupoli, Sara; Greenbaum, Lior; Kohn, Yoav; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Ben-Asher, Edna; Lancet, Doron; Macciardi, Fabio; Lerer, Bernard

    2012-05-01

    It is well accepted that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component. Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia have been published in recent years; most of them population based with a case-control design. Nevertheless, identifying the specific genetic variants which contribute to susceptibility to the disorder remains a challenging task. A family-based GWAS strategy may be helpful in the identification of schizophrenia susceptibility genes since it is protected against population stratification, enables better accounting for genotyping errors and is more sensitive for identification of rare variants which have a very low frequency in the general population. In this project we implemented a family-based GWAS of schizophrenia in a sample of 107 Jewish-Israeli families. We found one genome-wide significant association in the intron of the DOCK4 gene (rs2074127, p value=1.134×10⁻⁷) and six additional nominally significant association signals with pgene was significantly replicated in independent family-based sample of Arab-Israeli origin (rs4803480: p value=0.002; combined p value=9.61×10⁻⁸), surviving correction for multiple testing. Both DOCK4 and CEACAM21 are biologically reasonable candidate genes for schizophrenia although generalizability of the association of DOCK4 with schizophrenia should be investigated in further studies. In addition, gene-wide significant associations were found within three schizophrenia candidate genes: PGBD1, RELN and PRODH, replicating previously reported associations. By application of a family-based strategy to GWAS, our study revealed new schizophrenia susceptibility loci in the Jewish-Israeli population.

  12. Expression studies of the obesity candidate gene FTO in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Majbritt Busk; Birck, Malene Muusfeldt; Fredholm, Merete

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem worldwide and research on candidate genes in good animal models is highly needed. The pig is an excellent model as its metabolism, organ size, and eating habits resemble that of humans. The present study is focused on the characterization of the fat mass and obesity...... associated gene (FTO) in pig. This gene has recently been associated with increased body mass index in several human populations. To establish information on the expression profile of FTO in the pig we performed quantitative PCR in a panel of adult pig tissues and in tissues sampled at different...... and cerebellum). Additionally, in order to see the involvement of the FTO gene in obesity, the changes in expression level were investigated in a nutritional study in brain of Gottingen minipigs under a high cholesterol diet. Significantly higher (P

  13. Candidate driver genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhopuro, Pia; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Niittymäki, Iina;

    2012-01-01

    . Here, we evaluated somatic mutations in microsatellite repeats of 790 genes chosen based on reduced expression in MSI CRC and existence of a coding mononucleotide repeat of 6–10 bp in length. All the repeats were initially sequenced in 30 primary MSI CRC samples and whenever frameshift mutations were...... types (A/T and C/G, 6–10 bp). Along with several know target genes, including TGFBR2, ACVR2, and MSH3, six novel candidate driver genes emerged that harbored significantly more mutations than identical control repeats. The mutation frequencies in 100 MSI CRC samples were 51% in G8 of GLYR1, 47% in T9...... genes that when mutated are likely to contribute to MSI CRC development....

  14. Identification of yak lactate dehydrogenase B gene variants by gene cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that two types of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) existed in yaks. Based on the electrophoresis characteristics of LDH isoenzymes, yak LDH variants were speculated to be the gene mutation on H subunit encoded by B gene. According to the mobility in electrophoresis, the fast-band LDH type was named LDH-Hf and the slow-band LDH type LDH-Hs. In order to reveal the gene alteration in yak LDH variants, total RNA was extracted from heart tissues of yaks with different LDH variants, and cDNAs of the two variants were reverse transcripted. Two variants of B genes were cloned by RT-PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that four nucleotides differed between LDH-Bf and LDH-Bs, which resulted in two amino acids alteration. By Deepview software analysis of the conformation of yak LDH1 variants and H subunit, these four nucleotides altered two amino acids that generated new hydrogen bonds to change the hydrogen bonds network, and further caused subtle conformational changes between the two LDH variants.

  15. Identification of yak lactate dehydrogenase B gene variants by gene cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG YuCai; ZHAO XingBo; ZHOU Jing; PIAO Ying; JIN SuYu; HE QingHua; HONG Jian; LINing; WU ChangXin

    2008-01-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that two types of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) existed in yaks. Based on the electrophoresis characteristics of LDH isoenzymes, yak LDH variants were speculated to be the gene mutation on H subunit encoded by B gene. According to the mobility in electrophoresis, the fast-band LDH type was named LDH-Hf and the slow-band LDH type LDH-Hs. In order to reveal the gene alteration In yak LDH variants, total RNA was extracted from heart tissues of yaks with different LDH variants, and cDNAs of the two variants were reverse transcripted. Two variants of B genes were cloned by RT-PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that four nucleotides differed between LDH-Bf and LDH-Bs, which resulted in two amino acids alteration. By Deepview software analysis of the conformation of yak LDH1 variants and H subunit, these four nucleotides altered two amino acids that generated new hydrogen bonds to change the hydrogen bonds network, and further caused subtle conformstionsl changes between the two LDH variants.

  16. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere...... as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...

  17. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-08-16

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research.

  18. Reconstruction of a functional human gene network, with an application for prioritizing positional candidate genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, L.; Bakel, H. van; Fokkens, L.; Jong, E.D. de; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Wijmenga, C.

    2006-01-01

    Most common genetic disorders have a complex inheritance and may result from variants in many genes, each contributing only weak effects to the disease. Pinpointing these disease genes within the myriad of susceptibility loci identified in linkage studies is difficult because these loci may contain

  19. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  20. Analysis of IFT74 as a candidate gene for chromosome 9p-linked ALS-FTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogaeva Ekaterina

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new locus for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD has recently been ascribed to chromosome 9p. Methods We identified chromosome 9p segregating haplotypes within two families with ALS-FTD (F476 and F2 and undertook mutational screening of candidate genes within this locus. Results Candidate gene sequencing at this locus revealed the presence of a disease segregating stop mutation (Q342X in the intraflagellar transport 74 (IFT74 gene in family 476 (F476, but no mutation was detected within IFT74 in family 2 (F2. While neither family was sufficiently informative to definitively implicate or exclude IFT74 mutations as a cause of chromosome 9-linked ALS-FTD, the nature of the mutation observed within F476 (predicted to truncate the protein by 258 amino acids led us to sequence the open reading frame of this gene in a large number of ALS and FTD cases (n = 420. An additional sequence variant (G58D was found in a case of sporadic semantic dementia. I55L sequence variants were found in three other unrelated affected individuals, but this was also found in a single individual among 800 Human Diversity Gene Panel samples. Conclusion Confirmation of the pathogenicity of IFT74 sequence variants will require screening of other chromosome 9p-linked families.

  1. Melanocortin-1 receptor gene variants in four Chinese ethnic populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There is strong relationship between melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants and human hair color and skin type.Based on a sequencing study of MC1R gene in 50 individuals from the Uygur,Tibetan,Wa and Dai ethnic populations,we discuss the occurrence of 7 mc1r variants consisting of 5 nonsynonymous sites (Val60Leu,Arg67Gln,Val92Met,Arg163Gln and Ala299Val) and 2 synonymous sites (C414T and A942G),among which C414T and Ala299Val were reported for the first time.Confirmation and analysis were also made of 122 individuals at three common point mutations (Val92Met,Arg163Gln,A942G) using PCR-SSCP.The frequency of Arg163Gln variant varies in the four ethnic populations,with percentage of 40%,85.0%,66.2% and 72.7%,respectively,while those of Val92Met and A942G are roughly similar in these four populations.The different environments,migration and admixture of various ethnic groups in China might have impact on the observed frequency of Arg163Gln.

  2. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  3. Engineering of glucosinolate biosynthesis: candidate gene identification and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møldrup, Morten E; Salomonsen, Bo; Halkier, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    The diverse biological roles of glucosinolates as plant defense metabolites and anticancer compounds have spurred a strong interest in their biosynthetic pathways. Since the completion of the Arabidopsis genome, functional genomics approaches have enabled significant progress on the elucidation of glucosinolate biosynthesis, although in planta validation of candidate gene function often is hampered by time-consuming generation of knockout and overexpression lines in Arabidopsis. To better exploit the increasing amount of data available from genomic sequencing, microarray database and RNAseq, time-efficient methods for identification and validation of candidate genes are needed. This chapter covers the methodology we are using for gene discovery in glucosinolate engineering, namely, guilt-by-association-based in silico methods and fast proof-of-function screens by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the lessons learned in the rapid, transient tobacco system are readily translated to our robust, versatile yeast expression platform, where additional genes critical for large-scale microbial production of glucosinolates can be identified. We anticipate that the methodology presented here will be beneficial to elucidate and engineer other plant biosynthetic pathways.

  4. Evaluation of nine candidate genes in patients with normal tension glaucoma: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinthal Eva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal tension glaucoma is a major subtype of glaucoma, associated with intraocular pressures that are within the statistically normal range of the population. Monogenic forms following classical inheritance patterns are rare in this glaucoma subtype. Instead, multigenic inheritance is proposed for the majority of cases. The present study tested common sequence variants in candidate genes for association with normal tension glaucoma in the German population. Methods Ninety-eight SNPs were selected to tag the common genetic variation in nine genes, namely OPTN (optineurin, RDX (radixin, SNX16 (sorting nexin 16, OPA1 (optic atrophy 1, MFN1 (mitofusin 1, MFN2 (mitofusin 2, PARL (presenilin associated, rhomboid-like, SOD2 (superoxide dismutase 2, mitochondrial and CYP1B1 (cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1. These SNPs were genotyped in 285 cases and 282 fully evaluated matched controls. Statistical analyses comprised single polymorphism association as well as haplogroup based association testing. Results Results suggested that genetic variation in five of the candidate genes (RDX, SNX16, OPA1, SOD2 and CYP1B1 is unlikely to confer major risk to develop normal tension glaucoma in the German population. In contrast, we observed a trend towards association of single SNPs in OPTN, MFN1, MFN2 and PARL. The SNPs of OPTN, MFN2 and PARL were further analysed by multimarker haplotype-based association testing. We identified a risk haplotype being more frequent in patients and a vice versa situation for the complementary protective haplotype in each of the three genes. Conclusion Common variants of OPTN, PARL, MFN1 and MFN2 should be analysed in other cohorts to confirm their involvement in normal tension glaucoma.

  5. Copy number variants in extended autism spectrum disorder families reveal candidates potentially involved in autism risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Salyakina

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs are a major cause of genetic disruption in the human genome with far more nucleotides being altered by duplications and deletions than by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In the multifaceted etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, CNVs appear to contribute significantly to our understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease. A unique resource of 42 extended ASD families was genotyped for over 1 million SNPs to detect CNVs that may contribute to ASD susceptibility. Each family has at least one avuncular or cousin pair with ASD. Families were then evaluated for co-segregation of CNVs in ASD patients. We identified a total of five deletions and seven duplications in eleven families that co-segregated with ASD. Two of the CNVs overlap with regions on 7p21.3 and 15q24.1 that have been previously reported in ASD individuals and two additional CNVs on 3p26.3 and 12q24.32 occur near regions associated with schizophrenia. These findings provide further evidence for the involvement of ICA1 and NXPH1 on 7p21.3 in ASD susceptibility and highlight novel ASD candidates, including CHL1, FGFBP3 and POUF41. These studies highlight the power of using extended families for gene discovery in traits with a complex etiology.

  6. Examination of NRCAM, LRRN3, KIAA0716, and LAMB1 as autism candidate genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santangelo Susan L

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial body of research supports a genetic involvement in autism. Furthermore, results from various genomic screens implicate a region on chromosome 7q31 as harboring an autism susceptibility variant. We previously narrowed this 34 cM region to a 3 cM critical region (located between D7S496 and D7S2418 using the Collaborative Linkage Study of Autism (CLSA chromosome 7 linked families. This interval encompasses about 4.5 Mb of genomic DNA and encodes over fifty known and predicted genes. Four candidate genes (NRCAM, LRRN3, KIAA0716, and LAMB1 in this region were chosen for examination based on their proximity to the marker most consistently cosegregating with autism in these families (D7S1817, their tissue expression patterns, and likely biological relevance to autism. Methods Thirty-six intronic and exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and one microsatellite marker within and around these four candidate genes were genotyped in 30 chromosome 7q31 linked families. Multiple SNPs were used to provide as complete coverage as possible since linkage disequilibrium can vary dramatically across even very short distances within a gene. Analyses of these data used the Pedigree Disequilibrium Test for single markers and a multilocus likelihood ratio test. Results As expected, linkage disequilibrium occurred within each of these genes but we did not observe significant LD across genes. None of the polymorphisms in NRCAM, LRRN3, or KIAA0716 gave p LAMB1, the allelic association analysis revealed suggestive evidence for a positive association, including one individual SNP (p = 0.02 and three separate two-SNP haplotypes across the gene (p = 0.007, 0.012, and 0.012. Conclusions NRCAM, LRRN3, KIAA0716 are unlikely to be involved in autism. There is some evidence that variation in or near the LAMB1 gene may be involved in autism.

  7. Good gene, bad gene: new APP variant may be both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Morbin, Michela; Giaccone, Giorgio; Moro, Maria Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Colombo, Laura; Messa, Massimo; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Romeo, Margherita; Stravalaci, Matteo; Diomede, Luisa; Gobbi, Marco; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-12-01

    APP mutations cause Alzheimer disease (AD) with virtually complete penetrance. We found a novel APP mutation (A673V) in the homozygous state in a patient with early-onset AD-type dementia and in his younger sister showing initial signs of cognitive decline. It is noteworthy that the heterozygous relatives were not affected, suggesting that this mutation is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Studies on molecular events for the recessive mutation in causing disease revealed a double synergistic effect: the A673V APP variant shifts APP processing towards the amyloidogenic pathway with increased production of Aβ peptides and it markedly enhances the aggregation and fibrillogenic properties of both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. However, co-incubation of mutated and wild-type (wt) Aβ species resulted in inhibition of amyloidogenesis, consistent with the observation that heterozygous carriers do not develop the disease. The opposite effects of the A673V mutation in the homozygous and heterozygous state on amyloidogenesis account for the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, revealing a new scenario in AD genetics and pathogenesis. The anti-amyloidogenic properties of this novel human Aβ variant may offer grounds for the development of therapeutic strategies for AD based on modified Aβ peptides. Indeed, the interaction between mutated Aβ1-6 and wt full-length Aβ prevents amyloid fibril formation. The anti-amyloidogenic effect is further amplified by the use of a mutated six-mer peptide, constructed entirely from D-amino acids to increase the its stability in vivo. Here we reviewed the studies on pathogenic mechanisms associated with the A673V mutation and the first experimental steps toward the development of a novel disease-modifying therapy for AD.

  8. Adaptations to climate in candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Hancock

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary pressures due to variation in climate play an important role in shaping phenotypic variation among and within species and have been shown to influence variation in phenotypes such as body shape and size among humans. Genes involved in energy metabolism are likely to be central to heat and cold tolerance. To test the hypothesis that climate shaped variation in metabolism genes in humans, we used a bioinformatics approach based on network theory to select 82 candidate genes for common metabolic disorders. We genotyped 873 tag SNPs in these genes in 54 worldwide populations (including the 52 in the Human Genome Diversity Project panel and found correlations with climate variables using rank correlation analysis and a newly developed method termed Bayesian geographic analysis. In addition, we genotyped 210 carefully matched control SNPs to provide an empirical null distribution for spatial patterns of allele frequency due to population history alone. For nearly all climate variables, we found an excess of genic SNPs in the tail of the distributions of the test statistics compared to the control SNPs, implying that metabolic genes as a group show signals of spatially varying selection. Among our strongest signals were several SNPs (e.g., LEPR R109K, FABP2 A54T that had previously been associated with phenotypes directly related to cold tolerance. Since variation in climate may be correlated with other aspects of environmental variation, it is possible that some of the signals that we detected reflect selective pressures other than climate. Nevertheless, our results are consistent with the idea that climate has been an important selective pressure acting on candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

  9. Genome-wide screen identifies new candidate genes associated with artemisinin susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Straimer, Judith; Mwai, Leah; Abdi, Abdirahman; Rippert, Anja; Okombo, John; Muriithi, Steven; Sasi, Philip; Kortok, Moses Mosobo; Lowe, Brett; Campino, Susana; Assefa, Samuel; Auburn, Sarah; Manske, Magnus; Maslen, Gareth; Peshu, Norbert; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Marsh, Kevin; Nzila, Alexis; Clark, Taane G.

    2013-01-01

    Early identification of causal genetic variants underlying antimalarial drug resistance could provide robust epidemiological tools for timely public health interventions. Using a novel natural genetics strategy for mapping novel candidate genes we analyzed >75,000 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from high-resolution whole-genome sequencing data in 27 isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. We identified genetic variants associated with susceptibility to dihydroartemisinin that implicate one region on chromosome 13, a candidate gene on chromosome 1 (PFA0220w, a UBP1 ortholog) and others (PFB0560w, PFB0630c, PFF0445w) with putative roles in protein homeostasis and stress response. There was a strong signal for positive selection on PFA0220w, but not the other candidate loci. Our results demonstrate the power of full-genome sequencing-based association studies for uncovering candidate genes that determine parasite sensitivity to artemisinins. Our study provides a unique reference for the interpretation of results from resistant infections. PMID:24270944

  10. Candidate Genes for Inherited Autism Susceptibility in the Lebanese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtian, Silva; Soueid, Jihane; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Guisso, Dikran Richard; Chahrour, Maria; Boustany, Rose-Mary N.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by ritualistic-repetitive behaviors and impaired verbal/non-verbal communication. Many ASD susceptibility genes implicated in neuronal pathways/brain development have been identified. The Lebanese population is ideal for uncovering recessive genes because of shared ancestry and a high rate of consanguineous marriages. Aims here are to analyze for published ASD genes and uncover novel inherited ASD susceptibility genes specific to the Lebanese. We recruited 36 ASD families (ASD: 37, unaffected parents: 36, unaffected siblings: 33) and 100 unaffected Lebanese controls. Cytogenetics 2.7 M Microarrays/CytoScan™ HD arrays allowed mapping of homozygous regions of the genome. The CNTNAP2 gene was screened by Sanger sequencing. Homozygosity mapping uncovered DPP4, TRHR, and MLF1 as novel candidate susceptibility genes for ASD in the Lebanese. Sequencing of hot spot exons in CNTNAP2 led to discovery of a 5 bp insertion in 23/37 ASD patients. This mutation was present in unaffected family members and unaffected Lebanese controls. Although a slight increase in number was observed in ASD patients and family members compared to controls, there were no significant differences in allele frequencies between affecteds and controls (C/TTCTG: γ2 value = 0.014; p = 0.904). The CNTNAP2 polymorphism identified in this population, hence, is not linked to the ASD phenotype. PMID:28358038

  11. Meta-analysis of gene-level associations for rare variants based on single-variant statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Hirschhorn, Joel; North, Kari E; Ingelsson, Erik; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2013-08-08

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying "causal" rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available.

  12. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Ubadah; Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study.

  13. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubadah Sabbagh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES. A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study.

  14. Assessing the validity of asthma associations for eight candidate genes and age at diagnosis effects.

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    María Pino-Yanes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Before the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, ADAM33, ADRB2, CD14, MS4A2 (alias FCER1B, IL13, IL4, IL4R, and TNF constituted the most replicated non-HLA candidate genes with asthma and related traits. However, except for the IL13-IL4 region, none of these genes have been found in close proximity of genome-wide significant hits among GWAS for asthma or related traits. Here we aimed to assess the reproducibility of these asthma associations and to test if associations were more evident considering the effect of age at diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically evaluated 286 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of these 8 genes in a sample of 1,865 unrelated Spanish individuals (606 asthmatics and 1,259 controls. We found that variants at MS4A2, IL4R and ADAM33 genes demonstrated varying association effects with the age at diagnosis of asthma, with 10 SNPs showing study-wise significance after the multiple comparison adjustment. In addition, in silico replication with GWAS data supported the association of IL4R. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the important role of MS4A2, IL4R and ADAM33 genes in asthma and/or atopy susceptibility. However, additional studies in larger samples sets are needed to firmly implicate these genes in asthma susceptibility, and also to identify the causal variation underlying the associations found.

  15. Candidate genes for performance in horses, including monocarboxylate transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaê Cristina Regatieri

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Some horse breeds are highly selected for athletic activities. The athletic potential of each animal can be measured by its performance in sports. High athletic performance depends on the animal capacity to produce energy through aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways, among other factors. Transmembrane proteins called monocarboxylate transporters, mainly the isoform 1 (MCT1 and its ancillary protein CD147, can help the organism to adapt to physiological stress caused by physical exercise, transporting lactate and H+ ions. Horse breeds are selected for different purposes so we might expect differences in the amount of those proteins and in the genotypic frequencies for genes that play a significant role in the performance of the animals. The study of MCT1 and CD147 gene polymorphisms, which can affect the formation of the proteins and transport of lactate and H+, can provide enough information to be used for selection of athletic horses increasingly resistant to intense exercise. Two other candidate genes, the PDK4 and DMRT3, have been associated with athletic potential and indicated as possible markers for performance in horses. The oxidation of fatty acids is highly effective in generating ATP and is controlled by the expression of PDK4 (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 in skeletal muscle during and after exercise. The doublesex and mab-3 related transcription factor 3 (DMRT3 gene encodes an important transcription factor in the setting of spinal cord circuits controlling movement in vertebrates and may be associated with gait performance in horses. This review describes how the monocarboxylate transporters work during physical exercise in athletic horses and the influence of polymorphisms in candidate genes for athletic performance in horses.

  16. HIV-infection, atherosclerosis and the inflammatory pathway: candidate gene study in a Spanish HIV-infected population.

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    Laura Ibáñez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Higher prevalence of atherosclerosis and higher cardiovascular risk is observed in HIV-infected individuals. The biological mechanisms underlying these processes are unclear. Several studies have implicated genetic variants in the inflammatory genes in cardiovascular disease and in HIV natural course infection. METHODS & FINDINGS: In this study we have tested the possible association between genetic variants in several inflammatory genes and asymptomatic cardiovascular disease measured by carotid intima media thickness (cIMT and atherosclerotic plaque presence as dependent variables in 213 HIV-infected individuals. A total of 101 genetic variants in 25 candidate genes have been genotyped. Results were analyzed using Plink and SPSS statistical packages. We have found several polymorphisms in the genes ALOX5 (rs2115819 p = 0.009, ALOX5AP (rs9578196 p = 0.007; rs4769873 p = 0.004 and rs9315051 p = 0.0004, CX3CL1 (rs4151117 p = 0.040 and rs614230 p = 0.015 and CCL5 (rs3817655 p = 0.018 and rs2107538 p = 0.018 associated with atherosclerotic plaque. cIMT mean has been associated with CRP (1130864 p = 0.0003 and rs1800947 p = 0.008, IL1RN (rs380092 p = 0.002 and ALOX5AP (rs3885907 p = 0.02 genetic variants. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we have found modest associations between genetic variants in several inflammatory genes and atherosclerotic plaque or cIMT. Nevertheless, our study adds evidence to the association between inflammatory pathway genetic variants and the atherosclerotic disease in HIV-infected individuals.

  17. Copy number variants in the kallikrein gene cluster.

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    Pernilla Lindahl

    Full Text Available The kallikrein gene family (KLK1-KLK15 is the largest contiguous group of protease genes within the human genome and is associated with both risk and outcome of cancer and other diseases. We searched for copy number variants in all KLK genes using quantitative PCR analysis and analysis of inheritance patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two deletions were identified: one 2235-bp deletion in KLK9 present in 1.2% of alleles, and one 3394-bp deletion in KLK15 present in 4.0% of alleles. Each deletion eliminated one complete exon and created out-of-frame coding that eliminated the catalytic triad of the resulting truncated gene product, which therefore likely is a non-functional protein. Deletion breakpoints identified by DNA sequencing located the KLK9 deletion breakpoint to a long interspersed element (LINE repeated sequence, while the deletion in KLK15 is located in a single copy sequence. To search for an association between each deletion and risk of prostate cancer (PC, we analyzed a cohort of 667 biopsied men (266 PC cases and 401 men with no evidence of PC at biopsy using short deletion-specific PCR assays. There was no association between evidence of PC in this cohort and the presence of either gene deletion. Haplotyping revealed a single origin of each deletion, with most recent common ancestor estimates of 3000-8000 and 6000-14 000 years for the deletions in KLK9 and KLK15, respectively. The presence of the deletions on the same haplotypes in 1000 Genomes data of both European and African populations indicate an early origin of both deletions. The old age in combination with homozygous presence of loss-of-function variants suggests that some kallikrein-related peptidases have non-essential functions.

  18. Evaluation of the porcine ACSL4 gene as a candidate gene for meat quality traits in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, J; Ramayo-Caldas, Y; Castelló, A; Muñoz, M; Ibáñez-Escriche, N; Folch, J M; Ballester, M

    2012-12-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family members catalyse the formation of long-chain acyl-CoA from fatty acid, ATP and CoA, thus playing an important role in both de novo lipid synthesis and fatty acid catabolism. Previous studies in our group evaluated ACSL4 as a positional candidate gene for quantitative trait loci located on chromosome X in an Iberian × Landrace cross. A DQ144454:c.2645G>A SNP located in the 3' untranslated region of the ACSL4 gene was associated with the percentages of oleic and monounsaturated fatty acids. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the functional implication of this genetic variant. An expression analysis was performed for 120 individuals with different genotypes for the DQ144454:c.2645G>A polymorphism using real-time quantitative PCR. Differences between genotypes were identified in liver, with the ACSL4 mRNA expression levels higher in animals with the G allele than in animals with the A allele. A SNP genome-wide association study with ACSL4 relative expression levels showed significant positions on chromosomes 6 and 12. Description of positional candidate genes for ACSL4 regulation on chromosomes 6 and 12 is provided.

  19. Influence of SNPs in nutrient-sensitive candidate genes and gene-diet interactions on blood lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, Lena Kirchner; Angquist, Lars; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup

    2013-01-01

    Blood lipid response to a given dietary intervention could be determined by the effect of diet, gene variants or gene-diet interactions. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether variants in presumed nutrient-sensitive genes involved in lipid metabolism modified lipid profile...

  20. Common variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 and GRIA3 receptor genes are associated with migraine susceptibility

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    Gianfrancesco Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system which acts by the activation of either ionotropic (AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptors or G-protein coupled metabotropic receptors. Glutamate is widely accepted to play a major role in the path physiology of migraine as implicated by data from animal and human studies. Genes involved in synthesis, metabolism and regulation of both glutamate and its receptors could be, therefore, considered as potential candidates for causing/predisposing to migraine when mutated. Methods The association of polymorphic variants of GRIA1-GRIA4 genes which encode for the four subunits (GluR1-GluR4 of the alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA receptor for glutamate was tested in migraineurs with and without aura (MA and MO and healthy controls. Results Two variants in the regulative regions of GRIA1 (rs2195450 and GRIA3 (rs3761555 genes resulted strongly associated with MA (P = 0.00002 and P = 0.0001, respectively, but not associated with MO, suggesting their role in cortical spreading depression. Whereas the rs548294 variant in GRIA1 gene showed association primarily with MO phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that MA and MO phenotypes could be genetically related. These variants modify binding sites for transcription factors altering the expression of GRIA1 and GRIA3 genes in different conditions. Conclusions This study represents the first genetic evidence of a link between glutamate receptors and migraine.

  1. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia J; Rajala, Amelia K; Carlson, Scott R; Rupert, Jim L

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  2. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J Thomson

    Full Text Available Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4 influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599 that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  3. Computational disease gene identification: a concert of methods prioritizes type 2 diabetes and obesity candidate genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiffin, N.; Adie, E.; Turner, F.; Brunner, H.G.; Driel, M.A. van; Oti, M.O.; Lopez-Bigas, N.; Ouzounis, C.A.; Perez-Iratxeta, C.; Andrade-Navarro, M.A.; Adeyemo, A.; Patti, M.E.; Semple, C.A.; Hide, W.

    2006-01-01

    Genome-wide experimental methods to identify disease genes, such as linkage analysis and association studies, generate increasingly large candidate gene sets for which comprehensive empirical analysis is impractical. Computational methods employ data from a variety of sources to identify the most li

  4. Computational disease gene identification : a concert of methods prioritizes type 2 diabetes and obesity candidate genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiffin, N.; Adie, E.; Turner, F.; Brunner, H.G.; Driel, M.A. van; Oti, M.O.; Lopez-Bigas, N.; Ouzounis, C.A.; Perez-Iratxeta, C.; Andrade-Navarro, M.A.; Adeyemo, A.; Patti, M.E.; Semple, C.A.; Hide, W.

    2006-01-01

    Genome-wide experimental methods to identify disease genes, such as linkage analysis and association studies, generate increasingly large candidate gene sets for which comprehensive empirical analysis is impractical. Computational methods employ data from a variety of sources to identify the most li

  5. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. J.; Wang, B. Q.; Yang, Y.; Li, D.

    2016-01-01

    bone formation. Cite this article: J. J. Li, B. Q. Wang, Q. Fei, Y. Yang, D. Li. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:594–601. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.512.BJR-2016-0073.R1. PMID:27908864

  6. Syndrome to gene (S2G): in-silico identification of candidate genes for human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Avitan; Cohen, Raphael; Birk, Ohad S

    2010-03-01

    The identification of genomic loci associated with human genetic syndromes has been significantly facilitated through the generation of high density SNP arrays. However, optimal selection of candidate genes from within such loci is still a tedious labor-intensive bottleneck. Syndrome to Gene (S2G) is based on novel algorithms which allow an efficient search for candidate genes in a genomic locus, using known genes whose defects cause phenotypically similar syndromes. S2G (http://fohs.bgu.ac.il/s2g/index.html) includes two components: a phenotype Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)-based search engine that alleviates many of the problems in the existing OMIM search engine (negation phrases, overlapping terms, etc.). The second component is a gene prioritizing engine that uses a novel algorithm to integrate information from 18 databases. When the detailed phenotype of a syndrome is inserted to the web-based software, S2G offers a complete improved search of the OMIM database for similar syndromes. The software then prioritizes a list of genes from within a genomic locus, based on their association with genes whose defects are known to underlie similar clinical syndromes. We demonstrate that in all 30 cases of novel disease genes identified in the past year, the disease gene was within the top 20% of candidate genes predicted by S2G, and in most cases--within the top 10%. Thus, S2G provides clinicians with an efficient tool for diagnosis and researchers with a candidate gene prediction tool based on phenotypic data and a wide range of gene data resources. S2G can also serve in studies of polygenic diseases, and in finding interacting molecules for any gene of choice.

  7. Detection of Novel Gene Variants Associated with Congenital Hypothyroidism in a Finnish Patient Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löf, Christoffer; Patyra, Konrad; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Undeutsch, Henriette; Jaeschke, Holger; Pajunen, Tuulia; Kero, Andreina; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike; Kleinau, Gunnar; Kühnen, Peter; Rantakari, Krista; Miettinen, Päivi; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Mustila, Taina; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Ojaniemi, Marja; Toppari, Jorma; Ignatius, Jaakko; Laakso, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as the lack of thyroid hormones at birth. Mutations in at least 15 different genes have been associated with this disease. While up to 20% of CH cases are hereditary, the majority of cases are sporadic with unknown etiology. Apart from a monogenic pattern of inheritance, multigenic mechanisms have been suggested to play a role in CH. The genetics of CH has not been studied in Finland so far. Therefore, multigenic sequencing of CH candidate genes was performed in a Finnish patient cohort with both familial and sporadic CH. Methods: A targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel, covering all exons of the major CH genes, was applied for 15 patients with sporadic and 11 index cases with familial CH. Results: Among the familial cases, six pathogenic mutations were found in the TPO, PAX8, and TSHR genes. Furthermore, pathogenic NKX2.1 and TG mutations were identified from sporadic cases, together with likely pathogenic variants in the TG, NKX2.5, SLC26A4, and DUOX2 genes. All identified novel pathogenic mutations were confirmed by Sanger-sequencing and characterized in silico and/or in vitro. Conclusion: In summary, the CH panel provides an efficient, cost-effective, and multigenic screening tool for both known and novel CH gene mutations. Hence, it may be a useful method to identify accurately the genetic etiology for dyshormogenic, familial, or syndromic forms of CH. PMID:27373559

  8. Population sequencing of two endocannabinoid metabolic genes identifies rare and common regulatory variants associated with extreme obesity and metabolite level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Targeted re-sequencing of candidate genes in individuals at the extremes of a quantitative phenotype distribution is a method of choice to gain information on the contribution of rare variants to disease susceptibility. The endocannabinoid system mediates signaling in the brain and peripheral tissues involved in the regulation of energy balance, is highly active in obese patients, and represents a strong candidate pathway to examine for genetic association with body mass index (BMI). Results We sequenced two intervals (covering 188 kb) encoding the endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) in 147 normal controls and 142 extremely obese cases. After applying quality filters, we called 1,393 high quality single nucleotide variants, 55% of which are rare, and 143 indels. Using single marker tests and collapsed marker tests, we identified four intervals associated with BMI: the FAAH promoter, the MGLL promoter, MGLL intron 2, and MGLL intron 3. Two of these intervals are composed of rare variants and the majority of the associated variants are located in promoter sequences or in predicted transcriptional enhancers, suggesting a regulatory role. The set of rare variants in the FAAH promoter associated with BMI is also associated with increased level of FAAH substrate anandamide, further implicating a functional role in obesity. Conclusions Our study, which is one of the first reports of a sequence-based association study using next-generation sequencing of candidate genes, provides insights into study design and analysis approaches and demonstrates the importance of examining regulatory elements rather than exclusively focusing on exon sequences. PMID:21118518

  9. Gene-level integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS prioritizes candidate genes for nephrotic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Sampson

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome (NS gene discovery efforts are now occurring in small kindreds and cohorts of sporadic cases. Power to identify causal variants in these groups beyond a statistical significance threshold is challenging due to small sample size and/or lack of family information. There is a need to develop novel methods to identify NS-associated variants. One way to determine putative functional relevance of a gene is to measure its strength of negative selection, as variants in genes under strong negative selection are more likely to be deleterious. We created a gene-level, integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS score for 20,079 genes by combining multiple comparative genomics and population genetics measures. To understand the utility of GIMS for NS gene discovery, we examined this score in a diverse set of NS-relevant gene sets. These included genes known to cause monogenic forms of NS in humans as well as genes expressed in the cells of the glomerulus and, particularly, the podocyte. We found strong negative selection in the following NS-relevant gene sets: (1 autosomal-dominant Mendelian focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS genes (p = 0.03 compared to reference, (2 glomerular expressed genes (p = 4×10(-23, and (3 predicted podocyte genes (p = 3×10(-9. Eight genes causing autosomal dominant forms of FSGS had a stronger combined score of negative selection and podocyte enrichment as compared to all other genes (p = 1 x 10(-3. As a whole, recessive FSGS genes were not enriched for negative selection. Thus, we also created a transcript-level, integrated metric of negative selection (TIMS to quantify negative selection on an isoform level. These revealed transcripts of known autosomal recessive disease-causing genes that were nonetheless under strong selection. We suggest that a filtering strategy that includes measuring negative selection on a gene or isoform level could aid in identifying NS-related genes. Our GIMS and TIMS

  10. Gene-level integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS) prioritizes candidate genes for nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Matthew G; Gillies, Christopher E; Ju, Wenjun; Kretzler, Matthias; Kang, Hyun Min

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) gene discovery efforts are now occurring in small kindreds and cohorts of sporadic cases. Power to identify causal variants in these groups beyond a statistical significance threshold is challenging due to small sample size and/or lack of family information. There is a need to develop novel methods to identify NS-associated variants. One way to determine putative functional relevance of a gene is to measure its strength of negative selection, as variants in genes under strong negative selection are more likely to be deleterious. We created a gene-level, integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS) score for 20,079 genes by combining multiple comparative genomics and population genetics measures. To understand the utility of GIMS for NS gene discovery, we examined this score in a diverse set of NS-relevant gene sets. These included genes known to cause monogenic forms of NS in humans as well as genes expressed in the cells of the glomerulus and, particularly, the podocyte. We found strong negative selection in the following NS-relevant gene sets: (1) autosomal-dominant Mendelian focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) genes (p = 0.03 compared to reference), (2) glomerular expressed genes (p = 4×10(-23)), and (3) predicted podocyte genes (p = 3×10(-9)). Eight genes causing autosomal dominant forms of FSGS had a stronger combined score of negative selection and podocyte enrichment as compared to all other genes (p = 1 x 10(-3)). As a whole, recessive FSGS genes were not enriched for negative selection. Thus, we also created a transcript-level, integrated metric of negative selection (TIMS) to quantify negative selection on an isoform level. These revealed transcripts of known autosomal recessive disease-causing genes that were nonetheless under strong selection. We suggest that a filtering strategy that includes measuring negative selection on a gene or isoform level could aid in identifying NS-related genes. Our GIMS and TIMS scores are

  11. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  12. Is mortalin a candidate gene for T1DM ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Jesper; Pie, Angeles; Karlsen, Allan Ertmann; Larsen, Zenia Marian; Jensen, Allan; Vissing, Henrik; Kristiansen, Ole Peter; Pociot, Flemming; Nerup, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Mortalin has been found to be up-regulated by 2D-protein gel analysis in isolated rodent islets exposed to cytokines. In islets from two rat strains with different sensitivity to the toxic effects of cytokines we observed a significant difference in IL-1beta mediated mortalin expression. Constitutive over-expression of rat mortalin in NIH3T3 cells reduced cellular survival in accordance with mortalin being associated to cellular senescence. Hence we consider the gene encoding for mortalin at chromosome 5q31.1 a putative candidate gene in cytokine induced beta-cell destruction. We scanned the human mortalin gene for polymorphisms and identified three novel polymorphisms. Neither the SNPs individually nor as constructed haplotypes showed disease association tested by (E)TDT in a Danish type 1 diabetes (T1DM) population. Furthermore, we tested the D5S500 microsatelite located close to 5q31.1 without finding linkage to (T1DM). In conclusion, the functional data identifying a difference in mortalin expression in IL-1beta stimulated islets between two rat strains and over-expression of mortalin in NIH3T3 cells associated with decreased viability suggests a functional role for mortalin in cytokine mediated beta cell destruction; however, the identified polymorphisms did not reveal any association in the presence of linkage disequilibrium of mortalin to T1DM in the Danish population.

  13. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the CASC15, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1, and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated eight additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNPs at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2,101 cases and 4,202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing, and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNPs associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014: Pcombined = 0.0050; OR, 0.88; rs2979704: Pcombined = 0.0072; OR, 0.87; rs1059111: Pcombined = 0.0049; OR, 0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biologic investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens were associated with better overall survival (P = 0.03; HR, 0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and

  14. Exploiting genomics resources to identify candidate genes underlying antioxidants content in tomato fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eCalafiore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The tomato is a model species for fleshy fruit development and ripening, as well as for genomics studies of others Solanaceae. Many genetic and genomics resources, including databases for sequencing, transcriptomics and metabolomics data, have been developed and are today available. The purpose of the present work was to uncover new genes and/or alleles that determine ascorbic acid and carotenoids accumulation, by exploiting one Solanum pennellii introgression lines (IL7-3 harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL that increase the content of these metabolite in the fruit. The higher ascorbic acid and carotenoids content in IL7-3 was confirmed at three fruit developmental stages. The tomato genome reference sequence and the recently released S. pennellii genome sequence were investigated to identify candidate genes that might control ascorbic acid and carotenoids accumulation. First of all, a refinement of the wild region borders in the IL7-3 was achieved by analyzing CAPS markers designed in our laboratory. Afterwards, six candidate genes associated to ascorbic acid and one with carotenoids metabolism were identified exploring the annotation and the Gene Ontology terms of genes included in the region. Variants between the sequence of the wild and the cultivated alleles of these genes were investigated for their functional relevance and their potential effects on the protein sequences were predicted. Transcriptional levels of candidate genes in the introgression region were extracted from RNA-Seq data available for the entire S. pennellii introgression lines collection and verified by Real-Time qPCR. Finally, seven IL7-3 sub-lines were genotyped using 28 species-specific markers and then were evaluated for metabolites content. These analyses evidenced a significant decrease in transcript abundance for one 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and one L-ascorbate oxidase homolog, whose role in the accumulation of carotenoids and ascorbic acid is

  15. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C.; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D.; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar “Flower Nabana”. In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  16. Racial Differences in DNA-Methylation of CpG Sites Within Preterm-Promoting Genes and Gene Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihu, H M; Das, R; Morton, L; Huang, H; Paothong, A; Wilson, R E; Aliyu, M H; Salemi, J L; Marty, P J

    2016-08-01

    Objective To evaluate the role DNA methylation may play in genes associated with preterm birth for higher rates of preterm births in African-American women. Methods Fetal cord blood samples from births collected at delivery and maternal demographic and medical information were used in a cross-sectional study to examine fetal DNA methylation of genes implicated in preterm birth among black and non-black infants. Allele-specific DNA methylation analysis was performed using a methylation bead array. Targeted maximum likelihood estimation was applied to examine the relationship between race and fetal DNA methylation of candidate preterm birth genes. Receiver-operating characteristic analyses were then conducted to validate the CpG site methylation marker within the two racial groups. Bootstrapping, a method of validation and replication, was employed. Results 42 CpG sites were screened within 20 candidate gene variants reported consistently in the literature as being associated with preterm birth. Of these, three CpG sites on TNFAIP8 and PON1 genes (corresponding to: cg23917399; cg07086380; and cg07404485, respectively) were significantly differentially methylated between black and non-black individuals. The three CpG sites showed lower methylation status among infants of black women. Bootstrapping validated and replicated results. Conclusion for Practice Our study identified significant differences in levels of methylation on specific genes between black and non-black individuals. Understanding the genetic/epigenetic mechanisms that lead to preterm birth may lead to enhanced prevention strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality by eventually providing a means to identify individuals with a genetic predisposition to preterm labor.

  17. Large-scale evaluation of candidate genes identifies associations between VEGF polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat García-Closas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Common genetic variation could alter the risk for developing bladder cancer. We conducted a large-scale evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in candidate genes for cancer to identify common variants that influence bladder cancer risk. An Illumina GoldenGate assay was used to genotype 1,433 SNPs within or near 386 genes in 1,086 cases and 1,033 controls in Spain. The most significant finding was in the 5' UTR of VEGF (rs25648, p for likelihood ratio test, 2 degrees of freedom = 1 x 10(-5. To further investigate the region, we analyzed 29 additional SNPs in VEGF, selected to saturate the promoter and 5' UTR and to tag common genetic variation in this gene. Three additional SNPs in the promoter region (rs833052, rs1109324, and rs1547651 were associated with increased risk for bladder cancer: odds ratio (95% confidence interval: 2.52 (1.06-5.97, 2.74 (1.26-5.98, and 3.02 (1.36-6.63, respectively; and a polymorphism in intron 2 (rs3024994 was associated with reduced risk: 0.65 (0.46-0.91. Two of the promoter SNPs and the intron 2 SNP showed linkage disequilibrium with rs25648. Haplotype analyses revealed three blocks of linkage disequilibrium with significant associations for two blocks including the promoter and 5' UTR (global p = 0.02 and 0.009, respectively. These findings are biologically plausible since VEGF is critical in angiogenesis, which is important for tumor growth, its elevated expression in bladder tumors correlates with tumor progression, and specific 5' UTR haplotypes have been shown to influence promoter activity. Associations between bladder cancer risk and other genes in this report were not robust based on false discovery rate calculations. In conclusion, this large-scale evaluation of candidate cancer genes has identified common genetic variants in the regulatory regions of VEGF that could be associated with bladder cancer risk.

  18. The norepinephrine transporter gene is a candidate gene for panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Kristensen, A S; Buch, H N

    2011-01-01

    of PD. The SLC6A2 gene is located on chromosome 16q12.2 and encodes the norepinephrine transporter (NET), responsible for the reuptake of norepinephrine into presynaptic nerve terminals. The aim of the present study was to analyze genetic variants located within the NET gene for association with PD....... The case-control sample consisted of 449 patients with PD and 279 ethnically matched controls. All cases fulfilled the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria for PD. Genotyping was performed using the Sequenom platform (Sequenom, Inc, San Diego, USA). To test for allelic and haplotypic association, the PLINK software...... was used, and COMBASSOC was applied to test for gene-wise association. After quality control 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the gene-region were successfully analyzed. Seven SNPs located within the 5' end of the gene were significantly associated with PD. Furthermore, the NET gene...

  19. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

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    Ferrell Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22 were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p CEBPG, peptidase D (PEPD, and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal tissue samples. Conclusions Association testing

  20. A candidate-gene association study for berry colour and anthocyanin content in Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Cardoso

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin content is a trait of major interest in Vitis vinifera L. These compounds affect grape and wine quality, and have beneficial effects on human health. A candidate-gene approach was used to identify genetic variants associated with anthocyanin content in grape berries. A total of 445 polymorphisms were identified in 5 genes encoding transcription factors and 10 genes involved in either the biosynthetic pathway or transport of anthocyanins. A total of 124 SNPs were selected to examine association with a wide range of phenotypes based on RP-HPLC analysis and visual characterization. The phenotypes were total skin anthocyanin (TSA concentration but also specific types of anthocyanins and relative abundance. The visual assessment was based on OIV (Organisation Internationale de la Vigne et du Vin descriptors for berry and skin colour. The genes encoding the transcription factors MYB11, MYBCC and MYC(B were significantly associated with TSA concentration. UFGT and MRP were associated with several different types of anthocyanins. Skin and pulp colour were associated with nine genes (MYB11, MYBCC, MYC(B, UFGT, MRP, DFR, LDOX, CHI and GST. Pulp colour was associated with a similar group of 11 genes (MYB11, MYBCC, MYC(B, MYC(A, UFGT, MRP, GST, DFR, LDOX, CHI and CHS(A. Statistical interactions were observed between SNPs within the transcription factors MYB11, MYBCC and MYC(B. SNPs within LDOX interacted with MYB11 and MYC(B, while SNPs within CHI interacted with MYB11 only. Together, these findings suggest the involvement of these genes in anthocyanin content and on the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis. This work forms a benchmark for replication and functional studies.

  1. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

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    Rajani Rai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634; FAS (rs2234767; FASL (rs763110; DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714; PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974; ADRA2A (rs1801253; ADRB1 (rs1800544; ADRB3 (rs4994; CYP17 (rs2486758 involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634, DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288 and ADRB3 (rs4994 polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994 to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10 or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10. Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility.

  2. Candidate gene polymorphisms among North Indians and their association with schizophrenia in a case–control study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prachi Semwal; Suman Prasad; Panchami G. Varma; A. M. Bhagwat; S. N. Deshpande; B. K. Thelma

    2002-08-01

    Knowledge of candidate gene polymorphisms in a population is useful for a variety of gene–disease association studies, particularly for some complex traits. A number of candidate genes, a majority of them from the monoaminergic pathway in the brain, have been very popular in association studies with schizophrenia, a neuropsychiatric disorder. In this study diallelic/multiallelic polymorphisms in some dopaminergic, serotonergic and membrane-phospholipid-related genes have been evaluated in a control population recruited from North India. Association, if any, of these allelic variants with schizopherenia has been tested using a case–control approach. The case data have been taken from our published family-based association studies in schizophrenia. Of the eight genes tested in this study, association with schizophrenia was observed for only two gene polymorphisms, one in the promoter region of the serotonin 2A receptor gene and the other in the tryptophan hydroxylase gene. One new allele for the dopamine transporter gene (with eight repeats, 570-bp size), not reported in any population so far, has been identified in one individual in our sample. The data generated in this study, besides providing a normative background for various disease association studies, are a significant contribution to the population-specific genome database, a currently growing requirement.

  3. Human genes with a greater number of transcript variants tend to show biological features of housekeeping and essential genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Hyun Uk; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    64 vertebrate species as orthologs, subjected to regulations by transcription factors and microRNAs, and showed hub node-like properties in the human protein-protein interaction network. These findings were also confirmed by metabolic simulations of 60 cancer metabolic models. All these results......Alternative splicing is a process observed in gene expression that results in a multi-exon gene to produce multiple mRNA variants which might have different functions and activities. Although physiologically important, many aspects of genes with different number of transcript variants (or splice...... variants) still remain to be characterized. In this study, we provide bioinformatic evidence that genes with a greater number of transcript variants are more likely to play functionally important roles in cells, compared with those having fewer transcript variants. Among 21 983 human genes, 3728 genes were...

  4. Candidate gene association study in type 2 diabetes indicates a role for genes involved in beta-cell function as well as insulin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Barroso

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly common, serious metabolic disorder with a substantial inherited component. It is characterised by defects in both insulin secretion and action. Progress in identification of specific genetic variants predisposing to the disease has been limited. To complement ongoing positional cloning efforts, we have undertaken a large-scale candidate gene association study. We examined 152 SNPs in 71 candidate genes for association with diabetes status and related phenotypes in 2,134 Caucasians in a case-control study and an independent quantitative trait (QT cohort in the United Kingdom. Polymorphisms in five of 15 genes (33% encoding molecules known to primarily influence pancreatic beta-cell function-ABCC8 (sulphonylurea receptor, KCNJ11 (KIR6.2, SLC2A2 (GLUT2, HNF4A (HNF4alpha, and INS (insulin-significantly altered disease risk, and in three genes, the risk allele, haplotype, or both had a biologically consistent effect on a relevant physiological trait in the QT study. We examined 35 genes predicted to have their major influence on insulin action, and three (9%-INSR, PIK3R1, and SOS1-showed significant associations with diabetes. These results confirm the genetic complexity of Type 2 diabetes and provide evidence that common variants in genes influencing pancreatic beta-cell function may make a significant contribution to the inherited component of this disease. This study additionally demonstrates that the systematic examination of panels of biological candidate genes in large, well-characterised populations can be an effective complement to positional cloning approaches. The absence of large single-gene effects and the detection of multiple small effects accentuate the need for the study of larger populations in order to reliably identify the size of effect we now expect for complex diseases.

  5. Genetic variants in telomere-maintenance genes and bladder cancer risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyuan Gu; Yao Zhu; Dingwei Ye

    2013-01-01

    Telomere maintenance genes play an important role in maintaining the integrity of the telomere structure that protects chromosome ends, and telomere dysfunction may lead to tumorigenesis. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes has been confirmed. Cumulative evidence shows that the dif erence of telomere length and stability among the indi-vidual depends on the genetic variants of telomere maintenance genes. Genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes may af ect telomere length and stability, thus the increased cancer risk. This review intends to summarize the association of genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes with bladder cancer risk.

  6. Candidate genes detected in transcriptome studies are strongly dependent on genetic background.

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    Pernille Sarup

    Full Text Available Whole genome transcriptomic studies can point to potential candidate genes for organismal traits. However, the importance of potential candidates is rarely followed up through functional studies and/or by comparing results across independent studies. We have analysed the overlap of candidate genes identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same genetic backgrounds. Putative candidates found using transcriptomics therefore appear very sensitive to genetic background and this can mask or override effects of treatments. The functional importance of putative candidate genes emerging from transcriptome studies needs to be validated through additional experiments and in future studies we suggest a focus on the genes, networks and pathways affecting traits in a consistent manner across backgrounds.

  7. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  8. Loss aversion and 5HTT gene variants in adolescent anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Ernst

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss aversion, a well-documented behavioral phenomenon, characterizes decisions under risk in adult populations. As such, loss aversion may provide a reliable measure of risky behavior. Surprisingly, little is known about loss aversion in adolescents, a group who manifests risk-taking behavior, or in anxiety disorders, which are associated with risk-avoidance. Finally, loss aversion is expected to be modulated by genotype, particularly the serotonin transporter (SERT gene variant, based on its role in anxiety and impulsivity. This genetic modulation may also differ between anxious and healthy adolescents, given their distinct propensities for risk taking. The present work examines the modulation of loss aversion, an index of risk-taking, and reaction-time to decision, an index of impulsivity, by the serotonin-transporter-gene-linked polymorphisms (5HTTLPR in healthy and clinically anxious adolescents. Findings show that loss aversion (1 does manifest in adolescents, (2 does not differ between healthy and clinically anxious participants, and (3, when stratified by SERT genotype, identifies a subset of anxious adolescents who are high SERT-expressers, and show excessively low loss-aversion and high impulsivity. This last finding may serve as preliminary evidence for 5HTTLPR as a risk factor for the development of comorbid disorders associated with risk-taking and impulsivity in clinically anxious adolescents.

  9. Characterization of a novel splicing variant in the RAPTOR gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Chang [Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, 920 E. 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: csun1@bsd.uchicago.edu; Southard, Catherine; Di Rienzo, Anna [Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, 920 E. 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2009-03-09

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Raptor, the regulatory associated protein of mTOR, is an important member in this signaling pathway. In the present report, we identified and characterized a novel splicing variant of this gene, RAPTOR{sub v}2, in which exons 14-17, 474 bp in total, are omitted from the mRNA. This deletion does not change the open reading frame, but causes a nearly complete absence of HEAT repeats, which were shown to be involved in the binding of mTOR substrates. Real time PCR performed on 48 different human tissues demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of this splice variant. Quantification of mRNA levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) from 56 unrelated HapMap individuals revealed that the expression of this splicing form is quite variable. One synonymous SNP, rs2289759 in exon 14, was predicted by ESEfinder to cause a significant gain/loss of SRp55 and/or SF2/ASF binding sites, and thus potentially influence splicing. This prediction was confirmed by linear regression analysis between the ratio of RAPTOR{sub v}2 to total RAPTOR mRNA levels and the SNP genotype in the above 56 individuals (r = 0.281 and P = 0.036). Moreover, the functional evaluation indicated that this splicing isoform is expected to retain the ability to bind mTOR, but is unlikely to bind mTOR substrates, hence affecting signal transduction and further cell proliferation.

  10. Identification of a novel prostate cancer susceptibility variant in the KLK3 gene transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote-Jarai, Z; Amin Al Olama, A; Leongamornlert, D; Tymrakiewicz, M; Saunders, E; Guy, M; Giles, G G; Severi, G; Southey, M; Hopper, J L; Sit, K C; Harris, J M; Batra, J; Spurdle, A B; Clements, J A; Hamdy, F; Neal, D; Donovan, J; Muir, K; Pharoah, P D P; Chanock, S J; Brown, N; Benlloch, S; Castro, E; Mahmud, N; O'Brien, L; Hall, A; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Easton, D F; Eeles, R A

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. One of these (rs2735839) is located close to a plausible candidate susceptibility gene, KLK3, which encodes prostate-specific antigen (PSA). PSA is widely used as a biomarker for PrCa detection and disease monitoring. To refine the association between PrCa and variants in this region, we used genotyping data from a two-stage GWAS using samples from the UK and Australia, and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) study. Genotypes were imputed for 197 and 312 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from HapMap2 and the 1000 Genome Project, respectively. The most significant association with PrCa was with a previously unidentified SNP, rs17632542 (combined P = 3.9 × 10(-22)). This association was confirmed by direct genotyping in three stages of the UK/Australian GWAS, involving 10,405 cases and 10,681 controls (combined P = 1.9 × 10(-34)). rs17632542 is also shown to be associated with PSA levels and it is a non-synonymous coding SNP (Ile179Thr) in KLK3. Using molecular dynamic simulation, we showed evidence that this variant has the potential to introduce alterations in the protein or affect RNA splicing. We propose that rs17632542 may directly influence PrCa risk.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pers, Tune H; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan; Lent, Samantha; Sullivan, Patrick F; O'Donovan, Michael C; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2016-03-15

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approach, we show that genes in associated loci: (1) are highly expressed in cortical brain areas; (2) are enriched for ion channel pathways (false discovery rates genes that are functionally related to each other and hence represent promising candidates for experimental follow up. We validate the relevance of the prioritized genes by showing that they are enriched for rare disruptive variants and de novo variants from schizophrenia sequencing studies (odds ratio 1.67, P = 0.039), and are enriched for genes encoding members of mouse and human postsynaptic density proteomes (odds ratio 4.56, P = 5.00 × 10(-4); odds ratio 2.60, P = 0.049).The authors wish it to be known that, in their opinion, the first 2 authors should be regarded as joint First Author.

  12. In silico Analysis of Candidate Genes Involved in Sanfilippo Syndrome

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    Mehreen Zaka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sanfilippo syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, caused by the deficiency of enzymes that play an important role in degradation of glycosaminoglycans and also called mucopolysaccharidosis III. Mucopolysaccharidosis is genetic disorder. Here, we searched the candidate genes for Sanfilippo syndrome by using BLAST with the query sequence. As no suitable homology was found against the query sequence we moved towards threading approach. The threading approach was carried out by employing online CPH models and LOMETS tools. Through present research, domains of the proteins were predicted by utilizing the Domain Sweep tools, GNS and two domains were reported. Motif search reported the maximum number of motifs for Type D protein as compared to other types. All four proteins were totally soluble proteins and no transmembrane domains were found. In future, these results and predicted 3D structures can be used for the molecular docking studies, binding activities and protein-protein interactions for all the four types of Sanfilippo syndrome.

  13. Evaluation of 6 candidate genes on chromosome 11q23 for coeliac disease susceptibility: a case control study

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    Close Eimear

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent whole genome analysis and follow-up studies have identified many new risk variants for coeliac disease (CD, gluten intolerance. The majority of newly associated regions encode candidate genes with a clear functional role in T-cell regulation. Furthermore, the newly discovered risk loci, together with the well established HLA locus, account for less than 50% of the heritability of CD, suggesting that numerous additional loci remain undiscovered. Linkage studies have identified some well-replicated risk regions, most notably chromosome 5q31 and 11q23. Methods We have evaluated six candidate genes in one of these regions (11q23, namely CD3E, CD3D, CD3G, IL10RA, THY1 and IL18, as risk factors for CD using a 2-phase candidate gene approach directed at chromosome 11q. 377 CD cases and 349 ethnically matched controls were used in the initial screening, followed by an extended sample of 171 additional coeliac cases and 536 additional controls. Results Promotor SNPs (-607, -137 in the IL18 gene, which has shown association with several autoimmune diseases, initially suggested association with CD (P IL18-137/-607 also supported this effect, primarily due to one relatively rare haplotype IL18-607C/-137C (P Conclusion Haplotypes of the IL18 promotor region may contribute to CD risk, consistent with this cytokine's role in maintaining inflammation in active CD.

  14. The rs3857059 variant of the SNCA gene is associated with Parkinson’s disease in Mexican Mestizos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the candidate genes for Parkinson’s disease (PD, SNCA has replicated association in different populations. Besides other known mutations in the SNCA gene, the rs3857059 variant has also been linked to various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to search for association of this variant and sporadic PD in Mexican Mestizo patients. A case-control study was performed including 241 individuals, 106 patients, and 135 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using real-time PCR. The rs3857059 variant demonstrated an association with PD in Mexican Mestizos (OR = 2.40, CI, 1.1 to 5.1, p = 0.02 under the recessive model. In addition, a gender effect was found for the GG genotype in females (OR = 1.31, CI, 1.01 to 1.7, p = 0.037. This is the first study to confirm an association of the rs3857059 variant with PD and also to show a gender effect. Our data contribute to the elucidation of the link between rs3857059 and susceptibility to PD observed in the Mexican Mestizo population.

  15. Candidate genes for drought tolerance and improved productivity in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Vinod; Naveen Sharma; K Manjunatha; Adnan Kanbar; N B Prakash; H E Shashidhar

    2006-03-01

    Candidate genes are sequenced genes of known biological action involved in the development or physiology of a trait. Twenty-one putative candidate genes were designed after an exhaustive search in the public databases along with an elaborate literature survey for candidate gene products and/or regulatory sequences associated with enhanced drought resistance. The downloaded sequences were then used to design primers considering the flanking sequences as well. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on 10 diverse cultivars that involved Japonica, Indica and local accessions, revealed 12 polymorphic candidate genes. Seven polymorphic candidate genes were then utilized to genotype 148 individuals of CT9993 × IR62266 doubled haploid (DH) mapping population. The segregation data were tested for deviation from the expected Mendelian ratio (1:1) using a Chi-square test (<1%). Based on this, four candidate genes were assessed to be significant and the remaining three, as non-significant. All the significant candidate genes were biased towards CT9993, the female parent in the DH mapping population. Single-marker analysis strongly associated ( < 1%) them to different traits under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions. Two candidate genes, EXP15 and EXP13, were found to be associated with root number and silicon content in the stem respectively, under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions.

  16. Folate receptor gene variants and neural tube defect occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnell, R.; Greer, K. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Lammer, E. [Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that periconceptional use of folic acid supplements may prevent 40-50% of neural tube defects (NTDs). The FDA has subsequently recommended folic acid supplementation of all women of childbearing potential, even though the mechanism by which folic acid prevents NTDs is unknown. We investigated genetic variation of a candidate gene, the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF) receptor, that may mediate this preventive effect. The receptor concentrates folate within cells and we have localized its mRNA to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Our hypothesis is that dysfunctional 5-MeTHF receptors inadequately concentrate folate intracellularly, predisposing infants to NTDs. We have completed SSCP analysis on 3 of the 4 coding exons of the 5-MeTHF receptor gene of 474 infants participating in a large population-based epidemiological case-control study of NTDs in California; genotyping of another 500 infants is ongoing. Genomic DNA was extracted from residual blood spots from newborn screening samples of cases and controls. Genotyping was done blinded to case status. Polymorphisms have been detected for exons 4 and 5; fourteen percent of the infants have exon 5 polymorphisms. Data will be presented on the prevalence of 5-MeTHF receptor polymorphisms among cases and controls. Relationships among the polymorphisms and NTD occurrence may shed light on how folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs.

  17. Recapitulation of Candidate Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Associated Variants in Koreans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki-Sung; Cho, Hye-Young

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects multiple organ systems. Although the etiology of SLE remains unclear, it is widely accepted that genetic factors could be involved in its pathogenesis. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of SLE in diverse populations. However, not all the SNP candidates identified from non-Asian populations have been validated in Koreans. In this study, we aimed to replicate the SNPs that were recently discovered in the GWAS; these SNPs have not been validated in Koreans or have only been replicated in Koreans with an insufficient sample size to conclude any association. For this, we selected five SNPs (rs1801274 in FCGR2A and rs2286672 in PLD2, rs887369 in CXorf21, rs9782955 in LYST, and rs3794060 in NADSYN1). Through the replication study with 656 cases and 622 controls, rs1801274 in FCGR2A was found to be significantly associated with SLE in Koreans (odds ratio, 1.26, 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 1.50; p = 0.01 in allelic model). This association was also significant in two other models (dominant and recessive). The other four SNPs did not show a significant association. Our data support that FCGR polymorphisms play important roles in the susceptibility to SLE in diverse populations, including Koreans. PMID:27729837

  18. Genetic variants within telomere-associated genes, leukocyte telomere length and the risk of acute coronary syndrome in Czech women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouha, Dana; Pitha, Jan; Mesanyova, Jana; Mrazkova, Jolana; Fellnerova, Adela; Stanek, Vladimir; Lanska, Vera; Hubacek, Jaroslav A

    2016-02-15

    The association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been published in many reports, although almost exclusively in men. In our study we analysed the association between LTL and five selected variants within three candidate genes (TERC rs12696304; TERF2IP rs3784929 and rs8053257; UCP2 rs659366 and rs622064), which are not only involved in telomere-length maintenance but also potentially associated with higher risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Czech women (505 cases and 642 controls). We detected significantly shorter LTL in women with ACS (Ptelomere length or ACS risk in Czech females.

  19. Tag SNP selection for candidate gene association studies using HapMap and gene resequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongli; Kaplan, Norman L; Taylor, Jack A

    2007-10-01

    HapMap provides linkage disequilibrium (LD) information on a sample of 3.7 million SNPs that can be used for tag SNP selection in whole-genome association studies. HapMap can also be used for tag SNP selection in candidate genes, although its performance has yet to be evaluated against gene resequencing data, where there is near-complete SNP ascertainment. The Environmental Genome Project (EGP) is the largest gene resequencing effort to date with over 500 resequenced genes. We used HapMap data to select tag SNPs and calculated the proportions of common SNPs (MAF>or=0.05) tagged (rho2>or=0.8) for each of 127 EGP Panel 2 genes where individual ethnic information was available. Median gene-tagging proportions are 50, 80 and 74% for African, Asian, and European groups, respectively. These low gene-tagging proportions may be problematic for some candidate gene studies. In addition, although HapMap targeted nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs), we estimate only approximately 30% of nonsynonymous SNPs in EGP are in high LD with any HapMap SNP. We show that gene-tagging proportions can be improved by adding a relatively small number of tag SNPs that were selected based on resequencing data. We also demonstrate that ethnic-mixed data can be used to improve HapMap gene-tagging proportions, but are not as efficient as ethnic-specific data. Finally, we generalized the greedy algorithm proposed by Carlson et al (2004) to select tag SNPs for multiple populations and implemented the algorithm into a freely available software package mPopTag.

  20. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Cornen

    Full Text Available Breast cancers (BCs of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+, highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs, DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15 and UTRN (6q24, were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  1. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornen, Stéphanie; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Raynaud, Stéphane; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  2. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte;

    2012-01-01

    . Also, identifying family members that do not carry the variant is important so they can be released from the intensive surveillance. Determining which genetic variants are pathogenic and which are neutral is a major challenge in clinical genetics. The profound mechanistic knowledge on the genetics...

  3. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Jodie N; O'Mara, Tracy A; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Leire; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; De Polanco, Ma Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Montgomery, Grant W; Webb, Penelope M; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G; Nyholt, Dale R; Henders, Anjali K; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Renner, Stefan P; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Ekici, Arif B; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Edwards, Stacey L; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-03-01

    Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10(-14), odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.

  4. Common variant rs9939609 in gene FTO confers risk to polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO has been associated with obesity, especially the common variant rs9939609. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrine-metabolic disorder and over 50% of patients are overweight/obese. Thus FTO is a potential candidate gene for PCOS but their relationship is confusing and remains to be clarified in different population with a large sample size. METHOD: This study was performed adopting a two-stage design by genotyping SNP rs9939609. The first set comprise of 741 PCOS and 704 control subjects, with data from our previous GWAS. The second phase of replication study was performed among another independent group of 2858 PCOS and 2358 control subjects using TaqMan-MGB probe assay. All subjects are from Han Chinese. RESULTS: The less meaningful association of FTO rs9939609 and PCOS discovered in GWAS (P = 2.47E-03, was further confirmed in the replication study (P = 1.86E-09. Using meta-analysis, the P-meta value has reached 6.89E-12, over-exceeding the genome-wide association level of 5.00E-8. By combination, the P value was 1.26E-11 and after BMI adjustment it remained significant(P = 1.82E-06. To further elucidate whether this association is resulted from obesity or PCOS per se, the samples were divided into two groups-obese and non-obese PCOS, and the results were still positive in obese group (P obese = 5.81E-05, OR = 1.55, as well as in non-obese PCOS group (P non-obese = 7.06E-04, OR = 1.28. CONCLUSION: Variant rs9939609 in FTO is associated with PCOS in Chinese women, not only in obese PCOS subjects, but also in non-obese cases.

  5. Carotenoid content and root color of cultivated carrot: a candidate-gene association study using an original broad unstructured population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Jourdan

    Full Text Available Accumulated in large amounts in carrot, carotenoids are an important product quality attribute and therefore a major breeding trait. However, the knowledge of carotenoid accumulation genetic control in this root vegetable is still limited. In order to identify the genetic variants linked to this character, we performed an association mapping study with a candidate gene approach. We developed an original unstructured population with a broad genetic basis to avoid the pitfall of false positive detection due to population stratification. We genotyped 109 SNPs located in 17 candidate genes – mostly carotenoid biosynthesis genes – on 380 individuals, and tested the association with carotenoid contents and color components. Total carotenoids and β-carotene contents were significantly associated with genes zeaxanthin epoxydase (ZEP, phytoene desaturase (PDS and carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO while α-carotene was associated with CRTISO and plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX genes. Color components were associated most significantly with ZEP. Our results suggest the involvement of the couple PDS/PTOX and ZEP in carotenoid accumulation, as the result of the metabolic and catabolic activities respectively. This study brings new insights in the understanding of the carotenoid pathway in non-photosynthetic organs.

  6. Pleiotrophin gene therapy for peripheral ischemia: evaluation of full-length and truncated gene variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Fang

    Full Text Available Pleiotrophin (PTN is a growth factor with both pro-angiogenic and limited pro-tumorigenic activity. We evaluated the potential for PTN to be used for safe angiogenic gene therapy using the full length gene and a truncated gene variant lacking the domain implicated in tumorigenesis. Mouse myoblasts were transduced to express full length or truncated PTN (PTN or T-PTN, along with a LacZ reporter gene, and injected into mouse limb muscle and myocardium. In cultured myoblasts, PTN was expressed and secreted via the Golgi apparatus, but T-PTN was not properly secreted. Nonetheless, no evidence of uncontrolled growth was observed in cells expressing either form of PTN. PTN gene delivery to myocardium, and non-ischemic skeletal muscle, did not result in a detectable change in vascularity or function. In ischemic hindlimb at 14 days post-implantation, intramuscular injection with PTN-expressing myoblasts led to a significant increase in skin perfusion and muscle arteriole density. We conclude that (1 delivery of the full length PTN gene to muscle can be accomplished without tumorigenesis, (2 the truncated PTN gene may be difficult to use in a gene therapy context due to inefficient secretion, (3 PTN gene delivery leads to functional benefit in the mouse acute ischemic hindlimb model.

  7. Response to succinylcholine in patients carrying the K-variant of the butyrylcholinesterase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretlau, Claus; Sørensen, Martin Kryspin; Vedersoe, Anne-Lise Zimling;

    2013-01-01

    Succinylcholine is usually metabolized quickly by the butyrylcholinesterase enzyme (BChE) but genetic variants of BChE may prolong the duration of action. The Kalow (K) variant is the most common mutation in the butyrylcholinesterase gene (BCHE), being present in 25% of Caucasians. The significan...

  8. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacArthur, D.G.; Balasubramanian, S.; Frankish, A.; Huang, N.; Morris, J.; Walter, K.; Jostins, L.; Habegger, L.; Pickrell, J.K.; Montgomery, S.B.; Albers, C.A.; Zhang, Z.D.; Conrad, D.F.; Lunter, G.; Zheng, H.; Ayub, Q.; DePristo, M.A.; Banks, E.; Hu, M.; Handsaker, R.E.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Fromer, M.; Jin, M.; Mu, X.J.; Khurana, E.; Ye, K.; Kay, M.; Saunders, G.I.; Suner, M.M.; Hunt, T.; Barnes, I.H.; Amid, C.; Carvalho-Silva, D.R.; Bignell, A.H.; Snow, C.; Yngvadottir, B.; Bumpstead, S.; Cooper, D.N.; Xue, Y.; Romero, I.G.; Genomes Project, C.; Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Gibbs, R.A.; McCarroll, S.A.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Pritchard, J.K.; Barrett, J.C.; Harrow, J.; Hurles, M.E.; Gerstein, M.B.; Tyler-Smith, C.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to det

  9. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  10. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  11. Exploring the Novel Genetic Variant of PITX1 Gene and Its Effect on Milk Performance in Dairy Goats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Xian-yong; ZHAO Hai-yu; LI Zhuan-jian; ZHOU Rui; PAN Chuan-ying; LEI Chu-zhao; CHEN Hong

    2013-01-01

    Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1) plays an important role in pituitary development by indirectly regulating the expression of the GH and PRL genes, and therefore PITX1 gene is regarded as a potential candidate gene for building the relationship between the gene polymorphism and milk traits. The aim of this study was to explore the novel genetic variant in PITX1 gene and its effect on milk performance in dairy goats. Herein, a novel genetic variation (NW_00314033:g.201G>A or IVS1+41G>A) located at nt41 position of the first intron of the goat PITX1 gene was reported at the P1 locus, which can be genotyped by the Msp I PCR-RFLP. In the Msp I PCR-RFLP analyis, the GG variant was a major genotype, and the A variant was a minor allele in Guanzhong dairy goats which was at Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (chi-squareχ2=140, P<0.01). The establishment of associations between different genotypes and milk performance was performed in the analyzed population. A total of three significant associations of the polymorphism with average milk fat content (%) (P=0.045), morning milk fat content (%) (P=0.049), and afternoon milk fat content (%) (P=0.050), were found, respectively. A significant relationship between the polymorphism and average total solid content (P=0.029) was also detected. This novel single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) extended the spectrum of genetic variation of the goat PITX1 gene, and its significant association with milk performance would benefit from the application of DNA markers related to improving milk performance through marker-assisted selection (MAS) in dairy goats.

  12. Genome-Wide association study identifies candidate genes for Parkinson's disease in an Ashkenazi Jewish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xinmin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, nine Parkinson disease (PD genome-wide association studies in North American, European and Asian populations have been published. The majority of studies have confirmed the association of the previously identified genetic risk factors, SNCA and MAPT, and two studies have identified three new PD susceptibility loci/genes (PARK16, BST1 and HLA-DRB5. In a recent meta-analysis of datasets from five of the published PD GWAS an additional 6 novel candidate genes (SYT11, ACMSD, STK39, MCCC1/LAMP3, GAK and CCDC62/HIP1R were identified. Collectively the associations identified in these GWAS account for only a small proportion of the estimated total heritability of PD suggesting that an 'unknown' component of the genetic architecture of PD remains to be identified. Methods We applied a GWAS approach to a relatively homogeneous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population from New York to search for both 'rare' and 'common' genetic variants that confer risk of PD by examining any SNPs with allele frequencies exceeding 2%. We have focused on a genetic isolate, the AJ population, as a discovery dataset since this cohort has a higher sharing of genetic background and historically experienced a significant bottleneck. We also conducted a replication study using two publicly available datasets from dbGaP. The joint analysis dataset had a combined sample size of 2,050 cases and 1,836 controls. Results We identified the top 57 SNPs showing the strongest evidence of association in the AJ dataset (p -5. Six SNPs located within gene regions had positive signals in at least one other independent dbGaP dataset: LOC100505836 (Chr3p24, LOC153328/SLC25A48 (Chr5q31.1, UNC13B (9p13.3, SLCO3A1(15q26.1, WNT3(17q21.3 and NSF (17q21.3. We also replicated published associations for the gene regions SNCA (Chr4q21; rs3775442, p = 0.037, PARK16 (Chr1q32.1; rs823114 (NUCKS1, p = 6.12 × 10-4, BST1 (Chr4p15; rs12502586, p = 0.027, STK39 (Chr2q24.3; rs3754775, p = 0

  13. Obstructive heart defects associated with candidate genes, maternal obesity, and folic acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinyu; Cleves, Mario A; Nick, Todd G; Li, Ming; MacLeod, Stewart L; Erickson, Stephen W; Li, Jingyun; Shaw, Gary M; Mosley, Bridget S; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Right-sided and left-sided obstructive heart defects (OHDs) are subtypes of congenital heart defects, in which the heart valves, arteries, or veins are abnormally narrow or blocked. Previous studies have suggested that the development of OHDs involved a complex interplay between genetic variants and maternal factors. Using the data from 569 OHD case families and 1,644 control families enrolled in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) between 1997 and 2008, we conducted an analysis to investigate the genetic effects of 877 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 60 candidate genes for association with the risk of OHDs, and their interactions with maternal use of folic acid supplements, and pre-pregnancy obesity. Applying log-linear models based on the hybrid design, we identified a SNP in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (C677T polymorphism) with a main genetic effect on the occurrence of OHDs. In addition, multiple SNPs in betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT and BHMT2) were also identified to be associated with the occurrence of OHDs through significant main infant genetic effects and interaction effects with maternal use of folic acid supplements. We also identified multiple SNPs in glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta (DNMT3B) that were associated with elevated risk of OHDs among obese women. Our findings suggested that the risk of OHDs was closely related to a combined effect of variations in genes in the folate, homocysteine, or glutathione/transsulfuration pathways, maternal use of folic acid supplements and pre-pregnancy obesity.

  14. High-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jiwen; Mark, Adam; Afrasiabi, Cyrus; Tsueng, Ginger; Juchler, Moritz; Gopal, Nikhil; Stupp, Gregory S; Putman, Timothy E; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Griffith, Obi L; Torkamani, Ali; Whetzel, Patricia L; Mungall, Christopher J; Mooney, Sean D; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Chunlei

    2016-05-06

    Efficient tools for data management and integration are essential for many aspects of high-throughput biology. In particular, annotations of genes and human genetic variants are commonly used but highly fragmented across many resources. Here, we describe MyGene.info and MyVariant.info, high-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation information. These web services are currently accessed more than three million times permonth. They also demonstrate a generalizable cloud-based model for organizing and querying biological annotation information. MyGene.info and MyVariant.info are provided as high-performance web services, accessible at http://mygene.info and http://myvariant.info . Both are offered free of charge to the research community.

  15. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of purple pericarp gene Pb in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Purple rice is a type of rice with anthocyanins deposited in its grain pericarp. The rice Pb gene controlling purple pericarp character is known to be on chromosome 4, and the purple color is dominant over white color. In this study, we fine mapped the Pb gene using two F2 segregating populations, i.e. Pei'ai 64S (white) × Yunanheixiannuo (purple) and Pei'ai 64S × Chuanheinuo (purple). In the first-pass mapping, the Pb gene was located in the region downstream the SSR marker RM3820. In the fine mapping, the candidate region was saturated with InDel and CAPS markers developed specifically for this study. Eventually, the Pb gene was mapped within the 25-kb region delimited by the upstream marker RID3 and the downstream marker RID4. The delimited region contained two annotated genes, Ra and bhlh16 (TIGR Rice Genome, R.5). The former is a homologue of the Myc transcription factor Lc controlling anthocyanin biosynthesis in maize, and the latter is a homologue of the TT8 gene, which is also an Myc transcription factor gene controlling the pericarp pigmentation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence analysis showed that the exon 7 of the Ra gene of Yunanheixiannuo and Chuanheinuo had a 2-bp (GT) deletion compared with those of the white rice varieties Pei'ai 64S, 9311 and Nipponbare. A CAPS marker, CAPSRa, was developed according to the GT deletion for analysis of the two F2 segregating populations and 106 rice lines. The results showed that all F2 plants with white pericarp, and all non-purple rice lines (63 white and 22 red) contained no GT deletion, but all 20 purple rice lines contained the GT deletion. These results suggested that the Ra gene may be the Pb gene and the purple pericarp characteristic of rice is caused by the GT deletion within exon 7 of the Ra gene.

  16. Molecular genetic gene-environment studies using candidate genes in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modinos, Gemma; Iyegbe, Conrad; Prata, Diana; Rivera, Margarita; Kempton, Matthew J; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Sham, Pak C; van Os, Jim; McGuire, Philip

    2013-11-01

    The relatively high heritability of schizophrenia suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of the disorder. On the other hand, a number of environmental factors significantly influence its incidence. As few direct genetic effects have been demonstrated, and there is considerable inter-individual heterogeneity in the response to the known environmental factors, interactions between genetic and environmental factors may be important in determining whether an individual develops the disorder. To date, a considerable number of studies of gene-environment interactions (G×E) in schizophrenia have employed a hypothesis-based molecular genetic approach using candidate genes, which have led to a range of different findings. This systematic review aims to summarize the results from molecular genetic candidate studies and to review challenges and opportunities of this approach in psychosis research. Finally, we discuss the potential of future prospects, such as new studies that combine hypothesis-based molecular genetic candidate approaches with agnostic genome-wide association studies in determining schizophrenia risk.

  17. ASSOCIATION OF SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS IN THE LEPR CANDIDATE GENE WITH CARCASS TRAITS OF PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kováčik

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Leptin and leptin receptor genetic variants are associated with obese phenotypes in humans and mice and are expected to influence fat deposition in pigs. This study aimed to investigate the associations of LEPR polymorphism with carcass traits (half carcass weight, lean meat percentage, back-fat thickness, MLT area - musculus longisimus thoracis and evaluation of genotypic values, additive values and dominance deviations. To identify the genotypes of LEPR candidate genes, we used biological material obtained from sows (55 and boars (51 of hybrid combination Large White x Landrace after reaching the slaughter weight. We identified three genotypes using restriction endonuclease HpaII in a group of 106 pigs. The AA genotype was the dominant one (42.45%, AB heterozygotes constituted 39.62%, while the BB genotype was the lowest (17.93%. Analyzing the half carcass weight the highest value detected was the highest in the dominant AA homozygotes together with the highest genotypic value (GAA = 0.3649. The pork genotype AA presented the highest back-fat thickness, A high correlation between the additive genetic effect of the A allele and back-fat thickness (0.8183 has been observed while the effect of the allelic dominance was relatively low (0.1907. Based on our results we may conclude that there is an inverse and antagonistic relationship between the quality of the half carcass weight together with the back-fat thickness and the lean meat marker.

  18. Utilizing Gene Tree Variation to Identify Candidate Effector Genes in Zymoseptoria tritici

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    Megan C. McDonald

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zymoseptoria tritici is a host-specific, necrotrophic pathogen of wheat. Infection by Z. tritici is characterized by its extended latent period, which typically lasts 2 wks, and is followed by extensive host cell death, and rapid proliferation of fungal biomass. This work characterizes the level of genomic variation in 13 isolates, for which we have measured virulence on 11 wheat cultivars with differential resistance genes. Between the reference isolate, IPO323, and the 13 Australian isolates we identified over 800,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which ∼10% had an effect on the coding regions of the genome. Furthermore, we identified over 1700 probable presence/absence polymorphisms in genes across the Australian isolates using de novo assembly. Finally, we developed a gene tree sorting method that quickly identifies groups of isolates within a single gene alignment whose sequence haplotypes correspond with virulence scores on a single wheat cultivar. Using this method, we have identified < 100 candidate effector genes whose gene sequence correlates with virulence toward a wheat cultivar carrying a major resistance gene.

  19. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castède, Sophie; Campoy, José Antonio; Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  20. Identification of candidate methylation-responsive genes in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickerson Erin B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant methylation of gene promoter regions has been linked to changes in gene expression in cancer development and progression. Genes associated with CpG islands (CGIs are especially prone to methylation, but not all CGI-associated genes display changes in methylation patterns in cancers. Results In order to identify genes subject to regulation by methylation, we conducted gene expression profile analyses of an ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3 before and after treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC. An overlapping subset of these genes was found to display significant differences in gene expression between normal ovarian surface epithelial cells and malignant cells isolated from ovarian carcinomas. While 40% of all human genes are associated with CGIs, > 94% of the overlapping subset of genes is associated with CGIs. The predicted change in methylation status of genes randomly selected from the overlapping subset was experimentally verified. Conclusion We conclude that correlating genes that are upregulated in response to 5-aza-dC treatment of cancer cell lines with genes that are down-regulated in cancer cells may be a useful method to identify genes experiencing epigenetic-mediated changes in expression over cancer development.

  1. A Candidate Gene Association Study of 77 Polymorphisms in Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Schürks, Markus; Kurth, Tobias; Buring, Julie E.; Zee, Robert Y.L.

    2009-01-01

    Population-based studies have established an association between migraine and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We sought to investigate whether genetic variants implicated in CVD are associated with migraine. We performed an association study among 25,713 women, participating in the Women’s Health Study, with information on 77 previously characterized polymorphisms. Migraine and migraine aura status were self-reported. We used logistic regression to investigate the genotype-migraine association....

  2. Degrees of separation as a statistical tool for evaluating candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ronald M; Pettersson, Mats E

    2014-12-01

    Selection of candidate genes is an important step in the exploration of complex genetic architecture. The number of gene networks available is increasing and these can provide information to help with candidate gene selection. It is currently common to use the degree of connectedness in gene networks as validation in Genome Wide Association (GWA) and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping studies. However, it can cause misleading results if not validated properly. Here we present a method and tool for validating the gene pairs from GWA studies given the context of the network they co-occur in. It ensures that proposed interactions and gene associations are not statistical artefacts inherent to the specific gene network architecture. The CandidateBacon package provides an easy and efficient method to calculate the average degree of separation (DoS) between pairs of genes to currently available gene networks. We show how these empirical estimates of average connectedness are used to validate candidate gene pairs. Validation of interacting genes by comparing their connectedness with the average connectedness in the gene network will provide support for said interactions by utilising the growing amount of gene network information available.

  3. DNA sequence and haplotype variation in two candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy in the turkey Meleagris gallopavo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-chin; Xu, Jun; Kamara, Davida; Geng, Tuoyu; Gyenai, Kwaku; Reed, Kent M; Smith, Edward J

    2007-05-01

    Determining variation in genes is fundamental to understanding their function in the disease state. Cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and phospholamban (PLN) genes have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in human and model species. To investigate the role of these 2 candidate genes in DCM in the turkey Meleagris gallopavo, understanding sequence variants and map position distribution is necessary. To this end, a total of 1854 and 1771 bp of cTnT and PLN gene sequences, respectively, were scanned for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a randomly bred population. A total of 15 SNPs was identified in the cTnT and PLN genomic sequences. Nine haplotypes, 5 in cTnT and 4 in PLN, were identified. Observed heterozygosities (0.02-0.39) in the turkey population were low for both genes. Within each gene, 1 SNP corresponding to a restriction enzyme site was identified and used to develop a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping assay. The PLN gene was genetically mapped to turkey chromosome 2, equivalent to Gallus gallus chromosome 3, and cTnT mapped to a turkey microchromosome. Although limited because of the relatively small sample size of 55 birds, the data from this SNP analysis of PLN and cTnT provide a foundation from which to evaluate the function of cTnT and PLN in the turkey. Information about the distribution of the SNPs and haplotypes will facilitate future association and linkage studies.

  4. Functional validation of GWAS gene candidates for abnormal liver function during zebrafish liver development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Y. Liu

    2013-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed numerous associations between many phenotypes and gene candidates. Frequently, however, further elucidation of gene function has not been achieved. A recent GWAS identified 69 candidate genes associated with elevated liver enzyme concentrations, which are clinical markers of liver disease. To investigate the role of these genes in liver homeostasis, we narrowed down this list to 12 genes based on zebrafish orthology, zebrafish liver expression and disease correlation. To assess the function of gene candidates during liver development, we assayed hepatic progenitors at 48 hours post fertilization (hpf and hepatocytes at 72 hpf using in situ hybridization following morpholino knockdown in zebrafish embryos. Knockdown of three genes (pnpla3, pklr and mapk10 decreased expression of hepatic progenitor cells, whereas knockdown of eight genes (pnpla3, cpn1, trib1, fads2, slc2a2, pklr, mapk10 and samm50 decreased cell-specific hepatocyte expression. We then induced liver injury in zebrafish embryos using acetaminophen exposure and observed changes in liver toxicity incidence in morphants. Prioritization of GWAS candidates and morpholino knockdown expedites the study of newly identified genes impacting liver development and represents a feasible method for initial assessment of candidate genes to instruct further mechanistic analyses. Our analysis can be extended to GWAS for additional disease-associated phenotypes.

  5. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  6. Meiotic Interactors of a Mitotic Gene TAO3 Revealed by Functional Analysis of its Rare Variant

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    Saumya Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Studying the molecular consequences of rare genetic variants has the potential to identify novel and hitherto uncharacterized pathways causally contributing to phenotypic variation. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of a rare coding variant of TAO3, previously reported to contribute significantly to sporulation efficiency variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During mitosis, the common TAO3 allele interacts with CBK1—a conserved NDR kinase. Both TAO3 and CBK1 are components of the RAM signaling network that regulates cell separation and polarization during mitosis. We demonstrate that the role of the rare allele TAO3(4477C in meiosis is distinct from its role in mitosis by being independent of ACE2—a RAM network target gene. By quantitatively measuring cell morphological dynamics, and expressing the TAO3(4477C allele conditionally during sporulation, we show that TAO3 has an early role in meiosis. This early role of TAO3 coincides with entry of cells into meiotic division. Time-resolved transcriptome analyses during early sporulation identified regulators of carbon and lipid metabolic pathways as candidate mediators. We show experimentally that, during sporulation, the TAO3(4477C allele interacts genetically with ERT1 and PIP2, regulators of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis metabolic pathways, respectively. We thus uncover a meiotic functional role for TAO3, and identify ERT1 and PIP2 as novel regulators of sporulation efficiency. Our results demonstrate that studying the causal effects of genetic variation on the underlying molecular network has the potential to provide a more extensive understanding of the pathways driving a complex trait.

  7. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trubicka Joanna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations.

  8. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses M Muraya

    Full Text Available A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS, assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents. Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful

  9. Functional confirmation of PLAG1 as the candidate causative gene underlying major pleiotropic effects on body weight and milk characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Tania; Tiplady, Kathryn; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Snell, Russell G.; Spelman, Richard J.; Davis, Stephen R.; Littlejohn, Mathew D.

    2017-01-01

    A major pleiotropic quantitative trait locus (QTL) located at ~25 Mbp on bovine chromosome 14 affects a myriad of growth and developmental traits in Bos taurus and indicus breeds. These QTL have been attributed to two functional variants in the bidirectional promoter of PLAG1 and CHCHD7. Although PLAG1 is a good candidate for mediating these effects, its role remains uncertain given that these variants are also associated with expression of five additional genes at the broader locus. In the current study, we conducted expression QTL (eQTL) mapping of this region using a large, high depth mammary RNAseq dataset representing 375 lactating cows. Here we show that of the seven previously implicated genes, only PLAG1 and LYN are differentially expressed by QTL genotype, and only PLAG1 bears the same association signature of the growth and body weight QTLs. For the first time, we also report significant association of PLAG1 genotype with milk production traits, including milk fat, volume, and protein yield. Collectively, these data strongly suggest PLAG1 as the causative gene underlying this diverse range of traits, and demonstrate new effects for the locus on lactation phenotypes. PMID:28322319

  10. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-01-01

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium. PMID:23092983

  11. Capture Hi-C reveals novel candidate genes and complex long-range interactions with related autoimmune risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul; McGovern, Amanda; Orozco, Gisela; Duffus, Kate; Yarwood, Annie; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Cooper, Nicholas J.; Barton, Anne; Wallace, Chris; Fraser, Peter; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been tremendously successful in identifying genetic variants associated with complex diseases. The majority of association signals are intergenic and evidence is accumulating that a high proportion of signals lie in enhancer regions. We use Capture Hi-C to investigate, for the first time, the interactions between associated variants for four autoimmune diseases and their functional targets in B- and T-cell lines. Here we report numerous looping interactions and provide evidence that only a minority of interactions are common to both B- and T-cell lines, suggesting interactions may be highly cell-type specific; some disease-associated SNPs do not interact with the nearest gene but with more compelling candidate genes (for example, FOXO1, AZI2) often situated several megabases away; and finally, regions associated with different autoimmune diseases interact with each other and the same promoter suggesting common autoimmune gene targets (for example, PTPRC, DEXI and ZFP36L1). PMID:26616563

  12. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-10-23

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium.

  13. rs5888 variant of SCARB1 gene is a possible susceptibility factor for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Jennyfer; Seddon, Johanna M; Richard, Florence; Reynolds, Robyn; Leveziel, Nicolas; Benlian, Pascale; Borel, Patrick; Feingold, Josué; Munnich, Arnold; Soubrane, Gisèle; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Souied, Eric H

    2009-10-05

    Major genetic factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have recently been identified as susceptibility risk factors, including variants in the CFH gene and the ARMS2 LOC387715/HTRA1locus. Our purpose was to perform a case-control study in two populations among individuals who did not carry risk variants for CFHY402H and LOC387715 A69S (ARMS2), called "study" individuals, in order to identify new genetic risk factors. Based on a candidate gene approach, we analyzed SNP rs5888 of the SCARB1 gene, coding for SRBI, which is involved in the lipid and lutein pathways. This study was conducted in a French series of 1241 AMD patients and 297 controls, and in a North American series of 1257 patients with advanced AMD and 1732 controls. Among these individuals, we identified 61 French patients, 77 French controls, 85 North American patients and 338 North American controls who did not carry the CFH nor ARMS2 polymorphisms. An association between AMD and the SCARB1 gene was seen among the study subjects. The genotypic distribution of the rs5888 polymorphism was significantly different between cases and controls in the French population (plutein and vitamin E) metabolism in AMD.

  14. Variants in the ASB10 Gene Are Associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Micheal

    Full Text Available Recently nonsynonymous coding variants in the ankyrin repeats and suppressor of cytokine signaling box-containing protein 10 (ASB10 gene were found to be associated with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG in cohorts from Oregon and Germany, but this finding was not confirmed in an independent cohort from Iowa. The aim of the current study was to assess the role of ASB10 gene variants in Pakistani glaucoma patients.Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and splice junctions of the ASB10 gene was performed in 30 probands of multiplex POAG families, 208 sporadic POAG patients and 151 healthy controls from Pakistan. Genotypic associations of individual variants with POAG were analyzed with the Fisher's exact or Chi-square test.In total 24 variants were identified in POAG probands and sporadic patients, including 11 novel variants and 13 known variants. 13 of the variants were nonsynonymous, 6 were synonymous, and 5 were intronic. Three nonsynonymous variants (p.Arg49Cys, p.Arg237Gly, p.Arg453Cys identified in the probands were not segregating in the respective families. This is not surprising since glaucoma is a multifactorial disease, and multiple factors are likely to be involved in the disease manifestation in these families. However a nonsynonymous variant, p.Arg453Cys (rs3800791, was found in 6 sporadic POAG patients but not in controls, suggesting that it infers increased risk for the disease. In addition, one synonymous variant was found to be associated with sporadic POAG: p.Ala290Ala and the association of the variant with POAG remained significant after correction for multiple testing (uncorrected p-value 0.002, corrected p-value 0.047. The cumulative burden of rare, nonsynonymous variants was significantly higher in sporadic POAG patients compared to control individuals (p-value 0.000006.Variants in ASB10 were found to be significantly associated with sporadic POAG in the Pakistani population. This supports previous findings that sequence

  15. Validation of Candidate Causal Genes for Abdominal Obesity Which Affect Shared Metabolic Pathways and Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xia; Deignan, Joshua L; Qi, Hongxiu; Zhu, Jun; Qian, Su; Zhong, Judy; Torosyan, Gevork; Majid, Sana; Falkard, Brie; Kleinhanz, Robert R; Karlsson, Jenny; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Mumick, Sheena; Wang, Kai; Xie, Tao

    2009-01-01

    A major task in dissecting the genetics of complex traits is to identify causal genes for disease phenotypes. We previously developed a method to infer causal relationships among genes through the integration of DNA variation, gene transcription, and phenotypic information. Here we validated our method through the characterization of transgenic and knockout mouse models of candidate genes that were predicted to be causal for abdominal obesity. Perturbation of eight out of the nine genes, with...

  16. Candidate gene prioritization by network analysis of differential expression using machine learning approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitsch Daniela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovering novel disease genes is still challenging for diseases for which no prior knowledge - such as known disease genes or disease-related pathways - is available. Performing genetic studies frequently results in large lists of candidate genes of which only few can be followed up for further investigation. We have recently developed a computational method for constitutional genetic disorders that identifies the most promising candidate genes by replacing prior knowledge by experimental data of differential gene expression between affected and healthy individuals. To improve the performance of our prioritization strategy, we have extended our previous work by applying different machine learning approaches that identify promising candidate genes by determining whether a gene is surrounded by highly differentially expressed genes in a functional association or protein-protein interaction network. Results We have proposed three strategies scoring disease candidate genes relying on network-based machine learning approaches, such as kernel ridge regression, heat kernel, and Arnoldi kernel approximation. For comparison purposes, a local measure based on the expression of the direct neighbors is also computed. We have benchmarked these strategies on 40 publicly available knockout experiments in mice, and performance was assessed against results obtained using a standard procedure in genetics that ranks candidate genes based solely on their differential expression levels (Simple Expression Ranking. Our results showed that our four strategies could outperform this standard procedure and that the best results were obtained using the Heat Kernel Diffusion Ranking leading to an average ranking position of 8 out of 100 genes, an AUC value of 92.3% and an error reduction of 52.8% relative to the standard procedure approach which ranked the knockout gene on average at position 17 with an AUC value of 83.7%. Conclusion In this study we

  17. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham A. R.; Adany, Roza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Barbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Maki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Mein, Charles A.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I.; Mulder, Chris J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Nunez, Concepcion; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A.; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J.; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wolters, Victorien M.; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) <10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions re

  18. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, J J; Wang, B. Q.; Fei, Q.; Yang, Y; Li, D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In order to screen the altered gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with osteoporosis, we performed an integrated analysis of the online microarray studies of osteoporosis. Methods We searched the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database for microarray studies of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with osteoporosis. Subsequently, we integrated gene expression data sets from multiple microarray studies to obtain differentially expressed...

  19. Epidermal growth factor gene is a newly identified candidate gene for gout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Cao, Chunwei; Jia, Zhaotong; Liu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Xin, Ruosai; Wang, Can; Li, Xinde; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 4q25 has been identified as a genomic region associated with gout. However, the associations of gout with the genes in this region have not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed two-stage analysis to determine whether variations in candidate genes in the 4q25 region are associated with gout in a male Chinese Han population. We first evaluated 96 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight inflammatory/immune pathway- or glucose/lipid metabolism-related genes in the 4q25 region in 480 male gout patients and 480 controls. The SNP rs12504538, located in the elongation of very-long-chain-fatty-acid-like family member 6 gene (Elovl6), was found to be associated with gout susceptibility (Padjusted = 0.00595). In the second stage of analysis, we performed fine mapping analysis of 93 tag SNPs in Elovl6 and in the epidermal growth factor gene (EGF) and its flanking regions in 1017 male patients gout and 1897 healthy male controls. We observed a significant association between the T allele of EGF rs2298999 and gout (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval = 0.67–0.88, Padjusted = 6.42 × 10−3). These results provide the first evidence for an association between the EGF rs2298999 C/T polymorphism and gout. Our findings should be validated in additional populations. PMID:27506295

  20. Gentrepid V2.0: A web server for candidate disease gene prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballouz, S.; Liu, J.Y.; George, R.A.; Bains, N.; Liu, A.; Oti, M.O.; Gaeta, B.; Fatkin, D.; Wouters, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Candidate disease gene prediction is a rapidly developing area of bioinformatics research with the potential to deliver great benefits to human health. As experimental studies detecting associations between genetic intervals and disease proliferate, better bioinformatic techniques that c

  1. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  2. Variants in microRNA genes in familial papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Jerneja; Fultz, Rebecca; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Genutis, Luke K; Wang, Yanqiang; Li, Wei; Volinia, Stefano; Jazdzewski, Krystian; He, Huiling; Wakely, Paul E; Senter, Leigha; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2017-01-24

    Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC) displays one of the highest familiality scores of all cancers as measured by case-control studies, yet only a handful of genes have been implicated until now. Variants in microRNAs have been associated with the risk of several cancers including PTC but the magnitude of this involvement is unclear. This study was designed to test to what extent genomic variants in microRNAs contribute to PTC risk. We used SOLiD technology to sequence 321 genomic regions encoding 427 miRNAs in one affected individual from each of 80 PTC families. After excluding variants with frequency ≥ 1% in 1000 Genomes Phase 1 (n = 1092) we detected 1978 variants. After further functional filtering steps 25 variants in pre-miRs remained. Co-segregation was observed for six out of 16 tested miRNA variants with PTC in the families, namely let-7e, miR-181b, miR-135a, miR-15b, miR-320, and miR-484. Expression of miR-135a and miR-181b was tested in normal thyroid and tumor tissue from patients that carry the variants and a decrease in expression was observed. In vitro assays were applied to measure the effect of the variants on microRNAs' maturation. Four out of six variants were tested. Only the let-7e and miR-181b variants showed an effect on processing leading to lower levels of mature miRNA. These two variants were not detected in 1170 sporadic PTC cases nor in 1404 controls. Taken together, our data show that high penetrance germline sequence variants of miRNAs potentially predispose to a fraction of all PTC but are not common.

  3. Assessment of osteoarthritis candidate genes in a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rodriguez-Fontenla (Cristina); M. Calaza (Manuel); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); N.K. Arden (Nigel); F.J. Blanco; A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan); K. Chapman (Kay); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Doherty (Michael); T. Esko (Tõnu); C.M. Garcés Aletá (Carlos); J.J. Gomez-Reino Carnota (Juan); H.T. Helgadottir (Hafdis); A. Hofman (Albert); I. Jonsdottir (Ingileif); J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); A. McCaskie (Andrew); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); W.E.R. Ollier (William); N. Oreiro (Natividad); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); J.A. Riancho (José); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G.A. Wallis (Gillian); J.M. Wilkinson (Mark); G. Zhai (Guangju); Y. Zhu (Yanyan); D. Felson; J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); J. Loughlin (John); A. Metspalu (Andres); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Gonzalez (Antonio)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective To assess candidate genes for association with osteoarthritis (OA) and identify promising genetic factors and, secondarily, to assess the candidate gene approach in OA. Methods A total of 199 candidate genes for association with OA were identified using Human Genome Epidemiolog

  4. Correlation of a set of gene variants, life events and personality features on adult ADHD severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel J; Chiesa, Alberto; Mandelli, Laura; De Luca, Vincenzo; De Ronchi, Diana; Jain, Umesh; Serretti, Alessandro; Kennedy, James L

    2010-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could persist into adult life in a substantial proportion of cases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of (1) adverse events, (2) personality traits and (3) genetic variants chosen on the basis of previous findings and (4) their possible interactions on adult ADHD severity. One hundred and ten individuals diagnosed with adult ADHD were evaluated for occurrence of adverse events in childhood and adulthood, and personality traits by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Common polymorphisms within a set of nine important candidate genes (SLC6A3, DBH, DRD4, DRD5, HTR2A, CHRNA7, BDNF, PRKG1 and TAAR9) were genotyped for each subject. Life events, personality traits and genetic variations were analyzed in relationship to severity of current symptoms, according to the Brown Attention Deficit Disorder Scale (BADDS). Genetic variations were not significantly associated with severity of ADHD symptoms. Life stressors displayed only a minor effect as compared to personality traits. Indeed, symptoms' severity was significantly correlated with the temperamental trait of Harm avoidance and the character trait of Self directedness. The results of the present work are in line with previous evidence of a significant correlation between some personality traits and adult ADHD. However, several limitations such as the small sample size and the exclusion of patients with other severe comorbid psychiatric disorders could have influenced the significance of present findings.

  5. Candidate-Gene Screening and Association Analysis at the Autism-Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 16p: Evidence of Association at GRIN2A and ABAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnby, Gabrielle; Abbott, Aaron; Sykes, Nuala; Morris, Andrew; Weeks, Daniel E.; Mott, Richard; Lamb, Janine; Bailey, Anthony J.; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder whose underlying genetic causes have yet to be identified. To date, there have been eight genome screens for autism, two of which identified a putative susceptibility locus on chromosome 16p. In the present study, 10 positional candidate genes that map to 16p11-13 were examined for coding variants: A2BP1, ABAT, BFAR, CREBBP, EMP2, GRIN2A, MRTF-B, SSTR5, TBX6, and UBN1. Screening of all coding and regulatory regions by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography identified seven nonsynonymous changes. Five of these mutations were found to cosegregate with autism, but the mutations are not predicted to have deleterious effects on protein structure and are unlikely to represent significant etiological variants. Selected variants from candidate genes were genotyped in the entire International Molecular Genetics Study of Autism Consortium collection of 239 multiplex families and were tested for association with autism by use of the pedigree disequilibrium test. Additionally, genotype frequencies were compared between 239 unrelated affected individuals and 192 controls. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium were investigated, and the transmission of haplotypes across candidate genes was tested for association. Evidence of single-marker association was found for variants in ABAT, CREBBP, and GRIN2A. Within these genes, 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were subsequently genotyped in 91 autism trios (one affected individual and two unaffected parents), and the association was replicated within GRIN2A (Fisher's exact test, P<.0001). Logistic regression analysis of SNP data across GRIN2A and ABAT showed a trend toward haplotypic differences between cases and controls. PMID:15830322

  6. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  7. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  8. Candidate pathways and genes for prostate cancer: a meta-analysis of gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathiou Eleni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound The genetic mechanisms of prostate tumorigenesis remain poorly understood, but with the advent of gene expression array capabilities, we can now produce a large amount of data that can be used to explore the molecular and genetic mechanisms of prostate tumorigenesis. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of gene expression data from 18 gene array datasets targeting transition from normal to localized prostate cancer and from localized to metastatic prostate cancer. We functionally annotated the top 500 differentially expressed genes and identified several candidate pathways associated with prostate tumorigeneses. Results We found the top differentially expressed genes to be clustered in pathways involving integrin-based cell adhesion: integrin signaling, the actin cytoskeleton, cell death, and cell motility pathways. We also found integrins themselves to be downregulated in the transition from normal prostate tissue to primary localized prostate cancer. Based on the results of this study, we developed a collagen hypothesis of prostate tumorigenesis. According to this hypothesis, the initiating event in prostate tumorigenesis is the age-related decrease in the expression of collagen genes and other genes encoding integrin ligands. This concomitant depletion of integrin ligands leads to the accumulation of ligandless integrin and activation of integrin-associated cell death. To escape integrin-associated death, cells suppress the expression of integrins, which in turn alters the actin cytoskeleton, elevates cell motility and proliferation, and disorganizes prostate histology, contributing to the histologic progression of prostate cancer and its increased metastasizing potential. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that prostate tumor progression is associated with the suppression of integrin-based cell adhesion. Suppression of integrin expression driven by integrin-mediated cell death leads to increased cell

  9. Using the candidate gene approach for detecting genes underlying seed oil concentration and yield in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-07-01

    Increasing the oil concentration in soybean seeds has been given more attention in recent years because of demand for both edible oil and biodiesel production. Oil concentration in soybean is a complex quantitative trait regulated by many genes as well as environmental conditions. To identify genes governing seed oil concentration in soybean, 16 putative candidate genes of three important gene families (GPAT: acyl-CoA:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, DGAT: acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, and PDAT: phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase) involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathways were selected and their sequences retrieved from the soybean database ( http://www.phytozome.net/soybean ). Three sequence mutations were discovered in either coding or noncoding regions of three DGAT soybean isoforms when comparing the parents of a 203 recombinant inbreed line (RIL) population; OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe. The RIL population was used to study the effects of these mutations on seed oil concentration and other important agronomic and seed composition traits, including seed yield and protein concentration across three field locations in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. An insertion/deletion (indel) mutation in the GmDGAT2B gene in OAC Wallace was significantly associated with reduced seed oil concentration across three environments and reduced seed yield at Woodstock in 2010. A mutation in the 3' untranslated (3'UTR) region of GmDGAT2C was associated with seed yield at Woodstock in 2009. A mutation in the intronic region of GmDGAR1B was associated with seed yield and protein concentration at Ottawa in 2010. The genes identified in this study had minor effects on either seed yield or oil concentration, which was in agreement with the quantitative nature of the traits. However, the novel gene-specific markers designed in the present study can be used in soybean breeding for marker-assisted selection aimed at increasing seed yield and oil

  10. Multiple insulin degrading enzyme variants alter in vitro reporter gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Belbin

    Full Text Available The insulin degrading enzyme (IDE variant, v311 (rs6583817, is associated with increased post-mortem cerebellar IDE mRNA, decreased plasma β-amyloid (Aβ, decreased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD and increased reporter gene expression, suggesting that it is a functional variant driving increased IDE expression. To identify other functional IDE variants, we have tested v685, rs11187061 (associated with decreased cerebellar IDE mRNA and variants on H6, the haplotype tagged by v311 (v10; rs4646958, v315; rs7895832, v687; rs17107734 and v154; rs4646957, for altered in vitro reporter gene expression. The reporter gene expression levels associated with the second most common haplotype (H2 successfully replicated the post-mortem findings in hepatocytoma (0.89 fold-change, p = 0.04 but not neuroblastoma cells. Successful in vitro replication was achieved for H6 in neuroblastoma cells when the sequence was cloned 5' to the promoter (1.18 fold-change, p = 0.006 and 3' to the reporter gene (1.29 fold change, p = 0.003, an effect contributed to by four variants (v10, v315, v154 and v311. Since IDE mediates Aβ degradation, variants that regulate IDE expression could represent good therapeutic targets for AD.

  11. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods.

  12. FSH receptor gene variants are rarely associated with premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woad, Kathryn J; Prendergast, Deborah; Winship, Ingrid M; Shelling, Andrew N

    2013-04-01

    FSH receptor (FSHR) gene variants have been associated with premature ovarian failure (POF). Genomic DNA from New Zealand women with POF (n=80) and control women (n=80) was screened for variants in FSHR exons 7 and 10. FSHR exon 7 variants, including the c.566C>T Finnish founder mutation (p.Ala189Val), were not detected. Previously reported FSHR exon 10 polymorphisms were identified in both groups with similar allelic distributions. A novel heterozygous FSHR exon 10 variant c.1411A>T, p.Ile471Phe was observed in one woman with a family history of POF, but not her affected siblings. It is concluded that variants in exons 7 and 10 of FSHR are not frequently associated with the development of POF in the New Zealand population.

  13. Evaluation of 6 candidate genes on chromosome 11q23 for coeliac disease susceptibility: a case control study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Karen

    2010-05-17

    Abstract Background Recent whole genome analysis and follow-up studies have identified many new risk variants for coeliac disease (CD, gluten intolerance). The majority of newly associated regions encode candidate genes with a clear functional role in T-cell regulation. Furthermore, the newly discovered risk loci, together with the well established HLA locus, account for less than 50% of the heritability of CD, suggesting that numerous additional loci remain undiscovered. Linkage studies have identified some well-replicated risk regions, most notably chromosome 5q31 and 11q23. Methods We have evaluated six candidate genes in one of these regions (11q23), namely CD3E, CD3D, CD3G, IL10RA, THY1 and IL18, as risk factors for CD using a 2-phase candidate gene approach directed at chromosome 11q. 377 CD cases and 349 ethnically matched controls were used in the initial screening, followed by an extended sample of 171 additional coeliac cases and 536 additional controls. Results Promotor SNPs (-607, -137) in the IL18 gene, which has shown association with several autoimmune diseases, initially suggested association with CD (P < 0.05). Follow-up analyses of an extended sample supported the same, moderate effect (P < 0.05) for one of these. Haplotype analysis of IL18-137\\/-607 also supported this effect, primarily due to one relatively rare haplotype IL18-607C\\/-137C (P < 0.0001), which was independently associated in two case-control comparisons. This same haplotype has been noted in rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusion Haplotypes of the IL18 promotor region may contribute to CD risk, consistent with this cytokine\\'s role in maintaining inflammation in active CD.

  14. Evaluation of 6 candidate genes on chromosome 11q23 for coeliac disease susceptibility: a case control study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Karen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent whole genome analysis and follow-up studies have identified many new risk variants for coeliac disease (CD, gluten intolerance). The majority of newly associated regions encode candidate genes with a clear functional role in T-cell regulation. Furthermore, the newly discovered risk loci, together with the well established HLA locus, account for less than 50% of the heritability of CD, suggesting that numerous additional loci remain undiscovered. Linkage studies have identified some well-replicated risk regions, most notably chromosome 5q31 and 11q23. METHODS: We have evaluated six candidate genes in one of these regions (11q23), namely CD3E, CD3D, CD3G, IL10RA, THY1 and IL18, as risk factors for CD using a 2-phase candidate gene approach directed at chromosome 11q. 377 CD cases and 349 ethnically matched controls were used in the initial screening, followed by an extended sample of 171 additional coeliac cases and 536 additional controls. RESULTS: Promotor SNPs (-607, -137) in the IL18 gene, which has shown association with several autoimmune diseases, initially suggested association with CD (P < 0.05). Follow-up analyses of an extended sample supported the same, moderate effect (P < 0.05) for one of these. Haplotype analysis of IL18-137\\/-607 also supported this effect, primarily due to one relatively rare haplotype IL18-607C\\/-137C (P < 0.0001), which was independently associated in two case-control comparisons. This same haplotype has been noted in rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSION: Haplotypes of the IL18 promotor region may contribute to CD risk, consistent with this cytokine\\'s role in maintaining inflammation in active CD.

  15. Candidate driver genes involved in genome maintenance and DNA repair in Sézary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Wesley J; Pullabhatla, Venu; Lorenc, Anna; Patel, Varsha M; Butler, Rosie M; Bayega, Anthony; Begum, Nelema; Bakr, Farrah; Dedhia, Kiran; Fisher, Joshua; Aguilar-Duran, Silvia; Flanagan, Charlotte; Ghasemi, Aria A; Hoffmann, Ricarda M; Castillo-Mosquera, Nubia; Nuttall, Elisabeth A; Paul, Arisa; Roberts, Ceri A; Solomonidis, Emmanouil G; Tarrant, Rebecca; Yoxall, Antoinette; Beyers, Carl Z; Ferreira, Silvia; Tosi, Isabella; Simpson, Michael A; de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Mitchell, Tracey J; Whittaker, Sean J

    2016-06-30

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is a leukemic variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and represents an ideal model for study of T-cell transformation. We describe whole-exome and single-nucleotide polymorphism array-based copy number analyses of CD4(+) tumor cells from untreated patients at diagnosis and targeted resequencing of 101 SS cases. A total of 824 somatic nonsynonymous gene variants were identified including indels, stop-gain/loss, splice variants, and recurrent gene variants indicative of considerable molecular heterogeneity. Driver genes identified using MutSigCV include POT1, which has not been previously reported in CTCL; and TP53 and DNMT3A, which were also identified consistent with previous reports. Mutations in PLCG1 were detected in 11% of tumors including novel variants not previously described in SS. This study is also the first to show BRCA2 defects in a significant proportion (14%) of SS tumors. Aberrations in PRKCQ were found to occur in 20% of tumors highlighting selection for activation of T-cell receptor/NF-κB signaling. A complex but consistent pattern of copy number variants (CNVs) was detected and many CNVs involved genes identified as putative drivers. Frequent defects involving the POT1 and ATM genes responsible for telomere maintenance were detected and may contribute to genomic instability in SS. Genomic aberrations identified were enriched for genes implicated in cell survival and fate, specifically PDGFR, ERK, JAK STAT, MAPK, and TCR/NF-κB signaling; epigenetic regulation (DNMT3A, ASLX3, TET1-3); and homologous recombination (RAD51C, BRCA2, POLD1). This study now provides the basis for a detailed functional analysis of malignant transformation of mature T cells and improved patient stratification and treatment.

  16. Novel Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccines: evidence-based searching for variant surface antigens as candidates for vaccination against pregnancy-associated malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Jensen, Anja T R; Theander, Thor G;

    2002-01-01

    to statistically significant co-variation with protection rather than on demonstration of causal relationships. We have studied the relationship between variant surface antigen-specific antibodies and clinical protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria in general, and from pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM......) in particular, to provide robust evidence of a causal link between the two in order to allow efficient and evidence-based identification of candidate antigens for malaria vaccine development....

  17. Testing the thrifty gene hypothesis: the Gly482Ser variant in PPARGC1A is associated with BMI in Tongans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macartney-Coxson Donia P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thrifty gene hypothesis posits that, in populations that experienced periods of feast and famine, natural selection favoured individuals carrying thrifty alleles that promote the storage of fat and energy. Polynesians likely experienced long periods of cold stress and starvation during their settlement of the Pacific and today have high rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM, possibly due to past positive selection for thrifty alleles. Alternatively, T2DM risk alleles may simply have drifted to high frequency in Polynesians. To identify thrifty alleles in Polynesians, we previously examined evidence of positive selection on T2DM-associated SNPs and identified a T2DM risk allele at unusually high frequency in Polynesians. We suggested that the risk allele of the Gly482Ser variant in the PPARGC1A gene was driven to high frequency in Polynesians by positive selection and therefore possibly represented a thrifty allele in the Pacific. Methods Here we examine whether PPARGC1A is a thrifty gene in Pacific populations by testing for an association between Gly482Ser genotypes and BMI in two Pacific populations (Maori and Tongans and by evaluating the frequency of the risk allele of the Gly482Ser variant in a sample of worldwide populations. Results We find that the Gly482Ser variant is associated with BMI in Tongans but not in Maori. In a sample of 58 populations worldwide, we also show that the 482Ser risk allele reaches its highest frequency in the Pacific. Conclusion The association between Gly482Ser genotypes and BMI in Tongans together with the worldwide frequency distribution of the Gly482Ser risk allele suggests that PPARGC1A remains a candidate thrifty gene in Pacific populations.

  18. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  19. Determination of variants in the 3'-region of the Tyrosinase gene requires locus specific amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaki, M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Ray, K.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (TYR, 11q14-q21) cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1). The 3'-region of the TYR shows 98.55% sequence identity with a pseudogene, known as Tyrosinase-Like Gene (TYRL, 11p11.2-cen). A large number of publicly available nucleotide variants of TYR in this region

  20. Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Clendenen

    Full Text Available Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  1. Integrative strategies to identify candidate genes in rodent models of human alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    The search for genes underlying alcohol-related behaviours in rodent models of human alcoholism has been ongoing for many years with only limited success. Recently, new strategies that integrate several of the traditional approaches have provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol's actions in the brain. We have used alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and alcohol-avoiding DBA/2J (D2) genetic strains of mice in an integrative strategy combining high-throughput gene expression screening, genetic segregation analysis, and mapping to previously published quantitative trait loci to uncover candidate genes for the ethanol-preference phenotype. In our study, 2 genes, retinaldehyde binding protein 1 (Rlbp1) and syntaxin 12 (Stx12), were found to be strong candidates for ethanol preference. Such experimental approaches have the power and the potential to greatly speed up the laborious process of identifying candidate genes for the animal models of human alcoholism.

  2. Functional Characterization of the Plasmacytoma Variant Translocation 1 Gene (PVT1) in Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    M Lucrecia Alvarez; Johanna K. DiStefano

    2011-01-01

    We previously observed association between variants in the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) attributed to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and demonstrated PVT1 expression in a variety of renal cell types. While these findings suggest a role for PVT1 in the development of ESRD, potential mechanisms for involvement remain unknown. The goal of this study was to identify possible molecular mechanisms by which PVT1 may contribute to the developme...

  3. Novel splicing variant of the human orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐评议; 乐卫东

    2004-01-01

    Background Nurr1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors. The objective of the present study was to identify novel splicing variants of the gene in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and determine their functions. Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was used to screen for Nurr1 splice variants in the adult human central nervous system (CNS) and in other tissues such as lymphocytes, and liver, muscle, and kidney cells. Functional assays of the variants were performed by measuring Nurr1 response element (NuRE) transcriptional activity in vitro. Results In this study, the authors identified a novel splicing variant of Nurr1 within exon 5, found in multiple adult human tissues, including lymphocytes, and liver, muscle, and kidney cells, but not in the brain or spinal cord. Sequencing analysis showed the variant has a 75 bp deletion between nucleotides 1402 and 1476. A functional assay of the Nurr1-c splicing variant, performed by measuring NuRE transcriptional activity in vitro, detected a 39% lower level of luciferase (LUC) activity (P<0.05).Conclusion A novel splicing variant of Nurr1 exists in human non-neuronal tissues and functional assays suggest that the variant may act as an alternate transcription regulator.

  4. Alternative spliced variants in the pantetheinase family of genes expressed in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-15

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.92) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes pantetheine, an intermediate metabolite of coenzyme A, into pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and cysteamine, a potent antioxidant. The pantetheinase gene family consists of three independent genes, pantetheinase/vanin-1/VNN1, GPI-80/VNN2 and vanin-3/VNN3 that are each composed of seven exons. We herein report that human neutrophils express transcripts encoding at least nine splice variants of VNN3 and four splice variants of GPI-80/VNN2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the human VNN3 gene demonstrated that the VNN3 locus in the human genome as well as the sequence of cDNA clones obtained in this study does not encode the complete VNN3 protein, as previously reported due to a frame shift caused by lack of one nucleotide. Moreover, the VNN3 locus indeed encodes smaller peptides compared to the proteins encoded by the mouse orthologous gene, vanin-3. The anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody 3H9 recognized amino acids 120-179 of the GPI-80/VNN2 protein as shown by the results of immunoblotting with recombinant GPI-80/VNN2 variant proteins. Immunoblotting with human neutrophil lysate suggests that the GPI-80/VNN2 variants exist in human neutrophils. The existence of splice variants in the pantetheinase gene family suggests the possibility of alternative roles in addition to canonical enzymatic activity in human neutrophils.

  5. Candidate genes of hypertension with defective environmental expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNYULIN; JOHANNETREMBLAY; 等

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the thermosensitivity locus cosegregates with blood pressure and that the elevated expression and restriction fragment length polymorphism of HSP70 gene are associated with hypertension.Cell protection against environmental stressors such as heat and chemicals is often accompanied by up-regulated expression of a wide spectrum of heat shock genes(HSP).To further investigate the interrelation between HSP expression and blood pressure regulation,we employed an effective method of cloning 2 potential hypertension-related HSPs.Synthetic oligonucleotides corresponding either to a highly-conserved region of the known HSP family or a repetitive sequence in the proteinencoding gene were used as target primers for polymerase chain reaction(PCR).cDNA prepared from heat-stressed and non-stressed vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMC)of Brown Norway rats(BN.1x)and spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRp) respectively served as template in the reaction.The PCR products were subsequently analyzed in a single-stranded conformational polymorphism(SSCP) electrophoresing system.Differential gene expression in BN.1x and SHRp was seen on autoradiographs of SSCP gel by comparing the migration patterns of PCR-amplified DNA fragments.Using this technique,we also found that HSP27 and a new member of the large HSP gene family were differentially expressed in BN.1x and SHRp VSMC.

  6. Are all the previously reported genetic variants in limb girdle muscular dystrophy genes pathogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Savarese, Marco; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of variants in autosomal genes associated with the limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) have been reported as being causative. However, in most cases the proof of pathogenicity derives from their non-occurrence in hundreds of healthy controls and/or from segregation studies in small families. The limited statistics of the genetic variations in the general population may hamper a correct interpretation of the effect of variants on the protein. To clarify the meaning of low-frequency variants in LGMD genes, we have selected all variants described as causative in the Leiden Open Variation Database and the Human Gene Mutation Database. We have systematically searched for their frequency in the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and in our internal database. Surprisingly, the ESP contains about 4% of the variants previously associated with a dominant inheritance and about 9% of those associated with a recessive inheritance. The putative disease alleles are much more frequent than those estimated considering the disease prevalence. In conclusion, we hypothesize that a number of disease-associated variants are non-pathogenic and that other variations are not fully penetrant, even if they affect the protein function, suggesting a more complex genetic mechanisms for such heterogeneous disorders.

  7. Functional Insight From Fruit Flies on Human ADHD Candidate Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric disorder emerging in early childhood with an average prevalence rate of 5% in children and 3.7% in adults. ADHD is characterized by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. This, combined with educational and social dysfunctions......, and increased risk of mental comorbidities, makes ADHD a disorder with high individual and societal costs. We use Drosophila melanogaster as a model to investigate the phenotypic consequences of gene disruption of 14 genes with human orthologs, selected by their proposed contribution to increased risk...... of developing ADHD. We use Minos mutants, where target genes have been disrupted by the Minos transposable element, to test the effect on locomotor activity. By measuring the distance traveled, we find disparity in locomotor activity between control and Minos mutants. Impaired dopamine system underlies...

  8. The Axon Guidance Receptor Gene ROBO1 Is a Candidate Gene for Developmental Dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is the most common learning disorder with a complex, partially genetic basis, but its biochemical mechanisms remain poorly understood. A locus on Chromosome 3, DYX5, has been linked to dyslexia in one large family and speech-sound disorder in a subset of small families. We found that the axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1, orthologous to the Drosophila roundabout gene, is disrupted by a chromosome translocation in a dyslexic individual. In a large pedigree with 21 dyslexic individuals genetically linked to a specific haplotype of ROBO1 (not found in any other chromosomes in our samples, the expression of ROBO1 from this haplotype was absent or attenuated in affected individuals. Sequencing of ROBO1 in apes revealed multiple coding differences, and the selection pressure was significantly different between the human, chimpanzee, and gorilla branch as compared to orangutan. We also identified novel exons and splice variants of ROBO1 that may explain the apparent phenotypic differences between human and mouse in heterozygous loss of ROBO1. We conclude that dyslexia may be caused by partial haplo-insufficiency for ROBO1 in rare families. Thus, our data suggest that a slight disturbance in neuronal axon crossing across the midline between brain hemispheres, dendrite guidance, or another function of ROBO1 may manifest as a specific reading disability in humans.

  9. The axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1 is a candidate gene for developmental dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katariina Hannula-Jouppi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is the most common learning disorder with a complex, partially genetic basis, but its biochemical mechanisms remain poorly understood. A locus on Chromosome 3, DYX5, has been linked to dyslexia in one large family and speech-sound disorder in a subset of small families. We found that the axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1, orthologous to the Drosophila roundabout gene, is disrupted by a chromosome translocation in a dyslexic individual. In a large pedigree with 21 dyslexic individuals genetically linked to a specific haplotype of ROBO1 (not found in any other chromosomes in our samples, the expression of ROBO1 from this haplotype was absent or attenuated in affected individuals. Sequencing of ROBO1 in apes revealed multiple coding differences, and the selection pressure was significantly different between the human, chimpanzee, and gorilla branch as compared to orangutan. We also identified novel exons and splice variants of ROBO1 that may explain the apparent phenotypic differences between human and mouse in heterozygous loss of ROBO1. We conclude that dyslexia may be caused by partial haplo-insufficiency for ROBO1 in rare families. Thus, our data suggest that a slight disturbance in neuronal axon crossing across the midline between brain hemispheres, dendrite guidance, or another function of ROBO1 may manifest as a specific reading disability in humans.

  10. Expression Profiling Identifies Candidate Genes for Fiber Yield and Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LLEWELLYN D J; MACHADO A; AI-GHAZI Y; WU Y; DENNIS E S

    2008-01-01

    @@ Gene expression profiling at early stages (0~2 DPA) of fiber development in Gossypiurn hirsuturn identified a number of transcription factors which were down regulated in fiberless mutants relative to wild type controls and which could play a role in controlling early fiber development.Chief among these was GhMYB25,a Mixta-like MYB gene.Transgenic GhMYB25-silenced cotton showeddramatic alterations in fiber initiation and the timing of rapid fiber elongation,reduction in trichomes on other parts of the plant,a delay in lateral root growth,and a reduction in seed production due toreduced fertilization efficiency.

  11. Characterisation of five candidate genes within the ETEC F4ab/ac candidate region in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertschinger Hans U

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC that express the F4ab and F4ac fimbriae is a major contributor to diarrhoea outbreaks in the pig breeding industry, infecting both newborn and weaned piglets. Some pigs are resistant to this infection, and susceptibility is inherited as a simple dominant Mendelian trait. Indentifying the genetics behind this trait will greatly benefit pig welfare as well as the pig breeding industry by providing an opportunity to select against genetically susceptible animals, thereby reducing the number of diarrhoea outbreaks. The trait has recently been mapped by haplotype sharing to a 2.5 Mb region on pig chromosome 13, a region containing 18 annotated genes. Findings The coding regions of five candidate genes for susceptibility to ETEC F4ab/ac infection (TFRC, ACK1, MUC20, MUC4 and KIAA0226, all located in the 2.5 Mb region, were investigated for the presence of possible causative mutations. A total of 34 polymorphisms were identified in either coding regions or their flanking introns. The genotyping data for two of those were found to perfectly match the genotypes at the ETEC F4ab/ac locus, a G to C polymorphism in intron 11 of TFRC and a C to T silent polymorphism in exon 22 of KIAA0226. Transcriptional profiles of the five genes were investigated in a porcine tissue panel including various intestinal tissues. All five genes were expressed in intestinal tissues at different levels but none of the genes were found differentially expressed between ETEC F4ab/ac resistant and ETEC F4ab/ac susceptible animals in any of the tested tissues. Conclusions None of the identified polymorphisms are obvious causative mutations for ETEC F4ab/ac susceptibility, as they have no impact on the level of the overall mRNA expression nor predicted to influence the composition of the amino acids composition. However, we cannot exclude that the five tested genes are bona fide candidate genes for susceptibility to ETEC F4ab

  12. Calpain-5 gene variants are associated with diastolic blood pressure and cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morón Francisco J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes implicated in common complex disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM or cardiovascular diseases are not disease specific, since clinically related disorders also share genetic components. Cysteine protease Calpain 10 (CAPN10 has been associated with T2DM, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, increased body mass index (BMI and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a reproductive disorder of women in which isunlin resistance seems to play a pathogenic role. The calpain 5 gene (CAPN5 encodes a protein homologue of CAPN10. CAPN5 has been previously associated with PCOS by our group. In this new study, we have analysed the association of four CAPN5 gene variants(rs948976A>G, rs4945140G>A, rs2233546C>T and rs2233549G>A with several cardiovascular risk factors related to metabolic syndrome in general population. Methods Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, insulin, glucose and lipid profiles were determined in 606 individuals randomly chosen from a cross-sectional population-based epidemiological survey in the province of Segovia in Central Spain (Castille, recruited to investigate the prevalence of anthropometric and physiological parameters related to obesity and other components of the metabolic syndrome. Genotypes at the four polymorphic loci in CAPN5 gene were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results Genotype association analysis was significant for BMI (p ≤ 0.041, diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.015 and HDL-cholesterol levels (p = 0.025. Different CAPN5 haplotypes were also associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP (0.0005 ≤ p ≤ 0.006 and total cholesterol levels (0.001 ≤ p ≤ 0.029. In addition, the AACA haplotype, over-represented in obese individuals, is also more frequent in individuals with metabolic syndrome defined by ATPIII criteria (p = 0.029. Conclusion As its homologue CAPN10, CAPN5 seems to influence traits related to increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Our

  13. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia candidate genes derived from embryonic transcriptomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, Meaghan K; Longoni, Mauro; Wells, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common (1 in 3,000 live births) major congenital malformation that results in significant morbidity and mortality. The discovery of CDH loci using standard genetic approaches has been hindered by its genetic heterogeneity. We hypothesized that gene expre...

  14. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Castède

    Full Text Available The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  15. LOD score exclusion analyses for candidate disease susceptibility genes using case-parents design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hongwen; GAO Guimin

    2006-01-01

    The focus of almost all the association studies of candidate genes is to test for their importance. We recently developed a LOD score approach that can be used to test against the importance of candidate genes for complex diseases and quantitative traits in random samples. As a complementary method to regular association analyses, our LOD score approach is powerful but still affected by the population admixture, though it is more conservative. To control the confounding effect of population heterogeneity, we develop here a LOD score exclusion analysis using case-parents design, the basic design of the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) approach that is immune to population admixture. In the analysis, specific genetic effects and inheritance models at candidate genes can be analyzed and if a LOD score is ≤ - 2.0, the locus can be excluded from having an effect larger than that specified. Simulations show that this approach has reasonable power to exclude a candidate gene having small genetic effects if it is not a disease susceptibility locus (DSL) with sample size often employed in TDT studies. Similar to association analyses with the TDT in nuclear families, our exclusion analyses are generally not affected by population admixture. The exclusion analyses may be implemented to rule out candidate genes with no or minor genetic effects as supplemental analyses for the TDT. The utility of the approach is illustrated with an application to test the importance of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene underlying the differential risk to osteoporosis.

  16. Absolute Quantitation of DNA Methylation of 28 Candidate Genes in Prostate Cancer Using Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataڑa Vasiljeviš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation plays a pivotal role in carcinogenesis and its mapping is likely to provide biomarkers for improved diagnostic and risk assessment in prostate cancer (PCa. We quantified and compared absolute methylation levels among 28 candidate genes in 48 PCa and 29 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH samples using the pyrosequencing (PSQ method to identify genes with diagnostic and prognostic potential.

  17. Haplotype sharing analysis with SNPs in candidate genes : The genetic analysis workshop 12 example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C; Beckmann, L; Majoram, P; Meerman, GT; Chang-Claude, J

    2003-01-01

    Haplotype sharing analysis was used to investigate the association of affection status with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within candidate gene 1 in one sample each from the isolated and the general population of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data. Gene 1 has direct

  18. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of an anthocyanin-rich gene, BnaA.PL1, conferring purple leaves in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibo; Zhu, Lixia; Yuan, Gaigai; Heng, Shuangping; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Wen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Because of the advantages of anthocyanins, the genetics and breeding of crops rich in anthocyanins has become a hot research topic. However, due to the lack of anthocyanin-related mutants, no regulatory genes have been mapped in Brassica napus. In this study, we first report the characterization of a B. napus line with purple leaves and the fine mapping and candidate screening of the BnaA.PL1 gene. The amount of anthocyanins in the purple leaf line was six times higher than that in a green leaf line. A genetic analysis indicated that the purple character was controlled by an incomplete dominant gene. Through map-based cloning, we localized the BnaA.PL1 gene to a 99-kb region at the end of B. napus chromosome A03. Transcriptional analysis of 11 genes located in the target region revealed that the expression level of only the BnAPR2 gene in seedling leaves decreased from purple to reddish green to green individuals, a finding that was consistent with the measured anthocyanin accumulation levels. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of BnAPR2 showed that the purple individual-derived allele contained 17 variants. Markers co-segregating with BnaA.PL1 were developed from the sequence of BnAPR2 and were validated in the BC4P2 population. These results suggested that BnAPR2, which encodes adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, is likely to be a valuable candidate gene. This work may lay the foundation for the marker-assisted selection of B. napus vegetables that are rich in anthocyanins and for an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling anthocyanin accumulation in Brassica.

  19. Candidates in Astroviruses, Seadornaviruses, Cytorhabdoviruses and Coronaviruses for +1 frame overlapping genes accessed by leaky scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overlapping genes are common in RNA viruses where they serve as a mechanism to optimize the coding potential of compact genomes. However, annotation of overlapping genes can be difficult using conventional gene-finding software. Recently we have been using a number of complementary approaches to systematically identify previously undetected overlapping genes in RNA virus genomes. In this article we gather together a number of promising candidate new overlapping genes that may be of interest to the community. Results Overlapping gene predictions are presented for the astroviruses, seadornaviruses, cytorhabdoviruses and coronaviruses (families Astroviridae, Reoviridae, Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae, respectively.

  20. Novel factor VIII variants with a modified furin cleavage site improve the efficacy of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, G N; George, L A; Siner, J I; Davidson, R J; Zander, C B; Zheng, X L; Arruda, V R; Camire, R M; Sabatino, D E

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor (F) VIII is an inefficiently expressed protein. Furin deletion FVIII variants were purified and characterized using in vitro and in vivo assays. These minimally modified novel FVIII variants have enhanced function. These variants provide a strategy for increasing FVIII expression in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  1. An abundance of rare functional variants in 202 drug target genes sequenced in 14.002 people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G.;

    2012-01-01

    Rare genetic variants contribute to complex disease risk; however, the abundance of rare variants in human populations remains unknown. We explored this spectrum of variation by sequencing 202 genes encoding drug targets in 14,002 individuals. We find rare variants are abundant (1 every 17 bases)...

  2. Cis and trans effects of human genomic variants on gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Bryois

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression is a heritable cellular phenotype that defines the function of a cell and can lead to diseases in case of misregulation. In order to detect genetic variations affecting gene expression, we performed association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and copy number variants (CNVs with gene expression measured in 869 lymphoblastoid cell lines of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC cohort in cis and in trans. We discovered that 3,534 genes (false discovery rate (FDR = 5% are affected by an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL in cis and 48 genes are affected in trans. We observed that CNVs are more likely to be eQTLs than SNPs. In addition, we found that variants associated to complex traits and diseases are enriched for trans-eQTLs and that trans-eQTLs are enriched for cis-eQTLs. As a variant affecting both a gene in cis and in trans suggests that the cis gene is functionally linked to the trans gene expression, we looked specifically for trans effects of cis-eQTLs. We discovered that 26 cis-eQTLs are associated to 92 genes in trans with the cis-eQTLs of the transcriptions factors BATF3 and HMX2 affecting the most genes. We then explored if the variation of the level of expression of the cis genes were causally affecting the level of expression of the trans genes and discovered several causal relationships between variation in the level of expression of the cis gene and variation of the level of expression of the trans gene. This analysis shows that a large sample size allows the discovery of secondary effects of human variations on gene expression that can be used to construct short directed gene regulatory networks.

  3. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, Elena; Lamb, Janine A; Barnby, Gabrielle;

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants...

  4. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, E.; Lamb, J.A.; Barnby, G.;

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants in t...

  5. Discovery and functional prioritization of Parkinson's disease candidate genes from large-scale whole exome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Jansen (Iris); Ye, H. (Hui); Heetveld, S. (Sasja); Lechler, M.C. (Marie C.); Michels, H. (Helen); Seinstra, R.I. (Renée I.); Lubbe, S.J. (Steven J.); Drouet, V. (Valérie); S. Lesage (Suzanne); E. Majounie (Elisa); Gibbs, J.R. (J.Raphael); M.A. Nalls (Michael); M. Ryten (Mina); Botia, J.A. (Juan A.); J. Vandrovcova (Jana); J. Simón-Sánchez (Javier); Castillo-Lizardo, M. (Melissa); P. Rizzu (Patrizia); Blauwendraat, C. (Cornelis); Chouhan, A.K. (Amit K.); Li, Y. (Yarong); Yogi, P. (Puja); N. Amin (Najaf); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); Morris, H.R. (Huw R.); Brice, A. (Alexis); A. Singleton (Andrew); David, D.C. (Della C.); Nollen, E.A. (Ellen A.); A. Jain (Ashok); J.M. Shulman; P. Heutink (Peter); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S. Arepalli (Sampath); J. Brooks (Janet); Price, R. (Ryan); Nicolas, A. (Aude); S. Chong (Sean); M.R. Cookson (Mark); A. Dillman (Allissa); M. Moore (Matt); B.J. Traynor (Bryan); A. Singleton (Andrew); V. Plagnol (Vincent); Nicholas W Wood,; U.-M. Sheerin (Una-Marie); Jose M Bras,; K. Charlesworth (Kate); M. Gardner (Mac); R. Guerreiro (Rita); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); Hardy, J. (John); M. Sharma; M. Saad (Mohamad); Javier Simón-Sánchez,; C. Schulte (Claudia); J.C. Corvol (Jean-Christophe); Dürr, A. (Alexandra); M. Vidailhet (M.); S. Sveinbjörnsdóttir (Sigurlaug); R.A. Barker (Roger); Caroline H Williams-Gray,; Y. Ben-Shlomo; H.W. Berendse (Henk W.); K.D. van Dijk (Karin); D. Berg (Daniela); K. Brockmann; K.D. Wurster (Kathrin); Mätzler, W. (Walter); Gasser, T. (Thomas); M. Martinez (Maria); R.M.A. de Bie (Rob); A. Biffi (Alessandro); D. Velseboer (Daan); B.R. Bloem (Bastiaan); B. Post (Bart); M. Wickremaratchi (Mirdhu); B. van de Warrenburg (Bart); Z. Bochdanovits (Zoltan); M. von Bonin (Malte); H. Pétursson (Hjörvar); O. Riess (Olaf); D.J. Burn (David); Lubbe, S. (Steven); Cooper, J.M. (J Mark); N.H. McNeill (Nathan); Schapira, A. (Anthony); Lungu, C. (Codrin); Chen, H. (Honglei); Dong, J. (Jing); Chinnery, P.F. (Patrick F.); G. Hudson (Gavin); Clarke, C.E. (Carl E.); C. Moorby (Catriona); C. Counsell (Carl); P. Damier (Philippe); J.-F. Dartigues; P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); E. Gray (Emma); T. Edkins (Ted); Hunt, S.E. (Sarah E.); S.C. Potter (Simon); A. Tashakkori-Ghanbaria (Avazeh); G. Deuschl (Günther); D. Lorenz (Delia); D.T. Dexter (David); F. Durif (Frank); J. Evans (Jonathan Mark); Langford, C. (Cordelia); T. Foltynie (Thomas); A.M. Goate (Alison); C. Harris (Clare); J.J. van Hilten (Jacobus); A. Hofman (Albert); J.R. Hollenbeck (John R.); J.L. Holton (Janice); Hu, M. (Michele); X. Huang (Xiaohong); Illig, T. (Thomas); P.V. Jónsson (Pálmi); J.-C. Lambert; S.S. O'Sullivan (Sean); T. Revesz (Tamas); K. Shaw (Karen); A.J. Lees (Andrew); P. Lichtner (Peter); P. Limousin (Patricia); G. Lopez; Escott-Price, V. (Valentina); J. Pearson (Justin); N. Williams (Nigel); E. Mudanohwo (Ese); J.S. Perlmutter (Joel); Pollak, P. (Pierre); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Sawcer (Stephen); H. Scheffer (Hans); I. Shoulson (Ira); L. Shulman (Lee); Smith, C. (Colin); R. Walker (Robert); C.C.A. Spencer (Chris C.); A. Strange (Amy); H. Stefansson (Hreinn); F. Bettella (Francesco); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); Stockton, J.D. (Joanna D.); D. Talbot; C.M. Tanner (Carlie); F. Tison (François); S. Winder-Rhodes (Sophie); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been successful in identifying genes that cause familial Parkinson's disease (PD). However, until now this approach has not been deployed to study large cohorts of unrelated participants. To discover rare PD susceptibility variants, we perform

  6. Detailed functional characterization of glycosylated and nonglycosylated variants of malaria vaccine candidate PfAMA1 produced in Nicotiana benthamiana and analysis of growth inhibitory responses in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; Edgue, Gueven; Kapelski, Stephanie; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Fendel, Rolf; Remarque, Edmond; Altmann, Friedrich; Maresch, Daniel; Reimann, Andreas; Pradel, Gabriele; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    One of the most promising malaria vaccine candidate antigens is the Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1). Several studies have shown that this blood-stage antigen can induce strong parasite growth inhibitory antibody responses. PfAMA1 contains up to six recognition sites for N-linked glycosylation, a post-translational modification that is absent in P. falciparum. To prevent any potential negative impact of N-glycosylation, the recognition sites have been knocked out in most PfAMA1 variants expressed in eukaryotic hosts. However, N-linked glycosylation may increase efficacy by improving immunogenicity and/or focusing the response towards relevant epitopes by glycan masking. We describe the production of glycosylated and nonglycosylated PfAMA1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and its detailed characterization in terms of yield, integrity and protective efficacy. Both PfAMA1 variants accumulated to high levels (>510 μg/g fresh leaf weight) after transient expression, and high-mannose-type N-glycans were confirmed for the glycosylated variant. No significant differences between the N. benthamiana and Pichia pastoris PfAMA1 variants were detected in conformation-sensitive ligand-binding studies. Specific titres of >2 × 10(6) were induced in rabbits, and strong reactivity with P. falciparum schizonts was observed in immunofluorescence assays, as well as up to 100% parasite growth inhibition for both variants, with IC₅₀ values of ~35 μg/mL. Competition assays indicated that a number of epitopes were shielded from immune recognition by N-glycans, warranting further studies to determine how glycosylation can be used for the directed targeting of immune responses. These results highlight the potential of plant transient expression systems as a production platform for vaccine candidates.

  7. Association between neuromedin U gene variants and overweight and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hainerová, Irena; Torekov, Signe S; Ek, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) is an anorexic neuropeptide expressed in the hypothalamus. Mice lacking the NmU gene are hyperphagic and obese, whereas mice overexpressing Nmu are hypophagic and lean.......Neuromedin U (NMU) is an anorexic neuropeptide expressed in the hypothalamus. Mice lacking the NmU gene are hyperphagic and obese, whereas mice overexpressing Nmu are hypophagic and lean....

  8. Allelic variants of melanocortin 3 receptor gene (MC3R) and weight loss in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. Santos, José; De la Cruz, Rolando; Holst, Claus

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin system plays an important role in energy homeostasis. Mice genetically deficient in the melanocortin-3 receptor gene have a normal body weight with increased body fat, mild hypophagia compared to wild-type mice. In humans, Thr6Lys and Val81Ile variants of the melanocortin-3...... receptor gene (MC3R) have been associated with childhood obesity, higher BMI Z-score and elevated body fat percentage compared to non-carriers. The aim of this study is to assess the association in adults between allelic variants of MC3R with weight loss induced by energy-restricted diets....

  9. Common variants of the genes encoding erythropoietin and its receptor modulate cognitive performance in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästner, Anne; Grube, Sabrina; El-Kordi, Ahmed;

    2012-01-01

    ) genotypes with cognitive functions. To prove this hypothesis, schizophrenic patients (N > 1000) were genotyped for 5' upstream-located gene variants, EPO SNP rs1617640 (T/G) and EPORSTR(GA)(n). Associations of these variants were obtained for cognitive processing speed, fine motor skills and short...... expression of constitutively active EPOR in pyramidal neurons of cortex and hippocampus. We thus predicted that the human genotypes associated with better cognition would reflect gain-of-function effects. Indeed, reporter gene assays and quantitative transcriptional analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear...

  10. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvrå, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-01-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice...... of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair...... mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have...

  11. A potato skin SSH library yields new candidate genes for suberin biosynthesis and periderm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Marçal; Serra, Olga; Fluch, Silvia; Molinas, Marisa; Figueras, Mercè

    2011-05-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers are underground storage organs covered by the skin or periderm, a suberized layer that protects inner flesh from dehydration and pathogens. Understanding the molecular processes associated with periderm formation is of great importance for a better knowledge of this protective tissue and for improving the storage life of tubers. Here, to isolate new candidate genes for potato periderm, a suppression subtractive hybridization library from potato skin was performed. This library yielded a comprehensive list of 108 candidate genes that were manually sorted in functional categories according to the main cellular and metabolic processes in periderm. As expected, the list contains Suberin and wax genes, including some genes with a demonstrated role in the biosynthesis of these cell wall aliphatic compounds. Moreover, Regulation and Stress and defence genes are highly abundant in the library in general agreement with previous potato skin proteomic studies. The putative function of the genes in periderm is discussed.

  12. Candidate genes expressed in human islets and their role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storling, Joachim; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the insulin-producing β cells are destroyed by an immune-mediated process leading to complete insulin deficiency. There is a strong genetic component in T1D. Genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are the most important genetic determinants of disease...... exposure to proinflammatory cytokines highlighting that these genes may be involved in the response of β cells to immune attack. In this review, the compiling evidence that many of the candidate genes are expressed in islets and β cells will be presented. Further, we perform the first systematic human...... islet expression analysis of all genes located in 50 T1D-associated GWAS loci using a published RNA sequencing dataset. We find that 336 out of 857 genes are expressed in human islets and that many of these interact in protein networks. Finally, the potential pathogenetic roles of some candidate genes...

  13. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  14. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  15. Microsatellite Scan Identifies New Candidate Genes for Susceptibility to Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis in Japanese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kitahara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is one of the most common risk factor for chronic pancreatitis, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify genes that contribute to susceptibility or resistance for alcoholic chronic pancreatitis by screening the whole genome. Sixty-five patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (63 men and 2 women, mean age 55.2 years and 99 healthy Japanese controls were enrolled in this study. This was an association study using 400 polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 10.8 cM distributed throughout the whole genome. This search revealed 10 candidate susceptibility regions and 5 candidate resistant regions throughout the genome. No specific microsatellite markers were detected in association with previously reported susceptibility genes for chronic pancreatitis, such as PRSS1, PRSS2, CTRC, SPINK1, CFTR, ALDH2, and CYP2E1. Among the statistically significant markers, D15S1007 on chromosome 15q14 showed strong evidence for disease susceptibility (70.8% vs. 35.1%, Pc = 0.0001. Within 500 kb of D15S1007, several genes were candidate genes for susceptibility, including FMN1, DKFZP686C2281, LOC440268, RYR3, and AVEN, This study identified 10 candidate susceptibility and 5 candidate resistant regions that may contain genes involved in ACP pathogenesis.

  16. A variant in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) and variants near the melanocortin-4 receptor gene (MC4R) do not influence dietary intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Ann L; Angquist, Lars; Christiansen, Lene;

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the role of the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) and variants near the melanocortin-4 receptor gene (MC4R) in modulating habitual intake of total energy and macronutrients, glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary energy density, and energy from 20 food groups in adults...... and variables transformed by natural logarithm were analyzed by linear regression and dichotomized variables were analyzed by logistic regression. FTO SNP rs9939609 was not associated with habitual dietary intake. For the near-MC4R SNP rs12970134 and rs17700633, we found significant positive associations...

  17. Novel Candidate Genes and a Wide Spectrum of Structural and Point Mutations Responsible for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies Revealed by Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro-Miró, Marta; Tonda, Raul; Escudero-Ferruz, Paula; Andrés, Rosa; Mayor-Lorenzo, Andrés; Castro, Joaquín; Ciccioli, Marcela; Hidalgo, Daniel A.; Rodríguez-Ezcurra, Juan José; Farrando, Jorge; Pérez-Santonja, Juan J.; Cormand, Bru; Marfany, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Background NGS-based genetic diagnosis has completely revolutionized the human genetics field. In this study, we have aimed to identify new genes and mutations by Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) responsible for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD). Methods A cohort of 33 pedigrees affected with a variety of retinal disorders was analysed by WES. Initial prioritization analysis included around 300 IRD-associated genes. In non-diagnosed families a search for pathogenic mutations in novel genes was undertaken. Results Genetic diagnosis was attained in 18 families. Moreover, a plausible candidate is proposed for 10 more cases. Two thirds of the mutations were novel, including 4 chromosomal rearrangements, which expand the IRD allelic heterogeneity and highlight the contribution of private mutations. Our results prompted clinical re-evaluation of some patients resulting in assignment to a syndromic instead of non-syndromic IRD. Notably, WES unveiled four new candidates for non-syndromic IRD: SEMA6B, CEP78, CEP250, SCLT1, the two latter previously associated to syndromic disorders. We provide functional data supporting that missense mutations in CEP250 alter cilia formation. Conclusion The diagnostic efficiency of WES, and strictly following the ACMG/AMP criteria is 55% in reported causative genes or functionally supported new candidates, plus 30% families in which likely pathogenic or VGUS/VUS variants were identified in plausible candidates. Our results highlight the clinical utility of WES for molecular diagnosis of IRD, provide a wider spectrum of mutations and concomitant genetic variants, and challenge our view on syndromic vs non-syndromic, and causative vs modifier genes. PMID:28005958

  18. Alternative splice variants of the human PD-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben;

    2005-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoregulatory receptor expressed on the surface of activated T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We describe four alternatively spliced PD-1 mRNA transcripts (PD-1Deltaex2, PD-1Deltaex3, PD-1Deltaex2,3, and PD-1Deltaex2,3,4) in addition to the full length isoform. PD-1Deltaex2 and PD-1......Deltaex3 are generated by alternative splicing where exon 2 (extracellular IgV-like domain) and exon 3 (transmembrane domain) respectively are spliced out. PD-1Deltaex3 is therefore likely to encode a soluble form of PD-1. PD-1Deltaex2,3 lacks exon 2 and 3. These three variants have unaffected open...

  19. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  20. Optimization of candidate-gene SNP-genotyping by flexible oligonucleotide microarrays; analyzing variations in immune regulator genes of hay-fever samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beier Markus

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants in immune regulator genes have been associated with numerous diseases, including allergies and cancer. Increasing evidence suggests a substantially elevated disease risk in individuals who carry a combination of disease-relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. For the genotyping of immune regulator genes, such as cytokines, chemokines and transcription factors, an oligonucleotide microarray for the analysis of 99 relevant SNPs was established. Since the microarray design was based on a platform that permits flexible in situ oligonucleotide synthesis, a set of optimally performing probes could be defined by a selection approach that combined computational and experimental aspects. Results While the in silico process eliminated 9% of the initial probe set, which had been picked purely on the basis of potential association with disease, the subsequent experimental validation excluded more than twice as many. The performance of the optimized microarray was demonstrated in a pilot study. The genotypes of 19 hay-fever patients (aged 40–44 with high IgE levels against inhalant antigens were compared to the results obtained with 19 age- and sex-matched controls. For several variants, allele-frequency differences of more than 10% were identified. Conclusion Based on the ability to improve empirically a chip design, the application of candidate-SNP typing represents a viable approach in the context of molecular epidemiological studies.

  1. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish eRoorkiwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 accessions of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among ten candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34 was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while PIC values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter. Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding.

  2. SORBS1 gene, a new candidate for diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germain, Marine; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; Sandholm, Niina

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The genetic determinants of diabetic nephropathy remain poorly understood. We aimed to identify novel susceptibility genes for diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: We performed a genome-wide association study using 1000 Genomes-based imputation to compare type 1 diabetic nephropathy...... consistently and significantly (p diabetic nephropathy. The minor rs1326934-C allele was less frequent in cases than in controls (0.34 vs 0.43) and was associated with a decreased risk for diabetic nephropathy (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.60, 0.82). However, this association was not observed...... in a second stage with two additional diabetic nephropathy cohorts, the All Ireland-Warren 3-Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes UK and Republic of Ireland (UK-ROI; p = 0.15) and the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane; p = 0.44) studies, totalling 2,142 cases and 2,494 controls. Altogether, the random...

  3. Dissecting the organ specificity of insecticide resistance candidate genes in Anopheles gambiae: known and novel candidate genes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The elevated expression of enzymes with insecticide metabolism activity can lead to high levels of insecticide resistance in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. In this study, adult female mosquitoes from an insecticide susceptible and resistant strain were dissected into four different body parts. RNA from each of these samples was used in microarray analysis to determine the enrichment patterns of the key detoxification gene families within the mosquito and to identify additio...

  4. Prioritization and evaluation of depression candidate genes by combining multidimensional data resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Feng Kao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Large scale and individual genetic studies have suggested numerous susceptible genes for depression in the past decade without conclusive results. There is a strong need to review and integrate multi-dimensional data for follow up validation. The present study aimed to apply prioritization procedures to build-up an evidence-based candidate genes dataset for depression. METHODS: Depression candidate genes were collected in human and animal studies across various data resources. Each gene was scored according to its magnitude of evidence related to depression and was multiplied by a source-specific weight to form a combined score measure. All genes were evaluated through a prioritization system to obtain an optimal weight matrix to rank their relative importance with depression using the combined scores. The resulting candidate gene list for depression (DEPgenes was further evaluated by a genome-wide association (GWA dataset and microarray gene expression in human tissues. RESULTS: A total of 5,055 candidate genes (4,850 genes from human and 387 genes from animal studies with 182 being overlapped were included from seven data sources. Through the prioritization procedures, we identified 169 DEPgenes, which exhibited high chance to be associated with depression in GWA dataset (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p = 0.00005. Additionally, the DEPgenes had a higher percentage to express in human brain or nerve related tissues than non-DEPgenes, supporting the neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories in depression. CONCLUSIONS: With comprehensive data collection and curation and an application of integrative approach, we successfully generated DEPgenes through an effective gene prioritization system. The prioritized DEPgenes are promising for future biological experiments or replication efforts to discover the underlying molecular mechanisms for depression.

  5. Variants of the PPARD gene and their clinicopathological significance in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Ticha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD is nuclear hormone receptor involved in colorectal cancer (CRC differentiation and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and spectrum of variants in the PPARD gene in CRC, and their contribution to clinicopathological endpoints. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Direct sequencing of the PPARD gene was performed in 303 primary tumors, in blood samples from 50 patients with ≥ 3 affected first-degree relatives, 50 patients with 2 affected first-degree relatives, 50 sporadic patients, 360 healthy controls, and in 6 colon cancer cell lines. Mutation analysis revealed 22 different transversions, 7 of them were novel. Three of all variants were somatic (c.548A>G, p.Y183C, c.425-9C>T, and c.628-16G>A. Two missense mutations (p.Y183C and p.R258Q were pathogenic using in silico predictive program. Five recurrent variants were detected in/adjacent to the exons 4 (c.1-87T>C, c.1-67G>A, c.130+3G>A, and c.1-101-8C>T and exon 7 (c.489T>C. Variant c.489C/C detected in tumors was correlated to worse differentiation (P = 0.0397. CONCLUSIONS: We found 7 novel variants among 22 inherited or acquired PPARD variants. Somatic and/or missense variants detected in CRC patients are rare but indicate the clinical importance of the PPARD gene.

  6. SPACA3 gene variants in a New Zealand cohort of infertile and fertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Deborah; Woad, Kathryn J; Chamley, Lawrence W; Holland, Olivia J; Shelling, Andrew N

    2014-06-01

    SPRASA (also referred to as SLLP1) is a protein identified in the acrosome of human sperm and encoded by the gene SPACA3. SPRASA is associated with sperm-oocyte recognition and binding, and may play a role in fertility. In order to determine whether variants in the SPACA3 gene are associated with human infertility, we undertook a genetic analysis of 102 infertile and 104 fertile couples. Three gene variants were identified using PCR-based DNA sequencing; 1) an insertion of TGC within a quadruple tri-nucleotide (TGC) repeat region in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) (g.-22TGC(4_5), 2) a guanine to adenosine transition at position 239 (c.239G>A) resulting in a non-synonymous amino acid substitution from cysteine to tyrosine (p.C80Y) at position 80 in the putative transmembrane region, and 3) a novel nucleotide variant (c.691G>C) located in the 3'UTR. A functional effect of the g.-22TGC (4_5) was confirmed by a luciferase expression assay, while the effects of the variants c.239G>A and c.691G>C were predicted using in silico analysis. Although the frequencies of these variants were not significantly different between the infertile and fertile populations, we present evidence that the variants could affect the expression levels or function of SPRASA, thereby affecting a couple's fertility. Larger populations, especially individuals/couples with unexplained infertility, need to be screened for these variants to validate a relationship with fertility.

  7. Gene Duplication and Gene Expression Changes Play a Role in the Evolution of Candidate Pollen Feeding Genes in Heliconius Butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-09-02

    Heliconius possess a unique ability among butterflies to feed on pollen. Pollen feeding significantly extends their lifespan, and is thought to have been important to the diversification of the genus. We used RNA sequencing to examine feeding-related gene expression in the mouthparts of four species of Heliconius and one nonpollen feeding species, Eueides isabella We hypothesized that genes involved in morphology and protein metabolism might be upregulated in Heliconius because they have longer proboscides than Eueides, and because pollen contains more protein than nectar. Using de novo transcriptome assemblies, we tested these hypotheses by comparing gene expression in mouthparts against antennae and legs. We first looked for genes upregulated in mouthparts across all five species and discovered several hundred genes, many of which had functional annotations involving metabolism of proteins (cocoonase), lipids, and carbohydrates. We then looked specifically within Heliconius where we found eleven common upregulated genes with roles in morphology (CPR cuticle proteins), behavior (takeout-like), and metabolism (luciferase-like). Closer examination of these candidates revealed that cocoonase underwent several duplications along the lineage leading to heliconiine butterflies, including two Heliconius-specific duplications. Luciferase-like genes also underwent duplication within lepidopterans, and upregulation in Heliconius mouthparts. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that three cocoonases, a peptidase, and one luciferase-like gene are expressed in the proboscis with little to no expression in labial palps and salivary glands. Our results suggest pollen feeding, like other dietary specializations, was likely facilitated by adaptive expansions of preexisting genes-and that the butterfly proboscis is involved in digestive enzyme production.

  8. Identification of putative candidate genes for juvenile wood density in Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinguo; Wu, Harry X; Southerton, Simon G

    2012-08-01

    Wood formation is a complex developmental process driven by the annual activity of the vascular cambium. Conifers usually produce juvenile wood at young ages followed by mature wood for the rest of their lifetime. Juvenile wood exhibits poorer wood quality (i.e., lower density) compared with mature wood and can account for up to 50% of short-rotation harvested logs, thus representing a major challenge for commercial forestry globally. Wood density is an important quality trait for many timber-related products. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of juvenile wood density is critical for the improvement of juvenile wood quality via marker-aided selection. A previous study has identified several candidate genes affecting mature wood density in Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.; however, genes associated with juvenile wood density in conifers remain poorly characterized. Here, cDNA microarrays containing 3320 xylem unigenes were used to investigate genes differentially transcribed in juvenile wood with high (HD) and low density (LD) in Pinus radiata D.Don. In total, 814 xylem unigenes with differential transcription were identified in at least one of two microarray experiments and 73 genes (45 for HD, 28 for LD) were identified in both experiments, thus representing putative candidate genes for juvenile wood density. Interestingly, cellulose synthases (PrCesA3, PrCesA11) and sucrose synthase (SuSy), which are involved in secondary cell wall formation, had stronger transcription in juvenile wood with HD, while genes functioning in primary wall formation (pectin synthesis, cell expansion and other modifications) were more transcribed in LD wood. Cell wall genes encoding monolignol biosynthesis enzymes, arabinogalactan proteins, actins and tubulins were differentially transcribed in either HD or LD juvenile wood; however, the latter had exclusively greater transcription of genes involved in monolignol polymerization (laccase and peroxidase). The

  9. Novel splice variants associated with one of the zebrafish dnmt3 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhanni Aizeddin A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation and the methyltransferases are known to be important in vertebrate development and this may be particularly true for the Dnmt3 family of enzymes because they are thought to be the de novo methyltransferases. Mammals have three Dnmt3 genes; Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, and Dnmt3L, two of which encode active enzymes and one of which produces an inactive but necessary cofactor. However, due to multiple promoter use and alternative splicing there are actually a number of dnmt3 isoforms present. Six different dnmt3 genes have recently been identified in zebrafish. Results We have examined two of the dnmt3 genes in zebrafish that are located in close proximity in the same linkage group and we find that the two genes are more similar to each other than they are to the other zebrafish dnmt3 genes. We have found evidence for the existence of several different splice variants and alternative splice sites associated with one of the two genes and have examined the relative expression of these genes/variants in a number of zebrafish developmental stages and tissues. Conclusion The similarity of the dnmt3-1 and dnmt3-2 genes suggests that they arose due to a relatively recent gene duplication event. The presence of alternative splice and start sites, reminiscent of what is seen with the human DNMT3s, demonstrates strong parallels between the control/function of these genes across vertebrate species. The dynamic expression levels of these genes/variants suggest that they may well play a role in early development and this is particularly true for dnmt3-2-1 and dnmt3-1. dnmt3-2-1 is the predominantly expressed form prior to zygotic gene activation whereas dnmt3-1 predominates post zygotic gene activation suggesting a distinct developmental role for each.

  10. Mapping a candidate gene (MdMYB10) for red flesh and foliage colour in apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagné, David; Carlisle, Charmaine M; Blond, Céline; Volz, Richard K; Whitworth, Claire J; Oraguzie, Nnadozie C; Crowhurst, Ross N; Allan, Andrew C; Espley, Richard V; Hellens, Roger P; Gardiner, Susan E

    2007-01-01

    Background Integrating plant genomics and classical breeding is a challenge for both plant breeders and molecular biologists. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is a tool that can be used to accelerate the development of novel apple varieties such as cultivars that have fruit with anthocyanin through to the core. In addition, determining the inheritance of novel alleles, such as the one responsible for red flesh, adds to our understanding of allelic variation. Our goal was to map candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes in a population segregating for the red flesh phenotypes. Results We have identified the Rni locus, a major genetic determinant of the red foliage and red colour in the core of apple fruit. In a population segregating for the red flesh and foliage phenotype we have determined the inheritance of the Rni locus and DNA polymorphisms of candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the candidate genes were also located on an apple genetic map. We have shown that the MdMYB10 gene co-segregates with the Rni locus and is on Linkage Group (LG) 09 of the apple genome. Conclusion We have performed candidate gene mapping in a fruit tree crop and have provided genetic evidence that red colouration in the fruit core as well as red foliage are both controlled by a single locus named Rni. We have shown that the transcription factor MdMYB10 may be the gene underlying Rni as there were no recombinants between the marker for this gene and the red phenotype in a population of 516 individuals. Associating markers derived from candidate genes with a desirable phenotypic trait has demonstrated the application of genomic tools in a breeding programme of a horticultural crop species. PMID:17608951

  11. Mapping a candidate gene (MdMYB10 for red flesh and foliage colour in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Andrew C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating plant genomics and classical breeding is a challenge for both plant breeders and molecular biologists. Marker-assisted selection (MAS is a tool that can be used to accelerate the development of novel apple varieties such as cultivars that have fruit with anthocyanin through to the core. In addition, determining the inheritance of novel alleles, such as the one responsible for red flesh, adds to our understanding of allelic variation. Our goal was to map candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes in a population segregating for the red flesh phenotypes. Results We have identified the Rni locus, a major genetic determinant of the red foliage and red colour in the core of apple fruit. In a population segregating for the red flesh and foliage phenotype we have determined the inheritance of the Rni locus and DNA polymorphisms of candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the candidate genes were also located on an apple genetic map. We have shown that the MdMYB10 gene co-segregates with the Rni locus and is on Linkage Group (LG 09 of the apple genome. Conclusion We have performed candidate gene mapping in a fruit tree crop and have provided genetic evidence that red colouration in the fruit core as well as red foliage are both controlled by a single locus named Rni. We have shown that the transcription factor MdMYB10 may be the gene underlying Rni as there were no recombinants between the marker for this gene and the red phenotype in a population of 516 individuals. Associating markers derived from candidate genes with a desirable phenotypic trait has demonstrated the application of genomic tools in a breeding programme of a horticultural crop species.

  12. Candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility show enriched association within a large genome-wide association study for BMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Zhao, Jing Hua; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Dudbridge, Frank; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Before the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), hundreds of candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility had been identified through a variety of approaches. We examined whether those obesity candidate genes are enriched for associations with body mass index (BMI) compared with non-candidate genes by using data from a large-scale GWAS. A thorough literature search identified 547 candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility based on evidence from animal studies, Mendelian syndromes, linkage studies, genetic association studies and expression studies. Genomic regions were defined to include the genes ±10 kb of flanking sequence around candidate and non-candidate genes. We used summary statistics publicly available from the discovery stage of the genome-wide meta-analysis for BMI performed by the genetic investigation of anthropometric traits consortium in 123 564 individuals. Hypergeometric, rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment analysis tests were used to test for the enrichment of association in candidate compared with non-candidate genes. The hypergeometric test of enrichment was not significant at the 5% P-value quantile (P = 0.35), but was nominally significant at the 25% quantile (P = 0.015). The rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment tests were nominally significant for the full set of genes and borderline significant for the subset without SNPs at P < 10−7. Taken together, the observed evidence for enrichment suggests that the candidate gene approach retains some value. However, the degree of enrichment is small despite the extensive number of candidate genes and the large sample size. Studies that focus on candidate genes have only slightly increased chances of detecting associations, and are likely to miss many true effects in non-candidate genes, at least for obesity-related traits. PMID:22791748

  13. A transcription map of the 6p22.3 reading disability locus identifying candidate genes

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    Gruen Jeffrey R

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reading disability (RD is a common syndrome with a large genetic component. Chromosome 6 has been identified in several linkage studies as playing a significant role. A more recent study identified a peak of transmission disequilibrium to marker JA04 (G72384 on chromosome 6p22.3, suggesting that a gene is located near this marker. Results In silico cloning was used to identify possible candidate genes located near the JA04 marker. The 2 million base pairs of sequence surrounding JA04 was downloaded and searched against the dbEST database to identify ESTs. In total, 623 ESTs from 80 different tissues were identified and assembled into 153 putative coding regions from 19 genes and 2 pseudogenes encoded near JA04. The identified genes were tested for their tissue specific expression by RT-PCR. Conclusions In total, five possible candidate genes for RD and other diseases mapping to this region were identified.

  14. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A;

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from...... existing genotype data, we conducted a combined analysis of five independent studies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Up to 2,120 cases and 3,382 controls were genotyped in the course of two collaborations at a variety of SNPs in 11 cell cycle genes (CDKN2C, CDKN1A, CCND3, CCND1, CCND2, CDKN1B, CDK2......, and rs3212891; CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736; and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies and lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls....

  15. Concordant association of insulin degrading enzyme gene (IDE variants with IDE mRNA, Abeta, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva M Carrasquillo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The insulin-degrading enzyme gene (IDE is a strong functional and positional candidate for late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined conserved regions of IDE and its 10 kb flanks in 269 AD cases and 252 controls thereby identifying 17 putative functional polymorphisms. These variants formed eleven haplotypes that were tagged with ten variants. Four of these showed significant association with IDE transcript levels in samples from 194 LOAD cerebella. The strongest, rs6583817, which has not previously been reported, showed unequivocal association (p = 1.5x10(-8, fold-increase = 2.12,; the eleven haplotypes were also significantly associated with transcript levels (global p = 0.003. Using an in vitro dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that rs6583817 increases reporter gene expression in Be(2-C (p = 0.006 and HepG2 (p = 0.02 cell lines. Furthermore, using data from a recent genome-wide association study of two Croatian isolated populations (n = 1,879, we identified a proxy for rs6583817 that associated significantly with decreased plasma Abeta40 levels (ss = -0.124, p = 0.011 and total measured plasma Abeta levels (b = -0.130, p = 0.009. Finally, rs6583817 was associated with decreased risk of LOAD in 3,891 AD cases and 3,605 controls. (OR = 0.87, p = 0.03, and the eleven IDE haplotypes (global p = 0.02 also showed significant association. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, a previously unreported variant unequivocally associated with increased IDE expression was also associated with reduced plasma Abeta40 and decreased LOAD susceptibility. Genetic association between LOAD and IDE has been difficult to replicate. Our findings suggest that targeted testing of expression SNPs (eSNPs strongly associated with altered transcript levels in autopsy brain samples may be a powerful way to identify genetic associations with LOAD that would otherwise be difficult to detect.

  16. Identification of novel type 2 diabetes candidate genes involved in the crosstalk between the mitochondrial and the insulin signaling systems.

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    Josep M Mercader

    Full Text Available Type 2 Diabetes (T2D is a highly prevalent chronic metabolic disease with strong co-morbidity with obesity and cardiovascular diseases. There is growing evidence supporting the notion that a crosstalk between mitochondria and the insulin signaling cascade could be involved in the etiology of T2D and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated the molecular basis of this crosstalk by using systems biology approaches. We combined, filtered, and interrogated different types of functional interaction data, such as direct protein-protein interactions, co-expression analyses, and metabolic and signaling dependencies. As a result, we constructed the mitochondria-insulin (MITIN network, which highlights 286 genes as candidate functional linkers between these two systems. The results of internal gene expression analysis of three independent experimental models of mitochondria and insulin signaling perturbations further support the connecting roles of these genes. In addition, we further assessed whether these genes are involved in the etiology of T2D using the genome-wide association study meta-analysis from the DIAGRAM consortium, involving 8,130 T2D cases and 38,987 controls. We found modest enrichment of genes associated with T2D amongst our linker genes (p = 0.0549, including three already validated T2D SNPs and 15 additional SNPs, which, when combined, were collectively associated to increased fasting glucose levels according to MAGIC genome wide meta-analysis (p = 8.12×10(-5. This study highlights the potential of combining systems biology, experimental, and genome-wide association data mining for identifying novel genes and related variants that increase vulnerability to complex diseases.

  17. A genome-wide association study on androstenone levels in pigs reveals a cluster of candidate genes on chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenen Martien AM

    2010-05-01

    concentration were identified in this commercial breeding line of pigs. Known and new candidate genes cluster especially on SSC6. For one of the most significant SNP variants, the difference in the proportion of animals surpassing the threshold of consumer acceptance between the two homozygous genotypes was as much as 15.6%.

  18. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kolvraa, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-05-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have been significantly associated with human longevity and survival. We have also provided some functional evidence for these genetic associations by showing that isolated peripheral blood cells from those genotypes which are negatively associated with human longevity also have less ability to respond to heat shock. Stress response genes, particularly HSP70, are now the major candidates in the gene-longevity association studies.

  19. Social cognitive role of schizophrenia candidate gene GABRB2.

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    Shui Ying Tsang

    Full Text Available The occurrence of positive selection in schizophrenia-associated GABRB2 suggests a broader impact of the gene product on population fitness. The present study considered the possibility of cognition-related GABRB2 involvement by examining the association of GABRB2 with psychosis and altruism, respectively representing psychiatric and psychological facets of social cognition. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped for quantitative trait analyses and population-based association studies. Psychosis was measured by either the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS or antipsychotics dosage, and altruism was based on a self-report altruism scale. The minor alleles of SNPs rs6556547, rs1816071 and rs187269 in GABRB2 were correlated with high PANSS score for positive symptoms in a Han Chinese schizophrenic cohort, whereas those of rs1816071 and rs1816072 were associated with high antipsychotics dosage in a US Caucasian schizophrenic cohort. Moreover, strongly significant GABRB2-disease associations were found among schizophrenics with severe psychosis based on high PANSS positive score, but no significant association was observed for schizophrenics with only mild psychosis. Interestingly, in addition to association with psychosis in schizophrenics, rs187269 was also associated with altruism in healthy Han Chinese. Furthermore, parallel to correlation with severe psychosis, its minor allele was correlated with high altruism scores. These findings revealed that GABRB2 is associated with psychosis, the core symptom and an endophenotype of schizophrenia. Importantly, the association was found across the breadth of the psychiatric (psychosis to psychological (altruism spectrum of social cognition suggesting GABRB2 involvement in human cognition.

  20. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Shan M.; Swanson, Johanna; Selker, Eric U.

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged ...

  1. The histone variant macroH2A is an epigenetic regulator of key developmental genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschbeck, Marcus; Uribesalgo, Iris; Wibowo, Indra;

    2009-01-01

    variants at many genes encoding key regulators of development and cell fate decisions. On these genes, the presence of macroH2A1+2 is a repressive mark that overlaps locally and functionally with Polycomb repressive complex 2. We demonstrate that macroH2A1+2 contribute to the fine-tuning of temporal...... activation of HOXA cluster genes during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, elimination of macroH2A2 function in zebrafish embryos produced severe but specific phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that macroH2A variants constitute an important epigenetic mark involved in the concerted...... regulation of gene expression programs during cellular differentiation and vertebrate development....

  2. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

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    Clark Taane G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%. Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes

  3. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amankwah, Ernest K.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants co...

  4. Allelic variants of melanocortin 3 receptor gene (MC3R) and weight loss in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. Santos, José; De la Cruz, Rolando; Holst, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    receptor gene (MC3R) have been associated with childhood obesity, higher BMI Z-score and elevated body fat percentage compared to non-carriers. The aim of this study is to assess the association in adults between allelic variants of MC3R with weight loss induced by energy-restricted diets....

  5. A rare variant of the TYK2 gene is confirmed to be associated with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mero, Inger-Lise; Lorentzen, Aslaug R; Ban, Maria;

    2010-01-01

    A rare functional variant within the TYK2 gene (rs34536443) has been reported as protective in multiple sclerosis (MS) in recent studies. However, because of the low frequency of the minor allele (minor allele frequency=0.04), genome-wide significant association has been hard to establish. We...

  6. Detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and the Ile105Val GSTP1 gene variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchard, Anders; Sanchez, Juan J.; Dalhoff, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a PCR multiplex method that in a fast, inexpensive and reliable manner can detect if a person has two, one or no GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and which at the same time can detect the allelic status of the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic variant. A total of 200 Danes, 100 Somalis and 100 Green...

  7. ALOX5 gene variants affect eicosanoid production and response to fish oil supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine whether 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene variants associated with cardiovascular disease affect eicosanoid production by monocytes. The study was a randomized, double-masked, parallel intervention trial with fish oil (5.0 g of fish oil daily, containing 2.0 g ...

  8. Variants in the ASB10 Gene Are Associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Ayub, H.; Islam, F.; Siddiqui, S.N.; Khan, W.A.; Akhtar, F.; Qamar, R.; Khan, M.I.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently nonsynonymous coding variants in the ankyrin repeats and suppressor of cytokine signaling box-containing protein 10 (ASB10) gene were found to be associated with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in cohorts from Oregon and Germany, but this finding was not confirmed in an indep

  9. Mutations in the paralogous human α-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Moradkhani (Kamran); C. Prehu (Claude); J. Old (John); S. Henderson (Shirley); V. Balamitsa (Vera); H-Y. Luo; M-C. Poon (Man-Chiu); D.H. Chui (David); H. Wajcman (Henri); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe human α-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical α-globin chain. Over half of the α-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these varian

  10. DNA-repair gene variants are associated with glioblastoma survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara; Henriksson, Roger

    2012-01-01

    genes, in 138 glioblastoma samples from Sweden and Denmark. We confirmed our findings in an independent cohort of 121 glioblastoma patients from the UK. Our analysis revealed nine SNPs annotating MSH2, RAD51L1 and RECQL4 that were significantly (p

  11. rs5888 variant of SCARB1 gene is a possible susceptibility factor for age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer Zerbib

    Full Text Available Major genetic factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD have recently been identified as susceptibility risk factors, including variants in the CFH gene and the ARMS2 LOC387715/HTRA1locus. Our purpose was to perform a case-control study in two populations among individuals who did not carry risk variants for CFHY402H and LOC387715 A69S (ARMS2, called "study" individuals, in order to identify new genetic risk factors. Based on a candidate gene approach, we analyzed SNP rs5888 of the SCARB1 gene, coding for SRBI, which is involved in the lipid and lutein pathways. This study was conducted in a French series of 1241 AMD patients and 297 controls, and in a North American series of 1257 patients with advanced AMD and 1732 controls. Among these individuals, we identified 61 French patients, 77 French controls, 85 North American patients and 338 North American controls who did not carry the CFH nor ARMS2 polymorphisms. An association between AMD and the SCARB1 gene was seen among the study subjects. The genotypic distribution of the rs5888 polymorphism was significantly different between cases and controls in the French population (p<0.006. Heterozygosity at the rs5888 SNP increased risk of AMD compared to the CC genotypes in the French study population (odds ratio (OR = 3.5, CI95%: 1.4-8.9, p<0.01 and after pooling the 2 populations (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.6-5.3, p<0.002. Subgroup analysis in exudative forms of AMD revealed a pooled OR of 3.6 for individuals heterozygous for rs5888 (95% CI: 1.7-7.6, p<0.0015. These results suggest the possible contribution of SCARB1, a new genetic factor in AMD, and implicate a role for cholesterol and antioxidant micronutrient (lutein and vitamin E metabolism in AMD.

  12. Third chromosome candidate genes for conspecific sperm precedence between D. simulans and D. mauritiana

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    Brouwers Barb

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male - female incompatibilities can be critical in keeping species as separate and discrete units. Premating incompatibilities and postzygotic hybrid sterility/inviability have been widely studied as isolating barriers between species. In recent years, a number of studies have brought attention to postmating prezygotic barriers arising from male - male competition and male - female interactions. Yet little is known about the genetic basis of postmating prezygotic isolation barriers between species. Results Using D. simulans lines with mapped introgressions of D. mauritiana into their third chromosome, we find at least two D. mauritiana introgressions causing male breakdown in competitive paternity success. Eighty one genes within the mapped introgressed regions were identified as broad-sense candidates on the basis of male reproductive tract expression and male-related function. The list of candidates was narrowed down to five genes based on differences in male reproductive tract expression between D. simulans and D. mauritiana. Another ten genes were confirmed as candidates using evidence of adaptive gene coding sequence diversification in the D. simulans and/or D. mauritiana lineage. Our results show a complex genetic basis for conspecific sperm precedence, with evidence of gene interactions between at least two third chromosome loci. Pleiotropy is also evident from correlation between conspecific sperm precedence and female induced fecundity and the identification of candidate genes that might exert an effect through genetic conflict and immunity. Conclusions We identified at least two loci responsible for conspecific sperm precedence. A third of candidate genes within these two loci are located in the 89B cytogenetic position, highlighting a possible major role for this chromosome position during the evolution of species specific adaptations to postmating prezygotic reproductive challenges.

  13. Classification and Clinical Management of Variants of Uncertain Significance in High Penetrance Cancer Predisposition Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, Setareh; Eccles, Diana M; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; van Asperen, Christi J

    2016-04-01

    In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) proposed a system for classifying sequence variants in highly penetrant breast and colon cancer susceptibility genes, linked to clinical actions. This system uses a multifactorial likelihood model to calculate the posterior probability that an altered DNA sequence is pathogenic. Variants between 5%-94.9% (class 3) are categorized as variants of uncertain significance (VUS). This interval is wide and might include variants with a substantial difference in pathogenicity at either end of the spectrum. We think that carriers of class 3 variants would benefit from a fine-tuning of this classification. Classification of VUS to a category with a defined clinical significance is very important because for carriers of a pathogenic mutation full surveillance and risk-reducing surgery can reduce cancer incidence. Counselees who are not carriers of a pathogenic mutation can be discharged from intensive follow-up and avoid unnecessary risk-reducing surgery. By means of examples, we show how, in selected cases, additional data can lead to reclassification of some variants to a different class with different recommendations for surveillance and therapy. To improve the clinical utility of this classification system, we suggest a pragmatic adaptation to clinical practice.

  14. Performance of genotype imputation for rare variants identified in exons and flanking regions of genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Genotype imputation has the potential to assess human genetic variation at a lower cost than assaying the variants using laboratory techniques. The performance of imputation for rare variants has not been comprehensively studied. We utilized 8865 human samples with high depth resequencing data for the exons and flanking regions of 202 genes and Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS data to characterize the performance of genotype imputation for rare variants. We evaluated reference sets ranging from 100 to 3713 subjects for imputing into samples typed for the Affymetrix (500K and 6.0 and Illumina 550K GWAS panels. The proportion of variants that could be well imputed (true r(2>0.7 with a reference panel of 3713 individuals was: 31% (Illumina 550K or 25% (Affymetrix 500K with MAF (Minor Allele Frequency less than or equal 0.001, 48% or 35% with 0.0010.05. The performance for common SNPs (MAF>0.05 within exons and flanking regions is comparable to imputation of more uniformly distributed SNPs. The performance for rare SNPs (0.01variants identified in humans via targeted exon resequencing into additional samples with GWAS data, but imputation of very rare variants (MAF< = 0.005 will require reference panels with thousands of subjects.

  15. Human nucleolus organizers on nonhomologous chromosomes can share the same ribosomal gene variants.

    OpenAIRE

    Krystal, M; D'Eustachio, P; Ruddle, F H; Arnheim, N

    1981-01-01

    The distributions of three human ribosomal gene polymorphisms among individual chromosomes containing nucleolus organizers were analyzed by using mouse--human hybrid cells. Different nucleolus organizers can contain the same variant, suggesting the occurrence of genetic exchanges among ribosomal gene clusters on nonhomologous chromosomes. Such exchanges appear to occur less frequently in mice. This difference is discussed in terms of the nucleolar organization and chromosomal location of ribo...

  16. Orofacial cleft risk is increased with maternal smoking and specific detoxification-gene variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Min; Christensen, Kaare; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2007-01-01

    Maternal smoking is a recognized risk factor for orofacial clefts. Maternal or fetal pharmacogenetic variants are plausible modulators of this risk. In this work, we studied 5,427 DNA samples, including 1,244 from subjects in Denmark and Iowa with facial clefting and 4,183 from parents, siblings......, or unrelated population controls. We examined 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 16 genes in pathways for detoxification of components of cigarette smoke, to look for evidence of gene-environment interactions. For genes identified as related to oral clefting, we studied gene-expression profiles in fetal...

  17. Haplotype combination of the bovine CFL2 gene sequence variants and association with growth traits in Qinchuan cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujia; Lan, Xianyong; Lei, Chuzhao; Zhang, Chunlei; Chen, Hong

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of cofilin2 (CFL2) gene polymorphisms with growth traits in Chinese Qinchuan cattle. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the bovine CFL2 gene using DNA sequencing and (forced) PCR-RFLP methods. These polymorphisms included a missense mutation (NC_007319.5: g. C 2213 G) in exon 4, one synonymous mutation (NC_007319.5: g. T 1694 A) in exon 4, and a mutation (NC_007319.5: g. G 1500 A) in intron 2, respectively. In addition, we evaluated the haplotype frequency and linkage disequilibrium coefficient of three sequence variants in 488 individuals in QC cattle. All the three SNPs in QC cattle belonged to an intermediate level of genetic diversity (0.250.33). Association analysis indicated that SNP G 1500 A, T 1694 A and C 2213 G were significantly associated with growth traits in the QC population. The results of our study suggest that the CFL2 gene may be a strong candidate gene that affects growth traits in the QC cattle breeding program.

  18. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies.

  19. New variants of lepidoptericidal toxin genes encoding Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauka, Diego H; Rodriguez, Sonia E; Benintende, Graciela B

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an entomopathogenic bacterium characterized by producing parasporal proteinaceous insecticidal crystal inclusions during sporulation. Many strains are capable of also expressing other insecticidal proteins called Vip during the vegetative growing phase. Particularly, Vip3A proteins have activity against certain Lepidoptera species through a unique mechanism of action which emphasized their possible use in resistance management strategies against resistant pests. The aim of the work was to develop a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method that can distinguish between vip3A genes from B. thuringiensis strains. In addition, 4 novel vip3Aa genes were cloned and sequenced. The method was originally based on amplification of a single PCR amplicon and the use of 2 restriction enzymes with recognition sites that facilitate simultaneous detection. Subsequently, a third restriction enzyme was used to distinguish between vip3A variants. Thirteen vip3Aa genes were identified in strains belonging to 10 different B. thuringiensis serovars. Three intra-subclass variants of vip3Aa genes could be differentiated. The presented method can serve as an invaluable tool for the investigation of known and novel vip3A genes in B. thuringiensis strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where variants of a same subclass of insecticidal genes could be distinguished following PCR-RFLP.

  20. Surface gene variants of hepatitis B Virus in Saudi Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Y Al-Qudari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV continues to be one of the most important viral pathogens in humans. Surface (S protein is the major HBV antigen that mediates virus attachment and entry and determines the virus subtype. Mutations in S gene, particularly in the “a” determinant, can influence virus detection by ELISA and may generate escape mutants. Since no records have documented the S gene mutations in HBV strains circulating in Saudi Arabia, the current study was designed to study sequence variation of S gene in strains circulating in Saudi Arabia and its correlation with clinical and risk factors. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Results: A total of 48 mutations (21 unique were recorded in viral strains in Saudi Arabia, among which 24 (11 unique changed their respective amino acids. Two amino acid changes were recorded in “a” determinant, including F130L and S135F with no evidence of the vaccine escape mutant G145R in any of the samples. No specific relationship was recognized between the mutation/amino acid change record of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia and clinical or laboratory data. Phylogenetic analysis categorized HBV viral strains in Saudi Arabia as members of subgenotypes D1 and D3. Conclusion: The present report is the first that describes mutation analysis of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia on both nucleotide and amino acid levels. Different substitutions, particularly in major hydrophilic region, may have a potential influence on disease diagnosis, vaccination strategy, and antiviral chemotherapy.

  1. Surface Gene Variants of Hepatitis B Virus in Saudi Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudari, Ahmed Y.; Amer, Haitham M.; Abdo, Ayman A.; Hussain, Zahid; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alswat, Khalid; Almajhdi, Fahad N.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be one of the most important viral pathogens in humans. Surface (S) protein is the major HBV antigen that mediates virus attachment and entry and determines the virus subtype. Mutations in S gene, particularly in the “a” determinant, can influence virus detection by ELISA and may generate escape mutants. Since no records have documented the S gene mutations in HBV strains circulating in Saudi Arabia, the current study was designed to study sequence variation of S gene in strains circulating in Saudi Arabia and its correlation with clinical and risk factors. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Results: A total of 48 mutations (21 unique) were recorded in viral strains in Saudi Arabia, among which 24 (11 unique) changed their respective amino acids. Two amino acid changes were recorded in “a” determinant, including F130L and S135F with no evidence of the vaccine escape mutant G145R in any of the samples. No specific relationship was recognized between the mutation/amino acid change record of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia and clinical or laboratory data. Phylogenetic analysis categorized HBV viral strains in Saudi Arabia as members of subgenotypes D1 and D3. Conclusion: The present report is the first that describes mutation analysis of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia on both

  2. Dopamine D2 receptor gene variants and response to rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease: a pharmacogenetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masellis, Mario; Collinson, Shannon; Freeman, Natalie; Tampakeras, Maria; Levy, Joseph; Tchelet, Amir; Eyal, Eli; Berkovich, Elijahu; Eliaz, Rom E; Abler, Victor; Grossman, Iris; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl; Tiwari, Arun; Hayden, Michael R; Kennedy, James L; Lang, Anthony E; Knight, Jo

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of early Parkinson's disease with dopaminergic agents remains the mainstay of symptomatic therapy for this incurable neurodegenerative disorder. However, clinical responses to dopaminergic drugs vary substantially from person to person due to individual-, drug- and disease-related factors that may in part be genetically determined. Using clinical data and DNA samples ascertained through the largest placebo-controlled clinical trial of the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, rasagiline (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00256204), we examined how polymorphisms in candidate genes associate with the clinical response to rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease. Variants in genes that express proteins involved in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rasagiline, and genes previously associated with the risk to develop Parkinson's disease were genotyped. The LifeTechnologies OpenArray NT genotyping platform and polymerase chain reaction-based methods were used to analyse 204 single nucleotide polymorphisms and five variable number tandem repeats from 30 candidate genes in 692 available DNA samples from this clinical trial. The peak symptomatic response to rasagiline, the rate of symptom progression, and their relation to genetic variation were examined controlling for placebo effects using general linear and mixed effects models, respectively. Single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs2283265 and rs1076560, in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) were found to be significantly associated with a favourable peak response to rasagiline at 12 weeks in early Parkinson's disease after controlling for multiple testing. From a linear regression, the betas were 2.5 and 2.38, respectively, with false discovery rate-corrected P-values of 0.032. These polymorphisms were in high linkage disequilibrium with each other (r(2) = 0.96) meaning that the same clinical response signal was identified by each of them. No polymorphisms were associated with slowing the rate of worsening in

  3. Surveying genetic variants and molecular phylogeny of cerebral cavernous malformation gene, CCM3/PDCD10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-12-01

    The three cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) genes namely CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 have been identified for which mutations cause cerebral cavernous malformations. However, the protein products of these genes involved in forming CCM signaling, are still poorly understood imposing an urgent need to understand these genes and their signaling processes in details. So far involvement of CCM3/PDCD10 in the cavernous angioma has been characterized from biochemical and biophysical analyses. However, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history and comprehensive genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10. Herein, we explored the phylogenetic history and genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10 gene. Synteny analyses revealed that CCM3/PDCD10 gene shared same genomic loci from Drosophila to human and the gene structure of CCM3/PDCD10 is conserved from human to Branchiostoma floridae for about 500 MYs with some changes in sea urchin and in insects. The conserved CCM3/PDCD10 is characterized by presence of indels in the N-terminal dimerization domain. We identified 951 CCM3/PDCD10 variants by analysis of 1092 human genomes with top three variation classes belongs to 84% SNPs, 6.9% insertions and 6.2% deletions. We identified 22 missense mutations in the human CCM3/PDCD10 protein and out of which three mutations are deleterious. We also identified four stop-codon gaining mutations at the positions E34*, E68*, E97* and E140*, respectively. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of the CCM3/PDCD10 gene based on phylogenetic origin and genetic variants. This study corroborates that the evolution of CCM proteins with tubular organization evolvements by endothelial cells.

  4. Mapping regulatory genes as candidates for cold and drought stress tolerance in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondelli, A; Francia, E; Barabaschi, D; Aprile, A; Skinner, J S; Stockinger, E J; Stanca, A M; Pecchioni, N

    2006-02-01

    Cereal crop yield is greatly affected in many growing areas by abiotic stresses, mainly low temperature and drought. In order to find candidates for the tolerance genes for these stresses, 13 genes encoding for transcription factors and upstream regulators were screened by amplification and SSCP on six parental genotypes of three barley mapping populations ('Nure' x 'Tremois', 'Proctor' x 'Nudinka', and 'Steptoe' x 'Morex'), and mapped as newly developed STS, SNP, and SSCP markers. A new consensus function map was then drawn using the three maps above, including 16 regulatory candidate genes (CGs). The positions of barley cold and drought tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) presently described in the literature were added to the consensus map to find positional candidates from among the mapped genes. A cluster of six HvCBF genes co-mapped with the Fr-H2 cold tolerance QTL, while no QTLs for the same trait were positioned on chromosome 7H, where two putative barley regulators of CBF expression, ICE1 and FRY1, found by homology search, were mapped in this work. These observations suggest that CBF gene(s) themselves, rather than their two regulators, are at present the best candidates for cold tolerance. Four out of 12 drought tolerance QTLs of the consensus map are associated with regulatory CGs, on chromosomes 2H, 5H, and 7H, and two QTLs with effector genes, on chromosomes 5H and 6H. The results obtained could be used to guide MAS applications, allowing introduction into an ideal genotype of favourable alleles of tolerance QTLs.

  5. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of Resistance Gene RSC3Q to Soybean mosaic virus in Qihuang 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng gui-jie; Yang Yong-qing; Ma Ying; Yang Xiao-feng; Chen Shan-yu; Ren Rui; Wang Da-gang; Yang Zhong-lu; ZhI hai-jian

    2014-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) disease is one of the most destructive viral diseases in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). SMV strain SC3 is the major prevalent strain in huang-huai and Yangtze valleys, China. The soybean cultivar Qihuang 1 is of a rich resistance spectrum and has a wide range of application in breeding programs in China. In this study, F1, F2 and F2:3 from Qihuang 1×nannong 1138-2 were used to study inheritance and linkage mapping of the SC3 resistance gene in Qihuang 1. The secondary F2 population and near isogenic lines (nILs) derived from residual heterozygous lines (RhLs) of Qihuang 1×nannong 1138-2 were separatively used in the ifne mapping and candidate gene analysis of the resistance gene. Results indicated that a single dominant gene (designated RSC3Q) controls resistance, which was located on chromosome 13. Two genomic-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers BARCSOYSSR_13_1114 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1136 were found lfanking the two sides of the RSC3Q. The interval between the two markers was 651 kb. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the candidate genes showed that ifve genes (Glyma13g25730, 25750, 25950, 25970 and 26000) were likely involved in soybean SMV resistance. These results would have utility in cloning of RSC3Q resistance candidate gene and marker-assisted selection (MaS) in resistance breeding to SMV.

  6. Whole-genome sequencing of individuals from a founder population identifies candidate genes for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catarina D; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS.

  7. When is it MODY? Challenges in the Interpretation of Sequence Variants in MODY Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althari, Sara; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    The genomics revolution has raised more questions than it has provided answers. Big data from large population-scale resequencing studies are increasingly deconstructing classic notions of Mendelian disease genetics, which support a simplistic correlation between mutational severity and phenotypic outcome. The boundaries are being blurred as the body of evidence showing monogenic disease-causing alleles in healthy genomes, and in the genomes of individu-als with increased common complex disease risk, continues to grow. In this review, we focus on the newly emerging challenges which pertain to the interpretation of sequence variants in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), a presumed mono-genic form of diabetes characterized by Mendelian inheritance. These challenges highlight the complexities surrounding the assignments of pathogenicity, in particular to rare protein-alerting variants, and bring to the forefront some profound clinical diagnostic implications. As MODY is both genetically and clinically heterogeneous, an accurate molecular diagnosis and cautious extrapolation of sequence data are critical to effective disease management and treatment. The biological and translational value of sequence information can only be attained by adopting a multitude of confirmatory analyses, which interrogate variant implication in disease from every possible angle. Indeed, studies which have effectively detected rare damaging variants in known MODY genes in normoglycemic individuals question the existence of a sin-gle gene mutation scenario: does monogenic diabetes exist when the genetic culprits of MODY have been systematical-ly identified in individuals without MODY?

  8. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA-dam...

  9. A Candidate Gene Analysis of Methylphenidate Response in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, James J.; McCracken, James T.; Loo, Sandra K.; Manganiello, Marc; Leung, Michael C.; Tietjens, Jeremy R.; Trinh, Thao; Baweja, Shilpa; Suddath, Robert; Smalley, Susan L.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the potential role of candidate genes in moderating treatment effects of methylphenidate (MPH) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Eighty-two subjects with ADHD aged 6 to 17 years participated in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, crossover titration trial of…

  10. Genetics of Estrogen-Related Traits; From Candidate Genes to GWAS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Stolk (Lisette)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis, the association of polymorphisms in three candidate genes (estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1), retinoblastoma interacting zinc finger domain (RIZ1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)) with estradiol levels, age at natural menopause, BMD and fracture ris

  11. No association of candidate genes with cannabis use in a large sample of Australian twin families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.; Zietsch, B.P.; Liu, J.Z.; Medland, S.E.; Lynskey, M.T.; Madden, P.A.F.; Agrawal, A.; Montgomery, G.W.; Heath, A.C.; Martin, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    While there is solid evidence that cannabis use is heritable, attempts to identify genetic influences at the molecular level have yielded mixed results. Here, a large twin family sample (n = 7452) was used to test for association between 10 previously reported candidate genes and lifetime frequency

  12. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  13. Functional annotation and identification of candidate disease genes by computational analysis of normal tissue gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-throughput gene expression data can predict gene function through the "guilt by association" principle: coexpressed genes are likely to be functionally associated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed publicly available expression data on normal human tissues. The analysis is based on the integration of data obtained with two experimental platforms (microarrays and SAGE and of various measures of dissimilarity between expression profiles. The building blocks of the procedure are the Ranked Coexpression Groups (RCG, small sets of tightly coexpressed genes which are analyzed in terms of functional annotation. Functionally characterized RCGs are selected by means of the majority rule and used to predict new functional annotations. Functionally characterized RCGs are enriched in groups of genes associated to similar phenotypes. We exploit this fact to find new candidate disease genes for many OMIM phenotypes of unknown molecular origin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We predict new functional annotations for many human genes, showing that the integration of different data sets and coexpression measures significantly improves the scope of the results. Combining gene expression data, functional annotation and known phenotype-gene associations we provide candidate genes for several genetic diseases of unknown molecular basis.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Analyses Point to Candidate Genes for Electric Shock Avoidance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Mirjam; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus; König, Christian; Bockstaller, Marie; Oguz, Tuba; Khalili, Afshin; Antwi-Adjei, Emmanuel; Schauer, Tamas; Margulies, Carla; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Yarali, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Electric shock is a common stimulus for nociception-research and the most widely used reinforcement in aversive associative learning experiments. Yet, nothing is known about the mechanisms it recruits at the periphery. To help fill this gap, we undertook a genome-wide association analysis using 38 inbred Drosophila melanogaster strains, which avoided shock to varying extents. We identified 514 genes whose expression levels and/ or sequences co-varied with shock avoidance scores. We independently scrutinized 14 of these genes using mutants, validating the effect of 7 of them on shock avoidance. This emphasizes the value of our candidate gene list as a guide for follow-up research. In addition, by integrating our association results with external protein-protein interaction data we obtained a shock avoidance-associated network of 38 genes. Both this network and the original candidate list contained a substantial number of genes that affect mechanosensory bristles, which are hair-like organs distributed across the fly's body. These results may point to a potential role for mechanosensory bristles in shock sensation. Thus, we not only provide a first list of candidate genes for shock avoidance, but also point to an interesting new hypothesis on nociceptive mechanisms.

  15. Identification of candidate olfactory genes in Leptinotarsa decemlineata by antennal transcriptome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sense of smell is critical for the survival of insects, by which insects detect the odor signals in the environment and make appropriate behavioral responses such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. The antenna is the main olfactory organ in insects. Multiple antennal proteins have been suggested to be involved in olfactory signal transduction pathway such as odorant receptors (ORs, ionotropic receptors (IRs, odorant binding proteins (OBPs, chemosensory proteins (CSPs and sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs. In this study, we identified several olfactory gene subfamilies in the economically important Coleopteran agricultural pest, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, by assembling the adult male and female antennal transcriptomes. In the male and female antennal transcriptome, we identified a total of 37 OR genes, 10 IR genes, 26 OBP genes, 15 CSP genes and 3 SNMP genes. Further all candidate ORs were validated to be expressed in male or female antenna by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Most of the candidate OR genes have similar expression level in male and female. A few OR genes have been detected as male-specific (LdecOR6 or male-bias (LdecOR5, LdecOR12, LdecOR26 and LdecOR32 expression. As well as that, two OR genes (LdecOR3 and LdecOR29 were proved to be expressed higher in female. Our findings make it possible for future research of the olfactory system of L. decemlineata at the molecular level.

  16. ReCGiP, a database of reproduction candidate genes in pigs based on bibliomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproduction in pigs is one of the most economically important traits. To improve the reproductive performances, numerous studies have focused on the identification of candidate genes. However, it is hard for one to read all literatures thoroughly to get information. So we have developed a database providing candidate genes for reproductive researches in pig by mining and processing existing biological literatures in human and pigs, named as ReCGiP. Description Based on text-mining and comparative genomics, ReCGiP presents diverse information of reproduction-relevant genes in human and pig. The genes were sorted by the degree of relevance with the reproduction topics and were visualized in a gene's co-occurrence network where two genes were connected if they were co-cited in a PubMed abstract. The 'hub' genes which had more 'neighbors' were thought to be have more important functions and could be identified by the user in their web browser. In addition, ReCGiP provided integrated GO annotation, OMIM and biological pathway information collected from the Internet. Both pig and human gene information can be found in the database, which is now available. Conclusions ReCGiP is a unique database providing information on reproduction related genes for pig. It can be used in the area of the molecular genetics, the genetic linkage map, and the breeding of the pig and other livestock. Moreover, it can be used as a reference for human reproduction research.

  17. Molecular evolution of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jennifer R; McAssey, Edward V; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations.

  18. Identification of Novel Milk Protein Gene Variants in Sahiwal Cattle Breed of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahlla N. Mir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This novel study was aimed at identification of new genetic variants in Sahiwal cattle breed of Pakistan and determined the effects of these variants on milk yield. Five major milk protein genes in Sahiwal cattle were analyzed and two single nucleotide polymorphisms identified through bi-directional sequencing. These include A to T in exon XI at position 11462 of the alpha s1 casein gene; resulting in a Glutamic Acid (GAA to Aspartic acid (GAU substitution at position 84 of alpha s1 casein protein and T to C change at position 8491 of the exon VII in beta-casein gene resulting in a Valine to Alanine substitution at position 197 of beta casein protein. Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS and SNaPshot genotyping protocols were optimized for genotyping new genetic variants. The genotypes in both the alpha-s1 casein and beta casein genes were found associated with milk yield but their influence was not statistically significant. However, the least square means of milk yield for TT genotypes of alpha s1 casein and of beta casein genes were higher compared to other genotypes.

  19. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Bourneuf, Emmanuelle; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2011-06-03

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation.

  20. Variant surface antigens, virulence genes and the pathogenesis of malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deitsch, Kirk W; Hviid, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The first Molecular Approaches to Malaria meeting was held 2-5 February 2000 in Lorne, Australia. Following the meeting, Brian Cooke, Mats Wahlgren and Ross Coppel predicted that research into the molecular details of the mechanisms behind sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes would "become...... increasingly more complicated, with further interactions, receptors, ligands and functional domains". Furthermore, they cautioned that "the challenge will be not to lose ourselves in the molecular detail, but remain focused on the role of [the var genes and other multigene families] in pathogenesis of malaria......". We contemplate on these statements, following the recent second Molecular Approaches to Malaria meeting, which was held at the same venue on 2-5 February 2004....

  1. Chromosomal Aberrations and DNA Repair Gene Variants in a Radon-exposed Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, A.; Lindholm, C.; Koivistoinen, A.; Salomaa, S.

    2004-07-01

    Polymorphisms of XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1), XRCC3 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3), and hOGG1 (the human homologue of the yeast OGG1 gene) DNA repair genes have been associated with altered DNA repair capacity and risk of various cancers. In the present study our goal was to clarify the influence of various DNA repair gene variants on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in subjects exposed to residential radon. The study group of 84 non-smoking, healthy individuals exposed to domestic radon were analysed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique. No association between radon concentration and CA frequencies was observed. However, a significant increase with age was shown as well as a large variability in translocation frequencies between individuals within the same age group. In order to investigate the role of individual susceptibility to this variation genotypes of DNA repair genes XRCC1 (codons 194, 280 and 399), XRCC3 (codon 241) and hOGG1 (codon 326) were determined from leukocyte DNA using methods based on polymerase chain reaction. Multiple regression analysis was applied to evaluate the effect of the polymorphisms and the other confounding factors (age, exposure to randon etc) to the frequency of CA. The preliminary statistical analyses showed that the different gene appeared not to be related to a pronounced increase in chromosome aberration frequencies observed by FISH painting. However, the analysis indicated that the homozygous variant of XRCC3 codon 241 was associated (P<0.05) with two-ways translocations in conjunction with age. Larger studies, both with regard to the cohort and the number of gene variants are needed to elucidate the influence of other DNA repair variants to the yield of chromosomal aberrations. The results indicate that the chromosomal translocations accumulated by age (spontaneous background) may be partly explained by defects in homologous recombination repair. (Author

  2. Rapid analysis of colipase gene variants by multicapillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaczó, Zsuzsanna; Pál, Eszter; Dénes, Réka; Somogyi, Anikó; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Guttman, András; Rónai, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    Despite of the fact that the Human Genome Project was completed more than a decade ago, identification of the genetic background of polygenic diseases is still challenging. Several somewhat different approaches are available to investigate inheritable factors of complex phenotypes, all require, however efficient, high-throughput techniques for SNP genotyping. In this paper, we report a robust and reliable multiplex PCR-RFLP for genotype and haplotype analysis of six SNPs (rs41270082, rs3748051, rs142027015, rs3748048, rs73404011, and rs72925892) of the colipase (CLPS) gene. A multicapillary (12 capillaries) electrophoresis unit was used for high throughput and sensitive analysis of the digestion fragments. A Microsoft Excel-based spreadsheet was designed for the flexible visualization and evaluation of the electrophoretic separations, which is readily adaptable for any kind of electrophoresis application. Haplotype analysis of the two loci localized in close proximity of each other was carried out by molecular method, extended haplotypes including all five SNPs in the 5' upstream region were calculated. The techniques were applied in a case-control association study of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although, single marker analysis did not reveal any significant association, it was observed that the rare GGCCG haplotype of the five 5' upstream region SNPs was about three times more frequent among patients compared to healthy control population. Our results demonstrated the applicability of multicapillary CGE in large-scale, high-throughput SNP analysis, and suggested that the CLPS gene polymorphisms might be considered as genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Identification of novel candidate genes for follicle selection in the broiler breeder ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDerment Neil A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broiler breeders fed ad libitum are characterised by multiple ovulation, which leads to poor shell quality and egg production. Multiple ovulation is controlled by food restriction in commercial flocks. However, the level of food restriction raises welfare concerns, including that of severe hunger. Reducing the rate of multiple ovulation by genetic selection would facilitate progress towards developing a growth profile for optimum animal welfare. Results The study utilised 3 models of ovarian follicle development; laying hens fed ad libitum (experiment 2 and broiler breeders fed ad libitum or a restricted diet (experiments 1 & 3. This allowed us to investigate gene candidates for follicular development by comparing normal, abnormal and “controlled” follicle hierarchies at different stages of development. Several candidate genes for multiple ovulation were identified by combining microarray analysis of restricted vs. ad libitum feeding, literature searches and QPCR expression profiling throughout follicle development. Three candidate genes were confirmed by QPCR as showing significant differential expression between restricted and ad libitum feeding: FSHR, GDF9 and PDGFRL. PDGFRL, a candidate for steroidogenesis, showed significantly up-regulated expression in 6–8 mm follicles of ad libitum fed broiler breeders (P = 0.016, the period at which follicle recruitment occurs. Conclusions Gene candidates have been identified and evidence provided to support a possible role in regulation of ovarian function and follicle number. Further characterisation of these genes will be required to assess their potential for inclusion into breeding programmes to improve the regulation of follicle selection and reduce the need for feed restriction.

  4. Genetic variants and haplotype analyses of the ZBRK1/ZNF350 gene in high-risk non BRCA1/2 French Canadian breast and ovarian cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Sylvie; Belleau, Pascal; Labrie, Yvan; Ouellette, Geneviève; Bessette, Paul; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Laframboise, Rachel; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Pichette, Roxane; Plante, Marie; Durocher, Francine

    2008-01-01

    Our current understanding of breast cancer susceptibility involves mutations in the 2 major genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, found in about 25% of high-risk families, as well as few other low penetrance genes such as ATM and CHEK2. Approximately two-thirds of the multiple cases families remain to be explained by mutations in still unknown genes. In a candidate gene approach to identify new genes potentially involved in breast cancer susceptibility, we analyzed genomic variants in the ZBRK1 gene, a co-repressor implicated in BRCA1-mediated repression of GADD45. Direct sequencing of ZBRK1 entire coding region in affected breast cancer individuals from 97 high-risk French Canadian breast/ovarian cancer families and 94 healthy controls led to the identification of 18 genomic variants. Haplotype analyses, using PHASE, COCAPHASE and HaploStats programs, put in evidence 3 specific haplotypes which could potentially modulate breast cancer risk, and among which 2 that are associated with a potential protective effect (p = 0.01135 and p = 0.00268), while another haplotype is over-represented in the case group (p = 0.00143). Further analyses of these haplotypes indicated that a strong component of the observed difference between both groups emerge from the first 5 variants (out of 12 used for haplotype determination). The present study also permitted to determine a set of tagging SNPs that could be useful for subsequent analyses in large scale association studies. Additional studies in large cohorts and other populations will however be needed to further evaluate if common and/or rare ZBRK1 sequence variants and haplotypes could be associated with a modest/intermediate breast cancer risk.

  5. DNA Fragmentation Factor 45 (DFF45 Gene at 1p36.2 Is Homozygously Deleted and Encodes Variant Transcripts in Neuroblastoma Cell Line

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    Hong Wei Yang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, loss of heterozygosity (LOH studies suggest that more than two tumor suppressor genes lie on the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p in neuroblastoma (NB. To identify candidate tumor suppressor genes in NB, we searched for homozygous deletions in 20 NB cell lines using a high-density STS map spanning chromosome 1 p36, a common LOH region in NB. We found that the 45-kDa subunit of the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF45 gene was homozygously deleted in an NB cell line, NB-1. DFF45 is the chaperon of DFF40, and both molecules are necessary for caspase 3 to induce apoptosis. DFF35, a splicing variant of DFF45, is an inhibitor of DFF40. We examined 20 NB cell lines for expression and mutation of DFF45 gene by reverse transcription (RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and RT-PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism. Some novel variant transcripts of the DFF45 gene were found in NB cell lines, but not in normal adrenal gland and peripheral blood. These variants may not serve as chaperons of DFF40, but as inhibitors like DFF35, thus disrupting the balance between DFF45 and DFF40. No mutations of the DFF45 gene were found in any NB cell line, suggesting that the DFF45 is not a tumor suppressor gene for NB. However, homozygous deletion of the DFF45 gene in the NB-1 cell line may imply the presence of unknown tumor suppressor genes in this region.

  6. Dynamic expression of combinatorial replication-dependent histone variant genes during mouse spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongfang; Qi, Huayu

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are basic chromatin structural units that are formed by DNA sequences wrapping around histones. Global chromatin states in different cell types are specified by combinatorial effects of post-translational modifications of histones and the expression of histone variants. During mouse spermatogenesis, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renew while undergo differentiation, events that occur in the company of constant re-modeling of chromatin structures. Previous studies have shown that testes contain highly expressed or specific histone variants to facilitate these epigenetic modifications. However, mechanisms of regulating the epigenetic changes and the specific histone compositions of spermatogenic cells are not fully understood. Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, we examined the dynamic expression of replication-dependent histone genes in post-natal mouse testes. It was found that distinct sets of histone genes are expressed in various spermatogenic cells at different stages during spermatogenesis. While gonocyte-enriched testes from mice at 2-dpp (days post partum) express pre-dominantly thirteen histone variant genes, SSC-stage testes at 9-dpp highly express a different set of eight histone genes. During differentiation stage when testes are occupied mostly by spermatocytes and spermatids, another twenty-two histone genes are expressed much higher than the rest, including previously known testis-specific hist1h1t, hist1h2ba and hist1h4c. In addition, histone genes that are pre-dominantly expressed in gonocytes and SSCs are also highly expressed in embryonic stem cells. Several of them were changed when embryoid bodies were formed from ES cells, suggesting their roles in regulating pluripotency of the cells. Further more, differentially expressed histone genes are specifically localized in either SSCs or spermatocytes and spermatids, as demonstrated by in situ hybridization using gene specific probes. Taken together, results presented here

  7. Gene-wise association of variants in four lysosomal storage disorder genes in neuropathologically confirmed Lewy body disease.

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    Lorraine N Clark

    Full Text Available Variants in GBA are associated with Lewy Body (LB pathology. We investigated whether variants in other lysosomal storage disorder (LSD genes also contribute to disease pathogenesis.We performed a genetic analysis of four LSD genes including GBA, HEXA, SMPD1, and MCOLN1 in 231 brain autopsies. Brain autopsies included neuropathologically defined LBD without Alzheimer Disease (AD changes (n = 59, AD without significant LB pathology (n = 71, Alzheimer disease and lewy body variant (ADLBV (n = 68, and control brains without LB or AD neuropathology (n = 33. Sequencing of HEXA, SMPD1, MCOLN1 and GBA followed by 'gene wise' genetic association analysis was performed. To determine the functional effect, a biochemical analysis of GBA in a subset of brains was also performed. GCase activity was measured in a subset of brain samples (n = 64 that included LBD brains, with or without GBA mutations, and control brains. A lipidomic analysis was also performed in brain autopsies (n = 67 which included LBD (n = 34, ADLBV (n = 3, AD (n = 4, PD (n = 9 and control brains (n = 17, comparing GBA mutation carriers to non-carriers.In a 'gene-wise' analysis, variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 were significantly associated with LB pathology (p range: 0.03-4.14 x10(-5. Overall, the mean levels of GCase activity were significantly lower in GBA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (p<0.001. A significant increase and accumulation of several species for the lipid classes, ceramides and sphingolipids, was observed in LBD brains carrying GBA mutations compared to controls (p range: p<0.05-p<0.01.Our study indicates that variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 are associated with LB pathology. Biochemical data comparing GBA mutation carrier to non-carriers support these findings, which have important implications for biomarker development and therapeutic strategies.

  8. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan;

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2...... mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively......, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream...

  9. Common variant in myocilin gene is associated with high myopia in isolated population of Korcula Island, Croatia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vatavuk, Zoran

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To study the association between genetic variants in myocilin and collagen type I alpha 1 genes and high myopia in an isolated island population. METHODS: A total of 944 examinees from the genetic epidemiology study conducted on the island of Korcula, Croatia, were included in the study. We selected 2 short nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) available in our genome-wide scan set of SNPs that were previously associated with high myopia and used them to replicate previous claims of possible association. RESULTS: Nineteen cases of high myopia, defined as the refraction of <\\/=-6.00 diopters, were identified and included in the analysis. We showed that rs2075555 in the COL1A1 gene was not associated with high myopia. In contrast, rs2421853 in the myocilin gene was significantly associated in both bivariate (P=0.006) and age- and sex-adjusted analysis (P=0.049). CONCLUSION: Myocilin seems to be a very strong candidate for explaining some of the pathophysiological pathways leading to the development of both glaucoma and high myopia. As our finding was obtained in a relatively under-powered sample, further research and replication of these results is needed.

  10. Effect of polymorphic variants of GH, Pit-1, and beta-LG genes on milk production of Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, M; Azari, M A; Hasani, S; Khanahmadi, A; Zerehdaran, S

    2012-04-01

    Effect of polymorphic variants of growth hormone (GH), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and Pit-1 genes on milk yield was analyzed in a Holstein herd. Genotypes of the cows for these genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Allele frequencies were 0.884 and 0.116 for L and V variants of GH, 0.170 and 0.830 for A and B variants of Pit-1, and 0.529 and 0.471 for A and B variants of beta-LG, respectively. GLM procedure of SAS software was used to test the effects of these genes on milk yield. Results indicated significant effects of these genes on milk yield (P LG gene, milk yield of animals with AA genotype was more than BB genotype (P LG (AA) were superior compared to heterozygote genotypes, whereas, the heterozygote genotype of Pit-1 gene (AB) was desirable.

  11. Investigation of the molecular relationship between breast cancer and obesity by candidate gene prioritization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Garshasbi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer and obesity are two major public health concerns. More than 12 million cases of cancer are reported annually. Many reports confirmed obesity as a risk factor for cancer. The molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer has not been clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate priorities of effective genes in the molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer. Methods: In this study, computer simulation method was used for prioritizing the genes that involved in the molecular links between obesity and breast cancer in laboratory of systems biology and bioinformatics (LBB, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran, from March to July 2014. In this study, ENDEAVOUR software was used for prioritizing the genes and integrating multiple data sources was used for data analysis. Training genes were selected from effective genes in obesity and/or breast cancer. Two groups of candidate genes were selected. The first group was included the existential genes in 5 common region chromosomes (between obesity and breast cancer and the second group was included the results of genes microarray data analysis of research Creighton, et al (In 2012 on patients with breast cancer. The microarray data were analyzed with GER2 software (R online software on GEO website. Finally, both training and candidate genes were entered in ENDEAVOUR software package. Results: The candidate genes were prioritized to four style and five genes in ten of the first priorities were repeated twice. In other word, the outcome of prioritizing of 72 genes (Product of microarray data analysis and genes of 5 common chromosome regions (Between obesity and breast cancer showed, 5 genes (TNFRSF10B, F2, IGFALS, NTRK3 and HSP90B1 were the priorities in the molecular connection between obesity and breast cancer. Conclusion: There are some common genes between breast cancer and obesity. So, molecular relationship is confirmed. In this study the possible effect

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies loci and candidate genes for meat quality traits in Simmental beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangwei; Qi, Xin; Wu, Yang; Zhu, Bo; Xu, Lingyang; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Gao, Huijiang

    2016-06-01

    Improving meat quality is the best way to enhance profitability and strengthen competitiveness in beef industry. Identification of genetic variants that control beef quality traits can help breeders design optimal breeding programs to achieve this goal. We carried out a genome-wide association study for meat quality traits in 1141 Simmental cattle using the Illumina Bovine HD 770K SNP array to identify the candidate genes and genomic regions associated with meat quality traits for beef cattle, including fat color, meat color, marbling score, longissimus muscle area, and shear force. In our study, we identified twenty significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (p meat quality traits. Notably, we observed several SNPs were in or near eleven genes which have been reported previously, including TMEM236, SORL1, TRDN, S100A10, AP2S1, KCTD16, LOC506594, DHX15, LAMA4, PREX1, and BRINP3. We identified a haplotype block on BTA13 containing five significant SNPs associated with fat color trait. We also found one of 19 SNPs was associated with multiple traits (shear force and longissimus muscle area) on BTA7. Our results offer valuable insights to further explore the potential mechanism of meat quality traits in Simmental beef cattle.

  13. QTLs and candidate genes for desiccation and abscisic acid content in maize kernels

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    Charcosset Alain

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kernel moisture at harvest is an important trait since a low value is required to prevent unexpected early germination and ensure seed preservation. It is also well known that early germination occurs in viviparous mutants, which are impaired in abscisic acid (ABA biosynthesis. To provide some insight into the genetic determinism of kernel desiccation in maize, quantitative trait loci (QTLs were detected for traits related to kernel moisture and ABA content in both embryo and endosperm during kernel desiccation. In parallel, the expression and mapping of genes involved in kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis, were examined to detect candidate genes. Results The use of an intermated recombinant inbred line population allowed for precise QTL mapping. For 29 traits examined in an unreplicated time course trial of days after pollination, a total of 78 QTLs were detected, 43 being related to kernel desiccation, 15 to kernel weight and 20 to ABA content. Multi QTL models explained 35 to 50% of the phenotypic variation for traits related to water status, indicating a large genetic control amenable to breeding. Ten of the 20 loci controlling ABA content colocated with previously detected QTLs controlling water status and ABA content in water stressed leaves. Mapping of candidate genes associated with kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis revealed several colocations between genes with putative functions and QTLs. Parallel investigation via RT-PCR experiments showed that the expression patterns of the ABA-responsive Rab17 and Rab28 genes as well as the late embryogenesis abundant Emb5 and aquaporin genes were related to desiccation rate and parental allele effect. Database searches led to the identification and mapping of two zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP and five novel 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED related genes, both gene families being involved in ABA biosynthesis. The expression of these genes appeared independent in

  14. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2016-01-01

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim...... was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses...... in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans....

  15. Reliable and rapid characterization of functional FCN2 gene variants reveals diverse geographical patterns

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    Ojurongbe Olusola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ficolin-2 coded by FCN2 gene is a soluble serum protein and an innate immune recognition element of the complement system. FCN2 gene polymorphisms reveal distinct geographical patterns and are documented to alter serum ficolin levels and modulate disease susceptibility. Methods We employed a real-time PCR based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET method to genotype four functional SNPs including -986 G > A (#rs3124952, -602 G > A (#rs3124953, -4A > G (#rs17514136 and +6424 G > T (#rs7851696 in the ficolin-2 (FCN2 gene. We characterized the FCN2 variants in individuals representing Brazilian (n = 176, Nigerian (n = 180, Vietnamese (n = 172 and European Caucasian ethnicity (n = 165. Results We observed that the genotype distribution of three functional SNP variants (−986 G > A, -602 G > A and -4A > G differ significantly between the populations investigated (p p  Conclusions The observed distribution of the FCN2 functional SNP variants may likely contribute to altered serum ficolin levels and this may depend on the different disease settings in world populations. To conclude, the use of FRET based real-time PCR especially for FCN2 gene will benefit a larger scientific community who extensively depend on rapid, reliable method for FCN2 genotyping.

  16. Distribution of allelic variants of the chromosomal gene bla OXA-114-like in Achromobacter xylosoxidans clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traglia, German Matías; Almuzara, Marisa; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Papalia, Mariana; Galanternik, Laura; Radice, Marcela; Vay, Carlos; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2013-11-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is increasingly being documented in cystic fibrosis patients. The bla(OXA-114) gene has been recognized as a naturally occurring chromosomal gene, exhibiting different allelic variants. In the population under study, the bla(OXA-114)-like gene was found in 19/19 non-epidemiological-related clinical isolates of A. xylosoxidans with ten different alleles including 1 novel OXA-114 variant.

  17. Evaluation of candidate reference genes for gene expression normalization in Brassica juncea using real time quantitative RT-PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Chandna

    Full Text Available The real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is becoming increasingly important to gain insight into function of genes. Given the increased sensitivity, ease and reproducibility of qRT-PCR, the requirement of suitable reference genes for normalization has become important and stringent. It is now known that the expression of internal control genes in living organism vary considerably during developmental stages and under different experimental conditions. For economically important Brassica crops, only a couple of reference genes are reported till date. In this study, expression stability of 12 candidate reference genes including ACT2, ELFA, GAPDH, TUA, UBQ9 (traditional housekeeping genes, ACP, CAC, SNF, TIPS-41, TMD, TSB and ZNF (new candidate reference genes, in a diverse set of 49 tissue samples representing different developmental stages, stress and hormone treated conditions and cultivars of Brassica juncea has been validated. For the normalization of vegetative stages the ELFA, ACT2, CAC and TIPS-41 combination would be appropriate whereas TIPS-41 along with CAC would be suitable for normalization of reproductive stages. A combination of GAPDH, TUA, TIPS-41 and CAC were identified as the most suitable reference genes for total developmental stages. In various stress and hormone treated samples, UBQ9 and TIPS-41 had the most stable expression. Across five cultivars of B. juncea, the expression of CAC and TIPS-41 did not vary significantly and were identified as the most stably expressed reference genes. This study provides comprehensive information that the new reference genes selected herein performed better than the traditional housekeeping genes. The selection of most suitable reference genes depends on the experimental conditions, and is tissue and cultivar-specific. Further, to attain accuracy in the results more than one reference genes are necessary for normalization.

  18. Network Based Integrated Analysis of Phenotype-Genotype Data for Prioritization of Candidate Symptom Genes

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    Xing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms and signs (symptoms in brief are the essential clinical manifestations for individualized diagnosis and treatment in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. To gain insights into the molecular mechanism of symptoms, we develop a computational approach to identify the candidate genes of symptoms. Methods. This paper presents a network-based approach for the integrated analysis of multiple phenotype-genotype data sources and the prediction of the prioritizing genes for the associated symptoms. The method first calculates the similarities between symptoms and diseases based on the symptom-disease relationships retrieved from the PubMed bibliographic database. Then the disease-gene associations and protein-protein interactions are utilized to construct a phenotype-genotype network. The PRINCE algorithm is finally used to rank the potential genes for the associated symptoms. Results. The proposed method gets reliable gene rank list with AUC (area under curve 0.616 in classification. Some novel genes like CALCA, ESR1, and MTHFR were predicted to be associated with headache symptoms, which are not recorded in the benchmark data set, but have been reported in recent published literatures. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated that by integrating phenotype-genotype relationships into a complex network framework it provides an effective approach to identify candidate genes of symptoms.

  19. Double-stranded Let-7 mimics, potential candidates for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-zhao; Lv, Ying-hui; Gong, Yu-hua; Li, Zhao-fa; Xu, William; Diao, Yong; Xu, Ruian

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, single-stranded endogenous RNAs, act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. The ability of one single miRNA regulating multiple functionally related mRNAs makes it a new potential candidate for cancer gene therapy. Let-7s miRNAs have been demonstrated as tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancers, providing one choice of gene therapy by replenishing this miRNA. In the present studies, we demonstrate that the chemically synthesized, double-stranded Let-7 mimics can inhibit the growth and migration and induce the cell cycle arrest of lung cancer cell lines in vitro. Let-7 mimics silence gene expression by binding to the 3' UTR of targeting mRNAs. Mutation of seed sequence significantly depresses the gene silencing activity of Let-7 mimics. Our results also demonstrate that it is possible to increase the activity of Let-7s through mutating the sequence within the 3'end of the antisense strand. Directly, co-transfection Let-7 mimics with active siRNAs impairs the anti-cancer activities of Let-7 mimics. However, a 3-h interval between the introduction of Let-7 mimics and a kind of siRNA avoids the competition and enhances the anti-cancer activities of Let-7 mimics. Taken together, these results have revealed that Let-7s mimics are potential candidates for cancer gene therapy.

  20. DNA sequence variation and selection of tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms at candidate genes for drought-stress response in Pinus taeda L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Santiago C; Ersoz, Elhan; Brown, Garth R; Wheeler, Nicholas C; Neale, David B

    2006-03-01

    Genetic association studies are rapidly becoming the experimental approach of choice to dissect complex traits, including tolerance to drought stress, which is the most common cause of mortality and yield losses in forest trees. Optimization of association mapping requires knowledge of the patterns of nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium and the selection of suitable polymorphisms for genotyping. Moreover, standard neutrality tests applied to DNA sequence variation data can be used to select candidate genes or amino acid sites that are putatively under selection for association mapping. In this article, we study the pattern of polymorphism of 18 candidate genes for drought-stress response in Pinus taeda L., an important tree crop. Data analyses based on a set of 21 putatively neutral nuclear microsatellites did not show population genetic structure or genomewide departures from neutrality. Candidate genes had moderate average nucleotide diversity at silent sites (pi(sil) = 0.00853), varying 100-fold among single genes. The level of within-gene LD was low, with an average pairwise r2 of 0.30, decaying rapidly from approximately 0.50 to approximately 0.20 at 800 bp. No apparent LD among genes was found. A selective sweep may have occurred at the early-response-to-drought-3 (erd3) gene, although population expansion can also explain our results and evidence for selection was not conclusive. One other gene, ccoaomt-1, a methylating enzyme involved in lignification, showed dimorphism (i.e., two highly divergent haplotype lineages at equal frequency), which is commonly associated with the long-term action of balancing selection. Finally, a set of haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPs) was selected. Using htSNPs, a reduction of genotyping effort of approximately 30-40%, while sampling most common allelic variants, can be gained in our ongoing association studies for drought tolerance in pine.

  1. KIAA1462, a coronary artery disease associated gene, is a candidate gene for late onset Alzheimer disease in APOE carriers.

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    Deborah G Murdock

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disease affecting more than five million Americans. In this study, we have used updated genetic linkage data from chromosome 10 in combination with expression data from serial analysis of gene expression to choose a new set of thirteen candidate genes for genetic analysis in late onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD. Results in this study identify the KIAA1462 locus as a candidate locus for LOAD in APOE4 carriers. Two genes exist at this locus, KIAA1462, a gene associated with coronary artery disease, and "rokimi", encoding an untranslated spliced RNA The genetic architecture at this locus suggests that the gene product important in this association is either "rokimi", or a different isoform of KIAA1462 than the isoform that is important in cardiovascular disease. Expression data suggests that isoform f of KIAA1462 is a more attractive candidate for association with LOAD in APOE4 carriers than "rokimi" which had no detectable expression in brain.

  2. Fine-mapping resolves Eae23 into two QTLs and implicates ZEB1 as a candidate gene regulating experimental neuroinflammation in rat.

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    Pernilla Stridh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To elucidate mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis (MS, we studied genetic regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in rats, assuming a conservation of pathogenic pathways. In this study, we focused on Eae23, originally identified to regulate EAE in a (LEW.1AV1xPVG.1AV1F2 cross. Our aim was to determine whether one or more genes within the 67 Mb region regulate EAE and to define candidate risk genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used high resolution quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis in the 10th generation (G10 of an advanced intercross line (AIL to resolve Eae23 into two QTLs that independently regulate EAE, namely Eae23a and Eae23b. We established a congenic strain to validate the effect of this region on disease. PVG alleles in Eae23 resulted in significant protection from EAE and attenuated CNS inflammation/demyelination. Disease amelioration was accompanied with increased levels of Foxp3(+ cells in the CNS of the congenic strain compared to DA. We then focused on candidate gene investigation in Eae23b, a 9 Mb region linked to all clinical phenotypes. Affymetrix exon arrays were used to study expression of the genes in Eae23b in the parental strains, where none showed differential expression. However, we found lower expression of exon 4 of ZEB1, which is specific for splice-variant Zfhep1. ZEB1 is an interleukin 2 (IL2 repressor involved in T cell development. The splice-specific variance prompted us to next analyze the expression of ZEB1 and its two splice variants, Zfhep1 and Zfhep2, in both lymph node and spleen. We demonstrated that ZEB1 splice-variants are differentially expressed; severity of EAE and higher IL2 levels were associated with down-regulation of Zfhep1 and up-regulation of Zfhep2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We speculate that the balance between splice-variants of ZEB1 could influence the regulation of EAE. Further functional studies of ZEB1 and the splice-variants may unravel

  3. HFE gene variants, iron, and lipids: a novel connection in Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne; Connor, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulation and associated oxidative stress in the brain have been consistently found in several neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple genetic studies have been undertaken to try to identify a cause of neurodegenerative diseases but direct connections have been rare. In the iron field, variants in the HFE gene that give rise to a protein involved in cellular iron regulation, are associated with iron accumulation in multiple organs including the brain. There is also substantial epidemiolo...

  4. Identification of candidate genes for Fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage by differential expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motoki; Fujimoto, Ryo; Ying, Hua; Pu, Zi-jing; Ebe, Yusuke; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Saeki, Natsumi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kaji, Makoto; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans is an important disease of Brassica worldwide. To identify a resistance (R) gene against Fusarium yellows in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis), we analyzed differential expression at the whole genome level between resistant and susceptible inbred lines using RNA sequencing. Four hundred and eighteen genes were significantly differentially expressed, and these were enriched for genes involved in response to stress or stimulus. Seven dominant DNA markers at putative R-genes were identified. Presence and absence of the sequence of the putative R-genes, Bra012688 and Bra012689, correlated with the resistance of six inbred lines and susceptibility of four inbred lines, respectively. In F(2) populations derived from crosses between resistant and susceptible inbred lines, presence of Bra012688 and Bra012689 cosegregated with resistance, suggesting that Bra012688 and Bra012689 are good candidates for fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage.

  5. Meta-analysis of Gene-Level Associations for Rare Variants Based on Single-Variant Statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Y.J.; Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Ganna, A.; Hirschhorn, J.; North, K.E.; Ingelsson, E.; Lin, D.Y.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Vermeulen, S.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying "causal" rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rar

  6. Targeted deep resequencing identifies coding variants in the PEAR1 gene that play a role in platelet aggregation.

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    Yoonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Platelet aggregation is heritable, and genome-wide association studies have detected strong associations with a common intronic variant of the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor1 (PEAR1 gene both in African American and European American individuals. In this study, we used a sequencing approach to identify additional exonic variants in PEAR1 that may also determine variability in platelet aggregation in the GeneSTAR Study. A 0.3 Mb targeted region on chromosome 1q23.1 including the entire PEAR1 gene was Sanger sequenced in 104 subjects (45% male, 49% African American, age = 52±13 selected on the basis of hyper- and hypo- aggregation across three different agonists (collagen, epinephrine, and adenosine diphosphate. Single-variant and multi-variant burden tests for association were performed. Of the 235 variants identified through sequencing, 61 were novel, and three of these were missense variants. More rare variants (MAF<5% were noted in African Americans compared to European Americans (108 vs. 45. The common intronic GWAS-identified variant (rs12041331 demonstrated the most significant association signal in African Americans (p = 4.020×10(-4; no association was seen for additional exonic variants in this group. In contrast, multi-variant burden tests indicated that exonic variants play a more significant role in European Americans (p = 0.0099 for the collective coding variants compared to p = 0.0565 for intronic variant rs12041331. Imputation of the individual exonic variants in the rest of the GeneSTAR European American cohort (N = 1,965 supports the results noted in the sequenced discovery sample: p = 3.56×10(-4, 2.27×10(-7, 5.20×10(-5 for coding synonymous variant rs56260937 and collagen, epinephrine and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation, respectively. Sequencing approaches confirm that a common intronic variant has the strongest association with platelet aggregation in African Americans

  7. Identifying candidate genes for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and obesity through gene expression profiling in multiple tissues or cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhui; Meng, Yuhuan; Zhou, Jinghui; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Recent studies have focused on identifying causal variations or candidate genes for obesity and T2DM via analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) within a single tissue. T2DM and obesity are affected by comprehensive sets of genes in multiple tissues. In the current study, gene expression levels in multiple human tissues from GEO datasets were analyzed, and 21 candidate genes displaying high percentages of differential expression were filtered out. Specifically, DENND1B, LYN, MRPL30, POC1B, PRKCB, RP4-655J12.3, HIBADH, and TMBIM4 were identified from the T2DM-control study, and BCAT1, BMP2K, CSRNP2, MYNN, NCKAP5L, SAP30BP, SLC35B4, SP1, BAP1, GRB14, HSP90AB1, ITGA5, and TOMM5 were identified from the obesity-control study. The majority of these genes are known to be involved in T2DM and obesity. Therefore, analysis of gene expression in various tissues using GEO datasets may be an effective and feasible method to determine novel or causal genes associated with T2DM and obesity.

  8. Identifying Candidate Genes for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity through Gene Expression Profiling in Multiple Tissues or Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yuhuan; Zhou, Jinghui; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Recent studies have focused on identifying causal variations or candidate genes for obesity and T2DM via analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) within a single tissue. T2DM and obesity are affected by comprehensive sets of genes in multiple tissues. In the current study, gene expression levels in multiple human tissues from GEO datasets were analyzed, and 21 candidate genes displaying high percentages of differential expression were filtered out. Specifically, DENND1B, LYN, MRPL30, POC1B, PRKCB, RP4-655J12.3, HIBADH, and TMBIM4 were identified from the T2DM-control study, and BCAT1, BMP2K, CSRNP2, MYNN, NCKAP5L, SAP30BP, SLC35B4, SP1, BAP1, GRB14, HSP90AB1, ITGA5, and TOMM5 were identified from the obesity-control study. The majority of these genes are known to be involved in T2DM and obesity. Therefore, analysis of gene expression in various tissues using GEO datasets may be an effective and feasible method to determine novel or causal genes associated with T2DM and obesity. PMID:24455749

  9. Identifying Candidate Genes for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity through Gene Expression Profiling in Multiple Tissues or Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and obesity have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Recent studies have focused on identifying causal variations or candidate genes for obesity and T2DM via analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL within a single tissue. T2DM and obesity are affected by comprehensive sets of genes in multiple tissues. In the current study, gene expression levels in multiple human tissues from GEO datasets were analyzed, and 21 candidate genes displaying high percentages of differential expression were filtered out. Specifically, DENND1B, LYN, MRPL30, POC1B, PRKCB, RP4-655J12.3, HIBADH, and TMBIM4 were identified from the T2DM-control study, and BCAT1, BMP2K, CSRNP2, MYNN, NCKAP5L, SAP30BP, SLC35B4, SP1, BAP1, GRB14, HSP90AB1, ITGA5, and TOMM5 were identified from the obesity-control study. The majority of these genes are known to be involved in T2DM and obesity. Therefore, analysis of gene expression in various tissues using GEO datasets may be an effective and feasible method to determine novel or causal genes associated with T2DM and obesity.

  10. Transcriptomic analysis using olive varieties and breeding progenies identify candidate genes involved in plant architecture

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    Juan José eGonzález Plaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2,252 differentially expressed genes associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies candidate genes for starch content regulation in maize kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kernel starch content is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L. as it accounts for 65% to 75% of the dry kernel weight and positively correlates with seed yield. A number of starch synthesis-related genes have been identified in maize in recent years. However, many loci underlying variation in starch content among maize inbred lines still remain to be identified. The current study is a genome-wide association study that used a set of 263 maize inbred lines. In this panel, the average kernel starch content was 66.99%, ranging from 60.60% to 71.58% over the three study years. These inbred lines were genotyped with the SNP50 BeadChip maize array, which is comprised of 56,110 evenly spaced, random SNPs. Population structure was controlled by a mixed linear model (MLM as implemented in the software package TASSEL. After the statistical analyses, four SNPs were identified as significantly associated with starch content (P ≤ 0.0001, among which one each are located on chromosomes 1 and 5 and two are on chromosome 2. Furthermore, 77 candidate genes associated with starch synthesis were found within the 100-kb intervals containing these four QTLs, and four highly associated genes were within 20-kb intervals of the associated SNPs. Among the four genes, Glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase (APS1; Gene ID GRMZM2G163437 is known as an important regulator of kernel starch content. The identified SNPs, QTLs, and candidate genes may not only be readily used for germplasm improvement by marker-assisted selection in breeding, but can also elucidate the genetic basis of starch content. Further studies on these identified candidate genes may help determine the molecular mechanisms regulating kernel starch content in maize and other important cereal crops.

  13. Sexually dimorphic effects of oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR variants on Harm Avoidance

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    Stankova Trayana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research has suggested that oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR variants may account for individual differences in social behavior, the effects of stress and parenting styles. Little is known, however, on a putative role of the gene in heritable temperamental traits. Methods We addressed effects of two common OXTR variants, rs237900 and rs237902, on personality dimensions in 99 healthy subjects using the Temperament and Character Inventory. Results When sex was controlled for and an OXTR genotype*sex interaction term was included in the regression model, 11% of the variance in Harm Avoidance could be explained (uncorrected p ≤ 0.01. Female carriers of the minor alleles scored highest, and a novel A217T mutation emerged in the most harm avoidant male participant. Conclusions Findings lend support to a modulatory effect of common OXTR variants on Harm Avoidance in healthy caucasian women and invite resequencing of the gene in anxiety phenotypes to identify more explanatory functional variation.

  14. HFE p.C282Y gene variant is associated with varicose veins in Russian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Ekaterina A; Shadrina, Alexandra S; Sevost'ianova, Kseniya S; Shevela, Andrey I; Soldatsky, Evgenii Yu; Seliverstov, Evgenii I; Demekhova, Marina Yu; Shonov, Oleg A; Ilyukhin, Evgenii A; Smetanina, Mariya A; Voronina, Elena N; Zolotukhin, Igor A; Filipenko, Maxim L

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the association of polymorphism rs1800562 (p.C282Y) in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene with the increased risk of venous ulceration was shown. We hypothesized that HFE gene polymorphism might be involved not only in ulceration process, but also in susceptibility to primary varicose veins. We genotyped HFE p.C282Y (rs1800562) and p.H63D (rs1799945) variants in patients with primary varicose veins (n = 463) and in the control group (n = 754). In our study, p.282Y variant (rs1800562 A allele) was significantly associated with the risk of varicose veins (OR 1.79, 95 % CI = 1.11-2.89, P = 0.02). A borderline significant reverse association of p.63D variant (rs1799945 G allele) with venous leg ulcer development was revealed in Russians (OR 0.25, 95 % CI = 0.06-1.00, P = 0.05), but not in the meta-analysis (P = 0.56). We conclude that the HFE gene polymorphism can affect the risk of developing primary varicose veins.

  15. A variant in the KCNQ1 gene predicts future type 2 diabetes and mediates impaired insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Anna Elisabet; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija;

    2009-01-01

    Two independent genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes in Japanese subjects have recently identified common variants in the KCNQ1 gene that are strongly associated with type 2 diabetes. Here we studied whether a common variant in KCNQ1 would influence BMI as well as insulin secretion...... and action and predict future type 2 diabetes in subjects from Sweden and Finland....

  16. Candidate gene analysis of tooth agenesis identifies novel mutations in six genes and suggests significant role for WNT and EDA signaling and allele combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Arte

    Full Text Available Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%, with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34. Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes.

  17. Pathogenic classification of LPL gene variants reported to be associated with LPL deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Rute; Artieda, Marta; Tejedor, Diego

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency is a serious lipid disorder of severe hypertriglyceridemia (SHTG) with chylomicronemia. A large number of variants in the LPL gene have been reported but their influence on LPL activity and SHTG has not been completely analyzed. Gaining insight...... into the deleterious effect of the mutations is clinically essential. METHODS: We used gene sequencing followed by in-vivo/in-vitro and in-silico tools for classification. We classified 125 rare LPL mutations in 33 subjects thought to have LPL deficiency and in 314 subjects selected for very SHTG. RESULTS: Of the 33...

  18. Differences in candidate gene association between European ancestry and African American asthmatic children.

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    Tesfaye M Baye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Candidate gene case-control studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are associated with asthma susceptibility. Most of these studies have been restricted to evaluations of specific SNPs within a single gene and within populations from European ancestry. Recently, there is increasing interest in understanding racial differences in genetic risk associated with childhood asthma. Our aim was to compare association patterns of asthma candidate genes between children of European and African ancestry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a custom-designed Illumina SNP array, we genotyped 1,485 children within the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository and Cincinnati Genomic Control Cohort for 259 SNPs in 28 genes and evaluated their associations with asthma. We identified 14 SNPs located in 6 genes that were significantly associated (p-values <0.05 with childhood asthma in African Americans. Among Caucasians, 13 SNPs in 5 genes were associated with childhood asthma. Two SNPs in IL4 were associated with asthma in both races (p-values <0.05. Gene-gene interaction studies identified race specific sets of genes that best discriminate between asthmatic children and non-allergic controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified IL4 as having a role in asthma susceptibility in both African American and Caucasian children. However, while IL4 SNPs were associated with asthma in asthmatic children with European and African ancestry, the relative contributions of the most replicated asthma-associated SNPs varied by ancestry. These data provides valuable insights into the pathways that may predispose to asthma in individuals with European vs. African ancestry.

  19. Different outcome of six homozygotes for prothrombin A20210A gene variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angiolillo Antonella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prothrombin G20210A gene variant (FII G20210A is a risk factor for venous thrombotic disease while conflicting results have been reported for the risk of arterial thrombotic events. However, vascular episodes were absent in up to 40% of the 67 homozygotes for the G20210A described so far, which indicates that the clinical expression depends on additional risk/trigger factors. We describe six homozygotes for the G20210A variant, among which the first pair of siblings (cases n. 3 and 4 reported so far that displayed a strongly heterogeneous clinical outcome. Case 1, a female of 27 years, developed a full thrombosis of common femoral, superficial and popliteal veins. She assumed oral contraceptives in the last two years. Case n. 2, 34 years old, suffered of recurrent pregnancy loss in absence of any causative alteration. Cases n. 3 and n. 5 experienced arterial thrombotic disease, i.e., juvenile myocardial infarction (40 years old and stroke (48 years old, respectively, in absence of other risk factors. Finally, cases n. 4 and 6 identified as homozygotes for the FII G20210A variant being consanguineous of symptomatic subjects bearing the variant, did not experience any episode of venous nor arterial disease. Both of them have chronic liver disease with an impairement of the prothrombin time INR. Thus, homozygotes for the G20210A are at risk for arterial (in addition to venous thromobotic events; chronic liver disease might modulate this risk.

  20. High prevalence of an anti-hypertriglyceridemic variant of the MLXIPL gene in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Yanagisawa, Yoshiko; Ogawa, Ayumi; Ishizuka, Yuumi; Munkhtulga, Lkhagvasuren; Charupoonphol, Phitaya; Supannnatas, Somjit; Kuartei, Stevenson; Chimedregzen, Ulziiburen; Koda, Yoshiro; Ishida, Takafumi; Kagawa, Yasuo; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2011-12-01

    MLXIPL is a transcription factor integral to the regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis in the liver. Common variants of the MLXIPL gene (MLXIPL) are known to influence plasma triglyceride levels in people of European descent. As MLXIPL has a key role in energy storage, genetic variations of the MLXIPL may be relevant to physiological adaptations to nutritional stresses that have occurred during the evolution of modern humans. In the present study, we assessed the phenotypic consequences of the Q241H variant of MLXIPL in populations of Asian and Oceanian origin and also surveyed the prevalence of Q241H variant in populations worldwide. Multiple linear regression models based on 2373 individuals of Asian origin showed that the H allele was significantly associated with decreased concentrations of plasma triglycerides (P=0.0003). Direct genotyping of 1455 individuals from Africa, Asia and Oceania showed that the triglyceride-lowering H allele was found at quite low frequencies (0.00-0.16) in most of the populations examined. The exceptions were some Central Asian populations, including Mongolians, Tibetans and Uyghurs, which exhibited much higher frequencies of the H allele (0.21-0.26). The high prevalence of the H allele in Central Asia implies that the Q241H variant of MLXIPL might have been significant for utilization of carbohydrates and fats in the common ancestors of these populations, who successfully adapted to the environment of Central Asia by relying on nomadic livestock herding.

  1. CNVs analysis in a cohort of isolated and syndromic DD/ID reveals novel genomic disorders, position effects and candidate disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Riberi, Evelise; Belligni, Elga Fabia; Biamino, Elisa; Spielmann, Malte; Ala, Ugo; Calcia, Alessandro; Bagnasco, Irene; Carli, Diana; Gai, Giorgia; Giordano, Mara; Guala, Andrea; Keller, Roberto; Mandrile, Giorgia; Arduino, Carlo; Maffè, Antonella; Naretto, Valeria Giorgia; Sirchia, Fabio; Sorasio, Lorena; Ungari, Silvana; Zonta, Andrea; Zacchetti, Giulia; Talarico, Flavia; Pappi, Patrizia; Cavalieri, Simona; Giorgio, Elisa; Mancini, Cecilia; Ferrero, Marta; Brussino, Alessandro; Savin, Elisa; Gandione, Marina; Pelle, Alessandra; Giachino, Daniela Francesca; De Marchi, Mario; Restagno, Gabriella; Provero, Paolo; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Grosso, Enrico; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Pasini, Barbara; De Rubeis, Silvia; Brusco, Alfredo; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista

    2017-03-14

    Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a widely used technique to detect Copy Number Variants (CNVs) associated with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID). We performed a comprehensive array-CGH investigation of 1,015 consecutive cases with DD/ID and combined literature mining, genetic evidence, evolutionary constraint scores, and functional information in order to assess the pathogenicity of the CNVs. We identified non-benign CNVs in 29% of patients. Amongst the pathogenic variants (11%), detected with a yield consistent with the literature, we found rare genomic disorders and CNVs spanning known disease genes. We further identified and discussed 51 cases with likely pathogenic CNVs spanning novel candidate genes, including genes encoding synaptic components and/or proteins involved in corticogenesis. Additionally, we identified two deletions spanning potential Topological Associated Domain (TAD) boundaries likely affecting the regulatory landscape. In conclusion, we show how phenotypic and genetic analyses of array-CGH data allow unraveling complex cases, identifying rare disease genes, and revealing unexpected position effects.

  2. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variant C677T influences susceptibility to migraine with aura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundholm James

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C677T variant in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene is associated with increased levels of circulating homocysteine and is a mild risk factor for vascular disease. Migraine, with and without aura (MA and MO, is a prevalent and complex neurovascular disorder that may also be affected by genetically influenced hyperhomocysteinaemia. To determine whether the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene is associated with migraine susceptibility we utilised unrelated and family-based case-control study designs. Methods A total of 652 Caucasian migraine cases were investigated in this study. The MTHFR C677T variant was genotyped in 270 unrelated migraine cases and 270 controls as well as 382 affected subjects from 92 multiplex pedigrees. Results In the unrelated case-control sample we observed an over-representation of the 677T allele in migraine patients compared to controls, specifically for the MA subtype (40% vs. 33% (χ2 = 5.70, P = 0.017. The Armitage test for trend indicated a significant dosage effect of the risk allele (T for MA (χ2 = 5.72, P = 0.017. This linear trend was also present in the independent family-based sample (χ2 = 4.25, Padjusted = 0.039. Overall, our results indicate that the T/T genotype confers a modest, yet significant, increase in risk for the MA subtype (odds ratio: 2.0 – 2.5. No increased risk for the MO subtype was observed (P > 0.05. Conclusions In Caucasians, the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene influences susceptibility to MA, but not MO. Investigation into the enzyme activity of MTHFR and the role of homocysteine in the pathophysiology of migraine is warranted.

  3. Studies of metabolic phenotypic correlates of 15 obesity associated gene variants.

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    Camilla Helene Sandholt

    Full Text Available AIMS: Genome-wide association studies have identified novel BMI/obesity associated susceptibility loci. The purpose of this study is to determine associations with overweight, obesity, morbid obesity and/or general adiposity in a Danish population. Moreover, we want to investigate if these loci associate with type 2 diabetes and to elucidate potential underlying metabolic mechanisms. METHODS: 15 gene variants in 14 loci including TMEM18 (rs7561317, SH2B1 (rs7498665, KCTD15 (rs29941, NEGR1 (rs2568958, ETV5 (rs7647305, BDNF (rs4923461, rs925946, SEC16B (rs10913469, FAIM2 (rs7138803, GNPDA2 (rs10938397, MTCH2 (rs10838738, BAT2 (rs2260000, NPC1 (rs1805081, MAF (rs1424233, and PTER (rs10508503 were genotyped in 18,014 middle-aged Danes. RESULTS: Five of the 15 gene variants associated with overweight, obesity and/or morbid obesity. Per allele ORs ranged from 1.15-1.20 for overweight, 1.10-1.25 for obesity, and 1.41-1.46 for morbid obesity. Five of the 15 variants moreover associated with increased measures of adiposity. BDNF rs4923461 displayed a borderline BMI-dependent protective effect on type 2 diabetes (0.87 (0.78-0.96, p = 0.008, whereas SH2B1 rs7498665 associated with nominally BMI-independent increased risk of type 2 diabetes (1.16 (1.07-1.27, p = 7.8×10(-4. CONCLUSIONS: Associations with overweight and/or obesity and measures of obesity were confirmed for seven out of the 15 gene variants. The obesity risk allele of BDNF rs4923461 protected against type 2 diabetes, which could suggest neuronal and peripheral distinctive ways of actions for the protein. SH2B1 rs7498665 associated with type 2 diabetes independently of BMI.

  4. Transcript profiling of candidate genes in testis of pigs exhibiting large differences in androstenone levels

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    Oeth Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boar taint is an unpleasant odor and flavor of the meat and occurs in a high proportion of uncastrated male pigs. Androstenone, a steroid produced in testis and acting as a sex pheromone regulating reproductive function in female pigs, is one of the main compounds responsible for boar taint. The primary goal of the present investigation was to determine the differential gene expression of selected candidate genes related to levels of androstenone in pigs. Results Altogether 2560 boars from the Norwegian Landrace and Duroc populations were included in this study. Testicle samples from the 192 boars with most extreme high or low levels of androstenone in fat were used for RNA extraction, and 15 candidate genes were selected and analyzed by real-competitive PCR analysis. The genes Cytochrome P450 c17 (CYP17A1, Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR, Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C4 (AKR1C4, Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family member 4 (DHRS4, Ferritin light polypeptide (FTL, Sulfotransferase family 2A, dehydroepiandrosterone-preferring member 1 (SULT2A1, Cytochrome P450 subfamily XIA polypeptide 1 (CYP11A1, Cytochrome b5 (CYB5A, and 17-beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase IV (HSD17B4 were all found to be significantly (P CYP19A2 was down-regulated and progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1 was up-regulated in high-androstenone Duroc boars only, while CYP21 was significantly down-regulated (2.5 in high-androstenone Landrace only. The genes Nuclear Receptor co-activator 4 (NCOA4, Sphingomyrlin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B were not significantly differentially expressed in any breeds. Additionally, association studies were performed for the genes with one or more detected SNPs. Association between SNP and androstenone level was observed in CYB5A only, suggesting cis-regulation of the differential transcription in this gene. Conclusion A large pig material of

  5. Heat shock alters the expression of schizophrenia and autism candidate genes in an induced pluripotent stem cell model of the human telencephalon.

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    Mingyan Lin

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ and autism spectrum disorders (ASD are highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorders, although environmental factors, such as maternal immune activation (MIA, play a role as well. Cytokines mediate the effects of MIA on neurogenesis and behavior in animal models. However, MIA stimulators can also induce a febrile reaction, which could have independent effects on neurogenesis through heat shock (HS-regulated cellular stress pathways. However, this has not been well-studied. To help understand the role of fever in MIA, we used a recently described model of human brain development in which induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs differentiate into 3-dimensional neuronal aggregates that resemble a first trimester telencephalon. RNA-seq was carried out on aggregates that were heat shocked at 39°C for 24 hours, along with their control partners maintained at 37°C. 186 genes showed significant differences in expression following HS (p<0.05, including known HS-inducible genes, as expected, as well as those coding for NGFR and a number of SZ and ASD candidates, including SMARCA2, DPP10, ARNT2, AHI1 and ZNF804A. The degree to which the expression of these genes decrease or increase during HS is similar to that found in copy loss and copy gain copy number variants (CNVs, although the effects of HS are likely to be transient. The dramatic effect on the expression of some SZ and ASD genes places HS, and perhaps other cellular stressors, into a common conceptual framework with disease-causing genetic variants. The findings also suggest that some candidate genes that are assumed to have a relatively limited impact on SZ and ASD pathogenesis based on a small number of positive genetic findings, such as SMARCA2 and ARNT2, may in fact have a much more substantial role in these disorders - as targets of common environmental stressors.

  6. A candidate gene association study of bone mineral density in an Iranian population.

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    Seyed Alireza Dastgheib

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The genetic epidemiology of variation in bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporosis is not well studied in Iranian populations and needs more research. We report a candidate gene association study of BMD variation in a healthy cross sectional study of 501 males and females sampled from the IMOS study Shiraz, Iran. We selected to study the association with 21 SNPs located in the 7 candidate genes LRP5, RANK, RANKL, OPG, P2RX7, VDR and ESR1. BMD was measured at the three sites L2-L4, neck of femur and total hip. Association between BMD and each SNP was assessed using multiple linear regression assuming an allele dose (additive effect on BMD (adjusted for age and sex. Statistically significant (at the unadjusted 5% level associations were seen with 7 SNPs in 5 of the candidate genes. Two SNPs showed statistically significant association with more than one BMD site. Significant association was seen between BMD at all three sites with the VDR SNP rs731246 (L2-L4 p=0.038; neck of femur p=0.001 and total hip p<0.001. The T allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the C allele. Significant association was also seen for the P2RX7 SNP rs3751143 where the G allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the T allele, (L2-L4 p=0.069; neck of femur p=0.024, total hip p=0.045.

  7. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  8. Rrp1b, a new candidate susceptibility gene for breast cancer progression and metastasis.

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    Nigel P S Crawford

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel candidate metastasis modifier, ribosomal RNA processing 1 homolog B (Rrp1b, was identified through two independent approaches. First, yeast two-hybrid, immunoprecipitation, and functional assays demonstrated a physical and functional interaction between Rrp1b and the previous identified metastasis modifier Sipa1. In parallel, using mouse and human metastasis gene expression data it was observed that extracellular matrix (ECM genes are common components of metastasis predictive signatures, suggesting that ECM genes are either important markers or causal factors in metastasis. To investigate the relationship between ECM genes and poor prognosis in breast cancer, expression quantitative trait locus analysis of polyoma middle-T transgene-induced mammary tumor was performed. ECM gene expression was found to be consistently associated with Rrp1b expression. In vitro expression of Rrp1b significantly altered ECM gene expression, tumor growth, and dissemination in metastasis assays. Furthermore, a gene signature induced by ectopic expression of Rrp1b in tumor cells predicted survival in a human breast cancer gene expression dataset. Finally, constitutional polymorphism within RRP1B was found to be significantly associated with tumor progression in two independent breast cancer cohorts. These data suggest that RRP1B may be a novel susceptibility gene for breast cancer progression and metastasis.

  9. Lack of evidence of WNT3A as a candidate gene for congenital vertebral malformations

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    Jacobsen F Stig

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior investigations have not identified a major locus for vertebral malformations, providing evidence that there is genetic heterogeneity for this condition. WNT3A has recently been identified as a negative regulator of Notch signaling and somitogenesis. Mice with mutations in Wnt3a develop caudal vertebral malformations. Because congenital vertebral malformations represent a sporadic occurrence, linkage approaches to identify genes associated with human vertebral development are not feasible. We hypothesized that WNT3A mutations might account for a subset of congenital vertebral malformations. Methods A pilot study was performed using a cohort of patients with congenital vertebral malformations spanning the entire vertebral column was characterized. DNA sequence analysis of the WNT3A gene in these 50 patients with congenital vertebral malformations was performed. Results A female patient of African ancestry with congenital scoliosis and a T12-L1 hemivertebrae was found to be heterozygous for a missense variant resulting in the substitution of alanine by threonine at codon 134 in highly conserved exon 3 of the WNT3A gene. This variant was found at a very low prevalence (0.35% in a control population of 443 anonymized subjects and 1.1% in an African population. Conclusion These data suggest that WNT3A does not contribute towards the development of congenital vertebral malformations. Factors such as phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity may underlie our inability to detect mutations in WNT3A in our patient sample.

  10. Acromegaly Is More Severe in Patients With AHR or AIP Gene Variants Living in Highly Polluted Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavo, S; Ragonese, M; Puglisi, S; Romeo, P D; Torre, M L; Alibrandi, A; Scaroni, C; Occhi, G; Ceccato, F; Regazzo, D; De Menis, E; Sartorato, P; Arnaldi, G; Trementino, L; Trimarchi, F; Ferrau, F

    2016-04-01

    In this multicentric study, we aimed to correlate the occurrence of AHR and/or AIP. genes variants in acromegalic patients with the disease severity and/or with the response to somatostatin analogs (SSa) treatment, according to pollution exposition.

  11. [Genetic background in common forms of obesity - from studies on identical twins to candidate genes of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendlová, Běla; Lukášová, Petra; Vaňková, Markéta; Vejražková, Daniela; Bradnová, Olga; Včelák, Josef; Stanická, Soňa; Zamrazilová, Hana; Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Dušátková, Lenka; Kunešová, Marie; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    Common obesity is a result of interaction between genes and environmental/lifestyle factors, with heritability estimates 40-70%. Not only the susceptibility to obesity but also the success of weight management depends on the genetic background of each individual. This paper summarizes the up-to-date knowledge on genetic causes of common obesities. Introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to an identification of a total of 32 variants associated with obesity/BMI and 14 with body fat distribution. Further, a great progress in revealing the mechanisms regulating the energy balance was also noted. However, the proportion of explained variance for BMI is still low, suggesting other mechanisms such as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, rare gene variants, copy number variants polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications and microRNAs regulating gene transcription. In summary, we present results of our studies on obesity risk variants in Czech adults, children and adolescents including those evaluating the influence of selected gene variants on the outcomes of weight management.

  12. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E. [Queen Charlotte`s and Chelsea Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes on HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.

  13. Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 gene variants affect idiopathic recurrent miscarriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Singh, Bharti; Mishra, Aditi; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2016-12-01

    Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 genes are considered as a crucial player in the determination of inflammatory responses; genetic variability in these may modulate the risk for idiopathic recurrent miscarriages (IRM). We investigated the association of functional variants of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) with IRM cases. We recruited 200 IRM women with a history of at least three consecutive pregnancy losses before 20th week of pregnancy and 300 fertile control women. Determination of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) gene variants were based on the polymerase chain reaction pursued by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and validated with Sanger sequencing. Single marker analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) model used to predict the IRM risk. We observed nearly three- to twofold increased risk in single marker analysis for minor homozygous genotypes of rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G tag-SNPs in IRM cases, suggesting the risk association. In MDR analysis, we observed 10.5-fold augmented risk among IRM women in three-SNP model (rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G). The eQTL mapping analyses was performed to strengthen the results of our study. The eQTL mapping analysis revealed that the variations in CD28 and NFKB1 gene content might affect the abundance of transcripts of CD28 and Family with sequence similarity 177 member A1 (FAM177A1) genes, respectively. These results suggest that CD28 and NFKB1 gene variants may be associated with increased risks to IRM.

  14. Novel variants of the 5S rRNA genes in Eruca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K; Bhatia, S; Lakshmikumaran, M

    1994-02-01

    The 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of Eruca sativa were cloned and characterized. They are organized into clusters of tandemly repeated units. Each repeat unit consists of a 119-bp coding region followed by a noncoding spacer region that separates it from the coding region of the next repeat unit. Our study reports novel gene variants of the 5S rRNA genes in plants. Two families of the 5S rDNA, the 0.5-kb size family and the 1-kb size family, coexist in the E. sativa genome. The 0.5-kb size family consists of the 5S rRNA genes (S4) that have coding regions similar to those of other reported plant 5S rDNA sequences, whereas the 1-kb size family consists of the 5S rRNA gene variants (S1) that exist as 1-kb BamHI tandem repeats. S1 is made up of two variant units (V1 and V2) of 5S rDNA where the BamHI site between the two units is mutated. Sequence heterogeneity among S4, V1, and V2 units exists throughout the sequence and is not limited to the noncoding spacer region only. The coding regions of V1 and V2 show approximately 20% dissimilarity to the coding regions of S4 and other reported plant 5S rDNA sequences. Such a large variation in the coding regions of the 5S rDNA units within the same plant species has been observed for the first time. Restriction site variation is observed between the two size classes of 5S rDNA in E. sativa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Screening for candidate genes related to breast cancer with cDNA microarray analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Juan Xiang; Zhi-Gang Yu; Ming-Ming Guo; Qin-Ye Fu; Zhong-Bing Ma; De-Zong Gao; Qiang Zhang; Yu-Yang Li; Liang Li; Lu Liu; Chun-Miao Ye

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to reveal the exact changes during the occurrence of breast cancer to explore significant new and promising genes or factors related to this disease. Methods: We compared the gene expression profiles of breast cancer tissues with its uninvolved normal breast tissues as controls using the cDNA microarray analysis in seven breast cancer patients. Further, one representative gene, named IFI30, was quanti-tatively analyzed by real-time PCR to confirm the result of the cDNA microarray analysis. Results: A total of 427 genes were identified with significantly differential expression, 221 genes were up-regulated and 206 genes were down-regulated. And the result of cDNA microarray analysis was validated by detection of IFI30 mRNA level changes by real-time PCR. Genes for cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell division, mitosis, apoptosis, and immune response were enriched in the up-regulated genes, while genes for cell adhesion, proteolysis, and transport were significantly enriched in the down-regulated genes in breast cancer tissues compared with normal breast tissues by a gene ontology analysis. Conclusion: Our present study revealed a range of differentially expressed genes between breast cancer tissues and normal breast tissues, and provide candidate genes for further study focusing on the pathogenesis and new biomarkers for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  16. ANALYSIS OF POLYMORPHIC VARIANTS OF CYTOKINE GENES IN PATIENTS WITH HIV INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sukhalentseva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A distribution mode for allelic variants of cytokine genes was evaluated in 184 patients with slow viral infections, including 97 patients with chronic herpetic infection and 87 HIV-infected patients. Using modern methods of immunogenetics, we have found that relative risks of recurrent course and poor outcome of infection are positively associated with AA promoter region genotype and AA promoter genotype of +874 A/T polymorphism in the IFNG gene. Immunogenetic factors associated with protective effect in slow virus infections, include G allele of TNFA gene (G-308A SNP, and T allele/TT genotype of promoter region in  the IFNG gene (+874 A/T SNP. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 79-82

  17. 'A variant of uncertain significance' and the proliferation of human disease gene databases

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    Nelson David R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapid accumulation of mutation data has led to the creation of nearly 300 locus-specific mutation databases. These sites may contain a few dozen to almost 20,000 mutations for a given gene. Many of the mutations are uncharacterised and have no known effects on the gene product, the 'variant of uncertain significance'. Here, the statistics of mutation distribution are examined for six different gene databases: BRCA1 and BRCA2, haemoglobin-beta (HBB, HPRT1, CFTR and TP53. The percentage of all possible point mutations for a protein (the mutation space is calculated for each gene and the question 'How much mutation data is enough?' is raised.

  18. Identification of microdeletions in candidate genes for cleft lip and/or palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Min; Mostowska, Adrianna; Jugessur, Astanand

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies are now used routinely to identify genes implicated in complex traits. The panels used for such analyses can detect single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants, both of which may help to identify small deleted regions of the genome that may...... for deletion detection. Apparent Mendelian inconsistencies between parents and children suggested deletion events in 15 individuals in 11 genomic regions. We confirmed deletions involving CYP1B1, FGF10, SP8, SUMO1, TBX1, TFAP2A, and UGT7A1, including both de novo and familial cases. Deletions of SUMO1, TBX1...

  19. High-throughput testing of terpenoid biosynthesis candidate genes using transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Søren Spanner; Bassard, Jean-Étienne André; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan;

    2014-01-01

    To respond to the rapidly growing number of genes putatively involved in terpenoid metabolism, a robust high-throughput platform for functional testing is needed. An in planta expression system offers several advantages such as the capacity to produce correctly folded and active enzymes localized...... describe an expression platform for rapid testing of candidate terpenoid biosynthetic genes based on Agrobacterium mediated gene expression in N. benthamiana leaves. Simultaneous expression of multiple genes is facilitated by co-infiltration of leaves with several engineered Agrobacterium strains, possibly...... making this the fastest and most convenient system for the assembly of plant terpenoid biosynthetic routes. Tools for cloning of expression plasmids, N. benthamiana culturing, Agrobacterium preparation, leaf infiltration, metabolite extraction, and automated GC-MS data mining are provided. With all steps...

  20. The variant rs1867277 in FOXE1 gene confers thyroid cancer susceptibility through the recruitment of USF1/USF2 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Iñigo; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Schiavi, Francesca; Leskelä, Susanna; Pita, Guillermo; Milne, Roger; Maravall, Javier; Ramos, Ignacio; Andía, Víctor; Rodríguez-Poyo, Paloma; Jara-Albarrán, Antonino; Meoro, Amparo; del Peso, Cristina; Arribas, Luis; Iglesias, Pedro; Caballero, Javier; Serrano, Joaquín; Picó, Antonio; Pomares, Francisco; Giménez, Gabriel; López-Mondéjar, Pedro; Castello, Roberto; Merante-Boschin, Isabella; Pelizzo, Maria-Rosa; Mauricio, Didac; Opocher, Giuseppe; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; González-Neira, Anna; Matías-Guiu, Xavier; Santisteban, Pilar; Robledo, Mercedes

    2009-09-01

    In order to identify genetic factors related to thyroid cancer susceptibility, we adopted a candidate gene approach. We studied tag- and putative functional SNPs in genes involved in thyroid cell differentiation and proliferation, and in genes found to be differentially expressed in thyroid carcinoma. A total of 768 SNPs in 97 genes were genotyped in a Spanish series of 615 cases and 525 controls, the former comprising the largest collection of patients with this pathology from a single population studied to date. SNPs in an LD block spanning the entire FOXE1 gene showed the strongest evidence of association with papillary thyroid carcinoma susceptibility. This association was validated in a second stage of the study that included an independent Italian series of 482 patients and 532 controls. The strongest association results were observed for rs1867277 (OR[per-allele] = 1.49; 95%CI = 1.30-1.70; P = 5.9x10(-9)). Functional assays of rs1867277 (NM_004473.3:c.-283G>A) within the FOXE1 5' UTR suggested that this variant affects FOXE1 transcription. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that, exclusively, the sequence containing the A allele recruited the USF1/USF2 transcription factors, while both alleles formed a complex in which DREAM/CREB/alphaCREM participated. Transfection studies showed an allele-dependent transcriptional regulation of FOXE1. We propose a FOXE1 regulation model dependent on the rs1867277 genotype, indicating that this SNP is a causal variant in thyroid cancer susceptibility. Our results constitute the first functional explanation for an association identified by a GWAS and thereby elucidate a mechanism of thyroid cancer susceptibility. They also attest to the efficacy of candidate gene approaches in the GWAS era.

  1. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Menggen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. Results A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Conclusion Enriched background of transcription abundance

  2. Rare missense variants within a single gene form yin yang haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, David

    2016-01-01

    Yin yang haplotype pairs differ at every SNP. They would not be accounted for by population models that incorporate sequential mutation, with or without recombination. Previous reports have claimed that there is a tendency for common SNPs to form yin yang haplotypes more often than would be expected by sequential mutation or by a random sample of all possible haplotypic arrangements of alleles. In the course of analysing next-generation sequencing data, instances of yin yang haplotypes being formed by very rare variants within a single gene were observed. As an example, this report describes a completely yin yang haplotype formed by eight rare missense variants in the ABCA13 gene. Of 1000 genome subjects, 21 have a copy of the alternate allele at all eight of these positions and a single subject is homozygous for all of them. None of the other 1070 subjects possesses any of the altetrnates. Thus, the eight alternate alleles are always found together and never occur separately. The existence of such yin yang haplotypes has important implications for statistical methods for analysing rare variants. Also, they may be of use for gaining a better understanding of the history of human populations.

  3. Cloning and Characterization of Multiple RNA Splicing Variants of LDH-C Gene in Human and Rat

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    Qinglian Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of LDH-C (Lactate dehydrogenase C gene is restricted in mature germ cells; however multiple splice variants of LDH-C expressed in human cancers and yak normal testes were reported recently. In order to know if there are any LDH-C splice variants in human normal testes, we set out to clone the putative variants in human and rat. Four splicing variants in human testes, 1 splicing variant in human spermatozoa, 6 splicing variants in rat testes and 1 splicing variant in rat non-testes tissues (liver, heart and muscle were cloned. The putative polypeptides encoded by these variants were compared with the full-length LDH-C protein, the results showed that these putative polypeptides were truncated LDH-C proteins or truncated LDH-C proteins with a few amino acid residues different at N or C terminal. This suggested that these variants are possibly not used for translation, but targets of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Western blotting did not detect any bands with similar molecular weight as the putative polypeptides. RT-PCR showed that the expression levels of the splicing variants were significant during development of rat testes. The results indicate that LDH-C was not silenced by transcriptional repression in non-mature germ cells, but significantly transcripted and alternatively spliced.

  4. Association of Variants in Genes Related to the Immune Response and Obesity with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in CLUE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, David S.; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Isaacs, William B.; Smith, Michael W.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic inflammation and obesity may contribute to the genesis or progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and BPH-associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The influence of variants in genes related to these states on BPH has not been studied extensively. Thus, we evaluated the association of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes (IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL10, TNF, CRP, TLR4, RNASEL) and genes involved in obesity, including insulin regulation (LEP, ADIPOQ, PPARG, TCF7L2), with BPH. METHODS BPH cases (N=568) and age-frequency matched controls (N=568) were selected from among adult male CLUE II cohort participants who responded in 2000 to a mailed questionnaire. BPH was defined as BPH surgery, use of BPH medications, or symptomatic BPH (American Urological Association Symptom Index Score ≥15). Controls were men who had not had BPH surgery, did not use BPH medications, and whose symptom score was ≤7. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS None of the candidate SNPs was statistically significantly associated with BPH. However, we could not rule out possible weak associations for CRP rs1205 (1082C>T), ADIPOQ rs1501299 (276C>A), PPARG rs1801282 (-49C>G), and TCF7L2 rs7903146 (47833T>C). After summing risk alleles, men with ≥4 had an increased BPH risk compared with those with ≤1 (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.10-2.89; Ptrend=0.006). CONCLUSION SNPs in genes related to immune response and obesity, especially in combination, may be associated with BPH. PMID:25224558

  5. Genome-Wide microRNA Binding Site Variation between Extinct Wild Aurochs and Modern Cattle Identifies Candidate microRNA-Regulated Domestication Genes

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    Braud, Martin; Magee, David A.; Park, Stephen D. E.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Waters, Sinead M.; MacHugh, David E.; Spillane, Charles

    2017-01-01

    The domestication of cattle from the now-extinct wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) involved selection for physiological and behavioral traits, with underlying genetic factors that remain largely unknown. Non-coding microRNAs have emerged as key regulators of the spatio-temporal expression of target genes controlling mammalian growth and development, including in livestock species. During the domestication process, selection of mutational changes in miRNAs and/or miRNA binding sites could have provided a mechanism to generate some of the traits that differentiate domesticated cattle from wild aurochs. To investigate this, we analyzed the open reading frame DNA sequence of 19,994 orthologous protein-coding gene pairs from extant Bos taurus genomes and a single extinct B. primigenius genome. We identified miRNA binding site polymorphisms in the 3′ UTRs of 1,620 of these orthologous genes. These 1,620 genes with altered miRNA binding sites between the B. taurus and B. primigenius lineages represent candidate domestication genes. Using a novel Score Site ratio metric we have ranked these miRNA-regulated genes according to the extent of divergence between miRNA binding site presence, frequency and copy number between the orthologous genes from B. taurus and B. primigenius. This provides an unbiased approach to identify cattle genes that have undergone the most changes in miRNA binding (i.e., regulation) between the wild aurochs and modern-day cattle breeds. In addition, we demonstrate that these 1,620 candidate domestication genes are enriched for roles in pigmentation, fertility, neurobiology, metabolism, immunity and production traits (including milk quality and feed efficiency). Our findings suggest that directional selection of miRNA regulatory variants was important in the domestication and subsequent artificial selection that gave rise to modern taurine cattle. PMID:28197171

  6. Candidate genes revealed by a genome scan for mosquito resistance to a bacterial insecticide: sequence and gene expression variations

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    David Jean-Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scans are becoming an increasingly popular approach to study the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation, but on their own, they are often helpless at identifying the specific gene(s or mutation(s targeted by selection. This shortcoming is hopefully bound to disappear in the near future, thanks to the wealth of new genomic resources that are currently being developed for many species. In this article, we provide a foretaste of this exciting new era by conducting a genome scan in the mosquito Aedes aegypti with the aim to look for candidate genes involved in resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti insecticidal toxins. Results The genome of a Bti-resistant and a Bti-susceptible strains was surveyed using about 500 MITE-based molecular markers, and the loci showing the highest inter-strain genetic differentiation were sequenced and mapped on the Aedes aegypti genome sequence. Several good candidate genes for Bti-resistance were identified in the vicinity of these highly differentiated markers. Two of them, coding for a cadherin and a leucine aminopeptidase, were further examined at the sequence and gene expression levels. In the resistant strain, the cadherin gene displayed patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms consistent with the action of positive selection (e.g. an excess of high compared to intermediate frequency mutations, as well as a significant under-expression compared to the susceptible strain. Conclusion Both sequence and gene expression analyses agree to suggest a role for positive selection in the evolution of this cadherin gene in the resistant strain. However, it is unlikely that resistance to Bti is conferred by this gene alone, and further investigation will be needed to characterize other genes significantly associated with Bti resistance in Ae. aegypti. Beyond these results, this article illustrates how genome scans can build on the body of new genomic information (here, full

  7. Candidate gene analysis of GH1 for effects on growth and carcass composition of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J F; Coutinho, L L; Herring, K L; Gallagher, D S; Brenneman, R A; Burney, N; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Smith, S B; Miller, R K; Savell, J W; Davis, S K

    1998-06-01

    We present an approach to evaluate the support for candidate genes as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) within the context of genome-wide map-based cloning strategies. To establish candidacy, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing a putative candidate gene is physically assigned to an anchored linkage map to localise the gene relative to an identified QTL effect. Microsatellite loci derived from BAC clones containing an established candidate gene are integrated into the linkage map facilitating the evaluation by interval analysis of the statistical support for QTL identity. Permutation analysis is employed to determine experiment-wise statistical support. The approach is illustrated for the growth hormone 1 (GH1) gene and growth and carcass phenotypes in cattle. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers which amplify a 441 bp fragment of GH1 were used to systematically screen a bovine BAC library comprising 60,000 clones and with a 95% probability of containing a single copy sequence. The presence of GH1 in BAC-110R2C3 was confirmed by sequence analysis of the PCR product from this clone and by the physical assignment of BAC110R2C3 to bovine chromosome 19 (BTA19) band 22 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Microsatellite KHGH1 was isolated from BAC110R2C3 and scored in 529 reciprocal backcross and F2 fullsib progeny from 41 resource families derived from Angus (Bos taurus) and Brahman (Bos indicus). The microsatellite KHGH1 was incorporated into a framework genetic map of BTA19 comprising 12 microsatellite loci, the erythrocyte antigen T and a GH1-TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Interval analysis localised effects of taurus vs. indicus alleles on subcutaneous fat and the percentage of either extractable fat from the Iongissimus dorsi muscle to the region of BTA19 harbouring GH1.

  8. Sequence analysis of candidate genes in two Roma families with severe tooth agenesis

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    Gabriková Dana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective tooth agenesis is the most common congenital disorder affecting the formation of dentition in humans. Both its forms (hypodontia and more severe oligodontia can be found either in isolated form and they can be associated with systemic condition (syndromic tooth agenesis. In addition to previously known genes (PAX9, MSX1 and AXIN2 mutations in EDA, EDARADD and WNT10 gene were recently found to be involved in isolated forms of tooth agenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of affected members in two large families of Roma origin segregating severe isolated tooth agenesis with very variable phenotype and to perform mutation analysis of seven genes with aim to find causal mutation. 26 family members were clinically examined and coding regions of seven genes (MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were sequenced. With exclusion of third molars, average number of missing teeth was 8.2 ± 4.9 in family 1 and 7.1 ± 2.3 in family 2. The most frequently missing teeth were maxillary lateral incisors and first premolars and mandibular central incisors. Sequencing revealed four potentially damaging variants (g.Ala40Gly in MSX1, g.Ala240Pro in PAX9, g.Pro50Ser in AXIN2 and g.Met9Ile in EDARADD; however, none of them was present in all affected family members. Variable phenotype in both families examined in this study is in favour of heterogeneous genetic cause of tooth agenesis in these families: possible interaction of several defected genes, sequence variants in regulatory regions and additional environmental factors is assumed.

  9. Characterization of candidate genes in inflammatory bowel disease–associated risk loci

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    Peloquin, Joanna M.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Newberry, Rodney D.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Yajnik, Vijay; Lira, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    GWAS have linked SNPs to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but a systematic characterization of disease-associated genes has been lacking. Prior studies utilized microarrays that did not capture many genes encoded within risk loci or defined expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) using peripheral blood, which is not the target tissue in IBD. To address these gaps, we sought to characterize the expression of IBD-associated risk genes in disease-relevant tissues and in the setting of active IBD. Terminal ileal (TI) and colonic mucosal tissues were obtained from patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and from healthy controls. We developed a NanoString code set to profile 678 genes within IBD risk loci. A subset of patients and controls were genotyped for IBD-associated risk SNPs. Analyses included differential expression and variance analysis, weighted gene coexpression network analysis, and eQTL analysis. We identified 116 genes that discriminate between healthy TI and colon samples and uncovered patterns in variance of gene expression that highlight heterogeneity of disease. We identified 107 coexpressed gene pairs for which transcriptional regulation is either conserved or reversed in an inflammation-independent or -dependent manner. We demonstrate that on average approximately 60% of disease-associated genes are differentially expressed in inflamed tissue. Last, we identified eQTLs with either genotype-only effects on expression or an interaction effect between genotype and inflammation. Our data reinforce tissue specificity of expression in disease-associated candidate genes, highlight genes and gene pairs that are regulated in disease-relevant tissue and inflammation, and provide a foundation to advance the understanding of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27668286

  10. Analysis of non-synonymous-coding variants of Parkinson's disease-related pathogenic and susceptibility genes in East Asian populations.

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    Foo, Jia Nee; Tan, Louis C; Liany, Herty; Koh, Tat Hung; Irwan, Ishak D; Ng, Yen Yek; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Au, Wing-Lok; Aung, Tin; Chan, Anne Y Y; Chong, Siow-Ann; Chung, Sun Ju; Jung, Yusun; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Kim, Juyeon; Lee, Jimmy; Lim, Shen-Yang; Mok, Vincent; Prakash, Kumar-M; Song, Kyuyoung; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tan, Eng-King; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the contribution of non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and genome-wide association studies (GWAS)-linked genes for Parkinson's disease (PD) to PD risk in the East Asian population, we sequenced all the coding exons of 39 PD-related disease genes and evaluated the accumulation of rare non-synonymous-coding variants in 375 early-onset PD cases and 399 controls. We also genotyped 782 non-synonymous-coding variants of these genes in 710 late-onset PD cases and 9046 population controls. Significant enrichment of LRRK2 variants was observed in both early- and late-onset PD (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval = 1.29-1.93; P = 8.05 × 10(-6)). Moderate enrichment was also observed in FGF20, MCCC1, GBA and ITGA8. Half of the rare variants anticipated to cause loss of function of these genes were present in healthy controls. Overall, non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and GWAS-linked genes appear to make a limited contribution to PD risk, suggesting that clinical sequencing of these genes will provide limited information for risk prediction and molecular diagnosis.

  11. Predicting the Pathogenic Potential of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Variants Identified in Clinical Genetic Testing

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    Clare Brookes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Missense variants are very commonly detected when screening for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes lead to an increased risk of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and/or pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess the predictive capability of in silico programmes and mutation databases in assisting diagnostic laboratories to determine the pathogenicity of sequence-detectable mutations. Methods: Between July 2011 and April 2013, an analysis was undertaken of 13 missense BRCA gene variants that had been detected in patients referred to the Genetic Health Services New Zealand (Northern Hub for BRCA gene analysis. The analysis involved the use of 13 in silico protein prediction programmes, two in silico transcript analysis programmes and the examination of three BRCA gene databases. Results: In most of the variants, the analysis showed different in silico interpretations. This illustrates the interpretation challenges faced by diagnostic laboratories. Conclusion: Unfortunately, when using online mutation databases and carrying out in silico analyses, there is significant discordance in the classification of some missense variants in the BRCA genes. This discordance leads to complexities in interpreting and reporting these variants in a clinical context. The authors have developed a simple procedure for analysing variants; however, those of unknown significance largely remain unknown. As a consequence, the clinical value of some reports may be negligible.

  12. Association analysis of SCN9A gene variants with borderline personality disorder.

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    Tadić, André; Baskaya, Omur; Victor, Anja; Lieb, Klaus; Höppner, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious psychiatric disorder affecting about 1-2% of the general population. Key features of BPD are emotional instability, strong impulsivity, repeated self-injurious behavior (SIB) and dissociation. In the etiology of BPD and its predominant symptoms, genetic factors have been suggested. The voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 is expressed in sensory neurons and in the hippocampus, a key region of the limbic system probably dysfunctional in BPD and dissociative disorders. The alpha-subunit of Nav1.7 is encoded by the SCN9A gene on chromosome 2 and variations of SCN9A can lead to complete inability to sense pain. The aim of the present study was to test for associations between SCN9A gene variants and BPD as well as BPD-related phenotypes. We genotyped ten tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the SCN9A gene in 161 well-defined Caucasian BPD patients and 156 healthy controls. We found no globally significant association of SCN9A markers with BPD at level 5%. However, in the female and in the male subsample, different SCN9A markers and individual haplotypes showed uncorrected p-valuesSCN9A markers and dissociative symptoms. Although our results were largely negative, replication studies in an independent sample are warranted to follow up on the potential role of SCN9A gene variants in BPD and dissociative symptoms, paying special attention to a possible gender different etiology.

  13. Variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor genes in type 2 diabetes and related metabolic abnormalities.

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    de Lorenzo, Carlo; Greco, Annalisa; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Hribal, Marta Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance and related traits are likely to be caused by abnormalities in the genes encoding for proteins involved in the composite network of insulin-signaling; in this review we have focused our attention on genetic variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor molecules. These proteins interfere with different steps in insulin-signaling: ENPP1/PC-1 and the phosphatases PTP1B and PTPRF/LAR inhibit the insulin receptor activation; INPPL1/SHIP-2 hydrolyzes PI3-kinase products, hampering the phosphoinositide-mediated downstream signaling; and TRIB3 binds the serine-threonine kinase Akt, reducing its phosphorylation levels. While several variants have been described over the years for all these genes, solid evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes and related diseases seems to exist only for rs1044498 of the ENPP1 gene and for rs2295490 of the TRIB3 gene. However, overall the data recapitulated in this Review article may supply useful elements to interpret the results of novel, more technically advanced genetic studies; indeed it is becoming increasingly evident that genetic information on metabolic diseases should be interpreted taking into account the complex biological pathways underlying their pathogenesis.

  14. Variants of Insulin-Signaling Inhibitor Genes in Type 2 Diabetes and Related Metabolic Abnormalities

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    Carlo de Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance and related traits are likely to be caused by abnormalities in the genes encoding for proteins involved in the composite network of insulin-signaling; in this review we have focused our attention on genetic variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor molecules. These proteins interfere with different steps in insulin-signaling: ENPP1/PC-1 and the phosphatases PTP1B and PTPRF/LAR inhibit the insulin receptor activation; INPPL1/SHIP-2 hydrolyzes PI3-kinase products, hampering the phosphoinositide-mediated downstream signaling; and TRIB3 binds the serine-threonine kinase Akt, reducing its phosphorylation levels. While several variants have been described over the years for all these genes, solid evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes and related diseases seems to exist only for rs1044498 of the ENPP1 gene and for rs2295490 of the TRIB3 gene. However, overall the data recapitulated in this Review article may supply useful elements to interpret the results of novel, more technically advanced genetic studies; indeed it is becoming increasingly evident that genetic information on metabolic diseases should be interpreted taking into account the complex biological pathways underlying their pathogenesis.

  15. Asthma families show transmission disequilibrium of gene variants in the vitamin D metabolism and signalling pathway

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    Bahnweg Margret

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The vitamin D prophylaxis of rickets in pregnant women and newborns may play a role in early allergic sensitization. We now asked if an already diseased population may have inherited genetic variants in the vitamin D turnover or signalling pathway. Serum levels of calcidiol (25-OH-D3 and calcitriol (1,25-(OH2-D3 were retrospectively assessed in 872 partipants of the German Asthma Family Study. 96 DNA single base variants in 13 different genes were genotyped with MALDI-TOF and a bead array system. At least one positive SNP with a TDT of p Genetic analysis of biological pathways seem to be a promising approach where this may be a first entry point into effects of a polygenic inherited vitamin D sensitivity that may affect also other metabolic, immunological and cancerous diseases.

  16. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

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    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  17. Marked increase in biofilm-derived rough pneumococcal variants and rifampin-resistant strains not due to hex gene mutations.

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    McEllistrem, M Catherine; Scott, Jennifer R; Zuniga-Castillo, Jacobo; Khan, Saleem A

    2009-06-01

    Otitis, pneumonia, and meningitis are tissue-based pneumococcal infections that can be associated with biofilms. The emergence of phenotypic rough variants, also known as acapsular small-colony variants, is essential for pneumococcal biofilm formation. These rough variants can increase nearly 100-fold in biofilms over time and can arise through single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions, or tandem duplications in the first gene of the capsular operon, cps3D. We detected a 100-fold increase in rifampin-resistant (Rif(r)) mutants in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures using a nonvaccine serotype 3 strain, which is causing an increasing number of cases of otitis in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Since both rough variants and Rif(r) strains can arise through SNPs, they could emerge due to alteration of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. The Hex system, a pneumococcal MMR system, repairs mismatches during replication and transformation. In this study, no mutations were detected in the hexAB gene sequences among several rough variants with unique mutations in the cps3D gene. Within a hexA null mutant grown in broth, we detected only a 17.5-fold increase in rough variants compared to the wild-type parental strain. Taken together, these data suggest that mutations in the hex genes and modulation of hexA activity are unlikely to account for the generation of biofilm-derived rough variants.

  18. A genetic signature of spina bifida risk from pathway-informed comprehensive gene-variant analysis.

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    Nicholas J Marini

    Full Text Available Despite compelling epidemiological evidence that folic acid supplements reduce the frequency of neural tube defects (NTDs in newborns, common variant association studies with folate metabolism genes have failed to explain the majority of NTD risk. The contribution of rare alleles as well as genetic interactions within the folate pathway have not been extensively studied in the context of NTDs. Thus, we sequenced the exons in 31 folate-related genes in a 480-member NTD case-control population to identify the full spectrum of allelic variation and determine whether rare alleles or obvious genetic interactions within this pathway affect NTD risk. We constructed a pathway model, predetermined independent of the data, which grouped genes into coherent sets reflecting the distinct metabolic compartments in the folate/one-carbon pathway (purine synthesis, pyrimidine synthesis, and homocysteine recycling to methionine. By integrating multiple variants based on these groupings, we uncovered two provocative, complex genetic risk signatures. Interestingly, these signatures differed by race/ethnicity: a Hispanic risk profile pointed to alterations in purine biosynthesis, whereas that in non-Hispanic whites implicated homocysteine metabolism. In contrast, parallel analyses that focused on individual alleles, or individual genes, as the units by which to assign risk revealed no compelling associations. These results suggest that the ability to layer pathway relationships onto clinical variant data can be uniquely informative for identifying genetic risk as well as for generating mechanistic hypotheses. Furthermore, the identification of ethnic-specific risk signatures for spina bifida resonated with epidemiological data suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis may differ between Hispanic and non-Hispanic groups.

  19. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

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    Dorota M Nowak

    Full Text Available Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  20. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Dorota M; Gajecka, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  1. Expression variants of the lipogenic AGPAT6 gene affect diverse milk composition phenotypes in Bos taurus.

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    Mathew D Littlejohn

    Full Text Available Milk is composed of a complex mixture of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and various vitamins and minerals as a source of nutrition for young mammals. The composition of milk varies between individuals, with lipid composition in particular being highly heritable. Recent reports have highlighted a region of bovine chromosome 27 harbouring variants affecting milk fat percentage and fatty acid content. We aimed to further investigate this locus in two independent cattle populations, consisting of a Holstein-Friesian x Jersey crossbreed pedigree of 711 F2 cows, and a collection of 32,530 mixed ancestry Bos taurus cows. Bayesian genome-wide association mapping using markers imputed from the Illumina BovineHD chip revealed a large quantitative trait locus (QTL for milk fat percentage on chromosome 27, present in both populations. We also investigated a range of other milk composition phenotypes, and report additional associations at this locus for fat yield, protein percentage and yield, lactose percentage and yield, milk volume, and the proportions of numerous milk fatty acids. We then used mammary RNA sequence data from 212 lactating cows to assess the transcript abundance of genes located in the milk fat percentage QTL interval. This analysis revealed a strong eQTL for AGPAT6, demonstrating that high milk fat percentage genotype is also additively associated with increased expression of the AGPAT6 gene. Finally, we used whole genome sequence data from six F1 sires to target a panel of novel AGPAT6 locus variants for genotyping in the F2 crossbreed population. Association analysis of 58 of these variants revealed highly significant association for polymorphisms mapping to the 5'UTR exons and intron 1 of AGPAT6. Taken together, these data suggest that variants affecting the expression of AGPAT6 are causally involved in differential milk fat synthesis, with pleiotropic consequences for a diverse range of other milk components.

  2. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism.

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    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; Zhong, Chunlong; Krystal, John H; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-07-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7-ADH1C-ADH1B-ADH1A-ADH6-ADH4-ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between common ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.05] and 11 neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. A total of 50,063 subjects in 25 independent cohorts were analyzed. The entire ADH gene cluster was imputed across these 25 cohorts using the same reference panels. Association analyses were conducted, adjusting for multiple comparisons. We found 28 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, that were significantly associated with schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans after correction by false discovery rate (FDR) (q disorders after region-wide correction by SNPSpD (8.9 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003 and 2.4 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003, respectively). No variants were significantly associated with the other nine neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol dependence. We concluded that common ADH variants conferred risk for both schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans.

  3. Modelling effects of candidate genes on complex traits as variables over time.

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    Szyda, J; Komisarek, J; Antkowiak, I

    2014-06-01

    In this study, changes in gene effects for milk production traits were analysed over time. Such changes can be expected by investigating daily milk production yields, which increase during the early phase of lactation and then decrease. Moreover, additive polygenic effects on milk production traits estimated in other studies differed throughout the 305 days of lactation, clearly indicating changes in the genetic determination of milk production throughout this period. Our study focused on particular candidate genes known to affect milk production traits and on the estimation of potential changes in the magnitude of their effects over time. With two independent data sets from Holstein-Friesian and Jersey breeds, we show that the effects of the DGAT1:p.Lys232Ala polymorphism on fat and protein content in milk change during lactation. The other candidate genes considered in this study (leptin receptor, leptin and butyrophilin, subf