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Sample records for candida tenuis xylose

  1. Systematic strain construction and process development: Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Candida tenuis xylose reductase in wild-type or mutant form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratter, S M; Eixelsberger, T; Nidetzky, B

    2015-12-01

    A novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae whole-cell biocatalyst for xylitol production based on Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR) is presented. Six recombinant strains expressing wild-type CtXR or an NADH-specific mutant were constructed and evaluated regarding effects of expression mode, promoter strength, biocatalyst concentration and medium composition. Intracellular XR activities ranged from 0.09 U mgProt(-1) to 1.05 U mgProt(-1) but did not correlate with the strains' xylitol productivities, indicating that other factors limited xylose conversion in the high-activity strains. The CtXR mutant decreased the biocatalyst's performance, suggesting use of the NADPH-preferring wild-type enzyme when (semi-)aerobic conditions are applied. In a bioreactor process, the best-performing strain converted 40 g L(-1) xylose with an initial productivity of 1.16 g L(-1)h(-1) and a xylitol yield of 100%. The obtained results underline the potential of CtXR wild-type for xylose reduction and point out parameters to improve "green" xylitol production. PMID:26452180

  2. Whole-cell bioreduction of aromatic α-keto esters using Candida tenuis xylose reductase and Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase co-expressed in Escherichia coli

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    Egger Sigrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole cell-catalyzed biotransformation is a clear process option for the production of chiral alcohols via enantioselective reduction of precursor ketones. A wide variety of synthetically useful reductases are expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli to a high level of activity. Therefore, this microbe has become a prime system for carrying out whole-cell bioreductions at different scales. The limited capacity of central metabolic pathways in E. coli usually requires that reductase coenzyme in the form of NADPH or NADH be regenerated through a suitable oxidation reaction catalyzed by a second NADP+ or NAD+ dependent dehydrogenase that is co-expressed. Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR was previously shown to promote NADH dependent reduction of aromatic α-keto esters with high Prelog-type stereoselectivity. We describe here the development of a new whole-cell biocatalyst that is based on an E. coli strain co-expressing CtXR and formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH. The bacterial system was evaluated for the synthesis of ethyl R-4-cyanomandelate under different process conditions and benchmarked against a previously described catalyst derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing CtXR. Results Gene co-expression from a pETDuet-1 vector yielded about 260 and 90 units of intracellular CtXR and CbFDH activity per gram of dry E. coli cell mass (gCDW. The maximum conversion rate (rS for ethyl 4-cyanobenzoylformate by intact or polymyxin B sulphate-permeabilized cells was similar (2 mmol/gCDWh, suggesting that the activity of CbFDH was partly rate-limiting overall. Uncatalyzed ester hydrolysis in substrate as well as inactivation of CtXR and CbFDH in the presence of the α-keto ester constituted major restrictions to the yield of alcohol product. Using optimized reaction conditions (100 mM substrate; 40 gCDW/L, we obtained ethyl R-4-cyanomandelate with an enantiomeric excess (e.e. of 97.2% in a yield of 82

  3. Optimized Production of Xylitol from Xylose Using a Hyper-Acidophilic Candida tropicalis

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Tamburini; Stefania Costa; Maria Gabriella Marchetti; Paola Pedrini

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida tropicalis DSM 7524 produces xylitol, a natural, low-calorie sweetener, by fermentation of xylose. In order to increase xylitol production rate during the submerged fermentation process, some parameters-substrate (xylose) concentration, pH, aeration rate, temperature and fermentation strategy-have been optimized. The maximum xylitol yield reached at 60–80 g/L initial xylose concentration, pH 5.5 at 37 °C was 83.66% (w/w) on consumed xylose in microaerophilic conditions (kLa ...

  4. Alcoholic Fermentation of d-Xylose by Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Toivola, A.; Yarrow, D.; van den Bosch, E.; van Dijken, J P; Scheffers, W A

    1984-01-01

    Type strains of 200 species of yeasts able to ferment glucose and grow on xylose were screened for fermentation of d-xylose. In most of the strains tested, ethanol production was negligible. Nineteen were found to produce between 0.1 and 1.0 g of ethanol per liter. Strains of the following species produce more than 1 g of ethanol per liter in the fermentation test with 2% xylose: Brettanomyces naardenensis, Candida shehatae, Candida tenuis, Pachysolen tannophilus, Pichia segobiensis, and Pich...

  5. Optimized Production of Xylitol from Xylose Using a Hyper-Acidophilic Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Elena; Costa, Stefania; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella; Pedrini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida tropicalis DSM 7524 produces xylitol, a natural, low-calorie sweetener, by fermentation of xylose. In order to increase xylitol production rate during the submerged fermentation process, some parameters-substrate (xylose) concentration, pH, aeration rate, temperature and fermentation strategy-have been optimized. The maximum xylitol yield reached at 60-80 g/L initial xylose concentration, pH 5.5 at 37 °C was 83.66% (w/w) on consumed xylose in microaerophilic conditions (kLa = 2·h(-1)). Scaling up on 3 L fermenter, with a fed-batch strategy, the best xylitol yield was 86.84% (w/w), against a 90% of theoretical yield. The hyper-acidophilic behaviour of C. tropicalis makes this strain particularly promising for industrial application, due to the possibility to work in non-sterile conditions. PMID:26295411

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of xylose reductase from Candida tropicalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of xylose reductase from C. tropicalis is reported. Xylose reductase (XR), which requires NADPH as a co-substrate, catalyzes the reduction of d-xylose to xylitol, which is the first step in the metabolism of d-xylose. The detailed three-dimensional structure of XR will provide a better understanding of the biological significance of XR in the efficient production of xylitol from biomass. XR of molecular mass 36.6 kDa from Candida tropicalis was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. According to X-ray diffraction data from C. tropicalis XR crystals at 2.91 Å resolution, the unit cell belongs to space group P31 or P32. Preliminary analysis indicated the presence of four XR molecules in the asymmetric unit, with 68.0% solvent content

  7. Optimized Production of Xylitol from Xylose Using a Hyper-Acidophilic Candida tropicalis

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    Elena Tamburini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida tropicalis DSM 7524 produces xylitol, a natural, low-calorie sweetener, by fermentation of xylose. In order to increase xylitol production rate during the submerged fermentation process, some parameters-substrate (xylose concentration, pH, aeration rate, temperature and fermentation strategy-have been optimized. The maximum xylitol yield reached at 60–80 g/L initial xylose concentration, pH 5.5 at 37 °C was 83.66% (w/w on consumed xylose in microaerophilic conditions (kLa = 2·h−1. Scaling up on 3 L fermenter, with a fed-batch strategy, the best xylitol yield was 86.84% (w/w, against a 90% of theoretical yield. The hyper-acidophilic behaviour of C. tropicalis makes this strain particularly promising for industrial application, due to the possibility to work in non-sterile conditions.

  8. Improved Ethanol Production from Xylose by Candida shehatae Induced by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Air Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xylose fermentation is essential for ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Exposure of the xylose-fermenting yeast Candida shehatae (C. shehatae) CICC1766 to atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) air plasma yields a clone (designated as C81015) with stability, which exhibits a higher ethanol fermentation rate from xylose, giving a maximal enhancement in ethanol production of 36.2% compared to the control (untreated). However, the biomass production of C81015 is lower than that of the control. Analysis of the NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide)- and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate)-linked xylose reductases and NAD+-linked xylitol dehydrogenase indicates that their activities are enhanced by 34.1%, 61.5% and 66.3%, respectively, suggesting that the activities of these three enzymes are responsible for improving ethanol fermentation in C81015 with xylose as a substrate. The results of this study show that DBD air plasma could serve as a novel and effective means of generating microbial strains that can better use xylose for ethanol fermentation

  9. Improved Ethanol Production from Xylose by Candida shehatae Induced by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Air Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huixia; Xiu, Zhilong; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-06-01

    Xylose fermentation is essential for ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Exposure of the xylose-fermenting yeast Candida shehatae (C. shehatae) CICC1766 to atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) air plasma yields a clone (designated as C81015) with stability, which exhibits a higher ethanol fermentation rate from xylose, giving a maximal enhancement in ethanol production of 36.2% compared to the control (untreated). However, the biomass production of C81015 is lower than that of the control. Analysis of the NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide)- and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate)-linked xylose reductases and NAD+-linked xylitol dehydrogenase indicates that their activities are enhanced by 34.1%, 61.5% and 66.3%, respectively, suggesting that the activities of these three enzymes are responsible for improving ethanol fermentation in C81015 with xylose as a substrate. The results of this study show that DBD air plasma could serve as a novel and effective means of generating microbial strains that can better use xylose for ethanol fermentation.

  10. Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of glucose and xylose metabolism in Candida tropicalis cell suspensions.

    OpenAIRE

    Lohmeier-Vogel, E M; Hahn-Hägerdal, B.; Vogel, H J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose and xylose was studied as a function of oxygenation in suspensions of Candida tropicalis by 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both the rate of carbohydrate metabolism and the cytoplasmic pH were independent of the rate of oxygenation in cells metabolizing glucose. However, these two parameters were markedly dependent on the rate of oxygenation in C. tropicalis cells metabolizing xylose. For example, the cytoplasmic pH in fully oxygenated xylose-met...

  11. De Novo Assembly of Candida sojae and Candida boidinii Genomes, Unexplored Xylose-Consuming Yeasts with Potential for Renewable Biochemical Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, Guilherme; José, Juliana; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Dos Santos, Leandro Vieira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Candida boidinii and Candida sojae yeasts were isolated from energy cane bagasse and plague-insects. Both have fast xylose uptake rate and produce great amounts of xylitol, which are interesting features for food and 2G ethanol industries. Because they lack published genomes, we have sequenced and assembled them, offering new possibilities for gene prospection. PMID:26769937

  12. Cloning and expression of Candida guilliermondii xylose reductase gene (xyl1) in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handumrongkul, C; Ma, D P; Silva, J L

    1998-04-01

    A xylose reductase gene (xyl1) of Candida guilliermondii ATCC 20118 was cloned and characterized. The open reading frame of xyl1 contained 954 nucleotides encoding a protein of 317 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 36 kDa. The derived amino acid sequence of C. guilliermondii xylose reductase was 70.4% homologous to that of Pichia stipitis. The gene was placed under the control of an alcohol oxidase promoter (AOX1) and integrated into the genome of a methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Methanol induced the expression of the 36-kDa xylose reductase in both intracellular and secreted expression systems. The expressed enzyme preferentially utilized NADPH as a cofactor and was functional both in vitro and in vivo. The different cofactor specificity between P. pastoris and C. guilliermondii xylose reductases might be due to the difference in the numbers of histidine residues and their locations between the two proteins. The recombinant was able to ferment xylose, and the maximum xylitol accumulation (7.8 g/l) was observed when the organism was grown under aerobic conditions. PMID:9615481

  13. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase System in the Xylose-Fermenting Yeast Candida maltosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yuping; He, Peng; Wang, Qinhong; Lu, Dajun; Li, Zilong; Wu, Changsheng; Jiang, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Background The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) system plays a critical role in sugar metabolism involving in not only ethanol formation and consumption but also the general “cofactor balance” mechanism. Candida maltosa is able to ferment glucose as well as xylose to produce a significant amount of ethanol. Here we report the ADH system in C. maltosa composed of three microbial group I ADH genes (CmADH1, CmADH2A and CmADH2B), mainly focusing on its metabolic regulation and physiological function. ...

  14. Fermentative Performance of Candida tropicalis Kuen 1022 Yeast For D-Xylose and Sunflower Seed Hull Hydrolysate in Xylitol Production

    OpenAIRE

    SARAÇOĞLU, N. Eken; ÇAVUŞOĞLU, H.

    1999-01-01

    The fermentative ability of Candida tropicalis Kuen 1022 yeast to produce xylitol from D-xylose and sunflower seed hull hydrolyste was examined under aerobic conditions. In batch cultures having a synthetic xylose concentrations ranging from 50 gl-1 to 100 gl-1,the maximum xylitol yield achieved was 0.26 g/g xylose consumed with a volumetric rate of xylitol production of 0.196 gl-1h-1 when the initial synthetic sugar concentration was 50 gl-1. The pretreated sunflower seed hull hydro...

  15. Production of Xylitol from D-Xylose by Overexpression of Xylose Reductase in Osmotolerant Yeast Candida glycerinogenes WL2002-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zong, Hong; Zhuge, Bin; Lu, Xinyao; Fang, Huiying; Zhuge, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Efficient bioconversion of D-xylose into various biochemicals is critical for the developing lignocelluloses application. In this study, we compared D-xylose utilization in Candida glycerinogenes WL2002-5 transformants expressing xylose reductase (XYL1) in D-xylose metabolism. C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5 expressing XYL1 from Schefferomyces stipitis can produce xylitol. Xylitol production by the recombinant strains was evaluated using a xylitol fermentation medium with glucose as a co-substrate. As glucose was found to be an insufficient co-substrate, various carbon sources were screened for efficient cofactor regeneration, and glycerol was found to be the best co-substrate. The effects of glycerol on the xylitol production rate by a xylose reductase gene (XYL1)-overexpressed mutant of C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5 were investigated. The XYL1-overexpressed mutant produced xylitol from D-xylose using glycerol as a co-substrate for cell growth and NAD (P) H regeneration: 100 g/L D-xylose was completely converted into xylitol when at least 20 g/L glycerol was used as a co-substrate. XYL1 overexpressed mutant grown on glycerol as co-substrate accumulated 2.1-fold increased xylitol concentration over those cells grown on glucose as co-substrate. XYL1 overexpressed mutant produced xylitol with a volumetric productivity of 0.83 g/L/h, and a xylitol yield of 98 % xylose. Recombinant yeast strains obtained in this study are promising candidates for xylitol production. This is the first report of XYL1 gene overexpression of C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5 for enhancing the efficiency of xylitol production. PMID:26018342

  16. Xylitol production from xylose mother liquor: a novel strategy that combines the use of recombinant Bacillus subtilis and Candida maltosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Xylose mother liquor has high concentrations of xylose (35%-40%) as well as other sugars such as L-arabinose (10%-15%), galactose (8%-10%), glucose (8%-10%), and other minor sugars. Due to the complexity of this mother liquor, further isolation of xylose by simple method is not possible. In China, more than 50,000 metric tons of xylose mother liquor was produced in 2009, and the management of sugars like xylose that present in the low-cost liquor is a problem. Results We designed a novel strategy in which Bacillus subtilis and Candida maltosa were combined and used to convert xylose in this mother liquor to xylitol, a product of higher value. First, the xylose mother liquor was detoxified with the yeast C. maltosa to remove furfural and 5-hydromethylfurfural (HMF), which are inhibitors of B. subtilis growth. The glucose present in the mother liquor was also depleted by this yeast, which was an added advantage because glucose causes carbon catabolite repression in B. subtilis. This detoxification treatment resulted in an inhibitor-free mother liquor, and the C. maltosa cells could be reused as biocatalysts at a later stage to reduce xylose to xylitol. In the second step, a recombinant B. subtilis strain with a disrupted xylose isomerase gene was constructed. The detoxified xylose mother liquor was used as the medium for recombinant B. subtilis cultivation, and this led to L-arabinose depletion and xylose enrichment of the medium. In the third step, the xylose was further reduced to xylitol by C. maltosa cells, and crystallized xylitol was obtained from this yeast transformation medium. C. maltosa transformation of the xylose-enriched medium resulted in xylitol with 4.25 g L-1·h-1 volumetric productivity and 0.85 g xylitol/g xylose specific productivity. Conclusion In this study, we developed a biological method for the purification of xylose from xylose mother liquor and subsequent preparation of xylitol by C. maltosa-mediated biohydrogenation of xylose

  17. Xylitol production from xylose mother liquor: a novel strategy that combines the use of recombinant Bacillus subtilis and Candida maltosa

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    Jiang Mingguo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylose mother liquor has high concentrations of xylose (35%-40% as well as other sugars such as L-arabinose (10%-15%, galactose (8%-10%, glucose (8%-10%, and other minor sugars. Due to the complexity of this mother liquor, further isolation of xylose by simple method is not possible. In China, more than 50,000 metric tons of xylose mother liquor was produced in 2009, and the management of sugars like xylose that present in the low-cost liquor is a problem. Results We designed a novel strategy in which Bacillus subtilis and Candida maltosa were combined and used to convert xylose in this mother liquor to xylitol, a product of higher value. First, the xylose mother liquor was detoxified with the yeast C. maltosa to remove furfural and 5-hydromethylfurfural (HMF, which are inhibitors of B. subtilis growth. The glucose present in the mother liquor was also depleted by this yeast, which was an added advantage because glucose causes carbon catabolite repression in B. subtilis. This detoxification treatment resulted in an inhibitor-free mother liquor, and the C. maltosa cells could be reused as biocatalysts at a later stage to reduce xylose to xylitol. In the second step, a recombinant B. subtilis strain with a disrupted xylose isomerase gene was constructed. The detoxified xylose mother liquor was used as the medium for recombinant B. subtilis cultivation, and this led to L-arabinose depletion and xylose enrichment of the medium. In the third step, the xylose was further reduced to xylitol by C. maltosa cells, and crystallized xylitol was obtained from this yeast transformation medium. C. maltosa transformation of the xylose-enriched medium resulted in xylitol with 4.25 g L-1·h-1 volumetric productivity and 0.85 g xylitol/g xylose specific productivity. Conclusion In this study, we developed a biological method for the purification of xylose from xylose mother liquor and subsequent preparation of xylitol by C. maltosa

  18. Production of Xylitol from d-Xylose by a Xylitol Dehydrogenase Gene-Disrupted Mutant of Candida tropicalis

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Byoung Sam; Kim, Jinmi; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2006-01-01

    Xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) is one of the key enzymes in d-xylose metabolism, catalyzing the oxidation of xylitol to d-xylulose. Two copies of the XYL2 gene encoding XDH in the diploid yeast Candida tropicalis were sequentially disrupted using the Ura-blasting method. The XYL2-disrupted mutant, BSXDH-3, did not grow on a minimal medium containing d-xylose as a sole carbon source. An enzyme assay experiment indicated that BSXDH-3 lost apparently all XDH activity. Xylitol production by BSXDH-3 ...

  19. The alcohol dehydrogenase system in the xylose-fermenting yeast Candida maltosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH system plays a critical role in sugar metabolism involving in not only ethanol formation and consumption but also the general "cofactor balance" mechanism. Candida maltosa is able to ferment glucose as well as xylose to produce a significant amount of ethanol. Here we report the ADH system in C. maltosa composed of three microbial group I ADH genes (CmADH1, CmADH2A and CmADH2B, mainly focusing on its metabolic regulation and physiological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic analysis indicated that CmADH2A and CmADH2B tandemly located on the chromosome could be derived from tandem gene duplication. In vitro characterization of enzymatic properties revealed that all the three CmADHs had broad substrate specificities. Homo- and heterotetramers of CmADH1 and CmADH2A were demonstrated by zymogram analysis, and their expression profiles and physiological functions were different with respect to carbon sources and growth phases. Fermentation studies of ADH2A-deficient mutant showed that CmADH2A was directly related to NAD regeneration during xylose metabolism since CmADH2A deficiency resulted in a significant accumulation of glycerol. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results revealed that CmADH1 was responsible for ethanol formation during glucose metabolism, whereas CmADH2A was glucose-repressed and functioned to convert the accumulated ethanol to acetaldehyde. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of function separation and glucose repression of ADH genes in xylose-fermenting yeasts. On the other hand, CmADH1 and CmADH2A were both involved in ethanol formation with NAD regeneration to maintain NADH/NAD ratio in favor of producing xylitol from xylose. In contrast, CmADH2B was expressed at a much lower level than the other two CmADH genes, and its function is to be further confirmed.

  20. Metabolic flux analysis model for optimizing xylose conversion into ethanol by the natural C5-fermenting yeast Candida shehatae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bideaux, Carine; Montheard, Julie; Cameleyre, Xavier; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Alfenore, Sandrine

    2016-02-01

    A metabolic flux analysis (MFA) model was developed to optimize the xylose conversion into ethanol using Candida shehatae strain. This metabolic model was compartmented and constructed with xylose as carbon substrate integrating the enzymatic duality of the first step of xylose degradation via an algebraic coefficient. The model included the pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis, synthesis of major metabolites like ethanol, acetic acid and glycerol, the tricarboxylic acid cycle as well as the respiratory chain, the cofactor balance, and the maintenance. The biomass composition and thus production were integrated considering the major biochemical synthesis reactions from monomers to each constitutive macromolecule (i.e., proteins, lipids, polysaccharides, nucleic acids). The construction of the model resulted into a 122-linear equation system to be resolved. A first experiment allowed was to verify the accuracy of the model by comparing calculated and experimental data. The metabolic model was utilized to determine the theoretical yield taking into account oxido-reductive balance and to optimize ethanol production. The maximal theoretical yield was calculated at 0.62 Cmolethanol/Cmolxylose for an oxygen requirement of 0.33 moloxygen/molxylose linked to the cofactors of the xylose reductase. Cultivations in chemostat mode allowed the fine tuning of both xylose and oxygen uptakes and showed that lower was the oxygen/xylose ratio, higher was the ethanol production yield. The best experimental ethanol production yield (0.51 Cmolethanol/Cmolxylose) was obtained for an oxygen supply of 0.47 moloxygen/molxylose. PMID:26536879

  1. Effect of biotin limitation on the conversion of xylose to ethanol and xylitol by Pachysolen tannophilus and Candida guilliermondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung Lee; Atkin, A.L.; Barbosa, M.F.S.; Dorscheid, D.R.; Schneider, Henry

    1988-02-01

    The relative amount of ethanol and xylitol accumulated in aerobic batch cultures of Pachysolen tannophilus and Candida guilliermondii on D-xylose depended on the extent of limitation by biotin. In high biotin media P. tannophilus favored ethanol production over that of xylitol while C. guilliermondii favoured xylitol formation. However, as the extent of biotin limitation increased, the ratio of ethanol to xylitol produced by both organisms increased. The results are of interest in efforts to control such ratios.

  2. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

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    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the substantial metabolic engineering effort previously devoted to the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting both the hexose and pentose sugars present in lignocellulose hydrolysates, the productivity of reported strains for conversion of the naturally most abundant pentose, xylose, is still a major issue of process efficiency. Protein engineering for targeted alteration of the nicotinamide cofactor specificity of enzymes catalyzing the first steps in the metabolic pathway for xylose was a successful approach of reducing xylitol by-product formation and improving ethanol yield from xylose. The previously reported yeast strain BP10001, which expresses heterologous xylose reductase from Candida tenuis in mutated (NADH-preferring form, stands for a series of other yeast strains designed with similar rational. Using 20 g/L xylose as sole source of carbon, BP10001 displayed a low specific uptake rate qxylose (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h of 0.08. The study presented herein was performed with the aim of analysing (external factors that limit qxylose of BP10001 under xylose-only and mixed glucose-xylose substrate conditions. We also carried out a comprehensive investigation on the currently unclear role of coenzyme utilization, NADPH compared to NADH, for xylose reduction during co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. Results BP10001 and BP000, expressing C. tenuis xylose reductase in NADPH-preferring wild-type form, were used. Glucose and xylose (each at 10 g/L were converted sequentially, the corresponding qsubstrate values being similar for each strain (glucose: 3.0; xylose: 0.05. The distribution of fermentation products from glucose was identical for both strains whereas when using xylose, BP10001 showed enhanced ethanol yield (BP10001 0.30 g/g; BP000 0.23 g/g and decreased yields of xylitol (BP10001 0.26 g/g; BP000 0.36 g/g and glycerol (BP10001 0.023 g/g; BP000 0.072 g/g as compared

  3. PENGARUH Ph, KADAR XILOSA DAN KADAR GLUKOSA TERHADAP PRODUKSI XYLITOL OLEH Candida shehatae WAY 08 [The Influence of Intial Xylose and Glucose Consentration on Xylitol production by Candida shehatae WAY 08

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    Wisnu Adi Yulianto 1

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectiviea of this research were to determine the optimum culture conditions of initial pH, xylose and glucose concentration for xylitol production by Candida shehatae WAY 08. The initial pH was altered whitin the range of 4-7, the xylose concentration from 5020%, and the glucose (cosubstrate from 0-4%. The fermentation was performed at 30°C in 500 ml erlenmeyer flaks placed in a shaker incubator at 250 rpm for 7d. biomas concentration war determined by oven method. Xylose, glucose and xylitol concentrations were determined by HPCL.the result incated that the highest xylitol volumetric productivity of Candida shehatae WAY 08 was 0,314 g/I/h at the initial pH of 5 in medium containing 150 g/I xylose. Addition of glucose into media inhibited the xylitol production, but in creased the xylitol yield.

  4. PENGARUH Ph, KADAR XILOSA DAN KADAR GLUKOSA TERHADAP PRODUKSI XYLITOL OLEH Candida shehatae WAY 08 [The Influence of Intial Xylose and Glucose Consentration on Xylitol production by Candida shehatae WAY 08

    OpenAIRE

    Wisnu Adi Yulianto1)

    2001-01-01

    The objectiviea of this research were to determine the optimum culture conditions of initial pH, xylose and glucose concentration for xylitol production by Candida shehatae WAY 08. The initial pH was altered whitin the range of 4-7, the xylose concentration from 5020%, and the glucose (cosubstrate) from 0-4%. The fermentation was performed at 30°C in 500 ml erlenmeyer flaks placed in a shaker incubator at 250 rpm for 7d. biomas concentration war determined by oven method. Xylose, glucose and ...

  5. Comparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Kuo, Alan; Sato, Trey K.; Potts, Katlyn M.; Salamov, Asaf A.; LaButti, Kurt M.; Sun, Hui; Clum, Alicia; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Jin, Mingjie; Gunawan, Christa; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E.; Jeffries, Thomas W.; Zinkel, Robert; Barry, Kerrie W.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2011-02-24

    Cellulosic biomass is an abundant and underused substrate for biofuel production. The inability of many microbes to metabolize the pentose sugars abundant within hemicellulose creates specific challenges for microbial biofuel production from cellulosic material. Although engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use the pentose xylose, the fermentative capacity pales in comparison with glucose, limiting the economic feasibility of industrial fermentations. To better understand xylose utilization for subsequent microbial engineering, we sequenced the genomes of two xylose-fermenting, beetle-associated fungi, Spathaspora passalidarum and Candida tenuis. To identify genes involved in xylose metabolism, we applied a comparative genomic approach across 14 Ascomycete genomes, mapping phenotypes and genotypes onto the fungal phylogeny, and measured genomic expression across five Hemiascomycete species with different xylose-consumption phenotypes. This approach implicated many genes and processes involved in xylose assimilation. Several of these genes significantly improved xylose utilization when engineered into S. cerevisiae, demonstrating the power of comparative methods in rapidly identifying genes for biomass conversion while reflecting on fungal ecology.

  6. Xylitol production from xylose mother liquor: a novel strategy that combines the use of recombinant Bacillus subtilis and Candida maltosa

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Mingguo; Lv Jiyang; Wang Ben; Cheng Hairong; Lin Shuangjun; Deng Zixin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Xylose mother liquor has high concentrations of xylose (35%-40%) as well as other sugars such as L-arabinose (10%-15%), galactose (8%-10%), glucose (8%-10%), and other minor sugars. Due to the complexity of this mother liquor, further isolation of xylose by simple method is not possible. In China, more than 50,000 metric tons of xylose mother liquor was produced in 2009, and the management of sugars like xylose that present in the low-cost liquor is a problem. Results We d...

  7. Xylitol production from waste xylose mother liquor containing miscellaneous sugars and inhibitors: one-pot biotransformation by Candida tropicalis and recombinant Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hengwei; Li, Lijuan; Zhang, Lebin; AN, JIN; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2016-01-01

    Background The process of industrial xylitol production is a massive source of organic pollutants, such as waste xylose mother liquor (WXML), a viscous reddish-brown liquid. Currently, WXML is difficult to reuse due to its miscellaneous low-cost sugars, high content of inhibitors and complex composition. WXML, as an organic pollutant of hemicellulosic hydrolysates, accumulates and has become an issue of industrial concern in China. Previous studies have focused only on the catalysis of xylose...

  8. Growth of Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 on mixed substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick V. Gurgel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 was grown on a mixed substrate comprising glucose and xylose. Inocula were grown using xylose or glucose as carbon source. Results showed that xylose utilization was delayed until glucose was utilized. Inoculum prepared on glucose showed a lag phase in xylose consumption. Cell mass production was higher when glucose was utilized during fermentation.

  9. Method for producing ethanol from xylose-containing substance

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dijken, J.; Scheffers, W A

    1987-01-01

    A method for producing ethanol from a D-xylose containing substance, comprising fermenting said substance with a yeast of the genus Pichia or its imperfect forms belonging to the genus Candida, selected from the species consisting of Pichia stipitis, Pichia segobiensis and Candida shehatae, under aerobic or anaerobic conditions to produce ethanol in a yield, in the absence of constituents severely inhibitory to the process, of at least 0.43 g. ethanol, per g. of D-xylose

  10. Carrageenan and agaran structures from the red seaweed Gymnogongrus tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Recalde, Mercedes; Canelón, Dilsia J; Compagnone, Reinaldo S; Matulewicz, María C; Cerezo, Alberto S; Ciancia, Marina

    2016-01-20

    The galactan system biosynthesized by the red seaweed Gymnogongrus tenuis (Phyllophoraceae) is constituted by major amounts of κ/ι-carrageenans, with predominance of ι-structures, which were isolated by extraction with hot water in high yield (∼ 45%). A small amount of non-cyclized carrageenans mostly of the ν-type was also obtained. Besides, 12% of these galactans are agaran structures, which were present in major quantities in the room temperature water extracts, but they were also found in the hot water extract. They are constituted by 3-linked β-D-galactose units partially substituted on C-6 with sulfate or single stubs of β-D-xylose and 4-linked residues that comprise α-L-galactose units partially sulfated or methoxylated on C-3 or sulfated on C-3 and C-6 and 3,6-anhydro-α-L-galactose. Related structural patterns were previously found for agarans synthesized by other carrageenophytes. Results presented here show that these agarans are low molecular weight molecules independent of the carrageenan structures, with strong interactions between them. PMID:26572482

  11. D-xylose absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine how well the intestines absorb a simple sugar (D-xylose). The test ... test is primarily used to determine if nutrient absorption problems are due to a disease of the ...

  12. D-xylose absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  13. Inhibitory effect of acetic acid on bioconversion of xylose in xylitol by Candida guilliermondii in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate Efeito inibitório do ácido acético na bioconversão de xilose em xilitol por Candida guilliermondii em hidrolisado de bagaço de cana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora D.V. Silva

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate (initial acetic acid concentration = 3.5g/L, was used as a fermentation medium for conversion of xylose into xylitol by the yeast Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037. Acetic acid (2.0g/L was added to the medium at different times of fermentation, with the aim of evaluating its effects on the bioconversion process. The addition of acetic acid to the medium after 12h of fermentation resulted in the strongest inhibition of the yeast metabolism. In this case, the xylose consumption and cell growth were, respectively, 23.22 and 11.24% lower than when acid was added to the medium at the beginning of fermentation. As a consequence of the inhibitory effect, lower values of the xylitol yield (0.39g/g and productivity (0.22g/L.h were observed, corresponding to a reduction of 36 and 48%, respectively, in relation to the values obtained with the addition of acetic acid after other fermentation times. The results obtained allowed to conclude that, under the experimental conditions employed in this work, the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on the xylose-xylitol bioconversion depends on the fermentation time when this acid was added, and not only on its concentration in the medium.Hidrolisado de bagaço de cana-de-açúcar contendo uma concentração inicial de ácido acético de 3,5g/L foi utilizado como meio de fermentação para a bioconversão de xilose em xilitol pela levedura Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037. Ácido acético (2,0g/L foi adicionado ao meio em diferentes tempos de fermentação, com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito deste ácido neste bioprocesso. O maior efeito inibitório deste ácido na bioconversão de xilose em xilitol pela levedura ocorreu quando este foi adicionado ao meio após 12h de fermentação. Nesta condição observou-se uma redução de 23,22% e 11,24%, respectivamente, no consumo de xilose e no crescimento celular em relação à fermentação em que a adição deste ácido ocorreu no tempo inicial

  14. Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae overexpressing different xylose reductases using non-detoxified hemicellulosic hydrolysate of corncob

    OpenAIRE

    Kogje, Anushree; Ghosalkar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Xylitol production was compared in fed batch fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing xylose reductase (XR) genes from Candida tropicalis, Pichia stipitis, Neurospora crassa, and an endogenous gene GRE3. The gene encoding a xylose specific transporter (SUT1) from P. stipitis was cloned to improve xylose transport and fed batch fermentation was used with glucose as a cosubstrate to regenerate NADPH. Xylitol yield was near theoretical for all the strains in fed batch ferm...

  15. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  16. Sources of pheromones in the lizard Liolaemus tenuis Fuentes de feromonas en el lagarto Liolaemus tenuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonieta Labra

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests were conducted with the lizard Liolaemus tenuis (Tropiduridae, to determine the potential sources of pheromones used in its chemical communication, centered in the phenomenon of self-recognition. During the post-reproductive season, feces of both sexes and secretions of precloacal pores (present only in males were tested. Stimuli were presented to lizards spread on rocks, and the number of tongue-flicks (TF to the rocks was used as a bioassay to determine pheromone recognition. Feces contained pheromones involved in self-recognition, since lizards showed less TF confronted to rocks with suspensions of their own feces than with suspensions of feces of conspecifics or with water (control. In order to assess the chemical nature of self-recognition pheromones, feces were submitted to a sequential extraction with three solvents of increasing polarity, thereby obtaining three feces fractions. There were no differences in TF towards rocks with different fractions with own feces. Additionally, lizards showed similar TF to rocks with fractions of own and conspecific feces, suggesting that the separation procedure broke up a complex stimulus into parts that were not active individually as pheromones. Finally, males did not discriminate between precloacal secretions from themselves and from another male. It is possible that these secretions convey information relevant to or detectable by females onlySe realizaron pruebas experimentales con la especie Liolaemus tenuis (Tropiduridae, para determinar las potenciales fuentes de feromonas usadas en su comunicación química. El estudio se centró en el fenómeno de auto-reconocimiento. Durante la estación post-reproductiva, las fecas de ambos sexos y las secreciones precloacales (presentes sólo en machos fueron probadas. Los estímulos fueron presentados a los lagartos esparcidos sobre rocas, y el número de lamidos (TF a la roca fue utilizado como un bioensayo para determinar

  17. Biotechnological production of xylitol with Candida yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Granström, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a biotechnological production process for xylitol. The xylitol production characteristics of Candida millerii, Candida guilliermondii and Candida tropicalis were compared. C. tropicalis was the best xylitol producer. A volumetric productivity of 5.7 g xylitol L-1 h-1 was achieved with 69 % yield from D-xylose on a mineral medium with a modified repeated fed batch production method. The xylitol production mechanism was confirmed by chemostat cultivation stu...

  18. Occurrence of Hydroclathrus tenuis Tseng and Baoren, (Phaeophyta) from Gulf of Kutch, northwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jagtap, T.G.; Untawale, A.G.

    Hydroclathrus tenuis (C. Agardh), a marine brown alga was considered to be a monotypic, till H. tenuis Tseng and Baoren was reported during 1983 from south China Sea. Recently the same alga was noticed to be abundant from Kalubhar Island in the Gulf...

  19. Xylitol production by Candida parapsilosis under fed-batch culture

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan Sandra A.; Castro Heizir F. de

    2001-01-01

    Xylitol production by Candida parapsilosis was investigated under fed-batch cultivation, using single (xylose) or mixed (xylose and glucose) sugars as substrates. The presence of glucose in the medium induced the production of ethanol as secondary metabolite and improved specific rates of growth, xylitol formation and substrate consumption. Fractionated supply of the feed medium at constant sugar concentration did not promote any increase on the productivity compared to the single batch culti...

  20. Candida famata (Candida flareri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2012-11-01

    Candida famata (Candida flareri) belongs to the group of so-called 'flavinogenic yeasts', capable of riboflavin oversynthesis under condition of iron starvation. Some strains of C. famata belong to the most flavinogenic organisms known and were used for industrial production of riboflavin for a long time in the USA. C. famata is characterized by high salt tolerance, growing at NaCl concentrations of up to 2.5  M. Development of basic tools for the metabolic engineering of C. famata, such as a transformation system, selective markers, insertional mutagenesis, a reporter system and others, are described. The developed tools were used for cloning and identification of structural and regulatory genes of riboflavin synthesis. The construction of improved yeast strains producing riboflavin, FMN and FAD, based on the industrial riboflavin-producing strain dep8 and its non-reverting analogue AF4, is also described. PMID:23108915

  1. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettiga, Maurizio; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2008-01-01

    Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells)-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells)-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells)-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells)-1 h-1 for the xylose reductase

  2. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells-1 h-1

  3. Analysis of Heavy-Chain Antibody Responses and Resistance to Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in Experimentally Infected Alpacas

    OpenAIRE

    Purdy, S. R.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Lefman, S.; Hamel, P. J. S.; Ku, S.; Mainini, T.; Hoyt, G.; Justus, K.; Daley-Bauer, L. P.; Duffy, M. S.; Appleton, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Parelaphostrongylus tenuis is an important cause of neurologic disease of camelids in central and eastern North America. The aim of this study was to determine whether alpacas develop resistance to disease caused by P. tenuis in response to a previous infection or a combination of controlled infection and immunization. Alpacas were immunized with a homogenate of third-stage larvae (L3) and simultaneously implanted subcutaneously with diffusion chambers containing 20 liv...

  4. Improvement of biotechnological xylitol production by glucose during cultive of Candida guilliermondii in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Danielle Virgínio da Silva; Ismael Maciel de Mancilha; Silvio Silvério da Silva; Maria das Graças de Almeida Felipe

    2007-01-01

    The effect of glucose on xylose-to-xylitol bioconversion by Candida guilliermondii was examined by adding it to sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate medium to obtain different glucose:xylose ratios (1:25, 1:12, 1:5 and 1:2.5). Under experimental conditions, increasing glucose:xylose ratio improved the assimilation of the xylose present in the hydrolysate by yeast, resulting in biomass increase, and in the formation of xylitol and glycerol/ethanol by-products. Maximum values of xylitol yield (0.59 g ...

  5. Genetic analysis of D-xylose metabolism by endophytic yeast strains of Rhodotorula graminis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two novel endophytic yeast strains, WP1 and PTD3, isolated from within the stems of poplar (Populus trees, were genetically characterized with respect to their xylose metabolism genes. These two strains, belonging to the species Rhodotorula graminis and R. mucilaginosa, respectively, utilize both hexose and pentose sugars, including the common plant pentose sugar, D-xylose. The xylose reductase (XYL1 and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2 genes were cloned and characterized. The derived amino acid sequences of xylose reductase (XR and xylose dehydrogenase (XDH were 32%~41% homologous to those of Pichia stipitis and Candida. spp., two species known to utilize xylose. The derived XR and XDH sequences of WP1 and PTD3 had higher homology (73% and 69% identity with each other. WP1 and PTD3 were grown in single sugar and mixed sugar media to analyze the XYL1 and XYL2 gene regulation mechanisms. Our results revealed that for both strains, the gene expression is induced by D-xylose, and that in PTD3 the expression was not repressed by glucose in the presence of xylose.

  6. Screening of microorganisms for xylitol production and fermentation behavior in high concentrations of xylose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeuchi, T.; Azuma, M.; Kato, J.; Ooshima, H. [Osaka City University, (Japan). Dept. of Bioapplied Chemistry

    1999-05-01

    Microorganisms with the ability to produce xylitol from high concentration of xylose were screened from soils by enrichments culture using xylose as a sole carbon source. The selected strain was classified and determined as Candida sp. according to a taxonomic identification. In this strain, various conditions for xylitol production were investigated. Organic nutrients such as peptone and yeast extract were essential for xylitol production, and the optimal initial pH and {kappa}{sub L}{alpha} were between 4.0 and 6.0, and 5.2/h, respectively. Under the optimal condition, xylitol production from 200 g/l of xylose was 173 g/l after 5 days incubation, a 99.3% yield of the theoretical value. In order to produce a higher concentration of xylitol, a fed-batch culture of xylose was carried out by feeding 2.0 g of xylose per 10 ml of culture medium. The production from 4.0 g of xylose was 2.9 g of xylitol (concentration of 256 g/l) after 11.5 days which is a yield of 85.0%. (author)

  7. Utilization of metabolic inhibitors for shifting product formation from xylitol to ethanol in pentose fermentations using Candida tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmeier-Vogel, E.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B.

    1985-02-01

    Xylose, glucose and xylose/glucose mixtures were fermented with Candida tropicalis ATCC 32113 under aerobic, oxygen limited and anaerobic conditions. Ethanol yields were highest under oxygen limited conditions with xylose and xylose/glucose. Anaerobic conditions were best for glucose fermentations. The effect of four metabolic inhibitors (azide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), oligomycin A and valinomycin-K/sup +/) were then studied under oxygen limited conditions. Only azide had a significant influence on ethanol production. At 2x10/sup -4/ M concentrations, ethanol yield increased up to two times and xylitol levels were repressed by 90% for xylose and glucose/xylose fermentations. 4.2x10/sup -3/ M azide gave highest ethanol yields in glucose fermentations. At this concentration of azide, however, cell growth was inhibited, which seemed to prevent ethanol production in xylose fermentations. The effect of azide is discussed in terms of 'fine-tuning' the respiratory activity necessary for metabolism.

  8. Pilot-scale steam explosion for xylose production from oil palm empty fruit bunches and the use of xylose for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangwang, Sairudee; Ruengpeerakul, Taweesak; Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Yamsaengsung, Ram; Sangwichien, Chayanoot

    2016-03-01

    Pilot-scale steam explosion equipments were designed and constructed, to experimentally solubilize xylose from oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) and also to enhance an enzyme accessibility of the residual cellulose pulp. The OPEFB was chemically pretreated prior to steam explosion at saturated steam (SS) and superheated steam (SHS) conditions. The acid pretreated OPEFB gave the highest xylose recovery of 87.58 ± 0.21 g/kg dried OPEFB in the liquid fraction after explosion at SHS condition. These conditions also gave the residual cellulose pulp with high enzymatic accessibility of 73.54 ± 0.41%, which is approximately threefold that of untreated OPEFB. This study has shown that the acid pretreatment prior to SHS explosion is an effective method to enhance both xylose extraction and enzyme accessibility of the exploded OPEFB. Moreover, the xylose solution obtained in this manner could directly be fermented by Candida shehatae TISTR 5843 giving high ethanol yield of 0.30 ± 0.08 g/g xylose. PMID:26735880

  9. Construction of a recombinant yeast strain converting xylose and glucose to ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Candida shehatae gene xyll and Pichia stipitis gene xyl2,encoding xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XD) respectively,were amplified by PCR.The genes xyl1 and xyl2 were placed under the control of promoter GAL in vector pYES2 to construct the recombinant expression vector pYES2-PI2.Subsequently the vector pYES2-P12 was transformed into S.cerevisiae YS58 by LiAc to produce the recombinant yeast YS58-12.The alcoholic ferment indicated that the recombinant yeast YS58-12 could convert xylose to ethanol with the xylose consumption rate of 81.3%.

  10. Diversity and physiological characterization of D-xylose-fermenting yeasts isolated from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel M Cadete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study is the first to investigate the Brazilian Amazonian Forest to identify new D-xylose-fermenting yeasts that might potentially be used in the production of ethanol from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 224 yeast strains were isolated from rotting wood samples collected in two Amazonian forest reserve sites. These samples were cultured in yeast nitrogen base (YNB-D-xylose or YNB-xylan media. Candida tropicalis, Asterotremella humicola, Candida boidinii and Debaryomyces hansenii were the most frequently isolated yeasts. Among D-xylose-fermenting yeasts, six strains of Spathaspora passalidarum, two of Scheffersomyces stipitis, and representatives of five new species were identified. The new species included Candida amazonensis of the Scheffersomyces clade and Spathaspora sp. 1, Spathaspora sp. 2, Spathaspora sp. 3, and Candida sp. 1 of the Spathaspora clade. In fermentation assays using D-xylose (50 g/L culture medium, S. passalidarum strains showed the highest ethanol yields (0.31 g/g to 0.37 g/g and productivities (0.62 g/L · h to 0.75 g/L · h. Candida amazonensis exhibited a virtually complete D-xylose consumption and the highest xylitol yields (0.55 g/g to 0.59 g/g, with concentrations up to 25.2 g/L. The new Spathaspora species produced ethanol and/or xylitol in different concentrations as the main fermentation products. In sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic fermentation assays, S. stipitis UFMG-XMD-15.2 generated the highest ethanol yield (0.34 g/g and productivity (0.2 g/L · h, while the new species Spathaspora sp. 1 UFMG-XMD-16.2 and Spathaspora sp. 2 UFMG-XMD-23.2 were very good xylitol producers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the promise of using new D-xylose-fermenting yeast strains from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest for ethanol or xylitol production from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates.

  11. Parelaphostrongylus tenuis-associated meningoencephalitis in a sika deer (Cervus nippon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Richard W; Keel, M Kevin; Arnold, Kim; Hotton, Doug; Beckstead, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    An adult, female, free-ranging, sika deer (Cervus nippon yakushimae) from Wicomico County, Maryland, USA, was found circling and having no fear of humans. The animal was euthanized and submitted for a postmortem exam. There were no gross lesions and the deer was negative for rabies. Microscopic examination revealed lymphoplasmacytic, neutrophilic, and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with intralesional adult nematodes, larvae, and eggs consistent with nematodes in the family Protostrongylidae. Parelaphostrongylus tenuis was identified by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of P. tenuis-associated encephalitis in a sika deer. PMID:20090046

  12. Three new species of Macrobiotus (Eutardigrada, Macrobiotidae, tenuis-group from Tien Shan (Kirghizia and Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. TUMANOV

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Illustrated descriptions of Macrobiotus danilovi sp. n., Macrobiotus tenuiformis sp. n. from Tien Shan (Kirghizia and Macrobiotus voronkovi sp. n. from Spitsbergen are given. These new species belong to the tenuis-group of the genus Macrobiotus. Members of the tenius-group have claws with a particularly long and thin common tract with a prominent frontal appendage at the base. Macrobiotus danilovi and M. tenuiformis differ from all known species of this group in the structure of their buccal armature. Macrobiotus voronkovi differs from all known species of the tenuis-group in its combination of features in adult animals and in the egg shell.

  13. Integrated Process of Arabinose Biopurification and Xylitol Fermentation Based on the Diverse Action of Candida boidinii

    OpenAIRE

    Fehér, C.; Gazsó, Z.; Gál, B.; Kontra, A.; Barta, Z.; Réczey, K.

    2016-01-01

    Hemicellulosic hydrolysates of agro-residues are promising raw materials for xylitol and arabinose production through biotechnological methods. Two-step acidic fractionation of corn fibre was developed to produce a glucose- and arabinose-rich hydrolysate and a xylose-rich hydrolysate. An integrated process of arabinose biopurification on the glucose- and arabinose-rich hydrolysate and xylitol fermentation on the xylose-rich hydrolysate using Candida boidinii NCAIM Y.01308 was introduced, i...

  14. Xylitol from rice husks by acid hydrolysis and Candida yeast fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magale K. D. Rambo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted into the production of xylose by acid hydrolysis of rice husks and its subsequent bioconversion to xylitol. The parameters were optimised using the response surface methodology. The fermentation stage took place with the aid of the yeast species Candida guilliermondii and Candida tropicalis. An evaluation of the influence of several biomass pre-treatments was also performed. The effects of the acid concentration and hydrolysate pH on xylitol global yield were also assessed, and the highest yield of xylitol was 64.0% (w/w. The main products, xylose and xylitol, were identified and quantified by means of liquid chromatography.

  15. Stage-Related Defense Response Induction in Tomato Plants by Nesidiocoris tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naselli, Mario; Urbaneja, Alberto; Siscaro, Gaetano; Jaques, Josep A; Zappalà, Lucia; Flors, Víctor; Pérez-Hedo, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effects of direct predation by zoophytophagous biological control agents (BCAs), such as the mirid bug Nesidiocoris tenuis, are well-known. However, the benefits of zoophytophagous BCAs' relation with host plants, via induction of plant defensive responses, have not been investigated until recently. To date, only the females of certain zoophytophagous BCAs have been demonstrated to induce defensive plant responses in tomato plants. The aim of this work was to determine whether nymphs, adult females, and adult males of N. tenuis are able to induce defense responses in tomato plants. Compared to undamaged tomato plants (i.e., not exposed to the mirid), plants on which young or mature nymphs, or adult males or females of N. tenuis fed and developed were less attractive to the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, but were more attractive to the parasitoid Encarsia formosa. Female-exposed plants were more repellent to B. tabaci and more attractive to E. formosa than were male-exposed plants. When comparing young- and mature-nymph-exposed plants, the same level of repellence was obtained for B. tabaci, but mature-nymph-exposed plants were more attractive to E. formosa. The repellent effect is attributed to the signaling pathway of abscisic acid, which is upregulated in N. tenuis-exposed plants, whereas the parasitoid attraction was attributed to the activation of the jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that all motile stages of N. tenuis can trigger defensive responses in tomato plants, although these responses may be slightly different depending on the stage considered. PMID:27472328

  16. Stage-Related Defense Response Induction in Tomato Plants by Nesidiocoris tenuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naselli, Mario; Urbaneja, Alberto; Siscaro, Gaetano; Jaques, Josep A.; Zappalà, Lucia; Flors, Víctor; Pérez-Hedo, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effects of direct predation by zoophytophagous biological control agents (BCAs), such as the mirid bug Nesidiocoris tenuis, are well-known. However, the benefits of zoophytophagous BCAs’ relation with host plants, via induction of plant defensive responses, have not been investigated until recently. To date, only the females of certain zoophytophagous BCAs have been demonstrated to induce defensive plant responses in tomato plants. The aim of this work was to determine whether nymphs, adult females, and adult males of N. tenuis are able to induce defense responses in tomato plants. Compared to undamaged tomato plants (i.e., not exposed to the mirid), plants on which young or mature nymphs, or adult males or females of N. tenuis fed and developed were less attractive to the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, but were more attractive to the parasitoid Encarsia formosa. Female-exposed plants were more repellent to B. tabaci and more attractive to E. formosa than were male-exposed plants. When comparing young- and mature-nymph-exposed plants, the same level of repellence was obtained for B. tabaci, but mature-nymph-exposed plants were more attractive to E. formosa. The repellent effect is attributed to the signaling pathway of abscisic acid, which is upregulated in N. tenuis-exposed plants, whereas the parasitoid attraction was attributed to the activation of the jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that all motile stages of N. tenuis can trigger defensive responses in tomato plants, although these responses may be slightly different depending on the stage considered. PMID:27472328

  17. Anaerobic xylose fermentation by Spathaspora passalidarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru

    2012-01-01

    reductase (XR) and NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). Thus, the capacity of S. passalidarum to utilize xylose under anaerobic conditions is possibly due to the balance between the cofactor’s supply and demand through this XR–XDH pathway. Only few XRs with NADH preference have been reported so far....... 2-Deoxy glucose completely inhibited the conversion of xylose by S. passalidarum under anaerobic conditions, but only partially did that under aerobic conditions. Thus, xylose uptake by S. passalidarum may be carried out by different xylose transport systems under anaerobic and aerobic conditions...

  18. Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibirny, Andriy A.; Voronovsky, Andriy Y.

    Debaryomyces hansenii (teleomorph of asporogenous strains known as Candida famata ) belongs to the group of so named ‘ flavinogenic yeasts ’ capable of riboflavin oversynthesis during starvation for iron. Some strains of C. famata belong to the most flavinogenic organisms known (accumulate 20 mg of riboflavin in 1 ml of the medium) and were used for industrial production of riboflavin in USA for long time. Many strains of D. hansenii are characterized by high salt tolerance and are used for ageing of cheeses whereas some others are able to convert xylose to xylitol, anti-caries sweetener. Transformation system has been developed for D. hansenii. It includes collection of host recipient strains, vectors with complementation and dominant markers and several transformation protocols based on protoplasting and electroporation. Besides, methods of multicopy gene insertion and insertional mutagenesis have been developed and several strong constitutive and regulatable promoters have been cloned. All structural genes of riboflavin synthesis and some regulatory genes involved in this process have been identified. Genome of D. hansenii has been sequenced in the frame of French National program ‘Genolevure’ and is opened for public access

  19. Comparison of the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase and the xylose isomerase pathways for xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhumaa, Kaisa; Sanchez, Rosa Garcia; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie-F

    2007-01-01

    Background Two heterologous pathways have been used to construct recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: i) the xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway and ii) the xylose isomerase (XI) pathway. In the present study, the Pichia stipitis XR-XDH pathway and the Piromyces XI pathway were compared in an isogenic strain background, using a laboratory host strain with genetic modifications known to improve xylose fermentation (overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deletion of the aldose reductase gene GRE3). The two isogenic strains and the industrial xylose-fermenting strain TMB 3400 were studied regarding their xylose fermentation capacity in defined mineral medium and in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Results In defined mineral medium, the xylose consumption rate, the specific ethanol productivity, and the final ethanol concentration were significantly higher in the XR- and XDH-carrying strain, whereas the highest ethanol yield was achieved with the strain carrying XI. While the laboratory strains only fermented a minor fraction of glucose in the undetoxified lignocellulose hydrolysate, the industrial strain TMB 3400 fermented nearly all the sugar available. Xylitol was formed by the XR-XDH-carrying strains only in mineral medium, whereas in lignocellulose hydrolysate no xylitol formation was detected. Conclusion Despite by-product formation, the XR-XDH xylose utilization pathway resulted in faster ethanol production than using the best presently reported XI pathway in the strain background investigated. The need for robust industrial yeast strains for fermentation of undetoxified spruce hydrolysates was also confirmed. PMID:17280608

  20. Xylitol from rice husks by acid hydrolysis and Candida yeast fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Magale K. D. Rambo; Daiane B. Bevilaqua; Carla G. B. Brenner; Ayrton F. Martins; Débora N. Mario; Sydney H. Alves; Carlos A. Mallmann

    2013-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the production of xylose by acid hydrolysis of rice husks and its subsequent bioconversion to xylitol. The parameters were optimised using the response surface methodology. The fermentation stage took place with the aid of the yeast species Candida guilliermondii and Candida tropicalis. An evaluation of the influence of several biomass pre-treatments was also performed. The effects of the acid concentration and hydrolysate pH on xylitol global yield were al...

  1. Population genetic structure and post-LGM expansion of the plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Huaizhu; Li, Hu; Li, Shujuan; Wei, Shujun; Zhang, Lijuan; Song, Fan; Jiang, Pei; Yang, Hailin; Han, Fei; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The plant bug, Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae), is one of the most thermophilous dicyphines in agroecosystems and is widely distributed in China. Little is known regarding the genetic structure of N. tenuis and the effect of historical climatic fluctuations on N. tenuis populations. We analyzed partial sequences of three mitochondrial protein-coding genes (COI, ND2 and CytB) and nuclear genes (5.8S, ITS2 and 28S) for 516 specimens collected from 37 localities across China. Analyses of the combined mitochondrial dataset indicated that the Southwestern China group (SWC) was significantly differentiated from the remaining populations, other Chinese group (OC). Asymmetric migration and high level of gene flow across a long distance within the OC group was detected. The long-distance dispersal of N. tenuis might be affected by air currents and human interference. Both the neutrality tests and mismatch distributions revealed the occurrence of historical population expansion. Bayesian skyline plot analyses with two different substitution rates indicated that N. tenuis might follow the post-LGM (the Last Glacial Maximum) expansion pattern for temperate species. Pleistocene climatic fluctuation, complicated topography and anthropogenic factors, along with other ecological factors (e.g. temperature and air current) might have accounted for the current population structure of N. tenuis. PMID:27230109

  2. Shifting product formation from xylitol to ethanol in pentose fermentations using Candida tropicalis by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn-Haegerdal, B.; Joensson, B.; Lohmeier-Vogel, E.

    1985-02-01

    When Candida tropicalis fermented xylose under oxygen limited conditions in the presence of increasing concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG), the ethanol production increased by a factor of two and the xylitol production was repressed by about 25%. Xylose assimilation and cell growth were not affected by the presence of PEG. The fermentation of glucose was not as strongly influenced by the presence of PEG as were xylose fermentations. The results are discussed in relation to the physico-chemical properties of a medium containing increasing concentrations of PEG. It is suggested that the presence of PEG might result in a fine-tuning of the aeration in the medium, necessary for ethanol production from xylose with Candida tropicalis.

  3. Huperzine A production by Paecilomyces tenuis YS-13, an endophytic fungus isolated from Huperzia serrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingqian; Yang, Minhe

    2015-01-01

    Huperzine A (HupA), a naturally occurring alkaloid in the plant family Huperziaceae, has drawn great interest for its potential application in Alzheimer disease therapy. Our primary objective was to identify alkaloid- and HupA-producing fungi from the Chinese folk herb, Huperzia serrata. We established a rapid and efficient model for screening HupA-producing endophytic fungal strains. The presence of HupA in Paecilomyces tenuis YS-13 was analysed by thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The fermentation yield of HupA was 21.0 μg/L, and the IC50 of the crude extract of YS-13 fermentation broth was 1.27 ± 0.04 mg/mL. This is the first report of P. tenuis as a HupA-producing endophyte isolated from Huperziaceae. PMID:25427833

  4. Three new species of Macrobiotus (Eutardigrada, Macrobiotidae, tenuis-group) from Tien Shan (Kirghizia) and Spitsbergen

    OpenAIRE

    Denis V. TUMANOV

    2007-01-01

    Illustrated descriptions of Macrobiotus danilovi sp. n., Macrobiotus tenuiformis sp. n. from Tien Shan (Kirghizia) and Macrobiotus voronkovi sp. n. from Spitsbergen are given. These new species belong to the tenuis-group of the genus Macrobiotus. Members of the tenius-group have claws with a particularly long and thin common tract with a prominent frontal appendage at the base. Macrobiotus danilovi and M. tenuiformis differ from all known species of this group in the structure of their buccal...

  5. Evaluation of sorghum straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate for biotechnological production of xylitol by Candida guilliermondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Sene

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study on xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii in sorghum straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate was performed. Hydrolysate had high xylose content and inhibitors concentrations did not exceed the commonly found values in other hemicellulosic hydrolysates. The highest xylitol yield (0.44 g/g and productivity (0.19 g/Lh were verified after 72 hours.

  6. Evaluation of sorghum straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate for biotechnological production of xylitol by Candida guilliermondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sene, L.; Arruda, P.V.; Oliveira, S.M.M.; Felipe, M.G.A.

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary study on xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii in sorghum straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate was performed. Hydrolysate had high xylose content and inhibitors concentrations did not exceed the commonly found values in other hemicellulosic hydrolysates. The highest xylitol yield (0.44 g/g) and productivity (0.19 g/Lh) were verified after 72 hours. PMID:24031733

  7. Evaluation of sorghum straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate for biotechnological production of xylitol by Candida guilliermondii

    OpenAIRE

    Sene, L.; Arruda, P.V.; S.M.M Oliveira; Felipe, M.G.A.

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary study on xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii in sorghum straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate was performed. Hydrolysate had high xylose content and inhibitors concentrations did not exceed the commonly found values in other hemicellulosic hydrolysates. The highest xylitol yield (0.44 g/g) and productivity (0.19 g/Lh) were verified after 72 hours.

  8. Comparison of the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase and the xylose isomerase pathways for xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two heterologous pathways have been used to construct recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: i the xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH pathway and ii the xylose isomerase (XI pathway. In the present study, the Pichia stipitis XR-XDH pathway and the Piromyces XI pathway were compared in an isogenic strain background, using a laboratory host strain with genetic modifications known to improve xylose fermentation (overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deletion of the aldose reductase gene GRE3. The two isogenic strains and the industrial xylose-fermenting strain TMB 3400 were studied regarding their xylose fermentation capacity in defined mineral medium and in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Results In defined mineral medium, the xylose consumption rate, the specific ethanol productivity, and the final ethanol concentration were significantly higher in the XR- and XDH-carrying strain, whereas the highest ethanol yield was achieved with the strain carrying XI. While the laboratory strains only fermented a minor fraction of glucose in the undetoxified lignocellulose hydrolysate, the industrial strain TMB 3400 fermented nearly all the sugar available. Xylitol was formed by the XR-XDH-carrying strains only in mineral medium, whereas in lignocellulose hydrolysate no xylitol formation was detected. Conclusion Despite by-product formation, the XR-XDH xylose utilization pathway resulted in faster ethanol production than using the best presently reported XI pathway in the strain background investigated. The need for robust industrial yeast strains for fermentation of undetoxified spruce hydrolysates was also confirmed.

  9. Directed Evolution of Xylose Isomerase for Improved Xylose Catabolism and Fermentation in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S.

    2012-01-01

    The heterologous expression of a highly functional xylose isomerase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae would have significant advantages for ethanol yield, since the pathway bypasses cofactor requirements found in the traditionally used oxidoreductase pathways. However, nearly all reported xylose isomerase-based pathways in S. cerevisiae suffer from poor ethanol productivity, low xylose consumption rates, and poor cell growth compared with an oxidoreductase pathway and, additionally, often r...

  10. Different strategies of Lotus japonicus, L. corniculatus and L. tenuis to deal with complete submergence at seedling stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, G G; Izaguirre, R F; Manzur, M E; Grimoldi, A A

    2012-01-01

    Two main strategies allow plants to deal with submergence: (i) escape from below water by means of shoot elongation, or (ii) remaining quiescent under the water until water subsides and then resume growth. We investigated these strategies in seedlings of Lotus japonicus, L. corniculatus and L. tenuis subjected to control and submergence for 12 days, with a subsequent 30-day recovery period. All three species survived submergence but used different strategies. Submerged seedlings of L. japonicus exhibited an escape strategy (emerging from water) as a result of preferential carbon allocation towards shoot mass and lengthening, in detriment to root growth. In contrast, seedlings of L. corniculatus and L. tenuis became quiescent, with no biomass accumulation, no new unfolding of leaves and no shoot elongation. Upon de-submergence, seedlings of L. japonicus had the lowest recovery growth (a biomass and shoot height 58% and 40% less than controls, respectively), L. corniculatus was intermediate and L. tenuis showed the greatest recovery growth. Previously submerged seedlings of L. tenuis did not differ from their controls, either in final shoot biomass or shoot height. Thus, for the studied species, quiescence appears to be an adequate strategy for tolerance of short-term (i.e., 12 days) complete submergence, being consistent with field observations of L. tenuis colonisation of flood-prone environments. PMID:21972978

  11. Temperature Dependence of Respiration in Larvae and Adult Colonies of the Corals Acropora tenuis and Pocillopora damicornis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Haryanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although algal symbionts can become a source of reactive oxygen species under stressful conditions, symbiotic planulae of the coral Pocillopora damicornis are highly tolerant to thermal stress compared with non-symbiotic planulae of Acropora tenuis. As a first step to understand how P. damicornis planulae attain high stress tolerance, we compared the respiration rate and temperature dependence between symbiotic planulae of P. damicornis and non-symbiotic planulae of A. tenuis, as well as between larvae and adult branches within each species. Larvae and adult branches of both species had similar temperature dependency of respiration rate, with the temperature coefficient (Q10 values of about 2. Planula larvae of P. damicornis had a significantly lower respiration rate than that of A. tenuis larvae at 25–30 °C, but not at 32 °C, whereas adult branches of P. damicornis had a significantly higher respiration rate than that of A. tenuis branches at all temperatures. Thus, P. damicornis larvae appear to be capable of reducing their respiration rate to a greater extent than A. tenuis larvae, which could partly explain why P. damicornis larvae had high survivorship under thermal stress, although other antioxidant or photoprotective mechanisms should be investigated in the future.

  12. Xylose utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walfridsson, M.

    1996-04-01

    Through metabolic engineering, S. cerevisiae was provided with the necessary enzymes required for xylose utilisation during ethanolic fermentation of xylose-rich lignocellulose raw materials. For xylitol production, S. cerevisiae was provided with the Pichia stipitis XYL1 gene encoding xylose reductase (XR). The in-vivo reduction and the following excretion of xylitol, requires a co-substrate for maintenance and cofactor regeneration. Xylitol yields close to 100% were obtained with the XYL1 containing S. cerevisiae. Introducing P. stipitis XYL1 and XYL2 genes, encoding XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, enabled S. cerevisiae to convert xylose to xylulose, via xylitol. During the screening work of P. stipitis XDH gene, another gene encoding a polyol dehydrogenase was isolated and cloned in S. cerevisiae. The gene was identified as a D-arabinitol dehydrogenase gene. In P. stipitis it may function as a redox sink by reducing D-ribulose to D-arabinitol. The metabolism through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was enhanced by over-expressing the native genes TKL1 and TAL1 encoding transketolase and transaldolase, respectively, resulting in improved xylose utilisation. The XR and XDH activities in recombinant S. cerevisiae were produced at different levels by constructing yeast vectors in which the PGK1 and ADHI promoters controlled XYL1 and XYL2. With higher XDH than XR activities, less by-products, in the form of xylitol and glycerol, were formed by the recombinant S. cerevisiae strains. The Thermus thermophilus xylA gene encoding a thermostable xylose isomerase was cloned and expressed in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant xylose isomerase was actively produced and a new functional metabolic pathway was established in S. cerevisiae resulting in ethanol production from xylose. 150 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  13. Influence of oxygen on ethanol and xylitol production by xylose fermenting yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlan, S.A.; Bouilloud, P.; Castro, H.F. de (Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica de Lorena, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of Pichia stipitis, Pachysolen tannophilus, Candida shehatae and Candida parapsilosis was investigated to select the most suitable yeast to convert xylose either to ethanol or to xylitol, with little or no formation of by-products. The aeration rate was used as a variable parameter. P.stipitis and C.parapsilosis were the most effective producers of ethanol and xylitol, respectively, both reaching productivities at very low levels of oxygenation. P.tannophilus and C.shehatae showed lower performances under all conditions used while changes in oxygenation modified the ratio of ethanol to xylitol produced by these yeasts, suggesting that they are more dependent on the oxygen power input than P.stipilis and C. parapsilosis. The influence of oxygen transfer rates on ethanol and xylitol formation with the best producers is discussed. (author)

  14. Xylose fermentation to ethanol. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J D

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  15. Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta: A New Species from South China Sea Based on Morphological Observation and rbcL Gene Sequences Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. is a new species described from Lingshui, Hainan Province, South China Sea. Based on the external form and internal structure, combined with rbcL gene sequence analysis, Grateloupia tenuis is distinct from other Grateloupia species as follows: (1 thalli is slippery and cartilaginous in texture; possess fewer branches, relatively slight main axes, and two or three dichotomous branches; (2 cortex is 5-6 layers; medulla is solid when young, but hollow in old branches; reproductive structures are dispersed in main axes of thalli and lower portions of branchlets; exhibits Grateloupia-type auxiliary cell ampullae; (3 the four studied G. tenuis sequences were positioned in a large Grateloupia clade of Halymeniaceae, which included sister group generitype G. filicina with 68 bp differences; G. tenuis was determined to be a sister taxon to the G. catenata, G. ramosissima, G. orientalis, and G. filiformis subclade. The pairwise distances between G. tenuis and these species were 39 to 50 bp. The sequences of G. tenuis differed by 81–108 bp from the sequences of other samples in Grateloupia; there are 114–133 bp changes between G. tenuis and other genera of Halymeniaceae. In final analysis, we considered Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. to be a new species of genus Grateloupia.

  16. Virulence factors of non-Candida albicans Candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sónia Carina; Negri, M.; Monteiro, D. R.; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Candida species (candidosis) have greatly increased over recent years, mainly due to the escalation of the AIDS epidemic, population ageing, increasing number of immunocompromised patients and the more widespread use of indwelling medical devices. Besides Candida albicans, non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species such as Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis are now frequently identified as potential human pathogens. Candida species pathogenicit...

  17. Heterologous xylose isomerase pathway and evolutionary engineering improve xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Zha, Jian; Liu, Gao-Gang; Zhang, Weiwen; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Xylose utilization is one key issue for the bioconversion of lignocelluloses. It is a promising approach to engineering heterologous pathway for xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed a xylose-fermenting yeast SyBE001 through combinatorial fine-tuning the expression of XylA and endogenous XKS1. Additional overexpression of genes RKI1, RPE1, TKL1, and TAL1 in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in SyBE001 increased the xylose consumption rate by 1.19-fold. By repetitive adaptation, the xylose utilization rate was further increased by ∼10-fold in the resultant strain SyBE003. Gene expression analysis identified a variety of genes with significantly changed expression in the PPP, glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in SyBE003. PMID:26539187

  18. Toxic effects of Pseudanabaena tenuis (Cyanobacteria on the cladocerans Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia Efectos tóxicos de Pseudanabaena tenuis (Cyanobacteria en los cladóceros Daphnia magna y Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Olvera-Ramírez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some cyanobacteria can produce toxins that affect the aquatic biota and represent a human health risk. The cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena tenuis was isolated from the Valle de Bravo dam, and cultured in the laboratory under controlled conditions. We determined the acute toxic effects and performed a chronic (consumption test in the cladocerans Daphnia magna (a reference test organism and Ceriodaphnia dubia (a cosmopolitan species. To determine acute toxicity, three exposure ways were assayed: a cell-free culture medium, b crude cell extracts of the cyanobacterium after lysing, and c aqueous extracts of P. tenuis phycobiliproteins. On the other hand, both cladocerans were fed P. tenuis, assessing the effects on survival and reproduction. For comparison, a control culture of both cladocerans was fed the green microalga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Exposure to the cell-free culture medium did not produce any mortality in either cladoceran, but the aqueous and crude extracts generated acute toxicity. D. magna and C. dubia were negatively affected when fed P. tenuis, since their survival, total progeny, average number of neonates per clutch, and the number of clutches decreased. C. dubia was more sensitive than D. magna, both in the acute toxicity tests and to the effects of P. tenuis consumption. Although most of the blooms around the world are dominated by cyanobacteria of the genus Microcystis, attention should be given to other species, such as P. tenuis, because, frequently, it is not recognized that smaller cyanobacteria could exceed the larger species in terms of biomass, and produce noxious biological effects.Algunas cianobacterias producen toxinas que afectan la biota acuática y representan un riesgo para la salud humana. La cianobacteria Pseudanabaena tenuis fue aislada del embalse Valle de Bravo y cultivada en el laboratorio. Se determinaron los efectos tóxicos agudos (por exposición y se evaluó la toxicidad crónica (por consumo

  19. Bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldau, Niels Christian; Brorson, Stig; Jensen, Poul Einar;

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis.......We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis....

  20. Ultrastructural study of sperm cells in Acanthocolpidae: the case of Stephanostomum murielae and Stephanostomoides tenuis (Digenea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye J.S. Bakhoum

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mature spermatozoa of Stephanostomum murielae and Stephanostomoides tenuis are described by transmission electron microscopy. They present several ultrastructural features previously reported in other digeneans. Their spermatozoa possess two axonemes of different length showing the 9 + ‘1’ trepaxonematan pattern, four attachment zones, two mitochondria (with an anterior moniliform one in S. murielae, a nucleus, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies and granules of glycogen. The main differences between the mature spermatozoon of S. murielae and S. tenuis are the maximum number of cortical microtubules, the morphology of the anterior spermatozoon extremity and the anterior mitochondrion. This study is the first concerning members of the family Acanthocolpidae. The main ultrastructural characteristics discussed are the morphology of the anterior and posterior spermatozoon extremities, antero-lateral electron dense material, external ornamentations, spine-like bodies and number and morphology of mitochondria. In addition, the phylogenetic significance of all these ultrastructural features is discussed and compared to molecular results in order to highlight the complex relationships in the Digenea.

  1. Candida Albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Maria Magdalena Simatupang

    2009-01-01

    義歯性口内炎患者のデンチャープラーク中には、多数の真菌が認められることから、これら真菌が衰症の原因菌の一つとされている。このようなデンチャープラーク中の真菌には、Candida属が高頻度に検出され、中でもCandida albicansの検出率が著しく高いことが知られている。本真菌は、酵母(Y)型並びにフィラメント(F)型の二つの形態をとる二形性真菌であり、種々の因子によりその形態が変化することが、古くから知られている。しかし、その詳細な機構については未だ不明な点が多い。著者は、C.albicansが培地中のビオテン濃度により形態変化を受ける事実に着目し、本菌の二形性と脂質代謝との間に、なんらかの関連性があるのではないかとの作業仮設のもとに、以下の実験を行った。 本研究は、Candida albicans A IFO 1385株を用いて行った。使用培地は、サブローグルコース培地(2% グルコース、1% ペプトン、 0.5% イーストエキス)(medium A)並びにメチオニン含有合成培地(medium B)である。培養温度は、それぞれY型薗並びにF型菌を得るために、25℃...

  2. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R. H.;

    2012-01-01

    flux to biomass production. Such a platform may then be enhanced with complementary metabolic engineering strategies that couple biomass production with high value-added chemical. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase, from the native xylose...

  3. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prathumpai, W.; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Groot, de M.J.L.; McIntyre, M.; Nielsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out, an

  4. Spathaspora arborariae sp. nov., a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotting wood in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadete, Raquel M; Santos, Renata O; Melo, Monaliza A; Mouro, Adriane; Gonçalves, Davi L; Stambuk, Boris U; Gomes, Fátima C O; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    Four strains of a new yeast species were isolated from rotting wood from two sites in an Atlantic Rain Forest and a Cerrado ecosystem in Brazil. The analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene showed that this species belongs to the Spathaspora clade. The new species ferments D-xylose efficiently and is related to Candida jeffriesii and Spathaspora passalidarum, both of which also ferment D-xylose. Similar to S. passalidarum, the new species produces unconjugated asci with a single greatly elongated ascospore with curved ends. The type strain of Spathaspora arborariae sp. nov. is UFMG-HM19.1A(T) (=CBS11463(T)=NRRL Y-48658(T)). PMID:19840117

  5. Evolved hexose transporter enhances xylose uptake and glucose/xylose co-utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reider Apel, Amanda; Ouellet, Mario; Szmidt-Middleton, Heather; Keasling, Jay D; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing xylose utilization has been a major focus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain-engineering efforts. The incentive for these studies arises from the need to use all sugars in the typical carbon mixtures that comprise standard renewable plant-biomass-based carbon sources. While major advances have been made in developing utilization pathways, the efficient import of five carbon sugars into the cell remains an important bottleneck in this endeavor. Here we use an engineered S. cerevisiae BY4742 strain, containing an established heterologous xylose utilization pathway, and imposed a laboratory evolution regime with xylose as the sole carbon source. We obtained several evolved strains with improved growth phenotypes and evaluated the best candidate using genome resequencing. We observed remarkably few single nucleotide polymorphisms in the evolved strain, among which we confirmed a single amino acid change in the hexose transporter HXT7 coding sequence to be responsible for the evolved phenotype. The mutant HXT7(F79S) shows improved xylose uptake rates (Vmax = 186.4 ± 20.1 nmol•min(-1)•mg(-1)) that allows the S. cerevisiae strain to show significant growth with xylose as the sole carbon source, as well as partial co-utilization of glucose and xylose in a mixed sugar cultivation. PMID:26781725

  6. Chromera velia is endosymbiotic in larvae of the reef corals Acropora digitifera and A. tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbo, Vivian R; Baird, Andrew H; Moore, Robert B; Negri, Andrew P; Neilan, Brett A; Salih, Anya; van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Wang, Yan; Marquis, Christopher P

    2013-03-01

    Scleractinian corals occur in symbiosis with a range of organisms including the dinoflagellate alga, Symbiodinium, an association that is mutualistic. However, not all symbionts benefit the host. In particular, many organisms within the microbial mucus layer that covers the coral epithelium can cause disease and death. Other organisms in symbiosis with corals include the recently described Chromera velia, a photosynthetic relative of the apicomplexan parasites that shares a common ancestor with Symbiodinium. To explore the nature of the association between C. velia and corals we first isolated C. velia from the coral Montipora digitata and then exposed aposymbiotic Acropora digitifera and A. tenuis larvae to these cultures. Three C. velia cultures were isolated, and symbiosis was established in coral larvae of both these species exposed to all three clones. Histology verified that C. velia was located in the larval endoderm and ectoderm. These results indicate that C. velia has the potential to be endosymbiotic with coral larvae. PMID:23063731

  7. Phytochemical screening, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of fruit extracts of Calamus tenuis Roxb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaki Uddin Ahmed; Seheli Sejuti Bithi; Md Minhazur Rahman Khan; Md Mofazzol Hossain; Suriya Sharmin; Satyajit Roy Rony

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of the fruits of Calamus tenuis Roxb. Methods:The preliminary phytochemical group tests were done, which revealed the presence of alkaloid, tannin, flavonoid and steroid. The dried fruit was extracted in soxhlet apparatus using petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol. Antioxidant potential of each extract was evaluated using total phenol content, total flavonoid content, cupric reducing antioxidant capacity, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity, and total antioxidant capacity determinations. Results:The extracts were found to possess moderate to high amounts of phenolic and flavonoid contents. In cupric reducing antioxidant capacity assay the extracts showed moderate reducing power which increases with concentration. Scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical was found to rise with concentration with lowest IC50 value for methanol extract, which was confirmed by total antioxidant activity test that shows highest (95 mg/g of extract) in ascorbic acid equivalent for methanol extract. In Brine shrimp lethality bioassay the methanol and petroleum ether extracts were found to be toxic to Brine shrimp nauplii, with LC50 of 25.53 µg/mL and 28.07 µg/mL respectively while the LC50 of the reference vincristine sulphate was 1.32 µg/mL. Ethyl acetate extract was found to be moderately cytotoxic showing LC50 of 47.79 µg/mL. Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that the fruits of Calamus tenuis Roxb possess antioxidant and cytotoxic potential. Moreover, phytochemical screening reveals the presence of alkaloid, tannin, flavonoid and steroid, which may be responsible for the observed bioactivities.

  8. Evaluation of novel xylose-fermenting yeast strains from Brazilian forests for hemicellulosic ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse

    OpenAIRE

    Martiniano, Sabrina E.; Chandel, Anuj K; Soares, Luma C. S. R.; Pagnocca, Fernando C.; da Silva, Sílvio S.

    2013-01-01

    Bioconversion of hemicellulosic hydrolysates into ethanol with the desired yields plays a pivotal role for the overall success of biorefineries. This paper aims to evaluate the ethanol production potential of four native strains of Scheffersomyces shehatae (syn. Candida shehatae) viz. S. shehatae BR6-2AI, CG8-8BY, PT1-1BASP and BR6-2AY, isolated from Brazilian forests. These strains were grown in commercial d-xylose-supplemented synthetic medium and sugarcane bagasse hemicellulose hydrolysate...

  9. Candida materiae sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from rotting wood in the Atlantic Rain Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Anne C; Cadete, Raquel M; Gomes, Fátima C O; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2009-08-01

    Three strains of a novel yeast species, Candida materiae sp. nov., were isolated from rotting wood in an Atlantic rain forest site in Brazil. Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rDNA showed that this species belonged to the Spathaspora clade and was related to Candida jeffriesii and Spathaspora passalidarum. Unlike C. jeffriesii and S. passalidarum, C. materiae sp. nov. did not ferment xylose. The type strain of C. materiae sp. nov. is UFMG-07-C15.1BT (=CBS 10975T=CBMAI 956T). PMID:19605715

  10. TAMANHO DA ÁREA DE FORRAGEAMENTO DO CUPIM SUBTERRÂNEO Heterotermes tenuis (ISOPTERA; RHINOTERMITIDAE EM CANA-DE-AÇÚCAR FORAGING AREA OF THE UNDERGROUND TERMITE Heterotermes tenuis (ISOPTERA; RHINOTERMITIDAE IN SUGARCANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Marcondes Almeida

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a área de forrageamento do cupim Heterotermes tenuis utilizando-se a isca Termitrap® marcada com o radioisótopo 32P. O experimento foi conduzido numa área com cana-de-açúcar, em Piracicaba-SP. Foram localizados 20 focos de H. tenuis, com iscas. Em cada um desses focos aplicou-se uma isca Termitrap® impregnada com 18,5 MBb (500 mCi 32P na forma de fosfato de sódio diluído em 15 ml de água destilada. Ao redor das iscas marcadas, foram instaladas iscas sem marcador em quatro pontos: Norte, Sul, Leste e Oeste, eqüidistantes de 1, 5, 10 e 20 metros. Cada tratamento foi representado por um foco previamente determinado e marcado e uma das distâncias estipuladas para a isca de monitoramento, sendo repetido de 4 a 6 vezes. Após 15 dias da marcação, procedeu-se a avaliação coletando-se 15 indivíduos de H. tenuis de cada isca de monitoramento infestada, acondicionando-os em frascos de vidro com água destilada, que foram analisados em cintilador líquido, pelo teste de Cerenkov. Verificou-se que em apenas 20% das iscas de monitoramento coletaram-se cupins e 11,3% estavam marcadas com o radioisótopo. Constatou-se que ocorrem diversas colônias forrageando numa mesma área. A área de forrageamento de H. tenuis em cana-de-açúcar pode variar de 3 a 1.250 m2.The area of foraging of the termite species Heterotermes tenuis was evaluated using the Termitrap® bait marked with the radioisotope 32P. The experiment was conducted in an area with sugarcane, in Piracicaba,SP Brazil. Twenty infestion foci of H. tenuis were identified with baits. Each focus recieved baits labeled with 18.5 MBb (500 mCi 32P in the form of sodium phosphate diluted in 15 ml of distilled water. Surrounding the marked baits were installed baits without marker in four points: North, South, East and West, halfway of 1, 5, 10 and 20 meters. Each treatment was represented previously by a focus settled and marked and one of the distances specified for the monitoring

  11. Thrush and Other Candida Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Thrush and Other Candida Infections Page Content Article Body The fungus Candida is ... thrush, frequently occurs in infants and toddlers. If Candida infections become chronic or occur in the mouth of ...

  12. Toxic effects of Pseudanabaena tenuis (Cyanobacteria) on the cladocerans Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia Efectos tóxicos de Pseudanabaena tenuis (Cyanobacteria) en los cladóceros Daphnia magna y Ceriodaphnia dubia

    OpenAIRE

    Roxana Olvera-Ramírez; Carla Centeno-Ramos; Fernando Martínez-Jerónimo

    2010-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria can produce toxins that affect the aquatic biota and represent a human health risk. The cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena tenuis was isolated from the Valle de Bravo dam, and cultured in the laboratory under controlled conditions. We determined the acute toxic effects and performed a chronic (consumption) test in the cladocerans Daphnia magna (a reference test organism) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (a cosmopolitan species). To determine acute toxicity, three exposure ways were assayed...

  13. Morfologia do tubo digestivo nos cupins Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen) e Coptotermes havilandi Holmgren (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae) Morphology of the digestive tube in the termites Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen) e Coptotermes havilandi Holmgren (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Cristina Barsotti; Ana Maria Costa-Leonardo

    2000-01-01

    The digestive tube of workers of Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen, 1858) e Coptotermes havilandi Holmgren, 1911 was analysed under the anatomical view. The digestive tube of both species did not show conspicuous diferences in relation to the morphology, morphometry and the configuration of the digestive tube that were the aspects studied. The general organization of the digestive tube of these species show several similarity with other lower termites previously analysed.

  14. Morfologia do tubo digestivo nos cupins Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen e Coptotermes havilandi Holmgren (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae Morphology of the digestive tube in the termites Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen e Coptotermes havilandi Holmgren (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cristina Barsotti

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The digestive tube of workers of Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen, 1858 e Coptotermes havilandi Holmgren, 1911 was analysed under the anatomical view. The digestive tube of both species did not show conspicuous diferences in relation to the morphology, morphometry and the configuration of the digestive tube that were the aspects studied. The general organization of the digestive tube of these species show several similarity with other lower termites previously analysed.

  15. Thermochemistry of α-D-xylose(cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Well-characterized material. ► Oxygen bomb calorimetry. ► Heat capacities obtained by using a Physical Property Measurement System. ► Thermochemical Network Calculations. ► Accurate thermodynamic property values of a key biochemical substance. -- Abstract: The thermochemistry of α-D-xylose(cr) was studied by means of oxygen bomb calorimetry and a Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS) in zero magnetic field. The sample of α-D-xylose(cr) used in this study was one well-characterized by HPLC, Karl Fischer analysis, NMR, and by carbon dioxide analysis. The standard molar enthalpy of combustion was found to be ΔcHmo = −(2342.2 ± 0.8) kJ·mol−1 at T = 298.15 K and at the standard pressure p° = 0.1 MPa. The standard molar heat capacity for α-D-xylose(cr) was measured with the PPMS over the temperature range 1.9001 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 303.66. At T = 298.15 K, Cp,mo = (178.1 ± 1.8) J·K−1·mol−1. The values of Cp,mo were fit as a function of T by using theoretical and empirical models for appropriate temperature ranges. The results of these fits were used to calculate values of Cp,mo, the entropy increment Δ0TSmo, Δ0THmo, and Φmo=(Δ0TSmo-Δ0THmo/T) from T = 0.5 K to T = 300 K. Derived quantities for α-D-xylose(cr) are the standard molar enthalpy of formation ΔfHmo = −(1054.5 ± 1.1) kJ·mol−1, the third law standard molar entropy Smo = (175.3 ± 1.9) J·K−1·mol−1, and the standard molar Gibbs energy of formation ΔfGmo = −(750.5 ± 1.0) kJ·mol−1. A comparison of values of ΔcHmo and Smo for the five-carbon aldoses demonstrated a striking similarity in the values of these respective properties for α-D-xylose(cr), D-ribose(cr), and D-arabinose(cr). Thermochemical network calculations were performed that led to values of the standard formation properties at T = 298.15 K for a variety of biochemical substances: D-xylose(aq), D-xylose−(aq), D-xylose2−(aq), D-lyxose(cr and aq), D-lyxose−(aq), D-xylulose(aq), xylitol

  16. Structure and Mechanism of Human UDP-xylose Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Eixelsberger, Thomas; Sykora, Sabine; Egger, Sigrid; Brunsteiner, Michael; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo; Brecker, Lothar; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    UDP-xylose synthase (UXS) catalyzes decarboxylation of UDP-d-glucuronic acid to UDP-xylose. In mammals, UDP-xylose serves to initiate glycosaminoglycan synthesis on the protein core of extracellular matrix proteoglycans. Lack of UXS activity leads to a defective extracellular matrix, resulting in strong interference with cell signaling pathways. We present comprehensive structural and mechanistic characterization of the human form of UXS. The 1.26-Å crystal structure of the enzyme bound with ...

  17. Ethanol production by recombinant and natural xylose-utilising yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, Anna

    2000-07-01

    The xylose-fermenting capacity of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, which encode xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, is poor due to high xylitol formation. Whereas, P. stipitis exhibits high ethanol yield on xylose, the tolerance towards inhibitors in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate is low. A recombinant strain possessing the advantageous characteristics of both S. cerevisiae and P. stipitis would constitute a biocatalyst capable of efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate. In the work presented in this thesis, factors influencing xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae and in the natural xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis have been identified and investigated. Anaerobic xylulose fermentation was compared in strains of Zygosaccharomyces and S. cerevisiae, mutants and wild-type strains to identify host strain background and genetic modifications beneficial for xylose fermentation. The greatest positive effect was found for over-expression of the gene XKS1 for the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzyme xylulokinase (XK), which increased the ethanol yield by almost 85%. The Zygosaccharomyces strains tested formed large amounts of polyols, making them unsuitable as host strains. The XR/XDH/XK ratio was found to determine whether carbon accumulated in a xylitol pool or was further utilised for ethanol production in recombinant xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae. Simulations, based on a kinetic model, and anaerobic xylose cultivation experiments implied that a 1:{>=}10:{>=}4 relation was optimal in minimising xylitol formation. Ethanol formation increased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, whereas xylitol formation decreased and XK overexpression was necessary for adequate ethanol formation. Based on the knowledge of optimal enzyme ratios, a stable, xylose-utilising strain, S. cerevisiae TMB 3001, was constructed by chromosomal integration of the XYL1 and XYL2 genes

  18. Impact of overexpressing NADH kinase on glucose and xylose metabolism in recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Vemuri, G. N.; Bao, X. M.;

    2009-01-01

    . However, the metabolism of xylose by recombinant S. cerevisiae carrying xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the fungal pathway requires both NADH and NADPH and creates cofactor imbalance during growth on xylose. As one possible solution to overcoming this imbalance, the effect of...... cytosol redirected carbon flow from CO2 to ethanol during aerobic growth on glucose and to ethanol and acetate during anaerobic growth on glucose. However, cytosolic NADH kinase has an opposite effect during anaerobic metabolism of xylose consumption by channeling carbon flow from ethanol to xylitol. In...

  19. Xylitol production by Candida parapsilosis under fed-batch culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A. Furlan

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol production by Candida parapsilosis was investigated under fed-batch cultivation, using single (xylose or mixed (xylose and glucose sugars as substrates. The presence of glucose in the medium induced the production of ethanol as secondary metabolite and improved specific rates of growth, xylitol formation and substrate consumption. Fractionated supply of the feed medium at constant sugar concentration did not promote any increase on the productivity compared to the single batch cultivation.A produção de xylitol por Candida parapsilosis foi investigada em regime de batelada alimentada, usando substratos açucarados de composição simples (xilose ou composta (xilose e glicose. A presença de glicose no meio induziu a formação de etanol como metabólito secundário. A suplementação fracionada do meio de alimentação numa concentração fixa de açúcar não resultou em aumento da produtividade em relação àquela alcançada em batelada simples.

  20. Influence of ecologic factors on prevalence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) infection in South Dakota, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Christopher N; Jenks, Jonathan A; Grovenburg, Troy W; Klaver, Robert W; Dubay, Shelli A

    2015-04-01

    The meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) is a nematode parasite that commonly infects white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; WTD) throughout the deciduous forest biome and deciduous-coniferous ecotone of eastern and central North America; the species is not known to occur west of the grassland biome of central North America. We used county-specific prevalence data to evaluate potential effects of landscape and climatologic factors on the spatial distribution of meningeal worm infection in South Dakota, US. Probability of infection increased 4-fold between eastern and western South Dakota and 1.3-fold for each 1-cm increase in summer precipitation. Sixty-three percent of WTD had only a single worm in the cranium. Expansion of meningeal worm infection across western South Dakota may be inherently low due to the combined effects of arid climate and potential attributes of the Missouri River that limit regional movements by infected WTD. Use of landscape genetic analyses to identify potential relationships between landscape features and population genetic structure of infected deer and parasites may contribute to a greater understanding of regional heterogeneity in meningeal worm infection rates across South Dakota, particularly in counties adjacent to the Missouri River. Future research evaluating heterogeneity in prevalence and intensity of infection between fawn and yearling deer, and the potential role of yearling male deer as dispersal agents of meningeal worms across the Missouri River, also is warranted. PMID:25588013

  1. Insights into Candida world : the extracellular milieu

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Margarida

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years fungi have emerged as a major cause of human disease. Candida albicans is the most common cause of opportunistic mycoses, albeit Non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species, namely Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis, are emerging as pathogens. Candida species factors that might influence the pathogenesis of infection include the ability to: undergo a reversible conversion between yeast and fil...

  2. Endoftalmite por Candida albicans Candida albicans endophthalmitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Duraes Serracarbassa; Patrícia Dotto

    2003-01-01

    O autor descreve os aspectos epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e clínicos da endoftalmite endógena por Candida albicans. Apresenta ainda novos métodos diagnósticos e opções terapêuticas utilizadas no tratamento das infecções fúngicas intra-oculares, por meio de revisão bibliográfica.The author describes epidemiological, histopathological and clinical aspects of endogenous Candida albicans endophthalmitis. He also presents new diagnostic methods and therapeutical options to treat intraocular f...

  3. Endoftalmite por Candida albicans Candida albicans endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Duraes Serracarbassa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available O autor descreve os aspectos epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e clínicos da endoftalmite endógena por Candida albicans. Apresenta ainda novos métodos diagnósticos e opções terapêuticas utilizadas no tratamento das infecções fúngicas intra-oculares, por meio de revisão bibliográfica.The author describes epidemiological, histopathological and clinical aspects of endogenous Candida albicans endophthalmitis. He also presents new diagnostic methods and therapeutical options to treat intraocular fungal infections, based on literature review.

  4. Application of gamma rays for increasing the productivity of xylitol from rice straw by candida teleprocess and candida guilieliermondii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiating the rice straw with high dose level of gamma rays (100-KGy) after being treated with diluted sulphuric acid increased the xylitol yields from the hydrolysates to 43.2 and 45.0 g/l out of 63.0 g/l xylose by Candida tropical and Candida guilliermondii, respectively. Meanwhile, irradiating C. tropical is and C. guilliermondii with low dose levels (0.25 and 0.5 KGy, respectively) before being inoculated in artificial medium, containing 150 g/l xylose, increased the yields of xylitol by the irradiated species. On the contrary, the produced xylitol was decreased sharply in case of isolates irradiated with 1 KGy especially C. tropical is, which showed less resistance to gamma rays recording. D10, value 1.225 compared with 1.608 for C. guilliermondii. Sub-lethal dose of gamma rays (10 and 8 KGy) shrank C. guilliermondii cells and their sh,ape became irregular while C. tropical is cells formed small cottony fibres structure on the external surface of the cell wall, respectively. Meanwhile, lethal radiation doses-(l l and 9 KGy) caused deformation of the vegetative cells of both isolates. Many cells were enlarged, the cell walls of many others were ruptured and the internal contents were released outside the cells. Complete lyses of some cells-was also observed

  5. Screening of Strain Producing D-Xylose Reductase%木糖还原酶产酶菌株的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王普; 钟卫鸿; 虞炳钧

    2001-01-01

    A Candida tropicalis strain that bioconverting D-xylose to xylitol was s creened out from more than 20 yeasts.Strain ZG-24,with high D-xylose reducta se activity,was obtained by UV repeated mutation and selection with high xylose c oncentration plate.Fermented for 64 h with 85.36 g/L initial xylose content in 10 L fermentor,the xylitol content was 60.87g/L,utilization ratio of xylose w as 94.11%,with 75.78% xylitol yield.Time curves of D-xylose reductase and x ylitol dehydrogenase were also investigated.%从20余株酵母菌中筛选得到可转化D-木糖生产木糖醇的热带假丝酵母。以此为出发菌株,通过UV重复诱变,并结合高糖平板分离,得到木糖还原酶活力较高的较佳诱变株 ZG-24。当初糖浓度为85.36g/L时,经10 L罐发酵64 h,木糖醇含量达60.87g/L,木糖利用率为 94.11%,产物木糖醇得率达75.78%。同时考察了该菌株发酵过程中木糖还原酶及木糖醇脱氢酶活力的变化曲线。

  6. Ethanol production in fermentation of mixed sugars containing xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Mc Cutchen, Carol M.; Li; Xu; Emptage, Mark; Caimi, Perry G.; Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; Franden, Mary Ann

    2009-12-08

    Xylose-utilizing Z. mobilis strains were found to have improved ethanol production when grown in medium containing mixed sugars including xylose if sorbitol or mannitol was included in the medium. The effect was seen in concentrations of mixed sugars where no growth lag period occurs, as well as in higher sugars concentrations.

  7. Improvement of biotechnological xylitol production by glucose during cultive of Candida guilliermondii in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Danielle Virgínio da Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of glucose on xylose-to-xylitol bioconversion by Candida guilliermondii was examined by adding it to sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate medium to obtain different glucose:xylose ratios (1:25, 1:12, 1:5 and 1:2.5. Under experimental conditions, increasing glucose:xylose ratio improved the assimilation of the xylose present in the hydrolysate by yeast, resulting in biomass increase, and in the formation of xylitol and glycerol/ethanol by-products. Maximum values of xylitol yield (0.59 g g-1 and volumetric productivity (0.53 g l-1.h-1 were obtained with glucose:xylose ratio of 1:5, resulting in the higher conversion efficiency (64.3%.O efeito da glicose na bioconversão de xilose em xilitol por Candida guilliermondii foi avaliado em hidrolisado hemicelulósico de bagaço de cana com diferentes relações glicose:xilose (1:25, 1:12, 1:5 and 1:2,5. Sob as condições experimentais, o aumento da relação glicose:xilose favoreceu a assimilação da xilose presente no hidrolisado, resultando em aumento da biomassa celular e aumento da formação de xilitol e dos sub-produtos glicerol e etanol. Os valores máximos do fator de conversão de xilose em xilitol (0,59 g g-1 e da produtividade volumétrica de xilitol (0,53 g l-1.h-1 foram obtidos com a relação glicose:xilose 1:5, resultando na maior eficiência de conversão (64,3%.

  8. Candida Infection of the Bloodstream - Candidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candida Infection of the Bloodstream– Candidemia Fungal Disease Series #4 Candida is the single most important cause of ... Where in my body can I get a Candida infection? Candida infection can happen in almost any part ...

  9. Genetics of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, S.; Magee, P T

    1990-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common fungal pathogens. Infections caused by C. albicans and other Candida species can be life threatening in individuals with impaired immune function. Genetic analysis of C. albicans pathogenesis is complicated by the diploid nature of the species and the absence of a known sexual cycle. Through a combination of parasexual techniques and molecular approaches, an effective genetic system has been developed. The close relationship of C. albicans to the more...

  10. Some aspects of the immunolocalization of FMRFamide in the nervous system of turbellarians, Polycelis tenuis and Girardia tigrina. Short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreshchenko, Natalia; Tolstenkov, O O

    2012-01-01

    The details of the morphology of the nervous system has been investigated in two turbellarian species Polycelis tenuis and Girardia tigrina using confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunostaining to neuropeptide FMRFamide. Abundant FMRFamide immunoreactivity (FMRF-IR) has been observed in central and peripheral nervous systems of both species. Intensive staining has been found in the sensory elements: cells and fibres surrounded the mouth opening, in the fibres enclosed the photoreceptors, triangular auricles in the head region of G. tigrina. The possible function of FMRF-IR neurons in the realization of sensory function in turbellarians is discussed. PMID:22776478

  11. Composición quimica y actividad antifouling de la fraccion lipidica de la esponja marina cliona tenuis (clionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Castellanos; Carmenza Duque

    2009-01-01

    Del extracto orgánico de la esponja marina Cliona tenuis, recolectada en las Islas del Rosario (Colombia, Mar Caribe), fue obtenida la fracción lipídica, la cual presentó propiedades antifouling en pruebas en campo. Esta fracción fue separada por CC sobre gel de sílice hasta obtener fracciones de ésteres metílicos, glicéridos, glicolípidos, fosfolípidos y ácidos grasos libres, las cuales fueron identificadas por CCD y técnicas de dereplicación (RMN 1H y 13C). Posteriormente, las fracciones ...

  12. Evaluation of nutrient supplementation to charcoal-treated and untreated rice straw hydrolysate for xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii

    OpenAIRE

    Solange Inês Mussatto; Inês Conceição Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Xylitol was produced by Candida guilliermondii from charcoal-treated and untreated rice straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate with or without nutrients (ammonium sulphate, calcium chloride, rice bran extract). Both, xylitol yield and volumetric productivity decreased significantly when the nutrients were added to treated and untreated hydrolysates. In the treated hydrolysate, the efficiency of xylose conversion to xylitol was 79% when the nutrients were omitted. The results demonstrated that rice ...

  13. Single zymomonas mobilis strain for xylose and arabinose fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; Picataggio, Stephen K.; Finkelstein, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to single microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugars which are genetically altered to ferment the pentose sugars, xylose and arabinose, to produce ethanol, and a fermentation process utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with a combination of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase, transaldolase and transketolase. Expression of added genes are under the control of Z. mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting glucose, xylose and arabinose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose or starch, to produce ethanol.

  14. Anti-Candida activity of Quercus infectoria gall extracts against Candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Saeida Baharuddin; Hasmah Abdullah; Wan Nor Amilah Wan Abdul Wahab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galls of Quercus infectoria have been traditionally used to treat common ailments, including yeast infections caused by Candida species. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro anti-Candida activity of Q. infectoria gall extracts against selected Candida species. Materials and Methods: Methanol and aqueous extracts of Q. infectoria galls were tested for anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida t...

  15. Candida infection of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features ... of the warm, moist conditions inside the diaper. Candida infection is particularly common in people with diabetes and ...

  16. Simultaneous utilization of glucose and xylose for lipid accumulation in black soldier fly

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wu; Li, Mingsun; Zheng, Longyu; Liu, Yusheng; Zhang, Yanlin; Yu, Ziniu; Ma, Zonghua; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background Lignocellulose is known to be an abundant source of glucose and xylose for biofuels. Yeasts can convert glucose into bioethanol. However, bioconversion of xylose by yeasts is not very efficient, to say nothing of the presence of both glucose and xylose. Efficient utilization of xylose is one of the critical factors for reducing the cost of biofuel from lignocelluloses. However, few natural microorganisms preferentially convert xylose to ethanol. The simultaneous utilization of both...

  17. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.; van de Vondervoort, P.J.I.; de Groot, M.J.L.; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out......, and flux control was shown to be dependent on the metabolite levels. Due to thermodynamic constraints, flux control may reside at the first step in the pathway, i.e., at the xylose reductase, even when the intracellular xylitol concentration is high. On the basis of the kinetic analysis, the general...... dogma specifying that flux control often resides at the step following an intermediate present at high concentrations was, therefore, shown not to hold. The intracellular xylitol concentration was measured in batch cultivations of two different strains of Aspergillus niger and two different strains of...

  18. External development of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae in the subterranean termite Heterotermes tenuis Desenvolvimento dos fungos entomopatogênicos Beauveria bassiana E Metarhizium anisopliae no cupim subterrâneo Heterotermes tenuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Moino Jr.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The subterranean termite Heterotermes tenuis is one of the main pests of sugarcane and eucalyptus in Brazil, and the use of entomopathogenic fungi, alone or associated to chemicals, is an efficient and environmentally favorable method for its control. Studies related to the fungal development on these insects are important due to the effect of insect behavior on entomopathogens. The objective of this work was to describe the external development of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae on H. tenuis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, determining the duration of the different phases of fungal infection. Two fixation techniques for preparing SEM samples were also evaluated. Worker specimens of H. tenuis were inoculated with a 1 x 10(9 conidia mL-1 suspension of the fungi and maintained at 25±1ºC and 70±10% relative humidity. Insects were collected from 0 to 144 hours after inoculation and prepared on SEM stubs for each of the two fixation techniques. The results obtained with the two techniques were compared and duration of the different phases of the infection process were estimated from SEM observations and compared for three fungal isolates. B. bassiana and M. anisopliae have similar development cycles on the termite, but some important differences exist. The penetration, colonization and conidiogenesis phases are relatively faster for M. anisopliae than for B. bassiana, which results in a faster rate of insect mortality. The fixation technique with OsO4 vapor is suitable for preparation of insects to be used in SEM observation of the developmental stages of entomopathogenic fungi.O cupim subterrâneo Heterotermes tenuis , uma das principais pragas da cana-de-açúcar e eucalipto no Brasil, e o uso de fungos entomopatogênicos, isoladamente ou associados a produtos químicos, é um método eficiente e ambientalmente seguro para seu controle. Estudos relacionados ao desenvolvimento fúngico nestes insetos são importantes devido

  19. Efficient xylose fermentation by the brown rot fungus Neolentinus lepideus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenji; Kanawaku, Ryuichi; Masumoto, Masaru; Yanase, Hideshi

    2012-02-10

    The efficient production of bioethanol on an industrial scale requires the use of renewable lignocellulosic biomass as a starting material. A limiting factor in developing efficient processes is identifying microorganisms that are able to effectively ferment xylose, the major pentose sugar found in hemicellulose, and break down carbohydrate polymers without pre-treatment steps. Here, a basidiomycete brown rot fungus was isolated as a new biocatalyst with unprecedented fermentability, as it was capable of converting not only the 6-carbon sugars constituting cellulose, but also the major 5-carbon sugar xylose in hemicelluloses, to ethanol. The fungus was identified as Neolentinus lepideus and was capable of assimilating and fermenting xylose to ethanol in yields of 0.30, 0.33, and 0.34 g of ethanol per g of xylose consumed under aerobic, oxygen-limited, and anaerobic conditions, respectively. A small amount of xylitol was detected as the major by-product of xylose metabolism. N. lepideus produced ethanol from glucose, mannose, galactose, cellobiose, maltose, and lactose with yields ranging from 0.34 to 0.38 g ethanol per g sugar consumed, and also exhibited relatively favorable conversion of non-pretreated starch, xylan, and wheat bran. These results suggest that N. lepideus is a promising candidate for cost-effective and environmentally friendly ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. To our knowledge, this is the first report on efficient ethanol fermentation from various carbohydrates, including xylose, by a naturally occurring brown rot fungus. PMID:22226194

  20. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase/xylulokinase ratio affects product formation in recombinant xylose-utilising Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Anna; Hofmeyr, J.H.S.; Pedler, S.;

    2001-01-01

    Data simulations based on a kinetic model implied that under simplified simulation conditions a 1:greater than or equal to 10:greater than or equal to4 relation of the xylose reductase (XR)/xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH)/xylulokinase (XK) ratio was optimal in minimising xylitol formation during xylose...... utilisation in yeast. The steady-state level of the intermediary xylitol depended also, to a great extent, on the NADH and NAD(+) concentrations. Anaerobic xylose utilisation was investigated for three different recombinant. XR-, XDH- and XK-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, TMB 3002, TMB 3003 and...... TMB 3004, to verify the model predictions. Overexpression of XK was found to be necessary for ethanol formation from xylose. Furthermore, the xylitol formation decreased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, while the ethanol formation increased. Of the three strains, TMB 3004, which was the strain with a XR...

  1. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase/xylulokinase ratio affects product formation in recombinant xylose-utilising Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Anna; Hofmeyr, J.H.S.; Pedler, S.; Hahn-Hagerdal, B.

    Data simulations based on a kinetic model implied that under simplified simulation conditions a 1:greater than or equal to 10:greater than or equal to4 relation of the xylose reductase (XR)/xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH)/xylulokinase (XK) ratio was optimal in minimising xylitol formation during xylose...... utilisation in yeast. The steady-state level of the intermediary xylitol depended also, to a great extent, on the NADH and NAD(+) concentrations. Anaerobic xylose utilisation was investigated for three different recombinant. XR-, XDH- and XK-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, TMB 3002, TMB 3003 and...... TMB 3004, to verify the model predictions. Overexpression of XK was found to be necessary for ethanol formation from xylose. Furthermore, the xylitol formation decreased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, while the ethanol formation increased. Of the three strains, TMB 3004, which was the strain with a XR...

  2. Xylose isomerase from polycentric fungus Orpinomyces: gene sequencing, cloning, and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for bioconversion of xylose to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Anjali; Tamalampudi, Sriappareddy; Ushida, Kazunari; Kanai, Daisuke; Katahira, Satoshi; Srivastava, Aradhana; Fukuda, Hideki; Bisaria, Virendra S; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-04-01

    The cDNA sequence of the gene for xylose isomerase from the rumen fungus Orpinomyces was elucidated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The 1,314-nucleotide gene was cloned and expressed constitutively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The deduced polypeptide sequence encoded a protein of 437 amino acids which showed the highest similarity to the family II xylose isomerases. Further, characterization revealed that the recombinant enzyme was a homodimer with a subunit of molecular mass 49 kDa. Cell extract of the recombinant strain exhibited high specific xylose isomerase activity. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 7.5, while the low temperature optimum at 37 degrees C was the property that differed significantly from the majority of the reported thermophilic xylose isomerases. In addition to the xylose isomerase gene, the overexpression of the S. cerevisiae endogenous xylulokinase gene and the Pichia stipitis SUT1 gene for sugar transporter in the recombinant yeast facilitated the efficient production of ethanol from xylose. PMID:19050860

  3. Performance of Candida ID, a New Chromogenic Medium for Presumptive Identification of Candida Species, in Comparison to CHROMagar Candida

    OpenAIRE

    Willinger, Birgit; Hillowoth, Cornelia; Selitsch, Brigitte; Manafi, Mammad

    2001-01-01

    Candida ID agar allows identification of Candida albicans and differentiation of other Candida species. In comparison with CHROMagar Candida, we evaluated the performance of this medium directly from 596 clinical specimens. In particular, detection of C. albicans after 24 h of incubation was easier on Candida ID (sensitivity, 96.8%) than on CHROMagar (sensitivity, 49.6%).

  4. The fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates with xylose isomerases and yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, T.

    1992-01-01

    Untreated spent sulphite liquor (SSL) was fermented with Canida tropicalis, Pichia stipitis, Pachysolen tannophilus, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a co-culture of P. Tannophilus and A. cerevisiae, in the presence of xylose isomerases and 4.6 mM azide. The highest yield of ethanol, 0.41 g/g total sugar was obtained with S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis, and P. tannophilus produced considerble amounts of polyoles, mainly xylitol. With P. stipitis sugar uptake was rapidly inhibited in untreated SSL. The presence of azide contributed to the yield by about 0.04. The fermentation of hydrogen fluoride-pretreated and acid-hydrolysed wheat straw with S. cerevisiae, xylose isomerase, and azide gave a yield of 0.40 g ethanol/g total sugar. In this substrate the xylose utilisation was 84% compared with 51% in SSL. In the concentration range appropriate for enzymatic xylose isomerization, xylulose was measured in a lignocellulose hydrolysate using HPLC with two hydrogen loaded ion exchange columns in series. SSL was used as a model for lignocellulose hydrolysates. The enzymatic isomerization of xylose to xylulose was followed directly in SSL, providing a method for the direct determination of xylose isomerase activity in lignocellulose hydrolysates. Three different xylose isomerase preparations of L. brevis whole cells were compared with a commercial enzyme preparation Maxazyme GI-immob., with respect to activity and stability. From a continuous SSL fermentation plant, two species of yeasts were isolated, S. cerevisiae and Pichia membranaefaciens. One of the isolates of S. cerevisiae, no. 3 was heavily flocculating. Without acetic acid present, both bakers' yeast and isolate no. 3 showed catabolite repression and fermented glucose and galactose sequentially. Galactose fermentation with bakers' yeast was strongly inhibited by acetic acid at pH values below 6. Isolate no. 3 fermented galactose, glucose and mannose, in the presence of acetic acid

  5. Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter (Heteroptera: Miridae, a predatory species of the tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrabi Fariba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick, is a major worldwide pest of tomato crops, both in the greenhouse and in open field cultivations. Since this pest’s new introduction in Iran, it has caused extensive damage. Chemicals have mainly been used to control this pest. The purpose of our research was to identify the indigenous predators of the tomato leafminer, associated with tomato in the Borazjan region of the Bushehr province, Iran. From March to May 2014, infested tomato leaves were collected from protected tomato crops. A predator species from the family Miridae was found, reared, and identified as Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter 1895. This species is reported for the first time on tomato leafminer in Iran. Identification of important natural enemies provides a scientific basis for including these predators in the biological programs against this pest.

  6. Microaerobic conversion of xylose to ethanol in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae SX6(MUT) expressing cofactor-balanced xylose metabolic enzymes and deficient in ALD6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung-Eun; Seong, Yeong-Je; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Min; Kim, Soo-Jung; Park, Kyungmoon; Park, Yong-Cheol

    2016-06-10

    Xylose is a major monosugar in cellulosic biomass and should be utilized for cost-effective ethanol production. In this study, xylose-converting ability of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae SX6(MUT) expressing NADH-preferring xylose reductase mutant (R276H) and other xylose-metabolic enzymes, and deficient in aldehyde dehydrogenase 6 (Ald6p) were characterized at microaerobic conditions using various sugar mixtures. The reduction of air supply from 0.5vvm to 0.1vvm increased specific ethanol production rate by 75% and did not affect specific xylose consumption rate. In batch fermentations using various concentrations of xylose (50-104g/L), higher xylose concentration enhanced xylose consumption rate and ethanol productivity but reduced ethanol yield, owing to the accumulation of xylitol and glycerol from xylose. SX6(MUT) consumed monosugars in pitch pine hydrolysates and produced 23.1g/L ethanol from 58.7g/L sugars with 0.39g/g ethanol yield, which was 14% higher than the host strain of S. cerevisiae D452-2 without the xylose assimilating enzymes. In conclusion, S. cerevisiae SX6(MUT) was characterized to possess high xylose-consuming ability in microaerobic conditions and a potential for ethanol production from cellulosic biomass. PMID:27059482

  7. STRAIN IMPROVEMENT OF CANDIDA TROPICALIS OVC5 FOR XYLITOLPRODUCTION BY RANDOM MUTAGENESIS.

    OpenAIRE

    Sama. Jagadish Kumar, Marrivada. Sudhakara Reddy and Linga.Venkateswar Rao

    2010-01-01

    Candida tropicalis OVC 5 was subjected to ultraviolet (UV) rays and the mutants obtained were screened for xylitol production. One of the mutant strain CT-UV20, produced 0.78 g xylitol/ g xylose. To isolate high xylitol yielding, Xylitol de hydrogenase enzyme (XDH) defective mutant strain, CT-UV20 was further treated with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitroso guanidine (MNNG) and five mutants were selected based on difference in colony morphology. Xylitol production of these MNNG treated mutants were co...

  8. Thermal degradation reaction mechanism of xylose: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Wu, Longqin; Tong, Hong

    2016-08-01

    The thermal degradation reaction mechanism of xylose as hemicellulose model compound was investigated by using density functional theory methods M062X with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. Eight possible pyrolytic reaction pathways were proposed and the standard kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in all reaction pathways were calculated at different temperatures. In reaction pathway (1), xylose is first transformed into acyclic containing-carbonyl isomer, and then the isomer further decomposes through four possible pyrolysis pathways (1-1)-(1-4). Pathways (2) and (3) depict an immediate ring-opening process through the simultaneous breaking of C-O and C-C bonds. Pathways (4)-(7) describe the pyrolysis processes of various anhydro-xyloses through a direct ring-opening process. Pathway (8) gives the evolutionary process of pyranones. The calculation results show that reaction pathways (1), (2) and (5) are the major reaction channels and reaction pathways (3), (4), and (6)-(8) are the competitive reaction channels in pyrolysis of xylose. The major products of xylose pyrolysis are low molecular products such as 2-furaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and acetone, and the main competitive products are formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, CO2, CH4, acetol, pyranone, and so on.

  9. Xylose fermentation efficiency and inhibitor tolerance of the recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Mitsumasu, Kanako; Gou, Zi-Xi; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Akamatsu, Takashi; Taguchi, Hisataka; Kida, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Industrial yeast strains with good xylose fermentation ability and inhibitor tolerance are important for economical lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37, harboring the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase (XR-XDH)-based xylose metabolic pathway, displayed efficient xylose fermentation during batch and continuous fermentation. During batch fermentation, the xylose consumption rates at the first 36 h were similar (1.37 g/L/h) when the initial xylose concentrations were 50 and 75 g/L, indicating that xylose fermentation was not inhibited even when the xylose concentration was as high as 75 g/L. The presence of glucose, at concentrations of up to 25 g/L, did not affect xylose consumption rate at the first 36 h. Strain NAPX37 showed stable xylose fermentation capacity during continuous ethanol fermentation using xylose as the sole sugar, for almost 1 year. Fermentation remained stable at a dilution rate of 0.05/h, even though the xylose concentration in the feed was as high as 100 g/L. Aeration rate, xylose concentration, and MgSO4 concentration were found to affect xylose consumption and ethanol yield. When the xylose concentration in the feed was 75 g/L, a high xylose consumption rate of 6.62 g/L/h and an ethanol yield of 0.394 were achieved under an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm, dilution rate of 0.1/h, and 5 mM MgSO4. In addition, strain NAPX37 exhibited good tolerance to inhibitors such as weak acids, furans, and phenolics during xylose fermentation. These findings indicate that strain NAPX37 is a promising candidate for application in the industrial production of lignocellulosic bioethanol. PMID:26603762

  10. Desarrollo biológico e instalación del mírido depredador Nesidiocoris tenuis en el cultivo del tomate con quistes desencapsulados de Artemia sp. como alimento alternativo

    OpenAIRE

    ALONSO VALIENTE, MIQUEL

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) caused great damage in tomato crops during the first years after its introduction in 2006. After several years using insecticides, its integrated management was improved via the use of the predatory mirid Nesidiocoris tenuis Reuter (Hemiptera: Miridae). N. tenuis is currently used in southeastern Spanish greenhouses. This predator is reared by several companies using the eggs of the mill moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller) ...

  11. Candida's arranged marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, N A; Brown, A J; Odds, F C

    2000-07-14

    Biologists who study the fungus Candida albicans have always assumed that this organism reproduces asexually because they have not found evidence of mating, meiosis, or a haploid stage of the life cycle. However, as Gow et al. explain in a Perspective, sequencing of the C. albicans genome has revealed the existence of a possible mating type locus. This finding has now been extended to demonstrate actual mating in the fungus (Hull et al., Magee and Magee). PMID:10917850

  12. Discovery and characterization of a xylose reductase from Zymomonas mobilis ZM4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Manoj; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2011-11-01

    Formation of xylitol, a byproduct from xylose fermentation, is a major limiting factor in ethanol production from xylose in engineered Zymomonas strains, yet the postulated xylose reductase remains elusive. We report here the discovery of xylose reductase in Zymomonas mobilis and, for the first time, to associate the enzyme function with its gene. Besides xylose and xylulose, the enzyme was active towards benzaldehyde, furfural, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, and acetaldehyde, exhibiting nearly 150-times higher affinity with benzaldehyde than xylose. The discovery of xylose reductase paves the way for further improvement of xylose fermentation in Z. mobilis. The enzyme may also be used to mitigate toxicity of furfural and other inhibitors from plant biomass. PMID:21720846

  13. Convergent Synthesis of Pancratistatin from Piperonal and Xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Johan Hygum; Madsen, Robert

    2009-01-01

    afford a highly functionalised 1,7-diene, which is then converted into the corresponding cyclohexene by ring-closing olefin metathesis. Subsequent Overman rearrangement, dihydroxylation and deprotection afford the natural product in a total of 25 steps from the two starting materials. The longest linear......A synthesis of the antitumour agent pancratistatin is described from piperonal and D-xylose. Piperonal is converted into cinnamyl bromide 11 while methyl 5-iodoribofuranoside 12 is derived from xylose. The allylic bromide and the iodocarbohydrate are combined in a zinc-mediated tandem reaction to...

  14. Co-fermentation of glucose, xylose and/or cellobiose by yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Thomas W.; Willis, Laura B.; Long, Tanya M.; Su, Yi-Kai

    2013-09-10

    Provided herein are methods of using yeast cells to produce ethanol by contacting a mixture comprising xylose with a Spathaspora yeast cell under conditions suitable to allow the yeast to ferment at least a portion of the xylose to ethanol. The methods allow for efficient ethanol production from hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic material and sugar mixtures including at least xylose and glucose or xylose, glucose and cellobiose.

  15. Investigating xylose metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae via 13C metabolic flux analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Xueyang; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Background To engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient xylose utilization, a fungal pathway consisting of xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulose kinase is often introduced to the host strain. Despite extensive in vitro studies on the xylose pathway, the intracellular metabolism rewiring in response to the heterologous xylose pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we applied 13C metabolic flux analysis and stoichiometric modeling to systemically investigate the f...

  16. Comparison of xylose fermentation by two high-performance engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Li; Annsea Park; Raissa Estrela; Soo-Rin Kim; Yong-Su Jin; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2016-01-01

    Economical biofuel production from plant biomass requires the conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in the plant cell wall. The best industrial fermentation organism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been developed to utilize xylose by heterologously expressing either a xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase (XR/XDH) pathway or a xylose isomerase (XI) pathway. Although it has been proposed that the optimal means for fermenting xylose into biofuels would use XI instead of the X...

  17. Engineering industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for xylose fermentation and comparison for switchgrass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces physiology and fermentation related properties vary broadly among industrial strains. In this study, six industrial strains of varied genetic background were engineered to ferment xylose. Aerobic growth rates on xylose were 0.040 h**-1 to 0.167 h**-1. Fermentation of xylose, glucose/xy...

  18. Xylitol synthesis mutant of xylose-utilizing zymomonas for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Chou, Yat-Chen; McCutchen, Carol M.; Zhang, Min

    2010-06-22

    A strain of xylose-utilizing Zymomonas was engineered with a genetic modification to the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase gene resulting in reduced expression of GFOR enzyme activity. The engineered strain exhibits reduced production of xylitol, a detrimental by-product of xylose metabolism. It also consumes more xylose and produces more ethanol during mixed sugar fermentation under process-relevant conditions.

  19. Engineering of the redox imbalance of Fusarium oxysporum enables anaerobic growth on xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, Paul; Grotkjær, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction metabolism, of the natural xylose-fermenting fungus Fusarium oxysporum, was used as a strategy to achieve anaerobic growth and ethanol production from xylose. Beneficial alterations of the redox fluxes and thereby of the xylose metabolism were obtained by taking...

  20. KINETIKA FERMENTASI PADA PRODUKSI XILITOL DENGAN PENAMBAHAN ARABINOSA DAN GLUKOSA SEBAGAI KOSUBSTRAT OLEH Candida shehatae WAY 08 [A Kinetic Study of Xylitol Production with Glucose and Arabinose as Cosubstrate by Candida shehatae WAY 08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnu Adi Yulianto1

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol production by Candida shehatae WAY 08 was investigated under two sets of conditions (a with addition of glucose or arabinose as cosubstrate, (b ratio of xylose to cosubstrate at the range of 6:1— 6:3%. The fermentation was performed at 3000/n 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks placed in a shaker incubator at 200 rpm for 72 h. Biornass concentration was calculated as dry mass. Xylose. cosubstrate. xylitol, ethanol, and acetic acid concentrator ware determined using API. C.The result indicated that addition of arabinose as cosubstrate to xylose within the ratio range of 1:6—3:6% could increase xylitol production. The highest xylitol yield (0,84 gIg and volumetric rate of xylitol production (0.66 g/Lh were achieved at ratio of xylose to arabinose as high as 6:1%. However, addition of glucose as cosubstrate decreased xylitul production. A medium containing 6% glucose as a sole carbon source could achieve the hiqhest ethanol yield(0.32 g/g and growth yièld (0,21/ gIg. wh;/e arabinose as a sole source was metabolized mainly for biomoss formation.

  1. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeekens, S.P.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility

  2. Preliminary Study on Construction of Recombinant Strains of Polygenic Series Fermentable Xylose to Ethanol Production%多基因串联发酵木糖产乙醇重组菌株构建初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆亮; 刘敏; 叶凯; 茆军; 于孟斌; 陈高云; 涂振东

    2013-01-01

    [目的]解决酿酒酵母不能发酵或利用木糖的问题,以期选育出高效转化秸秆生产乙醇的菌株.[方法]将来自近平滑假丝酵母(Candida parapsilosis)的木糖还原酶基因(xyl1),热带假丝酵母(Candida tropicalis)的木糖醇脱氢酶基因(xyl2),树干毕赤酵母(Pichia stipitis)的木酮糖激酶基因(xks1),以及酿酒酵母内源的转醛酶基因(tal1)和转酮酶基因(tkl1),通过串联共表达的方法构建到表达载体pAUR123上,构建了一株重组酿酒酵母.[结果]经过酶活性分析和Western blot蛋白免疫实验,证明转化子pAUR123-XL成功导入酿酒酵母并得到表达.以木糖为唯一碳源进行限氧发酵,能稳定利用木糖,木糖发酵结果表明:木糖的利用率为79.5%,乙醇产率为31%.[结论]构建的重组菌株能较好的利用木糖,为进一步的乙醇发酵提供了依据.%[Objective] This project aims to resolve the problem that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can 't ferment or utilize xylose,with a view to the efficient conversion of culms to ethanol strains.[Method] Xylose reductase gene (xyl1) from Candida parapsilosis xylitol,dehydrogenase gene (xyl2) from Candida tropicalis and the xylitol dehydrogenase gene (xyl2) in Pichia stipitis from the trunk and its own xylose transaldolase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (tall) on construction of expression vector pAUR123 by the method of concatenating co-expression,thus building a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.[Result] After analysis of enzyme activity and Western blot protein,the transformant pAUR123-X12A was successfully imported into Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1.The bacteria use xylose as the sole carbon source to ferment in the limited oxygen,and it could used the xylose initially,the results showed that:The recombinant bacteria could metabolize xylose stably,the yield of ethanol was 31%,and the utilization of xylose reached 79.5%.[Conclusion] The recombinant strain can utilize xylose and provide the

  3. Kinetics of xylose dehydration into furfural in acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Chen; Weijiang Zhang; Jiao Xu; Pingli Li

    2015-01-01

    In this paper kinetics of xylose dehydration into furfural using acetic acid as catalyst was studied comprehensively and systematical y. The reaction order of both furfural and xylose dehydration was determined and the reaction activation energy was obtalned by nonlinear regression. The effect of acetic acid concentration was also investi-gated. Reaction rate constants were galned. Reaction rate constant of xylose dehydration is k1 ¼ 4:189 . 1010 ½A.0:1676 exp −108:6.1000RT . ., reaction rate constant of furfural degradation is k2 ¼ 1:271 . 104½A.0:1375 exp−63:413.1000RT . and reaction rate constant of condensation reaction is k3 ¼ 3:4051 . 1010½A.0:1676 exp−104:99.1000RT .. Based on this, the kinetics equation of xylose dehydration into furfural in acetic acid was set up according to theory of Dunlop and Furfural generating rate equation is dd½F.t ¼ k1½X.0e−k1t−k2½F.−k3½X.0e−k1t½F.. © 2015 The Chemical Industry and Engineering Society of China, and Chemical Industry Press. Al rights reserved.

  4. Production of xylitol from D-xylose by Debaryomyces hansenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, J.M. [Univ. of Vigo, Ornese (Spain); Gong, Cheng S.; Tsao, G.T. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Xylitol, a naturally occurring five-carbon sugar alcohol, can be produced from D-xylose through microbial hydrogenation. Xylitol has found increasing use in the food industries, especially in confectionary. It is the only so-called {open_quotes}second-generation polyol sweeteners{close_quotes} that is allowed to have the specific health claims in some world markets. In this study, the effect of cell density on the xylitol production by the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii NRRL Y-7426 from D-xylose under microaerobic conditions was examined. The rate of xylitol production increased with increasing yeast cell density to 3 g/L. Beyond this amount there was no increase in the xylitol production with increasing cell density. The optimal pH range for xylitol production was between 4.5 and 5.5. The optimal temperature was between 28 and 37{degrees}C, and the optimal shaking speed was 300 rpm. The rate of xylitol production increased linearly with increasing initial xylose concentration. A high concentration of xylose (279 g/L) was converted rapidly and efficiently to produce xylitol with a product concentration of 221 g/L was reached after 48 h of incubation under optimum conditions. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Exploring xylose metabolism in Spathaspora species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadete, Raquel M.; de Las Heras, Alejandro M.; Sandström, Anders G.;

    2016-01-01

    TMB 3504 displays higher XR activity with NADH than with NADPH, with consequent improved ethanol yield and productivity and low xylitol production. This meaningful advance in anaerobic xylose fermentation by recombinant S. cerevisiae (using the XR/XDH pathway) paves the way for the development of...

  6. Reaction mechanisms and kinetics of processing glucose, xylose and glucose-xylose mixtures under hot compressed water conditions for predicting bio-crude composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigoras, Ionela; Toor, Saqib Sohail; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    Mechanisms for bio-crude formation during the conversion of glucose, xylose and glucose-xylose mixtures as biomass model compounds under hot compressed water conditions are investigated. Studies in literature have shown that the diverse products formed at the early stages of glucose or xylose...... insoluble components at longer reaction times. The effects of pressure, pH, catalyst and reaction time on the main products are examined thoroughly. The possible routes for the formation of oil compounds are developed....

  7. Analysis and prediction of the physiological effects of altered coenzyme specificity in xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase during xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Krahulec, Stefan; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    An advanced strategy of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain development for fermentation of xylose applies tailored enzymes in the process of metabolic engineering. The coenzyme specificities of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) and the NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) have been targeted in previous studies by protein design or evolution with the aim of improving the recycling of NADH or NADPH in their two-step pathway, converting xylose to xylulose. Yeast strains expressing va...

  8. Demographic history and asynchronous spawning shape genetic differentiation among populations of the hard coral Acropora tenuis in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Natalie L

    2016-05-01

    Genetic subdivision within populations can ultimately lead to the evolution of new species, and in populations of broadcast-spawners a potential facilitator of genetic subdivision is asynchronous reproduction. However, the factors that shape genetic variation in marine systems are complex and ambiguous, and ecological genetic structure may be influenced by the overriding signature of past demographic events. Here, the relative roles of the timing of reproduction and historical geography on the partitioning of genetic variation were examined in seven populations of the broadcast-spawning coral Acropora tenuis over 12° of latitude. The analysis of multiple loci (mitochondrial control region, two nuclear introns and six microsatellites) revealed significant genetic division between the most northern reef and all other reefs, suggesting that WA reefs were re-colonized from two different sources after the Pleistocene glaciation. Accompanying this pattern was significant genetic differentiation associated with different breeding seasons (spring and autumn), which was greatest in PaxC, in which there were two divergent lineages (ΦST=0.98). This is the second study to find divergent clades of PaxC associated with spring and autumn spawners, strengthening the suggestion of some selective connection to timing of reproduction in corals. This study reiterates the need to incorporate reproductive timing into population genetic studies of corals because it facilitates genetic differentiation; however, careful analysis of population genetic data is required to separate ecological and evolutionary processes. PMID:26876640

  9. Constant phycobilisome size in chromatically adapted cells of the cyanobacterium Tolypothrix tenuis, and variation in Nostoc sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohki, K.; Gantt, E.; Lipschultz, C.A.; Ernst, M.C.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes of Tolypothrix tenuis, a cyanobacterium capable of complete chromatic adaptation, were studied from cells grown in red and green light, and in darkness. The phycobilisome size remained constant irrespective of the light quality. The hemidiscoidal phycobilisomes had an average diameter of about 52 nanometers and height of about 33 nanometers, by negative staining. The thickness was equivalent to a physocyanin molecule (about 10 nanometers). The molar ratio of allophycocyanin, relative to other phycobiliproteins always remained at about 1:3. Phycobilisomes from red light grown cells and cells grown heterotrophically in darkness were indistinguishable in their pigment composition, polypeptide pattern, and size. Eight polypeptides were resolved in the phycobilin region (17.5 to 23.5 kilodaltons) by isoelectric focusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Half of these were invariable, while others were variable in green and red light. It is inferred that phycoerythrin synthesis in green light resulted in a one for one substitution of phycocyanin, thus retaining a constant phycobilisome size. Tolypothrix appears to be one of the best examples of phycobiliprotein regulation with wavelength. By contrast, in Nostoc sp., the decrease in phycoerythrin in red light cells was accompanied by a decrease in phycobilisome size but not a regulated substitution.

  10. Candida albicans skin abscess Abscesso de pele por Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Francisco Tuon; Antonio Carlos Nicodemo

    2006-01-01

    Subcutaneous candidal abscess is a very rare infection even in immunocompromised patients. Some cases are reported when breakdown in the skin occurs, as bacterial cellulites or abscess, iatrogenic procedures, trauma and parenteral substance abuse. We describe a case of Candida albicans subcutaneous abscess without fungemia, which can be associated with central venous catheter.Abscesso subcutâneo por Candida é infecção muito rara mesmo em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Alguns casos são relatado...

  11. Pathogenesis of Candida vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, J D

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of candida vulvovaginitis (CVV) has been estimated based on statistical data from Great Britain to be an increase to 200/100,000 over 10 years to 1984. CVV in the US is the 2nd commonest cause of vaginal infection, with bacterial vaginosis occurring twice as often. 85-90% of the yeasts isolated from the vagina are candida albicans, based on biotyping rather that the newer methods of DNA hybridization. The pathogenesis of CVV is discussed in terms of the microbiology (virulence factors, adherence, germ tube and mycelium formation, proteinase secretion, and switching colonies), asymptomatic vaginal colonization, transformation to symptomatic vaginitis, host predisposing factors (pregnancy, oral contraceptives, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobes, and other), vaginal defense mechanisms (humoral system, phagocytic system, cell mediated immunity, vaginal flora, other), and pathogenesis of recurrent and chronic CVV (internal reservoir, sexual transmission, vaginal relapse, and experimental models) The discussion of the development of virulent symptoms is capsuled in the following comments. Vaginal cell receptivity varies among individuals, but all strains of C. Albicans adhere to both exfoliated vaginal and buccal epithelial cells, or mucosal surfaces, through the yeast surface mannoprotein. It is suggested from in vitro studies that germ tube and mycelium formation facilitates vaginal mucosal invasion. Exogenous and endogenous factors may enhance germination and precipitate symptomatic vaginitis, or inhibit germination. Increased proteinase secretion may be a result of the transformation from the blastoconidium/colonization phase to the germinated invasive vaginitis stage or an independent virulence factor. It is reported that hereditable spontaneous switching may occur spontaneously in vivo also. Colonizing yeasts with a change in environment can transform to a more virulent phase. Colonization rates vary from 10-25%, and the critical issue is understanding

  12. Fermentation of xylose to produce ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain containing XYLA and XKS1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaolin; JIANG Ning; HE Peng; LU Dajun; SHEN An

    2005-01-01

    Fermentation of the pentose sugar xylose to produce ethanol using lignocellulosic biomass would make bioethanol production economically more competitive. Saccharomyce cerevisise, an efficient ethanol producer, cannot utilize xylose because it lacks the ability to convert xylose to its isomer xylulose. In this study, XYLA gene encoding xylose isomerase (XI) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4T and XKS1 gene encoding xylulokinase (XK) from Pichia stipitis were cloned and functionally coexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae EF-326 to construct a recombinant xylose-utilizing strain. The resulting strain S. cerevisiae EF 1014 not only grew on xylose as sole carbon source, but also produced ethanol under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations performed with different xylose concentrations at different temperatures demonstrated that the highest ethanol productivity was 0.11 g/g xylose when xylose concentration was provided at 50 g/L. Under this condition, 28.4% of xylose was consumed and 1.54 g/L xylitol was formed. An increasing fermentation temperature from 30℃ to 37℃ did not improve ethanol yield.

  13. Isolation and screening of yeasts that ferment D-xylose directly to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigam, J.N.; Ireland, R.S.; Margaritis, A.; Lachance, M.A.

    1985-12-01

    Natural habitats of yeasts were examined for the presence of strains able to produce ethanol from D-xylose. Black knots, insect frass, and tree exudates were screened by enrichment in liquid D-xylose-yeast extract medium. These and each D-xylose-assimilating yeast in a collection from cactus fruits and Drosophila spp. were tested for alcohol production from this sugar. Among the 412 isolates examined, 36 produced more than 1 g of ethanol liter/sup -1/ from 20 g of D-xylose liter/sup -1/, all under aerated conditions. Closer examination of the strains indicated that their time courses of D-xylose fermentation followed different patterns. Some strains produced more biomass than ethanol, and among these, ethanol may or may not be assimilated rapidly after depletion of D-xylose. Others produced more ethanol than biomass, but all catabolized ethanol after carbohydrate exhaustion. Ethanol production appeared best at low pH values and under mild aeration. Possible correlations between the nutritional profiles of the yeasts and their ability to produce ethanol from D-xylose were explored by multivariate analysis. D-Xylose appeared slightly better utilized by yeasts which rate poorly in terms of fermentation. The fermentation of D-glucose had no bearing on D-xylose fermentation. No specific nutritional trait could discriminate well between better D-xylose fermentors and other yeasts.

  14. Intraspecific variation in a physiological thermoregulatory mechanism: the case of the lizard Liolaemus tenuis (Liolaeminae Variación intraespecífica en un mecanismo termorregulatorio fisiológico: el caso del lagarto Liolaemus tenuis (Liolaeminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELA A VIDAL

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The interspecific variation of heating rates in Liolaemus lizards, suggests an adaptive value of this physiological thermoregulatory mechanism, which would allow lizards to cope with the environmental thermal restrictions, imposed to behavioral thermoregulation. This trend has barely been tested at intraspecific level, and here we explore if intraspecific variation in heating rates occurs in Liolaemus tenuis, a relative widely distributed species from central Chile. We test the hypothesis that heating rates are related to the thermal environmental conditions at which populations are exposed, by comparing the heating rates of three populations (from a latitudinal range, which inhabit under different thermal conditions. Additionally, we explore if the intrinsic factor, sex, also modulates heating rates. There was a significant intraspecific variation in heating rates, at population and gender level. These rates however, showed only a partial relationship with the environmental thermal conditions. We found that the northern population, inhabiting at higher temperature, heated slower, which might reduce the risk of overheating. On the other hand, independent of the population, females heated slower than males. The meaning of this sexual variation is unclear, but may be consequence of the significant differences in genders' social behavior. Because males defend a territory with a harem, by heating faster, they can allocate extra time in behaviors associated to the defense and maintenance of the territory.La variación interespecífica en las tasas de calentamiento de Liolaemus pareciera ser un mecanismo fisiológico adaptativo que permitiría a los lagartos enfrentar restricciones térmicas ambientales impuestas a la termorregulación conductual. Esta tendencia ha sido raramente analizada a nivel intraespecífico y en este estudio exploramos si existe variación intraespecífica en las tasas de calentamiento de Liolaemus tenuis, una especie con rango

  15. Production, purification, and characterization of a highly glucose-tolerant novel beta-glucosidase from Candida peltata.

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, B C; Bothast, R J

    1996-01-01

    Candida peltata (NRRL Y-6888) produced beta-glucosidase when grown in liquid culture on various substrates (glucose, xylose, L-arabinose, cellobiose, sucrose, and maltose). An extracellular beta-glucosidase was purified 1,800-fold to homogeneity from the culture supernatant of the yeast grown on glucose by salting out with ammonium sulfate, ion-exchange chromatography with DEAE Bio-Gel A agarose, Bio-Gel A-0.5m gel filtration, and cellobiose-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The enzyme was a...

  16. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    OpenAIRE

    Smeekens, S P; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Kullberg, B J; Netea, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility. On the one hand, severe fungal infections are associated with monogenic primary immunodeficiencies such as defects in STAT1, STAT3 or CARD9, recently discovered as novel clinical entities. On the...

  17. Xylitol Production From D-Xylose by Facultative Anaerobic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Rangaswamy, Sendil

    2003-01-01

    Seventeen species of facultative anaerobic bacteria belonging to three genera (Serratia, Cellulomonas, and Corynebacterium) were screened for the production of xylitol; a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener in the pharmaceutical and food industries. A chromogenic assay of both solid and liquid cultures showed that 10 of the 17 species screened could grow on D-xylose and produce detectable quantities of xylitol during 24-96 h of fermentation. The ten bacterial species were studied for the effe...

  18. Bypassing the Pentose Phosphate Pathway: Towards Modular Utilization of Xylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulika Chomvong

    Full Text Available The efficient use of hemicellulose in the plant cell wall is critical for the economic conversion of plant biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals. Previously, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been engineered to convert the hemicellulose-derived pentose sugars xylose and arabinose to d-xylulose-5-phosphate for conversion via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. However, efficient pentose utilization requires PPP optimization and may interfere with its roles in NADPH and pentose production. Here, we developed an alternative xylose utilization pathway that largely bypasses the PPP. In the new pathway, d-xylulose is converted to d-xylulose-1-phosphate, a novel metabolite to S. cerevisiae, which is then cleaved to glycolaldehyde and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. This synthetic pathway served as a platform for the biosynthesis of ethanol and ethylene glycol. The use of d-xylulose-1-phosphate as an entry point for xylose metabolism opens the way for optimizing chemical conversion of pentose sugars in S. cerevisiae in a modular fashion.

  19. Bypassing the Pentose Phosphate Pathway: Towards Modular Utilization of Xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomvong, Kulika; Bauer, Stefan; Benjamin, Daniel I.; Li, Xin; Nomura, Daniel K.; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient use of hemicellulose in the plant cell wall is critical for the economic conversion of plant biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals. Previously, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been engineered to convert the hemicellulose-derived pentose sugars xylose and arabinose to d-xylulose-5-phosphate for conversion via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). However, efficient pentose utilization requires PPP optimization and may interfere with its roles in NADPH and pentose production. Here, we developed an alternative xylose utilization pathway that largely bypasses the PPP. In the new pathway, d-xylulose is converted to d-xylulose-1-phosphate, a novel metabolite to S. cerevisiae, which is then cleaved to glycolaldehyde and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. This synthetic pathway served as a platform for the biosynthesis of ethanol and ethylene glycol. The use of d-xylulose-1-phosphate as an entry point for xylose metabolism opens the way for optimizing chemical conversion of pentose sugars in S. cerevisiae in a modular fashion. PMID:27336308

  20. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuza Nogueira Moysés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  1. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  2. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  3. Optimizing Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae) as a biological control agent: mathematical models for predicting its development as a function of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Héctor; Román-Fernández, Luis R; Sáenz-Romo, María G; Pérez-Moreno, Ignacio; Marco-Mancebón, Vicente S

    2016-04-01

    For optimal application of Nesidiocoris tenuis as a biological control agent, adequate field management and programmed mass rearing are essential. Mathematical models are useful tools for predicting the temperature-dependent developmental rate of the predator. In this study, the linear model and nonlinear models Logan type III, Lactin and Brière were estimated at constant temperatures and validated at alternating temperatures and under field conditions. N. tenuis achieved complete development from egg to adult at constant temperatures between 15 and 35°C with high survivorship (>80%) in the range 18-32°C. The total developmental time decreased from a maximum at 15°C (76.74 d) to a minimum at 33°C (12.67 d) and after that, increased to 35°C (13.98 d). Linear and nonlinear developmental models all had high accuracy (R a 2 >0.86). The maximum developmental rate was obtained between 31.9°C (Logan type III and Brière model for N1) and 35.6°C (for the egg stage in the Brière model). Optimal survival and the highest developmental rate fell within the range 27-30°C. The field validation revealed that the Logan type III and Lactin models offered the best predictions (95.0 and 94.5%, respectively). The data obtained on developmental time and mortality at different temperatures are useful for mass rearing this predator, and the developmental models are valuable for using N. tenuis as a biological control agent. PMID:26700327

  4. [Engineering of the xylose metabolic pathway for microbial production of bio-based chemicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weixi; Fu, Jing; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Tao

    2013-08-01

    As the rapid development of economy necessitates a large number of oil, the contradiction between energy supply and demand is further exacerbated by the dwindling reserves of petroleum resource. Therefore, the research of the renewable cellulosic biomass resources is gaining unprecedented momentum. Because xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose in lignocellulose hydrolyzes, high-efficiency bioconversion of xylose becomes one of the vital factors that affect the industrial prospects of lignocellulose application. According to the research progresses in recent years, this review summarized the advances in bioconversion of xylose, which included identification and redesign of the xylose metabolic pathway, engineering the xylose transport pathway and bio-based chemicals production. In order to solve the energy crisis and environmental pollution issues, the development of advanced bio-fuel technology, especially engineering the microbe able to metabolize xylose and produce ethanol by synthetic biology, is environmentally benign and sustainable. PMID:24364352

  5. Biología de la reproducción de los míridos depredadores "Macrolophus pygmaeus" y "Nesidiocoris tenuis"

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Villamizar, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    [spa] M. pygmaeus y N. tenuis son depredadores polífagos nativos de la región mediterránea que actualmente se utilizan en el control biológico de moscas blancas y otras plagas de los cultivos de hortalizas. Los cultivos de invernadero y al aire libre se han visto favorecidos con la colonización de estos depredadores debido a que se encuentran abundantes poblaciones sobre la flora ruderal. Sin embargo, se han descrito problemas de colonización e instalación dentro del cultivo del tomate. Este ...

  6. Description of Diutina gen. nov., Diutina siamensis, f.a. sp. nov., and reassignment of Candida catenulata, Candida mesorugosa, Candida neorugosa, Candida pseudorugosa, Candida ranongensis, Candida rugosa and Candida scorzettiae to the genus Diutina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunnamwong, Pannida; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Limtong, Savitree; Lachance, Marc-André

    2015-12-01

    Three strains (DMKU-RE28, DMKU-RE43T and DMKU-RE123) of a novel anamorphic yeast species were isolated from rice leaf tissue collected in Thailand. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the species forms a sister pair with Candida ranongensis CBS 10861T but differs by 24-30 substitutions in the LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 domains and 30-35 substitutions in the ITS region. A phylogenetic analysis based on both the small and the large rRNA gene subunits confirmed this connection and demonstrated the presence of a clade that also includes Candida catenulata, Candida mesorugosa, Candida neorugosa, Candida pseudorugosa, Candida rugosa and Candida scorzettiae. The clade is not closely affiliated to any known teleomorphic genus, and forms a well-separated lineage from currently recognized genera of the Saccharomycetales. Hence, the genus Diutina gen. nov. is proposed to accommodate members of the clade, including Diutina siamensis f.a. sp. nov. and the preceding seven Candida species. The type strain is DMKU-RE43T ( = CBS 13388T = BCC 61183T = NBRC 109695T). PMID:26410375

  7. Deletion of FPS1, Encoding Aquaglyceroporin Fps1p, Improves Xylose Fermentation by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Na; Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of xylitol in xylose fermentation with engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae presents a major problem that hampers economically feasible production of biofuels from cellulosic plant biomass. In particular, substantial production of xylitol due to unbalanced redox cofactor usage by xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) leads to low yields of ethanol. While previous research focused on manipulating intracellular enzymatic reactions to improve xylose metabolism, this s...

  8. Multi-species biofilm of Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans Candida species on acrylic substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Apurva K Pathak; Sanjay Sharma; Pallavi Shrivastva

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In polymicrobial biofilms bacteria extensively interact with Candida species, but the interaction among the different species of the Candida is yet to be completely evaluated. In the present study, the difference in biofilm formation ability of clinical isolates of four species of Candida in both single-species and multi-species combinations on the surface of dental acrylic resin strips was evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The species of Candida, isolated from multiple species oral...

  9. Affinity purifications of aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the xylose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolen, P.L.; Roth, K.A.; Freer, S.N.

    1986-10-01

    Although xylose is a major product of hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, few yeasts are able to convert it to ethanol. In Pachysolen tannophilus, one of the few xylose-fermenting yeasts found, aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were found to be key enzymes in the metabolic pathway for xylose fermentation. This paper presents a method for the rapid and simultaneous purification of both aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from P. tannophilus. Preliminary studies indicate that this method may be easily adapted to purify similar enzymes from other xylose-fermenting yeasts.

  10. High performance separation of xylose and glucose by enzyme assisted nanofiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.;

    2015-01-01

    An integrated membrane system was investigated for the separation of mixtures of xylose and glucose. Separation of these sugars is extremely challenging due to their similar structure, size and charge. In order to enhance the xylose separation factor in nanofiltration (NF), we present an enzymatic...... process for converting glucose to gluconic acid followed by separation of xylose from gluconic acid by nanofiltration. Process conditions which favored the negative charge repulsions between gluconic acid and the NF270 membrane were examined. At the best conditions (9:1 feed molar ratio of xylose to...

  11. Enhanced xylose fermentation and ethanol production by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Leonardo de Figueiredo; de Araujo, Verônica Parente Gomes; Paredes, Raquel de Sousa; Bon, Elba Pinto da Silva; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; Neves, Bianca Cruz; Eleutherio, Elis Cristina Araújo

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that heterologous expression of a bacterial xylose isomerase gene (xylA) of Burkholderia cenocepacia enabled a laboratorial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to ferment xylose anaerobically, without xylitol accumulation. However, the recombinant yeast fermented xylose slowly. In this study, an evolutionary engineering strategy was applied to improve xylose fermentation by the xylA-expressing yeast strain, which involved sequential batch cultivation on xylose. The resulting yeast strain co-fermented glucose and xylose rapidly and almost simultaneously, exhibiting improved ethanol production and productivity. It was also observed that when cells were grown in a medium containing higher glucose concentrations before being transferred to fermentation medium, higher rates of xylose consumption and ethanol production were obtained, demonstrating that xylose utilization was not regulated by catabolic repression. Results obtained by qPCR demonstrate that the efficiency in xylose fermentation showed by the evolved strain is associated, to the increase in the expression of genes HXT2 and TAL1, which code for a low-affinity hexose transporter and transaldolase, respectively. The ethanol productivity obtained after the introduction of only one genetic modification and the submission to a one-stage process of evolutionary engineering was equivalent to those of strains submitted to extensive metabolic and evolutionary engineering, providing solid basis for future applications of this strategy in industrial strains. PMID:25852993

  12. Production and Purification of Extracellular D-Xylose Isomerase from an Alkaliphilic, Thermophilic Bacillus sp. †

    OpenAIRE

    Chauthaiwale, Jyoti; Rao, Mala

    1994-01-01

    An alkaliphilic, thermophilic Bacillus sp. (NCIM 59) produced extracellular xylose isomerase at pH 10 and 50°C by using xylose or wheat bran as the carbon source. The distribution of xylose isomerase as a function of growth in comparison with distributions of extra- and intracellular marker enzymes such as xylanase and β-galactosidase revealed that xylose isomerase was truly secreted as an extracellular enzyme and was not released because of sporulation or lysis. The enzyme was purified to ho...

  13. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    reactors. Oxygen limitation had considerable influence on xylose metabolism. Under anaerobic conditions (0 vvm), xylitol was the main product with a maximum yield of 0.34 mole of xylitol/mole of xylose while the maximum ethanol yield (1.02 moles of ethanol/mole of xylose) was obtained under aerobic...... conditions (0.3 vvm). When the artificial electron acceptor acetoin was added to an anaerobic batch fermentation of xylose by F. oxysporum, the ethanol yield increased while xylitol excretion was also decreased....

  14. Candida albicans skin abscess Abscesso de pele por Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Francisco Tuon

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous candidal abscess is a very rare infection even in immunocompromised patients. Some cases are reported when breakdown in the skin occurs, as bacterial cellulites or abscess, iatrogenic procedures, trauma and parenteral substance abuse. We describe a case of Candida albicans subcutaneous abscess without fungemia, which can be associated with central venous catheter.Abscesso subcutâneo por Candida é infecção muito rara mesmo em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Alguns casos são relatados quando ocorre dano na pele, como celulite bacteriana ou abscesso, procedimentos iatrogênicos, trauma e abuso de substância parenteral. Relatamos caso de abscesso subcutâneo por Candida albicans sem fungemia, que pode estar associado com cateter venoso central.

  15. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    BEHZADI, Payam; BEHZADI, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution o...

  16. Comparison of the extracellular polymeric substances of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Mariana; M.C. Fernandes; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis live as benign commensal organisms in the oral cavity of both healthy and unhealthy individuals behaving, under certain conditions, as opportunistic pathogens, causing candidiasis. These two Candida species have been mismatched for years, but recently Candida dubliniensis was recovered from the mouth of imunnosupressed patients and identified as a different species. Candidiasis is usually related with the Candida capacity of forming biofilms on inert ...

  17. Farnesol : beyond morphogenesis control in non-candida albicans candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, M.; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade the incidence of candidiasis increased dramatically. Although Candida albicans remains the most frequent cause of infections, non-Candida albicans candida (NCAC) species are emerging as new pathogens. Candida infections are often associated with biofilms that can develop on natural surfaces and medical devices. In a similar manner to other microorganisms, signalling pathways may control the diversity and distribution of Candida species within biofilms. E,...

  18. Effect of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis planktonic/biofilm quorum sensing molecules on yeast morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Mariana; Martins, M.; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2006-01-01

    One of the aims of this work was to study the effect of farnesol, a quorum sensing molecule for Candida albicans, on morphologic inhibition of Candida dubliniensis. The second goal of this work was to confirm if Candida dubliniensis also excreted quorum sensing molecules, on both planktonic and biofilm forms. The results clearly demonstrate that Candida dubliniensis undergoes morphological alterations triggered by farnesol. It was also found that supernatants of Candida dubliniensis and Ca...

  19. Candida in mouth or on dummy?

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, D J; Coughlin, R P; Poskitt, E M

    1985-01-01

    Mouth and dummy swabs for Candida spp. were obtained from 100 children under 18 months old admitted with acute medical conditions. Forty four per cent of dummies were colonised by Candida spp. Children who sucked dummies had clinical thrush and positive mouth swabs for candida more frequently than those who did not.

  20. Transcriptomes of a xylose-utilizing industrial flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain cultured in media containing different sugar sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Yi; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Kida, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates used for bioethanol production contain a mixture of sugars, with xylose being the second most abundant after glucose. Since xylose is not a natural substrate for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recombinant S. cerevisiae strongly prefers glucose over xylose, and the fermentation rate and ethanol yield with xylose are both lower than those with glucose. To determine the molecular basis for glucose and xylose fermentation, we used microarrays to investigate the transcriptional difference of a xylose-utilizing industrial strain cultured in both single sugar media and a mixed sugar medium of glucose and xylose. The transcriptomes were nearly identical between glucose metabolizing cells in the glucose alone medium and those in the glucose fermentation phase in the mixed-sugar medium. Whereas the transcriptomes highly differed between the xylose metabolizing cells in the xylose alone medium and those in the xylose fermentation phase in the mixed sugar medium, and the differences mainly involved sulfur metabolism. When the transcriptional profiles were compared between glucose fermentation state and xylose fermentation state, we found the expression patterns of hexose transporters and glucose signaling pathway differed in response to different sugar sources, and the expression levels of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles and respiration increased with xylose, indicating that the xylose-metabolizing cells had high requirements for maintenance energy and lacked the carbon catabolite repression capability. The effect of carbon catabolite repression by glucose lasted after glucose depletion for specific genes to different extents. PMID:27485516

  1. [An update on Candida dubliniensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugam, A; Baixench, M-T; Viguié, C

    2008-01-01

    Eleven years ago, Irish authors, using molecular biology, demonstrated the existence of Candida dubliniensis, a new species of Candida close to Candida albicans. Initially isolated from AIDS patients with oral candidiasis, this species was detected, even in immunocompetent patients. Recently, with new, easy to implement identification tests (latex, immunochromatography), numerous epidemiological studies were undertaken. In most studies, C. dubliniensis was most often identified in the oral cavity. In the absence of HIV infection, the proportion C. dubliniensis/C. albicans ranged from 1 to 5% but it increased to 15-20% in case of HIV infection. It should be stressed that, from an experimental point of view, the acquisition of a secondary resistance to fluconazole is more quickly obtained with C. dubliniensis that with C. albicans, this resistance remains exceptionally observed in clinical observations. PMID:18065177

  2. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeekens, Sanne P; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Netea, Mihai G

    2013-06-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility. On the one hand, severe fungal infections are associated with monogenic primary immunodeficiencies such as defects in STAT1, STAT3 or CARD9, recently discovered as novel clinical entities. On the other hand, more common polymorphisms in genes of the immune system have also been associated with fungal infections such as recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and candidemia. The discovery of the genetic susceptibility to Candida infections can lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as to the design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. This review is part of the review series on host-pathogen interactions. See more reviews from this series. PMID:23629947

  3. 热带假丝酵母(Candida tropiclis)去除蔗渣木聚糖酶解副产物的研究%Study onenzymolysis of bagasse xylan by-products of Candida tropiclis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海珊; 石国良; 覃香香; 周玉恒; 蔡爱华

    2014-01-01

    The effects of xylose,xylitol on enzymolysis of bagasse xylan by xylanase Shearzyme 500 L were studied. Xylooligosaccharide with high xylobiose content was obtained through the enzymolysis of by-product xylose by Can-dida tropiclis and relieving the inhibitory effect of xylitol on xylanse.The results were as follows:xylose was the in-hibitor of Shearzyme 500 L,and its inhibitory effect was in proportion to xylose content in solution;xylitol had no in-hibitory effect on xylanase;C .tropiclis could transform the xylose in the solution of bagasse xylan into xylitol with-out xylooligosaccharide,and xylobiose increased from 53.09% to 62.92% in total sugar,and reached 78.90% through the second hydrolysis.%该文研究了木糖、木糖醇对木聚糖酶 Shearzyme 500 L 酶解蔗渣木聚糖的影响.通过热带假丝酵母(Candida tropiclis )转化酶解副产物木糖,解除木糖对木聚糖酶的抑制作用,从而获得高木二糖含量的低聚木糖.结果表明:木糖是 Shearzyme 500 L 的酶活性抑制物,其抑制作用与溶液中的木糖量成正比;木糖醇对木聚糖酶无抑制作用;热带假丝酵母可将蔗渣木聚糖酶解液中的木糖转化为木糖醇而不利用低聚木糖,木二糖占总糖比例由53.09%升高到62.92%,经二次酶解后,木二糖比例可达78.90%.

  4. COMPOSICIÓN QUIMICA Y ACTIVIDAD ANTIFOULING DE LA FRACCION LIPIDICA DE LA ESPONJA MARINA Cliona tenuis (Clionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Castellanos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Del extracto orgánico de la esponja marina Cliona tenuis, recolectada en las Islas del Rosario (Colombia, Mar Caribe, fue obtenida la fracción lipídica, la cual presentó propiedades antifouling en pruebas en campo. Esta fracción fue separada por CC sobre gel de sílice hasta obtener fracciones de ésteres metílicos, glicéridos, glicolípidos, fosfolípidos y ácidos grasos libres, las cuales fueron identificadas por CCD y técnicas de dereplicación (RMN 1H y 13C. Posteriormente, las fracciones de glicéridos, glicolípidos y fosfolípidos fueron hidrolizadas y los ácidos obtenidos, junto con los provenientes de la fracción de ácidos grasos libres, fueron transformados en ésteres metílicos y todos se analizaron por CGAR-EM. Para ubicar las insaturaciones y ramificaciones, los ésteres metílicos se transformaron luego en sus correspondientes pirrolididas, las cuales también se analizaron por CGAR-EM. El estudio cromatográfico (valores de ECL y de los espectros de masas de los ésteres metílicos y de sus derivados pirrolididas permitió identificar 81 ácidos grasos diferentes, de los cuales no habían sido previamente reportados: los ácidos 4,8-hexadecadienoico, 11-metil-4,10-octadecadienoico, 6,9,12,14-icosatetraenoico, y 6,9,12,14,17-icosapentanoico.

  5. Onycholysis caused by Candida Krusei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Onycholysis caused by Candida krusei is rare. A 21 years old male patient presented with grayish discolouration and elevation of all fingernails since one year. Patient was refractory to treatment with fluconazole. Potassium hydroxide preparation of subungual debris revealed fungal elements. Growth on Sabouraud dextrose agar was identified by cultural characteristics, morphotyping, microscopy and biochemical tests as Candida krusei. The isolate was resistant to fluconazole and amphotericin-B but susceptible to nystatin and clotrimazole. Patient responded well to clotrimazole and terbinafine.

  6. Integrative expression vectors for overexpression of xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) in Osmotolerant yeast, Candida glycerinogenes WL2002-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zong, Hong; Zhuge, Bin; Lu, Xinyao; Fang, Huiying; Zhuge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts are excellent hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. Candida glycerinogenes WL2002-5, an osmotolerant yeast with extremely high glycerol productivity, provides an attractive eukaryotic expression platform. The integrative vectors PURGAP-gfp and PURGPD-gfp harbouring phleomycin-resistance coding sequence and GFP coding sequence with PCgGAP, PCgGPD promoter, respectively, were constructed. The recombinant plasmid PURPpGAP-gfp with the promoter PPpGAP based on the sequence of Pichia pastoris GAPDH gene and the plasmid PURScGAP-gfp with the promoter PScGAP from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were constructed. After transformation, the copy number of gfp gene, which determined using fluorescent quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (FQ-RTPCR) in genome of C. glycerinogenes is 1. Expressions of gfp at different levels were conducted using different promoters by osmotic stress containing NaCl or glucose for the recombinant strains. In this study, C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5, expressing xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) gene from Pichia stipitis, has the ability to produce glycerol from xylose entered into pentose phosphate pathway. Two recombinant strains of PURGAPX, PURGPDX with XYL2 overexpression were constructed to ferment a mixture of glucose and xylose simultaneously in batch fermentation. Compared to C. glycerinogenes WL2002-5 strain, glycerol production from xylose in strains PURGAPX, PURGPDX were increased by 95.9 and 121.1 %, respectively. PMID:25363139

  7. Use of agricultural by-products for the production of xylitol. I. The production of xylose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Menezes, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    A Rhizopus species capable of converting xylan into xylose was isolated from the soil, and purified. The xylanase produced by this fungus was capable of producing xylose from corn cob, wheat bran, and rice hulls without prior extraction of the xylan.

  8. Ethanol production using xylitol synthesis mutant of xylose-utilizing zymomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Paul V.; McCutchen, Carol M.; Emptage, Mark; Caimi, Perry G.; Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen

    2010-06-22

    Production of ethanol using a strain of xylose-utilizing Zymomonas with a genetic modification of the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase gene was found to be improved due to greatly reduced production of xylitol, a detrimental by-product of xylose metabolism synthesized during fermentation.

  9. Engineering of carbon catabolite repression in recombinant xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Haack, Martin Brian; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Two xylose-fermenting glucose-derepressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed in order to investigate the influence of carbon catabolite repression on xylose metabolism. S. cerevisiae CPB.CR2 (Deltamig1, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) and CPB.MBH2 (Deltamig1, Deltamig2, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) were...

  10. Increasing ethanol productivity during xylose fermentation by cell recycling of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    The influence of cell recycling of xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae TMB3001 was investigated during continuous cultivation on a xylose-glucose mixture. By using cell recycling at the dilution rate (D) of 0.05 h(-1), the cell-mass concentration could be increased from 2.2 g l(-1) to 22 g l...

  11. Challenges of cellulosic ethanol production from xylose-extracted corncob residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylose production using corncobs is an established industrial practice. The cellulose-rich xylose-extracted corncob residue (X-ER), as a byproduct, is a potential energy resource. Efforts to convert the cellulose fraction of X-ER to ethanol have been unsatisfactory due to a lack of understanding of ...

  12. Xylose Isomerization with Zeolites in a Two-Step Alcohol–Water Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paniagua, Marta; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Melián Rodriguez, Mayra;

    2015-01-01

    Isomerization of xylose to xylulose was efficiently catalyzed by large-pore zeolites in a two-step methanol–water process that enhanced the product yield significantly. The reaction pathway involves xylose isomerization to xylulose, which, in part, subsequently reacts with methanol to form methyl...

  13. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM XYLOSE AND WOOD HYDROLYZATE BY MUCOR INDICUS AT DIFFERENT AERATION RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Millati

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Mucor indicus is able to produce ethanol from xylose as well as dilute-acid lignocellulosic hydrolyzates. The fungus completely assimilated 10 g/L xylose as the sole carbon and energy source within 32 to 65 h at an aeration rate of 0.1 to 1.0 vvm. The highest ethanol yield was 0.16 g/g at 0.1 vvm. Xylitol was formed intermediately with a maximum yield of 0.22 g/g at 0.5 vvm, but disappeared towards the end of experiments. During cultivation in a mixture of xylose and glucose, the fungus did not assimilate xylose as long as glucose was present in the medium. The anaerobic cultivation of the fungus in the hydrolyzate containing 20% xylose and 80% hexoses resulted in no assimilation of xylose but complete consumption of the hexoses in less than 15 h. The ethanol yield was 0.44 g/g. However, the xylose in the hydrolyzate was consumed when the media was aerated at 0.067 to 0.333 vvm. The best ethanol yield was 0.44 g/g at 0.067 vvm. The results of this study suggest that M. indicus hydrolyzate can be first fermented anaerobically for hexose assimilation and subsequently continued under oxygen-limited conditions for xylose fermentation.

  14. 75 FR 8920 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Danisco USA, Inc., Sweeteners Division (Xylitol, Xylose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... (74 FR 6856-6857, 2/11/2009) and the application has been processed pursuant to the FTZ Act and the... (Xylitol, Xylose, Galactose and Mannose); Thomson, IL Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade... Board for authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the xylitol, xylose, galactose and...

  15. Molecular screening for Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis among Danish Candida parapsilosis group blood culture isolates: proposal of a new RFLP profile for differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirhendi, Hossein; Bruun, Brita; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl;

    2010-01-01

    Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis are recently described species phenotypically indistinguishable from Candida parapsilosis . We evaluated phenotyping and molecular methods for the detection of these species among 79 unique blood culture isolates of the C. parapsilosis group obtained...

  16. Engineering of xylose reductase and overexpression of xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase improves xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    OpenAIRE

    Voronovsky Andriy Y; Abbas Charles A; Dmytruk Kostyantyn V; Dmytruk Olena V; Sibirny Andriy A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is capable of alcoholic fermentation of xylose at elevated temperatures (45 – 48°C). Such property of this yeast defines it as a good candidate for the development of an efficient process for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. However, to be economically viable, the main characteristics of xylose fermentation of H. polymorpha have to be improved. Results Site-specific mutagenesis of H. polymorpha XYL...

  17. Engineering of xylose reductase and overexpression of xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase improves xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronovsky Andriy Y

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is capable of alcoholic fermentation of xylose at elevated temperatures (45 – 48°C. Such property of this yeast defines it as a good candidate for the development of an efficient process for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. However, to be economically viable, the main characteristics of xylose fermentation of H. polymorpha have to be improved. Results Site-specific mutagenesis of H. polymorpha XYL1 gene encoding xylose reductase was carried out to decrease affinity of this enzyme toward NADPH. The modified version of XYL1 gene under control of the strong constitutive HpGAP promoter was overexpressed on a Δxyl1 background. This resulted in significant increase in the KM for NADPH in the mutated xylose reductase (K341 → R N343 → D, while KM for NADH remained nearly unchanged. The recombinant H. polymorpha strain overexpressing the mutated enzyme together with native xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase on Δxyl1 background was constructed. Xylose consumption, ethanol and xylitol production by the constructed strain were determined for high-temperature xylose fermentation at 48°C. A significant increase in ethanol productivity (up to 7.3 times was shown in this recombinant strain as compared with the wild type strain. Moreover, the xylitol production by the recombinant strain was reduced considerably to 0.9 mg × (L × h-1 as compared to 4.2 mg × (L × h-1 for the wild type strain. Conclusion Recombinant strains of H. polymorpha engineered for improved xylose utilization are described in the present work. These strains show a significant increase in ethanol productivity with simultaneous reduction in the production of xylitol during high-temperature xylose fermentation.

  18. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches uncover a small set of genetic changes efficient for rapid xylose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Rin Kim

    Full Text Available Economic bioconversion of plant cell wall hydrolysates into fuels and chemicals has been hampered mainly due to the inability of microorganisms to efficiently co-ferment pentose and hexose sugars, especially glucose and xylose, which are the most abundant sugars in cellulosic hydrolysates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot metabolize xylose due to a lack of xylose-metabolizing enzymes. We developed a rapid and efficient xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae through rational and inverse metabolic engineering strategies, comprising the optimization of a heterologous xylose-assimilating pathway and evolutionary engineering. Strong and balanced expression levels of the XYL1, XYL2, and XYL3 genes constituting the xylose-assimilating pathway increased ethanol yields and the xylose consumption rates from a mixture of glucose and xylose with little xylitol accumulation. The engineered strain, however, still exhibited a long lag time when metabolizing xylose above 10 g/l as a sole carbon source, defined here as xylose toxicity. Through serial-subcultures on xylose, we isolated evolved strains which exhibited a shorter lag time and improved xylose-fermenting capabilities than the parental strain. Genome sequencing of the evolved strains revealed that mutations in PHO13 causing loss of the Pho13p function are associated with the improved phenotypes of the evolved strains. Crude extracts of a PHO13-overexpressing strain showed a higher phosphatase activity on xylulose-5-phosphate (X-5-P, suggesting that the dephosphorylation of X-5-P by Pho13p might generate a futile cycle with xylulokinase overexpression. While xylose consumption rates by the evolved strains improved substantially as compared to the parental strain, xylose metabolism was interrupted by accumulated acetate. Deletion of ALD6 coding for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase not only prevented acetate accumulation, but also enabled complete and efficient fermentation of xylose as well as a mixture of glucose and

  19. Decreased Xylitol Formation during Xylose Fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Due to Overexpression of Water-Forming NADH Oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Liu, Jing-Jing; Ding, Wen-Tao

    2012-01-01

    The recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain harboring xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) from Scheffersomyces stipitis requires NADPH and NAD+, creates cofactor imbalance, and causes xylitol accumulation during growth on d-xylose. To solve this problem, noxE, encoding a water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactococcus lactis driven by the PGK1 promoter, was introduced into the xylose-utilizing yeast strain KAM-3X. A cofactor microcycle was set up between th...

  20. Synthetic arylquinuclidine derivatives exhibit antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Ian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterol biosynthesis is an essential pathway for fungal survival, and is the biochemical target of many antifungal agents. The antifungal drugs most widely used to treated fungal infections are compounds that inhibit cytochrome P450-dependent C14α-demethylase (CYP51, but other enzymes of this pathway, such as squalene synthase (SQS which catalyses the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, could be viable targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of SQS inhibitors on Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis strains. Methods Ten arylquinuclidines that act as SQS inhibitors were tested as antiproliferative agents against three ATCC strains and 54 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis. Also, the morphological alterations induced in the yeasts by the experimental compounds were evaluated by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Results The most potent arylquinuclidine derivative (3-[1'-{4'-(benzyloxy-phenyl}]-quinuclidine-2-ene (WSP1267 had a MIC50 of 2 μg/ml for all species tested and MIC90 varying from 4 μg/ml to 8 μg/ml. Ultrathin sections of C. albicans treated with 1 μg/ml of WSP1267 showed several ultrastructural alterations, including (a loss of cell wall integrity, (b detachment of the plasma membrane from the fungal cell wall, (c accumulation of small vesicles in the periplasmic region, (d presence of large electron-dense vacuoles and (e significantly increased cell size and cell wall thickness. In addition, fluorescence microscopy of cells labelled with Nile Red showed an accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of treated yeasts. Nuclear staining with DAPI revealed the appearance of uncommon yeast buds without a nucleus or with two nuclei. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrate that arylquinuclidine derivatives could be useful as lead compounds for the rational synthesis of new

  1. Simultaneous fermentation of glucose and xylose at elevated temperatures co-produces ethanol and xylitol through overexpression of a xylose-specific transporter in engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Han, Ruixiang; Ding, Rui; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2016-09-01

    Engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus strains were constructed through over-expression of various transporters for simultaneous co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. The glucose was converted into ethanol, whereas xylose was converted into xylitol which has higher value than ethanol. Over-expressing xylose-specific transporter ScGAL2-N376F mutant enabled yeast to co-ferment glucose and xylose and the co-fermentation ability was obviously improved through increasing ScGAL2-N376F expression. The production of glycerol was blocked and acetate production was reduced by disrupting gene KmGPD1. The obtained K. marxianus YZJ119 utilized 120g/L glucose and 60g/L xylose simultaneously and produced 50.10g/L ethanol and 55.88g/L xylitol at 42°C. The yield of xylitol from consumed xylose was over 98% (0.99g/g). Through simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation at 42°C, YZJ119 produced a maximal concentration of 44.58g/L ethanol and 32.03g/L xylitol or 29.82g/L ethanol and 31.72g/L xylitol, respectively, from detoxified or non-detoxified diluted acid pretreated corncob. PMID:27240239

  2. A Novel Technique that Enables Efficient Conduct of Simultaneous Isomerization and Fermentation (SIF) of Xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kripa; Chelikani, Silpa; Relue, Patricia; Varanasi, Sasidhar

    Of the sugars recovered from lignocellulose, D-glucose can be readily converted into ethanol by baker's or brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). However, xylose that is obtained by the hydrolysis of the hemicellulosic portion is not fermentable by the same species of yeasts. Xylose fermentation by native yeasts can be achieved via isomerization of xylose to its ketose isomer, xylulose. Isomerization with exogenous xylose isomerase (XI) occurs optimally at a pH of 7-8, whereas subsequent fermentation of xylulose to ethanol occurs at a pH of 4-5. We present a novel scheme for efficient isomerization of xylose to xylulose at conditions suitable for the fermentation by using an immobilized enzyme system capable of sustaining two different pH microenvironments in a single vessel. The proof-of-concept of the two-enzyme pellet is presented, showing conversion of xylose to xylulose even when the immobilized enzyme pellets are suspended in a bulk solution whose pH is sub-optimal for XI activity. The co-immobilized enzyme pellets may prove extremely valuable in effectively conducting "simultaneous isomerization and fermentation" (SIF) of xylose. To help further shift the equilibrium in favor of xylulose formation, sodium tetraborate (borax) was added to the isomerization solution. Binding of tetrahydroxyborate ions to xylulose effectively reduces the concentration of xylulose and leads to increased xylose isomerization. The formation of tetrahydroxyborate ions and the enhancement in xylulose production resulting from the complexation was studied at two different bulk pH values. The addition of 0.05 M borax to the isomerization solution containing our co-immobilized enzyme pellets resulted in xylose to xylulose conversion as high as 86% under pH conditions that are suboptimal for XI activity. These initial findings, which can be optimized for industrial conditions, have significant potential for increasing the yield of ethanol from xylose in an SIF approach.

  3. Impact of xylose and mannose on central metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.P.

    2005-07-01

    In this study, understanding of the central metabolism was improved by quantification of metabolite concentrations, enzyme activities, protein abundances, and gene transcript concentrations. Intracellular fluxes were estimated by applying stoichiometric models of metabolism. The methods were applied in the study of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in two separate projects. A xylose project aimed at improved utilization of D- xylose as a substrate for, e.g., producing biomaterial- based fuel ethanol. A mannose project studied the production of GDP-mannose from D-mannose in a strain lacking the gene for phosphomannose isomerase (PMI40 deletion). Hexose, D-glucose is the only sugar more abundant than pentose D-xylose. D-xylose is common in hardwoods (e.g. birch) and crop residues (ca. 25% of dry weight). However, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize D- xylose without a recombinant pathway where D-xylose is converted to Dxylulose. In this study D-xylose was converted in two steps via xylitol: by D-xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoded by XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, respectively. Additionally, endogenous xylulokinase (XKS1) was overexpressed in order to increase the consumption of D-xylose by enhancing the phosphorylation of D-xylulose. Despite of the functional recombinant pathway the utilization rates of D xylose still remained low. This study proposes a set of limitations that are responsible for the low utilization rates of D-xylose under microaerobic conditions. Cells compensated for the cofactor imbalance, caused by the conversion of D-xylose to D- xylulose, by increasing the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and by shuttling NADH redox potential to mitochondrion to be oxidized in oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial NADH inhibits citrate synthase in citric acid cycle, and consequently lower flux through citric acid cycle limits oxidative phosphorylation. Further, limitations in the uptake of D- xylose, in the

  4. Exceptional hexose-fermenting ability of the xylitol-producing yeast Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Horemans, Spencer K C; Sooksawat, Najjapak; Harner, Nicole K; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Yuan, Zhirun; Lee, Hung

    2016-06-01

    The yeast Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 is well-known for its ability to produce xylitol from xylose. Recently, this strain was found to produce greater than 5% (w/v) ethanol from glucose. This level of ethanol is typically not exceeded by wild-type strains of other native pentose-fermenting yeasts. This prompted the current study to examine the ability of C. guilliermondii FTI 20037 to utilize and ferment high concentrations of each of the hexoses commonly found in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In defined media, FTI 20037 fermented 14.4%-25.9% (w/v) of glucose, mannose or galactose individually to ethanol in concentrations ranging from 6% to 9.3% (w/v). Fermentation was completed within 36 h (for glucose) to 100 h (for galactose). In 25.9% (w/v) glucose, FTI 20037 produced 9.3% (w/v) ethanol within 40 h. FTI 20037 produced xylitol exclusively when xylose was given as the sole carbon source. The strain utilized arabinose poorly. Under the same fermentation conditions, an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain produced slightly higher levels of ethanol [9.9% (w/v)] from 25.0% (w/v) glucose. Another pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus also fermented high concentrations of glucose and mannose to produce relatively high peak ethanol concentrations; however, this yeast required considerably longer to completely consume these hexoses. The ability of FTI 20037 to produce high level of ethanol rapidly from glucose is remarkable. To our knowledge, this is the first known instance of a non-modified native xylose-fermenting yeast strain able to produce such high levels of ethanol from glucose as rapidly as S. cerevisiae in a defined medium. PMID:26596373

  5. L-lactic acid production from D-xylose with Candida sonorensis expressing a heterologous lactate dehydrogenase encoding gene

    OpenAIRE

    Koivuranta, Kari T; Ilmén, Marja; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Ruohonen, Laura; Suominen, Pirkko; Penttilä, Merja

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioplastics, like polylactic acid (PLA), are renewable alternatives for petroleum-based plastics. Lactic acid, the monomer of PLA, has traditionally been produced biotechnologically with bacteria. With genetic engineering, yeast have the potential to replace bacteria in biotechnological lactic acid production, with the benefits of being acid tolerant and having simple nutritional requirements. Lactate dehydrogenase genes have been introduced to various yeast to demonstrate this pot...

  6. Inhibitory action of the toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on xylose-to-xylitol bioconversion by Candida guilliermondii

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Rogério S.; Mussatto, Solange I.; Roberto, Inês Conceição

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic materials represent an abundant and inexpensive source of sugars which can be microbiologically converted to industrial products. However, hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials for sugars recovery always goes together with the formation of by-products that inhibit the fermentation process. Such by-products include acetic acid, phenolic compounds such as syringaldehyde, ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and vanillic acid, among others. These toxic compounds can...

  7. Evaluation of nutrient supplementation to charcoal-treated and untreated rice straw hydrolysate for xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Inês Mussatto

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol was produced by Candida guilliermondii from charcoal-treated and untreated rice straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate with or without nutrients (ammonium sulphate, calcium chloride, rice bran extract. Both, xylitol yield and volumetric productivity decreased significantly when the nutrients were added to treated and untreated hydrolysates. In the treated hydrolysate, the efficiency of xylose conversion to xylitol was 79% when the nutrients were omitted. The results demonstrated that rice straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate treated with activated charcoal was a cheap source of xylose and other nutrients for xylitol production by C. guilliermondii. The non-necessity of adding nutrients to the hydrolysate media would be very advantageous since the process becomes less costly.Este trabalho avaliou a produção de xilitol pela levedura Candida guilliermondii, a partir de hidrolisado hemicelulósico de palha de arroz não tratado e tratado com carvão ativo, ambos suplementados ou não com nutrientes (sulfato de amônio, cloreto de cálcio e extrato de farelo de arroz. Os resultados mostraram que tanto o rendimento como a produtividade volumétrica em xilitol diminuíram quando os nutrientes foram adicionados em ambos hidrolisados, tratado e não tratado. Em hidrolisado tratado, a eficiência de conversão de xilose em xilitol foi de 79% quando em ausência de nutrientes. Estes resultados mostram que o hidrolisado hemicelulósico de palha de arroz tratado com carvão ativo é uma fonte barata de xilose e outros nutrientes, para a produção de xilitol por Candida guilliermondii. A não necessidade de adicionar nutrientes ao meio a base de hidrolisado é muito vantajosa, uma vez que o processo se torna mais econômico.

  8. Engineered xylose utilization enhances bio-products productivity in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai-Chi; Xiong, Wei; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Ungerer, Justin; Hank Juo, Suh-Hang; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Hydrolysis of plant biomass generates a mixture of simple sugars that is particularly rich in glucose and xylose. Fermentation of the released sugars emits CO2 as byproduct due to metabolic inefficiencies. Therefore, the ability of a microbe to simultaneously convert biomass sugars and photosynthetically fix CO2 into target products is very desirable. In this work, the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to glucose. Both the xylA (xylose isomerase) and xylB (xylulokinase) genes from Escherichia coli were required to confer xylose utilization, but a xylose-specific transporter was not required. Introducing xylAB into an ethylene-producing strain increased the rate of ethylene production in the presence of xylose. Additionally, introduction of xylAB into a glycogen-synthesis mutant enhanced production of keto acids. Moreover, isotopic tracer studies found that nearly half of the carbon in the excreted keto acids was derived from the engineered xylose metabolism, while the remainder was derived from CO2 fixation.

  9. ATP-Based Ratio Regulation of Glucose and Xylose Improved Succinate Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengyu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Huaiwei; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously engineered E. coli YL104H to efficiently produce succinate from glucose. Furthermore, the present study proved that YL104H could also co-utilize xylose and glucose for succinate production. However, anaerobic succinate accumulation using xylose as the sole carbon source failed, probably because of an insufficient supply of energy. By analyzing the ATP generation under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose or xylose, we indicated that succinate production was affected by the intracellular ATP level, which can be simply regulated by the substrate ratio of xylose to glucose. This finding was confirmed by succinate production using an artificial mixture containing different xylose to glucose ratios. Using xylose mother liquor, a waste containing both glucose and xylose derived from xylitol production, a final succinate titer of 61.66 g/L with an overall productivity of 0.95 g/L/h was achieved, indicating that the regulation of the intracellular ATP level may be a useful and efficient strategy for succinate production and can be extended to other anaerobic processes. PMID:27315279

  10. ATP-Based Ratio Regulation of Glucose and Xylose Improved Succinate Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengyu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Huaiwei; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously engineered E. coli YL104H to efficiently produce succinate from glucose. Furthermore, the present study proved that YL104H could also co-utilize xylose and glucose for succinate production. However, anaerobic succinate accumulation using xylose as the sole carbon source failed, probably because of an insufficient supply of energy. By analyzing the ATP generation under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose or xylose, we indicated that succinate production was affected by the intracellular ATP level, which can be simply regulated by the substrate ratio of xylose to glucose. This finding was confirmed by succinate production using an artificial mixture containing different xylose to glucose ratios. Using xylose mother liquor, a waste containing both glucose and xylose derived from xylitol production, a final succinate titer of 61.66 g/L with an overall productivity of 0.95 g/L/h was achieved, indicating that the regulation of the intracellular ATP level may be a useful and efficient strategy for succinate production and can be extended to other anaerobic processes. PMID:27315279

  11. An efficient xylose-fermenting recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain obtained through adaptive evolution and its global transcription profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Peng, Bingyin; Chen, Liyuan; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Technology

    2012-11-15

    Factors related to ethanol production from xylose in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain an exogenous initial metabolic pathway are still to be elucidated. In the present study, a strain that expresses the xylose isomerase gene of Piromyces sp. Pi-xylA and overexpresses XKS1, RPE1, RKI1, TAL1, and TKL1, with deleted GRE3 and COX4 genes was constructed. The xylose utilization capacity of the respiratory deficiency strain was poor but improved via adaptive evolution in xylose. The {mu}{sub max} of the evolved strain in 20 gl{sup -1} xylose is 0.11 {+-} 0.00 h{sup -1}, and the evolved strain consumed 17.83 gl{sup -1} xylose within 72 h, with an ethanol yield of 0.43 gg{sup -1} total consumed sugars during glucose-xylose cofermentation. Global transcriptional changes and effect of several specific genes were studied. The result revealed that the increased xylose isomerase activity, the upregulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and glutamate synthesis, and the downregulation of trehalose and glycogen synthesis, may have contributed to the improved xylose utilization of the strain. Furthermore, the deletion of PHO13 decreased the xylose growth in the respiration deficiency strain although deleting PHO13 can improve the xylose metabolism in other strains. (orig.)

  12. Occurrence and Diversity of Candida Genus in Marine Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; CHI Zhenming; YUE Lixi; CHI Zhe; ZHANG Dechao

    2008-01-01

    A total of 317 yeast isolates from seawater,sediments,mud of salterns,guts of marine fishes and marine algae wereobtained.The results of routine identification and molecular characterization showed that six isolates among these marine yeastsbelonged to Candida genus as Candida interrnedia for YA01a,Candida parapsilosis for 3eA2,Candida quercitrusa for JHSb,Can-die rugosa for wl8,Candida zeylanoides for TJY13a,and Candida membranifaciens for W14-3.Isolates YA01a (Candida interme-die),wl8 (Candida rugosa),3eA2 (Candida parapsilosis),and JHSb (Candida quercitrusa) were found producing cell-bound lipase,while isolate W14-3 (Candida membranifaciens) producing riboflavin.These marine yeast Candida spp.Seem to have wide potentialapplications in biotechnology.

  13. Fermentative biohydrogen production by mixed anaerobic consortia: Impact of glucose to xylose ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakasham, R.S.; Brahmaiah, P.; Sathish, T. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 607 (India); Sambasiva Rao, K.R.S. [Department of Biotechnology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur (India)

    2009-12-15

    Glucose and xylose are the dominant monomeric carbohydrates present in agricultural materials which can be used as potential building blocks for various biotechnological products including biofuels production. Hence, the imperative role of glucose to xylose ratio on fermentative biohydrogen production by mixed anaerobic consortia was investigated. Microbial catabolic H{sub 2} and VFA production studies revealed that xylose is a preferred carbon source compared to glucose when used individually. A maximum of 1550 and 1650 ml of cumulative H{sub 2} production was observed with supplementation of glucose and xylose at a concentration of 5.5 and 5.0 g L{sup -1}, respectively. A triphasic pattern of H{sub 2} production was observed only with studied xylose concentration range. pH impact data revealed effective H{sub 2} production at pH 6.0 and 6.5 with xylose and glucose as carbon sources, respectively. Co-substrate related biohydrogen fermentation studies indicated that glucose to xylose ratio influence H{sub 2} and as well as VFA production. An optimum cumulative H{sub 2} production of 1900 ml for 5 g L{sup -1} substrate was noticed with fermentation medium supplemented with glucose to xylose ratio of 2:3 at pH 6. Overall, biohydrogen producing microbial consortia developed from buffalo dung could be more effective for H{sub 2} production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates however; maintenance of glucose to xylose ratio, inoculum concentration and medium pH would be essential requirements. (author)

  14. The level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity strongly influences xylose fermentation and inhibitor sensitivity in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, M.; Johansson, B.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2003-01-01

    Disruption of the ZWF1 gene encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) has been shown to reduce the xylitol yield and the xylose consumption in the xylose-utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TMB3255. In the present investigation we have studied the influence of different...... consumption, respectively, compared with the ZWF1-disrupted strain. Both strains exhibited decreased xylitol yields (0.13 and 0.19 g/g xylose) and enhanced ethanol yields (0.36 and 0.34 g/g xylose) compared with the control strain TMB3001 (0.29 g xylitol/g xylose, 0.31 g ethanol/g xylose). Cytoplasmic...... transhydrogenase (TH) from Azotobacter vinelandii has previously been shown to transfer NADPH and NAD(+) into NADP(+) and NADH, and TH-overproduction resulted in lower xylitol yield and enhanced glycerol yield during xylose utilization. Strains with low G6PDH-activity grew slower in a lignocellulose hydrolysate...

  15. The effect of Streptococcus mutans and Candida glabrata on Candida albicans biofilms formed on different surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pereira-Cenci; D.M. Deng; E.A. Kraneveld; E.M.M. Manders; A.A. Del Bel Cury; J.M. ten Cate; W. Crielaard

    2008-01-01

    Although Candida containing biofilms contribute to the development of oral candidosis, the characteristics of multi-species Candida biofilms and how oral bacteria modulate these biofilms is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between Candida albicans and either C

  16. Penetration of Candida Biofilms by Antifungal Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Fattani, Mohammed A.; Douglas, L. Julia

    2004-01-01

    A filter disk assay was used to investigate the penetration of antifungal agents through biofilms containing single and mixed-species biofilms containing Candida. Fluconazole permeated all single-species Candida biofilms more rapidly than flucytosine. The rates of diffusion of either drug through biofilms of three strains of Candida albicans were similar. However, the rates of drug diffusion through biofilms of C. glabrata or C. krusei were faster than those through biofilms of C. parapsilosi...

  17. Candida Infections of the Genitourinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Fries, Bettina C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: All humans are colonized with Candida species, mostly Candida albicans, yet some develop diseases due to Candida, among which genitourinary manifestations are extremely common. The forms of genitourinary candidiasis are distinct from each other and affect different populations. While vulvovaginal candidiasis affects mostly healthy women, candiduria occurs typically in elderly, hospitalized, or immunocompromised patients and in neonates. Despite its high incidence and clinical relevan...

  18. Susceptibility characterisation of Candida spp. to four essential oils

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, C. C.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, anti-Candida activity of four essential oils i.e. Black cumin (Nigella sativa), Curry leaf (Murraya koienigii), Ajwain (Trachiyspirum ammi), and Betel leaf (Piper betel) were screened against four human pathogenic species of Candida viz. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the oils ranged between 15.62 and 250 μl/ml while studied through tube dilution method. The oi...

  19. GAp permeases in Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraidlová, Lucie; Sychrová, Hana; Van Dijck, P.

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 57, č. 4 (2008), 79P-79P ISSN 0862-8408. [PhD Student Workshop of Institute of Physiology. 02.06.2008-04.06.2008, Seč] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * Candida albicans * amino-acid uptake * GAP permease Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  20. Evaluation of Bichro-Dubli Fumouze to distinguish Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahand, Ismail H; Moragues, María D; Robert, Raymond; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2006-06-01

    We have evaluated the ability of the Bichro-Dubli Fumouze (Fumouze Diagnostics, Levallois-Perret, France) latex agglutination test to identify colonies of Candida dubliniensis grown on different media. The test was positive for 103 of 106 isolates of C. dubliniensis and negative for Candida albicans and other Candida species studied. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were 97.1% and 100%, respectively. The test is very rapid, simple, and reliable giving the same results independently of whether the colonies are grown previously on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHROMagar Candida medium, Candida ID2 medium, or CHROMagar-Pal's medium. PMID:16529902

  1. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-08-05

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  2. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  3. Genomic sequence of the xylose fermenting, insect-inhabitingyeast, Pichia stipitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffries, Thomas W.; Grigoriev, Igor; Grimwood, Jane; Laplaza,Jose M.; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lindquist, Erika; Dehal, Paramvir; Shapiro, Harris; Jin, Yong-Su; Passoth, Volkmar; Richardson, Paul M.

    2007-06-25

    Xylose is a major constituent of angiosperm lignocellulose,so its fermentation is important for bioconversion to fuels andchemicals. Pichia stipitis is the best-studied native xylose fermentingyeast. Genes from P. stipitis have been used to engineer xylosemetabolism in Saccharomycescerevisiae, and the regulation of the P.stipitis genome offers insights into the mechanisms of xylose metabolismin yeasts. We have sequenced, assembled and finished the genome ofP.stipitis. As such, it is one of only a handful of completely finishedeukaryotic organisms undergoing analysis and manual curation. Thesequence has revealed aspects of genome organization, numerous genes forbiocoversion, preliminary insights into regulation of central metabolicpathways, numerous examples of co-localized genes with related functions,and evidence of how P. stipitis manages to achieve redox balance whilegrowing on xylose under microaerobic conditions.

  4. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, R.G.; Karhumaa, Kaisa; Fonseca, C.;

    2010-01-01

    xylose and arabinose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Improved anaerobic ethanol production was achieved at the expense of xylitol and glycerol but arabinose was almost stoichiometrically converted to arabitol. Further characterization of the strain indicated that the selection pressure during...

  5. Increasing ethanol productivity during xylose fermentation by cell recycling of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    The influence of cell recycling of xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae TMB3001 was investigated during continuous cultivation on a xylose-glucose mixture. By using cell recycling at the dilution rate (D) of 0.05 h(-1), the cell-mass concentration could be increased from 2.2 g l(-1) to 22 g...... ethanol productivity was in the range of 0.23-0.26 g g(-1) h(-1) with or without cell recycling, showing that an increased cell-mass concentration did not influence the efficiency of the yeast.......(-1). Consequently, the volumetric ethanol productivity increased ten-fold, from 0.5 g l(-1) h(-1) to 5.35 g l(-1) h(-1). By increasing the biomass concentration, the xylose consumption rate increased from 0.75 g xylose l(-1) h(-1) without recycling to 1.9 g l(-1) h(-1) with recycling. The specific...

  6. Co-Utilization of Glucose and Xylose for Enhanced Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production with Reverse Membrane Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Mofoluwake M. Ishola; Päivi Ylitervo; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated permeate channel (IPC) flat sheet membranes were examined for use as a reverse membrane bioreactor (rMBR) for lignocellulosic ethanol production. The fermenting organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (T0936), a genetically-modified strain with the ability to ferment xylose, was used inside the rMBR. The rMBR was evaluated for simultaneous glucose and xylose utilization as well as in situ detoxification of furfural and hydroxylmethyl furfural (HMF). The synthetic medium was investigate...

  7. Isolation of xylose isomerases by sequence- and function-based screening from a soil metagenomic library

    OpenAIRE

    Parachin Nádia; Gorwa-Grauslund Marie F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Xylose isomerase (XI) catalyses the isomerisation of xylose to xylulose in bacteria and some fungi. Currently, only a limited number of XI genes have been functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the microorganism of choice for lignocellulosic ethanol production. The objective of the present study was to search for novel XI genes in the vastly diverse microbial habitat present in soil. As the exploitation of microbial diversity is impaired by the ability to cult...

  8. UDP xylose synthase 1 is required for morphogenesis and histogenesis of the craniofacial skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Eames, B.; Singer, Amy; Smith, Gabriel A.; Wood, Zachary A.; Yan, Yi-Lin; He, Xinjun; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Catchen, Julian M.; Rodriguez-Mari, Adriana; Linbo, Tor; Raible, David W.; Postlethwait, John H.

    2010-01-01

    UDP-xylose synthase (Uxs1) is strongly conserved from bacteria to humans, but because no mutation has been studied in any animal, we do not understand its roles in development. Furthermore, no crystal structure has been published. Uxs1 synthesizes UDP-xylose, which initiates glycosaminoglycan attachment to a protein core during proteoglycan formation. Crystal structure and biochemical analyses revealed that an R233H substitution mutation in zebrafish uxs1 alters an arginine buried in the dime...

  9. Effect of Nystatin on the Metabolism of Xylitol and Xylose by Pachysolen tannophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jie; Taylor, Kenneth B.

    1993-01-01

    Ethanol production from xylitol by resting cells of Pachysolen tannophilus was increased 40-fold in the presence of nystatin, amphotericin B, and filipin, a group of antifungal agents that alter the permeability of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, these agents had little or no effect on ethanol formation from xylitol or xylose by the cell extract. During xylose metabolism, nystatin caused the intracellular xylitol to leak out into the medium at a 23-fold-faster rate but did not affect overal...

  10. Prefermentation improves xylose utilization in simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of pretreated spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olofsson Kim

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF is a promising process option for ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials. However, both the overall ethanol yield and the final ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth must be high. Hence, almost complete conversion of both hexoses and pentoses must be achieved in SSF at a high solid content. A principal difficulty is to obtain an efficient pentose uptake in the presence of high glucose and inhibitor concentrations. Initial glucose present in pretreated spruce decreases the xylose utilization by yeast, due to competitive inhibition of sugar transport. In the current work, prefermentation was studied as a possible means to overcome the problem of competitive inhibition. The free hexoses, initially present in the slurry, were in these experiments fermented before adding the enzymes, thereby lowering the glucose concentration. Results This work shows that a high degree of xylose conversion and high ethanol yields can be achieved in SSF of pretreated spruce with a xylose fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (TMB3400 at 7% and 10% water insoluble solids (WIS. Prefermentation and fed-batch operation, both separately and in combination, improved xylose utilization. Up to 77% xylose utilization and 85% of theoretical ethanol yield (based on total sugars, giving a final ethanol concentration of 45 g L-1, were obtained in fed-batch SSF at 10% WIS when prefermentation was applied. Conclusion Clearly, the mode of fermentation has a high impact on the xylose conversion by yeast in SSF. Prefermentation enhances xylose uptake most likely because of the reduced transport inhibition, in both batch and fed-batch operation. The process significance of this will be even greater for xylose-rich feedstocks.

  11. Bulk segregant analysis by high-throughput sequencing reveals a novel xylose utilization gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared W Wenger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of xylose is a fundamental requirement for the efficient production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass sources. Although they aggressively ferment hexoses, it has long been thought that native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains cannot grow fermentatively or non-fermentatively on xylose. Population surveys have uncovered a few naturally occurring strains that are weakly xylose-positive, and some S. cerevisiae have been genetically engineered to ferment xylose, but no strain, either natural or engineered, has yet been reported to ferment xylose as efficiently as glucose. Here, we used a medium-throughput screen to identify Saccharomyces strains that can increase in optical density when xylose is presented as the sole carbon source. We identified 38 strains that have this xylose utilization phenotype, including strains of S. cerevisiae, other sensu stricto members, and hybrids between them. All the S. cerevisiae xylose-utilizing strains we identified are wine yeasts, and for those that could produce meiotic progeny, the xylose phenotype segregates as a single gene trait. We mapped this gene by Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA using tiling microarrays and high-throughput sequencing. The gene is a putative xylitol dehydrogenase, which we name XDH1, and is located in the subtelomeric region of the right end of chromosome XV in a region not present in the S288c reference genome. We further characterized the xylose phenotype by performing gene expression microarrays and by genetically dissecting the endogenous Saccharomyces xylose pathway. We have demonstrated that natural S. cerevisiae yeasts are capable of utilizing xylose as the sole carbon source, characterized the genetic basis for this trait as well as the endogenous xylose utilization pathway, and demonstrated the feasibility of BSA using high-throughput sequencing.

  12. Identification of Candida species by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of intergenic spacer regions of ribosomal DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, D W; Wilson, M. J.; Lewis, M. A.; Potts, A J

    1995-01-01

    The PCR was used to amplify a targeted region of the ribosomal DNA from 84 Candida isolates. Unique product sizes were obtained for Candida guilliermondii, Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata, and Candida pseudotropicalis. Isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida stellatoidea, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei could be identified following restriction digestion of the PCR products.

  13. Xylose fermentation to biofuels (hydrogen and ethanol) by extreme thermophilic (70 C) mixed culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenxi, Zhao; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Lu, W.; Wang, H.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2010-01-01

    Combined biohydrogen and bioethanol (CHE) production from xylose was achieved by an extreme thermophilic (70 degrees C) mixed culture. Effect of initial pH, xylose, peptone, FeSO4, NaHCO3, yeast extract, trace mineral salts, vitamins, and phosphate buffer concentrations on bioethanol and biohydro......Combined biohydrogen and bioethanol (CHE) production from xylose was achieved by an extreme thermophilic (70 degrees C) mixed culture. Effect of initial pH, xylose, peptone, FeSO4, NaHCO3, yeast extract, trace mineral salts, vitamins, and phosphate buffer concentrations on bioethanol and...... biohydrogen yield was investigated in batch experiments. Results obtained showed that initial pH, concentration of xylose, peptone, and FeSO4 significantly affected biohydrogen and bioethanol production, while the concentration of NaHCO3 was only significant for bioethanol production. By changing cultivation......-xylose corresponding to 55% of the theoretical hydrogen yield based on acetate metabolic pathway. An empirical model was established to reveal the quantitative effect of factors significant for biohydrogen (quadratic model) production and for bioethanol (linear model) production. Changes in hydrogen/ethanol yields...

  14. Co-Utilization of Glucose and Xylose for Enhanced Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production with Reverse Membrane Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mofoluwake M. Ishola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Integrated permeate channel (IPC flat sheet membranes were examined for use as a reverse membrane bioreactor (rMBR for lignocellulosic ethanol production. The fermenting organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (T0936, a genetically-modified strain with the ability to ferment xylose, was used inside the rMBR. The rMBR was evaluated for simultaneous glucose and xylose utilization as well as in situ detoxification of furfural and hydroxylmethyl furfural (HMF. The synthetic medium was investigated, after which the pretreated wheat straw was used as a xylose-rich lignocellulosic substrate. The IPC membrane panels were successfully used as the rMBR during the batch fermentations, which lasted for up to eight days without fouling. With the rMBR, complete glucose and xylose utilization, resulting in 86% of the theoretical ethanol yield, was observed with the synthetic medium. Its application with the pretreated wheat straw resulted in complete glucose consumption and 87% xylose utilization; a final ethanol concentration of 30.3 g/L was obtained, which corresponds to 83% of the theoretical yield. Moreover, complete in situ detoxification of furfural and HMF was obtained within 36 h and 60 h, respectively, with the rMBR. The use of the rMBR is a promising technology for large-scale lignocellulosic ethanol production, since it facilitates the co-utilization of glucose and xylose; moreover, the technology would also allow the reuse of the yeast for several batches.

  15. Co-Utilization of Glucose and Xylose for Enhanced Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production with Reverse Membrane Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Ylitervo, Päivi; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-01-01

    Integrated permeate channel (IPC) flat sheet membranes were examined for use as a reverse membrane bioreactor (rMBR) for lignocellulosic ethanol production. The fermenting organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (T0936), a genetically-modified strain with the ability to ferment xylose, was used inside the rMBR. The rMBR was evaluated for simultaneous glucose and xylose utilization as well as in situ detoxification of furfural and hydroxylmethyl furfural (HMF). The synthetic medium was investigated, after which the pretreated wheat straw was used as a xylose-rich lignocellulosic substrate. The IPC membrane panels were successfully used as the rMBR during the batch fermentations, which lasted for up to eight days without fouling. With the rMBR, complete glucose and xylose utilization, resulting in 86% of the theoretical ethanol yield, was observed with the synthetic medium. Its application with the pretreated wheat straw resulted in complete glucose consumption and 87% xylose utilization; a final ethanol concentration of 30.3 g/L was obtained, which corresponds to 83% of the theoretical yield. Moreover, complete in situ detoxification of furfural and HMF was obtained within 36 h and 60 h, respectively, with the rMBR. The use of the rMBR is a promising technology for large-scale lignocellulosic ethanol production, since it facilitates the co-utilization of glucose and xylose; moreover, the technology also allows the reuse of the yeast for several batches. PMID:26633530

  16. Functional expression of xylose isomerase in flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Li, Guo-Ying; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with xylose isomerase (XI) pathway were constructed using a flocculating industrial strain (YC-8) as the host. Both strains expressing wild-type xylA (coding XI) from the fungus Orpinomyces sp. and the bacterium Prevotella ruminicola, respectively, showed better growth ability and fermentation capacity when using xylose as the sole sugar than most of the reported strains expressing XI. Codon optimization of both XIs did not improve the xylose fermentation ability of the strains. Adaption significantly increased XI activity resulting in improved growth and fermentation. The strains expressing codon-optimized XI showed a higher increase in xylose consumption and ethanol production compared to strains expressing wild XI. Among all strains, the adapted strain YCPA2E expressing XI from P. ruminicola showed the best performance in the fermentation of xylose to ethanol. After 48 h of fermentation, YCPA2E assimilated 16.95 g/L xylose and produced 6.98 g/L ethanol. These results indicate that YC-8 is a suitable host strain for XI expression, especially for the codon-optimized XI originating from P. ruminicola. PMID:26645659

  17. Ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates using engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring xylose isomerase-based pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-06-01

    The efficient co-fermentation of glucose and xylose is necessary for the economically feasible bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Even with xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the efficiency of the lignocellulosic ethanol production remains suboptimal mainly due to the low conversion yield of xylose to ethanol. In this study, we evaluated the co-fermentation performances of SXA-R2P-E, a recently engineered isomerase-based xylose utilizing strain, in mixed sugars and in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In a high-sugar fermentation with 70g/L of glucose and 40g/L of xylose, SXA-R2P-E produced 50g/L of ethanol with an yield of 0.43gethanol/gsugars at 72h. From dilute acid-pretreated hydrolysates of rice straw and hardwood (oak), the strain produced 18-21g/L of ethanol with among the highest yield of 0.43-0.46gethanol/gsugars ever reported. This study shows a highly promising potential of a xylose isomerase-expressing strain as an industrially relevant ethanol producer from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:26990396

  18. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kim, Soo Rin; Subramaniam, Vijay; Steffen, David; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-10-01

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite that cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose. Microbial strains capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose into lactic acid are needed for sustainable and economic lactic acid production. In this study, we introduced a lactic acid-producing pathway into an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose. Specifically, ldhA from the fungi Rhizopus oryzae was overexpressed under the control of the PGK1 promoter through integration of the expression cassette in the chromosome. The resulting strain exhibited a high lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced lactic acid from glucose or xylose. Interestingly, we observed that the engineered strain exhibited substrate-dependent product formation. When the engineered yeast was cultured on glucose, the major fermentation product was ethanol while lactic acid was a minor product. In contrast, the engineered yeast produced lactic acid almost exclusively when cultured on xylose under oxygen-limited conditions. The yields of ethanol and lactic acid from glucose were 0.31 g ethanol/g glucose and 0.22 g lactic acid/g glucose, respectively. On xylose, the yields of ethanol and lactic acid were S. cerevisiae without deleting pyruvate decarboxylase, and the formation patterns of fermentations can be altered by substrates. PMID:26043971

  19. Transcriptome analysis of Rhizopus oryzae in response to xylose during fumaric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Ying; Li, Shuang; Jiang, Ling; Huang, He; Wen, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    Xylose is one of the most abundant lignocellulosic components, but it cannot be used by R. oryzae for fumaric acid production. Here, we applied high-throughput RNA sequencing to generate two transcriptional maps of R. oryzae following fermentation in glucose or xylose. The differential expression analysis showed that, genes involved in amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and gluconeogenesis, were up-regulated in response to xylose. Moreover, we discovered the potential presence of oxidative stress in R. oryzae during xylose fermentation. To adapt to this unfavorable condition, R. oryzae displayed reduced growth and induce of a number of antioxidant enzymes, including genes involved in glutathione, trehalose synthesis, and the proteasomal pathway. These responses might divert the flow of carbon required for the accumulation of fumaric acid. Furthermore, using high-throughput RNA sequencing, we identified a large number of novel transcripts and a substantial number of genes that underwent alternative splicing. Our analysis provides remarkable insight into the mechanisms underlying xylose fermentation by R. oryzae. These results may reveal potential target genes or strategies to improve xylose fermentation. PMID:27170374

  20. Disruption of PHO13 improves ethanol production via the xylose isomerase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Takahiro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Xylose is the second most abundant sugar in lignocellulosic materials and can be converted to ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains expressing heterologous genes involved in xylose assimilation pathways. Recent research demonstrated that disruption of the alkaline phosphatase gene, PHO13, enhances ethanol production from xylose by a strain expressing the xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes; however, the yield of ethanol is poor. In this study, PHO13 was disrupted in a recombinant strain harboring multiple copies of the xylose isomerase (XI) gene derived from Orpinomyces sp., coupled with overexpression of the endogenous xylulokinase (XK) gene and disruption of GRE3, which encodes aldose reductase. The resulting YΔGP/XK/XI strain consumed 2.08 g/L/h of xylose and produced 0.88 g/L/h of volumetric ethanol, for an 86.8 % theoretical ethanol yield, and only YΔGP/XK/XI demonstrated increase in cell concentration. Transcriptome analysis indicated that expression of genes involved in the pentose phosphate pathway (GND1, SOL3, TAL1, RKI1, and TKL1) and TCA cycle and respiratory chain (NDE1, ACO1, ACO2, SDH2, IDH1, IDH2, ATP7, ATP19, SDH4, SDH3, CMC2, and ATP15) was upregulated in the YΔGP/XK/XI strain. And the expression levels of 125 cell cycle genes were changed by deletion of PHO13. PMID:26769491

  1. Design of Xylose-Based Semisynthetic Polyurethane Tissue Adhesives with Enhanced Bioactivity Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Sevgi; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Karaaslan, Merve Goksin; Gulgen, Selam; Taslidere, Elif; Koytepe, Suleyman; Ates, Burhan

    2016-02-24

    Developing biocompatible tissue adhesives with high adhesion properties is a highly desired goal of the tissue engineering due to adverse effects of the sutures. Therefore, our work involves synthesis, characterization, adhesion properties, protein adsorption, in vitro biodegradation, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility properties of xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethane (NPU-PEG-X) bioadhesives. Xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethanes were developed by the reaction among 4,4'-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) (MCI), xylose and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG). Synthesized polyurethanes (PUs) showed good thermal stability and high adhesion strength. The highest values in adhesion strength were measured as 415.0 ± 48.8 and 94.0 ± 2.8 kPa for aluminum substrate and muscle tissue in 15% xylose containing PUs (NPU-PEG-X-15%), respectively. The biodegradation of NPU-PEG-X-15% was also determined as 19.96 ± 1.04% after 8 weeks of incubation. Relative cell viability of xylose containing PU was above 86%. Moreover, 10% xylose containing NPU-PEG-X (NPU-PEG-X-10%) sample has favorable tissue response, and inflammatory reaction between 1 and 6 weeks implantation period. With high adhesiveness and biocompatibility properties, NPU-PEG-X can be used in the medical field as supporting materials for preventing the fluid leakage after abdominal surgery or wound closure. PMID:26824739

  2. Novel strategies to fight Candida species infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Silva, Sónia; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the incidence of human fungal infections. The increase in cases of infection caused by Candida species, and the consequent excessive use of antimicrobials, has favored the emergence of resistance to conventional antifungal agents over the past decades. Consequently, Candida infections morbidity and mortality are also increasing. Therefore, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients suffering from Candida infections, because it seems unlikely that the established standard treatments will drastically lower the morbidity of mucocutaneous Candida infections and the high mortality associated with invasive candidiasis. This review aims to present the last advances in the traditional antifungal therapy, and present an overview of novel strategies that are being explored for the treatment of Candida infections, with a special focus on combined antifungal agents, antifungal therapies with alternative compounds (plant extracts and essential oils), adjuvant immunotherapy, photodynamic therapy and laser therapy. PMID:25383647

  3. Dynamic metabolomics differentiates between carbon and energy starvation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting xylose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergdahl Basti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concerted effects of changes in gene expression due to changes in the environment are ultimately reflected in the metabolome. Dynamics of metabolite concentrations under a certain condition can therefore give a description of the cellular state with a high degree of functional information. We used this potential to evaluate the metabolic status of two recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during anaerobic batch fermentation of a glucose/xylose mixture. Two isogenic strains were studied, differing only in the pathways used for xylose assimilation: the oxidoreductive pathway with xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH or the isomerization pathway with xylose isomerase (XI. The isogenic relationship between the two strains ascertains that the observed responses are a result of the particular xylose pathway and not due to unknown changes in regulatory systems. An increased understanding of the physiological state of these strains is important for further development of efficient pentose-utilizing strains for bioethanol production. Results Using LC-MS/MS we determined the dynamics in the concentrations of intracellular metabolites in central carbon metabolism, nine amino acids, the purine nucleotides and redox cofactors. The general response to the transition from glucose to xylose was increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA-cycle intermediates, and decreased concentrations of sugar phosphates and redox cofactors. The two strains investigated had significantly different uptake rates of xylose which led to an enhanced response in the XI-strain. Despite the difference in xylose uptake rate, the adenylate energy charge remained high and stable around 0.8 in both strains. In contrast to the adenylate pool, large changes were observed in the guanylate pool. Conclusions The low uptake of xylose by the XI-strain led to several distinguished responses: depletion of key metabolites in glycolysis and NADPH

  4. Anti-Candida activity of Quercus infectoria gall extracts against Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Saeida Baharuddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Galls of Quercus infectoria have been traditionally used to treat common ailments, including yeast infections caused by Candida species. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro anti-Candida activity of Q. infectoria gall extracts against selected Candida species. Materials and Methods: Methanol and aqueous extracts of Q. infectoria galls were tested for anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using the two-fold serial dilution technique of concentrations ranging from 16 mg/ml to 0.03 mg/ml. After 24 h, the minimum fungicidal concentrations were determined by subculturing the wells, which showed no turbidity on the agar plate. Potential phytochemical group in the crude extracts was screened by phytochemical qualitative tests and subsequently subjected to the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Both methanol and aqueous extracts displayed substantial anti-Candida activity and pyrogallol was the major component of both crude extracts. Conclusions: Data from current study suggested that Q. infectoria gall extracts are a potential source to be developed as anti-candidiasis.

  5. Performance of chromogenic media for Candida in rapid presumptive identification of Candida species from clinical materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Pravin Charles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In perspective of the worldwide increase in a number of immunocompromised patients, the need for identification of Candida species has become a major concern. The development of chromogenic differential media, introduced recently, facilitate rapid speciation. However, it can be employed for routine mycology workup only after an exhaustive evaluation of its benefit and cost effectiveness. This study was undertaken to evaluate the benefit and cost effectiveness of chromogenic media for speciation of Candida clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Sputum samples of 382 patients were screened for the presence of Candida spp. by Gram stain and culture on sabouraud dextrose agar. Candida species were identified using Gram stain morphology, germ tube formation, cornmeal agar with Tween-80, sugar fermentation tests and morphology on HiCrome Candida differential agar. All the Candida isolates were inoculated on HiCrome Candida agar (HiMedia, Mumbai, India. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of HiCrome agar for identification of Candida albicans were 90% and 96.42%, respectively whereas sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate fermentation test were 86.67% and 74.07%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity values of HiCrome agar for detection of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata were above 90%. Conclusions: We found HiCrome agar has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the conventional method. In addition, use of this differential media could significantly cut down the turnaround time as well as cost of sample processing.

  6. Multi-species biofilm of Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans Candida species on acrylic substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva K Pathak

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In polymicrobial biofilms bacteria extensively interact with Candida species, but the interaction among the different species of the Candida is yet to be completely evaluated. In the present study, the difference in biofilm formation ability of clinical isolates of four species of Candida in both single-species and multi-species combinations on the surface of dental acrylic resin strips was evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The species of Candida, isolated from multiple species oral candidiasis of the neutropenic patients, were used for the experiment. Organisms were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 8% glucose (SDB. Biofilm production on the acrylic resins strips was determined by crystal violet assay. Student's t-test and ANOVA were used to compare in vitro biofilm formation for the individual species of Candida and its different multi-species combinations. RESULTS: In the present study, differences between the mean values of the biofilm-forming ability of individual species (C. glabrata>C. krusei>C. tropicalis>C. albicans and in its multi-species' combinations (the highest for C. albicans with C. glabrata and the lowest for all the four species combination were reported. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that biofilm-forming ability was found greater for non-Candida albicans Candida species (NCAC than for C. albicans species with intra-species variation. Presence of C. albicans in multi-species biofilms increased, whereas; C. tropicalis decreased the biofilm production with all other NCAC species.

  7. Repression of xylose-specific enzymes by ethanol in Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis and utility of repitching xylose-grown populations to eliminate diauxic lag

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolyzates to ethanol by native pentose-fermenting yeasts such as Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis NRRL Y-7124 (CBS 5773) and Pachysolen tannophilus NRRL Y-2460, the switch from glucose to xylose uptake results in a diauxic lag unless process strategies ...

  8. Partial oxidation of D-xylose to maleic anhydride and acrylic acid over vanadyl pyrophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xylose is the second most abundant sugar after glucose. Despite its tremendous potential to serve as a renewable feedstock, few commercial processes exploit this resource. Here, we report a new technology in which a two-fluid nozzle atomizes a xylose-water solution into a capillary fluidized bed operating above 300 °C. Xylose-water droplets form at the tip of the injector, vaporize then react with a heterogeneous mixed oxide catalyst. A syringe pump metered the solution to the reactor charged with 1 g of catalyst. Product yield over vanadyl pyrophosphate was higher compared to molybdenum trioxide-cobalt oxide and iron molybdate; it reached 25% for maleic anhydride, 17% for acrylic acid and 11% for acrolein. Gas residence time was 0.2 s. The catalyst was free of coke even after operating for 4 h – based on a thermogravimetric analysis of catalyst withdrawn from the reactor. Below 300 °C, powder agglomerated at the tip of the injector at 300 °C; it also agglomerated with a xylose mass fraction of 7% in water. - Highlights: • D-xylose reacts to form maleic anhydride and acrylic acid above 250 °C. • Vanadyl pyrophosphate is both active and selective for maleic and acrylic acid. • Acid and acrolein yield approaches 50% for a xylose mass fraction of 3% in water. • Catalyst agglomerates at low temperatures and high xylose aqueous mass fraction. • Atomization quality is a determining factor to minimize agglomeration

  9. Ethanol Production from Glucose and Xylose by Immobilized Zymomonas mobilis CP4(pZB5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, M.; Davison, B.H.; Krishnan, M.S.; Nghiem, n.P.; Shattuck, C.K.

    1999-05-02

    Fermentation of glucose-xylose mixtures to ethanol was investigated in batch and continuous experiments using immobilized recombinant Zymomonas mobilis CP4(pZB5). This microorganism was immobilized by entrapment in k-carrageenan beads having a diameter of 1.5-2.5 mm. Batch experiments showed that the immobilized cells co-fermented glucose and xylose to ethanol and that the presence of glucose improved the xylose utilization rate. Batch fermentation of rice straw hydrolyzate containing 76 g/L glucose and 33.8 g/L xylose gave an ethanol concentration of 44.3 g/L after 24 hours, corresponding to a yeild of 0.46 g ethanol/g sugars. Comparable results were achieved with a synthetic sugar control. Continuous fermentation runs were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR). Glucose-xylose feed mixtures were run through the FBR at residence times of 2 to 4 hours. Glucose conversion to ethanol was maintained above 98% in all continuous runs. Xylose conversion to ethanol was highest at 91.5% for a feed containing 50 g/L glucose-13 g/L xylose at a dilution rate of 0.24 h-1. The xylose conversion to ethanol decreased with increasing feed xylose concentration, dilution rate and age of the immobilized cells. Volumetric ethanol productivities in the range of 6.5 to 15.3 g/L-h were obtained.

  10. Metal Ions May Suppress or Enhance Cellular Differentiation in Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis Biofilms▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Joe J.; Ceri, Howard; Yerly, Jerome; Rabiei, Maryam; Hu, Yaoping; Martinuzzi, Robert; Turner, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are polymorphic fungi that develop antimicrobial-resistant biofilm communities that are characterized by multiple cell morphotypes. This study investigated cell type interconversion and drug and metal resistance as well as community organization in biofilms of these microorganisms that were exposed to metal ions. To study this, Candida biofilms were grown either in microtiter plates containing gradient arrays of metal ions or in the Calgary Biofilm Devi...

  11. Isolated Candida infection of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Shweihat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida pneumonia is a rare infection of the lungs, with the majority of cases occurring secondary to hematological dissemination of Candida organisms from a distant site, usually the gastrointestinal tract or skin. We report a case of a 77-year-old male who is life-long smoker with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and polymyalgia rheumatica, but did not take immunosuppressants for those conditions. Here, we present an extremely rare case of isolated pulmonary parenchymal Candida infection in the form pulmonary nodules without evidence of systemic disease which has only been described in a few previous reports.

  12. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jang-Gyu; Hong, Hyun-Sook [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Koh, Yoon-Woo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hee-Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Jung-Mi [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  13. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  14. Impact of defoliation intensities on plant biomass, nutrient uptake and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus tenuis growing in a saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, I; Mendoza, R

    2012-11-01

    The impact of different defoliation intensities on the ability of Lotus tenuis plants to regrowth, mobilise nutrients and to associate with native AM fungi and Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil was investigated. After 70 days, plants were subjected to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% defoliation and shoot regrowth was assessed at the end of subsequent 35 days. Compared to non-defoliated plants, low or moderate defoliation up to 75% did not affect shoot regrowth. However, 100% treatment affected shoot regrowth and the clipped plants were not able to compensate the growth attained by non-defoliated plants. Root growth was more affected by defoliation than shoot growth. P and N concentrations in shoots and roots increased with increasing defoliation while Na(+) concentration in shoots of non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants was similar. Non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants prevented increases of Na(+) concentration in shoots through both reducing Na(+) uptake and Na(+) transport to shoots by accumulating Na(+) in roots. At high defoliation, the salinity tolerance mechanism is altered and Na(+) concentration in shoots was higher than in roots. Reduction in the photosynthetic capacity induced by defoliation neither changed the root length colonised by AM fungi nor arbuscular colonisation but decreased the vesicular colonisation. Spore density did not change, but hyphal density and Rhizobium nodules increased with defoliation. The strategy of the AM symbiont consists in investing most of the C resources to preferentially retain arbuscular colonisation as well as inoculum density in the soil. PMID:22512871

  15. Antibiofilm activity of carboxymethyl chitosan on the biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yulong; Leonhard, Matthias; Moser, Doris; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2016-09-20

    Although most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, non-C. albicans Candida species have been isolated in increasing numbers in patients. In this study, we determined the inhibition of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) on single and mixed species biofilm of non-albicans Candida species, including Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata. Biofilm by all tested species in microtiter plates were inhibited nearly 70%. CM-chitosan inhibited mixed species biofilm in microtiter plates and also on medical materials surfaces. To investigate the mechanism, the effect of CM-chitosan on cell viability and biofilm growth was employed. CM-chitosan inhibited Candida planktonic growth as well as adhesion. Further biofilm formation was inhibited with CM-chitosan added at 90min, 12h or 24h after biofilm initiation. CM-chitosan was not only able to inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida cells, but was also active upon the establishment and the development of biofilms. PMID:27261732

  16. Candida glabrata among Candida spp. from environmental health practitioners of a Brazilian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Catarina Savastano; Elisa de Oliveira Silva; Lindyanne Lemos Gonçalves; Jéssica Maria Nery; Naiara Chaves Silva; Amanda Latercia Tranches Dias

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of the species Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida was evaluated in a Brazilian Tertiary Hospital from the environment and health practitioners. In a 12-month period we had a total positivity of 19.65% of Candida spp. The most recurring non-albicans Candida species was C. glabrata (37.62%), generally considered a species of low virulence, but with a higher mortality rate than C. albicans. Subsequently, C. parapsilosis (25.74%) and C. tropicalis (16.86%) were the s...

  17. Biohydrogen Production from Xylose by Aanaerobic Mixed Cultures in Elephant Dung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanittha FIALA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Xylose was used to produce hydrogen by anaerobic mixed cultures in elephant dung. The elephant dung was subjected to heat shock (90 ºC for 3 h and acid (pH 3.0 - 4.0 for 24 h followed by neutralization pretreatments before using it as a seed inoculum. The results showed that the seed inoculum pretreatment by heat shock produced higher hydrogen gas than acid seed inoculum pretreatment, while untreated seed inoculum gave the lowest hydrogen production. Therefore, seed inoculum by heat shock was suitable for hydrogen production from xylose, arabinose and glucose. It was found that xylose was a preferred pentose sugar for hydrogen production, in which the results were comparable to those of glucose. The initial pH of 8.0 was found to be optimal for hydrogen production from xylose, in which a maximum hydrogen production of 371 mL H2/g VSS and a yield of 1.62 mol H2/mol xylose were obtained. Microbial community analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE revealed that, under the optimum initial pH of 8.0, the predominant hydrogen producers were Clostridium acetobutylicum and Ethanoligenens sp. In addition, lactic acid bacteria i.e. Bifidobacterium minimum and Bifidobacterium sp. were observed, which coincided with the small amount of lactic acid detected at this optimum initial pH.

  18. Enhanced xylose recovery from oil palm empty fruit bunch by efficient acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hooi Teng; Dykes, Gary A; Wu, Ta Yeong; Siow, Lee Fong

    2013-08-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) is abundantly available in Malaysia and it is a potential source of xylose for the production of high-value added products. This study aimed to optimize the hydrolysis of EFB using dilute sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) via response surface methodology for maximum xylose recovery. Hydrolysis was carried out in an autoclave. An optimum xylose yield of 91.2 % was obtained at 116 °C using 2.0 % (v/v) H2SO4, a solid/liquid ratio of 1:5 and a hydrolysis time of 20 min. A lower optimum xylose yield of 24.0 % was observed for dilute H3PO4 hydrolysis at 116 °C using 2.4 % (v/v) H3PO4, a solid/liquid ratio of 1:5 and a hydrolysis time of 20 min. The optimized hydrolysis conditions suggested that EFB hydrolysis by H2SO4 resulted in a higher xylose yield at a lower acid concentration as compared to H3PO4. PMID:23709290

  19. Degradation Kinetics of Xylose and Glucose in Hydrolysate Containing Dilute Sulfuric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    亓伟; 张素平; 许庆利; 任铮伟; 颜涌捷

    2008-01-01

    In preparation of fuel alcohol from biomass as feedstock,hydrolysis with dilute acid as catalyst iS one way to produce fermentable saccharide,xylose and glucose.However,the acid is also the catalyst in degradation of xylose and glucose and the yield of sacchride is dependent on the kinetic behaviors of saccharide.The degradation kinetics of xylose and glucose in the hydrolysate Was investigated under the conventional process conditions of hydrogen ion concentration from O.05 to 0.2 mol/L and temperature from 150 to 200℃.With a numerical calculation method,the kinetic parameters Were estimated,and the activation energy of xylose and glucose in the degradation reaction was obtained.The kinetic equations correlating the effect of hydrogen ion concentration on the rate constants of degradation reaction were established.Comparison between the calculated results from the equations and experimental ones proved that the established kinetic model could satisfactorily predict the degradation behavior of xylose and glucose in the acidic hydrolysate.

  20. Electricity production from xylose using a mediator-less microbial fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation was investigated in a two-chamber mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC). Voltage output followed saturation kinetics as a function of xylose concentration for concentration below 9.7 mM, with a predicted maximum of 86 mV (6.3 mW m(-2) or...... 116 mW m(-3)) and half-saturation constant (K(s)) of 0.29 mM. Xylose concentrations from 0.5 mM to 1.5 mM resulted in coulombic efficiencies and maximum voltage ranging from 41+/-1.6% to 36+/-1.2% and 55+/-2.0 mV to 70+/-3.0 mV respectively. Xylose degradation rate increased with increasing xylose...... concentration up to 9.7 mM and the predicted maximum degradation rate was 0.13 mM h(-1) and K(s) of 3.0 mM. Stirring by nitrogen in the anode chamber led to 99+/-2.3 mV maximum voltage (8.4+/-0.4 mW m(-2) or 153+/-7.1 mW m(-3)) and 5.9+/-0.3% coulombic efficiency at MFC running time 180 h, which were...

  1. Balance of XYL1 and XYL2 expression in different yeast chassis for improved xylose fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eZha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Reducing xylitol formation is an important step in engineering xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase pathway for ethanol production from xylose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, to balance the expression of XYL1 and mutant XYL2 encoding xylose reductase and NADP+-preferring xylitol dehydrogenase for reduced xylitol production, we utilized a strategy combining chassis selection and direct fine-tuning of XYL1 and XYL2 expression. A XYL1 gene under control of various promoters of ADH1, truncated ADH1 and PGK1, and a mutated XYL2 with different copy numbers were constructed into different xylose-utilizing modules, which were then expressed in two yeast chassis W303a and L2612. The strategy enabled us to achieve an improved L2612-derived recombinant strain with XYL1 controlled by promoter PGK1 and with two copies of XYL2. The strain exhibited 21.3% lower xylitol yield and 40.0% higher ethanol yield. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the combinatorial strategy for construction of efficient xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Efficient fermentation of xylose to ethanol at high formic acid concentrations by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Matsuda, Fumio [Kobe Univ., Hyogo (Japan). Organization of Advanced Science and Technology; Sung, Kyung-mo; Sanda, Tomoya; Kondo, Akihiko [Kobe Univ., Hyogo (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering

    2011-05-15

    Recombinant yeast strains highly tolerant to formic acid during xylose fermentation were constructed. Microarray analysis of xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain overexpressing endogenous xylulokinase in addition to xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis revealed that upregulation of formate dehydrogenase genes (FDH1 and FDH2) was one of the most prominent transcriptional events against excess formic acid. The quantification of formic acid in medium indicated that the innate activity of FDH was too weak to detoxify formic acid. To reinforce the capability for formic acid breakdown, the FDH1 gene was additionally overexpressed in the xylose-metabolizing recombinant yeast. This modification allowed the yeast to rapidly decompose excess formic acid. The yield and final ethanol concentration in the presence of 20 mM formic acid is as essentially same as that of control. The fermentation profile also indicated that the production of xylitol and glycerol, major by-products in xylose fermentation, was not affected by the upregulation of FDH activity. (orig.)

  3. Lactic acid production from cellobiose and xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Subramaniam, Vijay; Adiputra, Andrew; Subramaniam, Vimal; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Park, In; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-05-01

    Efficient and rapid production of value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an important step toward a sustainable society. Lactic acid, used for synthesizing the bioplastic polylactide, has been produced by microbial fermentation using primarily glucose. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates contain high concentrations of cellobiose and xylose. Here, we constructed a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain capable of fermenting cellobiose and xylose into lactic acid. Specifically, genes (cdt-1, gh1-1, XYL1, XYL2, XYL3, and ldhA) coding for cellobiose transporter, β-glucosidase, xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, xylulokinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were integrated into the S. cerevisiae chromosomes. The resulting strain produced lactic acid from cellobiose or xylose with high yields. When fermenting a cellulosic sugar mixture containing 10 g/L glucose, 40 g/L xylose, and 80 g/L cellobiose, the engineered strain produced 83 g/L of lactic acid with a yield of 0.66 g lactic acid/g sugar (66% theoretical maximum). This study demonstrates initial steps toward the feasibility of sustainable production of lactic acid from lignocellulosic sugars by engineered yeast. PMID:26524688

  4. Comparison of xylose fermentation by two high-performance engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Economical biofuel production from plant biomass requires the conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in the plant cell wall. The best industrial fermentation organism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been developed to utilize xylose by heterologously expressing either a xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase (XR/XDH pathway or a xylose isomerase (XI pathway. Although it has been proposed that the optimal means for fermenting xylose into biofuels would use XI instead of the XR/XDH pathway, no clear comparison of the best publicly-available yeast strains engineered to use XR/XDH or XI has been published. We therefore compared two of the best-performing engineered yeast strains in the public domain—one using the XR/XDH pathway and another using XI—in anaerobic xylose fermentations. We find that, regardless of conditions, the strain using XR/XDH has substantially higher productivity compared to the XI strain. By contrast, the XI strain has better yields in nearly all conditions tested.

  5. Benzoate-induced stress enhances xylitol yield in aerobic fed-batch culture of Candida mogii TISTR 5892.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannawilai, Siwaporn; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Chisti, Yusuf

    2015-01-20

    Production of the natural sweetener xylitol from xylose via the yeast Candida mogii TISTR 5892 was compared with and without the growth inhibitor sodium benzoate in the culture medium. Sodium benzoate proved to be an uncompetitive inhibitor in relatively poorly oxygenated shake flask aerobic cultures. In a better controlled aerobic environment of a bioreactor, the role of sodium benzoate could equally well be described as competitive, uncompetitive or noncompetitive inhibitor of growth. In intermittent fed-batch fermentations under highly aerobic conditions, the presence of sodium benzoate at 0.15gL(-1) clearly enhanced the xylitol titer relative to the control culture without the sodium benzoate. The final xylitol concentration and the average xylitol yield on xylose were nearly 50gL(-1) and 0.57gg(-1), respectively, in the presence of sodium benzoate. Both these values were substantially higher than reported for the same fermentation under microaerobic conditions. Therefore, a fed-batch aerobic fermentation in the presence of sodium benzoate is promising for xylitol production using C. mogii. PMID:25499077

  6. Skin Immunity to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic commensal fungus that colonizes healthy human skin, mucosa, and the reproductive tract. C. albicans is also a predominantly opportunistic fungal pathogen, leading to disease manifestations such as disseminated candidiasis and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). The differing host susceptibilities for the sites of C. albicans infection have revealed tissue compartmentalization with tailoring of immune responses based on the site of infection. Furthermore, extensive studies of host genetics in rare cases of CMC have identified conserved genetic pathways involved in immune recognition and the response to the extracellular pathogen. We focus here on human and mouse skin as a site of C. albicans infection, and we review established and newly discovered insights into the cellular pathways that promote cutaneous antifungal immunity. PMID:27178391

  7. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both 32P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis

  8. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  9. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  10. Sequence resources at the Candida Genome Database

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Martha B.; Costanzo, Maria C.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Shah, Prachi; Binkley, Gail; Lane, Christopher; Miyasato, Stuart R.; SHERLOCK, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD, ) contains a curated collection of genomic information and community resources for researchers who are interested in the molecular biology of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. With the recent release of a new assembly of the C.albicans genome, Assembly 20, C.albicans genomics has entered a new era. Although the C.albicans genome assembly continues to undergo refinement, multiple assemblies and gene nomenclatures will remain in widespread use by the...

  11. Candida Sepsis Following Transcervical Chorionic Villi Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Israel Potasman; Roni Gonen; Alona Paz

    2001-01-01

    Background: The use of invasive devices and broad spectrum antibiotics has increased the rate of candidal superinfections.Candida sepsis associated with pregnancy is rare. Candida sepsis following chorionic villi sampling (CVS) has never been reported. Case: A 31-year-old pregnant woman presented with signs of sepsis one day after undergoing transcervical CVS. Blood culture and curettage material yielded C. albicans. She was treated with 400 mg of fluconazole daily for 4 weeks and completely ...

  12. Oral Candida infections--a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Samaranayake L; Nair R

    1995-01-01

    Candida species are the commonest agents of oral mycoses. They cause a variety of diseases including the new variant, erythematous candidosis, which is frequently described in HIV infection. Due to these and other reasons the classification of oral candidosis has been recently revised, and further more new therapeutic regimes have been described. Hence in this article an overview of oral Candida infections is presented with special emphasis on current concepts related to classification and tr...

  13. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commens...

  14. Candida species isolated from various clinical specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Uraz, Güven; Arslan, Seza; Ekener, Serpil

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: The various culture specimens of patients were investigated in our research. Material and methods: 123 Candida strains were isolated. In identification of Candida species that were isolated, germ tube test, growth in Cornmeal-Tween 80 agar and formation of clamydospore, presence of pseudohyphae, carbonhytrate fermentation and assimilation tests, formation of membranes in sabouraud medium, and the tests of ascospore in the mediums with cycloheximide and the test of nitrate were...

  15. Selective Preparation of Furfural from Xylose over Sulfonic Acid Functionalized Mesoporous Sba-15 Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Li

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous SBA-15 materials were prepared using the co-condensation and grafting methods, respectively, and their catalytic performance in the dehydration of xylose to furfural was examined. SBA-15-SO3H(C prepared by the co-condensation method showed 92–95% xylose conversion and 74% furfural selectivity, and 68–70% furfural yield under the given reaction conditions. The deactivation and regeneration of the SBA-15-SO3H(C catalyst for the dehydration of xylose was also investigated. The results indicate that the used and regeneration catalysts retained the SBA-15 mesoporous structure, and the S content of SBA-15-SO3H(C almost did not change. The deactivation of the catalysts is proposed to be associated with the accumulation of byproducts, which is caused by the loss reaction of furfural. After regeneration by H2O2, the catalytic activity of the catalyst almost recovered.

  16. Sugarcane straw as a feedstock for xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Hernández-Pérez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sugarcane straw has become an available lignocellulosic biomass since the progressive introduction of the non-burning harvest in Brazil. Besides keeping this biomass in the field, it can be used as a feedstock in thermochemical or biochemical conversion processes. This makes feasible its incorporation in a biorefinery, whose economic profitability could be supported by integrated production of low-value biofuels and high-value chemicals, e.g., xylitol, which has important industrial and clinical applications. Herein, biotechnological production of xylitol is presented as a possible route for the valorization of sugarcane straw and its incorporation in a biorefinery. Nutritional supplementation of the sugarcane straw hemicellulosic hydrolyzate as a function of initial oxygen availability was studied in batch fermentation of Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037. The nutritional supplementation conditions evaluated were: no supplementation; supplementation with (NH42SO4, and full supplementation with (NH42SO4, rice bran extract and CaCl2·2H2O. Experiments were performed at pH 5.5, 30 °C, 200 rpm, for 48 h in 125 mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing either 25 or 50 mL of medium in order to vary initial oxygen availability. Without supplementation, complete consumption of glucose and partial consumption of xylose were observed. In this condition the maximum xylitol yield (0.67 g g-1 was obtained under reduced initial oxygen availability. Nutritional supplementation increased xylose consumption and xylitol production by up to 200% and 240%, respectively. The maximum xylitol volumetric productivity (0.34 g L-1 h-1 was reached at full supplementation and increased initial oxygen availability. The results demonstrated a combined effect of nutritional supplementation and initial oxygen availability on xylitol production from sugarcane straw hemicellulosic hydrolyzate.

  17. Sugarcane straw as a feedstock for xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, Andrés Felipe; de Arruda, Priscila Vaz; Felipe, Maria das Graças de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane straw has become an available lignocellulosic biomass since the progressive introduction of the non-burning harvest in Brazil. Besides keeping this biomass in the field, it can be used as a feedstock in thermochemical or biochemical conversion processes. This makes feasible its incorporation in a biorefinery, whose economic profitability could be supported by integrated production of low-value biofuels and high-value chemicals, e.g., xylitol, which has important industrial and clinical applications. Herein, biotechnological production of xylitol is presented as a possible route for the valorization of sugarcane straw and its incorporation in a biorefinery. Nutritional supplementation of the sugarcane straw hemicellulosic hydrolyzate as a function of initial oxygen availability was studied in batch fermentation of Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037. The nutritional supplementation conditions evaluated were: no supplementation; supplementation with (NH4)2SO4, and full supplementation with (NH4)2SO4, rice bran extract and CaCl2·2H2O. Experiments were performed at pH 5.5, 30°C, 200rpm, for 48h in 125mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing either 25 or 50mL of medium in order to vary initial oxygen availability. Without supplementation, complete consumption of glucose and partial consumption of xylose were observed. In this condition the maximum xylitol yield (0.67gg(-1)) was obtained under reduced initial oxygen availability. Nutritional supplementation increased xylose consumption and xylitol production by up to 200% and 240%, respectively. The maximum xylitol volumetric productivity (0.34gL(-1)h(-1)) was reached at full supplementation and increased initial oxygen availability. The results demonstrated a combined effect of nutritional supplementation and initial oxygen availability on xylitol production from sugarcane straw hemicellulosic hydrolyzate. PMID:26991282

  18. Molecular screening for Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis among Danish Candida parapsilosis group blood culture isolates: proposal of a new RFLP profile for differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirhendi, Hossein; Bruun, Brita; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl;

    2010-01-01

    Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis are recently described species phenotypically indistinguishable from Candida parapsilosis . We evaluated phenotyping and molecular methods for the detection of these species among 79 unique blood culture isolates of the C. parapsilosis group obtained...... number of invasive infections in Denmark....

  19. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung-Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O, Joo Hyun [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis.

  20. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis

  1. Tandem mass spectrometric characterization of the conversion of xylose to furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal decomposition of xylose into furfural under acidic conditions has been studied using tandem mass spectrometry. Two different Brønsted acids, maleic and sulfuric acids, were used to demonstrate that varying the Brønsted acid does not affect the mechanism of the reaction. Two selectively labeled xylose molecules, 1-13C and 5-13C-xyloses, were examined to determine which carbon atom is converted to the aldehyde carbon in furfural. This can be done by using tandem mass spectrometry since collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of protonated unlabeled furfural results in the loss of CO from the aldehyde moiety. The loss of a neutral molecule with MW of 29 Da (13CO) was observed for protonated furfural derived from 1-13C-labeled xylose while the loss of a neutral molecule with MW of 28 Da (CO) was observed for protonated furfural derived from 5-13C labeled xylose. These results support the hypothesis that the mechanism of formation of furfural under mildly hot acidic conditions involves an intramolecular rearrangement of protonated xylose into the pyranose form rather than into an open-chain form. - Highlights: • Mechanism of catalytic conversion of Xyl to furfural under acidic conditions was studied by MS/MS and partially labeled Xyl. • The type of acid does not have a strong influence on the mechanism of catalytic conversion of Xyl to furfural. • The mechanism of formation of furfural under mildly hot acidic conditions involves an intramolecular rearrangement of Xyl

  2. Systems metabolic engineering of xylose-utilizing Corynebacterium glutamicum for production of 1,5-diaminopentane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschke, Nele; Becker, Judith; Schäfer, Rudolf; Kiefer, Patrick; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    The sustainable production of industrial platform chemicals is one of the great challenges facing the biotechnology field. Ideally, fermentation feedstocks would rather rely on industrial waste streams than on food-based raw materials. Corynebacterium glutamicum was metabolically engineered to produce the bio-nylon precursor 1,5-diaminopentane from the hemicellulose sugar xylose. Comparison of a basic diaminopentane producer strain on xylose and glucose feedstocks revealed a 30% reduction in diaminopentane yield and productivity on the pentose sugar. The integration of in vivo and in silico metabolic flux analysis by (13) C and elementary modes identified bottlenecks in the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle that limited performance on xylose. By the integration of global transcriptome profiling, this could be specifically targeted to the tkt operon, genes that encode for fructose bisphosphatase (fbp) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (icd), and to genes involved in formation of lysine (lysE) and N-acetyl diaminopentane (act). This was used to create the C. glutamicum strain DAP-Xyl1 icd(GTG) Peftu fbp Psod tkt Δact ΔlysE. The novel producer, designated DAP-Xyl2, exhibited a 54% increase in product yield to 233 mmol mol(-1) and a 100% increase in productivity to 1 mmol g(-1) h(-1) on the xylose substrate. In a fed-batch process, the strain achieved 103 g L(-1) of diaminopentane from xylose with a product yield of 32%. Xylose utilization is currently one of the most relevant metabolic engineering subjects. In this regard, the current work is a milestone in industrial strain engineering of C. glutamicum. See accompanying commentary by Hiroshi Shimizu DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300097. PMID:23447448

  3. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glucose and xylose by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yun;

    2015-01-01

    biomass into the products of interest. We engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), a potential building block for acrylates, from glucose and xylose. We introduced the 3HP biosynthetic pathways via malonyl-CoA or β-alanine intermediates into a xylose...

  4. Co-utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose by laboratory and industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boles Eckhard

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive alternative for the production of bioethanol. Traditionally, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in industrial ethanol fermentations. However, S. cerevisiae is naturally not able to ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose, which are present in high amounts in lignocellulosic raw materials. Results We describe the engineering of laboratory and industrial S. cerevisiae strains to co-ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose. Introduction of a fungal xylose and a bacterial arabinose pathway resulted in strains able to grow on both pentose sugars. Introduction of a xylose pathway into an arabinose-fermenting laboratory strain resulted in nearly complete conversion of arabinose into arabitol due to the L-arabinose reductase activity of the xylose reductase. The industrial strain displayed lower arabitol yield and increased ethanol yield from xylose and arabinose. Conclusion Our work demonstrates simultaneous co-utilization of xylose and arabinose in recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the co-utilization of arabinose together with xylose significantly reduced formation of the by-product xylitol, which contributed to improved ethanol production.

  5. Effect of in situ acids removal on mixed glucose and xylose fermentation by Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; V. Skiadas, Ioannis; Westermann, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    . tyrobutyricum has a lower affinity for xylose than for glucose. Potassium ions negatively affected the effective maximum growth rate of C. tyrobutyricum at concentrations higher than 5 g L-1 exhibiting a non-competitive type of inhibition. Continuous fermentation of a glucose and xylose mixture with...

  6. KINETICS OF GROWTH AND ETHANOL PRODUCTION ON DIFFERENT CARBON SUBSTRATES USING GENETICALLY ENGINEERED XYLOSE-FERMENTING YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) strain was used for fermentation of glucose and xylose. Growth kinetics and ethanol productivity were calculated for batch fermentation on media containing different combinations of glucose and xylose to give a final sugar concentra...

  7. Succinic acid production from xylose mother liquor by recombinant Escherichia coli strain

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Honghui; Pan, Jiachuan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Nan; Jie ZHANG; Li, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Succinic acid (1,4-butanedioic acid) is identified as one of important building-block chemicals. Xylose mother liquor is an abundant industrial residue in xylitol biorefining industry. In this study, xylose mother liquor was utilized to produce succinic acid by recombinant Escherichia coli strain SD121, and the response surface methodology was used to optimize the fermentation media. The optimal conditions of succinic acid fermentation were as follows: 82.62 g L−1 total initial sugars, 42.27 ...

  8. Transcriptional Control of ADH Genes in the Xylose-Fermenting Yeast Pichia stipitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jae-Yong; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the expression of the genes encoding group I alcohol dehydrogenases (PsADH1 and PsADH2) in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The cells expressed PsADH1 approximately 10 times higher under oxygen-limited conditions than under fully aerobic conditions when cultivated on xylose. Transcripts of PsADH2 were not detectable under either aeration condition. We used a PsADH1::lacZ fusion to monitor PsADH1 expression and found that expression increased as oxygen decreased...

  9. Characterization of Ethanol Production from Xylose and Xylitol by a Cell-Free Pachysolen tannophilus System

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jie; Taylor, Kenneth B.

    1993-01-01

    Whole cells and a cell extract of Pachysolen tannophilus converted xylose to xylitol, ethanol, and CO2. The whole-cell system converted xylitol slowly to CO2 and little ethanol was produced, whereas the cell-free system converted xylitol quantitatively to ethanol (1.64 mol of ethanol per mol of xylitol) and CO2. The supernatant solution from high-speed centrifugation (100,000 × g) of the extract converted xylose to ethanol, but did not metabolize xylitol unless a membrane fraction and oxygen ...

  10. Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover

    OpenAIRE

    Parreiras, Lucas S.; Rebecca J Breuer; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Alan J Higbee; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules genera...

  11. Multilocus sequence typing confirms synonymy but highlights differences between Candida albicans and Candida stellatoidea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, M.D.; Boekhout, T.; Odds, F.C.

    2008-01-01

    We used multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to investigate 35 yeast isolates representing the two genome-sequenced strains plus the type strain of Candida albicans, four isolates originally identified as Candida stellatoidea type I and 28 representing type strains of other species now regarded as syn

  12. Analysis and prediction of the physiological effects of altered coenzyme specificity in xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase during xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahulec, Stefan; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    An advanced strategy of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain development for fermentation of xylose applies tailored enzymes in the process of metabolic engineering. The coenzyme specificities of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) and the NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) have been targeted in previous studies by protein design or evolution with the aim of improving the recycling of NADH or NADPH in their two-step pathway, converting xylose to xylulose. Yeast strains expressing variant pairs of XR and XDH that according to in vitro kinetic data were suggested to be much better matched in coenzyme usage than the corresponding pair of wild-type enzymes, exhibit widely varying capabilities for xylose fermentation. To achieve coherence between enzyme properties and the observed strain performance during fermentation, we explored the published kinetic parameters for wild-type and engineered forms of XR and XDH as possible predictors of xylitol by-product formation (Yxylitol) in yeast physiology. We found that the ratio of enzymatic reaction rates using NADP(H) and NAD(H) that was calculated by applying intracellular reactant concentrations to rate equations derived from bi-substrate kinetic analysis, succeeded in giving a statistically reliable forecast of the trend effect on Yxylitol. Prediction based solely on catalytic efficiencies with or without binding affinities for NADP(H) and NAD(H) were not dependable, and we define a minimum demand on the enzyme kinetic characterization to be performed for this purpose. An immediate explanation is provided for the typically lower Yxylitol in the current strains harboring XR engineered for utilization of NADH as compared to strains harboring XDH engineered for utilization of NADP+. The known XDH enzymes all exhibit a relatively high Km for NADP+ so that physiological boundary conditions are somewhat unfavorable for xylitol oxidation by NADP+. A criterion of physiological fitness is developed for engineered XR

  13. Deleting the para-nitrophenyl phosphatase (pNPPase), PHO13, in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves growth and ethanol production on D-xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vleet, Jennifer; Jeffries, T.W.; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of D-xylulokinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for assimilation of xylose results in growth inhibition that is more pronounced at higher xylose concentrations. Mutants deficient in the para-nitrophenyl phosphatase, PHO13, resist growth inhibition on xylose. We studied thi...

  14. Seleção de iscas celulósicas para o cupim Heterotermes tenuis (isoptera: rhinotermitidae em cultura de cana-de-açúcar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMPOS M.B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se em condições de campo a atratividade ao cupim subterrâneo Heterotermes tenuis (H.,1858, importante praga da cana-de-açúcar no Brasil, de dezessete produtos com alto teor celulósico (bagaço de cana-de-açúcar "in natura"-T1; bagaço de cana + papelão ondulado picado-T2; bagaço de cana + açúcar refinado-T3; bagaço de cana + açúcar refinado + papelão picado-T4; bagaço de cana-de-açúcar decomposto-T5; bagaço decomposto + papelão picado-T6; bagaço decomposto + açúcar refinado-T7; bagaço decomposto + papelão picado + açúcar refinado-T8; torta de filtro "in natura"-T9; torta de filtro decomposta-T10; rolão de milho-T11; fezes frescas e secas de bovino-T12; papelão ondulado picado-T13; papel toalha picado-T14; serragem de pinus-T15; papelão ondulado usado picado-T16; celulose picada-T17. Usando-se a isca TermitrapR localizaram-se os focos do inseto no campo e, através de uma escala de notas, de zero a três, para a quantidade de cupins encontrados nas iscas, selecionaram-se os produtos mais atrativos, que foram em ordem decrescente: T12, T11, T1, T6, T3, T16, e T17.

  15. Effects of alumina refinery wastewater and signature metal constituents at the upper thermal tolerance of: 2. The early life stages of the coral Acropora tenuis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: →Methodology to assess relevant toxicants to sensitive early life histories of coral. → Explored the thermal sensitivity of fertilisation and larval metamorphosis in a coral. → First study to identify IC50s for Al, Ga and V in corals (at summer temperature). → First study to test the effects of an alumina outfall wastewater on coral. → Found additive effects of wastewater and high SST on fertilisation and metamorphosis. - Abstract: The success of early life history transitions of the coral Acropora tenuis were used as endpoints to evaluate thermal stress and the effects of wastewater discharged to a tropical marine environment. The studies assessed the effects of: (i) temperature; (ii) three signature metals of the wastewater, aluminium (Al), vanadium (V) and gallium (Ga); and (iii) the wastewater (at 27 oC and 32 oC) on fertilisation and larval metamorphosis. The median inhibition temperatures for fertilisation and metamorphosis were 32.8 oC and 33.0 oC, respectively. Fertilisation IC50s for Al, V and Ga were 2997, 2884 and 3430 μg L-1, respectively. Metamorphosis IC50s for Al, V and Ga were 1945, 675 and 3566 μg L-1, respectively. The wastewater only affected fertilisation and metamorphosis at moderate concentrations (IC50s = 63% and 67%, v/v, respectively, at 27 oC), posing a low risk to this species in the field. The effects of wastewater and temperature on fertilisation and metamorphosis were additive.

  16. Levels of (1→3-β-D-glucan, Candida mannan and Candida DNA in serum samples of pediatric cancer patients colonized with Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Zia U

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveillance cultures may be helpful in identifying patients at increased risk of developing invasive candidiasis. However, only scant information exists on the effect of Candida colonization on serum levels of diagnostic biomarkers. This prospective surveillance study determined the extent of Candida colonization among pediatric cancer patients and its possible impact on serum levels of (1-3-β-D-glucan (BDG, Candida mannan and Candida DNA. Methods A total of 1075 swabs originating from oropharynx (n = 294, nostrils (n = 600, rectum (n = 28, groin (n = 50, ear (n = 54, and axilla (n = 49 of 63 pediatric cancer patients were cultured for the isolation of Candida spp. Patients yielding Candida spp. from any sites were considered as colonized. Serum samples were collected from patients at the time of first surveillance culture for detection of BDG by Fungitell kit and Candida mannan by Platelia Candida Ag. Candida DNA was detected by using panfungal primers and identification was carried out by using species-specific primers and DNA sequencing. Results Seventy-five (7.6% swab cultures from 35 (55.5% patients yielded Candida spp. These isolates included C. albicans (n = 62, C. dubliniensis (n = 8, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis (n = 2 each and C. krusei (n = 1. Eleven patients were colonized at three or more sites. Eight of 36 serum samples from 6 colonized patients yielded BDG values higher than the currently recommended cut-off value of ≥80 pg/ml. However, none of the serum samples yielded Candida mannan levels ≥0.5 ng/ml and PCR test for Candida DNA was also negative in all the serum samples of colonized patients. During the study period, only two colonized patients subsequently developed candidemia due to C. tropicalis. Besides positive blood cultures, C. tropicalis DNA, BDG and Candida mannan were also detected in serum samples of both the patients. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that while mucosal

  17. Effect of xylose and nutrients concentration on ethanol production by a newly isolated extreme thermophilic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    An extreme thermophilic ethanol-producing strain was isolated from an ethanol high-yielding mixed culture, originally isolated from a hydrogen producing reactor operated at 70 °C. Ethanol yields were assessed with increasing concentrations of xylose, up to 20 g/l. The ability of the strain to gro...

  18. Optimization studies on acid hydrolysis of oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber for production of xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S H A; Choudhury, J P; Ahmad, A L; Kamaruddin, A H

    2007-02-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber is a lignocellulosic waste from palm oil mills. It is a potential source of xylose which can be used as a raw material for production of xylitol, a high value product. The increasing interest on use of lignocellulosic waste for bioconversion to fuels and chemicals is justifiable as these materials are low cost, renewable and widespread sources of sugars. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of H(2)SO(4) concentration, reaction temperature and reaction time for production of xylose. Batch reactions were carried out under various reaction temperature, reaction time and acid concentrations and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was followed to optimize the hydrolysis process in order to obtain high xylose yield. The optimum reaction temperature, reaction time and acid concentration found were 119 degrees C, 60 min and 2%, respectively. Under these conditions xylose yield and selectivity were found to be 91.27% and 17.97 g/g, respectively. PMID:16647852

  19. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glucose and xylose by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchana R. Kildegaard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass, the most abundant carbon source on the planet, may in the future become the primary feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals, replacing fossil feedstocks. This will, however, require development of cell factories that can convert both C6 and C5 sugars present in lignocellulosic biomass into the products of interest. We engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP, a potential building block for acrylates, from glucose and xylose. We introduced the 3HP biosynthetic pathways via malonyl-CoA or β-alanine intermediates into a xylose-consuming yeast. Using controlled fed-batch cultivation, we obtained 7.37±0.17 g 3HP L−1 in 120 hours with an overall yield of 29±1% Cmol 3HP Cmol−1 xylose. This study is the first demonstration of the potential of using S. cerevisiae for production of 3HP from the biomass sugar xylose.

  20. Biohydrogen production from xylose at extreme thermophilic temperatures (70 degrees C) by mixed culture fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-01-01

    /L. Addition of yeast extract in the cultivation medium resulted in significant improvement of hydrogen yield. The main metabolic products during xylose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, and lactate. The specific growth rates were able to fit the experimental points relatively well with Haldane equation...

  1. Fermentation performance and intracellular metabolite patterns in laboratory and industrial xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaldivar, Jesus; Borges, A.; Johansson, B.;

    2002-01-01

    , respectively for strains TMB 3001, A4 and A6. Xylose consumption resulted mainly in the formation of xylitol, with biomass and ethanol being minor products. The metabolite profile of intermediates in the pentose phosphate pathway and key glycolytic intermediates were determined during growth on glucose and...

  2. Enhancement in xylose utilization using Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 through evolutionary adaptation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nilesh Kumar; Behera, Shuvashish; Arora, Richa; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary adaptation was carried out on the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 at 45 °C up to 60 batches to enhance its xylose utilization capability. The adapted strain showed higher specific growth rate and 3-fold xylose uptake rate and short lag phase as compared to the native strain. During aerobic growth adapted yeast showed 2.81-fold higher xylose utilization than that of native. In anaerobic batch fermentation, adapted yeast utilized about 91% of xylose in 72 h and produced 2.88 and 18.75 g l⁻¹ of ethanol and xylitol, respectively, which were 5.11 and 5.71-fold higher than that of native. Ethanol yield, xylitol yield and specific sugar consumption rate obtained by the adapted cells were found to be 1.57, 1.65 and 4.84-fold higher than that of native yeast, respectively. Aforesaid results suggested that the evolutionary adaptation will be a very effective strategy in the near future for economic lignocellulosic ethanol production. PMID:26886223

  3. Ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by a recombinant xylose- and cellooligosaccharide-assimilating yeast strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katahira, Satoshi; Fukuda, Hideki [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Div. of Molecular Science; Mizuike, Atsuko; Kondo, Akihiko [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering

    2006-10-15

    The sulfuric acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass, such as wood chips, from the forest industry is an important material for fuel bioethanol production. In this study, we constructed a recombinant yeast strain that can ferment xylose and cellooligosaccharides by integrating genes for the intercellular expressions of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis, and xylulokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a gene for displaying ss-glucosidase from Aspergillus acleatus on the cell surface. In the fermentation of the sulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips, xylose and cellooligosaccharides were completely fermented after 36 h by the recombinant strain, and then about 30 g/l ethanol was produced from 73 g/l total sugar added at the beginning. In this case, the ethanol yield of this recombinant yeast was much higher than that of the control yeast. These results demonstrate that the fermentation of the lignocellulose hydrolysate is performed efficiently by the recombinant Saccharomyces strain with abilities for xylose assimilation and cellooligosaccharide degradation. (orig.)

  4. Generation of xylose solutions from Eucalyptus globulus wood by autohydrolysis-posthydrolysis processes: posthydrolysis kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, G; Domínguez, H; Parajó, J C

    2001-09-01

    Eucalyptus wood samples were treated with water under selected operational conditions (autohydrolysis reaction) to obtain a liquid phase containing hemicellulose-decomposition products (mainly acetylated xylooligosaccharides, xylose and acetic acid). In a further acid-catalysed step (posthydrolysis reaction), xylooligosaccharides were converted into xylose, a carbon source for further fermentation. The kinetic pattern governing the posthydrolysis step was established by reacting xylooligosaccharide-containing liquors at 100.5 degrees C, 115 degrees C, 125 degrees C or 135 degrees C in media containing 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 or 2 wt% of catalyst (sulphuric acid). The time course of the concentrations of xylooligosaccharides, xylose, furfural and acetic acid were determined, and the results were interpreted by means of a kinetic model which allowed a close reproduction of the experimental data. Almost quantitative conversion of xylooligosaccharides into xylose was achieved under a variety of experimental conditions. The first-order, kinetic coefficient for xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis (k1, h(-1)) varied with both temperature (T, K) and molar sulphuric acid concentration (C) according to the equation In k1 = 36.66 + 1.00lnC - 108.0/(8.314T). The hydrolysis of acetyl groups followed a first-order kinetics. The corresponding kinetic coefficient (ka, h(-1) was correlated with the operational conditions by the equation Inka = 26.80+ 1.18 InC - 73.37/(8.314T). PMID:11480924

  5. Separate and Simultaneous enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of wheat hemicellulose with recombinant xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Lisbeth; Sørensen, H. R.; Dam, B. P;

    2006-01-01

    maximum ethanol concentrations obtained were 4.3 and 4 g/L, respectively, but F12 converted xylose 15% faster than CR4 during the first 24 h. The comparison of separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with F12 showed that the highest, maximum...

  6. Fermentation performance and intracellular metabolite patterns in laboratory and industrial xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaldivar, Jesus; Borges, A.; Johansson, B.; Smits, Hans Peter; Villas-Boas, S.G.; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    , respectively for strains TMB 3001, A4 and A6. Xylose consumption resulted mainly in the formation of xylitol, with biomass and ethanol being minor products. The metabolite profile of intermediates in the pentose phosphate pathway and key glycolytic intermediates were determined during growth on glucose and...

  7. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two aldose (xylose) reductases (ARI and ARII) from Fusarium oxysporum were purified and characterized. The native ARI was a monomer with M-r 41000, pI 5.2 and showed a 52-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, while ARII was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 37000, pI 3.6 and a 60-fold preference...

  8. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose....

  9. Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of fuel ethanol from xylose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    For various reasons mankind is looking for alternatives for fossil fuels. One of these alternatives is ethanol made from plant biomass. However, the plant material when broken down by hydrolysis into its sugar monomers contains a significant amount of xylose, a 5-carbon-sugar or pentose. Contrary to

  10. Isolation and Identification of Candida from the Oral Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Shashanka Rajappa; Smitha Byadarahally Raju

    2011-01-01

    Various techniques are available for the isolation of Candida within the oral cavity. Such methods play an important role in the diagnosis and management of oral candidosis. The growing importance of Candida is in part related to the emergence of HIV infection and the more widespread use of immunosuppressive chemotherapy. Along with the Candida albicans there has been a greater recognition of the importance of the nonalbicans Candida species in oral candidosis. Identification of infecting str...

  11. Non-albicans Candida Infection: An Emerging Threat

    OpenAIRE

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Santosh Saini; Stephen Mathew

    2014-01-01

    The very nature of infectious diseases has undergone profound changes in the past few decades. Fungi once considered as nonpathogenic or less virulent are now recognized as a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and severely ill patients. Candida spp. are among the most common fungal pathogens. Candida albicans was the predominant cause of candidiasis. However, a shift toward non-albicans Candida species has been recently observed. These non-albicans Candida species d...

  12. The Host’s Reply to Candida Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. are among the most common nosocomial fungal pathogens and are notorious for their propensity toward biofilm formation. When growing on a medical device or mucosal surface, these organisms reside as communities embedded in a protective matrix, resisting host defenses. The host responds to Candida biofilm by depositing a variety of proteins that become incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Compared to free-floating Candida, leukocytes are less effective against Candida within a bio...

  13. Screening of Tanzanian medicinal plants for anti-Candida activity

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Cosam C; Ngassapa Olipa D; Matee Mecky IN; Runyoro Deborah KB; Mbwambo Zakaria H

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Candida albicans has become resistant to the already limited, toxic and expensive anti-Candida agents available in the market. These factors necessitate the search for new anti-fungal agents. Methods Sixty-three plant extracts, from 56 Tanzanian plant species obtained through the literature and interviews with traditional healers, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity. Aqueous methanolic extracts were screened for anti-Candida activity by bioautography agar overlay meth...

  14. The Effect of pH Control on Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 with Xylose and D-Glucose and D-Xylose Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Jiang; Zhiqiang Wen; Mianbin Wu; Hong Li; Jun Yang; Jianping Lin; Yijun Lin; Lirong Yang; Peilin Cen

    2014-01-01

    D-Glucose, L-arabinose, D-mannose, D-xylose, and cellobiose are saccharification products of lignocellulose and important carbon sources for industrial fermentation. The fermentation efficiency with each of the five sugars and the mixture of the two most dominant sugars, D-glucose and D-xylose, was evaluated for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The utilization efficacy of the five reducing sugars was in the order of D-glucose, L-arabinose, D-mannose, D-xylose and cellobiose. D-Xylose, the second most abundant component in lignocellulosic hydrolysate, was used in the fermentation either as sole carbon source or mixed with glucose. The results indicated that maintaining pH at 4.8, the optimal pH value for solventogenesis, could increase D-xylose consumption when it was the sole carbon source. Different media con-taining D-glucose and D-xylose at different ratios (1:2, 1:5, 1.5:1, 2:1) were then attempted for the ABE fermenta-tion. When pH was at 4.8 and xylose concentration was five times that of glucose, a 256.9%increase in xylose utilization and 263.7%increase in solvent production were obtained compared to those without pH control. These results demonstrate a possible approach combining optimized pH control and D-glucose and D-xylose ratio to increase the fermentation efficiency of lignocellulosic hydrolysate.

  15. Comparison Between Virulence Factors of Candida albicans and Non-Albicans Species of Candida Isolated from Genitourinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Udayalaxmi,; Jacob, Shani; D’Souza, Diney

    2014-01-01

    Background: Candida spp. is frequently isolated from cases of vulvovaginal candidiasis and catheter associated UTI. C.albicans is the most frequently isolated species but non-albicans species of candida are gaining clinical significance.

  16. Severe Candida spp. infections: new insights into natural immunity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.W.M. van der; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Joosten, L.A.B.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive infections caused by Candida spp. are associated with high mortality. Colonisation by Candida spp. and the capacity of the host to recognise them as potential pathogens are essential steps in the development of these infections. The major pathogen-associated molecular patterns of Candida ar

  17. Glucose(xylose isomerase production by Streptomyces sp. CH7 grown on agricultural residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankiya Chanitnun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. CH7 was found to efficiently produce glucose(xylose isomerase when grown on either xylan or agricultural residues. This strain produced a glucose(xylose isomerase activity of roughly 1.8 U/mg of protein when it was grown in medium containing 1% xylose as a carbon source. Maximal enzymatic activities of about 5 and 3 U/mg were obtained when 1% xylan and 2.5% corn husks were used, respectively. The enzyme was purified from a mycelial extract to 16-fold purity with only two consecutive column chromatography steps using Macro-prep DEAE and Sephacryl-300, respectively. The approximate molecular weight of the purified enzyme is 170 kDa, and it has four identical subunits of 43.6 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. Its Km values for glucose and xylose were found to be 258.96 and 82.77 mM, respectively, and its Vmax values are 32.42 and 63.64 μM/min/mg, respectively. The purified enzyme is optimally active at 85ºC and pH 7.0. It is stable at pH 5.5-8.5 and at temperatures up to 60ºC after 30 min. These findings indicate that glucose(xylose isomerase from Streptomyces sp. CH7 has the potential for industrial applications, especially for high-fructose syrup production and bioethanol fermentation from hemicellulosic hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  18. Glucose(xylose) isomerase production by Streptomyces sp. CH7 grown on agricultural residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanitnun, Kankiya; Pinphanichakarn, Pairoh

    2012-07-01

    Streptomyces sp. CH7 was found to efficiently produce glucose(xylose) isomerase when grown on either xylan or agricultural residues. This strain produced a glucose(xylose) isomerase activity of roughly 1.8 U/mg of protein when it was grown in medium containing 1% xylose as a carbon source. Maximal enzymatic activities of about 5 and 3 U/mg were obtained when 1% xylan and 2.5% corn husks were used, respectively. The enzyme was purified from a mycelial extract to 16-fold purity with only two consecutive column chromatography steps using Macro-prep DEAE and Sephacryl-300, respectively. The approximate molecular weight of the purified enzyme is 170 kDa, and it has four identical subunits of 43.6 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. Its K m values for glucose and xylose were found to be 258.96 and 82.77 mM, respectively, and its V max values are 32.42 and 63.64 μM/min/mg, respectively. The purified enzyme is optimally active at 85°C and pH 7.0. It is stable at pH 5.5-8.5 and at temperatures up to 60°C after 30 min. These findings indicate that glucose(xylose) isomerase from Streptomyces sp. CH7 has the potential for industrial applications, especially for high-fructose syrup production and bioethanol fermentation from hemicellulosic hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:24031932

  19. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26724864

  20. Expression of protein engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Katsuji; Takimura, Osamu; Sawayama, Shigeki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Hiroshima (Japan). Biomass Technology Research Center; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    2008-11-15

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain transformed with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes from Pichia stipitis has the ability to convert xylose to ethanol together with the unfavorable excretion of xylitol, which may be due to cofactor imbalance between NADPH-preferring XR and NAD{sup +}-dependent XDH. To reduce xylitol formation, we have already generated several XDH mutants with a reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADP{sup +}. In this study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains with xylose-fermenting ability, including protein-engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH-expressing strains. The most positive effect on xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was found by using a strain named MA-N5, constructed by chromosomal integration of the gene for NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH along with XR and endogenous xylulokinase genes. The MA-N5 strain had an increase in ethanol production and decrease in xylitol excretion compared with the reference strain expressing wild-type XDH when fermenting not only xylose but also mixed sugars containing glucose and xylose. Furthermore, the MA-N5 strain produced ethanol with a high yield of 0.49 g of ethanol/g of total consumed sugars in the nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. The results demonstrate that glucose and xylose present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be efficiently fermented by this redox-engineered strain. (orig.)

  1. Production of xylitol by a Coniochaeta ligniaria strain tolerant of inhibitors and defective in growth on xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nancy N; Saha, Badal C

    2016-05-01

    In conversion of biomass to fuels or chemicals, inhibitory compounds arising from physical-chemical pretreatment of the feedstock can interfere with fermentation of the sugars to product. Fungal strain Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 metabolizes the furan aldehydes furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, as well as a number of aromatic and aliphatic acids and aldehydes. Use of NRRL30616 to condition biomass sugars by metabolizing the inhibitors improves their fermentability. Wild-type C. ligniaria has the ability to grow on xylose as sole source of carbon and energy, with no accumulation of xylitol. Mutants of C. ligniaria unable to grow on xylose were constructed. Xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities were reduced by approximately two thirds in mutant C8100. The mutant retained ability to metabolize inhibitors in biomass hydrolysates. Although C. ligniaria C8100 did not grow on xylose, the strain converted a portion of xylose to xylitol, producing 0.59 g xylitol/g xylose in rich medium and 0.48 g xylitol/g xylose in corn stover dilute acid hydrolysate. 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2016 © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:606-612, 2016. PMID:26950770

  2. How to Use the Candida Genome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Marek S; Binkley, Jonathan; Sherlock, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Studying Candida biology requires access to genomic sequence data in conjunction with experimental information that provides functional context to genes and proteins. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) integrates functional information about Candida genes and their products with a set of analysis tools that facilitate searching for sets of genes and exploring their biological roles. This chapter describes how the various types of information available at CGD can be searched, retrieved, and analyzed. Starting with the guided tour of the CGD Home page and Locus Summary page, this unit shows how to navigate the various assemblies of the C. albicans genome, how to use Gene Ontology tools to make sense of large-scale data, and how to access the microarray data archived at CGD. PMID:26519061

  3. How to use the Candida Genome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Jonathan; Sherlock, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Studying Candida biology requires access to genomic sequence data in conjunction with experimental information that provides functional context to genes and proteins. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) integrates functional information about Candida genes and their products with a set of analysis tools that facilitate searching for sets of genes and exploring their biological roles. This chapter describes how the various types of information available at CGD can be searched, retrieved, and analyzed. Starting with the guided tour of the CGD Home page and Locus Summary page, this unit shows how to navigate the various assemblies of the C. albicans genome, how to use Gene Ontology tools to make sense of large-scale data, and how to access the microarray data archived at CGD. PMID:26519061

  4. Point mutation of the xylose reductase (XR) gene reduces xylitol accumulation and increases citric acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius

    OpenAIRE

    Weyda, István; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Peter S. Lübeck

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius accumulates xylitol when it grows on d-xylose. In fungi, d-xylose is reduced to xylitol by the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR). Xylitol is then further oxidized by the NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). The cofactor impairment between the XR and XDH can lead to the accumulation of xylitol under oxygen-limiting conditions. Most of the XRs are NADPH dependent and contain a conserved Ile-Pro-Lys-Ser motif. The only known naturally occurring NADH-dependent...

  5. Commensal Oral Candida in Asian Cohorts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lakshman Samaranayake

    2009-01-01

    The oral carriage rate of Candida in healthy humans ranges from 40% to 60%. However for a prolonged period, the oral candidal prevalence in humans was documented essentially using data from studies in the West as their prevalence in inhabitants in different regions of the world, including Asia was not known. Yet, recent reports from a number of studies indicate the quality, quantity and prevalence of oral yeasts differ between Asia and other regions for reason that are still unclear. This mini review on such data from Asian studies on oral carriage of Candida provides another intriguing facet of the behavior of this ubiquitous yeast.

  6. Caspofungin Etest susceptibility testing of Candida species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Pfaller, Michael A; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of caspofungin Etest and the recently revised CLSI breakpoints. A total of 497 blood isolates, of which 496 were wild-type isolates, were included. A total of 65/496 susceptible isolates (13.1%) were misclassified as intermediate (I) or re...... resistant (R). Such misclassifications were most commonly observed for Candida krusei (73.1%) and Candida glabrata (33.1%). The revised breakpoints cannot be safely adopted for these two species....

  7. The Host’s Reply to Candida Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeniel E. Nett

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. are among the most common nosocomial fungal pathogens and are notorious for their propensity toward biofilm formation. When growing on a medical device or mucosal surface, these organisms reside as communities embedded in a protective matrix, resisting host defenses. The host responds to Candida biofilm by depositing a variety of proteins that become incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Compared to free-floating Candida, leukocytes are less effective against Candida within a biofilm. This review highlights recent advances describing the host’s response to Candida biofilms using ex vivo and in vivo models of mucosal and device-associated biofilm infections.

  8. Effect of Furfural, Vanillin and Syringaldehyde on Candida guilliermondii Growth and Xylitol Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christine; Jones, Opal; Barnhart, Christopher; Lajoie, Curtis

    Xylitol is a five-carbon sugar alcohol with established commercial use as an alternative sweetener and can be produced from hemicellulose hydrolysate. However, there are difficulties with microbiological growth and xylitol biosynthesis on hydrolysate because of the inhibitors formed from hydrolysis of hemicellulose. This research focused on the effect of furfural, vanillin, and syringaldehyde on growth of Candida guilliermondii and xylitol accumulation from xylose in a semi-synthetic medium in microwell plate and bioreactor cultivations. All three compounds reduced specific growth rate, increased lag time, and reduced xylitol production rate. In general, increasing concentration of inhibitor increased the severity of inhibition, except in the case of 0.5 g vanillin per liter, which resulted in a faster late batch phase growth rate and increased biomass yield. At concentrations of 1 g/1 or higher, furfural was the least inhibitory to growth, followed by syringaldehyde. Vanillin most severely reduced specific growth rate. All three inhibitors reduced xylitol production rate approximately to the same degree.

  9. Susceptibility characterisation of Candida spp. to four essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, C C; Mohapatra, S

    2015-02-01

    In the present investigation, anti-Candida activity of four essential oils i.e. Black cumin (Nigella sativa), Curry leaf (Murraya koienigii), Ajwain (Trachiyspirum ammi), and Betel leaf (Piper betel) were screened against four human pathogenic species of Candida viz. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the oils ranged between 15.62 and 250 μl/ml while studied through tube dilution method. The oils retained their anti-Candida activities even after heat treatment (at 45ΊC, 60ΊC, 100ΊC for 1 hour) and also on autoclaving. Both Ajwain and Black Cumin leaf oils showed better anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, resulting in an irreversible damage to the cells. The anti-Candida activity of these essential oils could be attributable to the membrane inhibition mechanism. The activity of the oils is reported to be microbicidal (Candida-cidal). PMID:25657164

  10. Susceptibility characterisation of Candida spp. to four essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C C Rath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, anti-Candida activity of four essential oils i.e. Black cumin (Nigella sativa, Curry leaf (Murraya koienigii, Ajwain (Trachiyspirum ammi, and Betel leaf (Piper betel were screened against four human pathogenic species of Candida viz. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of the oils ranged between 15.62 and 250 μl/ml while studied through tube dilution method. The oils retained their anti-Candida activities even after heat treatment (at 45ΊC, 60ΊC, 100ΊC for 1 hour and also on autoclaving. Both Ajwain and Black Cumin leaf oils showed better anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, resulting in an irreversible damage to the cells. The anti-Candida activity of these essential oils could be attributable to the membrane inhibition mechanism. The activity of the oils is reported to be microbicidal (Candida-cidal.

  11. The Candida Genome Database (CGD), a community resource for Candida albicans gene and protein information

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Martha B.; Costanzo, Maria C.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Gail; Lane, Christopher; Miyasato, Stuart R.; SHERLOCK, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD) is a new database that contains genomic information about the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. CGD is a public resource for the research community that is interested in the molecular biology of this fungus. CGD curators are in the process of combing the scientific literature to collect all C.albicans gene names and aliases; to assign gene ontology terms that describe the molecular function, biological process, and subcellular localization of ea...

  12. Silver colloidal nanoparticles : antifungal effect against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, D. R.; Gorup, L. F.; Silva, Sónia Carina; Negri, M.; E. R. Camargo; Oliveira, Rosário; Barbosa, D. B.; Henriques, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applie...

  13. Hydrophobic interaction in Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis adherence to various denture base resin materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Minagi, S; Miyake, Y; Inagaki, K; Tsuru, H; Suginaka, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hydrophobicities of substrate surfaces on microbial adherence were examined by using Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis and 21 denture base resin materials. With increasing surface free energy of resin plates, increasing adherence of C. albicans and decreasing adherence of C. tropicalis were observed. The surface free energy of C. albicans is higher than that of all resin material surfaces, and C. tropicalis has surface free energy lower than that of all materials used. In...

  14. Production of anti-Candida antibodies in mice with gut colonization of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuo Ono; Osamu Koshio; Nobuo Suegara; Tatsuo Ikeda; Kayoko Wada; Masayasu Mitsuya; Hiroko Ishibashi; Shigeru Abe; Shigeru Tansho; Hideyo Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Production of antibodies that are specific for allergens is an important pathological process in inflammatory allergic diseases. These contain the antibodies against antigens of Candida albicans, one of the normal microbial flora in an intestinal tract. We studied the effects of the prednisolone administration on the production of anti-Candida antibodies in the gastrointestinally C. albicans-colonized mice. METHODS AND MATERIALS: BALB/c mice, treated with antibacterial antibiotics...

  15. Candida albicans versus Candida dubliniensis: Why Is C. albicans More Pathogenic?

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C.; Sullivan, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related pathogenic yeast species. However, C. albicans is far more prevalent in human infection and has been shown to be more pathogenic in a wide range of infection models. Comparison of the genomes of the two species has revealed that they are very similar although there are some significant differences, largely due to the expansion of virulence-related gene families (e.g., ALS and SAP) in C. albicans, and increased levels of pseudogenisa...

  16. Perbedaan Efek Ekstrak Jintan Hitam terhadap Candida albicans Denture Stomatitis dan Candida albicans (ATCC® 10231™)

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Steffi

    2015-01-01

    Jintan hitam mempunyai efek fungistatis dan fungisidal. Hal ini disebabkan adanya senyawa berupa timokuinon, timol, dan karvakrol. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui berapa konsentrasi Kadar Hambat Minimum (KHM) dan Kadar Bunuh Minimum (KBM) dari ekstrak jintan hitam terhadap Candida albicans denture stomatitis dan Candida albicans (ATCC® 10231™), serta untuk mengetahui apakah terdapat perbedaan efek ekstrak jintan hitam terhadap kedua jenis fungi tersebut. Jenis penelitian eksperiment...

  17. Comparison of the Hydrophobic Properties of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, Kevin C.; Wu, Jean G.; Masuoka, James

    2001-01-01

    Although Candida dubliniensis is a close genetic relative of Candida albicans, it colonizes and infects fewer sites. Nearly all instances of candidiasis caused by C. dubliniensis are restricted to the oral cavity. As cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) influences virulence of C. albicans, CSH properties of C. dubliniensis were investigated and compared to C. albicans. Growth temperature is one factor which affects the CSH status of stationary-phase C. albicans. However, C. dubliniensis, similar...

  18. Influence of growth conditions on cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, K C; Plotkin, B. J.; Klimas, D M

    1986-01-01

    The effect of cultural conditions on cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata was tested. C. albicans cells grown at room temperature were more hydrophobic than cells grown at 37 degrees C. No consistent pattern was observed with C. glabrata. Relative hydrophobicity was found to vary with the growth phase and growth medium for both species. The implications for pathogenesis studies are discussed.

  19. Comparative genomics of the fungal pathogens Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Andrew P; Gamble, John A.; Yeomans, Tim; Moran, Gary P.; Saunders, David; Harris, David; Aslett, Martin; Barrell, Jamie F.; Butler, Geraldine; Citiulo, Francesco; Coleman, David C.; de Groot, Piet W. J.; Goodwin, Tim J.; Quail, Michael A.; McQuillan, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is the closest known relative of Candida albicans, the most pathogenic yeast species in humans. However, despite both species sharing many phenotypic characteristics, including the ability to form true hyphae, C. dubliniensis is a significantly less virulent and less versatile pathogen. Therefore, to identify C. albicans-specific genes that may be responsible for an increased capacity to cause disease, we have sequenced the C. dubliniensis genome and compared it with the ...

  20. Induction of D-xylose uptake and expression of NAD(P)H-linked xylose reductase and NADP + -linked xylitol dehydrogenase in the oleaginous microalga Chlorella sorokiniana

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yubin; Yu, Xiaochen; Li, Tingting; Xiong, Xiaochao; Chen, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Background The heterotrophic and mixotrophic culture of oleaginous microalgae is a promising process to produce biofuel feedstock due to the advantage of fast growth. Various organic carbons have been explored for this application. However, despite being one of the most abundant and economical sugar resources in nature, D-xylose has never been demonstrated as a carbon source for wild-type microalgae. The purpose of the present work was to identify the feasibility of D-xylose utilization by th...

  1. Structure-based specificity mapping of secreted aspartic proteases of Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis using peptidomimetic inhibitors and homology modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majer, F.; Pavlíčková, Libuše; Majer, P.; Hradilek, Martin; Dolejší, Elena; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 387, č. 9 (2006), s. 1247-1254. ISSN 1431-6730 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/04/0432; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida albicans * Candida parapsilosis * Candida inhibitors * secreted aspartic protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.752, year: 2006

  2. Candida Esophagitis in an Immunocompetent Pregnant Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Greenspoon

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nausea and vomiting are common during the first half of pregnancy and usually require only supportive measures. When symptoms are progressive and weight loss occurs, treatable causes should be sought by means of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We report a case of an immunocompetent gravida with invasive Candida albicans esophagitis.

  3. Intracellular aspartic protease of Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauerová, Václava; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    Mátraháza : -, 2007. s. 43. [Alexander Von Humboldt Workshop on Structure Based Approaches Towards Disease Control. 22.05.2007-27.05.2007, Mátraháza] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * intracellular * aspartic protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. Intracellular aspartic protease ACP of Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauerová, Václava; Dolejší, Elena; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    Patras : University of Patras, 2007. s. 306. [General Meeting of the International Proteolysis Society /5./. 20.10.2007-24.10.2007, Patras] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida albicans * ACP Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  5. 21 CFR 173.160 - Candida guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... citric acid produced conforms to the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), under... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Candida guilliermondii. 173.160 Section 173.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  6. Decreased Xylitol Formation during Xylose Fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Due to Overexpression of Water-Forming NADH Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Ding, Wen-Tao

    2012-01-01

    The recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain harboring xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) from Scheffersomyces stipitis requires NADPH and NAD+, creates cofactor imbalance, and causes xylitol accumulation during growth on d-xylose. To solve this problem, noxE, encoding a water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactococcus lactis driven by the PGK1 promoter, was introduced into the xylose-utilizing yeast strain KAM-3X. A cofactor microcycle was set up between the utilization of NAD+ by XDH and the formation of NAD+ by water-forming NADH oxidase. Overexpression of noxE significantly decreased xylitol formation and increased final ethanol production during xylose fermentation. Under xylose fermentation conditions with an initial d-xylose concentration of 50 g/liter, the xylitol yields for of KAM-3X(pPGK1-noxE) and control strain KAM-3X were 0.058 g/g xylose and 0.191 g/g, respectively, which showed a 69.63% decrease owing to noxE overexpression; the ethanol yields were 0.294 g/g for KAM-3X(pPGK1-noxE) and 0.211 g/g for the control strain KAM-3X, which indicated a 39.33% increase due to noxE overexpression. At the same time, the glycerol yield also was reduced by 53.85% on account of the decrease in the NADH pool caused by overexpression of noxE. PMID:22156411

  7. Improvement of Xylose Uptake and Ethanol Production in Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae through an Inverse Metabolic Engineering Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yong-Su; Alper, Hal; Yang, Yea-Tyng; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    We used an inverse metabolic engineering approach to identify gene targets for improved xylose assimilation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, we created a genomic fragment library from Pichia stipitis and introduced it into recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing XYL1 and XYL2. Through serial subculturing enrichment of the transformant library, 16 transformants were identified and confirmed to have a higher growth rate on xylose. Sequencing of the 16 plasmids isolated from t...

  8. Rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    Conversion of xylose to ethanol by yeasts is a challenge because of the redox imbalances under oxygen-limited conditions. The thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus grows well with xylose as a carbon source at elevated temperatures, but its xylose fermentation ability is weak. In this study, a combination of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) from Neurospora crassa and the NADP(+)-preferring xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) mutant from Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) was constructed. The xylose fermentation ability and redox balance of the recombinant strains were improved significantly by over-expression of several downstream genes. The intracellular concentrations of coenzymes and the reduced coenzyme/oxidized coenzyme ratio increased significantly in these metabolic strains. The byproducts, such as glycerol and acetic acid, were significantly reduced by the disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1). The resulting engineered K. marxianus YZJ088 strain produced 44.95 g/L ethanol from 118.39 g/L xylose with a productivity of 2.49 g/L/h at 42 °C. Additionally, YZJ088 realized glucose and xylose co-fermentation and produced 51.43 g/L ethanol from a mixture of 103.97 g/L xylose and 40.96 g/L glucose with a productivity of 2.14 g/L/h at 42 °C. These promising results validate the YZJ088 strain as an excellent producer of ethanol from xylose through the synthetic xylose assimilation pathway. PMID:26253204

  9. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B; Bice, Benjamin D; Bonfert, Brandi L; Pinhancos, Rebeca C; Balloon, Allison J; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T; Simmons, Blake A; Hodge, David B; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  10. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas S Parreiras

    Full Text Available The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  11. Determination and Correlation of Solubility for D-Xylose in Volatile Fatty Acid Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 陈飞雄; 江振西; 任保增

    2014-01-01

    The solubility of D-xylose in formic acid and binary solvents of formic acid with formic acid and acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid or isobutyric acid was measured in the temperature range from 300.35 to 325.05 K using the synthetic method by a laser monitoring technique at atmospheric pressure. The solid-liquid equilibrium data will provide essential support for industrial design and further theoretical study. The experimental data show that the solubility of D-xylose in formic acid and in the mixtures of formic acid+acetic acid (1︰1), formic acid+propionic acid (1︰1), formic acid+n-butyric acid (1︰1), and formic acid+isobutyric acid (1︰1) increases with temperature. The Apelblat equation, theλh model, and the ideal solution equation correlate the solubility data well.

  12. Expanding xylose metabolism in yeast for plant cell wall conversion to biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Vivian Yaci; Lin, Yuping; Chomvong, Kulika; Estrela, Raíssa; Park, Annsea; Liang, Julie M; Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Feehan, Joanna; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su; Glass, N Louise; Cate, Jamie H D

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable biofuel production from renewable biomass will require the efficient and complete use of all abundant sugars in the plant cell wall. Using the cellulolytic fungus Neurospora crassa as a model, we identified a xylodextrin transport and consumption pathway required for its growth on hemicellulose. Reconstitution of this xylodextrin utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that fungal xylose reductases act as xylodextrin reductases, producing xylosyl-xylitol oligomers as metabolic intermediates. These xylosyl-xylitol intermediates are generated by diverse fungi and bacteria, indicating that xylodextrin reduction is widespread in nature. Xylodextrins and xylosyl-xylitol oligomers are then hydrolyzed by two hydrolases to generate intracellular xylose and xylitol. Xylodextrin consumption using a xylodextrin transporter, xylodextrin reductases and tandem intracellular hydrolases in cofermentations with sucrose and glucose greatly expands the capacity of yeast to use plant cell wall-derived sugars and has the potential to increase the efficiency of both first-generation and next-generation biofuel production. PMID:25647728

  13. The Effect of Initial Cell Concentration on Xylose Fermentation by Pichia stipitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbogbo, Frank K.; Coward-Kelly, Guillermo; Torry-Smith, Mads; Wenger, Kevin; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    Xylose was fermented using Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 at different initial cell concentrations. A high initial cell concentration increased the rate of xylose utilization, ethanol formation, and the ethanol yield. The highest ethanol concentration of 41.0 g/L and a yield of 0.38 g/g was obtained using an initial cell concentration of 6.5 g/L. Even though more xylitol was produced when the initial cell concentrations were high, cell density had no effect on the final ethanol yield. A two-parameter mathematical model was used to predict the cell population dynamics at the different initial cell concentrations. The model parameters, a and b correlate with the initial cell concentrations used with an R 2 of 0.99.

  14. Formation of xylitol and xylitol-5-phosphate and its impact on growth of d-xylose-utilizing Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radek, Andreas; Müller, Moritz-Fabian; Gätgens, Jochem; Eggeling, Lothar; Krumbach, Karin; Marienhagen, Jan; Noack, Stephan

    2016-08-10

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum has no endogenous metabolic activity for utilizing the lignocellulosic pentose d-xylose for cell growth. Therefore, two different engineering approaches have been pursued resulting in platform strains harbouring a functional version of either the Isomerase (ISO) or the Weimberg (WMB) pathway for d-xylose assimilation. In a previous study we found for C. glutamicum WMB by-product formation of xylitol during growth on d-xylose and speculated that the observed lower growth rates are due to the growth inhibiting effect of this compound. Based on a detailed phenotyping of the ISO, WMB and the wild-type strain of C. glutamicum, we here show that this organism has a natural capability to synthesize xylitol from d-xylose under aerobic cultivation conditions. We furthermore observed the intracellular accumulation of xylitol-5-phosphate as a result of the intracellular phosphorylation of xylitol, which was particularly pronounced in the C. glutamicum ISO strain. Interestingly, low amounts of supplemented xylitol strongly inhibit growth of this strain on d-xylose, d-glucose and d-arabitol. These findings demonstrate that xylitol is a suitable substrate of the endogenous xylulokinase (XK, encoded by xylB) and its overexpression in the ISO strain leads to a significant phosphorylation of xylitol in C. glutamicum. Therefore, in order to circumvent cytotoxicity by xylitol-5-phosphate, the WMB pathway represents an interesting alternative route for engineering C. glutamicum towards efficient d-xylose utilization. PMID:27297548

  15. Dehydration of xylose to furfural over niobium phosphate catalyst in biphasic solvent system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boonrat; Pholjaroen; Ning; Li; Zhiqiang; Wang; Aiqin; Wang; Tao; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoric acid treated niobic acid(NbP)was used for the dehydration of xylose to furfural in biphasic solvent system,which was found to exhibit the best performance among the tested catalysts.The excellent performance of NbP could be explained by the better synergistic cooperation between Bro¨nsted and Lewis acid sites.Moreover,NbP showed good stability and no obvious deactivation or leaching of Nb could be observed after six continuous recycles.

  16. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    OpenAIRE

    Verberkmoes Nathan C; Hettich Robert L; Shah Manesh; Raghavan Vijaya GS; Sivagnanam Kumaran; Lefsrud Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results We identifie...

  17. Conversion of hemicelluloses and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can be used for fermentation of the hemicelluloses fraction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, physiological studies of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria have shown that the ethanol yield decreases at increasing substrate concentration. The biochemical limitations causing this phenomenon are not known in detail. Physiological and biochemical studies of a newly characterized thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii, was performed. This study included extraction of intracellular metabolites and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. These studies revealed several bottlenecks in the D-xylose metabolism. This knowledge makes way for physiological and genetic engineering of this strain to improve the ethanol yield and productivity at high concentration of D-xylose. (au)

  18. Complete Fermentation of Xylose and Methylglucuronoxylose Derived from Methylglucuronoxylan by Enterobacter asburiae Strain JDR-1▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Changhao; Rice, John D.; Preston, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Acid pretreatment is commonly used to release pentoses from the hemicellulose fraction of cellulosic biomass for bioconversion. The predominant pentose in the hemicellulose fraction of hardwoods and crop residues is xylose in the polysaccharide methylglucuronoxylan, in which as many as one in six of the β-1,4-linked xylopyranose residues is substituted with α-1,2-linked 4-O-methylglucuronopyranose. Resistance of the α-1,2-methylglucuronosyl linkages to acid hydrolysis results in release of th...

  19. Engineering Yeast Hexokinase 2 for Improved Tolerance Toward Xylose-Induced Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sandström, Anders G.; Borgström, Celina; Boonyawan, Tarinee; van Niel, Ed W. J.; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2013-01-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a bi-functional enzyme being both a catalyst and an important regulator in the glucose repression signal. In the presence of xylose Hxk2p is irreversibly inactivated through an autophosphorylation mechanism, affecting all functions. Consequently, the regulation of genes involved in sugar transport and fermentative metabolism is impaired. The aim of the study was to obtain new Hxk2p-variants, immune to the autophosphorylation, which potenti...

  20. Consecutively Preparing D-Xylose, Organosolv Lignin, and Amorphous Ultrafine Silica from Rice Husk

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxi Zhang; Xuefeng Ding; Zichen Wang; Xu Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping ...

  1. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... cells (MFCs) was examined. Without HA addition the maximum power density increased from 39.5 mW/m2 to 83 mW/m2 when initial xylose concentrations increased from 1.5 to 30 mM, while coulombic efficiency ranged from 13.5% to 52.4% for xylose concentrations of 15 and 0.5 mM, respectively. Compared to...... controls where HAs were not added, addition of commercial HA resulted in increase of power density and coulombic efficiency, which ranged from 7.5% to 67.4% and 24% to 92.6%, respectively. Digested manure wastewater (DMW) was tested as potential mediator for power generation due to its content of natural...

  2. Breeding and fermentation characterization of Pachysolen Tannophilus mutant with high ethanol productivity from xylose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, few strains can utilize xylose to produce ethanol with very low productivity. By the method of mutation breeding to these strains the rate of lignocellulosic utilization could be improved. In this study, the initial Pachysolen tannophilus As 2.1585 was treated by N+ ions implantation of 15 keV. The survival curve showed a saddle model. Considering the survival rate and range of positive mutation, the N+ ions implantation of 12.5 × 1014 ions/cm for mutation breeding of Pachysolen tannophilus was selected. A Pachysolen tannophilus mutant mut-54, which had perfect genetic stability of producing ethanol was screened out after continuous 7 passages. The mut-54 had a higher xylose consumption rate, biomass accumulation and ability of ethanol-resistant than the parent strain. Compared with the parent strain, the ethanol concentration fermented by the mut-54 for 72 h increased by 12.74%, which was more suitable for producing ethanol from xylose than the parent strain. (authors)

  3. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces. PMID:26671616

  4. In vitro activity of Caspofungin combined with Fluconazole on mixed Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesee, Siripen; Angkananuwat, Chayanit; Tancharoensukjit, Sudarat; Muanmai, Somporn; Sirivan, Pattaraporn; Bubphawas, Manita; Tanarerkchai, Nissara

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effect of caspofungin (CAS) combined with fluconazole (FLU) on the biofilm biomass and cultivable viability and microstructure ofCandida albicansandCandida glabratamixed biofilmin vitro.Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microtiter plate for crystal violet assay and colony forming unit (CFU) method and grown on plastic coverslip disks for scanning electron microscopy. MIC50of CAS and FLU against singleCandida spp.and mixedCandida spp.biofilms were evaluated using crystal violet assay. Additional,C. albicansandC. glabratamixed biofilms were incubated with subinhibitory CAS concentration plus FLU and their percentages ofCandidabiofilm reduction were calculated. We found that percentages of biofilm reduction were significantly decreased when CAS at 0.25MIC and FLU (0.25 or 0.5MIC) were combined (P< .05) but not different when CAS at 0.5 MIC combined with FLU at 0.25 or 0.5MIC, compared to CAS treatment alone. Structural analyses revealed that CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms showed less hyphae and blastospores with some aberrant cells compared to control group. Although it was evident that a greater CFU ofCandida glabratawere demonstrated in every group, the total viable cells derived from CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms at any ratio were not significantly different from positive control. Overall, CAS/FLU combinations appeared to affect the quantity and cell architecture, but number of viable cell, ofCandida albicansandCandida glabratamixed biofilm. This antifungal effect was CAS concentration dependent. PMID:26768371

  5. The effect of canola meal tannins on the intestinal absorption capacity of broilers using a D-xylose test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoori, B; Rogiewicz, A; Slominski, B A

    2015-12-01

    In three D-xylose absorption experiments, the effect of 1% HCl/methanol, 70% methanol or 70% acetone extracts of canola meal (CM) or 70% acetone extract of soybean meal (SBM) containing polyphenols, phenolic acids, tannins and phytic acid on intestinal absorption capacity of broilers was determined. In Exp. 1, the experimental groups received orally D-xylose solution alone or with methanol/HCl, methanol or acetone extracts of CM. In Exp. 2, the experimental groups received D-xylose alone or with acetone extracts of CM or SBM. In Exp. 3, the experimental groups received D-xylose plus sucrose solution or D-xylose plus acetone extracts of CM or SBM. In Exps. 2 and 3, the CM extracts contained 2.7 and 2.6, 2.4 and 2.3, 3.2 and 3.2, and 2.4 and 2.2 times higher polyphenols, phenolic acids, tannins and condensed tannins than the corresponding SBM extracts respectively. Blood samples were collected in 40-min intervals, and plasma D-xylose was measured. Compared to the Control, plasma D-xylose in Exp. 1 was lower (p < 0.001) by 81, 69 and 73% at 40-min, by 41, 44 and 37% at 80-min and by 22, 31, and 23% at 120-min post-ingestion of the HCl/methanol, methanol and acetone extracts respectively. In both Exps. 2 and 3, plasma D-xylose level was lower (p < 0.001) in groups dosed with CM extract or SBM extract at each time of blood collection, when compared to the respective Control group. However, in Exp. 3, birds dosed with SBM extract had higher plasma D-xylose than CM extract-dosed birds by 28, 8 and 21% at 40, 80 and 120 min respectively (p < 0.01). In conclusion, although CM extract caused a lower absorption of D-xylose, based on 5 to 10% of CM inclusion levels in practical broiler rations, the soluble bioactive components of CM will likely have minor impact on the absorption capacity of the chicken intestine. PMID:25865561

  6. Altering coenzyme specificity of Pichia stipitis xylose reductase by the semi-rational approach CASTing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jingqing

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NAD(PH-dependent Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (PsXR is one of the key enzymes for xylose fermentation, and has been cloned into the commonly used ethanol-producing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to eliminate the redox imbalance resulting from the preference of this enzyme toward NADPH, efforts have been made to alter the coenzyme specificity of PsXR by site-directed mutagenesis, with limited success. Given the industrial importance of PsXR, it is of interest to investigate further ways to create mutants of PsXR that prefers NADH rather than NADPH, by the alternative directed evolution approach. Results Based on a homology model of PsXR, six residues were predicted to interact with the adenine ribose of NAD(PH in PsXR and altered using a semi-rational mutagenesis approach (CASTing. Three rounds of saturation mutagenesis were carried to randomize these residues, and a microplate-based assay was applied in the screening. A best mutant 2-2C12, which carried four mutations K270S, N272P, S271G and R276F, was obtained. The mutant showed a preference toward NADH over NADPH by a factor of about 13-fold, or an improvement of about 42-fold, as measured by the ratio of the specificity constant kcat/Kmcoenzyme. Compared with the wild-type, the kcatNADH for the best mutant was only slightly lower, while the kcatNADPH decreased by a factor of about 10. Furthermore, the specific activity of 2-2C12 in the presence of NADH was 20.6 U·mg-1, which is highest among PsXR mutants reported. Conclusion A seemingly simplistic and yet very effective mutagenesis approach, CASTing, was applied successfully to alter the NAD(PH preference for Pichia stipitis xylose reductase, an important enzyme for xylose-fermenting yeast. The observed change in the NAD(PH preference for this enzyme seems to have resulted from the altered active site that is more unfavorable for NADPH than NADH in terms of both Km and kcat. There are potentials for

  7. PRODUCCIÓN DE XILITOL A PARTIR DE CASCARILLA DE ARROZ UTILIZANDO Candida guilliermondii XYLITOL PRODUCTION FROM RICE HUSK USING Candida guilliermondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Villalba Cadavid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se empleó cascarilla de arroz como materia prima para la obtención de xilitol, previa hidrólisis durante 60 minutos con ácido sulfúrico al 4% p/v; a 121 ºC y 15 psig,; La xilosa producida se transformó en xilitol mediante su fermentación con Candida guilliermondii. Se estudió el efecto de las variables concentración inicial de xilosa, concentración de inóculo y relación volumen del medio/volumen del matraz, así como sus efectos combinados, sobre la producción de xilitol. Se encontró que las concentraciones iniciales de xilosa e inóculo más adecuadas, entre los valores ensayados, fueron 80 y 5,0 g/l, respectivamente. En estas condiciones, la concentración final de xilitol obtenida fue de 45,2 g/l, con una productividad volumétrica de 0,23 g/l•h y un rendimiento de 0,57 g/g.In this study was used rice husk, previosly hydrolyzed with diluted sulfuric acid at 121 ºC and 15 psig, with a residence time 60 min. The initial concentration of substrate, inoculum, and relationship between media volume/flask volume and their combined effects were studied on the production of xylitol. The initial concentrations of 80 g/l xylose and 5 g/l inoculums led the best xylitol production (45.2 g/l, productivity (0.23 g/l•h and yield (0.57 g/g.

  8. Candida heliconiae sp. nov., Candida picinguabensis sp. nov. and Candida saopaulonensis sp. nov., three ascomycetous yeasts from Heliconia velloziana (Heliconiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruivo, Carla C C; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A; Bacci, Maurício; Pagnocca, Fernando C

    2006-05-01

    Strains belonging to three novel yeast species, Candida heliconiae (four isolates), Candida picinguabensis (three isolates) and Candida saopaulonensis (two isolates), were recovered in the year 2000 from water of flower bracts of Heliconia velloziana L. Emigd. (Heliconiaceae) found in a forest ecosystem site in an Atlantic rainforest of south-eastern Brazil. C. picinguabensis and C. saopaulonensis were nearly identical in morphology and physiology, but sequence divergence in the D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit rDNA indicated that they should be regarded as different species. They belong to the Metschnikowiaceae clade. C. heliconiae had affinities to Pichia mexicana and related species, but was genetically isolated from all currently accepted species in that group. The type strains are C. heliconiae UNESP 00-91C1T (=CBS 10000T=NRRL Y-27813T), C. picinguabensis UNESP 00-89T (=CBS 9999T=NRRL Y-27814T) and C. saopaulonensis UNESP 00-99T (=CBS 10001T=NRRL Y-27815T). PMID:16627669

  9. Conversion of hemicellulose and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Peter

    1998-02-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmoshpere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. The need for a microorganism able to ferment D-xylose is therefore apparent. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can therefore be considered for fermentation of D-xylose. Screening of 130 thermophilic anaerobic bacterial strains, from hot-springs, mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants, paper pulp industries and brewery waste, were examined for production of ethanol from D-xylose and wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate. Several strains were isolated and one particular strain was selected for best performance during the screening test. This strain was characterized as a new species, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. However, the ethanol yield on wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate was not satisfactory. The bacterium was adapted by isolation of mutant strains, now resistant to the inhibitory compounds present in the hydrolysate. Growth and ethanol yield

  10. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis. PMID:25480879

  11. Screening of Tanzanian medicinal plants for anti-Candida activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Cosam C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans has become resistant to the already limited, toxic and expensive anti-Candida agents available in the market. These factors necessitate the search for new anti-fungal agents. Methods Sixty-three plant extracts, from 56 Tanzanian plant species obtained through the literature and interviews with traditional healers, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity. Aqueous methanolic extracts were screened for anti-Candida activity by bioautography agar overlay method, using a standard strain of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028. Results Twenty- seven (48% out of the 56 plants were found to be active. Extracts of the root barks of Albizia anthelmintica and Balanites aegyptiaca, and roots of Plectranthus barbatus showed strong activity. Conclusion The extracts that showed strong anti-Candida activity are worth of further investigation in order to isolate and identify the active compounds.

  12. Xylose-metabolizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the TKL1 and TAL1 genes encoding the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes transketolase and transaldolase.

    OpenAIRE

    Walfridsson, M; Hallborn, J; Penttilä, M.; Keränen, S; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically engineered for xylose utilization. The Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 genes XYL1 and XYL2 encoding xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were cloned into S. cerevisiae. The gene products catalyze the two initial steps in xylose utilization which S. cerevisiae lacks. In order to increase the flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, the S. cerevisiae TKL1 and TAL1 genes encoding transketolase and transaldolase were overexpressed. A XYL1- and XYL2-con...

  13. Optimization of CDT-1 and XYL1 Expression for Balanced Co-Production of Ethanol and Xylitol from Cellobiose and Xylose by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Zha; Bing-Zhi Li; Ming-Hua Shen; Meng-Long Hu; Hao Song; Ying-Jin Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Production of ethanol and xylitol from lignocellulosic hydrolysates is an alternative to the traditional production of ethanol in utilizing biomass. However, the conversion efficiency of xylose to xylitol is restricted by glucose repression, causing a low xylitol titer. To this end, we cloned genes CDT-1 (encoding a cellodextrin transporter) and gh1-1 (encoding an intracellular β-glucosidase) from Neurospora crassa and XYL1 (encoding a xylose reductase that converts xylose into xylitol) from ...

  14. Data for rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase–xylitol dehydrogenase pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Biao Zhang; Jia Zhang; Dongmei Wang; Xiaolian Gao; Lianhong Sun; Jiong Hong

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-tolerant NADP(H)-preferring xylose pathway was constructed in Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production with xylose at elevated temperatures (Zhang et al., 2015 [25]). Ethanol production yield and efficiency was enhanced by pathway engineering in the engineered strains. The constructed strain, YZJ088, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose for ethanol and xylitol production, which is a critical step toward enabling economic biofuel production from lignocellulosic bioma...

  15. Candida Arthritis: Analysis of 112 Pediatric and Adult Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A.; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Miller, Andy O.; Petraitiene, Ruta; Lortholary, Olivier; Thomas J Walsh

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Candida arthritis is a debilitating form of deeply invasive candidiasis. However, its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, management, and outcome are not well understood. Methods.  Cases of Candida arthritis were reviewed from 1967 through 2014. Variables included Candida spp in joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, clinical manifestations, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Results.  Among 112 evaluable cases, 62% were males and...

  16. Crystal violet staining to quantity Candida adhesion to epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Negri, M.; Gonçalves, Vera M.; Silva, Sónia Carina; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    In vitro studies of adhesion capability are essential to characterise the virulence of Candida species. However, the assessment of adhesion by traditional methods is timeconsuming. The aim of the present study is the development of a simple methodology using crystal violet staining to quantify in vitro adhesion of different Candida species to epithelial cells. The experiments are performed using Candida albicans (ATCC 90028), C. glabrata (ATCC 2001), C. parapsilosis (ATCC 22019) and C. tropic...

  17. Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Aparecida Marinho; Alice Becker Teixeira; Otávio Silveira Santos; Ricardo Flores Cazanova; Carlos Alexandre Sanchez Ferreira; Karen Cherubini; Sílvia Dias de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production,...

  18. Candida bracarensis Bloodstream Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Thomas A.; McTaggart, Lisa; Richardson, Susan E.; Zhang, Sean X.

    2010-01-01

    Candida bracarensis is a recently described Candida species which is phenotypically similar to Candida glabrata. A case of C. bracarensis bloodstream infection in a bone marrow transplant patient is described and confirms this organism as an opportunistic human pathogen. The organism can be distinguished from C. glabrata by its white color on CHROMagar and by DNA sequence analysis using D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers.

  19. Activity of phenolic compounds from plant origin against Candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Natália; Barros, Lillian; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and other Candida species have been highly associated with several opportunistic fungal infections. Their ability to develop host infections is incited by different determinants, being virulence factors the most highlighted. Molecular targets of the antifungal drugs are crucial components for determination of yeast survival. Ergosterol, nucleic acids and glucan are the most studied molecular targets to destroy Candida species, being considered the basis of the development of ...

  20. Roles of Candida albicans Sfl1 in Hyphal Development▿

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yandong; Su, Chang; Mao, Xuming; Cao, Fang; Chen, Jiangye

    2007-01-01

    The ability to switch between different morphological forms is an important feature of Candida albicans and is relevant to its pathogenesis. Many conserved positive and negative transcription factors are involved in morphogenetic regulation of the two dimorphic fungi Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In S. cerevisiae, the transcriptional repressor Sfl1 and the activator Flo8 function antagonistically in invasive and filamentous growth. We have previously reported that Candida alb...

  1. Oral candidiasis-adhesion of non-albicans Candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Bokor-Bratić Marija B.

    2008-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infection caused primarily by Candida albicans. However, in recent years, species of non-albicans Candida have been implicated more frequently in mucosal infection. Candida species usually reside as commensal organisms and are part of normal oral microflora. Determining exactly how transformation from commensal to pathogen takes place and how it can be prevented is continuous challenge for clinical doctors. Candidal adherence to mucosal surfaces is conside...

  2. Rat Indwelling Urinary Catheter Model of Candida albicans Biofilm Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Brooks, Erin G.; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-a...

  3. Absence of Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Cells in Biofilms of Some Candida Species▿

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dhaheri, Rawya S.; Douglas, L. Julia

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms and planktonic cells of five Candida species were surveyed for the presence of persister (drug-tolerant) cell populations after exposure to amphotericin B. None of the planktonic cultures (exponential or stationary phase) contained persister cells. However, persisters were found in biofilms of one of two strains of Candida albicans tested and in biofilms of Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis, but not in biofilms of Candida glabrata or Candida tropicalis. These results suggest th...

  4. Investigative Methods for Studying the Adhesion and Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Candida Species: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Ellepola, Arjuna N. B.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2011-01-01

    Candidal infections are common opportunistic infections in the compromized and manifest both as super? cial and systemic diseases. The super?ficial infections are by far the commonest form of the disease. Although Candida albicans is the most common Candida species isolated from humans and is responsible for the majority of super? cial yeast infections, non-albicans species such as Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis are regularly isolated but to a le...

  5. Proteomic analysis of the secretory response of Aspergillus niger to D-maltose and D-xylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel P Ferreira de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Fungi utilize polysaccharide substrates through extracellular digestion catalyzed by secreted enzymes. Thus far, protein secretion by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has mainly been studied at the level of individual proteins and by genome and transcriptome analyses. To extend these studies, a complementary proteomics approach was applied with the aim to investigate the changes in secretome and microsomal protein composition resulting from a shift to a high level secretion condition. During growth of A. niger on D-sorbitol, small amounts of D-maltose or D-xylose were used as inducers of the extracellular amylolytic and xylanolytic enzymes. Upon induction, protein compositions in the extracellular broth as well as in enriched secretory organelle (microsomal fractions were analyzed using a shotgun proteomics approach. In total 102 secreted proteins and 1,126 microsomal proteins were identified in this study. Induction by D-maltose or D-xylose resulted in the increase in specific extracellular enzymes, such as glucoamylase A on D-maltose and β-xylosidase D on D-xylose, as well as of microsomal proteins. This reflects the differential expression of selected genes coding for dedicated extracellular enzymes. As expected, the addition of extra D-sorbitol had no effect on the expression of carbohydrate-active enzymes, compared to addition of D-xylose or D-maltose. Furthermore, D-maltose induction caused an increase in microsomal proteins related to translation (e.g., Rpl15 and vesicular transport (e.g., the endosomal-cargo receptor Erv14. Millimolar amounts of the inducers D-maltose and D-xylose are sufficient to cause a direct response in specific protein expression levels. Also, after induction by D-maltose or D-xylose, the induced enzymes were found in microsomes and extracellular. In agreement with our previous findings for D-xylose induction, D-maltose induction leads to recruitment of proteins involved in proteasome-mediated degradation.

  6. VULVOVAGINAL CANDIDA INFECTION PREVALENCE IN TASHKENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uktam Ziyadullaev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The information on the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis does not always reflect real situation regarding this disease, since the frequency of patients’ self- treatment remains high, as evidenced by the results of the studies based on anonymous surveys. The prevalence of this disease is growing steadily both in Uzbekistan and elsewhere in the world.  Accumulated problems have provided grounds to conduct the research on the prevalence of Candida vulvovaginitis in the juvenile age population of Tashkent city. Method: The study included examining of 2107 adolescent aged girls of high schools, lyceums and colleges of Tashkent city. Results: Thus, in the studied region the prevalence of Candida vulvovaginitis in adolescent population is high, which in turn requires to take steps to further improve treatment and prevention.  

  7. Proinflammatory Chemokines during Candida albicans Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infect...

  8. Tetracycline Effects on Candida Albicans Virulence Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Logan McCool; Hanh Mai; Michael Essmann; Bryan Larsen

    2008-01-01

    Object. To determine if tetracycline, previously reported to increase the probability of developing symptomatic vaginal yeast infections, has a direct effect on Candida albicans growth or induction of virulent phenotypes. Method. In vitro, clinical isolates of yeast were cultivated with sublethal concentrations of tetracycline and yeast cell counts, hyphal formation, drug efflux pump activity, biofilm production, and hemolysin production were determined by previously reported methods. Resul...

  9. Pharmacotherapy of Candida Infections with Echinocandins

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Espinel-Ingroff; Emilia Canton; Estrella Martin-Mazuelos; Javier Pemán

    2009-01-01

    The classic recommended antifungal agents for the treatment of invasive Candida infections were amphotericin B, a lipid formulation of amphotericin B and fluconazole in both neutropenic or nonneutropenic patients as either primary or alternative therapies. Voriconazole has been recommended when additional coverage for filamentous fungi is needed (e.g. neutropenic patients). More recently and based on well designed comparative clinical trials, the three echinocandins, caspofungin, anidulafungi...

  10. Candida Esophagitis in an Immunocompetent Pregnant Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Greenspoon, Jeffrey S.; Seth Kivnick

    1993-01-01

    Background: Nausea and vomiting are common during the first half of pregnancy and usually require only supportive measures. When symptoms are progressive and weight loss occurs, treatable causes should be sought by means of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We report a case of an immunocompetent gravida with invasive Candida albicans esophagitis. Case: The immunocompetent primigravida developed progressive nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and a 4.1 kg weight loss during the second trimester...

  11. VULVOVAGINAL CANDIDA INFECTION PREVALENCE IN TASHKENT

    OpenAIRE

    Uktam Ziyadullaev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The information on the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis does not always reflect real situation regarding this disease, since the frequency of patients’ self- treatment remains high, as evidenced by the results of the studies based on anonymous surveys. The prevalence of this disease is growing steadily both in Uzbekistan and elsewhere in the world.  Accumulated problems have provided grounds to conduct the research on the prevalence of Candida vulvovaginitis in the juvenile ...

  12. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ota Samek; Katarina Mlynariková; Silvie Bernatová; Jan Ježek; Vladislav Krzyžánek; Martin Šiler; Pavel Zemánek; Filip Růžička; Veronika Holá; Martina Mahelová

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to...

  13. Laminin receptors on Candida albicans germ tubes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchara, J P; Tronchin, G; Annaix, V; Robert, R; Senet, J M

    1990-01-01

    Recent evidence for the role of laminin in cell adhesion and in the pathogenesis of several bacterial infections has led us to investigate the existence of receptors for this extracellular matrix component in Candida albicans. At first, immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of laminin-binding sites at the surface of germ tubes. Electron microscopy confirmed this result and permitted precise localization of the binding sites on the outermost fibrillar layer of the germ tube cell wall. B...

  14. The diploid genome sequence of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ted; Federspiel, Nancy A.; Chibana, Hiroji; Dungan, Jan; Kalman, Sue; Magee, B. B.; Newport, George; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.; Agabian, Nina; Magee, P T; Davis, Ronald W.; Scherer, Stewart

    2004-01-01

    We present the diploid genome sequence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Because C. albicans has no known haploid or homozygous form, sequencing was performed as a whole-genome shotgun of the heterozygous diploid genome in strain SC5314, a clinical isolate that is the parent of strains widely used for molecular analysis. We developed computational methods to assemble a diploid genome sequence in good agreement with available physical mapping data. We provide a whole-genome description ...

  15. Vacuolar trafficking and Candida albicans pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Glen E.

    2011-01-01

    The vacuole is likely to play a variety of roles in supporting host colonization and infection by pathogenic species of fungi. In the human pathogen Candida albicans, the vacuole undergoes dynamic morphological shifts during the production of the tissue invasive hyphal form, and this organelle is required for virulence. Recent efforts in my lab have focused on defining which vacuolar trafficking pathways are required for C. albicans hyphal growth and pathogenesis. Our results indicate that th...

  16. Milestones in Candida albicans Gene Manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Samaranayake, Dhanushki P.; Hanes, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, candidemia is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections and is estimated to cause 10,000 deaths per year. The species Candida albicans is responsible for the majority of these cases. As C. albicans is capable of developing resistance against the currently available drugs, understanding the molecular basis of drug resistance, finding new cellular targets, and further understanding the overall mechanism of C. albicans pathogenesis are important goals. To study th...

  17. Candida famata-induced fulminating cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sergio Ramos de Araujo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lithiasic cholecystitis is classically associated with the presence of enterobacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, and Enterobacter, in the gallbladder. Cholecystitis associated with fungal infections is a rare event related to underlying conditions such as diabetes mellitus, steroid use, and broad-spectrum antibiotic use for prolonged periods, as well as pancreatitis and surgery of the digestive tract. Here, we present the first reported case of a gallbladder infection caused by Candida famata.

  18. Triclosan antagonises fluconazole activity against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg/L) triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1? and cdr2? strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total m...

  19. Triclosan Antagonizes Fluconazole Activity against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, J.; Pinjon, E.; Oltean, H.N.; White, T. C.; Kelly, S.L.; Martel, C.M.; Sullivan, D. J.; Coleman, D C; MORAN, G.P

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total ...

  20. Candida albicans Biofilm-Defective Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Mathias L.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Bruno, Vincent M; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2005-01-01

    Biofilm formation plays a key role in the life cycles and subsistence of many microorganisms. For the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, biofilm development is arguably a virulence trait, because medical implants that serve as biofilm substrates are significant risk factors for infection. The development of C. albicans biofilms in vitro proceeds through an early phase, in which yeast cells populate a substrate, an intermediate phase, in which pseudohyphal and hyphal cell types are produc...

  1. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Taff, Heather T.; Mitchell, Kaitlin F.; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involvin...

  2. White-opaque switching in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    The human commensal yeast Candida albicans undergoes an epigenetic switch between two distinct types of cells, referred to as white and opaque. These two cell types differ in many respects, including their cell and colony morphologies, their metabolic states, their mating behaviors, their preferred niches in the host, and their interactions with the host immune system. Each of the two cell types is heritable for many generations and switching between them appears stochastic; however, environm...

  3. DIARE YANG DISEBABKAN OLEH CANDIDA PADA ANAK DI UJUNG PANDANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asaad Maidin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp were isolated from 18 out of 38 (47,4 % children under five years with acute diarrhoea and from 10 out of35 (28,6% children under five years without diarrhoea. Statistical tests showed no difference between the presence of Candida species and the occurence of diarrhoea of the two groups of children (p >0,05. Mycelia were isolated from one diarrhoeal patient (1/387 or 2,63%. From the diarrhoeal patients, the Candida species found, were Candida albicans 61,1% (11/18, Candida parapsilosis 5,6% (1/18, Candida pseudotropicalis 22,2%(4/18, and Candida tropicalis 11,1 %(2/18. While from the non diarrhoeal patients 30% (3/10 were Candida Albicans, 20% (2/10 were Can­dida pseudotropicalis, and 50%(5/10 were Candida tropicalis. Bacterial identification of rectal swabs from diarrhoeal patients showed that 2,63% (1/38 had Vibrio Cholera 2,63% had Shigella, 94,7% (36/38 had E. coli, 21,1% (8/38 had Proteus sp, 7,9% (3/38 had Providentia, and 2,6 % (1/38 had Arizona. The clinical symptoms of the diarrhoeal patients were 97,4% had watery diarrhoea, 63,2% de­fecated more than 10 times, and 78,9% had vomiting.

  4. Intestinal colonization with Candida albicans and mucosal immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Bai; Xian-Hua Liu; Qing-Ying Tong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the relationship between intestinal lumen colonization with Candida albicans and mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA).METHODS: A total of 82 specific-pathogen-free mice were divided randomly into control and colonization groups. After Candida albicans were inoculated into specific-pathogenfree mice, the number of Candida albicans adhering to cecum and mucosal membrane was counted. The lymphocyte proliferation in Peyer's patch and in lamina propria was shown by BrdU incorporation, while mucosal sIgA (surface membrane) isotype switch in Peyer's patch was investigated. IgA plasma cells in lamina propria were observed by immunohistochemical staining. Specific IgA antibodies to Candida albicans were measured with ELISA.RESULTS: From d 3 to d 14 after Candida albicans gavaging to mice, the number of Candida albicans colonizing in lumen and adhering to mucosal membrane was sharply reduced.Candida albicans translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes occurred at early time points following gavage administration and disappeared at later time points. Meanwhile, the content of specific IgA was increased obviously. Proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes in lamina propria were also increased.CONCLUSION: Lymphocytes in lamina propria play an important role in intestinal mucosal immunity of specificpathogen-free mice when they are first inoculated with Candida albicans. The decreasing number of Candida albicans in intestine is related to the increased level of specific IgA antibodies in the intestinal mucus.

  5. Biosorption of 241Am by Candida sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biosorption of radionuclide 241Am from solutions by Candida sp., and the influences of experimental conditions on the adsorption were studied. The results showed that the adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 4h and the optimum pH=2. No significant differences on 241Am biosorption were observed at 10-45 degree C, or challenged with Au3+ or Ag+, even 1500 times or 4500 times over 241Am, respectively. The adsorption rate could reach 97.8% by dry Candida sp. of 0.82 g/L in 241Am solutions (pH=2) of 5.6-111 MBq/L (44.04-873.0 μg/L) (C0), with maximum adsorption capacity (W) of 63.5 MBq/g (501.8 μg/g), implying that the removal of 241Am by Candida sp. from solutions was feasible. The relationship between activities (C0) and adsorption capacities (W) of 241Am indicated that the biosorption process could be described by Langmuir adsorption isotherm

  6. Endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S J; Chung, Y M; Liu, J H

    1998-06-01

    Reported, in this article, are the cases of two young women who developed endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after induced abortion. Both women experienced transient fever, chills, and abdominal pain after the abortion and were given antibiotics. The diagnosis of endophthalmitis was established on the basis of typical fundus appearance, positive vaginal culture, and (in one case) positive vitreous culture. In the first woman, who received vitrectomy and intravitreal amphotericin B injection, the affected eye had a best corrected visual acuity of 20/200. In the second woman, who was given systemic corticosteroid treatment before the correct diagnosis was reached, recurrent retinal detachment developed and the best corrected visual acuity was counting fingers. It appears that Candida organisms harbored in the genital tract are directly inoculated into the venous system during induced abortion. Once in the blood, if sufficient fungal load is present, Candida albicans tends to localize in the choroid and to spread toward the retina and vitreous cavity. The immunosuppressive effect of corticosteroids further increases the risk of endophthalmitis. PMID:9645729

  7. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath Lynn L; Floyd Karon L; Beckius Miriam L; Hospenthal Duane R; Murray Clinton K

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC) is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glab...

  8. Performance comparison of phenotypic and molecular methods for detection and differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Suhail; Khan Ziauddin; Asadzadeh Mohammad; Theyyathel Ajmal; Chandy Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Candida albicans is the most pathogenic Candida species but shares many phenotypic features with Candida dubliniensis and may, therefore, be misidentified in clinical microbiology laboratories. Candidemia cases due to C. dubliniensis are increasingly being reported in recent years. Accurate identification is warranted since mortality rates are highest for C. albicans infections, however, C. dubliniensis has the propensity to develop resistance against azoles more easily. W...

  9. Comparison of cell wall proteins in putative Candida albicans & Candida dubliniensis by using modified staining method & SDS-PAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdanparast, Seyed Amir; Nezarati, Seyedeh Shahrzad Mahdavi; Heshmati, Fariba; Hamzehlou, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    Background Candida species are among the most common causes of opportunistic fungal diseases. Among Candida species, Candida albicans is responsible for most infections. Having many strains, C. albicans is very polymorph. C. dubliniensis is very similar to albicans species both morphologically and physiologically. For an infection to occur, cell wall proteins play an important role as they enable yeast to adhere to host cells and begin pathogenesis. Therefore, we decided to extract these prot...

  10. Fibronectin-, vitronectin- and laminin-binding proteins at the cell walls of Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis pathogenic yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Kozik, Andrzej; Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Zajac, Dorota; Bochenska, Oliwia; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Jankowska, Urszula; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Candida parapsilosis and C. tropicalis increasingly compete with C. albicans—the most common fungal pathogen in humans—as causative agents of severe candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. In contrast to C. albicans, the pathogenic mechanisms of these two non-albicans Candida species are poorly understood. Adhesion of Candida yeast to host cells and the extracellular matrix is critical for fungal invasion of hosts. Methods The fungal proteins involved in interactions with extrac...

  11. Evaluation of Candida Colonization and Specific Humoral Responses against Candida albicans in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaffari Javad; Mehdi Taheri Sarvtin; Mohammad Taghi Hedayati; Zohreh Hajheydari; Jamshid Yazdani; Tahereh Shokohi 2

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the candidal colonization and specific humoral responses against Candida albicans in patients with atopic dermatitis. One hundred patients with atopic dermatitis and 50 healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. Skin and oral specimens from all participants were cultured on CHROMagar Candida medium. Isolated yeasts were identified by using the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. ELISA was used for detection of IgM, IgA, and IgG antibodie...

  12. Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation for improved xylose utilization in integrated ethanol production from wheat meal and wheat straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdei Borbála

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The commercialization of second-generation bioethanol has not been realized due to several factors, including poor biomass utilization and high production cost. It is generally accepted that the most important parameters in reducing the production cost are the ethanol yield and the ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Agricultural residues contain large amounts of hemicellulose, and the utilization of xylose is thus a plausible way to improve the concentration and yield of ethanol during fermentation. Most naturally occurring ethanol-fermenting microorganisms do not utilize xylose, but a genetically modified yeast strain, TMB3400, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose. However, the xylose uptake rate is only enhanced when the glucose concentration is low. Results Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS combined with wheat-starch hydrolysate feed was performed in two separate processes. The average yield of ethanol and the xylose consumption reached 86% and 69%, respectively, when the hydrolysate of the enzymatically hydrolyzed (18.5% WIS unwashed SPWS solid fraction and wheat-starch hydrolysate were fed to the fermentor after 1 h of fermentation of the SPWS liquid fraction. In the other configuration, fermentation of the SPWS hydrolysate (7.0% WIS, resulted in an average ethanol yield of 93% from fermentation based on glucose and xylose and complete xylose consumption when wheat-starch hydrolysate was included in the feed. Increased initial cell density in the fermentation (from 5 to 20 g/L did not increase the ethanol yield, but improved and accelerated xylose consumption in both cases. Conclusions Higher ethanol yield has been achieved in co-fermentation of xylose and glucose in SPWS hydrolysate when wheat-starch hydrolysate was used as feed, then in co-fermentation of the liquid fraction of SPWS fed with the mixed hydrolysates. Integration of first-generation and

  13. Influence of probiotics on Candida presence and IgA anti-Candida in the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agda Lima dos Santos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are defined as microorganisms that promote benefits to host health, mainly by regulating resident microbiota. Disequilibrium in microbiota can favor the growth of opportunist microorganisms and the development of pathologies, like candidosis caused by yeasts of the Candida genus. This work evaluated whether probiotics consumption was able to influence a specific immunological response to Candida and the presence of these yeasts in the oral cavity. Saliva samples were collected from healthy individuals and plated in Dextrose Saboraud Agar with chloramphenicol. Individuals presenting Candida in the oral cavity used the probiotic Yakult LBâ for 20 days, after which new collections and identifications were performed. Anti-Candida IgA analysis was conducted using the ELISA technique. Analysis of the results showed a significant reduction in Candida prevalence (46% and mean Candida CFU/mL counts (65%. The Candida species identified were C. albicans (98% and C.tropicalis (2%, before and after probiotics consumption. Immunological analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in anti-Candida IgA levels after probiotics use, probably due to less antigenic stimulation. In conclusion, in the individuals studied, probiotics use significantly reduced the amount of Candida in the oral cavity, possibly due to competition between the yeasts rather than by specific secretory immune response stimulation.

  14. Synergistic effect of calcium and zinc on glucose/xylose utilization and butanol tolerance of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Youduo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Lijie; Yuan, Wenjie; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    Biobutanol outperforms bioethanol as an advanced biofuel, but is not economically competitive in terms of its titer, yield and productivity associated with feedstocks and energy cost. In this work, the synergistic effect of calcium and zinc was investigated in the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum using glucose, xylose and glucose/xylose mixtures as carbon source(s). Significant improvements associated with enhanced glucose/xylose utilization, cell growth, acids re-assimilation and butanol biosynthesis were achieved. Especially, the maximum butanol and ABE production of 16.1 and 25.9 g L(-1) were achieved from 69.3 g L(-1) glucose with butanol/ABE productivities of 0.40 and 0.65 g L(-1) h(-1) compared to those of 11.7 and 19.4 g/L with 0.18 and 0.30 g L(-1) h(-1) obtained in the control respectively without any supplement. More importantly, zinc was significantly involved in the butanol tolerance based on the improved xylose utilization under various butanol-shock conditions (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 g L(-1) butanol). Under the same conditions, calcium and zinc co-supplementation led to the best xylose utilization and butanol production. These results suggested that calcium and zinc could play synergistic roles improving ABE fermentation by C. acetobutylicum. PMID:26850441

  15. Isolation Frequency Characteristics of Candida Species from Clinical Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga-Yeon; Jeon, Jae-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. is an invasive infectious fungus, a major risk factor that can increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In this study, 2,508 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens collected from university hospitals from July 2011 to October 2014. They were identified in order to determine isolation frequencies and characteristics by specimen, gender, age group, year, season, and month. The strain-specific isolation rate of Candida spp. is in the order of Candida albicans (1,218 strains, 48.56%), Candida glabrata (416 strains, 16.59%), Candida utilis (305 strains, 12.16%), Candida tropicalis (304 strains, 12.12%), and Candida parapsilosis (116 strains, 4.63%) and these five species accounted for more than 94% of the total strains. Of the specimens, Candida spp. were most frequently isolated from urine-catheter, followed by urine-voided, blood, sputum, other, open pus, vaginal discharge, Tip, ear discharge, bronchial aspiration and bile, in that order. Looking at the age distribution, the detection rate of patients in their 60s and older was significantly higher at 75.8% (1,900/2,508). The detection rate of patients in their 20s and younger was shown to be very low at 2.55% (64/2,508). By year, the detection rate of non-albicans Candida spp. showed a tendency to gradually increase each year compared with C. albicans. As isolation of Candida spp. from clinical samples at the specie level can vary depending on characteristics of the patient, sample, season, etc., continual studies are required. PMID:27433120

  16. 响应面法优化不同型态热带假丝酵母发酵生产木糖醇的工艺%Optimization for xylitol fermentation by different forms of Candida tropicalis with response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马伟超; 李一婧; 高文辉; 安建平

    2012-01-01

    The xylitol fermentation experiments by using mycelial form and yeast-like form of Candida tropicalis were designed and the results were analyzed.The quadratic polynomial regression model including the concentration of xylose and xylitol,as well as four key factors(forms,fermentation temperature,pH,initial concentration of xylose) were established and analyzed by Design Expert software.The result showed that,the mycelial form had better ability for conversion of xylose to xylitol than yeast-like form;the increase of fermentation temperature was favor to xylose conversion,and a higher pH did not improve the xylose utilization;the initial xylose concentration had a positive correlation with the conversion rate of xylose.The optimal conditions for xylose fermentation were:mycelial type,fermentation temperature 37℃,pH 8.00,initial xylitol concentration 60mg/mL,the concentration of xylitol reached 17.21mg/mL.%利用Design Expert软件对菌丝型和酵母型热带假丝酵母发酵生产木糖醇实验进行设计及结果分析,建立木糖和木糖醇浓度与4个关键因子(菌型、发酵温度、pH、初始木糖浓度)的二次多项式回归模型,并对模型进行解析。结果表明:菌丝型热带假丝酵母转化木糖为木糖醇的能力高于酵母型;升高发酵温度,有利于木糖转化为木糖醇,而pH升高对转化过程并没有明显促进;发酵液中初始木糖浓度与木糖转化率呈正相关关系;获得最佳发酵工艺条件为菌种采用菌丝型酵母,发酵温度37℃,pH8,初始木糖浓度60mg/mL,此时木糖醇浓度达到17.21mg/mL。

  17. Ethanol production from xylose by pichia stipitis NRRL Y-7124 in a stirred tank bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, J. P. A.; S. I. Mussatto; Roberto, I. C.; Teixeira, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The ethanol production by Pichia stipitis was evaluated in a stirred tank bioreactor using semi-defined medium containing xylose (90.0 g/l) as the main carbon source. Experimental assays were performed according to a 2² full factorial design to evaluate the influence of aeration (0.25 to 0.75 vvm) and agitation (150 to 250 rpm) conditions on ethanol production. In the studied range of values, the agitation increase and aeration decrease favored ethanol production, which was maximum (26.7 g/l)...

  18. Improved inhibitor tolerance in xylose-fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum by mutagenesis and protoplast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; Yao, Shuo

    2012-01-01

    inhibitor tolerance of this yeast, a combination of UV mutagenesis and protoplast fusion was used to construct strains with improved performance. Firstly, UVinduced mutants were screened and selected for improved tolerance towards furfural. The most promised mutant, S. passalidarum M7, produced 50% more...... from fusion of the protoplasts of S. passalidarum M7 and a robust yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581, were able to grow in 75% WSLQ and produce around 0.4 g ethanol/g consumed xylose. Among the selected hybrid strains, the hybrid FS22 showed the best fermentation capacity in 75% WSLQ...

  19. Co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and xylose dehydrogenase displayed whole cell on multiwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposite films modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric detection of D-glucose and D-xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Liang, Bo; Li, Feng; Shi, Jianguo; Mascini, Marco; Lang, Qiaolin; Liu, Aihua

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, we first report the construction of Nafion/glucose oxidase (GOD)/xylose dehydrogenase displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric determination of D-glucose and D-xylose. The optimal conditions for the immobilized enzymes were established. Both enzymes retained their good stability and activities. In the mixture solution of D-glucose and D-xylose containing coenzyme NAD⁺ (the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), the Nafion/GOD/XDH-bacteria/MWNTs modified electrode exhibited quasi-reversible oxidation-reduction peak at -0.5 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode, SCE) originating from the catalytic oxidation of D-glucose, and oxidation peak at +0.55 V(vs. SCE) responding to the oxidation of NADH (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) by the carbon nanotubes, where NADH is the resultant product of coenzyme NAD⁺ involved in the catalysis of D-xylose by XDH-displayed bacteria. For the proposed biosensor, cathodic peak current at -0.5 V was linear with the concentration of D-glucose within the range of 0.25-6 mM with a low detection limit of 0.1 mM D-glucose (S/N=3), and the anodic peak current at +0.55 V was linear with the concentration of d-xylose in the range of 0.25∼4 mM with a low detection limit of 0.1 mM D-xylose (S/N=3). Further, D-xylose and D-glucose did not interfere with each other. 300-fold excess saccharides including D-maltose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-sucrose, D-fructose, D-cellobiose, and 60-fold excess L-arabinose, and common interfering substances (100-fold excess ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid) as well as 300-fold excess D-xylitol did not affect the detection of D-glucose and D-xylose (both 1 mM). Therefore, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible, simple, rapid and cost-effective, which holds great potential in real applications. PMID:23202346

  20. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  1. Catalytic conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural over carbon solid acid catalyst in γ-valerolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingwei; Li, Wenzhi; Xu, Zhiping; Liu, Qiyu; Ma, Qiaozhi; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min; Ma, Longlong

    2016-06-01

    A novel carbon solid acid catalyst was synthesized by the sulfonation of carbonaceous material which was prepared by carbonization of sucrose using 4-BDS as a sulfonating agent. TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption, elemental analysis, XPS and FT-IR were used to characterize the catalyst. Then, the catalyst was applied for the conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural in GVL. The influence of the reaction time, temperature and dosage of catalyst on xylose dehydration were also investigated. The Brønsted acid catalyst exhibited high activity in the dehydration of xylose, with a high furfural yield of 78.5% at 170°C in 30min. What's more, a 60.6% furfural yield from corn stalk was achieved in 100min at 200°C. The recyclability of the sulfonated carbon catalyst was perfect, and it could be reused for 5times without the loss of furfural yields. PMID:26967333

  2. Candida Arthritis: Analysis of 112 Pediatric and Adult Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaletsou, Maria N; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Miller, Andy O; Petraitiene, Ruta; Lortholary, Olivier; Walsh, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Candida arthritis is a debilitating form of deeply invasive candidiasis. However, its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, management, and outcome are not well understood. Methods.  Cases of Candida arthritis were reviewed from 1967 through 2014. Variables included Candida spp in joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, clinical manifestations, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Results.  Among 112 evaluable cases, 62% were males and 36% were pediatric. Median age was 40 years (range, osteomyelitis was present in 30% of cases. Candida albicans constituted 63%, Candida tropicalis 14%, and Candida parapsilosis 11%. Most cases (66%) arose de novo, whereas 34% emerged during antifungal therapy. Osteolysis occurred in 42%, joint-effusion in 31%, and soft tissue extension in 21%. Amphotericin and fluconazole were the most commonly used agents. Surgical interventions included debridement in 25%, irrigation 10%, and drainage 12%. Complete or partial response was achieved in 96% and relapse in 16%. Conclusion.  Candida arthritis mainly emerges as a de novo infection in usually non-immunosuppressed patients with hips and knees being most commonly infected. Localizing symptoms are frequent, and the most common etiologic agents are C albicans, C tropicalis, and C parapsilosis. Management of Candida arthritis remains challenging with a clear risk of relapse, despite antifungal therapy. PMID:26858961

  3. Preparation of Candida albicans Biofilms for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Taff, Heather T.; Andes, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy is a form of microscopy that allows for imaging of distinct portions of an individual cell. For Candida albicans biofilms, it is often used to visualize the cell walls of fixed samples of yeast and hyphae. This protocol describes how to grow, harvest, and fix Candida albicans biofilms in preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  4. Genetic Relationship between Human and Animal Isolates of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Edelmann, Anke; Krüger, Monika; SCHMID, JAN

    2005-01-01

    Analyzing Candida albicans isolates from different human and animal individuals by Ca3 fingerprinting, we obtained no evidence for host-specific genotypes and for the existence of species-specific lineages, even though a certain degree of separation between human and animal isolates was found. Therefore, animals could potentially serve as reservoirs for human Candida infection.

  5. A Rare Cause of Persistent Nausea and Vomiting: Candida Duodenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yildirim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ižntestinal bowel lesions caused by Candida species are uncommon. These lesions may be  plaques or ulcers form. In this article, We presented endoscopic images  Candida duodenitis as a cause of persistent nausea, vomiting in a lung cancer patient treated with chemotherapy.  

  6. A Rare Cause of Persistent Nausea and Vomiting: Candida Duodenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Yildirim

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal bowel lesions caused by Candida species are uncommon. These lesions may be  plaques or ulcers form. In this article, We presented endoscopic images  Candida duodenitis as a cause of persistent nausea, vomiting in a lung cancer patient treated with chemotherapy.  

  7. Candida vaccines development from point view of US patent application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2011-11-01

    Candidiasis is the fourth most common bloodstream infection in hospitalized patients in the United States. Moreover, the mortality rate from Candida infections remains high, even after treatment with antifungal therapy. Vaccination would be a promising strategy for prevention of invasive fungal infections. In order to examine the main trends in anticandidal vaccine patenting activity, we conducted an analysis for anticandidal vaccine patents. We find 190 issued patent and 940 patent application documents containing the keywords Candida and vaccine within claims in the USA. Candida vaccines development, as evidenced by the numbers of issued patents, has decreased since the year 2002. Furthermore, the number of patent applications in Candida vaccines may indicate the strength of engaged resources were also in the status of stagnation during 2005-2007 and even a decline in 2008. Academic and nonprofit research institutions not only account for a large share of Candida vaccines patents but also apply for patents continually. Based on this analysis, the strength of Candida vaccines resources seems to remain stagnant in recent years due to patent prosecution or technical barrier in the filed of Candida vaccines. Therefore, we consider that Candida vaccines technology to still be under development and the researchers are still looking for scientific breakthrough in the filed. PMID:22048114

  8. Purification of actin from Candida albicans and comparison with the Candida 48,000-Mr protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Fiss, E.; Buckley, H R

    1987-01-01

    Actin was purified from Candida albicans cells by affinity chromatography by DNase-Sepharose and was recognized by immunoblotting with monoclonal antibody directed against chick muscle actin. The C. albicans 48-kilodalton protein recognized by sera from patients with invasive candidiasis was shown by DEAE chromatography and immunoblotting not to be identical with the purified C. albicans actin.

  9. Towards a Microbial Production of Fatty Acids as Precursors of Bio-kerosene from Glucose and Xylose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aviation industry considers the development of sustainable biofuels as one of the biggest challenges of the next ten years. The aim is to lower the environmental impact of the steadily increasing use of fossil fuels on climate change, yielding greater energy independence and fuel security. Thus, the development of a new route for the production of lipids from renewable non-food resources is now being promoted with the recent ASTM certification of hydrotreated oils. Our study focuses on the potential of growth of the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis using glucose and xylose which can come from renewable lignocellulosic substrates and of lipid accumulation using glucose as substrate. Experiments were carried out in fed-batch mode which allowed feed flux management. Carbon fluxes were controlled with modifying xylose/glucose ratios to quantify metabolism in optimal growth condition. Besides, the management of carbon and nitrogen fluxes allowed characterizing lipid accumulation. Thus, it has been shown that the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis can simultaneously consume glucose and xylose. When the ratio xylose/glucose increased, the growth rate and the carbon conversion yield into biomass decreased: it was of 0.36 h-1 and 0.64 Cmolx*.Cmolglu-1 for pure glucose, it was of 0.15 h-1 and 0.56 Cmol.Cmol-1 for 10% xylose and it was of 0.037 h-1 and 0.18 Cmol.Cmol-1 for pure xylose. The necessity to maintain residual growth and to manage carbon fluxes to optimize lipid accumulation performance was revealed. Lipid accumulation on glucose engendered a final biomass concentration of 150 gCDW.L-1, microbial production (72% of lipids) and maximal productivity over 1.48 glip.L-1.h-1. The culture temperature is an important parameter to modulate the lipid profile. The results were encouraging. Lipid accumulation using lignocellulosic feedstock was shown to be a highly promising route. (authors)

  10. The mechanism of 2-furaldehyde formation from D-xylose dehydration in the gas phase. A tandem mass spectrometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of reactions occurring in solution can be investigated also in the gas phase by suited mass spectrometric techniques, which allow to highlight fundamental mechanistic features independent of the influence of the medium and to clarifying controversial hypotheses proposed in solution studies. In this work, we report a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-TSQ/MS) on the dehydration of D-xylose, leading mainly to the formation of 2-furaldehyde (2-FA). It is generally known in carbohydrate chemistry that the thermal acid catalyzed dehydration of pentoses leads to the formation of 2-FA, but several aspects on the solution-phase mechanism are controversial. Here, gaseous reactant ions corresponding to protonated xylose molecules obtained from ESI of a solution containing D-xylose and ammonium acetate as protonating reagent were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the triple stage quadrupole analyzer. The product ion mass spectra of protonated xylose are characterized by the presence of ionic intermediates arising from xylose dehydration, which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. As expected, the xylose triple dehydration leads to the formation of the ion at m/z 97, corresponding to protonated 2-FA. On the basis of mass spectrometric evidences, we demonstrated that in the gas phase, the formation of 2-FA involves protonation at the OH group bound to the C1 atom of the sugar, the first ionic intermediate being characterized by a cyclic structure. Finally, energy resolved product ion mass spectra allowed to obtain information on the energetic features of the D-xylose→2-FA conversion. ᅟ PMID:23690250

  11. Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Xylose-extracted Corncob Residue by SSF Using Inhibitor- and Thermal-tolerant Yeast Clavispora NRRL Y-50339

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylose-extracted corncob residue, a byproduct of the xylose-producing industry using corncobs, is an abundant potential energy resource for cellulosic ethanol production. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is considered an ideal one-step process for conversion of lignocellulosic b...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium That Utilizes Xylose and Produces High Levels of l-Lactic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly l-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  13. Oral candidiasis-adhesion of non-albicans Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokor-Bratić Marija B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infection caused primarily by Candida albicans. However, in recent years, species of non-albicans Candida have been implicated more frequently in mucosal infection. Candida species usually reside as commensal organisms and are part of normal oral microflora. Determining exactly how transformation from commensal to pathogen takes place and how it can be prevented is continuous challenge for clinical doctors. Candidal adherence to mucosal surfaces is considered as a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. Acrylic dentures, acting as reservoirs, play an important role in increasing the risk from Candida colonisation. Thus, this review discusses what is currently known about the adhesion of non-albicans Candida species of oral origin to buccal epithelial cells and denture acrylics.

  14. Enzymatic Xylose Release from Pretreated Corn Bran Arabinoxylan: Differential Effects of Deacetylation and Deferuloylation on Insoluble and Soluble Substrate Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jane; Viksø-Nielsen, Ander; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work enzymatic hydrolysis of arabinoxylan from pretreated corn bran (190 °C, 10 min) was evaluated by measuring the release of xylose and arabinose after treatment with a designed minimal mixture of monocomponent enzymes consisting of α-l-arabinofuranosidases, an endoxylanase, and a...... β-xylosidase. The pretreatment divided the corn bran material 50:50 into soluble and insoluble fractions having A:X ratios of 0.66 and 0.40, respectively. Addition of acetyl xylan esterase to the monocomponent enzyme mixture almost doubled the xylose release from the insoluble substrate fraction and...

  15. Metabolic responses in Candida tropicalis to complex inhibitors during xylitol bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizeng; Li, Hao; Fan, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Jingkun; Tang, Pingwah; Yuan, Qipeng

    2015-09-01

    During xylitol fermentation, Candida tropicalis is often inhibited by inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysate. The mechanisms involved in the metabolic responses to inhibitor stress and the resistances to inhibitors are still not clear. To understand the inhibition mechanisms and the metabolic responses to inhibitors, a GC/MS-based metabolomics approach was performed on C. tropicalis treated with and without complex inhibitors (CI, including furfural, phenol and acetic acid). Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to determine the metabolic variability between CI-treated groups and control groups, and 25 metabolites were identified as possible entities responsible for the discrimination caused by inhibitors. We found that xylose uptake rate and xylitol oxidation rate were promoted by CI treatment. Metabolomics analysis showed that the flux from xylulose to pentose phosphate pathway increased, and tricarboxylic acid cycle was disturbed by CI. Moreover, the changes in levels of 1,3-propanediol, trehalose, saturated fatty acids and amino acids showed different mechanisms involved in metabolic responses to inhibitor stress. The increase of 1,3-propanediol was considered to be correlated with regulating redox balance and osmoregulation. The increase of trehalose might play a role in protein stabilization and cellular membranes protection. Saturated fatty acids could cause the decrease of membrane fluidity and make the plasma membrane rigid to maintain the integrity of plasma membrane. The deeper understanding of the inhibition mechanisms and the metabolic responses to inhibitors will provide us with more information on the metabolism regulation during xylitol bioconversion and the construction of industrial strains with inhibitor tolerance for better utilization of bioresource. PMID:26127015

  16. Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis induce different T-cell responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toth, A.; Csonka, K.; Jacobs, C.; Vagvolgyi, C.; Nosanchuk, J.D.; Netea, M.G.; Gacser, A.

    2013-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the third most frequent cause of candidemia. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the human immunological response to C. parapsilosis. In this study, we compared the cytokine responses evoked by Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis. C. parapsilosis-stimulate

  17. Pharmacotherapy of Candida Infections with Echinocandins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Espinel-Ingroff

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The classic recommended antifungal agents for the treatment of invasive Candida infections were amphotericin B, a lipid formulation of amphotericin B and fluconazole in both neutropenic or nonneutropenic patients as either primary or alternative therapies. Voriconazole has been recommended when additional coverage for filamentous fungi is needed (e.g. neutropenic patients. More recently and based on well designed comparative clinical trials, the three echinocandins, caspofungin, anidulafungin and micafungin have been added as primary or alternative therapies especially for critically ill or neutropenic patients. In general, the echinocandins are most useful when patients have previously been exposed to an azole or are unstable.

  18. Melittin induces apoptotic features in Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melittin is a well-known antimicrobial peptide with membrane-active mechanisms. In this study, it was found that Melittin exerted its antifungal effect via apoptosis. Candida albicans exposed to Melittin showed the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, measured by DHR-123 staining. Fluorescence microscopy staining with FITC-annexin V, TUNEL and DAPI further confirmed diagnostic markers of yeast apoptosis including phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The current study suggests that Melittin possesses an antifungal effect with another mechanism promoting apoptosis.

  19. A Candida albicans PeptideAtlas

    OpenAIRE

    Vialas, Vital; Sun, Zhi; Loureiro y Penha, Carla Verónica; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abián, Joaquín; Monteoliva, Lucía; Deutsch, Eric W.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L.; Gil, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans public proteomic datasets, though growing steadily in the last few years, still have a very limited presence in online repositories. We report here the creation of a C. albicans PeptideAtlas comprising near 22,000 distinct peptides at a 0.24% False Discovery Rate (FDR) that account for over 2500 canonical proteins at a 1.2% FDR. Based on data from 16 experiments, we attained coverage of 41% of the C. albicans open reading frame sequences (ORFs) in the database used for the se...

  20. Melittin induces apoptotic features in Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cana [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Puk-ku, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Gun, E-mail: dglee222@knu.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Puk-ku, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-26

    Melittin is a well-known antimicrobial peptide with membrane-active mechanisms. In this study, it was found that Melittin exerted its antifungal effect via apoptosis. Candida albicans exposed to Melittin showed the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, measured by DHR-123 staining. Fluorescence microscopy staining with FITC-annexin V, TUNEL and DAPI further confirmed diagnostic markers of yeast apoptosis including phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The current study suggests that Melittin possesses an antifungal effect with another mechanism promoting apoptosis.

  1. Consecutively Preparing D-Xylose, Organosolv Lignin, and Amorphous Ultrafine Silica from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m2/g.

  2. Efficient conversion of xylose to ethanol by stress-tolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus BUNL-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitiyon, Sukanya; Keo-Oudone, Chansom; Murata, Masayuki; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Limtong, Savitree; Kosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation ability of thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus BUNL-21 isolated in Laos was investigated. Comparison with thermotolerant K. marxianus DMKU3-1042 as one of the most thermotolerant yeasts isolated previously revealed that the strain possesses stronger ability for conversion of xylose to ethanol, resistance to 2-deoxyglucose in the case of pentose, and tolerance to various stresses including high temperature and hydrogen peroxide. K. marxianus BUNL-21 was found to have ethanol fermentation activity from xylose that is slightly lower and much higher than that of Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) at 30 °C and at higher temperatures, respectively. The lower ethanol production seems to be due to large accumulation of acetic acid. The possible mechanism of acetic acid accumulation is discussed. In addition, it was found that both K. marxianus strains produced ethanol in the presence of 10 mM hydroxymethylfurfural or furfural, at a level almost equivalent to that in their absence. Therefore, K. marxianus BUNL-21 is a highly competent yeast for high-temperature ethanol fermentation with lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:27026881

  3. Consecutively preparing d-xylose, organosolv lignin, and amorphous ultrafine silica from rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica) are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m(2)/g. PMID:25140120

  4. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT. PMID:24645431

  5. Application of factorial design to the study of xylitol production from corncob hemicellulose hydrolysate by Candida guilliermondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S*

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Optimization of the culture medium and process variables for xylitol production from corncob hemicelluloses hydrolysate was carried out using Candida guillermondii (NCIM 3124. The optimization was performed with statistical methodology based on experimental designs. The screening of nine nutrients for their influence on xylitol production was achieved using a Plackett-Burman design. The four selected components were optimized with Box-Behnken design using response surface methodology (RSM. The optimum level (g/l is: MgSO4.7H2O- 1.34, yeast extract- 4.34, KH2PO4- 2.94 and xylose- 9.49 and influence of various process variables on the xylitol production was evaluated. The optimal levels were quantified by the central composite design using RSM. The optimum level of process variables are: temperature (29.88 oC, substrate concentration (3.26 g/l, pH (7.25, agitation speed (170.42 rpm, inoculum size (3.41 ml. These conditions were validated experimentally which revealed an enhanced xylitol yield of 0.73 g/g.

  6. Ethanol and xylitol production by fermentation of acid hydrolysate from olive pruning with Candida tropicalis NBRC 0618.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Soledad; Puentes, Juan G; Moya, Alberto J; Sánchez, Sebastián

    2015-08-01

    Olive tree pruning biomass has been pretreated with pressurized steam, hydrolysed with hydrochloric acid, conditioned and afterwards fermented using the non-traditional yeast Candida tropicalis NBRC 0618. The main aim of this study was to analyse the influence of acid concentration on the hydrolysis process and its effect on the subsequent fermentation to produce ethanol and xylitol. From the results, it could be deduced that both total sugars and d-glucose recovery were enhanced by increasing the acid concentration tested; almost the whole hemicellulose fraction was hydrolysed when 3.77% was used. It has been observed a sequential production first of ethanol, from d-glucose, and then xylitol from d-xylose. The overall ethanol and xylitol yields ranged from 0.27 to 0.38kgkg(-1), and 0.12 to 0.23kgkg(-1) respectively, reaching the highest values in the fermentation of the hydrolysates obtained with hydrochloric acid 2.61% and 1.11%, respectively. PMID:25916261

  7. Co-utilization of glucose and xylose by evolved Thermus thermophilus LC113 strain elucidated by (13)C metabolic flux analysis and whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Lauren T; Lu, Jing; Cipolla, Robert M; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-09-01

    We evolved Thermus thermophilus to efficiently co-utilize glucose and xylose, the two most abundant sugars in lignocellulosic biomass, at high temperatures without carbon catabolite repression. To generate the strain, T. thermophilus HB8 was first evolved on glucose to improve its growth characteristics, followed by evolution on xylose. The resulting strain, T. thermophilus LC113, was characterized in growth studies, by whole genome sequencing, and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) with [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [5-(13)C]xylose, and [1,6-(13)C]glucose+[5-(13)C]xylose as isotopic tracers. Compared to the starting strain, the evolved strain had an increased growth rate (~2-fold), increased biomass yield, increased tolerance to high temperatures up to 90°C, and gained the ability to grow on xylose in minimal medium. At the optimal growth temperature of 81°C, the maximum growth rate on glucose and xylose was 0.44 and 0.46h(-1), respectively. In medium containing glucose and xylose the strain efficiently co-utilized the two sugars. (13)C-MFA results provided insights into the metabolism of T. thermophilus LC113 that allows efficient co-utilization of glucose and xylose. Specifically, (13)C-MFA revealed that metabolic fluxes in the upper part of metabolism adjust flexibly to sugar availability, while fluxes in the lower part of metabolism remain relatively constant. Whole genome sequence analysis revealed two large structural changes that can help explain the physiology of the evolved strain: a duplication of a chromosome region that contains many sugar transporters, and a 5x multiplication of a region on the pVV8 plasmid that contains xylose isomerase and xylulokinase genes, the first two enzymes of xylose catabolism. Taken together, (13)C-MFA and genome sequence analysis provided complementary insights into the physiology of the evolved strain. PMID:27164561

  8. Comparative identification of Candida species isolated from animals using phenotypic and PCR-RFLP methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadăş George Cosmin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify 58 Candida sp. strains isolated from animals using the Chromatic Candida test, the API 20 C AUX system, and polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The Chromatic Candida test was able to identify only C. albicans and C. krusei. The API 20 C AUX system and PCR-RFLP had similar specificity for the identification of Candida strains. In case of both methods, Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species - 22 (37.93% strains, followed by Candida krusei - 17 (29.31% strains, Candida famata - 10 (17.24% strains, Candida parapsilosis - five (8.62% strains, and Candida kefyr - four (6.89% strains. PCR-RFLP represents a reliable, quick and relatively inexpensive genotyping method, recommended for rapid identification of Candida spp.

  9. Activity of Polyphenolic Compounds against Candida glabrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Salazar-Aranda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic mycoses increase the morbidity and mortality of immuno-compromised patients. Five Candida species have been shown to be responsible for 97% of worldwide cases of invasive candidiasis. Resistance of C. glabrata and C. krusei to azoles has been reported, and new, improved antifungal agents are needed. The current study was designed to evaluatethe activity of various polyphenolic compounds against Candida species. Antifungal activity was evaluated following the M27-A3 protocol of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and antioxidant activity was determined using the DPPH assay. Myricetin and baicalein inhibited the growth of all species tested. This effect was strongest against C. glabrata, for which the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value was lower than that of fluconazole. The MIC values against C. glabrata for myricitrin, luteolin, quercetin, 3-hydroxyflavone, and fisetin were similar to that of fluconazole. The antioxidant activity of all compounds was confirmed, and polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant activity had the greatest activity against C. glabrata. The structure and position of their hydroxyl groups appear to influence their activity against C. glabrata.

  10. Candida Parapsilosis Arthritis Involving the Ankle in a Diabetes Patient: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candida parapsilosis is a rare opportunistic fungal pathogen of the musculoskeletal region. Immune function of almost all patients is severely disturbed. Most reported cases of septic arthritis of joints by Candida involve the knee, especially Candida parapsilosis. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of Candida parapsilosis involving the ankle presented on only plain radiography. We report a case of Candida parapsilosis arthritis involving the ankle in a diabetes patient which was shown on MR imaging.

  11. Candida Parapsilosis Arthritis Involving the Ankle in a Diabetes Patient: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Kyeong; Chun, Kyung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, The Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Candida parapsilosis is a rare opportunistic fungal pathogen of the musculoskeletal region. Immune function of almost all patients is severely disturbed. Most reported cases of septic arthritis of joints by Candida involve the knee, especially Candida parapsilosis. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of Candida parapsilosis involving the ankle presented on only plain radiography. We report a case of Candida parapsilosis arthritis involving the ankle in a diabetes patient which was shown on MR imaging.

  12. Interactions of Candida albicans with host epithelial surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. The organism is however, commonly encountered as a commensal in healthy individuals where it is a component of the normal microflora. The key determinant in the type of relationship that Candida has with its host is how it interacts with the epithelial surface it colonises. A delicate balance clearly exists between the potentially damaging effects of Candida virulence factors and the nature of the immune response elicited by the host. Frequently, it is changes in host factors that lead to Candida seemingly changing from a commensal to pathogenic existence. However, given the often reported heterogeneity in morphological and biochemical factors that exist between Candida species and indeed strains of C. albicans, it may also be the fact that colonising strains differ in the way they exploit resources to allow persistence at mucosal surfaces and as a consequence this too may affect the way Candida interacts with epithelial cells. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of some of the possible interactions that may occur between C. albicans and host epithelial surfaces that may in turn dictate whether Candida removal, its commensal persistence or infection follows.

  13. ISOLASI SPESIES CANDIDA DARI TINJA PENDERITA HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudji K Sjarifuddin

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida is a saprophyte in the human respiratory tract, gastro intestinal tract and also in the debris under the nail. Inpatients with compromised immunity such as HIV-AIDS, Candida is able to cause infection, in this case oral candidosisor esophagitis. In this study fungi were isolated from the stools of HIV/AIDS patients. Samples consisting of 95diarrheic stools from HIV/AIDS patients were investigated for the yeast especially Candida spp. The stools were inoculated onto Sabouraud dextrose agar then the fungi were identified using morphological methods and Chromagarmedium. Yeast colonies were found in 71 (74,74% out of 95 samples from which Candida was 42 44,21%, Geotrichum 24 (25,26%, and mixed of Candida and Geotrichum 3 (3,16%, Rhodotorula and Trichosporon 1(1,05% each. Species of Candida were identified as C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. guilliermondii, C. glabrata, C. lusitaniae and C. kefyr. Although Candida could be isolated from the diarrheic stools of HIV/AIDS patients but its role on the cause of diarrhea is still questionable.

  14. Prevalence of oral Candida in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecksén-Blicks, C; Granström, E; Silfverdal, S A; West, C E

    2015-09-01

    Colonisation of the gastrointestinal tract is influenced by primary microbial exposure and bioactive factors in breastmilk. The aim was to explore the prevalence of oral Candida in the first year of life in relation to selected exposures. Oral Candida was studied in 100 healthy infants at 4 and 8 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months of age and related to delivery mode, birth weight, infant health and feeding, antibiotics, antimycotics, steroids and probiotics in mother and infant, living conditions, maternal smoking and infections The association between lactoferrin and antisecretory factor in breastmilk and maternal serum haemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin levels in relation to oral Candida was also explored. About 11% to 15% of the infants had oral Candida at the respective age. Colonisation was fairly stable until 6 months of age. There was no conclusive impact of the investigated exposures at entry. Infants with a furry pet at home had a lower frequency of Candida at 3 months, (P < 0.05) whereas all but one colonised infant had older siblings at 12 months (P < 0.01). Lactoferrin in breastmilk was negatively associated with colonisation at 6 months of age. It is concluded that 11 to 15% had oral Candida. Exposure to furry pets and siblings impacted oral Candida. PMID:26214300

  15. Improving xylitol production through recombinant expression of xylose reductase in the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida YK-624.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Sho; Wang, Jianqiao; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Hirai, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    We generated an expression construct consisting of the xylose reductase (XR) gene (xr) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Transformant X7 exhibited increased xylitol production and markedly higher XR activities than the wild-type strain. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the increased XR activity was associated with constant expression of the recombinant xr gene. PMID:25547244

  16. Microbial production of xylitol from xylose and L-arabinose: conversion of L-arabitol to xylitol using bacterial oxidoreductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial production of xylitol, using hemicellulosic biomass such as agricultural residues, is becoming more attractive for reducing its manufacturing cost. L-arabitol is a particular problem to xylitol production from hemicellulosic hydrolyzates that contain both xylose and L-arabinose because it...

  17. Development of a membrane based detection of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Catarina Guerreiro Silva de

    2015-01-01

    Tese de mestrado integrado em Engenharia Biomédica e Biofísica , apresentada à Universidade de Lisboa, através da Faculdade de Ciências, 2015 Candida é uma família de fungos, normalmente, presente na flora gastrointestinal, nos orgãos genitais, no sistema respiratório e na pele de pessoas saudáveis e, até determinada quantidade, não trazem nenhum risco. Apenas 17 espécies de Candida podem ser consideradas como patogénicas para o ser humano e, dentro deste grupo, Candida albicans é a esp...

  18. Candida flosculorum sp. nov. and Candida floris sp. nov., two yeast species associated with tropical flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carlos A; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Lachance, Marc-André; Ruivo, Carla C C; Medeiros, Adriana O; Pimentel, Mariana R C; Fontenelle, Julio C R; Martins, Rogério P

    2007-12-01

    Two ascomycetous yeast species, Candida flosculorum sp. nov. and Candida floris sp. nov., were isolated from tropical flowers and their associated insects. C. flosculorum was isolated from flower bracts of Heliconia velloziana and Heliconia episcopalis (Heliconiaceae) collected from two Atlantic rain forest sites in Brazil. C. floris was isolated from flowers of Ipomoea sp. (Convolvulaceae) growing on the banks of the river Paraguai in the pantanal ecosystem in Brazil and from an adult of the stingless bee Trigona sp. and a flower of Merremia quinquefolia (Convolvulaceae) in Costa Rica. C. flosculorum belongs to the Metschnikowiaceae clade and C. floris belongs to the Starmerella clade. The type strain of C. flosculorum is UFMG-JL13(T) (=CBS 10566(T)=NRRL Y-48258(T)) and the type strain of C. floris is UWO(PS) 00-226.2(T) (=CBS 10593(T)=NRRL Y-48255(T)). PMID:18048759

  19. Sunflower seed husk agar: A new medium for the differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Z

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A sunflower ( Helianthus annuus seed husk agar medium has been developed and evaluated for differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans on the basis of colony morphology and chlamydospore production. All C. dubliniensis isolates (n=40 produced rough colonies with hyphal fringes and abundant chlamydospores whereas 101 of 105 (96.2% C. albicans isolates produced smooth colonies with no evidence of chlamydospore production. Since this medium is free from oil droplets, chlamydospores can be examined with greater clarity by Dalmau plate technique. This medium provides a simple and cost-effective tool for the presumptive differentiation of C. dubliniensis from C. albicans and is particularly suited for clinical microbiology laboratories where biochemical or molecular methods for the differentiation of these two species are not available.

  20. Candida albicans versus Candida dubliniensis: Why Is C. albicans More Pathogenic?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related pathogenic yeast species. However, C. albicans is far more prevalent in human infection and has been shown to be more pathogenic in a wide range of infection models. Comparison of the genomes of the two species has revealed that they are very similar although there are some significant differences, largely due to the expansion of virulence-related gene families (e.g., ALS and SAP) in C. albicans, and increased levels of pseudogenisation in C. dubliniensis. Comparative global gene expression analyses have also been used to investigate differences in the ability of the two species to tolerate environmental stress and to produce hyphae, two traits that are likely to play a role in the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, these data suggest that C. dubliniensis is in the process of undergoing reductive evolution and may have become adapted for growth in a specialized anatomic niche.

  1. Three novel species of the anamorphic yeast genus Candida in the Candida intermedia clade found in Japan, Thailand and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Takashi; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Am-In, Somit; Lee, Ching-Fu; Imanishi, Yumi; Limtong, Savitree

    2011-01-01

    Four strains of yeasts isolated in Japan, Thailand and Taiwan were found to represent three novel species of the genus Candida. The three species are located in a clade including Candida tsuchiyae, Candida thailandica and Candida akabanensis in a tree based on the D1/D2 domain sequences of the large subunit rRNA genes but clearly differentiated from these relative species. Three novel species are proposed for these strains, i. e., Candida berkhoutiae sp. nov., for strains ST-49(T) (=BCC 7749(T)=NBRC 106733(T)=CBS 11722(T)) isolated from insect frass in Thailand and SA13S01 (=NBRC 106053) isolated from soil in Taiwan, Candida ezoensis sp. nov., for strain Y07-1601-2(T) (=NBRC 105019(T)=CBS 11753(T)) isolated from forest soil in Japan, and Candida inulinophila sp. nov., for ST-369(T) (=BCC 15081(T)=NBRC 106735(T)=CBS 11725(T)) isolated from an unidentified wild mushroom from Thailand. PMID:21606608

  2. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic assay for identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot-Leblond, Agnes; Grimaud, Linda; David, Sandrine; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C; Ponton, Jose; Robert, Raymond

    2004-11-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first established as a novel yeast species in 1995. It is particularly associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but it has also been detected at other anatomical sites and at a low incidence level in non-HIV-infected patients. It shares so many phenotypic characteristics with C. albicans that it is easily misidentified as such. No rapid, simple, and commercial test that allows differentiation between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans has been developed, until now. Accurate species identification requires the use of genotype-based techniques that are not routinely available in most clinical microbiology diagnostic laboratories. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of a new test (the immunochromatographic membrane [ICM] albi-dubli test; SR2B, Avrille, France) to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. The organisms evaluated were strains whose identities had previously been confirmed by PCR tests and freshly isolated clinical strains and included 58 C. albicans isolates, 60 C. dubliniensis isolates, and 82 isolates belonging to other species of yeast. The ICM albi-dubli test is based on the principle of immunochromatographic analysis and involves the use of two distinct monoclonal antibodies that recognize two unrelated epitopes expressed by both species or specific to only one species. The assay requires no complex instrumentation for analysis and can be recommended for routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories. Results are obtained within 2 h and 30 min and are easy to interpret. This evaluation demonstrated the good performance of this immunochromatographic test for C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolated on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHOROMagar Candida, and CandidaSelect, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 93.1 to 100%. These parameters decreased, however, to 91.4% when the test was performed with yeast isolated

  3. Evaluation of a Rapid Immunochromatographic Assay for Identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    OpenAIRE

    Marot-Leblond, Agnes; Grimaud, Linda; David, Sandrine; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.; Ponton, Jose; Robert, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first established as a novel yeast species in 1995. It is particularly associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but it has also been detected at other anatomical sites and at a low incidence level in non-HIV-infected patients. It shares so many phenotypic characteristics with C. albicans that it is easily misidentified as such. No rapid, simple, and commercial test that allows differentiation betwee...

  4. Simultaneous utilization of glucose, xylose and arabinose in the presence of acetate by a consortium of Escherichia coli strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Tian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficient microbial utilization of lignocellulosic hydrolysates has remained challenging because this material is composed of multiple sugars and also contains growth inhibitors such as acetic acid (acetate. Using an engineered consortium of strains derived from Escherichia coli C and a synthetic medium containing acetate, glucose, xylose and arabinose, we report on both the microbial removal of acetate and the subsequent simultaneous utilization of the sugars. Results In a first stage, a strain unable to utilize glucose, xylose and arabinose (ALS1392, strain E. coli C ptsG manZ glk crr xylA araA removed 3 g/L acetate within 30 hours. In a subsequent second stage, three E. coli strains (ALS1370, ALS1371, ALS1391, which are each engineered to utilize only one sugar, together simultaneously utilized glucose, xylose and arabinose. The effect of non-metabolizable sugars on the metabolism of the target sugar was minimal. Additionally the deletions necessary to prevent the consumption of one sugar only minimally affected the consumption of a desired sugar. For example, the crr deletion necessary to prevent glucose consumption reduced xylose and arabinose utilization by less than 15% compared to the wild-type. Similarly, the araA deletion used to exclude arabinose consumption did not affect xylose- and glucose-consumption. Conclusions Despite the modest reduction in the overall rate of sugar consumption due to the various deletions that were required to generate the consortium of strains, the approach constitutes a significant improvement in any single-organism approach to utilize sugars found in lignocellulosic hydrolysate in the presence of acetate.

  5. Purification and germination of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis chlamydospores cultured in liquid media.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Citiulo, Francesco

    2009-10-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are the only Candida sp. that have been observed to produce chlamydospores. The function of these large, thick-walled cells is currently unknown. In this report, we describe the production and purification of chlamydospores from these species in defined liquid media. Staining with the fluorescent dye FUN-1 indicated that chlamydospores are metabolically active cells, but that metabolic activity is undetectable in chlamydospores that are >30 days old. However, 5-15-day-old chlamydospores could be induced to produce daughter chlamydospores, blastospores, pseudohyphae and true hyphae depending on the incubation conditions used. Chlamydospores that were preinduced to germinate were also observed to escape from murine macrophages following phagocytosis, suggesting that these structures may be viable in vivo. Mycelium-attached and purified chlamydospores rapidly lost their viability in water and when subjected to dry stress, suggesting that they are unlikely to act as long-term storage structures. Instead, our data suggest that chlamydospores represent an alternative specialized form of growth by C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  6. Global Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Chlamydospore Specific Markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palige, Katja

    2013-04-15

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2) which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  7. Increased accuracy of the carbon-14 D-xylose breath test in detecting small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth by correction with the gastric emptying rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the accuracy of 14C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth can be increased by correction with the gastric emptying rate of 14C-D-xylose. Ten culture-positive patients and ten culture-negative controls were included in the study. Small-intestinal aspirates for bacteriological culture were obtained endoscopically. A liquid-phase gastric emptying study was performed simultaneously to assess the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. The results of the percentage of expired 14CO2 at 30 min were corrected with the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. There were six patients in the culture-positive group with a 14CO2 concentration above the normal limit. Three out of four patients with initially negative results using the uncorrected method proved to be positive after correction. All these three patients had prolonged gastric emptying of 14C-D-xylose. When compared with cultures of small-intestine aspirates, the sensitivity and specificity of the uncorrected 14C-D-xylose breath test were 60% and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of the corrected 14C-D-xylose breath test improved to 90% and 100%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  8. Increased accuracy of the carbon-14 D-xylose breath test in detecting small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth by correction with the gastric emptying rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Chisen [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Granhum [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Kao Chiahung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Wang Shyhjen [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Peng Shihnen [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Huang Chihkuen [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Poon Sekkwong [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1995-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the accuracy of {sup 14}C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth can be increased by correction with the gastric emptying rate of {sup 14}C-D-xylose. Ten culture-positive patients and ten culture-negative controls were included in the study. Small-intestinal aspirates for bacteriological culture were obtained endoscopically. A liquid-phase gastric emptying study was performed simultaneously to assess the amount of {sup 14}C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. The results of the percentage of expired {sup 14}CO{sub 2} at 30 min were corrected with the amount of {sup 14}C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. There were six patients in the culture-positive group with a {sup 14}CO{sub 2} concentration above the normal limit. Three out of four patients with initially negative results using the uncorrected method proved to be positive after correction. All these three patients had prolonged gastric emptying of {sup 14}C-D-xylose. When compared with cultures of small-intestine aspirates, the sensitivity and specificity of the uncorrected {sup 14}C-D-xylose breath test were 60% and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of the corrected {sup 14}C-D-xylose breath test improved to 90% and 100%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  9. In situ detoxification of dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover by co-culture of xylose-utilizing and inhibitor-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Xia; Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Li, Hui-Ze; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-10-01

    Co-culture of xylose-utilizing and inhibitor-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed for bioethanol production from undetoxified pretreated biomass in simultaneously saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) process. Glucose accumulation during late fermentation phase in SSCF using xylose-utilizing strain can be eliminated by the introduction of inhibitor-tolerant strain. Effect of different ratios of two strains was investigated and xylose-utilizing strain to inhibitor-tolerant strain ratio of 10:1 (w/w) showed the best xylose consumption and the highest ethanol yield. Inoculating of xylose-utilizing strain at the later stage of SSCF (24-48h) exhibited lower ethanol yield than inoculating at early stage (the beginning 0-12h), probably due to the reduced enzymatic efficiency caused by the unconsumed xylose and oligomeric sugars. Co-culture SSCF increased ethanol concentration by 21.2% and 41.0% comparing to SSCF using individual inhibitor-tolerant and xylose-utilizing strain (increased from 48.5 and 41.7g/L to 58.8g/L), respectively, which suggest this co-culture system was very promising. PMID:27387414

  10. Optimization of CDT-1 and XYL1 expression for balanced co-production of ethanol and xylitol from cellobiose and xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zha

    Full Text Available Production of ethanol and xylitol from lignocellulosic hydrolysates is an alternative to the traditional production of ethanol in utilizing biomass. However, the conversion efficiency of xylose to xylitol is restricted by glucose repression, causing a low xylitol titer. To this end, we cloned genes CDT-1 (encoding a cellodextrin transporter and gh1-1 (encoding an intracellular β-glucosidase from Neurospora crassa and XYL1 (encoding a xylose reductase that converts xylose into xylitol from Scheffersomyces stipitis into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, enabling simultaneous production of ethanol and xylitol from a mixture of cellobiose and xylose (main components of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. We further optimized the expression levels of CDT-1 and XYL1 by manipulating their promoters and copy-numbers, and constructed an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (carrying one copy of PGK1p-CDT1 and two copies of TDH3p-XYL1, which showed an 85.7% increase in xylitol production from the mixture of cellobiose and xylose than that from the mixture of glucose and xylose. Thus, we achieved a balanced co-fermentation of cellobiose (0.165 g/L/h and xylose (0.162 g/L/h at similar rates to co-produce ethanol (0.36 g/g and xylitol (1.00 g/g.

  11. Optimization of CDT-1 and XYL1 Expression for Balanced Co-Production of Ethanol and Xylitol from Cellobiose and Xylose by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Jian; Li, Bing-Zhi; Shen, Ming-Hua; Hu, Meng-Long; Song, Hao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Production of ethanol and xylitol from lignocellulosic hydrolysates is an alternative to the traditional production of ethanol in utilizing biomass. However, the conversion efficiency of xylose to xylitol is restricted by glucose repression, causing a low xylitol titer. To this end, we cloned genes CDT-1 (encoding a cellodextrin transporter) and gh1-1 (encoding an intracellular β-glucosidase) from Neurospora crassa and XYL1 (encoding a xylose reductase that converts xylose into xylitol) from Scheffersomyces stipitis into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, enabling simultaneous production of ethanol and xylitol from a mixture of cellobiose and xylose (main components of lignocellulosic hydrolysates). We further optimized the expression levels of CDT-1 and XYL1 by manipulating their promoters and copy-numbers, and constructed an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (carrying one copy of PGK1p-CDT1 and two copies of TDH3p-XYL1), which showed an 85.7% increase in xylitol production from the mixture of cellobiose and xylose than that from the mixture of glucose and xylose. Thus, we achieved a balanced co-fermentation of cellobiose (0.165 g/L/h) and xylose (0.162 g/L/h) at similar rates to co-produce ethanol (0.36 g/g) and xylitol (1.00 g/g). PMID:23844185

  12. Enhanced Xylitol Production by Mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus 36907-FMEL1 Due to Improved Xylose Reductase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Seong; Park, Jae-Bum; Jang, Seung-Won; Ha, Suk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    A directed evolution and random mutagenesis were carried out with thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 for efficient xylitol production. The final selected strain, K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1, exhibited 120 and 39 % improvements of xylitol concentration and xylitol yield, respectively, as compared to the parental strain, K. marxianus ATCC 36907. According to enzymatic assays for xylose reductase (XR) activities, XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 was around twofold higher than that from the parental strain. Interestingly, the ratios of NADH-linked and NADPH-linked XR activities were highly changed from 1.92 to 1.30 when K. marxianus ATCC 36907 and K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 were compared. As results of KmXYL1 genes sequencing, it was found that cysteine was substituted to tyrosine at position 36 after strain development which might cause enhanced XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1. PMID:26043853

  13. Process alternatives for the fermentation of glucose/xylose mixtures by Pichia stipitis. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootjen, D.R.J.

    1993-03-07

    Technical substrates for the fermentative production of ethanol often contain hexose and pentose sugars. For an optimal ethanol yield a complete conversion of all sugars in such a substrate is desired. Pichia stipitis, a yeast that can convert hexose as well as pentose sugars, shows the sequential use of substrate. Therefore pentose will not be converted when the hexose concentration is too high. A complete conversion to ethanol of a mixed substrate in a normal continuous culture will be difficult. Furthermore P. stipitis needs oxygen for growth. However too much oxygen will shift the metabolism from ethanol to biomass production. The aim of the project was to find ways to convert a mixed substrate, which contains hexose and pentose sugars, using P. stipitis to ethanol in a continuous process with a high ethanol yield and production rate. For this purpose a model substrate that contained glucose (40 g/l;) and xylose (10 g/l) was used.

  14. Long-term bone retention of C-14 following oral administration of C-14-xylose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral administration of C-14-labeled xylose followed by measurement of C-14 activity in the breath has become a clinically useful test for diagnosis of small bowel bacterial overgrowth. However, accurate biodistribution and radiation dosimetry information was not available in the literature, so the true radiation exposure of the human subjects was not known. The purpose of this study was to determine the actual biodistribution data for orally administered C-14-xylose. A series of rats were given the material orally and sacrificed at various ages, up to 1 month after dosing. Tissues and fluids were solubilized and counted by liquid scintillation counting. Exhaled C-14-carbon dioxide was measured by trapping the gas in ethanolamine. Approximately two-thirds of the administered dose was absorbed from the GI tract and eventually appeared in the breath and urine. Much of the dose was not found in the major organs within the first day; it was presumed to be in the fatty tissue or muscle, which were not sampled. After most of the C-14 had disappeared from the GI and urinary tract, however, the bone retained a significant amount of radioactivity: approximately 5-6% of the administered dose was found in bone at one week, and remained at one month. These findings suggest that radiation exposure to the skeleton is long-term, much greater in magnitude than previously estimated, and suggests that the value of the test should be reevaluated in the light of the long-term radiation burden to the skeleton, especially in young patients

  15. Development of Candida-Specific Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection and Identification of Eight Medically Important Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Nagamine, Kenjiro; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Culture-based identification methods have been the gold standard for the diagnosis of fungal infection. Currently, molecular technologies such as real-time PCR assays with short turnaround time can provide desirable alternatives for the rapid detection of Candida microbes. However, most of the published PCR primer sets are not Candida specific and likely to amplify DNA from common environmental contaminants, such as Aspergillus microbes. In this study, we designed pan-Candida primer sets based on the ribosomal DNA-coding regions conserved within Candida but distinct from those of Aspergillus and Penicillium. We demonstrate that the final two selected pan-Candida primer sets would not amplify Aspergillus DNA and could be used to differentiate eight medically important Candida pathogens in real-time PCR assays based on their melting profiles, with a sensitivity of detection as low as 10 fg of Candida genomic DNA. Moreover, we further evaluated and selected species-specific primer sets covering Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida dubliniensis and show that they had high sensitivity and specificity. These real-time PCR primer sets could potentially be assembled into a single PCR array for the rapid detection of Candida species in various clinical settings, such as corneal transplantation. PMID:27103821

  16. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc;

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse...... is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We...... revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On...

  17. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the discrimination of Candida strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, S; Ugena, L; Tornero-Lopéz, J; Martín, H; Molina, M; Camacho, J J; Cáceres, J O

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports the evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Neural Networks (NN) for the discrimination of different strains of various species of Candida. This genus of yeast was selected due to its medical relevance as it is commonly found in cases of fungal infection in humans. Twenty one strains belonging to seven species of Candida were included in the study. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) was employed as a complementary technique to provide information about elemental composition of Candida cells. The use of LIBS spectra in combination with optimized NN models provided reliable discrimination among the distinct Candida strains with a high spectral correlation index for the samples analyzed, without any false positive or false negative. Therefore, this study indicates that LIBS-NN based methodology has the potential to be used as fast fungal identification or even diagnostic method. PMID:27216662

  18. Recurrent Candida albicans Ventriculitis Treated with Intraventricular Liposomal Amphotericin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Toprak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS infection with Candida is rare but significant because of its high morbidity and mortality. When present, it is commonly seen among immunocompromised and hospitalized patients. Herein, we describe a case of a four-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL who experienced recurrent Candida albicans meningitis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B at first attack, but 25 days after discharge he was readmitted to hospital with symptoms of meningitis. Candida albicans was grown in CFS culture again and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed ventriculitis. We administered liposomal amphotericin B both intravenously and intraventricularly and favorable result was achieved without any adverse effects. Intraventricular amphotericin B may be considered for the treatment of recurrent CNS Candida infections in addition to intravenous administration.

  19. Antifungal Activity of Local Anesthetics Against Candida Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio Gonçalves Rodrigues

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the activity of benzydamine, lidocaine, and bupivacaine, three drugs with local anesthetic activity, against Candida albicans and non-albicans strains and to clarify their mechanism of activity.

  20. Candida dubliniensis in children´s dental plaque

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, F.; Holá, V.; Kukletová, M.; Zacková, L.; Kuklová, J.; Horká, Marie

    Istanbul, 2008. s. 58. [International Congress of Mycology /12./. 05.08.2008-09.08.2008, Istanbul] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00310701 Keywords : Candida dubliniensis * dental plaque * CIEF Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  1. Activation of isoenzyme Sapp 1p from Candida parapsilosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jiří; Dlouhá, Helena; Maloň, Petr; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    Budapest : -, 2005. s. 15. [EMBO/HHMI. 07.02.2005-09.02.2005, Budapest] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * aspartic proteases * processing and self-processing Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Research Progress of Removal of Oscillatoria Tenuis by Pre-oxidation and Chemical Coagulation%预氧化与化学混凝联合去除颤藻的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李引

    2012-01-01

    It was a worldwide environment problem that the eutrophication of fresh waters became more serious.In drinking water supplies with conventional process,algae and its by-product can cause many influences of negative so that it is difficult to get rid of them.The research on the coagulation removal of Oscillatoria tenuis by pre-oxidation with Kaolin at home was summerized.Meanwhile,removal efficiency and limitation of different methods were analyzed systematically and some scientific tendencies were prospected.Issues were put forward to facilitate study and further improve and perfect the application.%日趋严重的水体富营养化早已成为全球性的环境问题,藻类及其副产物给传统除藻工艺带来了很多不利影响,增加了水处理难度。本文对国内预氧化与化学混凝联合去除颤藻的研究和应用动态进行了概括总结,并系统分析各技术去除效果、局限性,展望了颤藻去除技术发展前景。同时也提出了存在的一些问题,便于今后的研究和应用中进一步改进和完善。

  3. Antifungal activity of plant extracts against candida species from oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy five patients with oral lesions attending the different departments of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University were screened for Candida . Forty six (61.3% Candida strains were isolated from the oral lesions. Of the 46 Candida strains, Candida albicans accounted for 35 (76.08%, Candida glabrata for 5 (10.86%, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei for 2 (4.34% each and Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii for one (2.17% each. Antifungal activity of ethanol extracts of five plant species that included Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea, Odina wodier, Momordica charantia and Melia azedarach and two algal species, Sargassum wightii and Caulerpa scalpelliformis were tested against 25 isolated strains by disc diffusion method. Antifungal activity was observed at 100 mg/ml for Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea and Caulerpa scalpelliformis and at 10 mg/ml for Sargassum wightii .

  4. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2010-05-10

    Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging\\/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http:\\/\\/cgob.ucd.ie.

  5. Using routine laboratory techniques for differentiation of pathogenic Candida strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vykydalová, Marie; Horká, Marie; Růžička, F.; Kahle, Vladislav

    Toruń: Adam Marszałek, 2012 - (Węgłowska, J.). s. 380 ISBN 978-83-7780-440-7. [International Symposium on Chromatography /29./. 09.09.2012-13.02.2012, Toruń] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0182 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : Candida parasilosis * Candida metapsilosis * biofilm * SDS-PAGE Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  6. Biofilm formation among Candida albicans isolated from vagina

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Study was conducted in a rural tertiary care hospital with a purpose to demonstrate the biofilm forming abilities of C. albicans isolated from cases of vulvovaginal candidiasis and asymptomatic carriers.Material and Methods: C. albicans was isolated and identified by standard laboratory techniques. Biofilm formation in vitro was tested using the 96 well microtitre plate method with crystal violet staining.Results: Overall rate of Candida isolation in study subjects was 40%. Candida i...

  7. Candida parapsilosis meningitis associated with Gliadel (BCNU) wafer implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Deirdre

    2012-02-01

    A 58-year old male presented with meningitis associated with subgaleal and subdural collections 6 weeks following a temporal craniotomy for resection of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and Gliadel wafer implantation. Candida parapsilosis was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Gliadel wafers removed during surgical debridement. He was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Candida parapsilosis meningitis secondary to Gliadel wafer placement.

  8. Candida parapsilosis meningitis associated with Gliadel (BCNU) wafer implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'brien, Deirdre

    2010-12-15

    A 58-year old male presented with meningitis associated with subgaleal and subdural collections 6 weeks following a temporal craniotomy for resection of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and Gliadel wafer implantation. Candida parapsilosis was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Gliadel wafers removed during surgical debridement. He was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Candida parapsilosis meningitis secondary to Gliadel wafer placement.

  9. Successful management of presumed Candida endogenous endophthalmitis with oral voriconazole

    OpenAIRE

    Biju, Raju; Sushil, Daniel; Georgy, Nainan K

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous fungal endophthalmitis is most commonly caused by Candida species and usually occurs in patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency. Voriconazole, a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent, attains therapeutically significant concentrations in the vitreous cavity after systemic administration. We report, the successful management of presumed endogenous Candida endophthalmitis in a patient with multiple diseases and unstable systemic status with...

  10. Candida glabrata infection following total hip arthroplasty: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yun; Yue, Chen; Huang, Zeyu; Pei, Fuxing

    2013-01-01

    Candida glabrata infection following total hip arthroplasty is rare and, due to the insufficiency of standardized clinical and evidence-based guidelines, there is no appropriate therapeutic schedule. The present study reports the case of a 44-year-old patient with Candida glabrata infection following a total hip arthroplasty. The patient was successfully treated by administration of intravenous and oral voriconazole without removal of the prosthesis. This case illustrates the significance of ...

  11. The Detection of Candida Species in Patients with Halitosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effects of Candida on halitosis, the carrier state of Candida was examined in patients who made a visit with a chief complaint of halitosis. Methods. Subjects were 123 patients (42 males and 81 females) who visited our clinic, with a chief complaint of halitosis. Their average age was 45.8 years. To examine halitosis, an organoleptic test was conducted, and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) were measured by gas chromatography. Tongue-coating samples collected at the initial visi...

  12. Candida glabrata : a review of its features and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Célia F.; Silva, Sónia Carina; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Candida species belong to the normal microbiota of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal and vaginal tracts, and are responsible for several clinical manifestations, from mucocutaneous overgrowth to bloodstream infections. Once believed to be non-pathogenic, Candida glabrata was rapidly blamable for many human diseases. Year after year, these pathological circumstances are more recurrent and problematic to treat, especially when patients reveal any level of immunosuppression. These difficultie...

  13. Evolution of pathogenicity and sexual reproduction in eight Candida genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Geraldine; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Lin, Michael F.; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Munro, Carol A; Rheinbay, Esther; Grabherr, Manfred; Forche, Anja; Reedy, Jennifer L.; Agrafioti, Ino; Arnaud, Martha B.; Bates, Steven; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Brunke, Sascha

    2009-01-01

    Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. We report the genome sequences of six Candida species and compare these and related pathogens and nonpathogens. There are significant expansions of cell wall, secreted, and transporter gene families in pathogenic species, suggesting adaptations associated with virulence. Large genomic tracts are homozygous in three diploid species, possibly resulting from recent recombination events. Surprisingly, key compo...

  14. Fermentation of fruit juices by the osmotolerant yeast Candida magnoliae

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, Andreia Sofia Soares de

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the assessment of the fermentation conditions required to modulate the metabolic flux in the osmotolerant yeast Candida magnoliae and evaluate its potential to produce low-alcoholic and low-caloric fermented beverages. For that purpose, two strains, PYCC 2903 and PYCC 3191, were used and fermentation conditions as oxygenation, sugar concentration and the ratio of glucose to fructose were studied using synthetic culture media. Candida magnoliae PYCC 2903 was subsequently ...

  15. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known,...

  16. Three distinct secreted aspartyl proteinases in Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    White, T C; Miyasaki, S H; Agabian, N

    1993-01-01

    The secreted aspartyl proteinases of Candida albicans (products of the SAP genes) are thought to contribute to virulence through their effects on Candida adherence, invasion, and pathogenicity. From a single strain of C. albicans (WO-1) which expresses a phenotypic switching system, three secreted aspartyl proteinases have been identified as determined by molecular weight and N-terminal sequence. Each of the three identified proteins represents the mature form of one of three distinct protein...

  17. Interactions of Candida albicans with host epithelial surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    David W. Williams; Jordan, Rachael P. C.; Wei, Xiao-qing; Alves, Carlos T.; Wise, Matt P; Wilson, Melanie J.; Michael A. O. Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. The organism is however, commonly encountered as a commensal in healthy individuals where it is a component of the normal microflora. The key determinant in the type of relationship that Candida has with its host is how it interacts with the epithelial surface it colonises. A delicate balance clearly exis...

  18. Characterization of Candida isolates from pediatric burn patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Neely, A N; Odds, F.C.; Basatia, B K; Holder, I A

    1988-01-01

    To provide more detailed information about Candida epidemiology and pathogenesis in pediatric burn patients, Candida isolates from 113 patients collected over 3 years were identified at the species level and the serotypes and biotypes of the C. albicans isolates were determined. A total of 85% of the patients were colonized or infected by C. albicans, 18% by C. tropicalis, and 11% by C. parapsilosis. Although colonization or infection often was found at multiple sites and times, 87% of the pa...

  19. The importance of genus Candida in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojić-Miličević Gordana M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiology is a rapidly changing field. As new researches and experiences broaden our knowledge, changes in the approach to diagnosis and therapy have become necessary and appropriate. Recommended dosage of drugs, method and duration of administration, as well as contraindications to use, evolve over time all drugs. Over the last 2 decades, Candida species have emerged as causes of substantial morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. Isolation of Candida from blood or other sterile sites, excluding the urinary tract, defines invasive candidiasis. Candida species are currently the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infections (that is, candidemia in U.S. hospitals and occur primarily in the intensive care unit (ICU, where candidemia is recognized in up to 1% of patients and where deep-seated Candida infections are recognized in an additional 1 to 2% of patients. Despite the introduction of newer anti-Candida agents, invasive candidiasis continues to have an attributable mortality rate of 40 to 49%; excess ICU and hospital stays of 12.7 days and 15.5 days, respectively, and increased care costs. Postmortem studies suggest that death rates related to invasive candidiasis might, in fact, be higher than those described because of undiagnosed and therefore untreated infection. The diagnosis of invasive candidiasis remains challenging for both clinicians and microbiologists. Reasons for missed diagnoses include nonspecific risk factors and clinical manifestations, low sensitivity of microbiological culture techniques, and unavailability of deep tissue cultures because of risks associated with the invasive procedures used to obtain them. Thus, a substantial proportion of invasive candidiasis in patients in the ICU is assumed to be undiagnosed and untreated. Yet even when invasive candidiasis is diagnosed, culture diagnosis delays treatment for 2 to 3 days, which contributes to mortality. Interventions that do not rely on a specific

  20. Influence of probiotics on Candida presence and IgA anti-Candida in the oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Agda Lima; Antônio Olavo Cardoso JORGE; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Célia Regina Gonçalves e Silva; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as microorganisms that promote benefits to host health, mainly by regulating resident microbiota. Disequilibrium in microbiota can favor the growth of opportunist microorganisms and the development of pathologies, like candidosis caused by yeasts of the Candida genus. This work evaluated whether probiotics consumption was able to influence a specific immunological response to Candida and the presence of these yeasts in the oral cavity. Saliva samples were collected from...