WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancers molecular biology

  1. The molecular biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, J S

    2000-12-01

    identifies key genes directly involved in carcinogenesis and demonstrates how mutations in these genes allow cells to circumvent cellular controls. This detailed understanding of the process of carcinogenesis at the molecular level has only been possible because of the advent of modern molecular biology. This new discipline, by precisely identifying the molecular basis of the differences between normal and malignant cells, has created novel opportunities and provided the means to specifically target these modified genes. Whenever possible this review highlights these opportunities and the attempts being made to generate novel, molecular based therapies against cancer. Successful use of these new therapies will rely upon a detailed knowledge of the genetic defects in individual tumors. The review concludes with a discussion of how the use of high throughput molecular arrays will allow the molecular pathologist/therapist to identify these defects and direct specific therapies to specific mutations.

  2. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  3. Molecular Biology of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuanXi; JanBrabender; RalfMetzger; PaulM.Schneider

    2004-01-01

    There have been many new developments in our understanding of esophageal carcinoma biology over the past several years. Information regarding both of the major forms of this disease, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, has accumulated in conjunction with data on precursor conditions such as Barrett's esophagus. Interesting and promising findings have included overexpression of proto-oncogenes,loss of heterozygosity at multiple chromosomal loci, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic silencing by DNA methylation, and mutations and deletions involving the tumor suppressor gene p53. Important cancer pathways, the cyclin kinase inhibitor cascade and the DNA mismatch repair process, implicated in the genesis of multiple tumor types have also been inculpated in esophageal carcinogenesis. Alterations in the p16 and p15 cyclin kinase inhibitors including point mutations and homozygous deletions have been reported in primary esophageal tumors. Further developments in the field of molecular carcinogenesis of esophageal malignancies promise to yield improvements in prevention, early detection, prognostic categorization, and perhaps gene-based therapy of this deadly disease.

  4. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Zavoral; Petra Minarikova; Filip Zavada; Cyril Salek; Marek Minarik

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  5. Molecular biology of the lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The advances in molecular biology and genetics, including the modern microarray technology and rapid sequencing techniques, have enabled a remarkable progress into elucidating the lung cancer ethiopathogenesis. Numerous studies suggest that more than 20 different genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulating during the pathogenesis of clinically evident pulmonary cancers as a clonal, multistep process. Thus far, the most investigated alterations are the inactivational mutations and losses of tumour suppressor genes and the overexpression of growth-promoting oncogenes. More recently, the acquired epigenetic inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized. The early clonal genetic abnormalities that occur in preneoplastic bronchial epithelium damaged by smoking or other carcinogenes are being identified. The molecular distinctions between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as between tumors with different clinical outcomes have been described. These investigations lead to the hallmarks of lung cancer. Conclusions. It is realistic to expect that the molecular and cell culture-based investigations will lead to discoveries of new clinical applications with the potential to provide new avenues for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and most important, new more effective treatment approaches for the lung cancer patients. (author)

  6. Breast cancer. From molecular biology to personified therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko I.N.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in molecular biology had changed approaches to systemic treatment of breast cancer. Clinical decisions on the choice of optimal treatment regimens are performing on the basis of immunohistochemical and molecular genetic classifications. Their increasing uses have contributed changes of paradigm for cancer treatment - from the empirical to the individualized and personalized. The basis for such approaches is knowledge of molecular epidemiology, heterogeneity of expression of molecular subtypes, prognostic and predictive biomarkers of breast cancer. Breast cancer is a widely heterogeneous disease with 20 histological types, 8, molecular-genetic, 6 genomic subtypes, which are characterized by specific molecular and biochemical properties, different clinical course and different outcomes. Molecular genetic classification, created not on the basis of clinical, anatomical and morphological heterogeneity of tumor cells, and on the basis of their molecular-genetic heterogeneity is widely used in clinical practice. This allowed to separate the patients with breast cancer to molecular 4 subtypes - luminal A, luminal B, HER / 2 positive and triple-negative. The significant role of immunohistochemical tissue tumor markers, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER / 2-neu, Ki-67, p53 for selection the optimal treatment strategy is analyzing in this review. To increase the effectiveness of breast cancer treatment is possible, using a differentiated and personalized approach based on new molecular genetic classification of breast cancer (gene profiling or to its analogue - expression classification of breast cancer, based on the principle of diversity of immunohistochemical tumor tissue. Personification of cancer treatment involves a therapy based on the study of individual characteristics of tissue is not only the primary tumor but also its metastases. Citation: Bondarenko IN, Elhajj Mohammad H, Prokhach AV, Zavizion VF, Chebanov KO. [Breast cancer

  7. [Molecular biological predictors for kidney cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vtorushin, S V; Tarakanova, V O; Zavyalova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The paper considers the data available in the modern literature on studies of potential molecular predictors for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Investigations of cell death markers, namely; Bcl-2 as an inhibitor of apoptosis, are of interest. Its high expression correlates with a more favorable prognosis. Inactivation of Berclin 1 that is an authophagy indicator in intact tissues gives rise to t high risk for tumorigenesis. At the same time, high Beclin 1 expression in the tissue of the tumor itself results in the lower efficiency of performed chemotherapy. Excess annexin A2 in the tumor promotes the growth and invasion of cancer cells. Patients with tumor over-expression of SAM68 protein involved in cell proliferation have a lower overall survival rate. The lifespan of patients without distinct metastases survive significantly longer in the overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). High PD-L1 protein expression on the cell membrane is considered to be a potential marker of effective immunotherapy for RCC. PMID:27077146

  8. 2. Molecular Biology as a Tool in Cancer Epidemiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@There can be little doubt that we are entering a new era in our understanding of the origins of human cancer. Unfortunately from the point of view of the cancer epidemiology community, some of the more recent advances in the molecular biology of cancer (once fully assimilated) will tend to make the talk of the up-to-date cancer epidemiologist a great deal less straightforward than many of us had previously envisaged it to be, There may still be a few cancers that will prove to result from only a few distinctive types of mutation in a relatively small number of genes, but I strongly suspect that the great majority of human cancers that we wish to study will prove to have their origins in a complex set of DNA changes whose precise

  9. Current dichotomy between traditional molecular biological and omic research in cancer biology and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, William C

    2015-12-10

    There is currently a split within the cancer research community between traditional molecular biological hypothesis-driven and the more recent "omic" forms or research. While the molecular biological approach employs the tried and true single alteration-single response formulations of experimentation, the omic employs broad-based assay or sample collection approaches that generate large volumes of data. How to integrate the benefits of these two approaches in an efficient and productive fashion remains an outstanding issue. Ideally, one would merge the understandability, exactness, simplicity, and testability of the molecular biological approach, with the larger amounts of data, simultaneous consideration of multiple alterations, consideration of genes both of known interest along with the novel, cross-sample comparisons among cell lines and patient samples, and consideration of directed questions while simultaneously gaining exposure to the novel provided by the omic approach. While at the current time integration of the two disciplines remains problematic, attempts to do so are ongoing, and will be necessary for the understanding of the large cell line screens including the Developmental Therapeutics Program's NCI-60, the Broad Institute's Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Cancer Genome Project, as well as the the Cancer Genome Atlas clinical samples project. Going forward there is significant benefit to be had from the integration of the molecular biological and the omic forms or research, with the desired goal being improved translational understanding and application. PMID:26677427

  10. Book Review of "The Molecular Biology of Cancer" by Stella Pelengaris, Michael Khan (Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Christian

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here, a review of "The Molecular Biology of Cancer" (Stella Pelengaris and Michael Khan [Editors] is given. The detailed description of the book is provided here: Pelengaris S, Khan M (Eds: The Molecular Biology of Cancer; Blackwell Publishing, Oxford (U.K.; 2006. 531 pages, 214 illustrations, ISBN 9-78140-511-814-9, £31.99.

  11. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George H Sakorafas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular biology in patients with pancreatic cancer were retrieved from PubMed. These reports were selected on the basis of their clinical relevance, and the data of their publication (preferentially within the last 5 years. Emphasis was placed on reports investigating diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Results Molecular biology can be used to identify individuals at high-risk for pancreatic cancer development. Intensive surveillance is indicated in these patients to detect pancreatic neoplasia ideally at a preinvasive stage, when curative resection is still possible. Molecular biology can also be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, with molecular analysis on samples of biologic material, such as serum or plasma, duodenal fluid or preferentially pure pancreatic juice, pancreatic cells or tissue, and stools. Molecular indices have also prognostic significance. Finally, molecular biology may have therapeutic implications by using various therapeutic approaches, such as antiangiogenic factors, purine synthesis inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, factors modulating tumor-stroma interaction, inactivation of the hedgehog pathway, gene therapy, oncolytic viral therapy, immunotherapy (both passive as well as active etc. Conclusion Molecular biology may have important clinical implications in patients with pancreatic cancer and represents one of the most active areas on cancer research. Hopefully clinical applications of molecular biology

  12. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Sakorafas, George H; Vasileios Smyrniotis

    2012-01-01

    Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular bio...

  13. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Jan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Donati, Olivio F. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. (orig.)

  14. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis Molecular expression of vascular markers by aggressive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During embryogenesis, the formation of primary vascular networks occurs via the processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In uveal melanoma, vasculogenic mimicry describes the 'embryonic-like' ability of aggressive, but not nonaggressive, tumor cells to form networks surrounding spheroids of tumor cells in three-dimensional culture; these recapitulate the patterned networks seen in patients' aggressive tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. The molecular profile of these aggressive tumor cells suggests that they have a deregulated genotype, capable of expressing vascular phenotypes. Similarly, the embryonic-like phenotype expressed by the aggressive human breast cancer cells is associated with their ability to express a variety of vascular markers. These studies may offer new insights for consideration in breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutic intervention strategies

  15. Molecular biology and riddle of cancer: the ‘Tom & Jerry’ show

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Al Mamun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available From the conventional Bird’s eye, cancer initiation and metastasis are generally intended to be understood beneath the light of classical clonal genetic, epigenetic and cancer stem cell model. But inspite decades of investigation, molecular biology has shown hard success to give Eagle’s eye in unraveling the riddle of cancer. And it seems, tiring Tom runs in vague behind naughty Jerry.

  16. Correlative Study on MRI Morphologic Features,Pathology, and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Chen; Shuigen Gong; Weiguo Zhang; Jinhua Chen; Shuangwu He; Baohua Liu; Zengpeng Li

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the correlation among MRI morphologic features,pathology, and molecular biology of breast cancer.METHORDS MRI was used to analyze the morphologic features of breast cancers of 78 patients before operation. The mastectomy specimens of the breast neoplasms were immunohistochemically stained, and the expression of the estrogen (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), C-erbB-2, P53, and the distribution of microvessel density (MVD) measured. The pathologic results were compared with the MRI features.RESULTS Among the 80 breast cancers, ER positive expression was positively correlated with the spicular contour of breast cancers (P<0.01),while showing a significant inverse correlation with the T-stage (P<0.05). CerbB-2 and P53 positive expression were positively correlated with the necrotic center of the cancers (P<0.05). The expression of PR was not significantly correlated with the spicular contour, obscure margin, necrotic center, and T-stage of these cancers (P>0.05). Among 41 breast cancers examined with dynamic contrast enhanced MR, there was a positive correlation between the spatial distribution of the contrast agent and MVD(P<0.01).CONCLUSION To a certain extent there is some correlation among the MRI morphologic features, pathology, and molecular biological factors in breast cancer. The biological behavior and prognosis of breast cancer can be assessed based on MRI features.

  17. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  18. Procathepsin D and cancer: From molecular biology to clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vashishta, Aruna; Saraswat-Ohri, Sujata; Vetvickova, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Procathepsin D (pCD) is overexpressed and secreted by cells of various tumor types including breast and lung carcinomas. pCD affects multiple features of tumor cells including proliferation, invasion, metastases and apoptosis. Several laboratories have previously shown that the mitogenic effect of pCD on cancer cells is mediated via its propeptide part (APpCD). However, the exact mechanism of how pCD affects cancer cells has not been identified. Recent observations have also revealed the poss...

  19. The molecular biology of cancer and its diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, S E

    1981-07-01

    The origin of cancer is discussed from the view of the two-stage model of malignant transformation. Environmental carcinogens play an integral part in the process. When the cell is transformed, cell surface changes are found for such components as fibronectin, collagen, actin, myosin, glycopeptides and enzyme activities. Hormone receptors are a fruitful line for research. Both qualitative and quantitative alterations are also seen with cancer cell enzymes. Among enzymes that can be used as markers of malignancy are the protease. A group of oncodevelopmental proteins, hormonal and non-hormonal, are in regular service for the management of cancer. Improvements in diagnostic specificity can be expected as the newer technologies are harnessed for medical use.

  20. Biologia molecular do câncer cervical Molecular biology of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Augusto Rivoire

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A carcinogênese é um processo de múltiplas etapas. Alterações no equilíbrio citogenético ocorrem na transformação do epitélio normal a câncer cervical. Numerosos estudos apoiam a hipótese de que a infecção por HPV está associada com o desenvolvimento de alterações malignas e pré-malignas do trato genital inferior. Neste trabalho são apresentadas as bases para a compreensão da oncogênese cervical. O ciclo celular é controlado por proto-oncogenes e genes supressores. Quando ocorrem mutações, proto-oncogenes tornam-se oncogenes, que são carcinogênicos e causam multiplicação celular excessiva. A perda da ação de genes supressores funcionais pode levar a célula ao crescimento inadequado. O ciclo celular também pode ser alterado pela ação de vírus, entre eles o HPV (Human Papiloma Virus, de especial interesse na oncogênese cervical. Os tipos de HPV 16 e 18 são os de maior interesse, freqüentemente associados a câncer cervical e anal. O conhecimento das bases moleculares que estão envolvidas na oncogênese cervical tem sido possível devido a utilização de técnicas avançadas de biologia molecular. A associação destas técnicas aos métodos diagnósticos clássicos, poderão levar a uma melhor avaliação das neoplasias cervicais e auxiliar no desenvolvimento de novas terapias, talvez menos invasivas e mais efetivas.Carcinogenesis involves several steps. Disorders of the cytogenetic balance occur during the evolution from normal epithelium to cervical cancer. Several studies support the hypothesis that the Human Papiloma Virus (HPV infection is associated to development of premalignant and malignant lesions of cervical cancer. In this review we show the basis to understand cervical oncogenesis. The cell cycle is controlled by protooncogenes and supressive genes. This orchestrated cell cycle can be affected by virus such as HPV. Of special interest in the cervical carcinogenesis are the HPV subtypes 16 and 18

  1. Molecular subtype analysis determines the association of advanced breast cancer in Egypt with favorable biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DuQuette Rachelle A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic markers and molecular breast cancer subtypes reflect underlying biological tumor behavior and are important for patient management. Compared to Western countries, women in North Africa are less likely to be prognosticated and treated based on well-characterized markers such as the estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and Her2. We conducted this study to determine the prevalence of breast cancer molecular subtypes in the North African country of Egypt as a measure of underlying biological characteristics driving tumor manifestations. Methods To determine molecular subtypes we characterized over 200 tumor specimens obtained from Egypt by performing ER, PR, Her2, CK5/6, EGFR and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Results Our study demonstrated that the Luminal A subtype, associated with favorable prognosis, was found in nearly 45% of cases examined. However, the basal-like subtype, associated with poor prognosis, was found in 11% of cases. These findings are in sharp contrast to other parts of Africa in which the basal-like subtype is over-represented. Conclusions Egyptians appear to have favorable underlying biology, albeit having advanced disease at diagnosis. These data suggest that Egyptians would largely profit from early detection of their disease. Intervention at the public health level, including education on the benefits of early detection is necessary and would likely have tremendous impact on breast cancer outcome in Egypt.

  2. 59. Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology: Molecular genetics of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Investigation of the mechanistic aspects of cancer has its roots in the studies on tumor viruses and their effects on cell proliferation, function, and growth. This outstanding progress was well documented in previous Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. In the early to mid 1980s, progress on the development of chromosome mapping strategies and the accumulation of DNA probes that identified polymorphisms, encouraged by the international Human Genome Project, enabled the identification of other genes that contributed to familial inheritance of high susceptibility to specific cancers. This approach was very successful and led to a degree of optimism that one aspect of cancer, the multistep genetic process from early neoplasia to metastatic tumors, was beginning to be understood. It therefore seemed appropriate that the 59th Symposium on Quantitative Biology focus attention on the Molecular Genetics of Cancer. The concept was to combine the exciting progress on the identification of new genetic alterations in human tumor cells with studies on the function of the cancer gene products and how they go awry in tumor cells.

  3. Molecular biology of cancer-associated fibroblasts: can these cells be targeted in anti-cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Tamas A; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Timothy C; Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the non-neoplastic stromal compartment in most solid cancers plays an active role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the most abundant cell types in the tumor stroma, and these cells are pro-tumorigenic. Evidence that CAFs are epigenetically and possibly also genetically distinct from normal fibroblasts is beginning to define these cells as potential targets of anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the cell-of-origin and molecular biology of CAFs, arguing that such knowledge provides a rational basis for designing therapeutic strategies to coordinately and synergistically target both the stromal and malignant epithelial component of human cancers.

  4. Special conference of the American Association for Cancer Research on molecular imaging in cancer: linking biology, function, and clinical applications in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D

    2002-04-01

    The AACR Special Conference on Molecular Imaging in Cancer: Linking Biology, Function, and Clinical Applications In Vivo, was held January 23-27, 2002, at the Contemporary Hotel, Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL. Co-Chairs David Piwnica-Worms, Patricia Price and Thomas Meade brought together researchers with diverse expertise in molecular biology, gene therapy, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology, and imaging to accelerate progress in developing and applying technologies for imaging specific cellular and molecular signals in living animals and humans. The format of the conference was the presentation of research that focused on basic and translational biology of cancer and current state-of-the-art techniques for molecular imaging in animal models and humans. This report summarizes the special conference on molecular imaging, highlighting the interfaces of molecular biology with animal models, instrumentation, chemistry, and pharmacology that are essential to convert the dreams and promise of molecular imaging into improved understanding, diagnosis, and management of cancer.

  5. KRAS and BRAF Mutation Detection: Is Immunohistochemistry a Possible Alternative to Molecular Biology in Colorectal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Piton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KRAS genotyping is mandatory in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment prior to undertaking antiepidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR monoclonal antibody therapy. BRAF V600E mutation is often present in colorectal carcinoma with CpG island methylator phenotype and microsatellite instability. Currently, KRAS and BRAF evaluation is based on molecular biology techniques such as SNaPshot or Sanger sequencing. As molecular testing is performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples, immunodetection would appear to be an attractive alternative for detecting mutations. Thus, our objective was to assess the validity of KRAS and BRAF immunodetection of mutations compared with the genotyping reference method in colorectal adenocarcinoma. KRAS and BRAF genotyping was assessed by SNaPshot. A rabbit anti-human KRAS polyclonal antibody was tested on 33 FFPE colorectal tumor samples with known KRAS status. Additionally, a mouse anti-human BRAF monoclonal antibody was tested on 30 FFPE tumor samples with known BRAF status. KRAS immunostaining demonstrated both poor sensitivity (27% and specificity (64% in detecting KRAS mutation. Conversely, BRAF immunohistochemistry showed perfect sensitivity (100% and specificity (100% in detecting V600E mutation. Although molecular biology remains the reference method for detecting KRAS mutation, immunohistochemistry could be an attractive method for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer.

  6. KRAS and BRAF Mutation Detection: Is Immunohistochemistry a Possible Alternative to Molecular Biology in Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Nicolas; Borrini, Francesco; Bolognese, Antonio; Lamy, Aude; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    KRAS genotyping is mandatory in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment prior to undertaking antiepidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody therapy. BRAF V600E mutation is often present in colorectal carcinoma with CpG island methylator phenotype and microsatellite instability. Currently, KRAS and BRAF evaluation is based on molecular biology techniques such as SNaPshot or Sanger sequencing. As molecular testing is performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, immunodetection would appear to be an attractive alternative for detecting mutations. Thus, our objective was to assess the validity of KRAS and BRAF immunodetection of mutations compared with the genotyping reference method in colorectal adenocarcinoma. KRAS and BRAF genotyping was assessed by SNaPshot. A rabbit anti-human KRAS polyclonal antibody was tested on 33 FFPE colorectal tumor samples with known KRAS status. Additionally, a mouse anti-human BRAF monoclonal antibody was tested on 30 FFPE tumor samples with known BRAF status. KRAS immunostaining demonstrated both poor sensitivity (27%) and specificity (64%) in detecting KRAS mutation. Conversely, BRAF immunohistochemistry showed perfect sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) in detecting V600E mutation. Although molecular biology remains the reference method for detecting KRAS mutation, immunohistochemistry could be an attractive method for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer.

  7. [Systems biology of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillot, Emmanuel; Calzone, Laurence; Zinovyev, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    Cancer Systems Biology is now accepted and recognized as a promising field both in biological and clinical research. It relies on a rigorous formalization of regulation networks into precise and unambiguous languages. It provides both detailed and modular views of the complex biological system of interest (which in cancer research is typically an interaction network governing essential cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation, cell death...) in order to facilitate the interpretation of molecular profiles of tumors. The translation of these networks into mathematical models allows prediction of the evolution of the system in time and under certain perturbations. As a result, it can not only propose specific target points for pharmaceutical purposes, but also anticipate the evolution of tumors as well as their classifications. These characteristics emphasize the important role of Systems Biology of Cancer in the future of biomedical research.

  8. Molecular Biological Study of Anti-cancer Effects of Bee Venom Aqua-acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chan-Yol

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available To study anti-cancer effect and molecular biological mechanism of bee venom for aqua-acupuncture, the effects of bee venom on cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed using MTT assay, tryphan blue assay, [3H]thymidine release assay, flow cytometric analysis, and activity of caspase-3 protease activity assay. To explore whether anti-cancer effects of bee venom are associated with the transcriptional control of gene expression, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of apoptosis-related genes was performed. The obtained results are summarized as follows: 1. The MTT assay demonstrated that cell viability was decreased by bee venom in a dose-dependant manner. 2. Significant induction of apoptosis was identified using tryphan blue assay, [3H]thymidine release assay, and flow cytometric analysis of sub G1 fraction. 3. In analysis of caspase-3 protease activity, the activity had increased significantly, in a dose-dependant manner. 4. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the apoptosis-related genes showed that Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL were down-regulated whereas Bax was up-regulated by bee venom treatment.

  9. Glycobiology Current Molecular Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Sabire KARAÇALI

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate chemistry evolved into carbohydrate biochemistry and gradually into the biology of carbohydrates, or glycobiology, at the end of the last century. Glycobiology is the new research area of modern molecular biology, and it investigates the structure, biosynthesis and biological functions of glycans. The numbers, linkage types (a or b), positions, binding points and functional group differences of monosaccharides create microheterogeneity. Thus, numerous glycoforms with precise stru...

  10. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis: Clinical implications of experimental studies on metastatic inefficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent technological advances have led to an increasing ability to detect isolated tumour cells and groups of tumour cells in patients' blood, lymph nodes or bone marrow. However, the clinical significance of these cells is unclear. Should they be considered as evidence of metastasis, necessitating aggressive treatment, or are they in some cases unrelated to clinical outcome? Quantitative experimental studies on the basic biology of metastatic inefficiency are providing clues that may help in understanding the significance of these cells. This understanding will be of use in guiding clinical studies to assess the significance of isolated tumour cells and micrometastases in cancer patients

  11. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeben, Bianca A. W.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], e-mail: b.hoeben@rther.umcn.nl; Oyen, Wim J. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G. C. [Maastro Clinic, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer 18F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  12. A Molecular Biology Database Digest

    OpenAIRE

    Bry, François; Kröger, Peer

    2000-01-01

    Computational Biology or Bioinformatics has been defined as the application of mathematical and Computer Science methods to solving problems in Molecular Biology that require large scale data, computation, and analysis [18]. As expected, Molecular Biology databases play an essential role in Computational Biology research and development. This paper introduces into current Molecular Biology databases, stressing data modeling, data acquisition, data retrieval, and the integration...

  13. Descriptive Epidemiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics of Hereditary Prostate Cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Diem Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer.......A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer....

  14. B-Raf mutation: a key player in molecular biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M A; Salajegheh, A; Smith, R A; Lam, A K-Y

    2013-12-01

    B-Raf is one of the more commonly mutated proto-oncogenes implicated in the development of cancers. In this review, we consider the mechanisms and clinical impacts of B-Raf mutations in cancer and discuss the implications for the patient in melanoma, thyroid cancer and colorectal cancer, where B-Raf mutations are particularly common.

  15. Targeted Therapy Database (TTD: a model to match patient's molecular profile with current knowledge on cancer biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mocellin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The efficacy of current anticancer treatments is far from satisfactory and many patients still die of their disease. A general agreement exists on the urgency of developing molecularly targeted therapies, although their implementation in the clinical setting is in its infancy. In fact, despite the wealth of preclinical studies addressing these issues, the difficulty of testing each targeted therapy hypothesis in the clinical arena represents an intrinsic obstacle. As a consequence, we are witnessing a paradoxical situation where most hypotheses about the molecular and cellular biology of cancer remain clinically untested and therefore do not translate into a therapeutic benefit for patients. OBJECTIVE: To present a computational method aimed to comprehensively exploit the scientific knowledge in order to foster the development of personalized cancer treatment by matching the patient's molecular profile with the available evidence on targeted therapy. METHODS: To this aim we focused on melanoma, an increasingly diagnosed malignancy for which the need for novel therapeutic approaches is paradigmatic since no effective treatment is available in the advanced setting. Relevant data were manually extracted from peer-reviewed full-text original articles describing any type of anti-melanoma targeted therapy tested in any type of experimental or clinical model. To this purpose, Medline, Embase, Cancerlit and the Cochrane databases were searched. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We created a manually annotated database (Targeted Therapy Database, TTD where the relevant data are gathered in a formal representation that can be computationally analyzed. Dedicated algorithms were set up for the identification of the prevalent therapeutic hypotheses based on the available evidence and for ranking treatments based on the molecular profile of individual patients. In this essay we describe the principles and computational algorithms of an original method

  16. Topology in Molecular Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Monastyrsky, Michail Ilych

    2007-01-01

    The book presents a class of new results in molecular biology for which topological methods and ideas are important. These include: the large-scale conformation properties of DNA; computational methods (Monte Carlo) allowing the simulation of large-scale properties of DNA; the tangle model of DNA recombination and other applications of Knot theory; dynamics of supercoiled DNA and biocatalitic properties of DNA; the structure of proteins; and other very recent problems in molecular biology. The text also provides a short course of modern topology intended for the broad audience of biologists and physicists. The authors are renowned specialists in their fields and some of the new results presented here are documented for the first time in monographic form.

  17. Distant metastasis from oral cancer: A review and molecular biologic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been estimated to be the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The distant metastasis plays a critical role in the management and prognosis in oral cancer patients. Regarding the distant metastasis from the oral cancer, the hypopharynx is the most common primary site, followed by the base of tongue and anterior tongue. The present review article analyzes the characteristics of the distant metastases from the oral cavity from 1937 to 2015. PMID:27583211

  18. Distant metastasis from oral cancer: A review and molecular biologic aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been estimated to be the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The distant metastasis plays a critical role in the management and prognosis in oral cancer patients. Regarding the distant metastasis from the oral cancer, the hypopharynx is the most common primary site, followed by the base of tongue and anterior tongue. The present review article analyzes the characteristics of the distant metastases from the oral cavity from 1937 to 2015.

  19. Evolutionary biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard; Summers, Kyle

    2005-10-01

    Cancer is driven by the somatic evolution of cell lineages that have escaped controls on replication and by the population-level evolution of genes that influence cancer risk. We describe here how recent evolutionary ecological studies have elucidated the roles of predation by the immune system and competition among normal and cancerous cells in the somatic evolution of cancer. Recent analyses of the evolution of cancer at the population level show how rapid changes in human environments have augmented cancer risk, how strong selection has frequently led to increased cancer risk as a byproduct, and how anticancer selection has led to tumor-suppression systems, tissue designs that slow somatic evolution, constraints on morphological evolution and even senescence itself. We discuss how applications of the tools of ecology and evolutionary biology are poised to revolutionize our understanding and treatment of this disease.

  20. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis: Genetic regulation of human breast carcinoma metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present is an overview of recent data that describes the genetic underpinnings of the suppression of cancer metastasis. Despite the explosion of new information about the genetics of cancer, only six human genes have thus far been shown to suppress metastasis functionally. Not all have been shown to be functional in breast carcinoma. Several additional genes inhibit various steps of the metastatic cascade, but do not necessarily block metastasis when tested using in vivo assays. The implications of this are discussed. Two recently discovered metastasis suppressor genes block proliferation of tumor cells at a secondary site, offering a new target for therapeutic intervention

  1. Biologia molecular do câncer colorretal: uma revolução silenciosa em andamento Molecular biology of colorectal cancer: a silent revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro de Souza Leite Pinho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Embora os estudos sobre biologia molecular permaneçam como a principal expectativa para o surgimento de novos conceitos e recursos para o tratamento do câncer colorretal, a ausência de resultados de real impacto do ponto de vista clínico ao longo dos últimos anos podem representar uma frustração para quem não esteja acompanhando de perto a evolução das pesquisas nesta área. Assim sendo, nosso objetivo no presente texto é apresentar uma breve revisão do caminho percorrido até o momento desde os trabalhos pioneiros sobre carcinogênese colorretal até as pesquisas mais recentes sobre proteômica, demonstrando assim o constante fluxo de grandes avanços os quais possibilitam uma previsão realista a curto ou médio prazo da disponibilização de recursos de amplo impacto, com potencial para alterar de forma relevante os resultados do tratamento desta importante doença.Despite remaining as the main hope for emerging new concepts and strategies for treatment of colorectal cancer, the lack of results with clinical impact over the last years may contribute to frustrate those not entirely aware about current research data. So, the aim of this paper is to present a brief review since the first molecular biology studies in colorectal carcinogenesis until recent advances in proteomics, in order to demonstrate the consistent production of new data supporting a realistic expectancy for a near future availability of high impact resources that may change dramatically the results of treatment of colorectal cancer.

  2. Molecular control of the cell cycle in cancer: biological and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2003-01-01

    The RB1 pathway and the p53 pathway represent important, interconnected biochemical units frequently perturbed in human cancer. Essential tumor protective mechanisms, such as cellular growth control and apoptosis, are regulated through these systems. Comprehensive studies of these pathways, inclu...... D3 is important in lymphomagenesis. However, further studies are needed to implicate cyclin D3 definitively as an oncoprotein. Our data contain several lines of evidence supporting roles of CDKN2A and MDM2 in progression of neoplastic disease. We found that loss of p16INK4A coincided...... and potentially important findings. Several of the studied cell cycle regulators carried independent prognostic value in various subsets of lymphomas. In DLCL, both p16INK4A inactivation and reduced E2F-1 expression conferred shortened survival. p53 alteration was associated with poor prognosis of both B-cell and......, especially, T-cell lymphoma. Low expression of p27, a cell cycle regulator haplo-insufficient for tumor suppression, predicted poor outcome in indolent and aggressive lymphoma, and overexpression of cyclin D3 was associated with poor prognosis in indolent lymphomas. Finally, MDM2 overexpression identified...

  3. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field.

  4. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field. PMID:27625573

  5. Molecular oncology of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soh, Junichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yamane, Masaomi; Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-08-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has made it possible to elucidate the molecular biological abnormalities in lung cancer. Mutations in KRAS and P53 genes, loss of specific alleles, and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor genes were the major abnormalities investigated between 1980 and the 2000s. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that cause oncogene addiction were discovered in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially in adenocarcinomas. Because they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), a great deal of knowledge has been acquired in regard to both EGFR and other genes in the EGFR family and their downstream genes. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC; and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers that have this translocation. These discoveries graphically illustrate that molecular biological findings are directly linked to the development of clinical oncology and to improving the survival rates of lung cancer patients. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular biological knowledge acquired thus far in regard to lung cancer, especially NSCLC, and the future possibilities. PMID:21850578

  6. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for kidney cancer Targeted therapies for kidney cancer Biologic therapy (immunotherapy) for kidney cancer Chemotherapy for kidney cancer Pain control for kidney cancer Treatment choices by stage for ...

  7. Bilingual teaching of molecular biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Recently bilingual teaching in China's universities has been widely carried out and become a popular subject for study. In this paper, the reasons for bilingual teaching of molecular biology are pointed out, the textbook of molecular biology and teaching method in bilingual teaching classes are determined after investigation and the practice of bilingually teaching molecular biology use both English and Chinese in a class. The effect has proved good. The bilingual teaching methods, the problem of bilingual teaching, the importance of understanding its significance and the possibilities of improving such teaching of the subject are also discussed.

  8. A comparative study of the biologic and molecular basis of murine mammary carcinoma: a model for human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritiated-DNA complementary to mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) RNA was synthesized in an endogeneous reaction with MMTV particles. This DNA was used as a probe via molecular hybridization to detect MMTV-specific RNA in 'spontaneous' mammary tumors of several strains of mice, including the 'nonproducer' BALB/c mammary tumors. MMTV-specific RNA was also found in certain normal tissues (spleen, kidney, and epididymis) of a high-mammary-cancer strain (GR). Aging or treatment with nonviral carcinogens also induced the appearance of MMTV-specific RNA in certain normal tissues of the low-mammary-cancer strains, C57BL and BALB/c. The relationship of the presence of MMTV-specific RNA to the etiology and pathogenesis of murine mammary neoplasia and its potential application to human breast cancer are discussed

  9. Advances in molecular biology of lung disease: aiming for precision therapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Claire; Sethi, Tariq

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related mortality in the developed world, accounting for almost one-quarter of all cancer deaths. Traditional treatment algorithms have largely relied on histologic subtype and have comprised pragmatic chemotherapy regimens with limited efficacy. However, because our understanding of the molecular basis of disease in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has improved exponentially, it has become apparent that NSCLC can be radically subdivided, or molecularly characterized, based on recurrent driver mutations occurring in specific oncogenes. We know that the presence of such mutations leads to constitutive activation of aberrant signaling proteins that initiate, progress, and sustain tumorigenesis. This persistence of the malignant phenotype is referred to as "oncogene addiction." On this basis, a paradigm shift in treatment approach has occurred. Rational, targeted therapies have been developed, the first being tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which entered the clinical arena > 10 years ago. These were tremendously successful, significantly affecting the natural history of NSCLC and improving patient outcomes. However, the benefits of these drugs are somewhat limited by the emergence of adaptive resistance mechanisms, and efforts to tackle this phenomenon are ongoing. A better understanding of all types of oncogene-driven NSCLC and the occurrence of TKI resistance will help us to further develop second- and third-generation small molecule inhibitors and will expand our range of precision therapies for this disease. PMID:26182407

  10. Molecular Biology of Medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    Current methods of diagnosis and treatment of medulloblastoma, and the influence of new biological advances in the development of more effective and less toxic therapies are reviewed by researchers at Children’s National Medical Center, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

  11. Aplicación de las técnicas de biología molecular en oncología oral Application of molecular biology techniques in oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. López-Durán

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo de revisión se propone exponer las principales técnicas de biología molecular disponibles actualmente para los investigadores, en el campo del cáncer y precáncer oral, clasificadas según el tipo de material biológico del que se disponga para iniciar la investigación. Éste puede ser ADN, ARN o proteínas. La explicación de cada técnica comprenderá una breve sistemática del proceso, así como sus ventajas, inconvenientes y estado de actividad actual. Todo ello con la finalidad de esclarecer las aplicaciones, pronto indispensables, de las técnicas más destacadas, en el diagnóstico precoz, pronóstico y tratamiento individualizado del carcinoma oral. Entre las técnicas más útiles en este proceso se encuentran: la electroforesis en gel, las técnicas de hibridación, la tecnología microarray, los biochips, la PCR convencional, la cuantitativa o la transcriptasa inversa, las técnicas de Southern, Northern y Western blot, la secuenciación de ADN, la clonación de genes, la inmunohistoquímica, el ensayo ELISA y la citometría de flujo. Destacan en particular por su gran utilidad, la tecnología microarray, los biochips y la PCR.This article summarizes the main techniques in the area of molecular biology that are available for the investigation of oral cancer and precancer. They have been classified depending on the biological material we expect to analyze, which can be DNA, RNA or proteins. The explanation for each technique includes a brief description of its basics, as well as some advantages, drawbacks and current use of the technique. Our aim is to throw light on the applications of these techniques, soon indispensable for most studies, in the early diagnosis, prognosis and individualized treatment of oral carcinoma. The most useful techniques for this objective are nowadays: gel electrophoresis, hybridation, microarray technology, biochips, PCR (conventional, quantitative or reverse transcriptase, Southern

  12. Molecular biology of hearing [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diensthuber, Marc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] The inner ear is our most sensitive sensory organ and can be subdivided into three functional units: organ of Corti, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. The appropriate stimulus for the organ of hearing is sound, which travels through the external auditory canal to the middle ear where it is transmitted to the inner ear. The inner ear houses the hair cells, the sensory cells of hearing. The inner hair cells are capable of mechanotransduction, the transformation of mechanical force into an electrical signal, which is the basic principle of hearing. The stria vascularis generates the endocochlear potential and maintains the ionic homeostasis of the endolymph. The dendrites of the spiral ganglion form synaptic contacts with the hair cells. The spiral ganglion is composed of neurons that transmit the electrical signals from the cochlea to the central nervous system. In recent years there has been significant progress in research on the molecular basis of hearing. An increasing number of genes and proteins related to hearing are being identified and characterized. The growing knowledge of these genes contributes not only to greater appreciation of the mechanism of hearing but also to a deeper understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary hearing loss. This basic research is a prerequisite for the development of molecular diagnostics and novel therapies for hearing loss.

  13. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies.

  14. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. PMID:26861606

  15. [Knowledgebases in postgenomic molecular biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitsa, A V; Shilov, B V; Evdokimov, P A; Gusev, S A

    2010-01-01

    Knowledgebases can become an effective tool essentially raising quality of information retrieval in molecular biology, promoting the development of new methods of education and forecasting of the biomedical R&D. Knowledge-based technologies should induce "paradigm shift" in the life science due to integrative focusing of research groups towards the challenges of postgenomic era. This paper debates concept of the knowledgebase, which exploits web usage mining to personalize the access of molecular biologist to the Internet resources. PMID:21328913

  16. [Biology of cancer metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    Metastatic dissemination represents the true cause of the malignant character of cancers. Its targeting is much more difficult than that of cell proliferation, because metastasis, like angiogenesis, involves a number of complex interactions between tumour and stroma; the contribution of adhesion and motility pathways is added to that of proliferation and survival pathways. Long distance extension, discontinuous in respect to the primitive tumour, is a major feature of cancer and the main cause of patients' death. Cancer cells use two main dissemination pathways: the lymphatic pathway, leading to the invasion of the lymph nodes draining the organs where the tumour evolves; and the blood pathway, leading to the invasion of distant organs such as liver, brain, bone or lung. Metastasis is inscribed within the properties of the primitive tumour, as shown by the comparative molecular analysis of the primitive tumour and its own metastases: their similarity is always more important than what could be expected from the general activation of "metastasis genes" or the inhibition of "metastasis suppressor genes". Among the signalling pathways involved in metastasis, one can mention the integrin pathway, the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, the chemokine pathway, the dependence receptor pathway and many others. These pathways allow the possibility of therapeutic targeting, thanks to therapeutic antibodies or small molecules inhibiting the kinases involved in these signalling pathways, but not a single properly anti-metastatic drug has yet been proposed: the complexity and the diversity of the processes allowing metastasis emergence, as well as the fact that the activation mechanisms are more often epigenetic than genetic and are generally physiological processes misled by the malignant cell, render especially difficult the therapeutic approach of metastasis.

  17. Prostate cancer stem cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Zhi; Jiang, Yuan; Keller, Evan T.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides insights into pathophysiology of cancers and their therapeutic response. The CSC model has been both controversial, yet provides a foundation to explore cancer biology. In this review, we provide an overview of CSC concepts, biology and potential therapeutic avenues. We then focus on prostate CSC including (1) their purported origin as either basal-derived or luminal-derived cells; (2) markers used for prostate CSC identification; (3) alterations of s...

  18. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  19. Molecular biology from bench-to-bedside - which colorectal cancer patients should be referred for genetic counselling and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Dysager, Lars; Lindebjerg, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is associated with deficiency of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. However, most MLH1 deficient tumours are sporadic in origin, and they can be identified if harbouring a BRAF V600E mutation or hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. The aim of this study...... was to validate our previously suggested clinically applicable strategy based on molecular characteristics for identifying which patients to refer for genetic counselling. The strategy was validated in an unselected cohort of 287 colorectal cancer patients. All tumours were tested for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6...... protein expression with immunohistochemistry. DNA from MLH1 negative tumours was sequenced for BRAF mutations. If BRAF was wild-type, MLH1 promoter was subsequently analyzed for promoter hypermethylation. Most tumours, 251 (88%), stained positive for all four proteins. Six (2%) had negative MSH2 and one...

  20. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Lange

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models.

  1. Molecular Processes in Biological Thermosensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Digel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since thermal gradients are almost everywhere, thermosensation could represent one of the oldest sensory transduction processes that evolved in organisms. There are many examples of temperature changes affecting the physiology of living cells. Almost all classes of biological macromolecules in a cell (nucleic acids, lipids, proteins can present a target of the temperature-related stimuli. This review discusses some features of different classes of temperature-sensing molecules as well as molecular and biological processes that involve thermosensation. Biochemical, structural, and thermodynamic approaches are applied in the paper to organize the existing knowledge on molecular mechanisms of thermosensation. Special attention is paid to the fact that thermosensitive function cannot be assigned to any particular functional group or spatial structure but is rather of universal nature. For instance, the complex of thermodynamic, structural, and functional features of hemoglobin family proteins suggests their possible accessory role as “molecular thermometers”.

  2. Molecular biology of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Alberts, Bruce; Lewis, Julian

    2000-01-01

    Molecular Biology of the Cell is the classic in-dept text reference in cell biology. By extracting the fundamental concepts from this enormous and ever-growing field, the authors tell the story of cell biology, and create a coherent framework through which non-expert readers may approach the subject. Written in clear and concise language, and beautifully illustrated, the book is enjoyable to read, and it provides a clear sense of the excitement of modern biology. Molecular Biology of the Cell sets forth the current understanding of cell biology (completely updated as of Autumn 2001), and it explores the intriguing implications and possibilities of the great deal that remains unknown. The hallmark features of previous editions continue in the Fourth Edition. The book is designed with a clean and open, single-column layout. The art program maintains a completely consistent format and style, and includes over 1,600 photographs, electron micrographs, and original drawings by the authors. Clear and concise concept...

  3. Review of "Cancer Nanotechnology: Methods and Protocols (Methods in Molecular Biology" by Stephen R. Grobmyer (Editor, Brij M. Moudgil (Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmetz Nicole F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer remains one of the leading causes of death. Research and resulting technologies have contributed to rising numbers of cancer survivors. Cancer nanotechnology is a novel and burgeoning field with the promise to open the door for the development of improved cancer therapies and detection methods. Cancer nanotechnology has the potential to become clinical reality.

  4. Measurement Frontiers in Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laderman, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    Developments of molecular measurements and manipulations have long enabled forefront research in evolution, genetics, biological development and its dysfunction, and the impact of external factors on the behavior of cells. Measurement remains at the heart of exciting and challenging basic and applied problems in molecular and cell biology. Methods to precisely determine the identity and abundance of particular molecules amongst a complex mixture of similar and dissimilar types require the successful design and integration of multiple steps involving biochemical manipulations, separations, physical probing, and data processing. Accordingly, today's most powerful methods for characterizing life at the molecular level depend on coordinated advances in applied physics, biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, and engineering. This is well illustrated by recent approaches to the measurement of DNA, RNA, proteins, and intact cells. Such successes underlie well founded visions of how molecular biology can further assist in answering compelling scientific questions and in enabling the development of remarkable advances in human health. These visions, in turn, are motivating the interdisciplinary creation of even more comprehensive measurements. As a further and closely related consequence, they are motivating innovations in the conceptual and practical approaches to organizing and visualizing large, complex sets of interrelated experimental results and distilling from those data compelling, informative conclusions.

  5. Marine molecular biology: An emerging field of biological sciences

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thakur, N.L.; Jain, R.; Natalio, F.; Hamer, B.; Thakur, A.N.; Muller, W.E.G.

    the sustainable exploration of marine life for human health and welfare, through the cooperation between scientists working in marine biology, molecular biology, microbiology and chemistry disciplines. Several success stories of the applications of molecular...

  6. Molecular markers′ progress of breast cancer treatment efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Wang; Jingwei Xu; Guang Shi; Guanghao Yin

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a famous malignant tumor which is caused by varieties of mutation in multiple genes. In order to detect breast cancer in an earlier time and take appropriate treatment which includes  predicting treatment efficacy, we need a more accurate method of discovering the occurrence of breast cancer. With the development of molecular biology and biological detection technologies continue to emerge, molecular markers of breast cancer have gaining more and more widespread attention, an...

  7. Advanced computational biology methods identify molecular switches for malignancy in an EGF mouse model of liver cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Stegmaier

    Full Text Available The molecular causes by which the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase induces malignant transformation are largely unknown. To better understand EGFs' transforming capacity whole genome scans were applied to a transgenic mouse model of liver cancer and subjected to advanced methods of computational analysis to construct de novo gene regulatory networks based on a combination of sequence analysis and entrained graph-topological algorithms. Here we identified transcription factors, processes, key nodes and molecules to connect as yet unknown interacting partners at the level of protein-DNA interaction. Many of those could be confirmed by electromobility band shift assay at recognition sites of gene specific promoters and by western blotting of nuclear proteins. A novel cellular regulatory circuitry could therefore be proposed that connects cell cycle regulated genes with components of the EGF signaling pathway. Promoter analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested the majority of regulated transcription factors to display specificity to either the pre-tumor or the tumor state. Subsequent search for signal transduction key nodes upstream of the identified transcription factors and their targets suggested the insulin-like growth factor pathway to render the tumor cells independent of EGF receptor activity. Notably, expression of IGF2 in addition to many components of this pathway was highly upregulated in tumors. Together, we propose a switch in autocrine signaling to foster tumor growth that was initially triggered by EGF and demonstrate the knowledge gain form promoter analysis combined with upstream key node identification.

  8. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research.

  9. CPFP Summer Curriculum: Molecular Prevention Course | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) one-week course on molecular aspects of cancer prevention follows the Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course. It provides a strong background about molecular biology and genetics of cancer, and an overview of cutting-edge research and techniques in the fields of molecular epidemiology, biomarkers, multi-omic, and translational research. The following topics will be typically presented: |

  10. Biological heterogeneity of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Isaiah J. Fidler

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in diagnosis, surgical techniques, and advancements in general patient care, the majority of deaths from cancer are caused by the continuous growth of metastases that are resistant to conventional therapies. In a large number of cancer patients, metastasis may well have occurred by the time of diagnosis. The metastases can be located in different distant organs and in different regions within a single organ. The major obstacle for the eradication of metastases...

  11. Structural Biology and Molecular Applications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research and development in this area focuses on enabling technologies, models, and methodologies to support basic and applied cancer research.

  12. The molecular biology of ilarviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Herranz, Mari C; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesus A; Scott, Simon W

    2013-01-01

    Ilarviruses were among the first 16 groups of plant viruses approved by ICTV. Like Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), bromoviruses, and cucumoviruses they are isometric viruses and possess a single-stranded, tripartite RNA genome. However, unlike these other three groups, ilarviruses were recognized as being recalcitrant subjects for research (their ready lability is reflected in the sigla used to create the group name) and were renowned as unpromising subjects for the production of antisera. However, it was recognized that they shared properties with AMV when the phenomenon of genome activation, in which the coat protein (CP) of the virus is required to be present to initiate infection, was demonstrated to cross group boundaries. The CP of AMV could activate the genome of an ilarvirus and vice versa. Development of the molecular information for ilarviruses lagged behind the knowledge available for the more extensively studied AMV, bromoviruses, and cucumoviruses. In the past 20 years, genomic data for most known ilarviruses have been developed facilitating their detection and allowing the factors involved in the molecular biology of the genus to be investigated. Much information has been obtained using Prunus necrotic ringspot virus and the more extensively studied AMV. A relationship between some ilarviruses and the cucumoviruses has been defined with the recognition that members of both genera encode a 2b protein involved in RNA silencing and long distance viral movement. Here, we present a review of the current knowledge of both the taxonomy and the molecular biology of this genus of agronomically and horticulturally important viruses. PMID:23809923

  13. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of /ital Homo sapiens/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is the second part of a collection of papers submitted by the participants to the 1986 Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitled Molecular Biology of /ital Homo sapiens/. The 49 papers included in this volume are grouped by subject into receptors, human cancer genes, and gene therapy. (DT)

  14. Radionuclide molecular target therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer harms people's health or even lives severely. Currently, the morbidity and mortality of lung cancer are ascending all over the world. Accounting for 38.08% of malignant tumor caused death in male and 16% in female in cities,ranking top in both sex. Especially, the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer has not been obviously improved for many years. Recently, sodium/iodide transporter gene transfection and the therapy of molecular target drugs mediated radionuclide are being taken into account and become the new research directions in treatment of advanced lung cancer patients with the development of technology and theory for medical molecular biology and the new knowledge of lung cancer's pathogenesis. (authors)

  15. Systems biology of cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sanga; Das, Smarajit; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems-biology is an ever-growing area of research due to explosion of data; how to mine these data and extract useful information is the problem. To have an insight on carcinogenesis one need to systematically mine several resources, such as databases, microarray and next-generation sequences. This review encompasses management and analysis of cancer data, databases construction and data deposition, whole transcriptome and genome comparison, analysing results from high throughput experiments to uncover cellular pathways and molecular interactions, and the design of effective algorithms to identify potential biomarkers. Recent technical advances such as ChIP-on-chip, ChIP-seq and RNA-seq can be applied to get epigenetic information transformed into a high-throughput endeavour to which systems biology and bioinformatics are making significant inroads. The data from ENCODE and GENCODE projects available through UCSC genome browser can be considered as benchmark for comparison and meta-analysis. A pipeline for integrating next generation sequencing data, microarray data, and putting them together with the existing database is discussed. The understanding of cancer genomics is changing the way we approach cancer diagnosis and treatment. To give a better understanding of utilizing available resources' we have chosen oral cancer to show how and what kind of analysis can be done. This review is a computational genomic primer that provides a bird's eye view of computational and bioinformatics' tools currently available to perform integrated genomic and system biology analyses of several carcinoma.

  16. Research Status of Molecular Biology in Flax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jian-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Flax is a kind of worldwide fiber and oil crops, and it has a very important role in economic crop production in the world. With the development of molecular biology techniques, the research of flax molecular level has a very big breakthrough. But, flax molecular biology researches are less reported due to the later starting. This paper summarized the latest research progress of molecular biology of flax, including molecular marker technology, construction of genetic map, gene engineering and omics researches, in order to provide the reference to understand the development and research status for flax molecular breeding researchers.

  17. Molecular characteristics versus biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Vernon C.; Smith, Manning A.; Willeford, Bennett R.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of mononitrophenols containing halogens not only play a key role in their biological activity but provide a novel example of selective toxicity among vertebrate animals. It has been reported that efforts to control the parasitic sea lamprey in the Great Lakes are directed at present to the applications of a selective toxicant to streams inhabited by lamprey larvae. Since 1961, the larvicide that has been used almost exclusively in the control program has been 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM). However, this is only one of about 15 closely related compounds, all halogen-containing mononitrophenols, that display a selectively toxic action upon lampreys. Although not all of the halogenated mononitrophenols are selectively toxic to lampreys (in fact, fewer than half of those tested), no other group of related compounds has displayed any useful larvicidal activity except for the substituted nitrosalicylanilides.

  18. Biological markers of invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Ando, Tomofumi; Fujii, Taku; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Saito, Junichi; Takahashi, Maiko; Hayashida, Tetsu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-02-01

    Biological markers for breast cancer are biomolecules that result from cancer-related processes and are associated with particular clinical outcomes; they thus help predict responses to therapy. In recent years, gene expression profiling has made the molecular classification of breast cancer possible. Classification of breast cancer by immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and Ki-67 is standard practice for clinical decision-making. Assessments of hormone receptor expression and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression help estimate benefits from targeted therapies and have greatly improved prognoses for women with these breast cancer types. Although Ki-67 positivity is associated with an adverse outcome, its clear identification is an aid to optimal disease management. Standardization of testing methodology to minimize inter-laboratory measurement variations is a remaining issue. Multi-gene assays provide prognostic information and identify those most likely to benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Incorporating molecular profiles with conventional pathological classification would be more precise, and could enhance the clinical development of personalized therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26486826

  19. Molecular and genetic bases of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Gelibter, Alain; Bria, Emilio; Iapicca, Pierluigi; Cappello, Paola; Di Modugno, Francesca; Pino, Maria Simona; Nuzzo, Carmen; Cognetti, Francesco; Novelli, Francesco; Nistico, Paola; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a formidable challenge for oncologists and patients alike. Despite intensive efforts, attempts at improving survival in the past 15 years, particularly in advanced disease, have failed. This is true even with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their action on pathways that were supposedly important in pancreatic cancer development and progression: indeed, with the notable exception of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib, that has provided a minimal survival improvement when added to gemcitabine, other agents targeting EGFR, matrix metallo-proteases, farnesyl transferase, or vascular endothelial growth factor have not succeeded in improving outcomes over standard gemcitabine monotherapy for a variety of different reasons. However, recent developments in the molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and an ever evolving understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer initiation and progression raise renewed hope to find novel, relevant therapeutic targets that could be pursued in the clinical setting. In this review we focus on molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and its influence on sensitivity to EGFR-targeted approaches, apoptotic pathways, hypoxia-related pathways, developmental pathways (such as the hedgehog and Notch pathways), and proteomic analysis as keys to a better understanding of pancreatic cancer biology and, most importantly, as a source of novel molecular targets to be exploited therapeutically.

  20. The distinctive biology of cancer in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyer, Archie; Barr, Ronald; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Thomas, David; Ellis, Chad; Anderson, Barry

    2008-04-01

    One explanation for the relative lack of progress in treating cancer in adolescents and young adults is that the biology of malignant diseases in this age group is different than in younger and older persons, not only in the spectrum of cancers but also within individual cancer types and within the patient (host). Molecular, epidemiological and therapeutic outcome comparisons offer clues to this distinctiveness in most of the common cancers of adolescents and young adults. Translational and clinical research should not assume that the biology of cancers and patients is the same as in other age groups, and treatment strategies should be tailored to the differences.

  1. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology investigates the organization, compartmentalization, and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and the pathology associated...

  2. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  3. Computational systems biology in cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huiming; Tan, Hua; Zhao, Weiling; Jin, Guangxu; Sharma, Sambad; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in 20-40% of patients with advanced malignancies. A better understanding of the mechanism of this disease will help us to identify novel therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will discuss the systems biology approaches used in this area, including bioinformatics and mathematical modeling. Bioinformatics has been used for identifying the molecular mechanisms driving brain metastasis and mathematical modeling methods for analyzing dynamics of a system and predicting optimal therapeutic strategies. We will illustrate the strategies, procedures, and computational techniques used for studying systems biology in cancer brain metastases. We will give examples on how to use a systems biology approach to analyze a complex disease. Some of the approaches used to identify relevant networks, pathways, and possibly biomarkers in metastasis will be reviewed into details. Finally, certain challenges and possible future directions in this area will also be discussed.

  4. Molecular ferroelectrics: where electronics meet biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangyu; Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Cai, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2013-12-28

    In the last several years, we have witnessed significant advances in molecular ferroelectrics, with the ferroelectric properties of molecular crystals approaching those of barium titanate. In addition, ferroelectricity has been observed in biological systems, filling an important missing link in bioelectric phenomena. In this perspective, we will present short historical notes on ferroelectrics, followed by an overview of the fundamentals of ferroelectricity. The latest developments in molecular ferroelectrics and biological ferroelectricity will then be highlighted, and their implications and potential applications will be discussed. We close by noting molecular ferroelectric as an exciting frontier between electronics and biology, and a number of challenges ahead are also described.

  5. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education (BAMBED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voet Donald

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education (BAMBED is a journal that is a publication of the In-ternational Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB and is published by the AmericanSociety of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB. BAMBED, as its name indicates, publishesarticles of interest to educators in biochemistry and molecular biology. These include invited reviewson subjects not yet in textbooks, discussions of curricular development, new laboratory exercises,and articles on educational research. BAMBED also publishes Features on Problem-Based Learning(PBL, Biotechnology Education, and Multimedia in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educati-on. An important aspect of these articles is that their educational eectiveness must be assessed. Ishall discuss in greater detail the types of articles that BAMBED publishes and the criteria used foraccepting them for publication. Conference attendees are encouraged to submit articles to BAMBED.

  6. Molecular biology: Self-sustaining chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Wrede Paul

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Molecular biology is an established interdisciplinary field within biology that deals fundamentally with the function of any nucleic acid in the cellular context. The molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal focusses on the genetically determined chemistry and biochemistry occuring in the cell. How can thousands of chemical reactions interact smoothly to maintain the life of cells, even in a variable environment? How is this self-sustaining system achieved? These are qu...

  7. Molecular biology of microbial ureases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, H L; Island, M D; Hausinger, R P

    1995-09-01

    progress in our understanding of the molecular biology of microbial ureases is reviewed. PMID:7565414

  8. Origins of molecular biology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, M

    1986-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the origins of molecular biology in Japan. Japanese molecular biology does not have a long history since it started only after World War II. Especially, molecular genetics which uses "bacteriophage" had hardly been studied before the war and only a few scientists were interested in it immediately after the war. This is one of the origins of molecular biology in Japan. But there are other origins, one of which is the group formed by biologists, biochemists and physicists interested in nucleic acids. This group also started just after the war. Still another origin is the group of enzymologists. Enzymology was one of the main subjects of biochemistry from before the war. In Japan, biochemistry developed in conjunction with the medical and agricultural sciences from the pre-war era. These played an important role in introducing molecular biology from Europe and the United States after the war. A historical study of the development of molecular biology in Japan, comparing it with the history of molecular biology in Europe and the United States, should contribute to the elucidation of the features of the history of molecular biology in Japan.

  9. Molecular Imaging of Pulmonary Cancer and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Divgi, Chaitanya R.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) may be defined as imaging in vivo using molecules that report on biologic function. This review will focus on the clinical use of radioactive tracers (nonpharmacologic amounts of compounds labeled with a radioactive substance) that permit external imaging using single photon emission computed tomography (planar, SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Imaging of lung cancer has been revolutionized with the use of fluorine-18–labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18F...

  10. Molecular biology: Self-sustaining chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede Paul

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular biology is an established interdisciplinary field within biology that deals fundamentally with the function of any nucleic acid in the cellular context. The molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal focusses on the genetically determined chemistry and biochemistry occuring in the cell. How can thousands of chemical reactions interact smoothly to maintain the life of cells, even in a variable environment? How is this self-sustaining system achieved? These are questions that should be answered in the light of molecular biology and evolution, but with the application of biophysical, physico-chemical, analytical and preparative technologies. As the Section Editor for the molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal, I hope to receive manuscripts that present new approaches aimed at better answering and shedding light upon these fascinating questions related to the chemistry of livings cells.

  11. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  12. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    OpenAIRE

    E. N. Knyazev; K. A. Fomicheva; K. M. Nyushko; Kaprin, A. D.; B. Ya. Alekseev; M. Yu. Shkurnikov

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androge...

  13. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  14. Molecular imaging in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyners, A K L; Broekman, K E; Glaudemans, A W J M; Brouwers, A H; Arts, H J G; van der Zee, A G J; de Vries, E G E; Jalving, M

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and novel-targeted treatment strategies have not resulted in breakthroughs for this disease. Insight into the molecular characteristics of ovarian tumors may improve diagnosis and selection of patients for treatment with targeted therapies. A potential way to achieve this is by means of molecular imaging. Generic tumor processes, such as glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and DNA synthesis ((18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine), can be visualized non-invasively. More specific targets, such as hormone receptors, growth factor receptors, growth factors and targets of immunotherapy, can also be visualized. Molecular imaging can capture data on intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and is of potential value for individualized, target-guided treatment selection. Early changes in molecular characteristics during therapy may serve as early predictors of response. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on molecular imaging in the diagnosis and as an upfront or early predictive biomarker in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27141066

  15. The Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment: A Concept Assessment for Upper-Division Molecular Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Brian A.; Wood, William B.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring students' conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in…

  16. European Conference on Molecular Biology EMBO

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    European Conference on Molecular Biology, which eventually led to the setting up of EMBO, was held at CERN in April. Olivier Reverdin is adressing the delegates. Bernard Gregory is on the left and Willy Spuhler in the centre.

  17. Application of molecular biology in exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F W

    1989-01-01

    Past progress in exercise biochemical research has often depended on the use of knowledge and techniques which were originally reported from other disciplines. With the advent of newer methodologies in molecular biology, the purpose of this review has been to document the status of information gained from the application of molecular biological techniques to questions in exercise physiology. Furthermore, this review has speculated how new methods in molecular biology might be employed to answer classic questions in exercise physiology. A powerful revolution in science, that is, molecular biology, will provide new information about exercise mechanisms, which ideally will improve the training programs for elite athletes as well as continue to be associated with the public's interest in exercise training.

  18. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Mark H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  19. The Molecular Era of Surfactant Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey A Whitsett

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the physiology, biochemistry, molecular and cell biology of the pulmonary surfactant system transformed the clinical care and outcome of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. The molecular era of surfactant biology provided genetic insights into the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders, previously termed “idiopathic” that affect newborn infants, children and adults. Knowledge related to the structure and function of the surfactant proteins and their roles in alveolar ...

  20. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine. PMID:26498010

  1. Network systems biology for targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted cancer therapies has arrived.However,due to the complexity of biological systems,the current progress is far from enough.From biological network modeling to structural/dynamic network analysis,network systems biology provides unique insight into the potential mechanisms underlying the growth and progression of cancer cells.It has also introduced great changes into the research paradigm of cancer-associated drug discovery and drug resistance.

  2. Biological Significance and the Related Molecular Mechanism of Ets1 mRNA Expression in Lung Cancer by Tissue Microarray (TMA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expressions and molecular mechanism of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins in the pathogenesis, progression of lung cancer by tissue microarray (TMA) method. Methods: The expressions of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins were detected in 89 primary lung cancers, 12 lung cancer with lymph-node metastasis and 12 precancerous lesions by FISH(fluorescence in situ hybridization) and immunohistochemical method, and 10 normal lung tissues were used as controls. Results: The expressions of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins were significantly higher in 89 primary lung cancer than in the control group (P<0.05). The expressions of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins were related to lymph node metastasis and clinical stages. There was a positive correlation between the Ets-1 mRNA expression and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins (P<0.05). Conclusion: Ets-1 mRNA, TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins may be related to the pathogenesis, progression and malignant behavior of lung cancer. They may play an important role in prognosis assessment of lung cancer.

  3. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  4. Molecular ferroelectrics: where electronics meet biology

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiangyu; Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Cai, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2013-01-01

    In the last several years, we have witnessed significant advances in molecular ferroelectrics, with ferroelectric properties of molecular crystals approaching those of barium titanate. In addition, ferroelectricity has been observed in biological systems, filling an important missing link in bioelectric phenomena. In this perspective, we will present short historical notes on ferroelectrics, followed by overview on the fundamentals of ferroelectricity. Latest development in molecular ferroele...

  5. Synthetic Tools for Molecular Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Dervan, Peter B.

    1988-01-01

    Chemistry has made tremendous advances over the past four decades in the broad fields of synthesis and understanding chemical reactivity. In that same time span, a series of revolutionary events occurred in biology. First came the discovery of the double helical structure of DNA in the 1950s by Watson and Crick. This discovery allowed the elucidation of the mechanisms of DNA replication -- how DNA makes copies of itself -- and DNA transcription and translation -- the processes that allow the ...

  6. Molecular Taxonomy and Tumourigenesis of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, S; Holyoake, D; Maughan, T S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 5 years there has been a surge in interest in the molecular classification of colorectal cancer. The effect of molecular subtyping on current treatment decisions is limited to avoidance of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in stage II microsatellite unstable-high disease and avoidance of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibodies in extended RAS mutant tumours. The emergence of specific novel combination therapy for the BRAF-mutant cohort and of the microsatellite unstable-high cohort as a responsive group to immune checkpoint inhibition shows the growing importance of a clinically relevant molecular taxonomy. Clinical trials such as the Medical Research Council FOCUS4 trial using biomarkers to select patients for specific therapies are currently open and testing such approaches. The integration of mutation, gene expression and pathological analyses is refining our understanding of the biological subtypes within colorectal cancer. Sharing of data sets of parallel sequencing and gene expression of thousands of cancers among independent groups has allowed the description of disease subsets and the need for a validated consensus classification has become apparent. This biological understanding of the disease is a key step forward in developing a stratified approach to patient management. The discovery of stratifiers that predict a response to existing and emerging therapies will enable better use of these treatments. Improved scientific understanding of the biological characteristics of poorly responsive subgroups will facilitate the design of novel biologically rational combinations. Novel treatment regimens, including the combination of new drugs with radiation, and the discovery and validation of their associated predictive biomarkers will gradually lead to improved outcomes from therapy.

  7. Using Molecular Biology to Develop Drugs for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowey, C. Lance; Rathmell, W. Kimryn

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma is a disease marked by a unique biology which has governed it’s long history of poor response to conventional cancer treatments. The discovery of the signaling pathway activated as a result of inappropriate constitutive activation of the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF), transcription factors physiologically and transiently stabilized in response to low oxygen, has provided a primary opportunity to devise treatment strategies to target this oncogenic pathway. Objective A review of the molecular pathogenesis of renal cell cancer as well as molecularly targeted therapies, both those currently available and those in development, will be provided. In addition, trials involving combination or sequential targeted therapy are discussed. Methods A detailed review of the literature describing the molecular biology of renal cell cancer and novel therapies was performed and summarized. Results/Conclusion Therapeutics targeting angiogenesis have provided the first class of agents which provide clinical benefit in a large majority of patients and heralded renal cell carcinoma as a solid tumor paradigm for the development of novel therapeutics. Multiple strategies targeting this pathway and now other identified pathways in renal cell carcinoma provide numerous potential opportunities to make major improvements in treating this historically devastating cancer. PMID:20648240

  8. Molecular biological research on Foraminifera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Baohua; Kemal Topac ERTAN; Christoph HEMLEBEN

    2005-01-01

    As one of the most important groups in micropaleontology, Foraminifera is traditionally described to have a membranous, agglutinated or carbonate shell according to its morphology, which resembles the marine granuloreticuloseans. However, recent molecular analyses on its ribosomal RNA gene have disclosed the existence of the naked, and also freshwater and terrestrial species.Foraminiferal SSU rDNA sequence suggests that this group is positioned at the base of the Eukaryotes phylogenetic trees, between Euglenoida and Diplomonadida. Existence of a large amount of genetic types in planktonic foraminifera suggests an underestimation of the biodiversity for the nearly 50 species in world oceans and their close relationship with the ocean environment, such as bio-geographic distribution and water currents. This provides a more reliable proxy for future paleoenvironmental study.

  9. Biology of cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, F F; Wilson, J; Blesch, K S; Kaesberg, P R; Miller, R; Sprott, R

    1991-12-01

    The greatest risk factor for cancer is aging. Human cancer incidence increases exponentially with advancing age. Cancer growth rate and potential for metastatic spread may be influenced by age-specific change in host response. Because cancer and aging are, thus, inextricably linked, the American Cancer Society should encourage submission of research proposals that address the mechanisms of aging and how aging alters cancer development.

  10. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  11. Archaea: Evolution, Physiology, and Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to honor the archaea pioneers Wolfram Zillig and Karl O. Stetter, the book provides a thorough survey of the field from its controversial beginnings to its ongoing expansion to include aspects of eukaryotic biology. The editors have assembled articles from the premier researchers in this rapidly burgeoning...... and technological context, and include accounts of cutting-edge research developments. The book spans archaeal evolution, physiology, and molecular and cellular biology and will be an essential reference for both graduate students and researchers....

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  13. Arterivirus molecular biology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, Eric J; Kikkert, Marjolein; Fang, Ying

    2013-10-01

    Arteriviruses are positive-stranded RNA viruses that infect mammals. They can cause persistent or asymptomatic infections, but also acute disease associated with a respiratory syndrome, abortion or lethal haemorrhagic fever. During the past two decades, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and, to a lesser extent, equine arteritis virus (EAV) have attracted attention as veterinary pathogens with significant economic impact. Particularly noteworthy were the 'porcine high fever disease' outbreaks in South-East Asia and the emergence of new virulent PRRSV strains in the USA. Recently, the family was expanded with several previously unknown arteriviruses isolated from different African monkey species. At the molecular level, arteriviruses share an intriguing but distant evolutionary relationship with coronaviruses and other members of the order Nidovirales. Nevertheless, several of their characteristics are unique, including virion composition and structure, and the conservation of only a subset of the replicase domains encountered in nidoviruses with larger genomes. During the past 15 years, the advent of reverse genetics systems for EAV and PRRSV has changed and accelerated the structure-function analysis of arterivirus RNA and protein sequences. These systems now also facilitate studies into host immune responses and arterivirus immune evasion and pathogenesis. In this review, we have summarized recent advances in the areas of arterivirus genome expression, RNA and protein functions, virion architecture, virus-host interactions, immunity, and pathogenesis. We have also briefly reviewed the impact of these advances on disease management, the engineering of novel candidate live vaccines and the diagnosis of arterivirus infection. PMID:23939974

  14. Dictyostelium discoideum: Molecular approaches to cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spudich, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The central point of this book is to present Dictyostelium as a valuable eukaryotic organism for those interested in molecular studies that require a combined biochemical, structural, and genetic approach. The book is not meant to be a comprehensive compilation of all methods involving Dictyostelium, but instead is a selective set of chapters that demonstrates the utility of the organism for molecular approaches to interesting cell biological problems.

  15. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  16. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  17. [Molecular diagnostics of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryska, A; Dziadziuszko, R; Olszewski, W; Berzinec, P; Öz, B; Gottfried, M; Cufer, T; Samarzija, M; Plank, L; Ostoros, Gy; Tímár, J

    2015-09-01

    Development of the target therapies of lung cancer was a rapid process which fundamentally changed the pathological diagnosis as well. Furthermore, molecular pathology became essential part of the routine diagnostics of lung cancer. These changes generated several practical problems and in underdeveloped countries or in those with reimbursement problems have been combined with further challenges. The central and eastern region of Europe are characterized by similar problems in this respect which promoted the foundation of NSCLC Working Group to provide up to date protocols or guidelines. This present paper is a summary of the molecular pathology and target therapy guidelines written with the notion that it has to be upgraded continuously according to the development of the field.

  18. Molecular biology of the Chlamydia pneumoniae surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Østergaard, Lars; Birkelund, Svend

    1997-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniaeis a fastidious microorganism with a characteristic biphasic lifecycle causing a variety of human respiratory tract infections. There is limited knowledge about the molecular biology of C. pneumoniae, and only a few genes have been sequenced. The structure of the chlamydial...

  19. Book review: Baculovirus Molecular Biology, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of cell culture and molecular biology methodologies to the study of baculoviruses has resulted in an explosion of information on this group of insect pathogens. The quantity of the corresponding literature on baculoviruses has reached a level difficult for any one researcher to mast...

  20. Text Mining applied to Molecular Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Jelier (Rob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the development of text-mining algorithms for molecular biology, in particular for DNA microarray data analysis. Concept profiles were introduced, which characterize the context in which a gene is mentioned in literature, to retrieve functional associations

  1. Molecular biology applications to infectious diseases diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project goes directed to the applications of the techniques of molecular biology in hepatitis virus.A great advance of these techniques it allows its application to the diagnose molecular and it becomes indispensable to have these fundamental tools in the field of the Health Public for the detection precocious, pursuit of the treatment, the one predicts and the evolution of the patient hepatitis bearing virus technical.Use of molecular biology to increase the handling and the control of the patients with hepatitis B and C and to detect an adult numbers of positive cases by means of the training and integration of all the countries participating.Implement the technique of PCR to identify the virus of the hepatitis B and C,implement quantification methods and genotipification for these virus

  2. Molecular imaging of apoptosis in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakumaeki, Juhana M. [Cellular and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Biomedical NMR, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland) and Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)]. E-mail: juhana.hakumaki@uku.fi; Liimatainen, Timo [Cellular and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Biomedical NMR, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-11-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in cancer. Mechanisms hindering its action are implicated in a number of malignancies. Also, the induction of apoptosis plays a pivotal role in non-surgical cancer treatment regimes such as irradiation, chemotherapy, or hormones. Recent advanced in imaging science have made it now possible for us to detect and visualize previously inaccessible and even unrecognized biological phenomena in cells and tissue undergoing apoptosis in vivo. Not only are these imaging techniques painting an intriguing picture of the spatiotemporal characteristics and metabolic and biophysical of apoptosis in situ, but they are expected to have an ever increasing impact in preclinical testing and design of new anticancer agents as well. Rapid and accurate visualization of apoptotic response in the clinical settings can also be of significant diagnostic and prognostic worth. With the advent of molecular medicine and patient-tailored treatment options and therapeutic agents, such monitoring techniques are becoming paramount.

  3. Understanding biological functions through molecular networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Dong Jackie Han

    2008-01-01

    The completion of genome sequences and subsequent high-throughput mapping of molecular networks have allowed us to study biology from the network perspective. Experimental, statistical and mathematical modeling approaches have been employed to study the structure, function and dynamics of molecular networks, and begin to reveal important links of various network properties to the functions of the biological systems. In agreement with these functional links, evolutionary selection of a network is apparently based on the function, rather than directly on the structure of the network. Dynamic modularity is one of the prominent features of molecular networks. Taking advantage of such a feature may simplify network-based biological studies through construction of process-specific modular networks and provide functional and mechanistic insights linking genotypic variations to complex traits or diseases, which is likely to be a key approach in the next wave of understanding complex human diseases. With the development of ready-to-use network analysis and modeling tools the networks approaches will be infused into everyday biological research in the near future.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seon-Hee Yim; Yeun-Jun Chung

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differenc...

  5. Molecular knots in biology and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Nicole C H; Jackson, Sophie E

    2015-09-01

    Knots and entanglements are ubiquitous. Beyond their aesthetic appeal, these fascinating topological entities can be either useful or cumbersome. In recent decades, the importance and prevalence of molecular knots have been increasingly recognised by scientists from different disciplines. In this review, we provide an overview on the various molecular knots found in naturally occurring biological systems (DNA, RNA and proteins), and those created by synthetic chemists. We discuss the current knowledge in these fields, including recent developments in experimental and, in some cases, computational studies which are beginning to shed light into the complex interplay between the structure, formation and properties of these topologically intricate molecules. PMID:26291690

  6. Molecular knots in biology and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knots and entanglements are ubiquitous. Beyond their aesthetic appeal, these fascinating topological entities can be either useful or cumbersome. In recent decades, the importance and prevalence of molecular knots have been increasingly recognised by scientists from different disciplines. In this review, we provide an overview on the various molecular knots found in naturally occurring biological systems (DNA, RNA and proteins), and those created by synthetic chemists. We discuss the current knowledge in these fields, including recent developments in experimental and, in some cases, computational studies which are beginning to shed light into the complex interplay between the structure, formation and properties of these topologically intricate molecules. (paper)

  7. Bioenergetics molecular biology, biochemistry, and pathology

    CERN Document Server

    Ozawa, Takayuki

    1990-01-01

    The emergence of the Biochemical Sciences is underlined by the FAOB symposium in Seoul and highlighted by this Satellite meeting on the "New Bioenergetics. " Classical mitochondrial electron transfer and energy coupling is now complemented by the emerging molecular biology of the respiratory chain which is studied hand in hand with the recognition of mitochondrial disease as a major and emerging study in the basic and clinical medical sciences. Thus, this symposium has achieved an important balance of the fundamental and applied aspects of bioenergetics in the modern setting of molecular biology and mitochondrial disease. At the same time, the symposium takes note not only of the emerging excellence of Biochemical Studies in the Orient and indeed in Korea itself, but also retrospectively enjoys the history of electron transport and energy conservation as represented by the triumvirate ofYagi, King and Slater. Many thanks are due Drs. Kim and Ozawa for their elegant organization of this meeting and its juxtapo...

  8. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  9. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  10. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Jonathan [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Small, William [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine, Cardianl Bernardin Cancer Center; Woloschak, Gayle E. (ed.) [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  11. Discovering the intelligence in molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberbacher, E

    1995-12-01

    The Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems in Molecular Biology was truly an outstanding event. Computational methods in molecular biology have reached a new level of maturity and utility, resulting in many high-impact applications. The success of this meeting bodes well for the rapid and continuing development of computational methods, intelligent systems and information-based approaches for the biosciences. The basic technology, originally most often applied to 'feasibility' problems, is now dealing effectively with the most difficult real-world problems. Significant progress has been made in understanding protein-structure information, structural classification, and how functional information and the relevant features of active-site geometry can be gleaned from structures by automated computational approaches. The value and limits of homology-based methods, and the ability to classify proteins by structure in the absence of homology, have reached a new level of sophistication. New methods for covariation analysis in the folding of large structures such as RNAs have shown remarkably good results, indicating the long-term potential to understand very complicated molecules and multimolecular complexes using computational means. Novel methods, such as HMMs, context-free grammars and the uses of mutual information theory, have taken center stage as highly valuable tools in our quest to represent and characterize biological information. A focus on creative uses of intelligent systems technologies and the trend toward biological application will undoubtedly continue and grow at the 1996 ISMB meeting in St Louis.

  12. Biological Response Modifier in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Feifei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Luman; Yang, Jiao; Deng, Yuting; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Jiang, Xuechao; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-01-01

    Biological response modifiers (BRMs) emerge as a lay of new compounds or approaches used in improving cancer immunotherapy. Evidences highlight that cytokines, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and noncoding RNAs are of crucial roles in modulating antitumor immune response and cancer-related chronic inflammation, and BRMs based on them have been explored. In particular, besides some cytokines like IFN-α and IL-2, several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists like BCG, MPL, and imiquimod are also licensed to be used in patients with several malignancies nowadays, and the first artificial small noncoding RNA (microRNA) mimic, MXR34, has entered phase I clinical study against liver cancer, implying their potential application in cancer therapy. According to amounts of original data, this chapter will review the regulatory roles of TLR signaling, some noncoding RNAs, and several key cytokines in cancer and cancer-related immune response, as well as the clinical cases in cancer therapy based on them.

  13. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply.

  14. Molecular biology and its applications in orthodontics and oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yi-jin

    2005-01-01

    Molecular biology is an exciting, rapidly expanding field, which has enabled enormously greater understanding of the biology of diseases and malfunctions in many fields. It chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interrelationship of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis and how these interactions are regulated. Since the introduction of molecular biology into modern science, numerous other fields have been enabled to go "molecular". Advanced molecular biological techniques showed us new avenue towards finding answers to the questions asked for decades. The first part of this article described the history of molecular biology.It started as a joined discipline of other areas of biology, i.e. genetics and biochemistry in the 1930s and 1940s, and enjoyed its classical period and became institutionalized in the 1950s and 1960s. Major molecular techniques manipulating proteins, DNA and RNA were introduced and their mechanisms were concisely illustrated. The current knowledge of molecular biology and their applications in orthodontic and oral and maxillofacial surgery, i.e. osteoclast differentiation and function, regulation of tooth movement, mechanotransduction/cell-signalling, bone fracture healing, oral cancer as well as craniofacial/dental anomalies and distraction osteogenesis were discussed. Although the problems of introducing molecular technologies are still substantial, it is anticipated that the future of medicine/dentistry will be "molecular": molecular prevention, molecular diagnosis and molecular therapy.

  15. Circadian molecular clocks and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Fergal C; Rao, Aparna; Maguire, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and hormone secretion are controlled by a circadian rhythm adapted to 24h day-night periodicity. This circadian synchronisation is in part controlled by ambient light decreasing melatonin secretion by the pineal gland and co-ordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Peripheral cell autonomous circadian clocks controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master regulator, exist within every cell of the body and are comprised of at least twelve genes. These include the basic helix-loop-helix/PAS domain containing transcription factors; Clock, BMal1 and Npas2 which activate transcription of the periodic genes (Per1 and Per2) and cryptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2). Points of coupling exist between the cellular clock and the cell cycle. Cell cycle genes which are affected by the molecular circadian clock include c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin D and p21. Therefore the rhythm of the circadian clock and cancer are interlinked. Molecular examples exist including activation of Per2 leads to c-myc overexpression and an increased tumor incidence. Mice with mutations in Cryptochrome 1 and 2 are arrhythmic (lack a circadian rhythm) and arrhythmic mice have a faster rate of growth of implanted tumors. Epidemiological finding of relevance include 'The Nurses' Health Study' where it was established that women working rotational night shifts have an increased incidence of breast cancer. Compounds that affect circadian rhythm exist with attendant future therapeutic possibilities. These include casein kinase I inhibitors and a candidate small molecule KL001 that affects the degradation of cryptochrome. Theoretically the cell cycle and malignant disease may be targeted vicariously by selective alteration of the cellular molecular clock. PMID:24099911

  16. Molecular aspects of carcinogenesis in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandros Koliopanos; Constantinos Avgerinos; Constantina Paraskeva; Zisis Touloumis; Dionisisa Kelgiorgi; Christos Dervenis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PCa) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumors, with rapid growth and metastatic spread as well as resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, leading rapidly to virtually incurable disease. Over the last 20 years, however, signiifcant advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular biology of PCa, with a focus on the cytogenetic abnormalities in PCa cell growth and differentiation. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search and manual cross-referencing were utilized to identify published data for PCa molecular biology studies between 1986 and 2008, with emphasis on genetic alterations and developmental oncology. RESULTS: Activation of oncogenes, deregulation of tumor suppressor and genome maintenance genes, upregulation of growth factors/growth factor receptor signaling cascade systems, and alterations in cytokine expression, have been reported to play important roles in the process of pancreatic carcinogenesis. Alterations in the K-ras proto-oncogene and the p16INK4a, p53, FHIT, and DPC4 tumor suppressor genes occur in a high percentage of tumors. Furthermore, a variety of growth factors are expressed at increased levels. In addition, PCa often exhibits alterations in growth inhibitory pathways and evades apoptosis through p53 mutations and aberrant expression of apoptosis-regulating genes, such as members of the Bcl family. Additional pathways in the development of an aggressive phenotype, local inifltration and metastasis are still under ongoing genetic research. The present paper reviews recent studies on the pathogenesis of PCa, and includes a brief reference to alterations reported for other types of pancreatic tumor. CONCLUSIONS: Advances in molecular genetics and biology have improved our perception of the pathogenesis of PCa. However, further studies are needed to better understand the fundamental changes that occur in PCa, thus leading to better diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  17. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women.Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment,advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens.As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations,researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at specific targets contributing to the progression of tumorigenesis.Recent advances in systems biology have enabled the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis to be elucidated.Our understanding of the physiologic processes of tumor development provide a means to design more effective and specific drugs with less toxicity,thereby accelerating the delivery of new drug therapies to the patient's bedside.

  18. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shyam A; Heinrich, Andrew C; Bobby Y. Reddy; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the ef...

  19. The molecular biology of vertebrate olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Sara; Teeling, Emma C

    2014-11-01

    The importance of chemosensation for vertebrates is reflected in the vast and variable nature of their chemosensory tissues, neurons, and genes, which we explore in this review. Immense progress has been made in elucidating the molecular biology of olfaction since the discovery of the olfactory receptor genes by Buck and Axel, which eventually won the authors the Nobel Prize. In particular, research linking odor ligands to olfactory receptors (ORs) is truly revolutionizing our understanding of how a large but limited number of chemosensory receptors can allow us to perceive the massive diversity of odors in our habitat. This research is providing insight into the evolution of genomes and providing the raw data needed to explore links between genotype and phenotype, still a grand challenge in biology. Research into olfaction is still developing and will no doubt continue until we have a clear understanding of how all odors are detected and the evolutionary forces that have molded the chemosensory subgenome in vertebrates. This knowledge will not only be a huge step in elucidating olfactory function, advancing scientific knowledge and techniques, but there are also commercial applications for this research. This review focuses on the molecular basis of chemosensation, particularly olfaction, its evolution across vertebrates and the recent molecular advances linking odors to their cognate receptors.

  20. The molecular biology of vertebrate olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Sara; Teeling, Emma C

    2014-11-01

    The importance of chemosensation for vertebrates is reflected in the vast and variable nature of their chemosensory tissues, neurons, and genes, which we explore in this review. Immense progress has been made in elucidating the molecular biology of olfaction since the discovery of the olfactory receptor genes by Buck and Axel, which eventually won the authors the Nobel Prize. In particular, research linking odor ligands to olfactory receptors (ORs) is truly revolutionizing our understanding of how a large but limited number of chemosensory receptors can allow us to perceive the massive diversity of odors in our habitat. This research is providing insight into the evolution of genomes and providing the raw data needed to explore links between genotype and phenotype, still a grand challenge in biology. Research into olfaction is still developing and will no doubt continue until we have a clear understanding of how all odors are detected and the evolutionary forces that have molded the chemosensory subgenome in vertebrates. This knowledge will not only be a huge step in elucidating olfactory function, advancing scientific knowledge and techniques, but there are also commercial applications for this research. This review focuses on the molecular basis of chemosensation, particularly olfaction, its evolution across vertebrates and the recent molecular advances linking odors to their cognate receptors. PMID:25312375

  1. Systems biology and cancer, [Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C; Maini, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    The systems approach to complex biological problems has rapidly gained ground during the first decade of this century. There are several reasons for this development. An important one is that while the achievement of sequencing the complete human genome, and those of other species, has been of great benefit to fundamental science, for example in comparative genomics and evolutionary biology, it has not led to the expected quick and simple solutions to multifactorial diseases (2010). On the co...

  2. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Huth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients.  Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC. Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53 as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  3. Targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer: Molecular mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki; Itamochi

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and have a poor prognosis.Currently, surgical tumor debulking, followed by platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. However, these patients are at great risk of recurrence and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, novel treatment strategies are required to improve outcomes for women with advanced ovarian cancer. A variety of molecular targeted agents, the majority of which are monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule protein-kinase inhibitors, have been explored in the management of ovarian cancer. The targets of these agents include angiogenesis, the human epidermal growth factor receptor family, ubiquitinproteasome pathway, epigenetic modulators, poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which are aberrant in tumor tissue. The antiangiogenic agent, bevacizumab, has been reported as the most effective targeted agent and should be included in the standard chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced ovarian cancer. PARP inhibitors, which are mainly used in breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene-mutated patients, and mTOR inhibitors are also attractive treatment strategies, either alone or combination with chemotherapy, for ovarian cancer. Understanding the tumor molecular biology and identification of predictive biomarkers are essential steps for selection of the best treatment strategies. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of the most promising targeted agents that are under early phase clinical evaluation for ovarian cancer.

  4. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  5. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  6. The consensus molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M; Morris, Jeffrey S; Simon, Iris M; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression-based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (microsatellite instability immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable and strong immune activation; CMS2 (canonical, 37%), epithelial, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (metabolic, 13%), epithelial and evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor-β activation, stromal invasion and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intratumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC-with clear biological interpretability-and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype-based targeted interventions.

  7. Molecular Biological Methods in Environmental Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guocai; Wei, Li; Chang, Chein-Chi; Zhang, Yuhua; Wei, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria, acting as catalysts, perform the function of degrading pollutants. Molecular biological techniques play an important role in research on the community analysis, the composition and the functions of complex microbial communities. The development of secondary high-throughput pyrosequencing techiniques enhances the understanding of the composition of the microbial community. The literatures of 2015 indicated that 16S rDNA gene as genetic tag is still the important method for bacteria identification and classification. 454 high throughput sequencing and Illumina MiSeq sequencing have been the primary and widely recognized methods to analyze the microbial. This review will provide environmental engineers and microbiologists an overview of important advancements in molecular techniques and highlight the application of these methods in diverse environments. PMID:27620079

  8. 2007 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imke Schroeder

    2008-09-18

    The Archaea are a fascinating and diverse group of prokaryotic organisms with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of this GRC conference, 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology', expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting the evolution and composition of microbial communities and novel archaeal species, their impact on the environment, archaeal metabolism, and research that stems from sequence analysis of archaeal genomes. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple reputable areas with new scientific topics in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  9. The common biology of cancer and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Toren; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A

    2007-08-16

    At first glance, cancer and ageing would seem to be unlikely bedfellows. Yet the origins for this improbable union can actually be traced back to a sequence of tragic--and some say unethical--events that unfolded more than half a century ago. Here we review the series of key observations that has led to a complex but growing convergence between our understanding of the biology of ageing and the mechanisms that underlie cancer.

  10. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Weekes, Colin D

    2016-04-15

    The emergence of the "precision-medicine" paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease. PMID:27096032

  11. Integrative computational biology for cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Fortney, Kristen; Jurisica, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, high-throughput (HTP) technologies such as microarrays and mass spectrometry have fundamentally changed clinical cancer research. They have revealed novel molecular markers of cancer subtypes, metastasis, and drug sensitivity and resistance. Some have been translated into the clinic as tools for early disease diagnosis, prognosis, and individualized treatment and response monitoring. Despite these successes, many challenges remain: HTP platforms are often noisy and ...

  12. The biology and clinical development of MEK inhibitors for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; Ott, Patrick A; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2014-12-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK) MEK1 and MEK2 are integral members of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and are of interest in the development of anti-cancer therapeutics. The MAPK/ERK pathway is dysregulated in more than 30 % of cancers, predominately by mutations in RAS and BRAF proteins, and MEK serves as a potential downstream target for both of these. The biology of MEK inhibition is complex, as the molecule is differentially regulated by upstream RAS or RAF. This has impacted on the past development of MEK inhibitors as treatments for cancer and may be exploited in more rational, molecularly selected drug development plans in the future. The role of MEK in cancer and the mechanism of action of MEK inhibitors is reviewed. Furthermore, MEK inhibitors that are available in standard practice, as well as those most advanced in clinical development, are discussed. Finally, next steps in the development of MEK inhibitors are considered.

  13. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-06-27

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer.

  14. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  15. Biological functions of decorin in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Li Bi; Wancai Yang

    2013-01-01

    Decorin is a member of the extracellular matrix small leucine-rich proteoglycans family that exists and functions in stromal and epithelial cells.Accumulating evidence suggests that decorin affects the biology of various types of cancer by directly or indirectly targeting the signaling molecules involved in cell growth,survival,metastasis,and angiogenesis.More recent studies show that decorin plays important roles during tumor development and progression and is a potential cancer therapeutic agent.In this article,we summarize recent studies of decorin in cancer and discuss decorin's therapeutic and prognostic value.

  16. Cancer systems biology: signal processing for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olli Yli-Harja; Antti Ylip(a)(a); Matti Nykter; Wei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    In this editorial we introduce the research paradigms of signal processing in the era of systems biology. Signal processing is a field of science traditionally focused on modeling electronic and communications systems, but recently it has turned to biological applications with astounding results. The essence of signal processing is to describe the natural world by mathematical models and then, based on these models, develop efficient computational tools for solving engineering problems. Here, we underline, with examples, the endless possibilities which arise when the battle-hardened tools of engineering are applied to solve the problems that have tormented cancer researchers. Based on this approach, a new field has emerged, called cancer systems biology. Despite its short history, cancer systems biology has already produced several success stories tackling previously impracticable problems. Perhaps most importantly, it has been accepted as an integral part of the major endeavors of cancer research, such as analyzing the genomic and epigenomic data produced by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Finally, we show that signal processing and cancer research, two fields that are seemingly distant from each other, have merged into a field that is indeed more than the sum of its parts.

  17. Cancer systems biology: signal processing for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Harja, Olli; Ylipää, Antti; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2011-04-01

    In this editorial we introduce the research paradigms of signal processing in the era of systems biology. Signal processing is a field of science traditionally focused on modeling electronic and communications systems, but recently it has turned to biological applications with astounding results. The essence of signal processing is to describe the natural world by mathematical models and then, based on these models, develop efficient computational tools for solving engineering problems. Here, we underline, with examples, the endless possibilities which arise when the battle-hardened tools of engineering are applied to solve the problems that have tormented cancer researchers. Based on this approach, a new field has emerged, called cancer systems biology. Despite its short history, cancer systems biology has already produced several success stories tackling previously impracticable problems. Perhaps most importantly, it has been accepted as an integral part of the major endeavors of cancer research, such as analyzing the genomic and epigenomic data produced by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Finally, we show that signal processing and cancer research, two fields that are seemingly distant from each other, have merged into a field that is indeed more than the sum of its parts.

  18. Molecular biology approaches in bioadhesion research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of molecular biology tools in the field of bioadhesion is still in its infancy. For new research groups who are considering taking a molecular approach, the techniques presented here are essential to unravelling the sequence of a gene, its expression and its biological function. Here we provide an outline for addressing adhesion-related genes in diverse organisms. We show how to gradually narrow down the number of candidate transcripts that are involved in adhesion by (1 generating a transcriptome and a differentially expressed cDNA list enriched for adhesion-related transcripts, (2 setting up a BLAST search facility, (3 perform an in situ hybridization screen, and (4 functional analyses of selected genes by using RNA interference knock-down. Furthermore, latest developments in genome-editing are presented as new tools to study gene function. By using this iterative multi-technologies approach, the identification, isolation, expression and function of adhesion-related genes can be studied in most organisms. These tools will improve our understanding of the diversity of molecules used for adhesion in different organisms and these findings will help to develop innovative bio-inspired adhesives.

  19. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Advances in Molecular and Cellular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue malignancy in childhood and adolescence. The two major histological subtypes of RMS are alveolar RMS, driven by the fusion protein PAX3-FKHR or PAX7-FKHR, and embryonic RMS, which is usually genetically heterogeneous. The prognosis of RMS has improved in the past several decades due to multidisciplinary care. However, in recent years, the treatment of patients with metastatic or refractory RMS has reached a plateau. Thus, to improve the survival rate of RMS patients and their overall well-being, further understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of RMS and identification of novel therapeutic targets are imperative. In this review, we describe the most recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of RMS, including alterations in oncogenic pathways, miRNA (miR, in vivo models, stem cells, and important signal transduction cascades implicated in the development and progression of RMS. Furthermore, we discuss novel potential targeted therapies that may improve the current treatment of RMS.

  20. Molecular biology foundation and treatment progress on HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer%HER-2过表达型乳腺癌的分子生物学基础及治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚孜琪; 姜达

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a a kind of highly heterogeneous malignant tumor by hormone receptor regulation.Different molecular subtypes of disease-free survival,recurrence rate and prognosis are not the same.Patients with HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer diagnosis often experience A higher malignant degree,low survival rate and inferior prognosis,The humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab is currently the foundation of treatment for HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer.However,due to drug resistance,targeting low efficiency,breast cancer eventually relapse inevitable.The follow-up treatment after trastuzumab resistant become a new hotspot.This article describes the basis of the molecular biology of HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer and corresponding signal transduction pathways,and as a basis for the development of a series of new drugs.%乳腺癌是一类受激素受体调控且高度异质性的恶性肿瘤,不同类型乳腺癌无病生存期、复发转移率及预后均不相同.其中HER-2过表达型乳腺癌恶性程度高、生存率低,预后相对较差.但却是曲妥珠单抗进行分子靶向治疗的较好的适应症,可极大的改善该类患者的生存率.但由于药物耐药性、靶向效率低等,乳腺癌的最终复发不可避免.针对曲妥珠单抗耐药以后的后续治疗成为新的研究热点,本文介绍了HER-2过表达型乳腺癌发生的分子生物学基础及相应的信号传导过程,及以此为基础开发了一系列新药.

  1. 三阴性乳腺癌的分子生物学及治疗进展%Progress of molecular biology and treatment for triple negative breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊杰; 钱军

    2016-01-01

    三阴性乳腺癌(TNBC)难以获益于内分泌治疗或曲妥珠单抗靶向药物治疗,乳腺癌易感基因1、p53基因、血管内皮生长因子、微小 RNA 等的生物过表达提示其易转移复发和较差的预后。探索 TNBC 的分子亚型、制定针对亚分类的治疗方案、寻找相应单克隆抗体的靶点是今后的研究方向。%Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC)is difficult to benefit from endocrine therapy or tras-tuzumab targeted drug therapy.Biological overexpression of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1,p53 gene,vas-cular endothelial growth factor and microRNA suggests that TNBC is easy to metastasis and recurrence and has a poor prognosis.Exploring the molecular subtypes of TNBC,setting out the treatment plan for subtypes and finding the corresponding monoclonal antibody targets are the research direction of TNBC in the future.

  2. A National Comparison of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Capstone Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the "American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end,…

  3. Synthetic biology: A foundation for multi-scale molecular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Adam G; McClintock, Maria K; Stephen S. Fong

    2010-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology has made rapid progress in a number of areas including method development, novel applications and community building. In seeking to make biology “engineerable,” synthetic biology is increasing the accessibility of biological research to researchers of all experience levels and backgrounds. One of the underlying strengths of synthetic biology is that it may establish the framework for a rigorous bottom-up approach to studying biology starting at the DNA level. Bu...

  4. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  5. Chemical kinetic mechanistic models to investigate cancer biology and impact cancer medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Edward C.

    2013-04-01

    Traditional experimental biology has provided a mechanistic understanding of cancer in which the malignancy develops through the acquisition of mutations that disrupt cellular processes. Several drugs developed to target such mutations have now demonstrated clinical value. These advances are unequivocal testaments to the value of traditional cellular and molecular biology. However, several features of cancer may limit the pace of progress that can be made with established experimental approaches alone. The mutated genes (and resultant mutant proteins) function within large biochemical networks. Biochemical networks typically have a large number of component molecules and are characterized by a large number of quantitative properties. Responses to a stimulus or perturbation are typically nonlinear and can display qualitative changes that depend upon the specific values of variable system properties. Features such as these can complicate the interpretation of experimental data and the formulation of logical hypotheses that drive further research. Mathematical models based upon the molecular reactions that define these networks combined with computational studies have the potential to deal with these obstacles and to enable currently available information to be more completely utilized. Many of the pressing problems in cancer biology and cancer medicine may benefit from a mathematical treatment. As work in this area advances, one can envision a future where such models may meaningfully contribute to the clinical management of cancer patients.

  6. 2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Sussman

    2010-07-23

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

  7. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L.R.

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Because of the often long latent period between initial contact with certain chemical and physical agents in our environment and subsequent expression of deleterious health or ecological impact, the development of sensitive methods for detecting and estimating early exposure is needed so that necessary interventions can ensue. A promising biological endpoint for detecting early exposure to damaging chemicals is the interaction of these compounds with cellular macromolecules such as Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). This biological endpoint assumes significance because it can be one of the critical early events leading eventually to adverse effects (neoplasia) in the exposed organism.

  8. Molecular Profiling of Prostate Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nna, Emmanuel Okechukwu

    2009-01-01

    In the UK, more than 30 000 men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer (PCa) and about 10 000 men die from it each year. Although several molecular markers have been associated with prostate cancer development and/ or progression, only few of them are used in diagnostic pathology. The current standard tests include serum PSA test, digital rectal examination and histology of prostate biopsy. Recently the PCA-3 molecular test was approved in the European Union, and it is now...

  9. Testicular cancer: biology and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looijenga, Leendert H J; Stoop, Hans; Biermann, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    The term "human germ cell tumors" (GCTs) refers to a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, all with a defined histological appearance. They have specific epidemiological characteristics, clinical behavior, and pathogenesis. Histologically, GCTs contain various tissue elements, which are homologs of normal embryogenesis. We have proposed a subclassification of GCTs in five subtypes, three of which preferentially occur in the testis. These include teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants (type I), seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults (type II), and spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly (type III). Both spontaneous and induced animal models have been reported, of which the relevance for human GCTs is still to be clarified. Multidisciplinary studies have recently shed new light on the (earliest steps in the) pathogenesis of GCTs, mainly in regard of malignant type II GCTs (germ cell cancer (GCC)). This review discusses novel understanding of the pathogenesis of (mainly) GCC, focusing on identification of informative diagnostic markers suitable for application in a clinical setting. These include OCT3/4, SOX9/FOXL2, SOX17/SOX2, as well as embryonic microRNAs. These markers have been identified through studies on normal embryogenesis, specifically related to the gonads, including the germ cell lineage. Their strengths and limitations are discussed as well as the expected future approach to identify the group of individuals at highest risk for development of a GCC. The latter would allow screening of defined populations, early diagnosis, optimal follow-up, and potentially early treatment, preventing long-term side effects of systemic treatment. PMID:24487784

  10. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing radiatio

  11. Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallick, R.B. [ed.

    1995-02-01

    The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

  12. State of the art biological therapies in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one ofthe most lethal malignancies with a five-year survivalrate of approximately 5%. Several target agents havebeen tested in PDAC, but almost all have failed todemonstrate efficacy in late phase clinical trials, despitethe better understanding of PDAC molecular biologygenerated by large cancer sequencing initiatives in thepast decade. Eroltinib (a small-molecule tyrosine-kinaseinhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor) plusgemcitabine is the only schedule with a biological agentapproved for advanced pancreatic cancer, but it hasresulted in a very modest survival benefit in unselectedpatients. In our work, we report a summary of the mainclinical trials (closed and ongoing) that refer to biologicaltherapy evaluation in pancreatic cancer treatment.

  13. Epidemiology and biology of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, W M; Janicek, M F; Mirhashemi, R

    1999-01-01

    Worldwide, cancer of the cervix is the second leading cause of cancer death in women: each year, an estimated 500,000 cases are newly diagnosed. Among populations, there are large differences in incidence rates of invasive cervical cancer: these reflect the influence of environmental factors, screening Papanicolaou (Pap) tests, and treatment of pre-invasive lesions. The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, and 51 have been recovered from more than 95% of cervical cancers. We have made great strides in understanding the molecular mechanism of oncogenesis of this virus, focusing on the action of the E6 and E7 viral oncoproteins. These oncoproteins function by inactivating cell cycle regulators p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb), thus providing the initial event in progression to malignancy. Cervical cancers develop from precursor lesions, which are termed squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and are graded as high or low, depending on the degree of disruption of epithelial differentiation. Viral production occurs in low-grade lesions and is restricted to basal cells. In carcinomas, viral DNA is found integrated into the host genome, but no viral production is seen. The well-defined pre-invasive stages, as well as the viral factors involved at the molecular level, make cervical carcinoma a good model for investigating immune therapeutic alternatives or adjuvants to standard treatments. PMID:10225296

  14. Biology of cancer: some questions to answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapekar, T

    2001-10-01

    Though great advances in cancer biology have taken place through these years, some fundamental questions are still to be explained. Some observations in this regard are discussed in the present paper. In the course of experimental studies on hormonal stimulation of target cells, it was observed that goat granulosa cells showed differential proliferative response to sustained stimulation by oLH and hCG in culture. oLH caused cells to proliferate whereas hCG failed to stimulate the cells though both the gonadotropins have common receptors on the target cell. Further studies might throw some light on the mechanism of signal transduction in cell biology and neoplasia. A question is also posed as to how to interpret thermodynamically the sustained growth of cancer vis-a-vis the host.

  15. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both with respect to traditional clinical treatment targets and on the genomic and transcriptomic level. With the increasing use of molecularly targeted therapy, discordance of actionable molecular targets between primary tumors and recurrences can result in nonoptimal treatment or unnecessary side effects. The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine receptors, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic insight into the biology underlying metastatic progression and has the potential to identify novel, potentially druggable, drivers of progression. PMID:27089067

  16. Exploiting novel molecular targets in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Novel molecular targets are being discovered as we learn more about the aberrant processes underlying various cancers. Efforts to translate this knowledge are starting to impact on the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway and angiogenesis have been targeted successfully in colorectal cancer with cetuximab, panitunumab and bevacizumab. Similarly, EGFR-targeting with erlotinib yielded significant survival benefit in pancreatic cancer when combined with gemcitabine. The multi-targeting approach with sorafenib has made it the first agent to achieve significant survival benefit in hepatocellular carcinoma. Efforts to exploit the dysregulated Akt/mTOR pathway in GI cancer therapy are ongoing. These molecular targets can be disrupted by various approaches, including the use of monoclonal antibody to intercept extracellular ligands and disrupt receptor-ligand binding, and small molecule inhibitors that interrupt the activation of intracellular kinases.

  17. Review and application of group theory to molecular systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rietman Edward A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper we provide a review of selected mathematical ideas that can help us better understand the boundary between living and non-living systems. We focus on group theory and abstract algebra applied to molecular systems biology. Throughout this paper we briefly describe possible open problems. In connection with the genetic code we propose that it may be possible to use perturbation theory to explore the adjacent possibilities in the 64-dimensional space-time manifold of the evolving genome. With regards to algebraic graph theory, there are several minor open problems we discuss. In relation to network dynamics and groupoid formalism we suggest that the network graph might not be the main focus for understanding the phenotype but rather the phase space of the network dynamics. We show a simple case of a C6 network and its phase space network. We envision that the molecular network of a cell is actually a complex network of hypercycles and feedback circuits that could be better represented in a higher-dimensional space. We conjecture that targeting nodes in the molecular network that have key roles in the phase space, as revealed by analysis of the automorphism decomposition, might be a better way to drug discovery and treatment of cancer.

  18. Review and application of group theory to molecular systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietman, Edward A; Karp, Robert L; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide a review of selected mathematical ideas that can help us better understand the boundary between living and non-living systems. We focus on group theory and abstract algebra applied to molecular systems biology. Throughout this paper we briefly describe possible open problems. In connection with the genetic code we propose that it may be possible to use perturbation theory to explore the adjacent possibilities in the 64-dimensional space-time manifold of the evolving genome. With regards to algebraic graph theory, there are several minor open problems we discuss. In relation to network dynamics and groupoid formalism we suggest that the network graph might not be the main focus for understanding the phenotype but rather the phase space of the network dynamics. We show a simple case of a C6 network and its phase space network. We envision that the molecular network of a cell is actually a complex network of hypercycles and feedback circuits that could be better represented in a higher-dimensional space. We conjecture that targeting nodes in the molecular network that have key roles in the phase space, as revealed by analysis of the automorphism decomposition, might be a better way to drug discovery and treatment of cancer. PMID:21696623

  19. 2003 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard F. Shand

    2004-09-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2003 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, NH from August 3-8, 2003. The Conference was well-attended with 150 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, ''free time'' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field. I want to personally thank you for your support of this Conference. As you know, in the interest of promoting the presentation of unpublished and frontier-breaking research, Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings. If you wish any further details, please feel free to contact me. Thank you, Dr. Richard F. Shand, 2003 Conference Chair.

  20. Biology of cancer: current issues and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J

    1992-02-01

    The future of cancer treatment is limited only by the rate of progress made in understanding the biology of cancer. The future will present a considerable challenge to health care professionals to learn new theories, understand new terms, and expect different toxicities. The explosion of information and technology is exciting, yet frightening. The willingness of scientists, health care professionals, and consumers to deal with the ethical, financial, and political issues generated by this progress is gratifying. Because science has created such advances, the effort to deal with the outcomes is worthwhile but still difficult. The challenge to rapidly facilitate the sharing of the scientific and clinical advances has been recognized by the nation. A legislative mandate to create a way to store and analyze the vast data related to molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics resulted in the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The development of automated systems to analyze genetic, environmental, biological, and chemistry information can only enhance future progress in the management of cancer.

  1. Recent advances in molecular biology of gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    萧树东; 冉志华

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major health care problem and the second most common fatal cancer worldwide. In the last decade, better insight has been gained into the molecular basis underlying the neoplasitc transformation of stomach. The dramatic variation in the incidence of gastric cancer in different geographical areas and from one generation to the next have led to the hypothesis that the incidence of gastric cancer is determined largely by environmental rather than genetic factors.

  2. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  3. A Diagnostic Assessment for Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jia; Wood, William B.; Martin, Jennifer M.; Guild, Nancy A.; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed…

  4. The nucleic acid revolution continues – will forensic biology become forensic molecular biology?

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, Peter; Walsh, Simon; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology has evolved far beyond that which could have been predicted at the time DNA identity testing was established. Indeed we should now perhaps be referring to “forensic molecular biology.” Aside from DNA’s established role in identifying the “who” in crime investigations, other developments in medical and developmental molecular biology are now ripe for application to forensic challenges. The impact of DNA methylation and other post-fertilization DNA modifications, plus the emer...

  5. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide Biology in Stress and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Bryan Craig

    2010-01-01

    The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in biological systems is associated with a variety of pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and the general process of aging. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that the reactivity of this particular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is also harnessed for physiological processes. Molecular imaging using fluorescence microscopy offers a valuable approach for deciphering the multifaceted roles of H2O2 in biological processes. ...

  6. Systems biology for molecular life sciences and its impact in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2013-03-01

    Modern systems biology is already contributing to a radical transformation of molecular life sciences and biomedicine, and it is expected to have a real impact in the clinical setting in the next years. In this review, the emergence of systems biology is contextualized with a historic overview, and its present state is depicted. The present and expected future contribution of systems biology to the development of molecular medicine is underscored. Concerning the present situation, this review includes a reflection on the "inflation" of biological data and the urgent need for tools and procedures to make hidden information emerge. Descriptions of the impact of networks and models and the available resources and tools for applying them in systems biology approaches to molecular medicine are provided as well. The actual current impact of systems biology in molecular medicine is illustrated, reviewing two cases, namely, those of systems pharmacology and cancer systems biology. Finally, some of the expected contributions of systems biology to the immediate future of molecular medicine are commented.

  7. Interactive analysis of systems biology molecular expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar Sunil; Salt David E; Kane Michael D; Stephenson Alan; Ouyang Qi; Zhang Mingwu; Burgner John; Buck Charles; Zhang Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Systems biology aims to understand biological systems on a comprehensive scale, such that the components that make up the whole are connected to one another and work through dependent interactions. Molecular correlations and comparative studies of molecular expression are crucial to establishing interdependent connections in systems biology. The existing software packages provide limited data mining capability. The user must first generate visualization data with a preferr...

  8. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  9. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, David; Pernia Leal, Manuel; Garcia, Irene; Garcia-Martin, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases) and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis) that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  10. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litchfield, J.H.; Zupancic, T.J.; Kittle, J.D. Jr.; Baker, B.; Palmer, D.T.; Traunero, C.G.; Wyza, R.E.; Schweitzer, A.; Conkle, H.N. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Chakravarty, L.; Tuovinen, O.H. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-10-08

    Progress is reported in understanding Thiobacillus molecular biology, specifically in the area of vector development. At the initiation of this program, the basic elements needed for performing genetic engineering in T. ferrooxidans were either not yet developed. Improved techniques are described which will make it easier to construct and analyze the genetic structure and metabolism of recombinant T. ferrooxidans. The metabolism of the model organic sulfur compound dibenzothiophene (DBT) by certain heterotrophic bacteria was confirmed and characterized. Techniques were developed to analyze the metabolites of DBT, so that individual 4S pathway metabolites could be distinguished. These techniques are expected to be valuable when engineering organic sulfur metabolism in Thiobacillus. Strain isolation techniques were used to develop pure cultures of T. ferrooxidans seven of which were assessed as potential recombinant hosts. The mixotrophic strain T. coprinus was also characterized for potential use as an electroporation host. A family of related Thiobacillus plasmids was discovered in the seven strains of P. ferrooxidans mentioned above. One of these plasmids, pTFI91, was cloned into a pUC-based plasmid vector, allowing it to propagate in E. coli. A key portion of the cloned plasmid was sequenced. This segment, which is conserved in all of the related plasmids characterized, contains the vegetative origin of DNA replication, and fortuitously, a novel insertion sequence, designated IS3091. The sequence of the DNA origin revealed that these Thiobacillus plasmids represent a unique class of replicons not previously described. The potentially useful insertion sequence IS3091 was identified as a new member of a previously undefined family of insertion sequences which include the E. coli element IS30.

  11. Clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Pineda, Estela; Adamo, Barbara; Galván, Patricia; Fernández, Aranzazu; Gaba, Lydia; Díez, Marc; Viladot, Margarita; Arance, Ana; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Gene-expression profiling has had a considerable impact on our understanding of breast cancer biology. During the last 15 years, 5 intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) have been identified and intensively studied. In this review, we will focus on the current and future clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes beyond the current pathological-based classification endorsed by the 2013 St. Gallen Consensus Recommendations. Within hormone receptor-positive and HER2-negative early breast cancer, the Luminal A and B subtypes predict 10-year outcome regardless of systemic treatment administered as well as residual risk of distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine therapy. Within clinically HER2-positive disease, the 4 main intrinsic subtypes can be identified and dominate the biological and clinical phenotype. From a clinical perspective, patients with HER2+/HER2-enriched disease seem to benefit the most from neoadjuvant trastuzumab, or dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab/lapatinib, in combination with chemotherapy, and patients with HER2+/Luminal A disease seem to have a relative better outcome compared to the other subtypes. Finally, within triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the Basal-like disease predominates (70-80%) and, from a biological perspective, should be considered a cancer-type by itself. Importantly, the distinction between Basal-like versus non-Basal-like within TNBC might predict survival following (neo)adjvuvant multi-agent chemotherapy, bevacizumab benefit in the neoadjuvant setting (CALGB40603), and docetaxel vs. carboplatin benefit in first-line metastatic disease (TNT study). Overall, this data suggests that intrinsic molecular profiling provides clinically relevant information beyond current pathology-based classifications.

  12. Cancer Hallmarks, Biomarkers and Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Liangjian; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease encompassing multiple tumor entities, each characterized by distinct morphology, behavior and clinical implications. Besides estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, novel biomarkers have shown their prognostic and predictive values, complicating our understanding towards to the heterogeneity of such cancers. Ten cancer hallmarks have been proposed by Weinberg to characterize cancer and its carcinogenesis. By reviewing biomarkers and breast cancer molecular subtypes, we propose that the divergent outcome observed from patients stratified by hormone status are driven by different cancer hallmarks. 'Sustaining proliferative signaling' further differentiates cancers with positive hormone receptors. 'Activating invasion and metastasis' and 'evading immune destruction' drive the differentiation of triple negative breast cancers. 'Resisting cell death', 'genome instability and mutation' and 'deregulating cellular energetics' refine breast cancer classification with their predictive values. 'Evading growth suppressors', 'enabling replicative immortality', 'inducing angiogenesis' and 'tumor-promoting inflammation' have not been involved in breast cancer classification which need more focus in the future biomarker-related research. This review novels in its global view on breast cancer heterogeneity, which clarifies many confusions in this field and contributes to precision medicine. PMID:27390604

  13. Molecular subtyping of serous ovarian tumors reveals multiple connections to intrinsic breast cancer subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny-Maria Jönsson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. METHODS: Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. RESULTS: 5,944 genes were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal-like breast cancer subtype were found. The benign and borderline serous tumors together were significantly correlated to the normal-like breast cancer subtype and the ovarian cancer signature derived from borderline tumors. The borderline tumors in the study dataset, in addition, also correlated significantly to the luminal A breast cancer subtype. These findings remained when analyzed in an independent dataset, supporting links between the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and breast cancer beyond those recently acknowledged. CONCLUSIONS: These data link the transcriptional profiles of serous ovarian cancer to the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer, in line with the shared clinical and molecular features between high-grade serous ovarian cancer and

  14. Identification of a novel luminal molecular subtype of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dvorkin-Gheva

    Full Text Available The molecular classification of human breast tumors has afforded insights into subtype specific biological processes, patient prognosis and response to therapies. However, using current methods roughly one quarter of breast tumors cannot be classified into one or another molecular subtype. To explore the possibility that the unclassifiable samples might comprise one or more novel subtypes we employed a collection of publically available breast tumor datasets with accompanying clinical information to assemble 1,593 transcript profiles: 25% of these samples could not be assigned to one of the current molecular subtypes of breast cancer. All of the unclassifiable samples could be grouped into a new molecular subtype, which we termed "luminal-like". We also identified the luminal-like subtype in an independent collection of tumor samples (NKI295. We found that patients harboring tumors of the luminal-like subtype have a better prognosis than those with basal-like breast cancer, a similar prognosis to those with ERBB2+, luminal B or claudin-low tumors, but a worse prognosis than patients with luminal A or normal-like breast tumors. Our findings suggest the occurrence of another molecular subtype of breast cancer that accounts for the vast majority of previously unclassifiable breast tumors.

  15. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Díaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol.

  16. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  17. Molecular biology techniques and applications for ocean sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Zehr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of marine microorganisms using molecular biological techniques is now widespread in the ocean sciences. These techniques target nucleic acids which record the evolutionary history of microbes, and encode for processes which are active in the ocean today. Here we review some of the most commonly used molecular biological techniques. Molecular biological techniques permit study of the abundance, distribution, diversity, and physiology of microorganisms in situ. These techniques include the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and reverse-transcriptase PCR, quantitative PCR, whole assemblage "fingerprinting" approaches (based on nucleic acid sequence or length heterogeneity, oligonucleotide microarrays, and high-throughput shotgun sequencing of whole genomes and gene transcripts, which can be used to answer biological, ecological, evolutionary and biogeochemical questions in the ocean sciences. Moreover, molecular biological approaches may be deployed on ocean sensor platforms and hold promise for tracking of organisms or processes of interest in near-real time.

  18. Molecular markers for prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, M.A.; Kastury, K.; Groskopf, J.; Schalken, J.A.; Rittenhouse, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    Serum PSA testing has been used for over 20 years as an aid in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Although highly sensitive, it suffers from a lack of specificity, showing elevated serum levels in a variety of other conditions including prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and non

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yu Jin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Park, Seorim; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Follo, Matilde Yung; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy.

  20. Molecular biology of liver disorders: the hepatitis C virus and molecular targets for drug development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Howard J. Worman; Feng Lin

    2000-01-01

    Molecular biology has made a tremendous impact on the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases[1,2]. In particular, advances in molecular biology made possible the discovery of the virus that causes hepatitis C. In this review, we use hepatitis C as an example of the impact that molecular biology has made in the area of liver disorders. We emphasize how our growing understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) has lead to the identification of targets for development of new treatments.

  1. CSMB | Center For Structural Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Structural Molecular Biologyat ORNL is dedicated to developing instrumentation and methods for determining the 3-dimensional structures of proteins,...

  2. Study on the correlation between ultrasonic signs and molecular biological expression in breast cancer%乳腺癌超声征象与分子生物学表达的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雯; 刘纪锋

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation between ultrasonic signs and molecular biological expression in breast cancer ,in order to improve the diagnostic level of breast cancer and provide reliable imaging information for the treatment and prognosis of breast cancer. Methods:Randomly selected 50 cases of pathologically confirmed breast cancer patients and 50 cases healthy person. Breast high frequency ultrasonography was performed in all patients,focusing on observation of tumor morphology,edge, rear echo,microcalcification,internal flow and axillary lymph nodes,all subjects using immunohistochemical assay for the detec-tion of Er,PR,CerbB-2 expression,and analyzed the relationship with their ultrasound imaging findings. Results:①The detection rate of microcalcification in ultrasound was the highest ,and the second was the edge of the burr shape. The detection rate of the tumor of irregular shape was higher when the tumor was greater than 2 cm. ②The positive rate of ER and PR of the as-pect ratio over 1 was 77.8% and 61.1% in the breast cancer group,which was higher than the aspect ratio lower than 1 (P2 cm的肿瘤检出率较高。②肿块纵横比>1患者的ER、PR阳性率为77.8%、61.1%,较纵横比≤1者高(P<0.05);③边缘毛刺征患者的ER、PR阳性率分别为65.5%、55.2%,较无毛刺组高(P<0.05);④周边高回声晕患者的ER和PR阳性率分别为73.3%、60.0%,均高于无高回声晕患者(P<0.05);⑤内部无回声区患者的PR阳性率22.2%,低于未见无回声区患者(P<0.05);⑥微小钙化患者的CerbB-2阳性率83.3%,高于未见微钙化者(P<0.05)。结论:乳腺癌超声表现与分子生物学指标的表达有一定的关系,肿瘤生物学特性影响乳腺癌的超声表现。超声检查可为乳腺癌的预后评估及临床治疗方式的选择提供影像学依据。

  3. [Molecular biology and childhood leukemia: E2A-PBX1 and central nervous system relapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. The inclusion of molecular biology techniques in the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of these patients has allowed major treatment achievements in developed countries. One of the best studied gene rearrangements is E2A-PBX1, which predicts isolated central nervous system relapse in patients with ALL. However, further research on the search for new molecular markers related to prognosis of patients with childhood leukemia is required. Such studies need the integration of different disciplines, including epidemiology. Epidemiological studies are needed not only to accelerate the discovery of new molecular markers and new biological signals as to the etiology and pathophysiology of cancer, but also to evaluate the clinical impact of these findings in well-defined populations. PMID:26509298

  4. New molecular targets against cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duenas-Gonzalez A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Duenas-Gonzalez,1,2 Alberto Serrano-Olvera,3 Lucely Cetina,4 Jaime Coronel4 1Unit of Biomedical Research in Cancer, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas UNAM/Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City, 2ISSEMyM Cancer Center, Toluca, 3Medical Oncology Service, ABC Medical Center, Mexico City, 4Division of Clinical Research, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City, Mexico On behalf of the Tumor Study Group Abstract: Cervical cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women. Major advances but still insufficient achievements in the treatment of locally advanced and high-risk early stage patients have occurred in the last decade with the incorporation of concurrent cisplatin with radiation and, lately, gemcitabine added to cisplatin chemoradiation. Despite a number of clinical studies incorporating molecular-targeted therapy as radiosensitizers being in progress, so far, only antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab added to cisplatin chemoradiation has demonstrated safety and shown encouraging results in a Phase II study. In advanced disease, cisplatin doublets do not have a great impact on the natural history of the disease with median survival rates not exceeding 13 months. The first Phase III study of bevacizumab, added to cisplatin or a non-cisplatin-containing doublet, showed significant increase in both overall survival and progression-free survival. Further studies are needed before bevacizumab plus chemotherapy can be considered the standard of care for advanced disease. Characterization of the mutational landscape of cervical cancer has already been initiated, indicating that, for now, few of these targetable alterations match with available agents. Progress in both the mutational landscape knowledge and developments of novel targeted therapies may result in more effective and individualized treatments for cervical cancer. The potential efficacy of

  5. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  6. Molecular markers and targets for colorectal cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveena B JANAKIRAM; Chinthalapally V RAO

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. If detected at an early stage, treatment often might lead to cure. As prevention is better than cure, epidemiological studies reveal that having a healthy diet often protects from pro-moting/developing cancer. An important consideration in evaluating new drugs and devices is determining whether a product can effectively treat a targeted disease. There are quite a number of biomarkers making their way into clinical trials and few are awaiting the preclinical efficacy and safety results to enter into clinical trials. Researchers are facing challenges in modifying trial design and defining the right control population, validating biomarker assays from the bio-logical and analytical perspective and using biomarker data as a guideline for decision making. In spite of following all guidelines, the results are disappointing from many of the large clinical trials. To avoid these disappointments, selection of biomarkers and its target drug needs to be evaluated in appropriate animal models for its toxicities and efficacies. The focus of this review is on the few of the potential molecular targets and their biomarkers in colorectal cancers. Strengths and limitations of biomarkers/surrogate endpoints are also discussed. Various pathways involved in tumor cells and the specific agents to target the altered molecular biomarkerin biomolecular pathwayare elucidated. Importance of emerging new platforms siRNAs and miRNAs technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics is reviewed.

  7. Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network: a systems biology resource for integrative analysis of cancer data with Google Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperstein, I; Bonnet, E; Nguyen, H-A; Cohen, D; Viara, E; Grieco, L; Fourquet, S; Calzone, L; Russo, C; Kondratova, M; Dutreix, M; Barillot, E; Zinovyev, A

    2015-01-01

    Cancerogenesis is driven by mutations leading to aberrant functioning of a complex network of molecular interactions and simultaneously affecting multiple cellular functions. Therefore, the successful application of bioinformatics and systems biology methods for analysis of high-throughput data in cancer research heavily depends on availability of global and detailed reconstructions of signalling networks amenable for computational analysis. We present here the Atlas of Cancer Signalling Network (ACSN), an interactive and comprehensive map of molecular mechanisms implicated in cancer. The resource includes tools for map navigation, visualization and analysis of molecular data in the context of signalling network maps. Constructing and updating ACSN involves careful manual curation of molecular biology literature and participation of experts in the corresponding fields. The cancer-oriented content of ACSN is completely original and covers major mechanisms involved in cancer progression, including DNA repair, cell survival, apoptosis, cell cycle, EMT and cell motility. Cell signalling mechanisms are depicted in detail, together creating a seamless 'geographic-like' map of molecular interactions frequently deregulated in cancer. The map is browsable using NaviCell web interface using the Google Maps engine and semantic zooming principle. The associated web-blog provides a forum for commenting and curating the ACSN content. ACSN allows uploading heterogeneous omics data from users on top of the maps for visualization and performing functional analyses. We suggest several scenarios for ACSN application in cancer research, particularly for visualizing high-throughput data, starting from small interfering RNA-based screening results or mutation frequencies to innovative ways of exploring transcriptomes and phosphoproteomes. Integration and analysis of these data in the context of ACSN may help interpret their biological significance and formulate mechanistic hypotheses

  8. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more accessible and potentially usable from a methodological viewpoint for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule before surgery. The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more

  9. Molecular biology techniques and applications for ocean sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Zehr

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of marine microorganisms using molecular biological techniques is now widespread in the ocean sciences. These techniques target nucleic acids which record the evolutionary history of microbes, and encode for processes which are active in the ocean today. Molecular techniques can form the basis of remote instrumentation sensing technologies for marine microbial diversity and ecological function. Here we review some of the most commonly used molecular biological techniques. These techniques include the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and reverse-transcriptase PCR, quantitative PCR, whole assemblage "fingerprinting" approaches (based on nucleic acid sequence or length heterogeneity, oligonucleotide microarrays, and high-throughput shotgun sequencing of whole genomes and gene transcripts, which can be used to answer biological, ecological, evolutionary and biogeochemical questions in the ocean sciences. Moreover, molecular biological approaches may be deployed on ocean sensor platforms and hold promise for tracking of organisms or processes of interest in near-real time.

  10. Molecular pathogenesis ofsporadic colorectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HidetsuguYamagishi; HajimeKuroda; YasuoImai; HideyukiHiraishi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classiifed into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identiifed by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the ifrst half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a lim-ited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research ifeld and discuss its prospects.

  11. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  12. A refined molecular taxonomy of breast cancer. : molecular classification of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Guedj, Michael; Marisa, Laëtitia; De Reynies, Aurélien; Orsetti, Béatrice; Schiappa, Renaud; Bibeau, Frédéric; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Lerebours, Florence; Finetti, Pascal; Longy, Michel; Bertheau, Philippe; Bertrand, Françoise; Bonnet, Françoise; Martin, Anne-Laure; Feugeas, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The current histoclinical breast cancer classification is simple but imprecise. Several molecular classifications of breast cancers based on expression profiling have been proposed as alternatives. However, their reliability and clinical utility have been repeatedly questioned, notably because most of them were derived from relatively small initial patient populations. We analyzed the transcriptomes of 537 breast tumors using three unsupervised classification methods. ...

  13. [Molecular bases of cancer immunology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune system is a tight network of different types of cells and molecules. The coordinated action of these elements mounts a precise immune response against tumor cells. However, these cells present several escape mechanisms, leading to tumor progression. This paper shows several cellular and molecular events involved in the regulation of the immune response against tumor cells. The interaction of several molecules such as MHC, TcR, adhesins, tumor antigens and cytokines are discussed, as well as the most recent knowledge about escape mechanisms and immunotherapy. PMID:7502157

  14. The evolving biology and treatment of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Taichman, Russel S.; Loberg, Robert D; Mehra, Rohit; Kenneth J Pienta

    2007-01-01

    Since the effectiveness of androgen deprivation for treatment of advanced prostate cancer was first demonstrated, prevention strategies and medical therapies for prostate cancer have been based on understanding the biologic underpinnings of the disease. Prostate cancer treatment is one of the best examples of a systematic therapeutic approach to target not only the cancer cells themselves, but the microenvironment in which they are proliferating. As the population ages and prostate cancer pre...

  15. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer: implications for future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etel R. P. Gimba

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been developed trying to understand the complex molecular mechanisms involved in oncogenesis and progression of prostate cancer (PCa. Current biotechnological methodologies, especially genomic studies, are adding important aspects to this area. The construction of extensive DNA sequence data and gene expression profiles have been intensively explored to search for candidate biomarkers to evaluate PCa. The use of DNA micro-array robotic systems constitutes a powerful approach to simultaneously monitor the expression of a great number of genes. The resulting gene expressing profiles can be used to specifically describe tumor staging and response to cancer therapies. Also, it is possible to follow PCa pathological properties and to identify genes that anticipate the behavior of clinical disease. The molecular pathogenesis of PCa involves many contributing factors, such as alterations in signal transduction pathways, angiogenesis, adhesion molecules expression and cell cycle control. Also, molecular studies are making clear that many genes, scattered through several different chromosomal regions probably cause predisposition to PCa. The discovery of new molecular markers for PCa is another relevant advance resulting from molecular biology studies of prostate tumors. Interesting tissue and serum markers have been reported, resulting in many cases in useful novelties to diagnostic and prognostic approaches to follow-up PCa. Finally, gene therapy comes as an important approach for therapeutic intervention in PCa. Clinical trials for PCa have been demonstrating that gene therapy is relatively safe and well tolerated, although some improvements are yet to be developed.

  16. Bacteriophages: The viruses for all seasons of molecular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Jim D

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacteriophage research continues to break new ground in our understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of gene action and biological structure. The abundance of bacteriophages in nature and the diversity of their genomes are two reasons why phage research brims with excitement. The pages of Virology Journal will reflect the excitement of the "New Phage Biology."

  17. Proceedings of the symposium on molecular biology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symposium on molecular biology and radiation protection was organized in sessions with the following titles: Radiation protection and the human genome; Molecular changes in DNA induced by radiation; Incidence of genetic changes - pre-existing, spontaneous and radiation-induced; Research directions and ethical implications. The ten papers in the symposium have been abstracted individually

  18. Fundamental Approaches in Molecular Biology for Communication Sciences and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Rebecca S.; Jette, Marie E.; King, Suzanne N.; Schaser, Allison; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This contemporary tutorial will introduce general principles of molecular biology, common deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein assays and their relevance in the field of communication sciences and disorders. Method: Over the past 2 decades, knowledge of the molecular pathophysiology of human disease has…

  19. Using a Computer Animation to Teach High School Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotbain, Yosi; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Stavy, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    We present an active way to use a computer animation in secondary molecular genetics class. For this purpose we developed an activity booklet that helps students to work interactively with a computer animation which deals with abstract concepts and processes in molecular biology. The achievements of the experimental group were compared with those…

  20. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging

  1. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  2. [Better understanding of the biology of cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G

    2000-09-25

    Most forms of cancer arise through a Darwinian evolutionary process. The natural selection that ultimately leads to cancer takes place in somatic tissues although it may be triggered by inherited mutations in a small but significant minority. It favors the growth of clones and subclones that are less and less responsive to normal intra- and extracellular growth control mechanisms. The development of molecular biology has led to the identification of many genes that participate in this somatic evolution. They belong to the following groups: Oncogenes, constitutively activated by structural and/or regulatory changes that drive the cell to continuous proliferation; Tumor suppressor genes, that can inhibit the illegitimately activated cell cycle. They contribute to tumor development by loss mutations or permanent down-regulation, e.g. by methylation; Apoptosis inhibitory genes that can contribute to tumor development by raising the apoptotic threshold, and apoptosis promoting genes that can favor the growth of apoptosis prone tumor cells by their loss or inactivation; DNA repair genes whose inactivation can counteract the normal elimination of cells that carry potentially cancer promoting mutations. Inherited mutations in DNA repair genes can lead to familial cancer syndromes. Immortalizing genes that counteract cellular senescence; Angiogenesis promoting genes whose products may stimulate the vascular supply of tumors; Genes whose structural or functional changes may facilitate the escape of tumor cells from immune rejection; The multi-step development of individual tumors can encompass changes in most or all of these genes. They occur independently of each other and without any fixed order or timing. Tumor emancipation from growth control can therefore proceed along various pathways. It follows that each tumor must be regarded as a biologically unique individual.

  3. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. (Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  4. Cancer of the Pancreas: Molecular Pathways and Current Advancement in Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers among all malignances, with a median overall survival of cancers harbor a variety of genetic alternations that render it difficult to treat even with targeted therapy. Recent studies revealed that pancreatic cancers are highly enriched with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population, which is resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs, and therefore escapes chemotherapy and promotes tumor recurrence. Cancer cell epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is highly associated with metastasis, generation of CSCs, and treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. Reviewed here are the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the major signaling pathways regulating pancreatic cancer EMT and CSCs, and the advancement in current clinical and experimental treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  5. 09091 Executive Summary -- Formal Methods in Molecular Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Breitling, Rainer; Gilbert, David Roger; Heiner, Monika; Priami, Corrado

    2009-01-01

    Formal logical models play an increasing role in the newly emerging field of Systems Biology. Compared to the classical, well-established approach of modeling biological processes using continuous and stochastic differential equations, formal logical models offer a number of important advantages. Many different formal modeling paradigms have been applied to molecular biology, each with its own community, formalisms and tools. In this seminar we brought together modelers from variou...

  6. Gastric cancer-molecular and clinical dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Roopma; Song, Shumei; Lee, Ju-Seog; Yao, Yixin; Wei, Qingyi; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer imposes a considerable health burden around the globe despite its declining incidence. The disease is often diagnosed in advanced stages and is associated with a poor prognosis for patients. An in-depth understanding of the molecular underpinnings of gastric cancer has lagged behind many other cancers of similar incidence and morbidity, owing to our limited knowledge of germline susceptibility traits for risk and somatic drivers of progression (to identify novel therapeutic targets). A few germline (PLCE1) and somatic (ERBB2, ERBB3, PTEN, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, FGF, TP53, CDH1 and MET) alterations are emerging and some are being pursued clinically. Novel somatic gene targets (ARID1A, FAT4, MLL and KMT2C) have also been identified and are of interest. Variations in the therapeutic approaches dependent on geographical region are evident for localized gastric cancer-differences that are driven by preferences for the adjuvant strategies and the extent of surgery coupled with philosophical divides. However, greater uniformity in approach has been noted in the metastatic cancer setting, an incurable condition. Having realized only modest successes, momentum is building for carrying out more phase III comparative trials, with some using biomarker-based patient selection strategies. Overall, rapid progress in biotechnology is improving our molecular understanding and can help with new drug discovery. The future prospects are excellent for defining biomarker-based subsets of patients and application of specific therapeutics. However, many challenges remain to be tackled. Here, we review representative molecular and clinical dimensions of gastric cancer.

  7. The cellular and molecular biology of medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peringa, A; Fung, KM; Muragaki, Y; Trojanowski, JQ

    1995-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are prototypical of primitive neuroectodermal tumors which are some of the most frequent malignant brain tumors of childhood. The cell biology of medulloblastomas is still poorly understood, but recent studies of the expression of trophic factors and their receptors in medulloblasto

  8. Methods in molecular biology: plant cytogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytogenetic studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of genetics, biology, reproduction, and evolution. From early studies in basic chromosome behavior the field has expanded enabling whole genome analysis to the manipulation of chromosomes and their organization. This book covers a ran...

  9. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbane, J.J. II; Bielaga, B.A.

    1991-12-01

    The overall objective of this project was to use molecular genetics to develop strains of bacteria with enhanced ability to remove sulfur from coal, and to obtain data that will allow the performance and economics of a coal biodesulfurization process to be predicted. (VC)

  10. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the western world for both men and women. Lung cancer appears to be a perfect candidate for a screening program, since it is the number one cancer killer, it has a long preclinical phase, curative treatment for the minority of patients who are diagnosed early and a target population at risk (smokers and it is also a major economic burden. The earliest approaches to identifying cancer markers were based on preliminary clinical or pathological observations, although molecular biology is a strong candidate for occupying a place among the set of methods. In search of markers, several alterations, such as mutations, loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite instability, DNA methylation, mitochondrial DNA mutations, viral DNA, modified expression of mRNA, miRNA and proteins, and structurally altered proteins have all been analysed. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small RNA molecules, about 19-25 nucleotides long and encoded in genomes of plants, animals, fungi and viruses. It has been reported that miRNAs may have multiple functions in lung development and that aberrant expression of miRNAs could induce lung tumorigenesis. We review here the role of miRNAs in lung tumorigenesis and also as a novel type of biomarker.-----------------------------------Cite this article as:Silva J, Garcia V, Lopez-Gonzalez A, Provencio M. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:010111. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0101.11

  11. Systems biology in the frontier of cancer research:a report of the Second International Workshop of Cancer Systems Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Cui; Yan-Chun Liang; Ying Xu

    2012-01-01

    The report summarizes the Second International Workshop of Cancer Systems Biology held on July 5-6,2012 in Changchun,China.The goal of the workshop was to bring together cancer researchers with different backgrounds to share their views about cancer and their experiences in fighting against cancer,and to gain new and systems-level understanding about cancer formation,progression,diagnosis,and treatment through exchanging ideas.

  12. Systems biology in the frontier of cancer research: a report of the Second International Workshop of Cancer Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Xu; Yan-Chun Liang; Juan Cui

    2012-01-01

    The report summarizes the Second International Workshop of Cancer Systems Biology held on July 5-6, 2012 in Changchun, China. The goal of the workshop was to bring together cancer researchers with different backgrounds to share their views about cancer and their experiences in fighting against cancer, and to gain new and systems-level understanding about cancer formation, progression, diagnosis, and treatment through exchanging ideas.

  13. Interactive analysis of systems biology molecular expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Sunil

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology aims to understand biological systems on a comprehensive scale, such that the components that make up the whole are connected to one another and work through dependent interactions. Molecular correlations and comparative studies of molecular expression are crucial to establishing interdependent connections in systems biology. The existing software packages provide limited data mining capability. The user must first generate visualization data with a preferred data mining algorithm and then upload the resulting data into the visualization package for graphic visualization of molecular relations. Results Presented is a novel interactive visual data mining application, SysNet that provides an interactive environment for the analysis of high data volume molecular expression information of most any type from biological systems. It integrates interactive graphic visualization and statistical data mining into a single package. SysNet interactively presents intermolecular correlation information with circular and heatmap layouts. It is also applicable to comparative analysis of molecular expression data, such as time course data. Conclusion The SysNet program has been utilized to analyze elemental profile changes in response to an increasing concentration of iron (Fe in growth media (an ionomics dataset. This study case demonstrates that the SysNet software is an effective platform for interactive analysis of molecular expression information in systems biology.

  14. Cellular and molecular aspects of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm G Smith; Georgina L Hold; Eiichi Tahara; Emad M El-Omar

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global killer with a shifting burden from the developed to the developing world.The cancer develops along a multistage process that is defined by distinct histological and pathophysiological phases. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations mediate the transition from one stage to another and these include mutations in oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cell cycle and mismatch repair genes. The most significant advance in the fight against gastric caner came with the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as the most important acquired aetiological agent for this cancer. Recent work has focussed on elucidating the complex host/microbial interactions that underlie the neoplastic process. There is now considerable insight into the pathogenesis of this cancer and the prospect of preventing and eradicating the disease has become a reality. Perhaps more importantly, the study of H pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis offers a paradigm for understanding more complex human cancers. In this review, we examine the molecular and cellular events that underlie H pyloriinduced gastric cancer.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of metastasis in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel W.Clarke; Claire A.Hart; Mick D.Brown

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) preferentially metastasizes to the bone marrow stroma of the axial skeleton.This activity is the principal cause of PCa morbidity and mortality.The exact mechanism of PCa metastasis is currently unknown,although considerable progress has been made in determining the key players in this process.In this review,we present the current understanding of the molecular processes driving PCa metastasis to the bone.

  16. Molecular basis of the triple negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ayse Feyda Nursal

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women and more than 1 million breast cancer cases are diagnosed each year all over the world. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease in terms of its molecular structure, mutation type, metastase properties, clinical course and therapeutic response. Breast cancer is divided into subtypes based on expression properties of molecular markers as estrogen receptor, progestron receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Triple-...

  17. Asymmetry at the molecular level in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Louise N.

    2005-10-01

    Naturally occurring biological molecules are made of homochiral building blocks. Proteins are composed of L-amino acids (and not D-amino acids); nucleic acids such as DNA have D-ribose sugars (and not L-ribose sugars). It is not clear why nature selected a particular chirality. Selection could have occurred by chance or as a consequence of basic physical chemistry. Possible proposals, including the contribution of the parity violating the weak nuclear force, are discussed together with the mechanisms by which this very small contribution might be amplified. Homochirality of the amino acids has consequences for protein structure. Helices are right handed and beta sheets have a left-hand twist. When incorporated into the tertiary structure of a protein these chiralities limit the topologies of connections between helices and sheets. Polypeptides comprised of D-amino acids can be synthesized chemically and have been shown to adopt stable structures that are the mirror image of the naturally occurring L-amino acid polypeptides. Chirality is important in drug design. Three examples are discussed: penicillin; the CD4 antagonistic peptides; and thalidomide. The absolute hand of a biological structure can only be established by X-ray crystallographic methods using the technique of anomalous scattering.

  18. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  19. MICA polymorphism: biology and importance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA) encodes a membrane-bound protein acting as a ligand to stimulate an activating receptor, NKG2D, expressed on the surface of essentially all human natural killer (NK), γδ T and CD8(+) αβ T cells. MICA protein is absent from most cells but can be induced by infections and oncogenic transformation and is frequently expressed in epithelial tumors. Upon binding to MICA, NKG2D activates cytolytic responses of NK and γδ T cells against infected and tumor cells expressing MICA. Therefore, membrane-bound MICA acts as a signal during the early immune response against infection or spontaneously arising tumors. On the other hand, human tumor cells spontaneously release a soluble form of MICA, causing the downregulation of NKG2D and in turn severe impairment of the antitumor immune response of NK and CD8(+) T cells. This is considered to promote tumor immune evasion and also to compromise host resistance to infections. MICA is the most polymorphic non-classical class I gene. A possible association of MICA polymorphism with genetic predisposition to different cancer types has been investigated in candidate gene-based studies. Two genome-wide association studies have identified loci in MICA that influence susceptibility to cervical neoplasia and hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. Given the current level of interest in the field of MICA gene, we discuss the genetics and biology of the MICA gene and the role of its polymorphism in cancer. Gaps in our understanding and future research needs are also discussed.

  20. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Patel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Shyam A Patel1,2,3, Andrew C Heinrich2,3, Bobby Y Reddy2, Pranela Rameshwar21Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 2Department of Medicine – Division of Hematology/Oncology, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 3These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the effects of inflammatory reactions on stem cells and extrapolate on information pertaining to cancer biology. The discussion focuses on integrins and cytokines, and identifies the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB as central to the inflammatory response. Since stem cell therapy has been proposed for type II diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, pulmonary edema, these disorders are used as examples to discuss the roles of inflammatory mediators. We propose prospects for future research on targeting the NFκB signaling pathway. Finally, we explore the bridge between inflammation and stem cells, including neural stem cells and adult stem cells from the bone marrow. The implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine as pertaining to inflammation are vast based on their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Such features of stem cells offer great potential for therapy in graft-versus-host disease, conditions with a significant inflammatory component, and tissue regeneration.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, cancer, cytokines

  1. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  2. Overview of selected molecular biological databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayl, K.D.; Gaasterland, T.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the purpose, content, and design of a subset of the currently available biological databases, with an emphasis on protein databases. Databases included in this summary are 3D-ALI, Berlin RNA databank, Blocks, DSSP, EMBL Nucleotide Database, EMP, ENZYME, FSSP, GDB, GenBank, HSSP, LiMB, PDB, PIR, PKCDD, ProSite, and SWISS-PROT. The goal is to provide a starting point for researchers who wish to take advantage of the myriad available databases. Rather than providing a complete explanation of each database, we present its content and form by explaining the details of typical entries. Pointers to more complete ``user guides`` are included, along with general information on where to search for a new database.

  3. pGLO Mutagenesis: A Laboratory Procedure in Molecular Biology for Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, Eby A.

    2011-01-01

    A five-session laboratory project was designed to familiarize or increase the laboratory proficiency of biology students and others with techniques and instruments commonly used in molecular biology research laboratories and industries. In this project, the EZ-Tn5 transposon is used to generate and screen a large number of cells transformed with…

  4. Genomics Study of Gastric Cancer and Its Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease encompassing diverse morphological (intestinal versus diffuse) and molecular subtypes (MSI, EBV, TP53 mutation). Recent advances in genomic technology have led to an improved understanding of the driver gene mutational profile, gene expression, and epigenetic alterations that underlie each of the subgroups, with therapeutic implications in some of these alterations. There have been attempts to classify gastric cancers based on these genomic features, with an aim to improve prognostication and predict responsiveness to specific drug therapy. The eventual aims of these genomic studies are to develop deep biological insights into the carcinogenic pathway in each of these subtypes. Future large-scale drug screening strategies may then be able to link these genomic features to drug responsiveness, eventually leading to genome-guided personalized medicine with improved cure rates. PMID:27573784

  5. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L.R.; D' Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  6. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  7. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO6-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O6-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP

  8. Molecular Imaging Probes for Diagnosis and Therapy Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer death in women where early detection and accurate assessment of therapy response can improve clinical outcomes. Molecular imaging, which includes PET, SPECT, MRI, and optical modalities, provides noninvasive means of detecting biological processes and molecular events in vivo. Molecular imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology and effects of drug action during both preclinical and clinical phases of drug development. This has led to the identification of many molecular imaging probes for key processes in breast cancer. Hormone receptors, growth factor receptor, and angiogenic factors, such as ER, PR, HER2, and VEGFR, have been adopted as imaging targets to detect and stage the breast cancer and to monitor the treatment efficacy. Receptor imaging probes are usually composed of targeting moiety attached to a signaling component such as a radionuclide that can be detected using dedicated instruments. Current molecular imaging probes involved in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy evaluation are reviewed, and future of molecular imaging for the preclinical and clinical is explained.

  9. Molecular targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer%胃肠癌分子靶向治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Xiang; Ximing Xu

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer is one of the highly prevalent malignant diseases worldwide which is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the world and its management,especially in advanced stages, has evolved relatively little [1]. Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide [2]. The surgical treatment is still the most effective therapy for the gastrointestinal cancer. However, the majority of the patients had lost the opporunity of surgical therapy when it was detected at advanced stage, so to seek means other than surgical treatment of gastrointestinal cancer metastasis and recurrence also has an important significance. With the deeping research of the molecular biology, molecular targeted therapy has become the hotspot and focus of comprehensive treatment of gastrointestinal cancer which is proposed against the molecular biological targets such as tumor cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle, invasion and angiogenesis. Molecular targeted therapy can be grouped into six main areas: the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, anti-angiogenic factors, cell cycle inhibitors, apoptosis promoters and matrix metalloproteinase innhibitors, cyclooxygenase inhibitors. The review of the progress are as follows.

  10. A decade of molecular cell biology: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Asifa; Fuchs, Elaine; Mitchison, Tim; Shaw, Reuben J; St Johnston, Daniel; Strasser, Andreas; Taylor, Susan; Walczak, Claire; Zerial, Marino

    2011-09-23

    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology celebrated its 10-year anniversary during this past year with a series of specially commissioned articles. To complement this, here we have asked researchers from across the field for their insights into how molecular cell biology research has evolved during this past decade, the key concepts that have emerged and the most promising interfaces that have developed. Their comments highlight the broad impact that particular advances have had, some of the basic understanding that we still require, and the collaborative approaches that will be essential for driving the field forward.

  11. Molecular biological mechanism II. Molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell cycle in eukaryotes is regulated by central cell cycle controlling protein kinase complexes. These protein kinase complexes consist of a catalytic subunit from the cyclin-dependent protein kinase family (CDK), and a regulatory subunit from the cyclin family. Cyclins are characterised by their periodic cell cycle related synthesis and destruction. Each cell cycle phase is characterised by a specific set of CDKs and cyclins. The activity of CDK/cyclin complexes is mainly regulated on four levels. It is controlled by specific phosphorylation steps, the synthesis and destruction of cyclins, the binding of specific inhibitor proteins, and by active control of their intracellular localisation. At several critical points within the cell cycle, named checkpoints, the integrity of the cellular genome is monitored. If damage to the genome or an unfinished prior cell cycle phase is detected, the cell cycle progression is stopped. These cell cycle blocks are of great importance to secure survival of cells. Their primary importance is to prevent the manifestation and heritable passage of a mutated genome to daughter cells. Damage sensing, DNA repair, cell cycle control and apoptosis are closely linked cellular defence mechanisms to secure genome integrity. Disregulation in one of these defence mechanisms are potentially correlated with an increased cancer risk and therefore in at least some cases with an increased radiation sensitivity. (orig.)

  12. Molecular circuits, biological switches, and nonlinear dose-response relationships.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Melvin E.; Yang, Raymond S.H.; French, C. Tenley; Chubb, Laura S; Dennison, James E

    2002-01-01

    Signaling motifs (nuclear transcriptional receptors, kinase/phosphatase cascades, G-coupled protein receptors, etc.) have composite dose-response behaviors in relation to concentrations of protein receptors and endogenous signaling molecules. "Molecular circuits" include the biological components and their interactions that comprise the workings of these signaling motifs. Many of these molecular circuits have nonlinear dose-response behaviors for endogenous ligands and for exogenous toxicants...

  13. A possible molecular metric for biological evolvability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya Mittal; B Jayaram

    2012-07-01

    Proteins manifest themselves as phenotypic traits, retained or lost in living systems via evolutionary pressures. Simply put, survival is essentially the ability of a living system to synthesize a functional protein that allows for a response to environmental perturbations (adaptation). Loss of functional proteins leads to extinction. Currently there are no universally applicable quantitative metrics at the molecular level for either measuring ‘evolvability’ of life or for assessing the conditions under which a living system would go extinct and why. In this work, we show emergence of the first such metric by utilizing the recently discovered stoichiometric margin of life for all known naturally occurring (and functional) proteins. The constraint of having well-defined stoichiometries of the 20 amino acids in naturally occurring protein sequences requires utilization of the full scope of degeneracy in the genetic code, i.e. usage of all codons coding for an amino acid, by only 11 of the 20 amino acids. This shows that the non-availability of individual codons for these 11 amino acids would disturb the fine stoichiometric balance resulting in non-functional proteins and hence extinction. Remarkably, these amino acids are found in close proximity of any given amino acid in the backbones of thousands of known crystal structures of folded proteins. On the other hand, stoichiometry of the remaining 9 amino acids, found to be farther/distal from any given amino acid in backbones of folded proteins, is maintained independent of the number of codons available to synthesize them, thereby providing some robustness and hence survivability.

  14. Diet & Cancer: An Update for Biology Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Clifford J.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on dietary substances which act against cancer-causing agents. Indicates that adapting a lifestyle which combines reduced fat intake with increased fiber-containing foods will reduce the risk of some common cancers. Provides teaching strategies and activities to help students analyze their lifestyles for a reduction in cancer risk. (RT)

  15. Oral cancer: molecular technologies for risk assessment and diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Tao Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: The effective biomarkers related to diagnosis, metastasis, drug resistance and irradiation sensitivity of oral cancers will help the pathologist and oncologist to determine the molecular taxonomy diagnosis and design the individualization treatment for the patients with oral cancers.

  16. Deciphering The Complex Biological Interactions Of Nitric Oxide In Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Perwez Hussain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available NO• is a free radical and is involved in a number of critical physiological processes including vasodilation, neurotransmission, immune regulation and inflammation. There are convincing evidence suggesting a role of NO• in the development and progression of different cancer types. However, the role of NO• in tumorigenesis is highly complex and both pro- and anti-neoplastic functions have been reported, which largely depends on the amount of NO•, cell types, cellular microenvironment, its interaction with other reactive species and presence of metals. An interesting interaction occurs between NO• and p53 tumor suppressor, in which NO•-induced DNA damage causes the stabilization and accumulation of p53, which in turn, transrepresses inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2 in a negative feedback loop. In chronic inflammatory diseases, for example ulcerative colitis, NO• induces p53 stabilization and the initiation of DNA-damage response pathway, and also generation of p53 mutation and subsequent clonal selection of p53 mutant cells. Genetic deletion of NOS2 in p53-deficient mice can either suppress or enhance lymphomagenesis depending on the inflammatory microenvironment. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the complex biological interaction of NO• in the context of the molecular makeup of each individual cancer to design NO•-targeted treatment strategies.

  17. Molecular Imaging of Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Riedl, Chris C.; Dickler, Maura N.; Jhaveri, Komal; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The success of breast cancer therapy is ultimately defined by clinical endpoints such as survival. It is valuable to have biomarkers that can predict the most efficacious therapies or measure response to therapy early in the course of treatment. Molecular imaging has a promising role in complementing and overcoming some of the limitations of traditional biomarkers by providing the ability to perform noninvasive, repeatable whole-body assessments. The potential advantages of imaging biomarkers are obvious and initial clinical studies have been promising, but proof of clinical utility still requires prospective multicenter clinical trials. PMID:26834103

  18. From Molecular Biology to Biomedicine; De la Biologia Molecular a la Biomedicina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, M.

    2009-07-01

    From Molecular Biology to Biomedicine. The well known molecular biologist Margarita S alas offered an informative conference at the CSN on progress in these areas since the discovery, more than half a century ago, of the structure of the molecule carrying genetic information, DNA, work that is having an enormous impact in areas such as biomedicine and foodstuff production. (Author)

  19. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia : recent molecular biology findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraszewska, Monika D.; Dawidowska, Malgorzata; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Witt, Michal

    2012-01-01

    For many years, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) has been considered and treated as a single malignancy, but divergent outcomes in T-ALL patients receiving uniform treatment protocols encouraged intensive research on the molecular biology of this disease. Recent findings in the field dem

  20. Web Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmsen, Tinri; Bisseling, Ton; Hartog, Rob

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is a certain proficiency level in experimental design. Currently students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, in lectures and in the laboratory. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the design of experimental approaches. This…

  1. Gene Concepts in Higher Education Cell and Molecular Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Pitombo Maiana; de Almeida, Ana Maria Rocha; El-Hani, Nino Charbel

    2008-01-01

    Despite being a landmark of 20th century biology, the "classical molecular gene concept," according to which a gene is a stretch of DNA encoding a functional product, which may be a single polypeptide or RNA molecule, has been recently challenged by a series of findings (e.g., split genes, alternative splicing, overlapping and nested genes, mRNA…

  2. Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

  3. A Streamlined Molecular Biology Module for Undergraduate Biochemistry Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Gregory W.; Chihade, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis and other molecular biology techniques, including plasmid manipulation and restriction analysis, are commonly used tools in the biochemistry research laboratory. In redesigning our biochemistry lab curricula, we sought to integrate these techniques into a term-long, project-based course. In the module presented here,…

  4. A Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Course for Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Novell, J. M.; Cid, E.; Gomis, R.; Barbera, A.; Guinovart, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a course for reinforcing the knowledge of biochemistry in secondary school science teachers. The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Barcelona designed a course to bring these teachers up to date with this discipline. In addition to updating their knowledge of biochemistry and molecular…

  5. Frontiers in nuclear medicine symposium: Nuclear medicine & molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document contains the abstracts from the American College of Nuclear Physicians 1993 Fall Meeting entitled, `Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Symposium: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology`. This meeting was sponsored by the US DOE, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The program chairman was Richard C. Reba, M.D.

  6. Bench to bedside molecular functional imaging in translational cancer medicine: to image or to imagine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongoing research on malignant and normal cell biology has substantially enhanced the understanding of the biology of cancer and carcinogenesis. This has led to the development of methods to image the evolution of cancer, target specific biological molecules, and study the anti-tumour effects of novel therapeutic agents. At the same time, there has been a paradigm shift in the field of oncological imaging from purely structural or functional imaging to combined multimodal structure–function approaches that enable the assessment of malignancy from all aspects (including molecular and functional level) in a single examination. The evolving molecular functional imaging using specific molecular targets (especially with combined positron-emission tomography [PET] computed tomography [CT] using 2- [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose [FDG] and other novel PET tracers) has great potential in translational research, giving specific quantitative information with regard to tumour activity, and has been of pivotal importance in diagnoses and therapy tailoring. Furthermore, molecular functional imaging has taken a key place in the present era of translational cancer research, producing an important tool to study and evolve newer receptor-targeted therapies, gene therapies, and in cancer stem cell research, which could form the basis to translate these agents into clinical practice, popularly termed “theranostics”. Targeted molecular imaging needs to be developed in close association with biotechnology, information technology, and basic translational scientists for its best utility. This article reviews the current role of molecular functional imaging as one of the main pillars of translational research. -- Highlights: •Molecular functional imaging (MFI) gives insight into the tumor biology and intratumoral heterogeneity. •It has potential role in identifying radiomic signatures associated with underlying gene-expression. •Radiomics can be used to create a road map

  7. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we rev...

  8. AACR centennial series: the biology of cancer metastasis: historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmadge, James E; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2010-07-15

    Metastasis resistant to therapy is the major cause of death from cancer. Despite almost 200 years of study, the process of tumor metastasis remains controversial. Stephen Paget initially identified the role of host-tumor interactions on the basis of a review of autopsy records. His "seed and soil" hypothesis was substantiated a century later with experimental studies, and numerous reports have confirmed these seminal observations. An improved understanding of the metastatic process and the attributes of the cells selected by this process is critical for the treatment of patients with systemic disease. In many patients, metastasis has occurred by the time of diagnosis, so metastasis prevention may not be relevant. Treating systemic disease and identifying patients with early disease should be our goal. Revitalized research in the past three decades has focused on new discoveries in the biology of metastasis. Even though our understanding of molecular events that regulate metastasis has improved, the contributions and timing of molecular lesion(s) involved in metastasis pathogenesis remain unclear. Review of the history of pioneering observations and discussion of current controversies should increase understanding of the complex and multifactorial interactions between the host and selected tumor cells that contribute to fatal metastasis and should lead to the design of successful therapy.

  9. Surgery and radiation therapy of triple-negative breast cancers: From biology to clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Jacques; Poortmans, Philip M P

    2016-08-01

    Triple negative breast cancer refers to tumours lacking the expression of the three most used tumour markers, namely oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These cancers are known to carry a more dismal prognosis than the other molecular subtypes. Whether a more aggressive local-regional treatment is warranted or not in patients with triple-negative breast cancer is still a matter of debate. Indeed there remain a number of grey zones with respect to the optimization of the extent and the timing of surgery and radiation therapy (RT) in this patient population, also in consideration of the significant heterogeneity in biological behaviour and response to treatment identified for these tumours. The objective of this review is to provide an insight into the biological and clinical behaviour of triple-negative breast cancers and revisit the most recent advances in their management, focussing on local-regional treatments. PMID:27318170

  10. Cellular and Molecular Biological Approaches to Interpreting Ancient Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dianne K.; Neubauer, Cajetan; Ricci, Jessica N.; Wu, Chia-Hung; Pearson, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Our ability to read the molecular fossil record has advanced significantly in the past decade. Improvements in biomarker sampling and quantification methods, expansion of molecular sequence databases, and the application of genetic and cellular biological tools to problems in biomarker research have enabled much of this progress. By way of example, we review how attempts to understand the biological function of 2-methylhopanoids in modern bacteria have changed our interpretation of what their molecular fossils tell us about the early history of life. They were once thought to be biomarkers of cyanobacteria and hence the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, but we now believe that 2-methylhopanoid biosynthetic capacity originated in the Alphaproteobacteria, that 2-methylhopanoids are regulated in response to stress, and that hopanoid 2-methylation enhances membrane rigidity. We present a new interpretation of 2-methylhopanes that bridges the gap between studies of the functions of 2-methylhopanoids and their patterns of occurrence in the rock record.

  11. Membrane curvature in cell biology: An integration of molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarsch, Iris K; Daste, Frederic; Gallop, Jennifer L

    2016-08-15

    Curving biological membranes establishes the complex architecture of the cell and mediates membrane traffic to control flux through subcellular compartments. Common molecular mechanisms for bending membranes are evident in different cell biological contexts across eukaryotic phyla. These mechanisms can be intrinsic to the membrane bilayer (either the lipid or protein components) or can be brought about by extrinsic factors, including the cytoskeleton. Here, we review examples of membrane curvature generation in animals, fungi, and plants. We showcase the molecular mechanisms involved and how they collaborate and go on to highlight contexts of curvature that are exciting areas of future research. Lessons from how membranes are bent in yeast and mammals give hints as to the molecular mechanisms we expect to see used by plants and protists.

  12. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Saletta

    2014-06-01

    General significance: The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  13. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  14. 非吸烟者肺癌的流行病学、病因学和分子生物学特点%Characteristics of epidemiology, etiology and molecular biology of lung cancer in nonsmokers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞娟; 王萍; 张建中

    2009-01-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, while efforts to study the disease in nonsmokers have been limited. The proportion of lung cancer in nonsmokers is increasing with the successful implementation of tobacco control. Current study indicates that there are striking differences in the epidemiological,clinical and molecular characteristics of lung cancer between nonsmokers and smokers,suggesting that they are separate entities.%吸烟已被证实为肺癌发病的主要原因,但对于非吸烟者患病的研究非常有限,而且随着戒烟措施的成功实施,非吸烟者肺癌的比例会逐渐增加.最近研究表明,非吸烟者和吸烟者肺癌在流行病学、临床、分子生物学方面存在明显差异,提示它们有着本质区别.

  15. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  16. Biologic therapies for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Aiwu Ruth; Lindenberg, Andreas Peter; Marshall, John Lindsay

    2008-08-01

    Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis and short survival due to lack of effective therapy and aggressiveness of the disease. Pancreatic cancer has widespread chromosomal instability, including a high rate of translocations and deletions. Upregulated EGF signaling and mutation of K-RAS are found in most pancreatic cancers. Therefore, inhibitors that target EGF receptor, K-RAS, RAF, MEK, mTOR, VEGF and PDGF, for example, have been evaluated in patients with pancreatic cancer. Although significant activities of these inhibitors have not been observed in the majority of pancreatic cancer patients, an enormous amount of experience and knowledge has been obtained from recent clinical trials. With a better inhibitor or combination of inhibitors, and improvement in the selection of patients for available inhibitors, better therapy for pancreatic cancer is on the horizon.

  17. Ki-67 Proliferation Index in Gastric Cancer - Biologic Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Nabais, C.; Caldeira Fradique, A; Oliveira, M.; Quaresma, L.; Gualdino Silva, J; Vasconcelos, V.; Sacadura, J.; Costa, L; Cabrita, F; Mateus Marques, R; Esteves, J.; Fernandez, G.; Guedes da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Introdution: Ki-67 protein has been used as an indicator of proliferation activity in tumor cells. In gastric cancer the prognostic value has not been fully understood. This study was designed to assess the biologic significance of Ki-67 proliferation index (PI) in gastric cancer. Material/Methods: Seventy-two patients with gastric cancer were evaluated. These patients underwent gastric resection, and the tumor tissue was stained immunohistochemically. Ki-67 PI was defi...

  18. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekanova M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cekanova, Kusum Rathore Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. Keywords: mouse cancer model, companion animal cancer model, dogs, cats, molecular targets

  19. From Biology to Targeted Cancer Treatment and Prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li MAO

    2009-01-01

    @@ Cancer is a complex disease involving accumulation of multiple molecular abnormalities during a long period of time. Because the differences in tim-ing and types of abnormalities, together with differences in inherited genetic background of individuals, patients with even same type cancer may experi- ence dramatically different clinical presentations and outcomes.

  20. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

  1. Potential of biological images for radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent technical advances in 3D conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (3DCRT and IMRT) based, on patient-specific CT and MRI images, have the potential of delivering exquisitely conformal dose distributions to the target volume while avoiding critical structures. Emerging clinical results in terms of reducing treatment-related morbidity and increasing local control appear promising. Recent developments in imaging have suggested that biological images may further positively impact cancer diagnosis, characterization and therapy. While in the past radiological images are largely anatomical, the new types of images can provide metabolic, biochemical, physiological, functional and molecular (genotypic and phenotypic) information. For radiation therapy, images that give information about factors (e.g. tumor hypoxia, Tpot) that influence radiosensitivity and treatment outcome can be regarded as radiobiological images. The ability of IMRT to 'paint' (in 2D) or 'sculpt' (in 3D) the dose, and produce exquisitely conformal dose distributions begs the '64 million dollar question' as to how to paint or sculpt, and whether biological imaging may provide the pertinent information. Can this new approach provide 'radiobiological phenotypes' non-invasively, and incrementally improve upon the predictive assays of radiobiological characteristics such as proliferative activity (Tpot - the potential doubling time), radiosensitivity (SF2 - the surviving fraction at a dose of 2 Gy), energy status (relative to sublethal damage repair), pH (a possible surrogate of hypoxia), tumor hypoxia, etc. as prognosticator(s) of radiation treatment outcome. Important for IMRT, the spatial (geometrical) distribution of the radiobiological phenotypes provide the basis for dose distribution design to conform to both the physical (geometrical) and the biological attributes. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  2. Molecular profiling of multiple human cancers defines an inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern and uncovers KPNA2 as a uniform poor prognostic cancer marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M Rachidi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immune evasion is one of the recognized hallmarks of cancer. Inflammatory responses to cancer can also contribute directly to oncogenesis. Since the immune system is hardwired to protect the host, there is a possibility that cancers, regardless of their histological origins, endow themselves with a common and shared inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern (iCAMP to promote oncoinflammation. However, the definition of iCAMP has not been conceptually and experimentally investigated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome-wide cDNA expression data was analyzed for 221 normal and 324 cancer specimens from 7 cancer types: breast, prostate, lung, colon, gastric, oral and pancreatic. A total of 96 inflammatory genes with consistent dysregulation were identified, including 44 up-regulated and 52 down-regulated genes. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry for some of these genes. The iCAMP contains proteins whose roles in cancer have been implicated and others which are yet to be appreciated. The clinical significance of many iCAMP genes was confirmed in multiple independent cohorts of colon and ovarian cancer patients. In both cases, better prognosis correlated strongly with high CXCL13 and low level of GREM1, LOX, TNFAIP6, CD36, and EDNRA. An "Inflammatory Gene Integrated Score" was further developed from the combination of 18 iCAMP genes in ovarian cancer, which predicted overall survival. Noticeably, as a selective nuclear import protein whose immuno-regulatory function just begins to emerge, karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2 is uniformly up-regulated across cancer types. For the first time, the cancer-specific up-regulation of KPNA2 and its clinical significance were verified by tissue microarray analysis in colon and head-neck cancers. CONCLUSION: This work defines an inflammatory signature shared by seven epithelial cancer types and KPNA2 as a consistently up-regulated protein in cancer. Identification of iCAMP may not only

  3. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  4. Molecular diagnosis for personalized target therapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Yong

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathways have reinforced the discovery of treatment targets and personalized treatments. However, there are numerous challenges from cancer target discoveries to practical clinical benefits. Although there is a flood of biomarkers and target agents, only a minority of patients are tested and treated accordingly. Numerous molecular target agents have been under investigation for gastric cancer. Currently, targets for gastric cancer include the epidermal growth factor receptor family, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor axis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Deeper insights of molecular characteristics for gastric cancer has enabled the molecular classification of gastric cancer, the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the prediction of prognosis, the recognition of gastric cancer driver genes, and the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Not only have we deeper insights for the molecular diversity of gastric cancer, but we have also prospected both affirmative potentials and hurdles to molecular diagnostics. New paradigm of transdisciplinary team science, which is composed of innovative explorations and clinical investigations of oncologists, geneticists, pathologists, biologists, and bio-informaticians, is mandatory to recognize personalized target therapy. PMID:24156032

  5. PathSys: integrating molecular interaction graphs for systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raval Alpan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of information integration in systems biology is to combine information from a number of databases and data sets, which are obtained from both high and low throughput experiments, under one data management scheme such that the cumulative information provides greater biological insight than is possible with individual information sources considered separately. Results Here we present PathSys, a graph-based system for creating a combined database of networks of interaction for generating integrated view of biological mechanisms. We used PathSys to integrate over 14 curated and publicly contributed data sources for the budding yeast (S. cerevisiae and Gene Ontology. A number of exploratory questions were formulated as a combination of relational and graph-based queries to the integrated database. Thus, PathSys is a general-purpose, scalable, graph-data warehouse of biological information, complete with a graph manipulation and a query language, a storage mechanism and a generic data-importing mechanism through schema-mapping. Conclusion Results from several test studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in retrieving biologically interesting relations between genes and proteins, the networks connecting them, and of the utility of PathSys as a scalable graph-based warehouse for interaction-network integration and a hypothesis generator system. The PathSys's client software, named BiologicalNetworks, developed for navigation and analyses of molecular networks, is available as a Java Web Start application at http://brak.sdsc.edu/pub/BiologicalNetworks.

  6. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS FOR MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (ISMB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Goldberg; Matthew Hibbs; Lukas Kall; Ravikumar Komandurglayavilli; Shaun Mahony; Voichita Marinescu; Itay Mayrose; Vladimir Minin; Yossef Neeman; Guy Nimrod; Marian Novotny; Stephen Opiyo; Elon Portugaly; Tali Sadka; Noboru Sakabe; Indra Sarkar; Marc Schaub; Paul Shafer; Olena Shmygelska; Gregory Singer; Yun Song; Bhattacharya Soumyaroop; Michael Stadler; Pooja Strope; Rong Su; Yuval Tabach; Hongseok Tae; Todd Taylor; Michael Terribilini; Asha Thomas; Nam Tran; Tsai-Tien Tseng; Akshay Vashist; Parthiban Vijaya; Kai Wang; Ting Wang; Lai Wei; Yong Woo; Chunlei Wu; Yoshihiro Yamanishi; Changhui Yan; Jack Yang; Mary Yang; Ping Ye; Miao Zhang

    2009-12-29

    The Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference has provided a general forum for disseminating the latest developments in bioinformatics on an annual basis for the past 13 years. ISMB is a multidisciplinary conference that brings together scientists from computer science, molecular biology, mathematics and statistics. The goal of the ISMB meeting is to bring together biologists and computational scientists in a focus on actual biological problems, i.e., not simply theoretical calculations. The combined focus on “intelligent systems” and actual biological data makes ISMB a unique and highly important meeting, and 13 years of experience in holding the conference has resulted in a consistently well organized, well attended, and highly respected annual conference. The ISMB 2005 meeting was held June 25-29, 2005 at the Renaissance Center in Detroit, Michigan. The meeting attracted over 1,730 attendees. The science presented was exceptional, and in the course of the five-day meeting, 56 scientific papers, 710 posters, 47 Oral Abstracts, 76 Software demonstrations, and 14 tutorials were presented. The attendees represented a broad spectrum of backgrounds with 7% from commercial companies, over 28% qualifying for student registration, and 41 countries were represented at the conference, emphasizing its important international aspect. The ISMB conference is especially important because the cultures of computer science and biology are so disparate. ISMB, as a full-scale technical conference with refereed proceedings that have been indexed by both MEDLINE and Current Contents since 1996, bridges this cultural gap.

  7. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  8. [Usefulness of the oncogenetic molecular counselling in adults whith familial cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor M; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor E

    2016-01-01

    More than 200 cancer susceptibility syndromes (CSS) have been recognized through performing classic epidemiologic studies and genetic linkage analysis. In most CSSs clinical conditions of the patients have been identified as well as their hereditary patterns and the predisponent genes to cancer development. Cancer hereditary identification is a useful condition, since cancer family integrants may benefit of efficient strategies in early screening and in tumor prevention strategies; this consultation is performed by oncogenetic molecular medical consultants who must be scientifically competent for Human Genetics and Cancer molecular biology domains. The oncogenetic molecular consult of patients and family relatives of cancer predisposition families is a medical service in health programs of developed and developing countries; in our country this type of medical service needs to be organized and settled to be part of the integral oncology medical service. The oncogenetic molecular consultation is a structural process of assessment and communication of the associated integral problems of the cancer inherited susceptibility in familial cancer. PMID:27100983

  9. Molecular biology of gliomas: present and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, R; Agnoletti, A; Quattrucci, F; Garbossa, D; Calamo Specchia, F M; Bozzaro, M; Fornaro, R; Mencarani, C; Lanotte, M; Spaziante, R; Ducati, A

    2014-09-01

    Malignant brain tumours are one of the most relevant causes of morbidity and mortality across a wide range of individuals. Malignant glioma is the most common intra axial tumor in the adult. Many researches on this theme brought advances in the knowledge of gliomas biology and pathogenesis and to the development of new agents for targeted molecular therapy. Recent studies focused on either tumor metabolism analysis or epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis or maintenance of brain tumors. This Review summarizes these developments analyzing molecular pathology and possible further developments for targeted therapies.

  10. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  11. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  12. Early-onset gastric cancers have a different molecular expression profile than conventional gastric cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N.A. Milne; R. Carvalho; F.M. Morsink; A.R. Musler; W.W.J. de Leng; A. Ristimaki; G.J.A. Offerhaus

    2006-01-01

    Many studies examine the molecular genetics of gastric cancer, but few look at young patients in particular and there is no comparison of molecular expression between early-onset gastric cancer (<= 45 years old) and conventional gastric cancers. Expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) is elevated in g

  13. Grete Kellenberger-Gujer: Molecular biology research pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citi, Sandra; Berg, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Grete Kellenberger-Gujer was a Swiss molecular biologist who pioneered fundamental studies of bacteriophage in the mid-20(th) century at the University of Geneva. Her life and career stories are reviewed here, focusing on her fundamental contributions to our early understanding of phage biology via her insightful analyses of phenomena such as the lysogenic state of a temperate phage (λ), genetic recombination, radiation's in vivo consequences, and DNA restriction-modification; on her creative personality and interactions with peers; and how her academic advancement was affected by gender, societal conditions and cultural attitudes of the time. Her story is important scientifically, putting into perspective features of the scientific community from just before the molecular biology era started through its early years, and also sociologically, in illustrating the numerous "glass ceilings" that, especially then, often hampered the advancement of creative women. PMID:27607140

  14. Molecular biology of the renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzau, V.J.; Burt, D.W.; Pratt, R.E. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-10-01

    This paper reviews the molecular biology of the renin-angiotensin system. The renin gene structure is analyzed in detail, including an examination of the putative regulatory regions. The combined action of these regulatory sequences would result in the complex, tissue-specific expression and regulation observed in vivo. The expression of the tissue renin-angiotensin systems, which may have important physiological functions, is also described. In addition, the pathway of renin biosynthesis and secretion is reviewed. This includes speculation on the fate of circulating prorenin and the physiological role of multiple renin forms and secretory pathways. The molecular approaches described in this paper have greatly advanced our knowledge of the biology of the renin-angiotensin system. Future studies using these and other approaches should provide further insight into this complex system.

  15. Grete Kellenberger-Gujer: Molecular biology research pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citi, Sandra; Berg, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Grete Kellenberger-Gujer was a Swiss molecular biologist who pioneered fundamental studies of bacteriophage in the mid-20(th) century at the University of Geneva. Her life and career stories are reviewed here, focusing on her fundamental contributions to our early understanding of phage biology via her insightful analyses of phenomena such as the lysogenic state of a temperate phage (λ), genetic recombination, radiation's in vivo consequences, and DNA restriction-modification; on her creative personality and interactions with peers; and how her academic advancement was affected by gender, societal conditions and cultural attitudes of the time. Her story is important scientifically, putting into perspective features of the scientific community from just before the molecular biology era started through its early years, and also sociologically, in illustrating the numerous "glass ceilings" that, especially then, often hampered the advancement of creative women.

  16. Hormonal and molecular aspects of endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Vincentius Hubertus Willibrordus Maria

    2008-01-01

    This thesis concerns the expression and prognostic value of various hormones and molecular markers playing a role n endometrioid endometrial cancer. Especially we were interested in the enzyme aromatase, its expression and (prognostic) role in endometrioid endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is t

  17. Molecular biological factors in the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Ponomareva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have made a complex analysis of the molecular biological factors associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. They have revealed that infection by oncogenic human papillomavirus types is associated with suppressed apoptosis and enhanced cellular proliferative activity, which can be effectively used in the diagnosis and prediction of cervical neoplasias to optimize management tac- tics and to improve the results of treatment.

  18. Towards an Upper-Level Ontology for Molecular Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Stefan; Beisswanger, Elena; Wermter, Joachim; Hahn, Udo

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing need for the general-purpose description of the basic ontological entities in the life sciences domain. Up until now, upper-level models are mainly purpose-driven, such as the GENIA ontology, originally devised as a vocabulary for corpus annotation. As an alternative, we here present BioTop, a description-logic-based top-level ontology for molecular biology, as an ontologically more conscious re-design of the GENIA ontology.

  19. Application of Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphism to Meloidogyne Molecular Population Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Hyman, B. C.; Whipple, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have enabled the genotyping of individual nematodes, facilitating the analysis of genetic variability within and among plant-pathogenic nematode isolates. This review first describes representative examples of how RFLP, RAPD, AFLP, and DNA sequence analysis have been employed to describe populations of several phytonematodes, including the pinewood, burrowing, root-knot, and cyst nematodes. The second portion of this paper evaluates the utility of a size-v...

  20. In focus: molecular and cell biology research in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xuebiao; Li, Dangsheng; Pei, Gang

    2013-09-01

    An interactive, intellectual environment with good funding opportunities is essential for the development and success of basic research. The fast-growing economy and investment in science, together with a visionary plan, have attracted foreign scholars to work in China, motivated world-class Chinese scientists to return and strengthened the country's international collaborations. As a result, molecular and cell biology research in China has evolved rapidly over the past decade.

  1. Molecular Markers with Predictive and Prognostic Relevance in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphy Rose-James

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer accounts for the majority of cancer-related deaths worldwide of which non-small-cell lung carcinoma alone takes a toll of around 85%. Platinum-based therapy is the stronghold for lung cancer at present. The discovery of various molecular alterations that underlie lung cancer has contributed to the development of specifically targeted therapies employing specific mutation inhibitors. Targeted chemotherapy based on molecular profiling has shown great promise in lung cancer treatment. Various molecular markers with predictive and prognostic significance in lung cancer have evolved as a result of advanced research. Testing of EGFR and Kras mutations is now a common practice among community oncologists, and more recently, ALK rearrangements have been added to this group. This paper discusses various predictive and prognostic markers that are being investigated and have shown significant relevance which can be exploited for targeted treatment in lung cancer.

  2. The Molecular Biology of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas and Current Trends in Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Quesada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic research in sarcoma models has been fundamental in the discovery of scientific milestones leading to a better understanding of the molecular biology of cancer. Yet, clinical research in sarcoma has lagged behind other cancers because of the multiple clinical and pathological entities that characterize sarcomas and their rarity. Sarcomas encompass a very heterogeneous group of tumors with diverse pathological and clinical overlapping characteristics. Molecular testing has been fundamental in the identification and better definition of more specific entities among this vast array of malignancies. A group of sarcomas are distinguished by specific molecular aberrations such as somatic mutations, intergene deletions, gene amplifications, reciprocal translocations, and complex karyotypes. These and other discoveries have led to a better understanding of the growth signals and the molecular pathways involved in the development of these tumors. These findings are leading to treatment strategies currently under intense investigation. Disruption of the growth signals is being targeted with antagonistic antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and inhibitors of several downstream molecules in diverse molecular pathways. Preliminary clinical trials, supported by solid basic research and strong preclinical evidence, promises a new era in the clinical management of these broad spectrum of malignant tumors.

  3. Molecular Pathways: Estrogen Pathway in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Annika Medea; Labonte, Melissa J.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide colorectal cancer (CRC) has a higher incidence rate in men than in women, suggesting a protective role for sex hormones in the development of the disease. Preclinical data supports a role for estrogen and its receptors in the initiation and progression of CRC and establishes that protective effects of estrogen are exerted through ERβ. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women as well as consumption of soy reduces the incidence of CRC. In the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) trial use of HRT in postmenopausal women reduced the risk of colon cancer by 56% (95% CI, 0.38 to 0.81; P=0.003). A recent meta-analysis showed that in females, consumption of soy reduced the risk of colon cancer by 21% (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.35; P=0.026). In this review, utilizing the preclinical data, we translate the findings in the clinical trials and observational studies to define the role of estrogen in the prevention of CRC. We hypothesize that sometime during the tumorigenesis process ERβ expression in colonocytes is lost and the estrogen ligand, HRT or soy products, exerts its effects through preventing this loss. Thus in the adenoma to carcinoma continuum, timing of HRT is a significant determinant of the observed benefit from this intervention. We further argue that the protective effects of estrogen are limited to certain molecular subtypes. Successful development of estrogen modulators for prevention of CRC depends on identification of susceptible CRC population(s). Thus research to better understand the estrogen pathway is fundamental for clinical delivery of these agents. PMID:23965904

  4. Choice of adjuvant drug therapy on the basis of the molecular classification of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Besova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular genetic analysis identified some biological subtypes of breast cancer (BC: luminal A, luminal B, HER2 positive, and basal-like (including triple negative. The surrogate clinical and morphological criteria including the immunohistochemical determination of estrogen and progesterone receptors, the hyperexpression and/or amplification of HER2, Ki-67, or tumor grade (G are used to identify the biological subtypes of BC in clinical practice. The biological subtypes are distinguished by their biological course and susceptibility to various systemic treatments, which requires different therapeutic tactics. The paper presents tactics of adjuvant therapy for BC in relation to its biological subtype according to the recommendations of the 12th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference (2011 and considers the place of taxans.

  5. An update on the biology of cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bueno, José María; Ocaña, Alberto; Castro-García, Paola; Gil Gas, Carmen; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Poblet, Enrique; Serrano, Rosario; Calero, Raúl; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer stem cells are defined as cancer cells with self-renewal capacity. These cells represent a small subpopulation endowed with the ability to form new tumours when injected in nude mice. Markers of differentiation have been used to identify these cancer cells. In the case of breast cancer, CD44+/CD24- select a population with stem cell properties. The fact that these cells have self-renewal ability has suggested that this population could be responsible for new tumour formation and cancer relapse. These cells have been shown to be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than normal cancer cells. The identification of the molecular druggable alterations responsible for the initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells is an important goal. In this article we will review all these points with special emphasis on the possible role of new drugs designed to interact with molecular pathways of cancer stem cells.

  6. Intraductal Proliferative Lesions of the Breast—Terminology and Biology Matter: Premalignant Lesions or Preinvasive Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Mauri; Lucio Fortunato; Leopoldo Costarelli; Domenico Campagna

    2012-01-01

    Morphological criteria for the diagnosis of intraductal proliferative lesions of the breast have been an object of research and much controversy, and its terminology is rather confusing. Knowledge of the molecular aspects of this disease probably necessitates further research to clarify if these entities can be identified as breast cancer precursors or as a malignant preinvasive disease. These issues are of great interest not only for their biological implications, but also to the clinician w...

  7. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies

  8. A national comparison of biochemistry and molecular biology capstone experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end, ASBMB conducted a series of regional workshops to build a BMB Concept Inventory containing validated assessment tools, based on foundational and discipline-specific knowledge and essential skills, for the community to use. A culminating activity, which integrates the educational experience, is often part of undergraduate molecular life science programs. These "capstone" experiences are commonly defined as an attempt to measure student ability to synthesize and integrate acquired knowledge. However, the format, implementation, and approach to outcome assessment of these experiences are quite varied across the nation. Here we report the results of a nation-wide survey on BMB capstone experiences and discuss this in the context of published reports about capstones and the findings of the workshops driving the development of the BMB Concept Inventory. Both the survey results and the published reports reveal that, although capstone practices do vary, certain formats for the experience are used more frequently and similarities in learning objectives were identified. The use of rubrics to measure student learning is also regularly reported, but details about these assessment instruments are sparse in the literature and were not a focus of our survey. Finally, we outline commonalities in the current practice of capstones and suggest the next steps needed to elucidate best practices.

  9. Molecular biology of the skin introduction: approaches and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, C; Goldsmith, L A

    1993-09-01

    This issue of Seminars in Dermatology describes our current understanding of the molecular nature of skin diseases. Some would say it is hubris to even contemplate this charge considering the rapid progress in molecular genetics. We implore the gods protecting the nucleotides to look kindly on our efforts. This introductory article discussed some general methodological considerations and techniques and provides a glossary of common terms used in molecular biology, useful for understanding this issue of Seminars in Dermatology. This article is aimed at neophytes to enhance their ability to enter the magical realm of the gene. The articles in this issue describe diseases with a defined defect at the DNA level or diseases in which there is a rapid closing in on the basic defect. PMID:8217556

  10. Biology of cancer invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareel, M M; Crombez, R

    1992-01-01

    Current concepts of invasion eventually leading to metastasis are discussed and exemplified by cancers of the head and neck mucosa. Invasion occurs at a number of steps, each step making an ecosystem comprising not only the neoplastic cells but also their normal counterparts, a variety of host cells and the extracellular matrix. The ecosystem concept may explain aspects of metastasis such as site-dependence and organ-specificity of cancer metastasis as well as invasiveness of normal leucocytes. Genes implicated in invasion and metastasis are actively searched for. Recently, the epithelial cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin has been identified as an i- (invasion suppressor) gene product, i.e. a molecule the expression of which counterbalances i+ (invasion promotor) gene activity. Downregulation of E-cadherin in human head and neck cancers may account for their invasive and metastatic behaviour.

  11. Natural Killer Cells: Biology and Clinical Use in Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William H. D. Hallett; William J. Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the ability to mediate both bone marrow rejection and promote engraftment, as well as the ability to elicit potent anti-tumor effects. However the clinical results for these processes are still elusive. Greater understanding of NK cell biology, from activating and inhibitory receptor functions to the role of NK cells in allogeneic transplantation, needs to be appreciated in order to draw out the clinical potential of NK cells. Mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection are known to be dependant on inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and on activating receptors that have many potential ligands. The modulation of activating and inhibitory receptors may hold the key to clinical success involving NK cells. Pre-clinical studies in mice have shown that different combinations of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells can reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), promote engraftment, and provide superior graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Recent clinical data have shown that the use of KIR-ligand incompatibility produces tremendous graft-versus-leukemia effect in patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. This review will attempt to be a synthesis of current knowledge concerning NK cells, their involvement in BMT, and their use as an immunotherapy for cancer and other hematologic malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):12-21.

  12. Natural Killer Cells: Biology and Clinical Use in Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WilliamH.D.Hallett; WilliamJ.Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the ability to mediate both bone marrow rejection and promote engraftment, as well as the ability to elicit potent anti-tumor effects. However the clinical results for these processes are still elusive. Greater understanding of NK cell biology, from activating and inhibitory receptor functions to the role of NK cells in allogeneic transplantation, needs to be appreciated in order to draw out the clinical potential of NK cells. Mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection are known to be dependant on inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and on activating receptors that have many potential ligands. The modulation of activating and inhibitory receptors may hold the key to clinical success involving NK cells. Pre-clinical studies in mice have shown that different combinations of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells can reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), promote engraftment, and provide superior graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Recent clinical data have shown that the use of KIR-ligand incompatibility produces tremendous graft-versus-leukemia effect in patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. This review will attempt to be a synthesis of current knowledge concerning NK cells, their involvement in BMT, and their use as an immunotherapy for cancer and other hematologic malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):12-21.

  13. The genetics and biology of KRAS in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M.K.Westcott; Minh D.To

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of KRAS is a common oncogenic event in lung cancer and other epithelial cancer types.Efforts to develop therapies that counteract the oncogenic effects of mutant KRAS have been largely unsuccessful,and cancers driven by mutant KRAS remain among the most refractory to available treatments.Studies undertaken over the past decades have produced a wealth of information regarding the clinical relevance of KRAS mutations in lung cancer.Mutant Kras-driven mouse models of cancer,together with cellular and molecular studies,have provided a deeper appreciation for the complex functions of KRAS in tumorigenesis.However,a much more thorough understanding of these complexities is needed before clinically effective therapies targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers can be achieved.

  14. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  15. Cathepsin K induces platelet dysfunction and affects cell signaling in breast cancer - molecularly distinct behavior of cathepsin K in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Gouvea, Iuri Estrada; Silva, Mariana Cristina C.; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; de Paula, Cláudia A. A.; Okamoto, Debora; Oliveira, Lilian; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Ottaiano, Tatiana; Facina, Gil; Nazário, Afonso Celso Pinto; Campos, Antonio Hugo J. F. M.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Juliano, Maria; da Silva, Ismael D. C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer comprises clinically and molecularly distinct tumor subgroups that differ in cell histology and biology and show divergent clinical phenotypes that impede phase III trials, such as those utilizing cathepsin K inhibitors. Here we correlate the epithelial-mesenchymal-like transition breast cancer cells and cathepsin K secretion with activation and aggregation of platelets. Cathepsin K is up-regulated in cancer cells that proteolyze extracellular matrix and contributes t...

  16. Urinary nucleosides as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fang Zheng; Jun Yang; Xin-Jie Zhao; Bo Feng; Hong-Wei Kong; Ying-Jie Chen; Shen Lv; Min-Hua Zheng; Guo-Wang Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Fourteen urinary nucleosides, primary degradation products of tRNA, were evaluated to know the potential as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer.METHODS: The concentrations of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides from 52 patients with colorectal cancer, 10patients with intestinal villous adenoma and 60 healthy adults were determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method.RESULTS: The mean levels of 12 kinds of urinary nucleosides (except uridine and guanosine) in the patients with colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with intestinal villous adenoma or the healthy adults. Using the levels of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides as the data vectors for principal component analysis, 71% (37/52) patients with colorectal cancer were correctly classified from healthy adults, in which the identification rate was much higher than that of CEA method (29%).Only 10% (1/10) of patients with intestinal villous adenoma were indistinguishable from patients with colorectal cancer. The levels of m1G, Pseu and m1A were positively related with tumor size and Duke's stages of colorectal cancer. When monitoring the changes in urinary nucleoside concentrations of patients with colorectal cancer associated with surgery, it was found that the overall correlations with clinical assessment were 84% (27/32)and 91% (10/11) in response group and progressive group, respectively.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that urinary nucleosides determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method may be useful as biological markers for colorectal cancer.

  17. The impact of tumor biology on cancer treatment and multidisciplinary strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molls, Michael [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Vaupel, Peter [University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Nieder, Carsten [Nordlandssykehuset HF Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Internal Medicine - Oncology; Anscher, Mitchell S. (eds.) [Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2009-07-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals of tumor biology and the influence of various biologic factors, including inhomogeneity of cancer cells, microenvironment, and host factors, on the design of therapeutic strategies and the outcome of established and emerging treatments. Particular attention is devoted to multidisciplinary combined modality therapy. The topics reviewed include tumorigenesis, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, physiology of malignant tissues, adhesion and invasion, development of metastases, and the role of the immune system in cancer development. Subsequent chapters focus on cancer prevention, detection, and treatment. The principles of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and molecularly targeted therapy are discussed, treatment resistance is explained, and strategies for rational combinations are provided, including the design of translational studies. Furthermore, the principles and clinical implications of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, such as gene expression profiling, gene transfer and silencing, proteomics, and molecular imaging, are presented. The chapters in this book have been written by an outstanding group of basic scientists, clinical researchers, and cancer professionals with long experience in the field. Their aim is to educate and inspire all those who devote most of their work to research into cancer and its treatment. (orig.)

  18. Support of the IMA summer program molecular biology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.

    1995-08-01

    The revolutionary progress in molecular biology within the last 30 years opens the way to full understanding of the molecular structures and mechanisms of living organisms. The mathematical sciences accompany and support much of the progress achieved by experiment and computation, as well as provide insight into geometric and topological properties of biomolecular structure and processes. The 4 week program at the IMA brought together biologists and mathematicians leading researchers, postdocs, and graduate students. It focused on genetic mapping and DNA sequencing, followed by biomolecular structure and dynamics. High-resolution linkage maps of genetic marker were discussed extensively in relation to the human genome project. The next level of DNA mapping is physical mapping, consisting of overlapping clones spanning the genome. These maps are extremely useful for genetic analysis. They provide the material for less redundant sequencing and for detailed searches for a gene among other things. This topic was also extensively studied by the participants. From there, the program moved to consider protein structure and dynamics; this is a broad field with a large array of interesting topics. It is of key importance in answering basic scientific questions about the nature of all living organisms, and has practical biomedical applications. The major subareas of structure prediction and classification, techniques and heuristics for the simulation of protein folding, and molecular dynamics provide a rich problem domain where mathematics can be helpful in analysis, modeling, and simulation. One of the important problems in molecular biology is the three-dimensional structure of proteins, DNA and RNA in the cell, and the relationship between structure and function. The program helped increased the understanding of the topology of cellular DNA, RNA and proteins and the various life-sustaining mechanisms used by the cell which modify this molecular topology.

  19. Towards molecular computers that operate in a biological environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Maya; Gil, Binyamin; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-07-01

    important consequences when performed in a proper context. We envision that molecular computers that operate in a biological environment can be the basis of “smart drugs”, which are potent drugs that activate only if certain environmental conditions hold. These conditions could include abnormalities in the molecular composition of the biological environment that are indicative of a particular disease. Here we review the research direction that set this vision and attempts to realize it.

  20. Biological Applications of Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Kang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since in most cases biological macromolecular systems including solvent water molecules are remarkably large, the computational costs of performing ab initio calculations for the entire structures are prohibitive. Accordingly, QM calculations that are jointed with MM calculations are crucial to evaluate the long-range electrostatic interactions, which significantly affect the electronic structures of biological macromolecules. A UNIX-shell-based interface program connecting the quantum mechanics (QMs and molecular mechanics (MMs calculation engines, GAMESS and AMBER, was developed in our lab. The system was applied to a metalloenzyme, azurin, and PU.1-DNA complex; thereby, the significance of the environmental effects on the electronic structures of the site of interest was elucidated. Subsequently, hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD simulation using the calculation system was employed for investigation of mechanisms of hydrolysis (editing reaction in leucyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with the misaminoacylated tRNALeu, and a novel mechanism of the enzymatic reaction was revealed. Thus, our interface program can play a critical role as a powerful tool for state-of-the-art sophisticated hybrid ab initio QM/MM MD simulations of large systems, such as biological macromolecules.

  1. Telomere biology: cancer firewall or aging clock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteldorf, J J

    2013-09-01

    It has been a decade since the first surprising discovery that longer telomeres in humans are statistically associated with longer life expectancies. Since then, it has been firmly established that telomere shortening imposes an individual fitness cost in a number of mammalian species, including humans. But telomere shortening is easily avoided by application of telomerase, an enzyme which is coded into nearly every eukaryotic genome, but whose expression is suppressed most of the time. This raises the question how the sequestration of telomerase might have evolved. The predominant assumption is that in higher organisms, shortening telomeres provide a firewall against tumor growth. A more straightforward interpretation is that telomere attrition provides an aging clock, reliably programming lifespans. The latter hypothesis is routinely rejected by most biologists because the benefit of programmed lifespan applies only to the community, and in fact the individual pays a substantial fitness cost. There is a long-standing skepticism that the concept of fitness can be applied on a communal level, and of group selection in general. But the cancer hypothesis is problematic as well. Animal studies indicate that there is a net fitness cost in sequestration of telomerase, even when cancer risk is lowered. The hypothesis of protection against cancer has never been tested in animals that actually limit telomerase expression, but only in mice, whose lifespans are not telomerase-limited. And human medical evidence suggests a net aggravation of cancer risk from the sequestration of telomerase, because cells with short telomeres are at high risk of neoplastic transformation, and they also secrete cytokines that exacerbate inflammation globally. The aging clock hypothesis fits well with what is known about ancestral origins of telomerase sequestration, and the prejudices concerning group selection are without merit. If telomeres are an aging clock, then telomerase makes an

  2. Physical aspects of biological activity and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are organelles at the boundary between chemical-genetic and physical processes in living cells. Mitochondria supply energy and provide conditions for physical mechanisms. Protons transferred across the inner mitochondrial membrane diffuse into cytosol and form a zone of a strong static electric field changing water into quasi-elastic medium that loses viscosity damping properties. Mitochondria and microtubules form a unique cooperating system in the cell. Microtubules are electrical polar structures that make possible non-linear transformation of random excitations into coherent oscillations and generation of coherent electrodynamic field. Mitochondria supply energy, may condition non-linear properties and low damping of oscillations. Electrodynamic activity might have essential significance for material transport, organization, intra- and inter-cellular interactions, and information transfer. Physical processes in cancer cell are disturbed due to suppression of oxidative metabolism in mitochodria (Warburg effect). Water ordering level in the cell is decreased, excitation of microtubule electric polar oscilations diminished, damping increased, and non-linear energy transformation shifted towards the linear region. Power and coherence of the generated electrodynamic field are reduced. Electromagnetic activity of healthy and cancer cells may display essential differences. Local invasion and metastastatic growth may strongly depend on disturbed electrodynamic activity. Nanotechnological measurements may disclose yet unknown properties and parameters of electrodynamic oscillations and other physical processes in healthy and cancer cells.

  3. Computational systems biology approaches to anti-angiogenic cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Stacey D; Chu, Liang-Hui; Popel, Aleksander S

    2015-02-01

    Angiogenesis is an exquisitely regulated process that is required for physiological processes and is also important in numerous diseases. Tumors utilize angiogenesis to generate the vascular network needed to supply the cancer cells with nutrients and oxygen, and many cancer drugs aim to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. Anti-angiogenic therapy involves inhibiting multiple cell types, molecular targets, and intracellular signaling pathways. Computational tools are useful in guiding treatment strategies, predicting the response to treatment, and identifying new targets of interest. Here, we describe progress that has been made in applying mathematical modeling and bioinformatics approaches to study anti-angiogenic therapeutics in cancer.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells: Biological Functions and Therapeutically Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Eugen Ciurea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be important in treatment of malignant diseases both as targets and drug carriers. The efforts to understand the role of different signalling in cancer stem cells requires in depth knowledge about the mechanisms that control their self-renewal, differentiation and malignant potential. The aim of this paper is to discuss insights into cancer stem cells historical background and to provide a brief review of the new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells.

  5. Molecular biology of breast tumors and prognosis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Baldassarre

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Great scientific, economical, and organizational efforts are in place to understand the causes of onset, identify the critical molecular players of progression, and define new lines of intervention providing more benefits and less toxicity. These efforts have certainly not been vain, since overall survival, especially in specific subsets of breast cancer, has greatly improved during the last decades. At present, breast cancer patients’ treatment and care have reached a high standard of quality, and currently one of the most urgent needs resides in the necessity to better distinguish the tumors that need to be more aggressively treated and identify the best therapeutic option tailored to each patient. This objective will be achievable only if the information clarifying the biology of breast cancer can be successfully transferred to the clinic. A common effort by scientists and clinicians toward this integration and toward the use of multidisciplinary approaches will be necessary to reach this important goal.

  6. Biodiversity: molecular biological domains, symbiosis and kingdom origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.

    1992-01-01

    The number of extant species of organisms is estimated to be from fewer than 3 to more than 30 x 10(6) (May, 1992). Molecular biology, comparative genetics and ultrastructural analyses provide new insights into evolutionary relationships between these species, including increasingly precise ideas of how species and higher taxa have evolved from common ancestors. Accumulation of random mutations and large macromolecular sequence change in all organisms since the Proterozoic Eon has been importantly supplemented by acquisition of inherited genomes ('symbiogenesis'). Karyotypic alterations (polyploidization and karyotypic fissioning) have been added to these other mechanisms of species origin in plants and animals during the Phanerozoic Eon. The new evolution concepts (coupled with current rapid rates of species extinction and ignorance of the extent of biodiversity) prompted this analysis of the field of systematic biology and its role in the reorganization of extant species into higher taxa. Two superkingdoms (= Domains: Prokaryotae and Eukaryotae) and five kingdoms (Monera = Procaryotae or Bacteria; Protoctista: algae, amoebae, ciliates, foraminifera, oomycetes, slime molds, etc.; Mychota: 'true' fungi; Plantae: one phylum (division) of bryophytes and nine phyla of tracheophytes; and Animalia) are recognized. Two subkingdoms comprise the monera: the great diverse lineages are Archaebacteria and Eubacteria. The criteria for classification using molecular, ultrastructural and genetic data for this scheme are mentioned. For the first time since the nineteenth century, logical, technical definitions for each group are given with their time of appearance as inferred from the fossil record in the primary scientific literature. This classification scheme, which most closely reflects the evolutionary history, molecular biology, genetics and ultrastructure of extant life, requires changes in social organization of biologists, many of whom as botanists and zoologists, still

  7. Organization of a radioisotope based molecular biology laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has revolutionized the application of molecular techniques to medicine. Together with other molecular biology techniques it is being increasingly applied to human health for identifying prognostic markers and drug resistant profiles, developing diagnostic tests and genotyping systems and for treatment follow-up of certain diseases in developed countries. Developing Member States have expressed their need to also benefit from the dissemination of molecular advances. The use of radioisotopes, as a step in the detection process or for increased sensitivity and specificity is well established, making it ideally suitable for technology transfer. Many molecular based projects using isotopes for detecting and studying micro organisms, hereditary and neoplastic diseases are received for approval every year. In keeping with the IAEA's programme, several training activities and seminars have been organized to enhance the capabilities of developing Member States to employ in vitro nuclear medicine technologies for managing their important health problems and for undertaking related basic and clinical research. The background material for this publication was collected at training activities and from feedback received from participants at research and coordination meetings. In addition, a consultants' meeting was held in June 2004 to compile the first draft of this report. Previous IAEA TECDOCS, namely IAEA-TECDOC-748 and IAEA-TECDOC-1001, focused on molecular techniques and their application to medicine while the present publication provides information on organization of the laboratory, quality assurance and radio-safety. The technology has specific requirements of the way the laboratory is organized (e.g. for avoiding contamination and false positives in PCR) and of quality assurance in order to provide accurate information to decision makers. In addition while users of the technology accept the scientific rationale of using radio

  8. Research Applications of Proteolytic Enzymes in Molecular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Tőzsér

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes (also termed peptidases, proteases and proteinases are capable of hydrolyzing peptide bonds in proteins. They can be found in all living organisms, from viruses to animals and humans. Proteolytic enzymes have great medical and pharmaceutical importance due to their key role in biological processes and in the life-cycle of many pathogens. Proteases are extensively applied enzymes in several sectors of industry and biotechnology, furthermore, numerous research applications require their use, including production of Klenow fragments, peptide synthesis, digestion of unwanted proteins during nucleic acid purification, cell culturing and tissue dissociation, preparation of recombinant antibody fragments for research, diagnostics and therapy, exploration of the structure-function relationships by structural studies, removal of affinity tags from fusion proteins in recombinant protein techniques, peptide sequencing and proteolytic digestion of proteins in proteomics. The aim of this paper is to review the molecular biological aspects of proteolytic enzymes and summarize their applications in the life sciences.

  9. Diagnosis of Whipple's disease using molecular biology techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Ángel; Ojeda, Evelia; Muñagorri, Ana I; Gaminde, Eduardo; Bujanda, Luis; Larzabal, Mikel; Gil, Inés

    2011-04-01

    The diagnosis of Whipple's disease (WD) is based on the existence of clinical signs and symptoms compatible with the disease and in the presence of PAS-positive diastase-resistant granules in the macrophages of the small intestine. If there is suspicion of the disease but no histological findings or only isolated extraintestinal manifestations, species-specific PCR using different sequences of the T. whippleii genome from different tissue types and biological fluids is recommended.This study reports two cases: the first patient had diarrhea and the disease was suspected after an endoscopic examination of the ileum, while the second patient had multi-systemic manifestations,particularly abdominal, thoracic, and peripheral lymphadenopathies. In both cases, the diagnosis was confirmed using molecular biology techniques to samples from the small intestine or from a retroperineal lymph node, respectively. PMID:21526877

  10. The molecular biology and diagnostics of Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend

    1992-01-01

    The rapid development of biotechnological methods provides the potential of dissecting the molecular structure of microorganisms. In this review the molecular biology of chlamydia is described. The genus Chlamydia contains three species C. trachomatis, C. psittaci, and C. pneumonia which all...... negative bacteria since incubation of EB with antibodies against LPS will liberate it from the chlamydial surface. Therefore the surface localized LPS may be important for chlamydial survival. OMP1 varies between the different serovar of C. trachomatis. Several very conserved regions are separated....... Patient serum samples will recognize the chlamydial DnaK-like protein. From the determined DNA sequence the amino acid sequence was determined. It was 57% homologous to the Eschrichia coli DnaK protein. Also the GroEL-like protein is antigenic and very conserved. Factors of importance for pathogenicity...

  11. International Symposium on Insect Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We are building on the success of the Sixth Chinese Insect Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Symposium, Beijing, held in 2005. The 2005 symposium saw many Chinese and international authorities share their expertise in a broad range of insect science, including analyses of insect genomes and proteomes, functional gene expression and regulation during development, insect immunity, insect neurobiology, insect-host interactions and insect chemical communication. The coming symposium, which will be held in Shandong University,Jinan, Shandong province, September 19-22, 2007, will offer material along similar lines.

  12. A complex systems approach to computational molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)

    1993-09-01

    We report on the containing research program at Santa Fe Institute that applies complex systems methodology to computational molecular biology. Two aspects are stressed here are the use of co-evolving adaptive neutral networks for determining predictable protein structure classifications, and the use of information theory to elucidate protein structure and function. A ``snapshot`` of the current state of research in these two topics is presented, representing the present state of two major research thrusts in the program of Genetic Data and Sequence Analysis at the Santa Fe Institute.

  13. Molecular Biology of Pediatric Hydrocephalus and Hydrocephalus-related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Mami; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2015-01-01

    We are beginning to understand the molecular biology of hydrocephalus and its related diseases. X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH), holoprosencephaly (HPE), Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM), and neural tube defect (NTD) can all be discussed with respect to their available molecular genetics knowledge base and its clinical applications. XLH is single gene disorder caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion molecule-encoding L1CAM (L1) gene. Our knowledge of the molecular basis of XLH is already being applied clinically in disease diagnosis, disease classification, and prenatal diagnosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying XLH-related hydrocephalus still needs to be clarified. Sixteen causative genes for HPE have been identified, of which mutations are most often found in SHH, ZIC2, SIX3, and TGIF. Genetic interactions, gene complexity, and the wide variety of HPE phenotypes and genotypes are topics for future study. For DWM, two important loci, 3q24, which includes the FOXC1 gene, and 6q25.3, which includes the ZIC1 and ZIC4 genes, were recently identified as causative areas. The planar cell polarity (PCP) genes CELSR1, CELSR2, VANGL1, and VANGL2 have been implicated in NTD; these genes have roles in neural tube closure and ependymal ciliary movement. PMID:26227058

  14. Integration of proteomics into systems biology of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanash, S; Schliekelman, M.; Q. Zhang; Taguchi, A

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the complexity and heterogeneity of cancer benefits from integration of proteomic level data into systems biology efforts. The opportunities available as a result of advances in proteomic technologies, the successes to date and the challenges involved in integrating diverse datasets are addressed in this review.

  15. Integration of proteomics into systems biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanash, S; Schliekelman, M; Zhang, Q; Taguchi, A

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the complexity and heterogeneity of cancer, benefits from integration of proteomic level data into systems biology efforts. The opportunities available as a result of advances in proteomic technologies, the successes to date, and the challenges involved in integrating diverse datasets are addressed in this review.

  16. RNA Systems Biology for Cancer: From Diagnosis to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhah, Raheleh; Farazmand, Ali; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Schmitz, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    It is due to the advances in high-throughput omics data generation that RNA species have re-entered the focus of biomedical research. International collaborate efforts, like the ENCODE and GENCODE projects, have spawned thousands of previously unknown functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with various but primarily regulatory roles. Many of these are linked to the emergence and progression of human diseases. In particular, interdisciplinary studies integrating bioinformatics, systems biology, and biotechnological approaches have successfully characterized the role of ncRNAs in different human cancers. These efforts led to the identification of a new tool-kit for cancer diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment, which is now starting to enter and impact on clinical practice. This chapter is to elaborate on the state of the art in RNA systems biology, including a review and perspective on clinical applications toward an integrative RNA systems medicine approach. The focus is on the role of ncRNAs in cancer.

  17. Radiation oncology--linking technology and biology in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, C Norman

    2002-01-01

    Technical advances in radiation oncology including CT-simulation, 3D- conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques, and brachytherapy have allowed greater treatment precision and dose escalation. The ability to intensify treatment requires the identification of the critical targets within the treatment field, recognizing the unique biology of tumor, stroma and normal tissue. Precision is technology based while accuracy is biologically based. Therefore, the intensity of IMRT will undoubtedly mean an increase in both irradiation dose and the use of biological agents, the latter considered in the broadest sense. Radiation oncology has the potential and the opportunity to provide major contributions to the linkage between molecular and functional imaging, molecular profiling and novel therapeutics for the emerging molecular targets for cancer treatment. This process of 'credentialing' of molecular targets will require multi disciplinary imaging teams, clinicians and basic scientists. Future advances will depend on the appropriate integration of biology into the training of residents, continuing post graduate education, participation in innovative clinical research and commitment to the support of basic research as an essential component of the practice of radiation oncology.

  18. Mathematical and Statistical Modeling in Cancer Systems Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael eHageman Blair

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major health problem with high mortality rates. In the post-genome era, investigators have access to massive amounts of rapidly accumulating high-throughput data in publicly available databases, some of which are exclusively devoted to housing Cancer data. However, data interpretation efforts have not kept pace with data collection, and gained knowledge is not necessarily translating into better diagnoses and treatments. A fundamental problem is to integrate and interpret data to further our understanding in Cancer Systems Biology. Viewing cancer as a network provides insights into the complex mechanisms underlying the disease. Mathematical and statistical models provide an avenue for cancer network modeling. In this article, we review two widely used modeling paradigms: deterministic metabolic models and statistical graphical models. The strength of these approaches lies in their flexibility and predictive power. Once a model has been validated, it can be used to make predictions and generate hypotheses. We describe a number of diverse applications to Cancer Biology, including, the system-wide effects of drug-treatments, disease prognosis, tumor classification, forecasting treatment outcomes, and survival predictions.

  19. 乳腺癌的分子分型%Molecular classification of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张百红; 岳红云

    2014-01-01

    乳腺癌是一种分子水平异质性很高的疾病,分子分型可为乳腺癌的个体化治疗提供一个新视野.在分子病理学、分子生物学和系统生物学指导下,乳腺癌经历了4类分型、70种和21种基因蛋白谱以及基因组整合分类等不同分型.这些分型将为乳腺癌的精确治疗提供指导.%Breast cancer is a group of heterogeneous diseases.Molecular portraits provide a new insight for personalized cancer management in breast cancer.According to the molecular pathology,molecular biology and system biology,breast cancer goes through different typing methods,including four subclasses,geneexpression signature and integrated genomic classification.These major subtypes of breast cancer may provide guidance for precise therapeutics.

  20. Applications of molecular MRI and optical imaging in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Penet, Marie-France; Mikhaylova, Maria; Li, Cong; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Glunde, Kristine; Pathak, Arvind P.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the most exciting advances in molecular-functional imaging of cancer are occurring at the interface between chemistry and imaging. Several of these advances have occurred through the development of novel imaging probes that report on molecular pathways, the tumor micro-environment and the response of tumors to treatment; as well as through novel image-guided platforms such as nanoparticles and nanovesicles that deliver therapeutic agents against specific targets and pathways. Cancer c...

  1. Sphingosine kinase 1 is a relevant molecular target in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Hoeflmayer, Doris; Jaeger-Lansky, Agnes;

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1), a lipid kinase implicated in cell transformation and tumor growth, is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is linked with a poor prognosis. The biological relevance of Sphk1 expression in gastric cancer is unclear. Here, we studied the functional significance of Sphk1...... as a novel molecular target for gastric cancer by using an antisense oligonucleotide approach in vitro and in vivo. Gastric cancer cell lines (MKN28 and N87) were treated with Sphk1 with locked nucleic acid-antisense oligonucleotides (LNA-ASO). Sphk1 target regulation, cell growth, and apoptosis were...... assessed for single-agent Sphk1 LNA-ASO and for combinations with doxorubicin. Athymic nude mice xenografted with gastric cancer cells were treated with Sphk1 LNA and assessed for tumor growth and Sphk1 target regulation, in vivo. In vitro, nanomolar concentrations of Sphk1 LNA-ASO induced an approximately...

  2. Epidemiological-molecular evidence of metabolic reprogramming on proliferation, autophagy and cell signaling in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest human cancers with little progress made in survival over the past decades, and 5-year survival usually below 5%. Despite this dismal scenario, progresses have been made in understanding of the underlying tumor biology through among other definition of precursor lesions, delineation of molecular pathways, and advances in genome-wide technology. Further, exploring the relationship between epidemiological risk factors involving metabolic features to that of an altered cancer metabolism may provide the foundation for new therapies. Here we explore how nutrients and caloric intake may influence the KRAS-driven ductal carcinogenesis through mediators of metabolic stress, including autophagy in presence of TP53, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptors (RAGE) and ligands (HMGB1), as well as glutamine pathways, among others. Effective understanding the cancer metabolism mechanisms in pancreatic cancer may propose new ways of prevention and treatment. PMID:24704294

  3. Errant life, molecular biology, and biopower: Canguilhem, Jacob, and Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talcott, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the theoretical circumstances that urged Michel Foucault to analyse modern societies in terms of biopower. Georges Canguilhem's account of the relations between science and the living forms an essential starting point for Foucault's own later explorations, though the challenges posed by the molecular revolution in biology and François Jacob's history of it allowed Foucault to extend and transform Canguilhem's philosophy of error. Using archival research into his 1955-1956 course on "Science and Error," I show that, for Canguilhem, it is inauthentic to treat a living being as an error, even if living things are capable of making errors in the domain of knowledge. The emergent molecular biology in the 1960s posed a grave challenge, however, since it suggested that individuals could indeed be errors of genetic reproduction. The paper discusses how Canguilhem and Foucault each responded to this by examining, among other texts, their respective reviews of Jacob's The Logic of the Living. For Canguilhem this was an opportunity to reaffirm the creativity of life in the living individual, which is not a thing to be evaluated, but the source of values. For Foucault, drawing on Jacob's work, this was the opportunity to develop a transformed account of valuation by posing biopower as the DNA of society. Despite their disagreements, the paper examines these three authors as different iterations of a historical epistemology attuned to errancy, error, and experimentation.

  4. How phenotypic plasticity made its way into molecular biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michel Morange

    2009-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been fashionable in recent years. It has never been absent from the studies of evolutionary biologists, although the availability of stable animal models has limited its role. Although opposed by the reductionist and deterministic approach of molecular biology, phenotypic plasticity has nevertheless recently made its way into this discipline, in particular through the limits of the molecular description. Its resurrection has been triggered by a small group of theoreticians, the rise of epigenetic descriptions and the publicized discovery of stem cell plasticity. The notion of phenotypic plasticity remains vague. History shows that too strong a belief in plasticity can be an obstacle to the development of biology. Two important questions are still pending: the link between the different forms of plasticity present at different levels of organization, and the relation, if any, between the modular organization of organisms and phenotypic plasticity. Future research will help to discriminate between possible and actual mechanisms of phenotypic plasticity, and to give phenotypic plasticity its real place in the living world.

  5. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro C Ucero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alvaro C Ucero1,*, Sara Gonçalves2,*, Alberto Benito-Martin1, Beatriz Santamaría1, Adrian M Ramos1, Sergio Berzal1, Marta Ruiz-Ortega1, Jesus Egido1, Alberto Ortiz11Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Fundación Renal Iñigo Alvarez de Toledo, Madrid, Spain; 2Nefrologia e Transplantação Renal, Hospital de Santa Maria EPE, Lisbon, Portugal *Both authors contributed equally to the manuscriptAbstract: Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.Keywords: urinary tract obstruction, renal injury, fluid mechanics, molecular cell biology

  6. Developing protein documentaries and other multimedia presentations for molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, G; Wang, H P; Martinez, D; Bourne, P E

    1999-01-01

    Computer-based multimedia technology for distance learning and research has come of age--the price point is acceptable, domain experts using off-the-shelf software can prepare compelling materials, and the material can be efficiently delivered via the Internet to a large audience. While not presenting any new scientific results, this paper outlines experiences with a variety of commercial and free software tools and the associated protocols we have used to prepare protein documentaries and other multimedia presentations relevant to molecular biology. A protein documentary is defined here as a description of the relationship between structure and function in a single protein or in a related family of proteins. A description using text and images which is further enhanced by the use of sound and interactive graphics. Examples of documentaries prepared to describe cAMP dependent protein kinase, the founding structural member of the protein kinase family for which there is now over 40 structures can be found at http://franklin.burnham-inst.org/rcsb. A variety of other prototype multimedia presentations for molecular biology described in this paper can be found at http://fraklin.burnham-inst.org. PMID:10380212

  7. On the shoulders of giants: Molecular Biology in Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Melino

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available

    We accepted with great pleasure the invitation by professor Walter Ricciardi,our friend and colleague, to write an editorial in order to introduce this special issue dedicated to Molecular Biology in Hygiene. We are delighted for two connected reasons.

    First, Carmine,as a former professor of Hygiene,has passed his concepts of Hygiene on to his family and, despite significant difficulties, keeps working on the problems of preventive medicine in the work environment and in geriatrics. Second, Gerry, raised in an environment of hygienists, has dedicated all his professional efforts to Molecular Biology. As these two distinct experiences have constantly mixed within our family over time, we appreciate the promiscuous intermingling of these two disciplines in this thematic issue.

    The result is a useful common effort aiming at understanding the problems of diseases in the work environment and in the human environment in general.

    These problems have a profound social meaning, for which it is necessary to create an essential collaboration with scientific research.

    This is the only way to benefit human society.

  8. The Utility of Molecular Imaging in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiblich, Aaron; Stevens, Daniel; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest solid-organ cancer diagnosed in males and represents an important source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Imaging plays a crucial role in diagnosing prostate cancer and informs the ongoing management of the disease at all stages. Several novel molecular imaging technologies have been developed recently that have the potential to revolutionise disease diagnosis and the surveillance of patients living with prostate cancer. These innovations include hyperpolarised MRI, choline PET/CT and PSMA PET/CT. The major utility of choline and PSMA PET/CT currently lies in their sensitivity for detecting early recurrence after radical treatment for prostate cancer and identifying discrete lesions that may be amenable to salvage therapy. Molecular imaging is likely to play a future role in characterising genetic and biochemical signatures in individual tumours, which may be of particular significance as cancer therapies move into an era of precision medicine. PMID:26894753

  9. Understanding the biology of cancer: has this any impact on treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, P B

    1994-01-01

    Rapid advances in laboratory techniques in the last two decades and, what is more important, in the last 5-7 years have significantly increased our knowledge and understanding on many fronts. We have learned much about (a) the basic biological processes of growth control and its aberrations, (b) the possible mechanisms involved in genetic initiation, progression and suppression, (c) the complexity of the multistep carcinogenesis induced by viruses, chemicals, hormones and other iatrogenic factors, (d) the secrets of immunological defence mechanisms and a host of other fundamental processes, (e) the application of molecular biology techniques to clinical problems, etc. The list is unending and often leads the uninitiated clinician to believe that the resolution of the mystery of the cancer cell and its successful control and cure are almost at hand. He or she often comes to believe that conventional principles in cancer treatment have radically changed from the 1960 and 1970 and that a new era in cancer treatment, based on our recent biological understanding, has already arrived. There is little doubt that the treatment scenario has changed significantly and that there is more hope for a cancer patient today than ever before-especially in certain types of paediatric and lymphoproliferative disorders; however, the unfortunate fact is that this cautiously optimistic therapeutic scenario has come about not because of any great understanding of the biological processes, which continue to confound us, but because of the intense interaction of various therapeutic disciplines and sophisticated technology now available for early diagnosis and more efficient therapeutic procedures in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. The author presents evidence and data here to show that, while treatment results have improved, we have a long way to go in understanding the biological processes before our knowledge can have a significant impact on the overall treatment methods in

  10. Molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Rong; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been prescribed to millions of females for breast cancer prevention or treatment. However, tamoxifen is known to significantly enhance the risk of developing endometrial lesions, including hyperplasia, polyps, carcinomas, and sarcoma. Notably, tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer often has a poor clinical outcome. Understanding the molecular mechanism of tamoxifen-induced endometrial cancer is essential for developing strategies that minimize tamoxifen’s effects on the endome...

  11. Integrating biological knowledge into variable selection: an empirical Bayes approach with an application in cancer biology

    OpenAIRE

    Hill Steven M; Neve Richard M; Bayani Nora; Kuo Wen-Lin; Ziyad Safiyyah; Spellman Paul T; Gray Joe W; Mukherjee Sach

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background An important question in the analysis of biochemical data is that of identifying subsets of molecular variables that may jointly influence a biological response. Statistical variable selection methods have been widely used for this purpose. In many settings, it may be important to incorporate ancillary biological information concerning the variables of interest. Pathway and network maps are one example of a source of such information. However, although ancillary informatio...

  12. The Impact of Collective Molecular Dynamics on Physiological and Biological Functionalities of Artificial and Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2008-03-01

    We use neutron, X-ray and light scattering techniques to determine dynamical and structural properties of artificial and biological membranes. The combination of various techniques enlarges the window to length scales from the nearest-neighbor distances of lipid molecules to more than 10-6m, covering time scales from about 0.1 ps to 1 s. The main research objective is to quantify collective molecular fluctuations in these systems and to establish relationships to physiological and biological functions of the bilayers, such as transmembrane transport. The motivation for this project is twofold: 1) By understanding fundamental properties of bilayers at the microscopic and mesoscopic level, we aim to tailor membranes with specific properties such as permeability and elasticity. 2) By relating dynamical fluctuations to physiological and biological functions, we can gain a deeper understanding of the bilayers on a molecular scale that may help optimizing the transmembrane transport of certain drugs. We show how bilayer permeability, elasticity and inter protein excitations can be determined from the experiments. M.C. Rheinstädter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 108107 (2004); Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 048103 (2006); Phys. Rev. E 75, 011907 (2007);J. Vac. Soc. Technol. A 24, 1191 (2006).

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Elfriede

    2010-11-01

    The great challenge for sensor systems to be accepted as a relevant diagnostic and therapeutic tool for cancer detection is the ability to determine the presence of relevant biomarkers or biomarker patterns comparably to or even better than the traditional analytical systems. Biosensor and chemical sensor technologies are already used for several clinical applications such as blood glucose or blood gas measurements. However, up to now not many sensors have been developed for cancer-related tests because only a few of the biomarkers have shown clinical relevance and the performance of the sensor systems is not always satisfactory. New genomic and proteomic tools are used to detect new molecular signatures and identify which combinations of biomarkers may detect best the presence or risk of cancer or monitor cancer therapies. These molecular signatures include genetic and epigenetic signatures, changes in gene expressions, protein biomarker profiles and other metabolite profile changes. They provide new changes in using different sensor technologies for cancer detection especially when complex biomarker patterns have to be analyzed. To address requirements for this complex analysis, there have been recent efforts to develop sensor arrays and new solutions (e.g. lab on a chip) in which sampling, preparation, high-throughput analysis and reporting are integrated. The ability of parallelization, miniaturization and the degree of automation are the focus of new developments and will be supported by nanotechnology approaches. This review recaps some scientific considerations about cancer diagnosis and cancer-related biomarkers, relevant biosensor and chemical sensor technologies, their application as cancer sensors and consideration about future challenges.

  14. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Zardavas; Martine Piccart-Gebhart

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  15. Molecular markers for detection, surveillance and prognostication of bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrooman, O.P.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many markers for the detection of bladder cancers have been tested and almost all urinary markers reported are better than cytology with regard to sensitivity, but they score lower in specificity. Currently molecular and genetic changes play an important role in the discovery of new molecular marker

  16. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...... individual approaches to targeted therapy of HER2-positive breast cancers....

  17. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... Factors When you're told that you have skin cancer, it's natural to wonder what may have caused ...

  18. [Experimental models in oncology: contribution of cell culture on understanding the biology of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Mariana; Enes, Margarida; Pereira, Marta; Dourado, Marília; Sarmento Ribeiro, Ana Bela

    2009-01-01

    In the beginning of the 20th century, tissue culture was started with the aim of studying the behaviour of animal cells in normal and stress conditions. The cell study at molecular level depends on their capacity of growing and how they can be manipulated in laboratory. In vitro cell culture allows us the possibility of studying biological key processes, such as growth, differentiation and cell death, and also to do genetic manipulations essential to the knowledge of structure and genes function. Human stem cells culture provides strategies to circumvent other models' deficiencies. It seems that cancer stem cells remain quiescent until activation by appropriated micro-environmental stimulation. Several studies reveal that different cancer types could be due to stem cell malignant transformations. Removal of these cells is essential to the development of more effective cancer therapies for advanced disease. On the other hand, dendritic cells modified in culture may be used as a therapeutic vaccine in order to induce tumour withdraw.

  19. Novel approaches for the molecular classification of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert H. Getzenberg

    2010-01-01

    @@ Among the urologic cancers, prostate cancer is by far the most common, and it appears to have the potential to affect almost all men throughout the world as they age. A number of studies have shown that many men with prostate cancer will not die from their disease, but rather with the disease but from other causes. These men have a form of prostate cancer that is de-scribed as "very low risk" and has often been called indolent. There are however a group of men that have a form of prostate cancer that is much more aggressive and life threatening. Unlike other cancer types, we have few tools to provide for the molecular classification of prostate cancer.

  20. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    . The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine receptors......Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both......, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic insight...

  1. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Bishnu P. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, BSRB 1722, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wang, Thomas D., E-mail: thomaswa@umich.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, BSRB 1722, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research.

  2. Exploiting Molecular Biology by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Francis; Fattinger, Christof

    Many contemporary biological investigations rely on highly sensitive in vitro assays for the analysis of specific molecules in biological specimens, and the main part of these assays depends on high-sensitivity fluorescence detection techniques for the final readout. The analyzed molecules and molecular interactions in the specimen need to be detected in the presence of other highly abundant biomolecules, while the analyzed molecules themselves are only present at nano-, pico-, or even femtomolar concentration.A short scientific rationale of fluorescence is presented. It emphasizes the use of fluorescent labels for sensitive assays in life sciences and specifies the main properties of an ideal fluorophore. With fluorescence lifetimes in the microsecond range and fluorescence quantum yield of 0.4 some water soluble complexes of Ruthenium like modified Ru(sulfobathophenanthroline) complexes fulfill these properties. They are outstanding fluorescent labels for ultrasensitive assays as illustrated in two examples, in drug discovery and in point of care testing.We discuss the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of the most sensitive time-gated fluorescence assays. We reflect on how the imaging devices currently employed for readout of these assays might evolve in the future. Many contemporary biological investigations rely on highly sensitive in vitro assays for the analysis of specific molecules in biological specimens, and the main part of these assays depends on high-sensitivity fluorescence detection techniques for the final readout. The analyzed molecules and molecular interactions in the specimen need to be detected in the presence of other highly abundant biomolecules, while the analyzed molecules themselves are only present at nano-, pico-, or even femtomolar concentration.A short scientific rationale of fluorescence is presented. It emphasizes the use of fluorescent labels for sensitive assays in life sciences and specifies the main properties of an ideal

  3. Implementation and Assessment of a Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Undergraduate Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Daphne Q. -D.; Higgs, David C.; Statham, Anne; Schleiter, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside has developed and implemented an innovative, multidisciplinary undergraduate curriculum in Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics (MBB). The objective of the MBB program is to give students a hands-on facility with molecular biology theories and laboratory techniques, an…

  4. Investigation of the molecular relationship between breast cancer and obesity by candidate gene prioritization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Garshasbi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer and obesity are two major public health concerns. More than 12 million cases of cancer are reported annually. Many reports confirmed obesity as a risk factor for cancer. The molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer has not been clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate priorities of effective genes in the molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer. Methods: In this study, computer simulation method was used for prioritizing the genes that involved in the molecular links between obesity and breast cancer in laboratory of systems biology and bioinformatics (LBB, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran, from March to July 2014. In this study, ENDEAVOUR software was used for prioritizing the genes and integrating multiple data sources was used for data analysis. Training genes were selected from effective genes in obesity and/or breast cancer. Two groups of candidate genes were selected. The first group was included the existential genes in 5 common region chromosomes (between obesity and breast cancer and the second group was included the results of genes microarray data analysis of research Creighton, et al (In 2012 on patients with breast cancer. The microarray data were analyzed with GER2 software (R online software on GEO website. Finally, both training and candidate genes were entered in ENDEAVOUR software package. Results: The candidate genes were prioritized to four style and five genes in ten of the first priorities were repeated twice. In other word, the outcome of prioritizing of 72 genes (Product of microarray data analysis and genes of 5 common chromosome regions (Between obesity and breast cancer showed, 5 genes (TNFRSF10B, F2, IGFALS, NTRK3 and HSP90B1 were the priorities in the molecular connection between obesity and breast cancer. Conclusion: There are some common genes between breast cancer and obesity. So, molecular relationship is confirmed. In this study the possible effect

  5. Traffic phenomena in biology: from molecular motors to organisms

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, D; Nishinari, K; Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukayotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In particular, some of the methods of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, pioneered almost a hundred years ago by Einstein, Langevin and others, turned out to be powerful theoretical tools for quantitative analysis of mode...

  6. Escherichia coli and the French School of Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2010-09-01

    André Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and François Jacob, the leaders of the French school of molecular biology, greatly contributed between 1937 and 1965 to its development and triumph. The main discovery of Lwoff was the elucidation of the mechanism of bacteriophage induction, the phenomenon of lysogeny, that led to the model of genetic regulation uncovered later by Jacob and Monod. Working on bacterial growth, Monod discovered in 1941 the phenomenon of diauxy and uncovered the nature of enzyme induction. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, Monod brought to light the structure and functions of the Escherichia coli lactose system, comprising the genes necessary for lactose metabolism, i.e., β-galactosidase and lactose permease, a pump responsible for accumulation of galactosides into the cells. An additional genetic factor (the i gene) determines the inducibility and constitutivity of enzyme synthesis. Around the same time, François Jacob and Elie Wollman dissected the main events of bacterial conjugation that enabled them to construct a map of the E. coli chromosome and to demonstrate its circularity. The genetic analysis of the lactose system led Monod and Jacob to elucidate the mechanism of the regulation of gene expression and to propose the operon model: a unit of coordinate transcription. One of the new concepts that emerged from the operon model was messenger RNA. In 1963, Monod developed one of the most elegant concepts of molecular biology, the theory of allostery. In 1965, Lwoff, Monod and Jacob were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

  7. Mutant p53: multiple mechanisms define biologic activity in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Paul Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of p53 alterations involve missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may acquire novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in multiple model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  8. The Important Molecular Markers on Chromosome 17 and Their Clinical Impact in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yingyan Yu; Wei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome 17 are important molecular genetic events in human breast cancers. Several famous oncogenes (HER2, TOP2A and TAU), tumor suppressor genes (p53, BRCA1 and HIC-1) or DNA double-strand break repair gene (RDM1) are located on chromosome 17. We searched the literature on HER2, TOP2A, TAU, RDM1, p53, BRCA1 and HIC-1 on the Pubmed database. The association of genes with chromosome 17, biological functions and potential significance are reviewed. In breast cancer, the poly...

  9. The Changing Landscape of Breast Cancer: How Biology Drives Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Friend

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most prevalent life-threatening cancer in women. Optimizing therapy to increase cure rates in early stage disease, and improving life expectancy and palliation for advanced stages, are goals driving major areas of research. The armamentarium of targeted treatments for breast cancer is ever expanding as understanding of breast cancer biology deepens. A revolution in our treatment was heralded a decade ago by the introduction of trastuzumab for human epidermal receptor-2 positive (HER2+ disease resulting in remarkable reductions in recurrence and improvements in overall survival (OS. Advances continue to be made in other breast cancer subtypes targeting key activating pathways for therapeutic development. However, for these other targeted agents, improvement in OS has been elusive. This article focuses on the development of targeted therapy in breast cancer focusing primarily on the last 5 years, to illustrate that as we understand the complex pathways allowing the dysregulated cell to become malignant, it also propels us closer towards the promise of precision and personalized medicine.

  10. Molecular Genetics Techniques to Develop New Treatments for Brain Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Jacob; Fathallan-Shaykh, Hassan

    2006-09-22

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to devise novel molecular gene therapies for malignant brain tumors, (2) advance our understanding of the immune system in the central nervous system; and (3) apply genomics to find molecular probes to diagnose brain tumors, predict prognosis, biological behavior and their response to treatment.

  11. Molecular Biology and Infection of Hepatitis E Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a viral pathogen transmitted primarily via fecal-oral route. In humans, HEV mainly causes acute hepatitis and is responsible for large outbreaks of hepatitis across the world. The case fatality rate of HEV-induced hepatitis ranges from 0.5 to 3% in young adults and up to 30% in infected pregnant women. HEV strains infecting humans are classified into four genotypes. HEV strains from genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic, whereas those from genotypes 1 and 2 have no known animal reservoirs. Recently, notable progress has been accomplished for better understanding of HEV biology and infection, such as chronic HEV infection, in vitro cell culture system, quasi-enveloped HEV virions, functions of the HEV proteins, mechanism of HEV antagonizing host innate immunity, HEV pathogenesis and vaccine development. However, further investigation on the cross-species HEV infection, host tropism, vaccine efficacy, and HEV-specific antiviral strategy is still needed. This review mainly focuses on molecular biology and infection of HEV and offers perspective new insight of this enigmatic virus. PMID:27656178

  12. Low angle neutron data acquisition system for molecular biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low angle spectrometer system utilizing a 2-dimensional position sensitive counter was designed to accommodate a variety of experiments in molecular biology requiring good low angle resolution. Biological structures requiring low angle analysis techniques fall into two groups: non-ordered systems (proteins or protein complexes in solution) and ordered systems with large spacings like muscle, collagen, and membranes. For structural investigations into such systems, data are ideally needed to a low scattering angle of 0.20 at 4.5 A or a minimum Q of 0.005 A-1 (Q = theta . 2π/lambda). Depending on the type of structure, data often extend to the high angle region, say 300. Apart from the low angle requirements, the spectrometer has to have good resolution to resolve diffraction peaks from samples with crystal spacings up to 1000 A or even larger. While it is desirable to build a spectrometer to such scattering conditions, given reactor conditions might not permit this and compromises have to be made between flux, resolution and lowest angle. The low angle spectrometer described here was designed to be used at the HFBR neutron beam pipe working at approximately 4.2 A or at the H4 satellite station working at 2.4 A

  13. Molecular Sociology: Further Insights from Biological and Environmental Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahed Jumah Mahmoud Al-Khatib

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study expanded our previous study in which features of molecular sociology were mentioned. In this study, we added the microbial dimensions in which it is thought that religiosity may be impacted by microbes that manipulate brains to create better conditions for their existence. This hypothesis is called “biomeme hypothesis”. We talked about other environmental impacts on human behaviors through three studies in which exposure to lead caused violent behaviors ending with arresting in prisons. By conclusion, the present study has expanded our horizon about interferences on various levels including biological and environmental impacts with our behaviors. Although we are convinced that behavior is a very diverse and complex phenomenon and cannot be understood within certain frame as either biologically or environmentally, but further new insights are possible to participate in better understanding of human behaviors. Many behaviors have their roots in religion, and we showed how religious rituals may be affected by some microbes that make to form a microenvironment within the host for microbial benefits.

  14. Correlation of microarray-based breast cancer molecular subtypes and clinical outcomes: implications for treatment optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimizing treatment through microarray-based molecular subtyping is a promising method to address the problem of heterogeneity in breast cancer; however, current application is restricted to prediction of distant recurrence risk. This study investigated whether breast cancer molecular subtyping according to its global intrinsic biology could be used for treatment customization. Gene expression profiling was conducted on fresh frozen breast cancer tissue collected from 327 patients in conjunction with thoroughly documented clinical data. A method of molecular subtyping based on 783 probe-sets was established and validated. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate molecular subtypes with survival outcome and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Heterogeneity of molecular subtypes within groups sharing the same distant recurrence risk predicted by genes of the Oncotype and MammaPrint predictors was studied. We identified six molecular subtypes of breast cancer demonstrating distinctive molecular and clinical characteristics. These six subtypes showed similarities and significant differences from the Perou-Sørlie intrinsic types. Subtype I breast cancer was in concordance with chemosensitive basal-like intrinsic type. Adjuvant chemotherapy of lower intensity with CMF yielded survival outcome similar to those of CAF in this subtype. Subtype IV breast cancer was positive for ER with a full-range expression of HER2, responding poorly to CMF; however, this subtype showed excellent survival when treated with CAF. Reduced expression of a gene associated with methotrexate sensitivity in subtype IV was the likely reason for poor response to methotrexate. All subtype V breast cancer was positive for ER and had excellent long-term survival with hormonal therapy alone following surgery and/or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not provide any survival benefit in early stages of subtype V patients. Subtype V was consistent with a unique subset of luminal A intrinsic

  15. Molecular codes in biological and chemical reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Görlich

    Full Text Available Shannon's theory of communication has been very successfully applied for the analysis of biological information. However, the theory neglects semantic and pragmatic aspects and thus cannot directly be applied to distinguish between (bio- chemical systems able to process "meaningful" information from those that do not. Here, we present a formal method to assess a system's semantic capacity by analyzing a reaction network's capability to implement molecular codes. We analyzed models of chemical systems (martian atmosphere chemistry and various combustion chemistries, biochemical systems (gene expression, gene translation, and phosphorylation signaling cascades, an artificial chemistry, and random reaction networks. Our study suggests that different chemical systems possess different semantic capacities. No semantic capacity was found in the model of the martian atmosphere chemistry, the studied combustion chemistries, and highly connected random networks, i.e. with these chemistries molecular codes cannot be implemented. High semantic capacity was found in the studied biochemical systems and in random reaction networks where the number of second order reactions is twice the number of species. We conclude that our approach can be applied to evaluate the information processing capabilities of a chemical system and may thus be a useful tool to understand the origin and evolution of meaningful information, e.g. in the context of the origin of life.

  16. A historical discourse analysis of the cancerous and non-cancerous body in secondary biology textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Neil Thomas

    This dissertation applies the archeological concepts developed by Michel Foucault to a study of thirteen biology textbooks (1993-2004) in order to develop an understanding of 'purchased truths' concerning cancer. This study focuses on the construction of the health/illness dialogue concerning cancer within the textbooks and not the meaning that the individual makes from reading the text; as such this study concerns itself with social truths rather than the search for an individual awareness of names, dates, or places. This study investigates the practices that allow the creation of dialogues that are inserted into a biology textbook and looks at how discursive formations create the 'truth regime' from which the biology textbook is said to speak. Using the Foucaultian themes of 'event', 'emergence', 'enunciation', and 'exteriority' a new reading of topics concerning cancer emerge from biology textbooks. Cancer is a disease that will impact the lives of countless individuals but coverage devoted to the pathology of cancer in secondary biology textbooks is very limited and no study textbook devoted a whole chapter to the discussion of cancer. There is an identified reduction in the number of pages and depth of coverage devoted to cancer in the newer biology texts compared to the older texts. Humans are pictured more than plants or animals in presentations concerning cancer with emphasis being placed on the digitalization of human cells via the scanning electron microscope. When the whole body is presented it is seldom located within the technology of disease diagnosis and treatment but rather is posed for specific social control. Just as each digitized picture of the cancerous cell in the texts is used to create a story so too are the pictures of the whole body in action. Possible story lines offered by the publishing houses concerning the reaction of the body to cancer are shown to intermingle with risk factor analysis to project a sense of Foucaultian

  17. Biologically based epidemiological studies of electric power and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Use of electricity is a hallmark of the industrialization process, but there has been no suspicion that electricity could increase the risk of cancer. Recently, however, a number of epidemiologic studies have suggested that electromagnetic fields (EMF) may do just that. Although few cancer experiments have been done yet, there are a number of biological effects of EMF reported in the literature that might provide bases for designing cancer experiments and epidemiologic studies. These include effects of EMF on: (a) DNA transcription and translation, (b) calcium balance in cells, and (c) pineal production of melatonin. Alterations in DNA transcription and translation could have pleiotropic effects. Disruption of calcium homeostasis has many implications including oncogene activation, promotional activity via protein kinases and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and increasing oxidative stress. Reduction of melatonin suggests a possible increased risk of cancers of hormone-dependent tissues such as breast and prostate. The idea that a cancer-causing agent must either be an initiator or a promoter should be discarded; indeed, the phenomenologic meaning of these two terms has become confused with imputed mechanistic necessity in recent years. Agents that affect division of normal cells or of fully transformed cells can play an important role in clinical cancer development quite apart from initiation or promotion. Epidemiologic studies of EMF and cancer should attempt to take account of other products of electric power (e.g., light at night) or factors associated with occupational EMF exposure (e.g., toxic chemicals) that may increase cancer risk and therefore act as cofactors or confounders. Epidemiology and laboratory studies should act synergistically in determining if there is a problem and identifying mitigation strategies if needed. 84 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. [Matrix metalloproteases as molecular markers in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the world. Prognosis in patients with gastric cancer is difficult to establish because it is commonly diagnosed when gastric wall invasion and metastasis have occurred. Currently, some members of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases have been identified, whose expression in gastric tumor tissue is significantly elevated compared to healthy gastric tissue. Matrix metalloproteinases are 24 zinc-dependent endopeptidases that catalyze the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. This degradation allows the cancer cells invade the surrounding stroma and trigger metastasis. Upregulation of certain matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis and elevated invasive capacity. This review compiles evidence about the genetic expression of matrix metalloproteinases in gastric cancer and their role in tumour invasion and metastasis, emphasizing their potential as molecular markers of prognosis.

  19. Molecular genetics of breast cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurður Ingvarsson 1956

    1999-01-01

    Somatic changes in the genome of breast cancer cells include amplifications, deletions and gene mutations. Several chromosome regions harboring known oncogenes are found amplified in breast tumors. Despite the high number of chromosome regions deleted in breast tumors the functional relationship to known genes at these locations and cancer growth is mainly undiscovered. Mutations in two tumor suppressor genes (TSG) have been described in a subset of breast carcinomas. These TSG are the TP53, ...

  20. The molecular biology of ear development - “Twenty years are nothing”#

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldez, Fernando; FRITZSCH, BERND

    2007-01-01

    Views of classical biological problems changed dramatically with the rise of molecular biology as a common framework. It was indeed the new language of life sciences. Molecular biology increasingly moved us towards a unified view of developmental genetics as ideas and techniques were imported to vertebrates from other biological systems where genetics was in a more advanced state. The ultimate advance has been the ability to actually perform genetic manipulations in vertebrate organisms that ...

  1. Pattern of distant recurrence according to the molecular subtypes in Korean women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hyung Seok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distant recurrence is one of the most important risk factors in overall survival, and distant recurrence is related to a complex biologic interaction of seed and soil factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the molecular subtypes and patterns of distant recurrence in patients with breast cancer. Methods In an investigation of 313 women with breast cancer who underwent surgery from 1994 and 2000, the expressions of estrogen and progestrone receptor (ER/PR, and human epithelial receptor-2 (HER2 were evaluated. The subtypes were defined as luminal-A, luminal-HER2, HER2-enriched, and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC according to ER, PR, and HER2 status. Results Bone was the most common site of distant recurrence. The incidence of first distant recurrence site was significantly different among the subtypes. Brain metastasis was more frequent in the luminal-HER2 and TNBC subtypes. In subgroup analysis, overall survival in patients with distant recurrence after 24 months after surgery was significantly different among the subtypes. Conclusions Organ-specific metastasis may depend on the molecular subtype of breast cancer. Tailored strategies against distant metastasis concerning the molecular subtypes in breast cancer may be considered.

  2. From Molecular Classification to Targeted Therapeutics: The Changing Face of Systemic Therapy in Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1 or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician’s therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  3. Which, when and why? Rational use of tissue-based molecular testing in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A E; D'Amico, A V; Freedland, S J

    2016-03-01

    An increased molecular understanding of localized prostate cancer and the improved ability for molecular testing of pathologic tissue has led to the development of multiple clinical assays. Here we review the relevant molecular biology of localized prostate cancer, currently available tissue-based tests and describe which is best supported for use in various clinical scenarios. Literature regarding testing of human prostate cancer tissue with Ki-67, PTEN (by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluroescence in situ hybridization (FISH)), ProMark, Prolaris, OncotypeDX Prostate and Decipher was reviewed to allow for generation of expert opinions. At diagnosis, evaluation of PTEN status, use of ProMark or OncotypeDX Prostate in men with Gleason 6 or 3+4=7 disease may help guide the use of active surveillance. For men with Gleason 7 or above disease considering watchful waiting, Ki-67 and Prolaris add independent prognostic information. For those men who have undergone prostatectomy and have adverse pathology, Decipher testing may aid in the decision to undergo adjuvant radiation. Newly available molecular tests bring opportunities to improve decision making for men with localized prostate cancer. A review of the currently available data suggests clinical scenarios for which each of these tests may have the greatest utility. PMID:26123120

  4. From molecular classification to targeted therapeutics: the changing face of systemic therapy in metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  5. Protocatechuic acid and human disease prevention: biological activities and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, R; Santangelo, C; D'Archivio, M; Li Volti, G; Giovannini, C; Galvano, F

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has shown that a high dietary intake of vegetables and fruit rich in polyphenols is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality from coronary heart disease. The healthy effects associated with polyphenol consumption have made the study of the mechanisms of action a matter of great importance. In particular, the hydroxybenzoic acid protocatechuic acid (PCA) has been eliciting a growing interest for several reasons. Firstly, PCA is one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols such as anthocyanins and procyanidins that are normally found at high concentrations in vegetables and fruit, and are absorbed by animals and humans. Since the daily intake of anthocyanins has been estimated to be much higher than that of other polyphenols, the nutritional value of PCA is increasingly recognized. Secondly, a growing body of evidence supports the concept that PCA can exert a variety of biological effects by acting on different molecular targets. It has been shown that PCA possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory as well as antihyperglycemic and neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, PCA seems to have chemopreventive potential because it inhibits the in vitro chemical carcinogenesis and exerts pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in different tissues. This review is aimed at providing an up-dated and comprehensive report on PCA giving a special emphasis on its biological activities and the molecular mechanisms of action most likely responsible for a beneficial role in human disease prevention. PMID:22519395

  6. Molecular targeted agents for gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Takashi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2012-04-01

    Despite recent improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy, advanced cancers of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) continue to have poor clinical outcomes. However, molecules intimately related to cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis have been studied as candidates for molecular targeted agents. Target molecules, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and P13k/Akt/mTor pathway, as well as the insulin-like growth factor receptor, c-Met pathways, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and other pathways are considered to be promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy for gastric and GEJ cancer. In this review we focus on the recent developments in targeting relevant pathways in these types of cancer.

  7. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A.; Zaver M Bhujwalla

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The incre...

  8. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol...

  9. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Vladimir; Suo, Chen; Orear, Cedric; van den Oord, Joost; Balogh, Zsofia; Guegan, Justine; Job, Bastien; Meurice, Guillaume; Ripoche, Hugues; Calza, Stefano; Hasmats, Johanna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lacroix, Ludovic; Vielh, Philippe; Dufour, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridiz...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a recently identified member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family[1]. Numerous studies indicate that TRAIL can induce apoptosis of cancer cells but not of normal cells, pointing to the possibility of de-veloping TRAIL into a cancer drug[2-4]. This review will summary the molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and discuss the questions to be resolved in this field.

  11. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  12. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-07-15

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  13. MODEL ORGANISMS USED IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OR MEDICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Govind

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A model organism is a non-human species that is studied to understand specific biological phenomena with the expectation that investigations made in the organism model will provide insight into the workings of other organisms. The model organisms are widely used to explore potential causes and treatments for human as well as animal diseases when experiments on animals or humans would be unfeasible or considered less ethical. Studying model organisms may be informative, but care must be taken when generalizing from one organism to another. Often, model organisms are chosen on the basis that they are amenable to experimental manipulation. When researchers look for an organism to use in their studies, they look for several traits. Among these are size, generation time, accessibility, manipulation, genetics, conservation of mechanisms and potential economic benefit. As comparative molecular biology has become more common, some researchers have sought model organisms from a wider assortment of lineages on the tree of life. There are many model organisms, such as viruses (e.g., Phage lambda virus, Tobacco mosaic virus, etc., bacteria (e.g., Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio fischeri, etc., algae (e.g., Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Emiliania huxleyi, etc., molds (e.g., Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, etc., yeasts (e.g., Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ustilago maydis, etc., higher plants (e.g., Arabidopsis thaliana, Lemna gibba, Lotus japonicus, Nicotiana tabaccum, Oryza sativa, Physcomitrella patens, Zea mays, etc. and animals (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans, guinea pig, hamster, mouse, rat, cat, chicken, dog, frog, Hydra, Drosophila melanogaster fruit fly, fish, etc..

  14. DNA aptamers as molecular probes for colorectal cancer study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Sefah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular features of specific tumors can increase our knowledge about the mechanism(s underlying disease development and progression. This is particularly significant for colorectal cancer, which is a heterogeneous complex of diseases developed in a sequential manner through a multistep carcinogenic process. As such, it is likely that tumors with similar characteristics might originate in the same manner and have a similar molecular behavior. Therefore, specific mapping of the molecular features can be potentially useful for both tumor classification and the development of appropriate therapeutic regimens. However, this can only be accomplished by developing high-affinity molecular probes with the ability to recognize specific markers associated with different tumors. Aptamers can most easily meet this challenge based on their target diversity, flexible manipulation and ease of development. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Using a method known as cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX and colorectal cancer cultured cell lines DLD-1 and HCT 116, we selected a panel of target-specific aptamers. Binding studies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that these aptamers have high affinity and selectivity. Our data further show that these aptamers neither recognize normal colon cells (cultured and fresh, nor do they recognize most other cancer cell lines tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The selected aptamers can identify specific biomarkers associated with colorectal cancers. We believe that these probes could be further developed for early disease detection, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers.

  15. [Molecular classification of bladder cancer. Possible similarities to breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, R M; Fritz, V; Stöhr, R; Hartmann, A

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic decisions for breast cancer are increasingly becoming based on subtype-specific gene expression tests. For bladder cancer very similar subtypes have been identified by genome-wide mRNA analysis, which as for breast cancer differ with respect to the prognosis and response to therapy on the basis of their hormone dependency. At the DNA level, however, the type of mutations and their frequencies within the subtypes are strikingly different between bladder and breast cancers. It will be interesting to see whether possible driver mutations can serve as therapeutic targets in both indications. In contrast, the apparent hormone dependency of a substantial number of bladder carcinomas suggests that hormonal and anti-hormonal treatment can be valid therapy options similar to breast cancer. Moreover, gender-specific differences with respect to the incidence and aggressiveness of male compared to female bladder cancers can be explained by hormonal effects. Together with forthcoming immunomodulatory therapies these multiple therapy options raise and give new hope to efficiently combat this aggressive disease. PMID:26780243

  16. Colorectal Cancer & Molecular Mutations and Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aga Syed Sameer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. The incidence of CRC shows considerable variation among racially or ethnically defined populations in multiracial/ethnic countries. The tumorigenesis of CRC is either because of the chromosomal instability (CIN or microsatellite instability (MIN or involving various proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and also epigenetic changes in the DNA. In this review I have focused on the mutations and polymorphisms of various important genes of the CIN and MIN pathways which have been implicated in the development of CRC.

  17. Correlation of morphological and molecular parameters for colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A.; Li, Qian; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M.; Chen, Yu

    2010-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is great interest in studying the relationship among microstructures and molecular processes of colorectal cancer during its progression at early stages. In this study, we use our multi-modality optical system that could obtain co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) images simultaneously to study CRC. The overexpressed carbohydrate α-L-fucose on the surfaces of polyps facilitates the bond of adenomatous polyps with UEA-1 and is used as biomarker. Tissue scattering coefficient derived from OCT axial scan is used as quantitative value of structural information. Both structural images from OCT and molecular images show spatial heterogeneity of tumors. Correlations between those values are analyzed and demonstrate that scattering coefficients are positively correlated with FMI signals in conjugated. In UEA-1 conjugated samples (8 polyps and 8 control regions), the correlation coefficient is ranged from 0.45 to 0.99. These findings indicate that the microstructure of polyps is changed gradually during cancer progression and the change is well correlated with certain molecular process. Our study demonstrated that multi-parametric imaging is able to simultaneously detect morphology and molecular information and it can enable spatially and temporally correlated studies of structure-function relationships during tumor progression.

  18. Endometrial cancer : from a molecular genetic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Smid-Koopman (Ellen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe first observations indicative of a role of genetic factors in carcinogenesis were made as early as 1912, when Rous demonstrated that a filterable agent (i.e. virus) could induce cancer in chicken (Rous 1965). In 1914, Boveri postulated a "genetic" theory on carcinogenesis by hypothes

  19. Molecular pathology of colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijenbroek, Marjo van

    2008-01-01

    Each year, approximately eleven thousand new colorectal cancer (CRC) patients are registered in the Netherlands. Half of these patients will eventually die of this disease. Consequently, it is of great importance to identify individuals with an increased risk for CRC. In this thesis, we evaluate the

  20. The consensus molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M; Morris, Jeffrey S; Simon, Iris M; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression-based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data shar

  1. Molecular-Genetic Aspects of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasteva M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women. Advances in breast cancer knowledge have deciphered the involvement of a number of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes in disease pathogenesis. These genes are part of the complex biochemical pathways, which enable cell cycle control and maintenance of genome integrity. Their function may be disrupted as a result of alterations in gene sequence or misregulation of gene expression including alterations in DNA methylation pattern. The present review summarizes the main findings on major breast cancer related genes BRCA1/2, p53, ATM, CHEK2, HER2, PIK3CA and their tumorigenic inactivation/activation. The potential clinical importance of these genes with respect to patients’ prognosis and therapy are also discussed. The possible implication of other putative breast cancer related genes is also outlined. The first elaborate data on the genetic and epigenetic status of the above mentioned genes concerning Bulgarian patients with the sporadic form of the disease are presented. The studies indicate for a characteristic mutational spectrum in some of the genes for the Bulgarian patients and specific correlation between the status of different genes and clinicopathological characteristics.

  2. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  3. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18

    reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

  4. The roles of integration in molecular systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Maureen A; Soyer, Orkun S

    2012-03-01

    A common way to think about scientific practice involves classifying it as hypothesis- or data-driven. We argue that although such distinctions might illuminate scientific practice very generally, they are not sufficient to understand the day-to-day dynamics of scientific activity and the development of programmes of research. One aspect of everyday scientific practice that is beginning to gain more attention is integration. This paper outlines what is meant by this term and how it has been discussed from scientific and philosophical points of view. We focus on methodological, data and explanatory integration, and show how they are connected. Then, using some examples from molecular systems biology, we will show how integration works in a range of inquiries to generate surprising insights and even new fields of research. From these examples we try to gain a broader perspective on integration in relation to the contexts of inquiry in which it is implemented. In today's environment of data-intensive large-scale science, integration has become both a practical and normative requirement with corresponding implications for meta-methodological accounts of scientific practice. We conclude with a discussion of why an understanding of integration and its dynamics is useful for philosophy of science and scientific practice in general.

  5. Do biological molecular machines act as Maxwell's demons?

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzynski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    In the intention of its creator, Maxwell's demon was thought to be an intelligent being able to perform work at the expense of the entropy reduction of a closed operating system. The perplexing notion of the demon's intelligence was formalized in terms of the memory and information processing by Szilard and followers. A non-informational formulation of the problem was proposed by Smoluchowski and popularized by Feynman as the ratchet and pawl machine. A. F. Huxley and followers adopted this way of thinking to propose numerous ratchet mechanisms of the protein molecular machines action, but no entropy reduction takes place for these models. More general models of protein dynamics have been proposed with a number of intramolecular states organized in a network of stochastic transitions. Here, a computer realization of such a network is investigated, displaying, like networks of the systems biology, a transition from the fractal organization on a small length-scale to the small-world organization on the large le...

  6. Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using molecular biology technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Garberi; Jorge Labrador; Federico Garberi; Juan Ezequiel Garberi; Julian Peneipil; Miguel Garberi; Luis Scigliano; Alcides Troncoso

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To present an integrated molecular biology dedicated system for tuberculosis diagnosis.Methods:One hundred and five sputum specimens from patients strongly suspected by clinical parameters of tuberculosis were studied by Ziehl-Neelsen staining, by cultivation on solid medium and by a balanced heminested fluorometricPCR system (OrangeG3TB) that could preserve worker safety and produce a rather pure material free of potential inhibitors. DNA amplification was performed in a low cost tuberculosis termocycler-fluorometer. Produced double stranded DNA was flurometrically detected. The whole reaction was conducted in one single tube which would not be opened after adding the processed sample in order to minimize the risk of cross contamination with amplicons.Results: The assay was able to detect30 bacillus per sample mL with99.8% interassay variation coefficient.PCR was positive in23 (21.9%) tested samples (21 of them were smear negative). In our study it showed a preliminary sensitivity of 94.5% for sputum and an overall specificity of98.7%.Conclusions:Total run time of the test is4 h with2.5 real working time. AllPCR positive samples are also positive by microbiological culture and clinical criteria. Results show that it could be a very useful tool to increase detection efficiency of tuberculosis disease in low bacilus load samples. Furthermore, its low cost and friendly using make it feasible to run in poor regions.

  7. The Molecular Biology of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. L. Lever

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is widespread in feline populations and causes an AIDS-like illness in domestic cats. It is highly prevalent in several endangered feline species. In domestic cats FIV infection is a valuable small animal model for HIV infection. In recent years there has been a significant increase in interest in FIV, in part to exploit this, but also because of the potential it has as a human gene therapy vector. Though much less studied than HIV there are many parallels in the replication of the two viruses, but also important differences and, despite their likely common origin, the viruses have in some cases used alternative strategies to overcome similar problems. Recent advances in understanding the structure and function of FIV RNA and proteins and their interactions has enhanced our knowledge of FIV replication significantly, however, there are still many gaps. This review summarizes our current knowledge of FIV molecular biology and its similarities with, and differences from, other lentiviruses.

  8. RT-PCR Protocols - Methods in Molecular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Monti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available “The first record I have of it, is when I made a computer file which I usually did whenever I had an idea, that would have been on the Monday when I got back, and I called it Chain Reaction.POL, meaning polymerase. That was the identifier for it and later I called the thing the Polymerase Chain Reaction, which a lot of people thought was a dumb name for it, but it stuck, and it became PCR”. With these words the Nobel prize winner, Kary Mullis, explains how he named the PCR: one of the most important techniques ever invented and currently used in molecular biology. This book “RT-PCR Protocols” covers a wide range of aspects important for the setting of a PCR experiment for both beginners and advanced users. In my opinion the book is very well structured in three different sections. The first one describes the different technologies now available, like competitive RT-PCR, nested RT-PCR or RT-PCR for cloning. An important part regards the usage of PCR in single cell mouse embryos, stressing how important...........

  9. Abstracts of the 26. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Resumos da 26. reuniao anual da Sociedade Brasileira de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This meeting was about biochemistry and molecular biology. It was discussed topics related to bio energetic, channels, transports, biotechnology, metabolism, cellular biology, immunology, toxicology, photobiology and pharmacology.

  10. Abstracts of the 27. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Resumos da 27. reuniao anual da Sociedade Brasileira de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This meeting was about biochemistry and molecular biology. It was discussed topics related to bio energetic, channels, transports, biotechnology, metabolism, cellular biology, immunology, toxicology, photobiology and pharmacology.

  11. Digital learning material for experimental design and model building in molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Designing experimental approaches is a major cognitive skill in molecular biology research, and building models, including quantitative ones, is a cognitive skill which is rapidly gaining importance. Since molecular biology education at university level is aimed at educating future researchers, we c

  12. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, S.; Laukenmann, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Vollmer, M.K.; Gleixner, G.; Roeckmann, T.

    2011-01-01

    Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2) is characterized by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of molecular hydrogen (H2

  13. Just Working with the Cellular Machine: A High School Game for Teaching Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernanda Serpa; Dumpel, Renata; Gomes da Silva, Luisa B.; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; Santos, Dilvani O.; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Castro, Helena C.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology is a difficult comprehension subject due to its high complexity, thus requiring new teaching approaches. Herein, we developed an interdisciplinary board game involving the human immune system response against a bacterial infection for teaching molecular biology at high school. Initially, we created a database with several…

  14. The role of the ALK receptor in cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, B; Palmer, R H

    2016-09-01

    A vast array of oncogenic variants has been identified for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Therefore, there is a need to better understand the role of ALK in cancer biology in order to optimise treatment strategies. This review summarises the latest research on the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK, and how this information can guide the management of patients with cancer that is ALK-positive. A variety of ALK gene alterations have been described across a range of tumour types, including point mutations, deletions and rearrangements. A wide variety of ALK fusions, in which the kinase domain of ALK and the amino-terminal portion of various protein partners are fused, occur in cancer, with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK being the most prevalent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Different ALK fusion proteins can mediate different signalling outputs, depending on properties such as subcellular localisation and protein stability. The ALK fusions found in tumours lack spatial and temporal regulation, which can also affect dimerisation and substrate specificity. Two ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), crizotinib and ceritinib, are currently approved in Europe for use in ALK-positive NSCLC and several others are in development. These ALK TKIs bind slightly differently within the ATP-binding pocket of the ALK kinase domain and are associated with the emergence of different resistance mutation patterns during therapy. This emphasises the need to tailor the sequence of ALK TKIs according to the ALK signature of each patient. Research into the oncogenic functions of ALK, and fast paced development of ALK inhibitors, has substantially improved outcomes for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Limited data are available surrounding the physiological ligand-stimulated activation of ALK signalling and further research is needed. Understanding the role of ALK in tumour biology is key to further optimising therapeutic strategies for ALK

  15. Tracking the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: bridging cancer biology to clinical gastrointestinal oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprile G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Aprile,1 Francesco Leone,2,3 Riccardo Giampieri,4 Mariaelena Casagrande,1 Donatella Marino,2,3 Luca Faloppi,4 Stefano Cascinu,4 Gianpiero Fasola,1 Mario Scartozzi5,6 1Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; 2Medical Oncology Department, University of Turin, 3Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin, Italy; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 5Medical Oncology Department, University of Cagliari, 6General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: The 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (San Francisco, CA, USA; January 15–17 is the world-class conference co-sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, and the Society of Surgical Oncology, in which the most innovative research results in digestive tract oncology are presented and discussed. In its twelfth edition, the meeting has provided new insights focusing on the underpinning biology and clinical management of gastrointestinal malignancies. More than 3,400 health care professionals gathered from all over the world to share their experiences on how to bridge the recent novelties in cancer biology with everyday medical practice. In this article, the authors report on the most significant advances, didactically moving on three different anatomic tracks: gastroesophageal malignancies, pancreatic and biliary cancers, and colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, target therapy, onartuzumab, AMG 337

  16. Modeling Cancer Metastasis using Global, Quantitative and Integrative Network Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoof, Erwin; Erler, Janine

    cancer networks using Network Biology. Technologies key to this, such as Mass Spectrometry (MS), Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) and High-Content Screening (HCS) are briefly described. In Chapter II, we cover how signaling networks and mutational data can be modeled in order to gain a better...... number of biological aspects that would need to be understood to enable comprehensive treatment regimens specific to each patient (i.e. personalized medicine). However, in the approaches outlined in this thesis, we chose metastasis as a key process for interrogating the clinical potential of targeting...... can be generated using MS, and how this can be modeled using a computational framework for deciphering kinase-substrate dynamics. This framework is described in depth in Article 3, and covers the design of KinomeXplorer, which allows the prediction of kinases responsible for modulating observed...

  17. Integrating tumor microenvironment with cancer molecular classifications

    OpenAIRE

    Becht, Etienne; De Reyniès, Aurélien; Fridman, Wolf H.

    2015-01-01

    Editorial summary The composition of the tumor microenvironment is associated with a patient's prognosis and can be therapeutically targeted. A link between the cellular composition and genomic features of the tumor and its response to immunotherapy is beginning to emerge. Analyzing the microenvironment of tumor molecular subgroups can be a useful approach to tailor immunotherapies.

  18. Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular docking studies of novel benzofuran-pyrazole derivatives as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Karim, Somaia S; Anwar, Manal M; Mohamed, Neama A; Nasr, Tamer; Elseginy, Samia A

    2015-12-01

    This study deals with design and synthesis of novel benzofuran-pyrazole hybrids as anticancer agents. Eight compounds were chosen by National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA to evaluate their in vitro antiproliferative activity at 10(-5)M in full NCI 60 cell panel. The preliminary screening of the tested compounds showed promising broad-spectrum anticancer activity. Compound 4c was further assayed for five dose molar ranges in full NCI 60 cell panel and exhibited remarkable growth inhibitory activity pattern against Leukemia CCRF-CEM, MOLT-4, Lung Cancer HOP-92, Colon Cancer HCC-2998, CNS Cancer SNB-75, Melanoma SK-MEL-2, Ovarian Cancer IGROV1, Renal Cancer 786-0, RXF 393, Breast Cancer HS 578T and T-47D (GI50: 1.00-2.71μM). Moreover, enzyme assays were carried out to investigate the possible antiproliferative mechanism of action of compound 4c. The results revealed that compound 4c has good c-Src inhibitory activity at 10μM. In addition, molecular docking studies showed that 4c could bind to the ATP Src pocket sites. Fulfilling the Lipinskiís rule of five in addition to its ADME profile and the biological results, all strongly suggest that 4c is a promising Src kinase inhibitor.

  19. Molecular biology in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology perspective of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are used to illustrate the application of molecular biology to clinical radiation oncology. Identified by linkage analysis and cloned, the structure of the genes and the numerous mutations are determined by molecular biology techniques that examine the structure of the DNA and the proteins made by the normal and mutant alleles. Mutations in the non-transcribed portion of the gene will not be found in protein structure assays and may be important in gene function. In addition to potential deleterious mutations, normal polymorphisms of the gene will also be detected, therefore not all differences in gene sequence may represent important mutations, a finding that complicates genetic screening and counseling. The localization of the protein in the nucleus, the expression in relation to cell cycle and the association with RAD51 led to the discovery that the two BRCA genes may be involved in transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. The defect in DNA repair can increase radiosensitivity which might improve local control using breast-conserving treatment in a tumor which is homozygous for the loss of the gene (i.e., BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes). This is supported by the early reports of a high rate of local control with breast-conserving therapy. Nonetheless, this radiosensitivity theoretically may also lead to increased susceptibility to carcinogenic effects in surviving cells, a finding that might not be observed for decades. The susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage appears also to make the cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Understanding the role of the normal BRCA genes in DNA repair might help define a novel mechanism for radiation sensitization by interfering with the normal gene function using a variety of molecular or biochemical therapies

  20. Molecular biology in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology perspective of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School (United States). Joint Center for Radiation Therapy

    1999-07-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are used to illustrate the application of molecular biology to clinical radiation oncology. Identified by linkage analysis and cloned, the structure of the genes and the numerous mutations are determined by molecular biology techniques that examine the structure of the DNA and the proteins made by the normal and mutant alleles. Mutations in the non-transcribed portion of the gene will not be found in protein structure assays and may be important in gene function. In addition to potential deleterious mutations, normal polymorphisms of the gene will also be detected, therefore not all differences in gene sequence may represent important mutations, a finding that complicates genetic screening and counseling. The localization of the protein in the nucleus, the expression in relation to cell cycle and the association with RAD51 led to the discovery that the two BRCA genes may be involved in transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. The defect in DNA repair can increase radiosensitivity which might improve local control using breast-conserving treatment in a tumor which is homozygous for the loss of the gene (i.e., BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes). This is supported by the early reports of a high rate of local control with breast-conserving therapy. Nonetheless, this radiosensitivity theoretically may also lead to increased susceptibility to carcinogenic effects in surviving cells, a finding that might not be observed for decades. The susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage appears also to make the cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Understanding the role of the normal BRCA genes in DNA repair might help define a novel mechanism for radiation sensitization by interfering with the normal gene function using a variety of molecular or biochemical therapies.

  1. TCGA divides gastric cancer into four molecular subtypes:implications for individualized therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. The treatment of gastric cancer is chalenging because of its highly heterogeneous etiology and clinical characteristics. Recent genomic and molecular characterization of gastric cancer, especialy the findings reported by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), have shed light on the heterogeneity and potential targeted therapeutics for four different subtypes of gastric cancer.

  2. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  3. Environmental effects on molecular biomarkers expression in pancreatic and brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Lawrence; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Massodi, Iqbal; Anbil, Sriram; Mai, Zhiming; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    A complete understanding of the biological mechanisms regulating devastating disease such as cancer remains elusive. Pancreatic and brain cancers are primary among the cancer types with poor prognosis. Molecular biomarkers have emerged as group of proteins that are preferentially overexpressed in cancers and with a key role in driving disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell proliferative biomarker is particularly highly expressed in most cancers including brain and pancreatic cancers. The ability of EGFR to sustain prolong cell proliferation is augmented by biomarkers such as Bax, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, proteins regulating the apoptotic process. To better understand the role and effect of the microenvironment on these biomarkers in pancreatic cancer (PaCa); we analysed two pancreatic tumor lines (AsPc-1 and MiaPaCa-2) in 2D, 3D in-vitro cultures and in orthotopic tumors at different growth stages. We also investigated in patient derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cultures, the ability to utilize the EGFR expression to specifically deliver photosensitizer to the cells for photodynamic therapy. Overall, our results suggest that (1) microenvironment changes affect biomarker expression; thereby it is critical to understand these effects prior to designing combination therapies and (2) EGFR expression in tumor cells indeed could serve as a reliable and a robust biomarker that could be used to design targeted and image-guided photodynamic therapy.

  4. Molecular genetics of cancer and tumorigenesis: Drosophila models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Min Deng

    2011-01-01

    Why do some cells not respond to normal control of cell division and become tumorous? Which signals trigger some tumor cells to migrate and colonize other tissues? What genetic factors are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer development? What environmental factors play a role in cancer formation and progression? In how many ways can our bodies prevent and restrict the growth of cancerous cells?How can we identify and deliver effective drugs to fight cancer? In the fight against cancer,which kills more people than any other disease,these and other questions have long interested researchers from a diverse range of fields.To answer these questions and to fight cancer more effectively,we must increase our understanding of basic cancer biology.Model organisms,including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,have played instrumental roles in our understanding of this devastating disease and the search for effective cures.Drosophila and its highly effective,easy-touse,and ever-expanding genetic tools have contributed toand enriched our knowledge of cancer and tumor formation tremendously.

  5. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  6. The redox biology network in cancer pathophysiology and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Manda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The review pinpoints operational concepts related to the redox biology network applied to the pathophysiology and therapeutics of solid tumors. A sophisticated network of intrinsic and extrinsic cues, integrated in the tumor niche, drives tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Critical mutations and distorted redox signaling pathways orchestrate pathologic events inside cancer cells, resulting in resistance to stress and death signals, aberrant proliferation and efficient repair mechanisms. Additionally, the complex inter-cellular crosstalk within the tumor niche, mediated by cytokines, redox-sensitive danger signals (HMGB1 and exosomes, under the pressure of multiple stresses (oxidative, inflammatory, metabolic, greatly contributes to the malignant phenotype. The tumor-associated inflammatory stress and its suppressive action on the anti-tumor immune response are highlighted. We further emphasize that ROS may act either as supporter or enemy of cancer cells, depending on the context. Oxidative stress-based therapies, such as radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy, take advantage of the cytotoxic face of ROS for killing tumor cells by a non-physiologically sudden, localized and intense oxidative burst. The type of tumor cell death elicited by these therapies is discussed. Therapy outcome depends on the differential sensitivity to oxidative stress of particular tumor cells, such as cancer stem cells, and therefore co-therapies that transiently down-regulate their intrinsic antioxidant system hold great promise. We draw attention on the consequences of the damage signals delivered by oxidative stress-injured cells to neighboring and distant cells, and emphasize the benefits of therapeutically triggered immunologic cell death in metastatic cancer. An integrative approach should be applied when designing therapeutic strategies in cancer, taking into consideration the mutational, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative status of tumor cells, cellular

  7. Application of Proteomics to Cancer Molecular Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam HANASH

    2009-01-01

    @@ Strategies to achieve personalized medicine and improve public health encompass assessment of an individual's risk for disease, early detection and molecular classification of disease resulting in an informed choice of the most appropriate treatment instituted at an early stage of disease develop- ment. A major contribution of proteomics in this field is the development of blood based tests to achieve the goals of personalized medicine.

  8. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litchfield, J.H.; Zupancic, T.J.; Kittle, J.D. Jr.; Baker, B.; Palmer, D.T.; Traunero, C.G.; Wyza, R.E.; Schweitzer, A.; Conkle, H.N. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Chakravarty, L.; Tuovinen, O.H. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1992-10-08

    Progress is reported in understanding Thiobacillus molecular biology, specifically in the area of vector development. At the initiation of this program, the basic elements needed for performing genetic engineering in T. ferrooxidans were either not yet developed. Improved techniques are described which will make it easier to construct and analyze the genetic structure and metabolism of recombinant T. ferrooxidans. The metabolism of the model organic sulfur compound dibenzothiophene (DBT) by certain heterotrophic bacteria was confirmed and characterized. Techniques were developed to analyze the metabolites of DBT, so that individual 4S pathway metabolites could be distinguished. These techniques are expected to be valuable when engineering organic sulfur metabolism in Thiobacillus. Strain isolation techniques were used to develop pure cultures of T. ferrooxidans seven of which were assessed as potential recombinant hosts. The mixotrophic strain T. coprinus was also characterized for potential use as an electroporation host. A family of related Thiobacillus plasmids was discovered in the seven strains of P. ferrooxidans mentioned above. One of these plasmids, pTFI91, was cloned into a pUC-based plasmid vector, allowing it to propagate in E. coli. A key portion of the cloned plasmid was sequenced. This segment, which is conserved in all of the related plasmids characterized, contains the vegetative origin of DNA replication, and fortuitously, a novel insertion sequence, designated IS3091. The sequence of the DNA origin revealed that these Thiobacillus plasmids represent a unique class of replicons not previously described. The potentially useful insertion sequence IS3091 was identified as a new member of a previously undefined family of insertion sequences which include the E. coli element IS30.

  9. Research Needs for Understanding the Biology of Overdiagnosis in Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhir; Reid, Brian J; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Kramer, Barnett S

    2016-09-01

    Many cancers offer an extended window of opportunity for early detection and therapeutic intervention that could lead to a reduction in cause-specific mortality. The pursuit of early detection in screening settings has resulted in decreased incidence and mortality for some cancers (e.g., colon and cervical cancers), and increased incidence with only modest or no effect on cause-specific mortality in others (e.g., breast and prostate). Whereas highly sensitive screening technologies are better at detecting a number of suspected "cancers" that are indolent and likely to remain clinically unimportant in the lifetime of a patient, defined as overdiagnosis, they often miss cancers that are aggressive and tend to present clinically between screenings, known as interval cancers. Unrecognized overdiagnosis leads to overtreatment with its attendant (often long-lasting) side effects, anxiety, and substantial financial harm. Existing methods often cannot differentiate indolent lesions from aggressive ones or understand the dynamics of neoplastic progression. To correctly identify the population that would benefit the most from screening and identify the lesions that would benefit most from treatment, the evolving genomic and molecular profiles of individual cancers during the clinical course of progression or indolence must be investigated, while taking into account an individual's genetic susceptibility, clinical and environmental risk factors, and the tumor microenvironment. Practical challenges lie not only in the lack of access to tissue specimens that are appropriate for the study of natural history, but also in the absence of targeted research strategies. This commentary summarizes the recommendations from a diverse group of scientists with expertise in basic biology, translational research, clinical research, statistics, and epidemiology and public health professionals convened to discuss research directions. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1870-1875, 2016. © 2015 Wiley

  10. Growth Analysis of Cancer Biology Research, 2000-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshava,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods and Material: The PubMed database was used for retrieving data on 'cancer biology.' Articles were downloaded from the years 2000 to 2011. The articles were classified chronologically and transferred to a spreadsheet application for analysis of the data as per the objectives of the study. Statistical Method: To investigate the nature of growth of articles via exponential, linear, and logistics tests. Result: The year wise analysis of the growth of articles output shows that for the years 2000 to 2005 and later there is a sudden increase in output, during the years 2006 to 2007 and 2008 to 2011. The high productivity of articles during these years may be due to their significance in cancer biology literature, having received prominence in research. Conclusion: There is an obvious need for better compilations of statistics on numbers of publications in the years from 2000 to 2011 on various disciplines on a worldwide scale, for informed critical assessments of the amount of new knowledge contributed by these publications, and for enhancements and refinements of present Scientometric techniques (citation and publication counts, so that valid measures of knowledge growth may be obtained. Only then will Scientometrics be able to provide accurate, useful descriptions and predictions of knowledge growth.

  11. Systems Biology of cancer: Moving toward the Integrative Study of the metabolic alterations in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Erika Hernández Patiño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives in systems biology is to understand the biological mechanisms that give rise to the phenotype of a microorganism by using high-throughput technologies and genome-scale mathematical modeling. The computational modeling of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions is one systemic and quantitative strategy for characterizing the metabolic phenotype associated with human diseases and potentially for designing drugs with optimal clinical effects. The purpose of this short review is to describe how computational modeling, including the specific case of constraint-based modeling, can be used to explore, characterize and predict the metabolic capacities that distinguish the metabolic phenotype of cancer cell lines. As we show herein, this computational framework is far from a pure theoretical description, and to ensure proper biological interpretation, it is necessary to integrate high-throughput data and generate predictions for later experimental assessment. Hence, genome-scale modeling serves as a platform for the following: 1 the integration of data from high-throughput technologies, 2 the assessment of how metabolic activity is related to phenotype in cancer cell lines and 3 the design of new experiments to evaluate the outcomes of the in silico analysis. By combining the functions described above, we show that computational modeling is a useful methodology to construct an integrative, systemic and quantitative scheme for understanding the metabolic profiles of cancer cell lines, a first step to determine the metabolic mechanism by which cancer cells maintain and support their malignant phenotype in human tissues.

  12. Systems biology of cancer: moving toward the integrative study of the metabolic alterations in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Patiño, Claudia E; Jaime-Muñoz, Gustavo; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo

    2012-01-01

    One of the main objectives in systems biology is to understand the biological mechanisms that give rise to the phenotype of a microorganism by using high-throughput technologies (HTs) and genome-scale mathematical modeling. The computational modeling of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions is one systemic and quantitative strategy for characterizing the metabolic phenotype associated with human diseases and potentially for designing drugs with optimal clinical effects. The purpose of this short review is to describe how computational modeling, including the specific case of constraint-based modeling, can be used to explore, characterize, and predict the metabolic capacities that distinguish the metabolic phenotype of cancer cell lines. As we show herein, this computational framework is far from a pure theoretical description, and to ensure proper biological interpretation, it is necessary to integrate high-throughput data and generate predictions for later experimental assessment. Hence, genome-scale modeling serves as a platform for the following: (1) the integration of data from HTs, (2) the assessment of how metabolic activity is related to phenotype in cancer cell lines, and (3) the design of new experiments to evaluate the outcomes of the in silico analysis. By combining the functions described above, we show that computational modeling is a useful methodology to construct an integrative, systemic, and quantitative scheme for understanding the metabolic profiles of cancer cell lines, a first step to determine the metabolic mechanism by which cancer cells maintain and support their malignant phenotype in human tissues.

  13. The new biology of cancer: future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, J W

    1989-06-01

    Our recognition that cancer evolves by clonal selection and that the basis for this selection is the growth advantage provided by the inappropriate expression or suppression of genes present in all normal cells allows us to anticipate that the pathways of this evolutionary process may be discovered. If a finite number of such pathways exist with some commonality between various tumors, there is the possibility to anticipate the mechanisms that cell clones might use for both carcinogenesis and tumor progression and to deal with evolving clones before their survival potential becomes overwhelming. As our biochemical understanding increases we may develop the capability to do the following: to identify individuals who have inherited or acquired defective cancer suppressor genes; to identify precursor lesions more exactly; to characterize the degree of progression of a newly diagnosed tumor (has the metastatic phenotype evolved?); to develop antibodies against cell membrane proteins necessary to tumor progression; to produce immune probes that carry cytotoxins or isotopes to specific cell populations; and to take advantage of cell signals to modify tumor growth. The potential for application of the New Biology to cancer medicine seems endless.

  14. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  15. Telomerase promoter mutations in cancer: an emerging molecular biomarker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Pinto, Vasco; Celestino, Ricardo; Reis, Marta; Pópulo, Helena; Boaventura, Paula; Melo, Miguel; Catarino, Telmo; Lima, Jorge; Lopes, José Manuel; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Cell immortalization has been considered for a long time as a classic hallmark of cancer cells. Besides telomerase reactivation, such immortalization could be due to telomere maintenance through the "alternative mechanism of telomere lengthening" (ALT) but the mechanisms underlying both forms of reactivation remained elusive. Mutations in the coding region of telomerase gene are very rare in the cancer setting, despite being associated with some degenerative diseases. Recently, mutations in telomerase (TERT) gene promoter were found in sporadic and familial melanoma and subsequently in several cancer models, notably in gliomas, thyroid cancer and bladder cancer. The importance of these findings has been reinforced by the association of TERT mutations in some cancer types with tumour aggressiveness and patient survival. In the first part of this review, we summarize the data on the biology of telomeres and telomerase, available methodological approaches and non-neoplastic diseases associated with telomere dysfunction. In the second part, we review the information on telomerase expression and genetic alterations in the most relevant types of cancer (skin, thyroid, bladder and central nervous system) on record, and discuss the value of telomerase as a new biomarker with impact on the prognosis and survival of the patients and as a putative therapeutic target. PMID:25048572

  16. ENDOCRINE TUMOURS: Advances in the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer: lessons from the cancer genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Santisteban, Pilar

    2016-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy giving rise to one of the most indolent solid cancers, but also one of the most lethal. In recent years, systematic studies of the cancer genome, most importantly those derived from The Cancer Genome Altas (TCGA), have catalogued aberrations in the DNA, chromatin, and RNA of the genomes of thousands of tumors relative to matched normal cellular genomes and have analyzed their epigenetic and protein consequences. Cancer genomics is therefore providing new information on cancer development and behavior, as well as new insights into genetic alterations and molecular pathways. From this genomic perspective, we will review the main advances concerning some essential aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer such as mutational mechanisms, new cancer genes implicated in tumor initiation and progression, the role of non-coding RNA, and the advent of new susceptibility genes in thyroid cancer predisposition. This look across these genomic and cellular alterations results in the reshaping of the multistep development of thyroid tumors and offers new tools and opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:27666535

  17. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  18. [Development of molecular targeted therapies in lung cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    Human cancers usually possess cumulative genetic aberrations. However, recent studies have revealed that the proliferation and survival of specific subsets of lung cancer depend on a few somatic mutation(s), so-called driver mutations. Representative driver mutations include the EGFR mutation and ALK translocation identified in about 40% and 3% of lung adenocarcinomas in Japan, respectively. These tumors are extremely sensitive to the respective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This sensitivity has encouraged researchers and clinicians to explore novel driver mutations in lung cancers as future molecular targets. Driver mutations reported so far include the HER2 mutation, BRAF mutation, ROS1 translocation, RET translocation, and NTRK translocation in lung adenocarcinomas, and FGFR1 amplification, DDR2 mutation, and FGFR3 translocation in lung squamous cell carcinomas. However, despite initial dramatic responses, the acquisition of resistance to molecular targeted drugs is almost inevitable. Overcoming resistance to molecular targeted drugs, the key drugs at this time, is an urgent issue to improve the outcomes of lung cancer patients. PMID:24946519

  19. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  20. Remaining Mysteries of Molecular Biology: The Role of Polyamines in the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Fleming, Leonor; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Campbell, Kate; Ralser, Markus

    2015-10-23

    The polyamines (PAs) spermidine, spermine, putrescine and cadaverine are an essential class of metabolites found throughout all kingdoms of life. In this comprehensive review, we discuss their metabolism, their various intracellular functions and their unusual and conserved regulatory features. These include the regulation of translation via upstream open reading frames, the over-reading of stop codons via ribosomal frameshifting, the existence of an antizyme and an antizyme inhibitor, ubiquitin-independent proteasomal degradation, a complex bi-directional membrane transport system and a unique posttranslational modification-hypusination-that is believed to occur on a single protein only (eIF-5A). Many of these features are broadly conserved indicating that PA metabolism is both concentration critical and evolutionary ancient. When PA metabolism is disrupted, a plethora of cellular processes are affected, including transcription, translation, gene expression regulation, autophagy and stress resistance. As a result, the role of PAs has been associated with cell growth, aging, memory performance, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic disorders and cancer. Despite comprehensive studies addressing PAs, a unifying concept to interpret their molecular role is missing. The precise biochemical function of polyamines is thus one of the remaining mysteries of molecular cell biology.

  1. 2012 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 15-20, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, Michael

    2013-07-20

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Plant Molecular Biology will present cutting-edge research on molecular aspects of plant growth and development, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries in molecular mechanisms involved with plant signaling systems. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics in plant molecular biology including hormone receptors and early events in hormone signaling, plant perception of and response to plant pathogen and symbionts, as well as technological and biological aspects of epigenomics particularly as it relates to signaling systems that regulate plant growth and development. Genomic approaches to plant signaling will be emphasized, including genomic profiling technologies for quantifying various biological subsystems, such as the epigenome, transcriptome, phosphorylome, and metabolome. The meeting will include an important session devoted to answering the question, "What are the biological and technological limits of plant breeding/genetics, and how can they be solved"?

  2. Multi-study integration of brain cancer transcriptomes reveals organ-level molecular signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyun Sung

    Full Text Available We utilized abundant transcriptomic data for the primary classes of brain cancers to study the feasibility of separating all of these diseases simultaneously based on molecular data alone. These signatures were based on a new method reported herein--Identification of Structured Signatures and Classifiers (ISSAC--that resulted in a brain cancer marker panel of 44 unique genes. Many of these genes have established relevance to the brain cancers examined herein, with others having known roles in cancer biology. Analyses on large-scale data from multiple sources must deal with significant challenges associated with heterogeneity between different published studies, for it was observed that the variation among individual studies often had a larger effect on the transcriptome than did phenotype differences, as is typical. For this reason, we restricted ourselves to studying only cases where we had at least two independent studies performed for each phenotype, and also reprocessed all the raw data from the studies using a unified pre-processing pipeline. We found that learning signatures across multiple datasets greatly enhanced reproducibility and accuracy in predictive performance on truly independent validation sets, even when keeping the size of the training set the same. This was most likely due to the meta-signature encompassing more of the heterogeneity across different sources and conditions, while amplifying signal from the repeated global characteristics of the phenotype. When molecular signatures of brain cancers were constructed from all currently available microarray data, 90% phenotype prediction accuracy, or the accuracy of identifying a particular brain cancer from the background of all phenotypes, was found. Looking forward, we discuss our approach in the context of the eventual development of organ-specific molecular signatures from peripheral fluids such as the blood.

  3. Molecular biology, epidemiology, and the demise of the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prime concern of radiation protection policy since 1959 has been protecting DNA from damage. The 1995 NCRP Report 121 on collective dose stases that since no human data provides direct support for the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT), and some studies provide quantitative data that, with statistical significance, contradict LNT, ultimately, confidence in LNT is based on the biophysical concept that the passage of a single charged particle could cause damage to DNA that would result in cancer. Current understanding of the basic molecular biologic mechanisms involved and recent data are examined before presenting several statistically significant epidemiologic studies that contradict the LNT hypothesis. Over eons of time a complex bio-system evolved to control the DNA alterations (oxidative adducts) produced by about 1010 free radicals/cell/d derived from 2-3 % of all metabolized oxygen. Antioxidant prevention, enzymatic repair of DNA damage, and removal of persistent DNA alterations by apoptosis, differentiation, necrosis, and the immune system, sequentially reduce DNA damage from about 106 DNA alterations/cell/d to about 1 mutation/cell/d. These mutations accumulate in stem cells during a lifetime with progressive DNA damage-control impairment associated with aging and malignant growth. A comparatively negligible number of mutations, an average of about 10-7 mutations/cell/d, is produced by low LET radiation background of 0.1 cGy/y. The remarkable efficiency of this bio-system is increased by the adaptive responses to low-dose ionizing radiation. Each of the sequential functions that prevent, repair, and remove DNA damage are adaptively stimulated by long-dose ionizing radiation in contrast to their impairment by high-dose radiation. The biologic effect of radiation is not determined by the number of mutations it creates, but by its effect on the bio-system that controls the relentless enormous burden of oxidative DNA damage. At low doses, radiation

  4. Molecular subtyping of breast cancer: opportunities for new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, P B; Millikan, R C

    2007-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that breast cancer is not one disease but many separate diseases. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling has demonstrated subtypes with distinct phenotypic features and clinical responses. Prominent among the new subtypes is 'basal-like' breast cancer, one of the 'intrinsic' subtypes defined by negativity for the estrogen, progesterone, and HER2/neu receptors and positivity for cytokeratins-5/6. Focusing on basal-like breast cancer, we discuss how molecular technologies provide new chemotherapy targets, optimising treatment whilst sparing patients from unnecessary toxicity. Clinical trials are needed that incorporate long-term follow-up of patients with well-characterised tumour markers. Whilst the absence of an obvious dominant oncogene driving basal-like breast cancer and the lack of specific therapeutic agents are serious stumbling blocks, this review will highlight several promising therapeutic candidates currently under evaluation. Thus, new molecular technologies should provide a fundamental foundation for better understanding breast and other cancers which may be exploited to save lives. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957336

  5. Molecular eco-systems biology: towards an understanding of community function

    OpenAIRE

    Raes, J.; Bork, P.

    2008-01-01

    Systems-biology approaches, which are driven by genome sequencing and high-throughput functional genomics data, are revolutionizing single-cell-organism biology. With the advent of various high-throughput techniques that aim to characterize complete microbial ecosystems (metagenomics, meta-transcriptomics and meta-metabolomics), we propose that the time is ripe to consider molecular systems biology at the ecosystem level (eco-systems biology). Here, we discuss the necessary data types that ar...

  6. Emerging Molecular and Biological Functions of MBD2, a Reader of DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen H Wood

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark that is essential for many biological processes and is linked to diseases such as cancer. Methylation is usually associated with transcriptional silencing, but new research has challenged this model. Both transcriptional activation and repression have recently been found to be associated with DNA methylation in a context-specific manner. How DNA methylation patterns are interpreted into different functional output remains poorly understood. One mechanism involves the protein ‘readers’ of methylation, which includes the methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD family of proteins. This review examines the molecular and biological functions of MBD2, which binds to CpG methylation and is an integral part of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD complex. MBD2 has been linked to immune system function and tumorigenesis, yet little is known about its functions in vivo. Recent studies have found the MBD2 protein is ubiquitously expressed, with relatively high levels in the lung, liver and colon. Mbd2 null mice surprisingly show relatively mild phenotypes compared to mice with loss of function of other MBD proteins. This evidence has previously been interpreted as functional redundancy between the MBD proteins. Here we examine and contextualize research that suggests MBD2 has unique properties and functions among the MBD proteins. These functions translate to recently described roles in the development and differentiation of multiple cell lineages, including pluripotent stem cells and various cell types of the immune system, as well as in tumorigenesis. We also consider possible models for the dynamic interactions between MBD2 and NuRD in different tissues in vivo. The functions of MBD2 may have direct therapeutic implications for several areas of human disease, including autoimmune conditions and cancer, in addition to providing insights into the actions of NuRD and chromatin regulation.

  7. The correlations between the MRI features of breast cancer and molecular biological behavior%乳腺癌MRI特征与分子生物学行为的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨爱萍; 蔡忠刚

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨乳腺癌MRI特征与ER、PR、Her-2、Ki-67表达及淋巴结转移的相关性,为乳腺癌的疗效评价提供依据。方法28例乳腺癌患者行MR平扫、MR动态增强( MR-DCE)及弥散加权成像( DWI),分析MRI成像特征(大小、边缘、强化、TIC类型、ADC值),并与肿瘤标记物( ER、PR、Her-2、Ki-67)表达、淋巴结转移进行相关性分析。结果①肿瘤标记物的表达及淋巴结转移:ER 阳性19例(67.86%)、PR 阳性18例(64.29%)、Her-2阳性15例(53.6%)、Ki-67阳性17例(60.71%)、淋巴结转移14例(50%)。②肿块型和非肿块型组、环形强化和非环形强化组与肿瘤标记物表达、淋巴结转移比较,差异无统计学意义。③肿瘤最大径>2 cm和≤2 cm组比较,Her-2阳性表达率差异有统计学意义(χ2=5.073,P<0.05);毛刺征和非毛刺征两组比较,PR阳性表达率差异有统计学意义(χ2=6.857, P<0.05)。④淋巴结转移率在TICⅡ型与Ⅲ型组比较,差异有统计学意义(χ2=7.337,P<0.05);ADC值在Her-2阳性和阴性组间比较,差异有统计学意义(t=5.624,P<0.01)。结论乳腺癌MRI征象(大小、毛刺征、TIC类型、ADC值)与肿瘤标记物(PR、Her-2)表达、淋巴结转移具有较高的相关性,分析MR征象有助于乳腺癌疗效的评价。%Objective To investigate the correlation between the MRI features of breast cancer and expression of ER, PR, HER-2, Ki-67 and lymph node metastasis, so as to provide basis for therapeutic evaluation of breast cancer.Methods We carried out MR plain scan, MR dynamic enhancement ( MR-DCE) and diffusion weighted imaging on 28 breast cancer patients;analyzed MRI ima-ging features ( size, edge, enhancement, TIC type and ADC value);and conducted correlation analysis with expression of tumor mark-ers ( ER, PR, Her-2, ki-67) and lymph node metastasis

  8. Efficient molecular subtype classification of high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Huei San; Galletta, Laura; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Köbel, Martin; Ramus, Susan J; Bowtell, David

    2015-07-01

    High-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) account for approximately 70% of all epithelial ovarian cancers diagnosed. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we previously identified four molecular subtypes of HGSC: C1 (mesenchymal), C2 (immunoreactive), C4 (differentiated), and C5 (proliferative), which correlate with patient survival and have distinct biological features. Here, we describe molecular classification of HGSC based on a limited number of genes to allow cost-effective and high-throughput subtype analysis. We determined a minimal signature for accurate classification, including 39 differentially expressed and nine control genes from microarray experiments. Taqman-based (low-density arrays and Fluidigm), fluorescent oligonucleotides (Nanostring), and targeted RNA sequencing (Illumina) assays were then compared for their ability to correctly classify fresh and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. All platforms achieved > 90% classification accuracy with RNA from fresh frozen samples. The Illumina and Nanostring assays were superior with fixed material. We found that the C1, C2, and C4 molecular subtypes were largely consistent across multiple surgical deposits from individual chemo-naive patients. In contrast, we observed substantial subtype heterogeneity in patients whose primary ovarian sample was classified as C5. The development of an efficient molecular classifier of HGSC should enable further biological characterization of molecular subtypes and the development of targeted clinical trials. PMID:25810134

  9. Use of biologics and chemotherapy in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Amezaga, Aranzazu; Vermeire, Séverine; Prenen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have an additional risk of developing cancer compared with the general population. This is due to local chronic inflammation that leads to the development of gastrointestinal cancers and the use of thiopurines, associated with a higher risk of lymphoproliferative disorders, skin cancers, or uterine cervical cancers. Similar to the general population, a previous history of cancer in inflammatory bowel disease patients increases the risk of developing a secondary cancer. Large studies have not shown an increased risk of cancer in patients treated with biologics. In this review we discuss the prevention and treatment of cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27065724

  10. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  11. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6) resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R) that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate

  12. Biologic Mechanisms of Oral Cancer Pain and Implications for Clinical Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Viet, C.T.; SCHMIDT, B.L.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer pain is an ever-present public health concern. With innovations in treatment, cancer patients are surviving longer, but uncontrollable pain creates a poor quality of life for these patients. Oral cancer is unique in that it causes intense pain at the primary site and significantly impairs speech, swallowing, and masticatory functions. We propose that oral cancer pain has underlying biologic mechanisms that are generated within the cancer microenvironment. A comprehensive understanding ...

  13. Metastasis promoter S100A4 is a potentially valuable molecular target for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbet, G V

    2009-07-18

    The growth, invasion and metastatic spread of cancer have been identified with the deregulation of cell proliferation, altered intercellular and cell-substratum adhesion and enhanced motility and the deposition of disseminated cancer cells at distant sites. The identification of therapeutic targets for cancer is crucial to human welfare. Drug development, molecular modelling and design of effective drugs greatly depend upon the identification of suitable therapeutic targets. Several genetic determinants relating to proliferation and growth, invasion and metastasis have been identified. S100A4 appears to be able to activate and integrate pathways to generate the phenotypic responses that are characteristic of cancer. S100A4 signalling can focus on factors associated with normal and aberrant proliferation, apoptosis and growth, and differentiation. It is able to activate signalling pathways leading to the remodelling of the cell membrane and the extracellular matrix; modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics, acquisition of invasiveness and induction of angiogenesis. Therefore S100A4 is arguably a molecular target of considerable potential possessing a wide ranging biological activity that can alter and regulate the major phenotypic features of cancer. The evolution of an appropriate strategy that permits the identification of therapeutic targets most likely to be effective in the disease process without unduly affecting normal biological processes and function is an incontrovertible imperative. By virtue of its ability to activate interacting and multi-functional signalling systems, S100A4 appears to offer suitable targets for developing new therapeutic procedures. Some effectors of the S100A4-activated pathways might also lend themselves as foci of therapeutic interest.

  14. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  15. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  16. Sodium selenite and cancer related lymphedema: Biological and pharmacological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Christina; Dawzcynski, Horst; Schingale, Franz-Josef

    2016-09-01

    A significant percentage of cancer patients develop secondary lymphedema after surgery or radiotherapy. The preferred treatment of secondary lymphedema is complex physical therapy. Pharmacotherapy, for example with diuretics, has received little attention, because they were not effective and only offered short-term solutions. Sodium selenite showed promise as a cost-effective, nontoxic anti-inflammatory agent. Treatment with sodium selenite lowers reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, causes a spontaneous reduction in lymphedema volume, increases the efficacy of physical therapy for lymphedema, and reduces the incidence of erysipelas infections in patients with chronic lymphedema. Besides biological effects in reducing excessive production of ROS, sodium selenite also displays various pharmacological effects. So far the exact mechanisms of these pharmacological effects are mostly unknown, but probably include inhibition of adhesion protein expression. PMID:27267968

  17. Interaction of pathology and molecular characterization of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of joint studies of thyroid cancer in children under 15 years of age between departments in Cambridge, Brussels, Naples and Munich in the European Union, and departments in Minsk, Kiev and Obninsk in the newly independent states of Eastern Europe. The pathology of 264 cases of childhood thyroid cancer out of 430 that have occurred since 1990 in the 3 countries in which high levels of fallout from the Chernobyl accident occurred has been restudied by NIS and EU pathologists. The overall level of agreement reached was about 97%. The diagnosis was supported by immunocytochemistry and ISH for the differentiation markers, thyroglobulin and calcitonin, and the tumors were classified according to the WHO, with papillary carcinomas being further subclassified. 99% of the 134 Belarussian cases were papillary carcinomas, as were 94% of the 114 Ukrainian tumors. All 9 of the Russian cases available for study were papillary in type. 76 of 154 cases of childhood thyroid cancer reviewed over a 30 year period in England and Wales and were also studied, 68% of these were papillary carcinoma. Histological study showed that a subtype of papillary carcinoma, rarely found in adults, with a solid/follicular architecture occurred in children. It was found in 72% of the Belarussian papillary carcinomas, 76% of the Ukrainian cases, but only 40% of the England and Wales cases. Molecular biological studies showed that the proportion of cases of papillary carcinoma expressing the ret gene was not significantly different in the exposed and the unexposed tumors, studies of the type of translocation leading to ret gene expression are not yet conclusive. Ras gene mutations were found as expected in follicular carcinoma, but were absent from any papillary carcinoma, whether from exposed or unexposed cases. TSH receptor mutations, normally found in follicular tumors were not found in any papillary carcinomas, nor were any p53 mutations identified. All these results

  18. Molecular Targeted Therapies Using Botanicals for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nagi; Chornokur, Ganna

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the large number of botanicals demonstrating promise as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving botanical agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-target based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods that are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity...

  19. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  20. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew; Register, Janna; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  1. Competency development in antibody production in cancer cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M.S.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to develop a rapid recombinant antibody production technology. To achieve the objective, the authors employed (1) production of recombinant antigens that are important for cell cycle regulation and DNA repair, (2) immunization and specific selection of antibody-producing lymphocytes using the flow cytometry and magnetic bead capturing procedure, (3) construction of single chain antibody library, (4) development of recombinant vectors that target, express, and regulate the expression of intracellular antibodies, and (5) specific inhibition of tumor cell growth in tissue culture. The authors have accomplished (1) optimization of a selection procedure to isolate antigen-specific lymphocytes, (2) optimization of the construction of a single-chain antibody library, and (3) development of a new antibody expression vector for intracellular immunization. The future direction of this research is to continue to test the potential use of the intracellular immunization procedure as a tool to study functions of biological molecules and as an immuno-cancer therapy procedure to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

  2. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  3. STUDIES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PATTERN RECOGNITION METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The attempt to rationalize the connections between the molecular structures of organic compounds and their biological activities comprises the field of structure-activity relations (SAR) studies. Correlations between structure and activity are important for the understanding and ...

  4. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Phair, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist–electrical engineer–systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a fu...

  5. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  6. Progress in nucleic acid research and molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, W.E. (Biology Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (US)); Moldave, K. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (US))

    1989-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: Transposable elements in Drosophilia; Regulation of gene expression; Structure and function of repetitive and unusual sequences; Retroviruses; Molecular analysis of chromosomal translocation and gene insertion.

  7. Multiple breast cancer cell-lines derived from a single tumor differ in their molecular characteristics and tumorigenic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goar Mosoyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer cell lines are widely used tools to investigate breast cancer biology and to develop new therapies. Breast cancer tissue contains molecularly heterogeneous cell populations. Thus, it is important to understand which cell lines best represent the primary tumor and have similarly diverse phenotype. Here, we describe the development of five breast cancer cell lines from a single patient's breast cancer tissue. We characterize the molecular profiles, tumorigenicity and metastatic ability in vivo of all five cell lines and compare their responsiveness to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT treatment. METHODS: Five breast cancer cell lines were derived from a single patient's primary breast cancer tissue. Expression of different antigens including HER2, estrogen receptor (ER, CK8/18, CD44 and CD24 was determined by flow cytometry, western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC. In addition, a Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH assay for HER2 gene amplification and p53 genotyping was performed on all cell lines. A xenograft model in nude mice was utilized to assess the tumorigenic and metastatic abilities of the breast cancer cells. RESULTS: We have isolated, cloned and established five new breast cancer cell lines with different tumorigenicity and metastatic abilities from a single primary breast cancer. Although all the cell lines expressed low levels of ER, their growth was estrogen-independent and all had high-levels of expression of mutated non-functional p53. The HER2 gene was rearranged in all cell lines. Low doses of 4-OHT induced proliferation of these breast cancer cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: All five breast cancer cell lines have different antigenic expression profiles, tumorigenicity and organ specific metastatic abilities although they derive from a single tumor. None of the studied markers correlated with tumorigenic potential. These new cell lines could serve as a model for detailed genomic and proteomic analyses to

  8. Development of New Molecular EZH2 on Lung Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui XIA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a serious threat to human health malignancies upward trend in morbidity and mortality. It is hot topic to investigate the molecular mechanisms of lung cancer development and explore the new therapeutic targets. The underlying mechanism of EZH2 on lung cancer development will demonstrate the new pathway of lung cancer development, invasion and metastasis. The exploration and application of new targeted molecular will improve the survival rate and living quality of lung cancer patients in future.

  9. Appraisal of progenitor markers in the context of molecular classification of breast cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Haviv, Izhak

    2011-01-01

    Clinical management of breast cancer relies on case stratification, which increasingly employs molecular markers. The motivation behind delineating breast epithelial differentiation is to better target cancer cases through innate sensitivities bequeathed to the cancer from its normal progenitor state. A combination of histopathological and molecular classification of breast cancer cases suggests a role for progenitors in particular breast cancer cases. Although a remarkable fraction of the re...

  10. Molecular targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: Clinical and experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although recent therapeutic developments for patients with pancreatic cancer have provided survival benefits, the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer remain unsatisfactory. Molecularly targeted cancer therapy has advanced in the past decade with the use of a number of pathways as candidates of therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the molecular features of this refractory disease while focusing on the...

  11. Workshop in computational molecular biology, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavare, S.

    1995-04-12

    Funds from this award were used to the Workshop in Computational Molecular Biology, `91 Symposium entitled Interface: Computing Science and Statistics, Seattle, Washington, April 21, 1991; the Workshop in Statistical Issues in Molecular Biology held at Stanford, California, August 8, 1993; and the Session on Population Genetics a part of the 56th Annual Meeting, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, San Francisco, California, August 9, 1993.

  12. Phosphorus-32 in the Phage Group: radioisotopes as historical tracers of molecular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Creager, Angela N. H.

    2009-01-01

    The recent historiography of molecular biology features key technologies, instruments and materials, which offer a different view of the field and its turning points than preceding intellectual and institutional histories. Radioisotopes, in this vein, became essential tools in postwar life science research, including molecular biology, and are here analyzed through their use in experiments on bacteriophage. Isotopes were especially well suited for studying the dynamics of chemical transformat...

  13. A Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment and Evaluation System for Biotechnology Specialty Students: An Effective Evaluation System to Improve the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suxia; Wu, Haizhen; Zhao, Jian; Ou, Ling; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to achieve high success in knowledge and technique acquisition as a whole, a biochemistry and molecular biology experiment was established for high-grade biotechnology specialty students after they had studied essential theory and received proper technique training. The experiment was based on cloning and expression of alkaline…

  14. Matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in gastric cancer as molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara L Sampieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a complex disease that involves a range of biological individuals and tumors with histopathological features. The pathogenesis of this disease is multi-factorial and includes the interaction of genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Gastric cancer is normally diagnosed in advanced stages where there are few alternatives to offer and the prognosis is difficult to establish. Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Identification of key genes and signaling pathways involved in metastasis and recurrence could predict these events and thereby identify therapeutic targets. In this context, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs represent a potential prognostic tool, because both genetic families regulate growth, angiogenesis, invasion, immune response, epithelial mesenchymal transition and cellular survival. Proteolytic parameters based on MMP/TIMP expression could be useful in the identification of patients with a high probability of developing distant metastases or peritoneal dissemination for each degree of histological malignancy. It is also probable that these parameters can allow improvement in the extent of surgery and dictate the most suitable therapy. We reviewed papers focused on human gastric epithelial cancer as a model and focus on the potential use of MMPs and TIMPs as molecular markers; also we include literature regarding gastric cancer risk factors, classification systems and MMP/TIMP regulation.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in gastric cancer as molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara L; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, Jos Maria

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex disease that involves a range of biological individuals and tumors with histopathological features. The pathogenesis of this disease is multi-factorial and includes the interaction of genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Gastric cancer is normally diagnosed in advanced stages where there are few alternatives to offer and the prognosis is difficult to establish. Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Identification of key genes and signaling pathways involved in metastasis and recurrence could predict these events and thereby identify therapeutic targets. In this context, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) represent a potential prognostic tool, because both genetic families regulate growth, angiogenesis, invasion, immune response, epithelial mesenchymal transition and cellular survival. Proteolytic parameters based on MMP/TIMP expression could be useful in the identification of patients with a high probability of developing distant metastases or peritoneal dissemination for each degree of histological malignancy. It is also probable that these parameters can allow improvement in the extent of surgery and dictate the most suitable therapy. We reviewed papers focused on human gastric epithelial cancer as a model and focus on the potential use of MMPs and TIMPs as molecular markers; also we include literature regarding gastric cancer risk factors, classification systems and MMP/TIMP regulation.

  16. Cancer tissue engineering - new perspectives in understanding the biology of solid tumours - a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, C.; Moroni, L.; Danti, S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding cancer biology is a major challenge of this century. The recent insight about carcinogenesis mechanisms, including the role exerted by the tumour microenvironment and cancer stem cells in chemoresistance, relapse and metastases, has made it self-evident that only new cancer models, wit

  17. Study on the biological characteristics of pancreatic cancer vascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the biological characteristics of pancreatic cancer vascular endothelial cells,including the aspects of morphology,species,genetics,vascular formation ability,and proliferation ability in vitro. Methods The human pancreatic cancer cells were inoculated in nude mice pancreas to get pancreatic cancer

  18. Xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolution and cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田聆; 魏于全

    2001-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes for death of human beings to date, and cancer biotherapy (mainlyimmunotherapy and gene therapy) has become the most promising approach after surgical therapy, radiotherapy andchemotherapy. However, there are still many limitations on cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy; therefore great ef-fort is being made to develop new strategies. It has been known that, in the process of evolution, a number of genes, theso-called xenogeneic homologous genes, are well-conserved and show the structural and/or functional similarity betweenvarious species to some degree. The nucleotide changes between various xenogeneic homologous genes are derived frommutation, and most of them are neutral mutations. Considering that the subtle differences in xenogeneic homologousgenes can break immune tolerance, enhance the immunogenicity and induce autologous immune response so as to elimi-nate tumor cells, we expect that a strategy of inducing autoimmune response using the property of xenogeneic homologousgenes will become a new therapy for cancer. Moreover, this therapy can also be used in the treatment of other diseases,such as autoimmune diseases and AIDS. This article will discuss the xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolutionand cancer therapy.

  19. Epigenetic: a molecular link between testicular cancer and environmental exposures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie eVega

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, studies in rodents have highlighted links between in utero and/or neonatal exposures to molecules that alter endocrine functions and the development of genital tract abnormalities, such as cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and impaired spermatogenesis. Most of these molecules, called endocrine disrupters (EDs exert estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic activities. These data led to the hypothesis of the Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome which postulates that these disorders are one clinical entity and are linked by epidemiological and pathophysiological relations. Futhermore, infertility has been stated as a risk factor for testicular cancer. The incidence of testicular cancer has been increasing over the past decades. Most of testicular germ cell cancers develop through a pre-invasive carcinoma in situ (CIS from fetal germ cells (primordial germ cell or gonocyte. During their development, fetal germ cells undergo epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, several lines of evidence have shown that gene regulation through epigenetic mechanisms (DNA and histone modifications plays an important role in normal development as well as in various diseases, including testicular cancer.Here we will review chromatin modifications which can affect testicular physiology leading to the development of testicular cancer; and highlight potential molecular pathways involved in these alterations in the context of environmental exposures.

  20. Molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by garlic-derived organosulfides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna HERMAN-ANTOSIEWICZ; Anna A POWOLNY; Shivendra V SINGH

    2007-01-01

    The medicinal benefits of Allium vegetables, especially garlic, have been noted throughout recorded history. The known health benefits of Allium vegetables and their constituents include cardiovascular protective effects, stimulation of immune function, reduction of blood glucose level, radioprotection, improvement of memory loss, protection against microbial, viral and fungal infections, as well as anticancer effects. Population-based case control studies have suggested an inverse correlation between dietary intake of Allium vegetables and the risk of different types of cancers. The anticarcinogenic effect of Allium vegetables in-eluding garlic is attributed to organosulfur compounds (OSC), which are highly effective in affording protection against cancer in animal models induced by a variety of chemical carcinogens. More recent studies have shown that certain naturally occurring OSC analogues can suppress proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The OSC-induced changes in the proliferation of cancer Cellsare frequently associated with perturbations in cell cycle progression and induc-tion of G2/M phase arrest. The OSC have also been demonstrated to induce apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by altering the ratio of the Bc1-2 family of proteins both in cell culture and in in vivo models. Anti-angiogenic activity for garlic-derived OSC has also been documented. This article summarizes current knowledge on molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by OSC.

  1. Diversity-Oriented Synthetic Strategies Applied to Cancer Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ian Collins; Jones, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    How can diversity-oriented strategies for chemical synthesis provide chemical tools to help shape our understanding of complex cancer pathways and progress anti-cancer drug discovery efforts? This review (surveying the literature from 2003 to the present) considers the applications of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS), biology-oriented synthesis (BIOS) and associated strategies to cancer biology and drug discovery, summarising the syntheses of novel and often highly complex scaffolds from p...

  2. Impact of tumor chronology and tumor biology on lymph node metastasis in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Smeets, Ann; Ryckx, Andries; Belmans, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Neven, Patrick; Floris, Giuseppe; Schöffski, Patrick; Christiaens, Marie-Rose

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The significance of nodal metastasis in breast cancer is under discussion. We investigated the impact of variables of tumor chronology and tumor biology on the presence of lymph node metastases. Purpose Lymph node involvement is the main prognostic factor in breast cancer. However, it is under discussion whether nodal metastasis in breast cancer only reflects the chronological age of the tumor or whether it is also a marker of tumor biology. The goal of our study was to investigate t...

  3. Molecular biology and its applications in orthodontics and oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yjin

    2005-01-01

    : Molecular biology is an exciting, rapidly expanding field, which has enabled enormously greater understanding of the biology of diseases and malfunctions in many fields. It chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interrelatio

  4. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H-2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, S.; Laukenmann, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Vollmer, M.K.; Gleixner, G.; Rockmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H-2) is characterised by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of H-2. Large uncertaint

  5. Size Matters: Molecular Weight Specificity of Hyaluronan Effects in Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime M. Cyphert; Trempus, Carol S.; Stavros Garantziotis

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan signaling properties are unique among other biologically active molecules, that they are apparently not influenced by postsynthetic molecular modification, but by hyaluronan fragment size. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the generation of hyaluronan fragments of different size and size-dependent differences in hyaluronan signaling as well as their downstream biological effects.

  6. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, S.; Laukenmann, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Vollmer, M.K.; Gleixner, G.; Roeckmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2) is characterised by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of H2. Large uncertaintie

  7. From Gene to Protein: A 3-Week Intensive Course in Molecular Biology for Physical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a 3-week intensive molecular biology methods course based upon fluorescent proteins, which is successfully taught at the McGill University to advanced undergraduates and graduates in physics, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, and medicine. No previous knowledge of biological terminology or methods is expected, so…

  8. Identifying molecular targets of lifestyle modifications in colon cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Marie Derry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; ~20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes that could positively influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals.

  9. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  10. Cloning Yeast Actin cDNA Leads to an Investigative Approach for the Molecular Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Michael W.; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the…

  11. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of potent discodermolide fluorescent and photoaffinity molecular probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amos B; Rucker, Paul V; Brouard, Ignacio; Freeze, B Scott; Xia, Shujun; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2005-11-10

    [structure: see text] The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of (+)-discodermolide molecular probes possessing photoaffinity and fluorescent appendages has been achieved. Stereoselective olefin cross-metathesis comprised a key tactic for construction of two of the molecular probes. Three photoaffinity probes were radiolabeled with tritium.

  12. The challenges for molecular nutrition research 4: the "nutritional systems biology level"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommen, B. van; Cavallieri, D.; Roche, H.M.; Klein, U.I.; Daniel, H.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional systems biology may be defined as the ultimate goal of molecular nutrition research, where all relevant aspects of regulation of metabolism in health and disease states at all levels of its complexity are taken into account to describe the molecular physiology of nutritional processes. T

  13. Posttranscriptional Regulation of Splicing Factor SRSF1 and Its Role in Cancer Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, alternative splicing has been progressively recognized as a major mechanism regulating gene expression patterns in different tissues and disease states through the generation of multiple mRNAs from the same gene transcript. This process requires the joining of selected exons or usage of different pairs of splice sites and is regulated by gene-specific combinations of RNA-binding proteins. One archetypical splicing regulator is SRSF1, for which we review the molecular mechanisms and posttranscriptional modifications involved in its life cycle. These include alternative splicing of SRSF1 itself, regulatory protein phosphorylation events, and the role of nuclear versus cytoplasmic SRSF1 localization. In addition, we resume current knowledge on deregulated SRSF1 expression in tumors and describe SRSF1-regulated alternative transcripts with functional consequences for cancer cell biology at different stages of tumor development.

  14. HMM Search for Apoptotic Domains (MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND INFORMATION-Biological Information Science)

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Masahiro; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2000-01-01

    For the purpose of analyzing apoptotic molecular interactions, we have developed a knowledge base, which consists of apoptotic molecular interactions, together with the WWW interface for it. This database and the user interface enabled us to find out entries containing various information about cell death. This information tells us that the apoptotic molecular interactions are likely to be controlled under a series of specific conserved domains. Thus, the viewpoint of domain seems to be more ...

  15. Teaching Cell and Molecular Biology for Gender Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sible, Jill C.; Wilhelm, Dayna E.; Lederman, Muriel

    2006-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, including cell biology, are characterized by the "leaky pipeline" syndrome in which, over time, women leave the discipline. The pipeline itself and the pond into which it empties may not be neutral. Explicating invisible norms, attitudes, and practices by integrating social studies of…

  16. Molecular probes for nonlinear optical imaging of biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Charier, Sandrine; Moreaux, Laurent; Mertz, Jerome

    2001-12-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) are nonlinear optical (NLO) phenomena that scale with excitation intensity squared, and hence give rise to an intrinsic 3-dimensional resolution when used in microscopic imaging. TPEF microscopy has gained widespread popularity in the biology community whereas SHG microscopy promises to be a powerful tool because of its sensitivity to local asymmetry. We have implemented an approach toward the design of NLO-probes specifically adapted for SHG and/or TPEF imaging of biological membranes. Our strategy is based on the design of nanoscale amphiphilic NLO-phores. We have prepared symmetrical bolaamphiphilic fluorophores combining very high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections in the visible red region and affinity for cellular membranes. Their incorporation and orientation in lipid membranes can be monitored via TPEF anisotropy. We have also prepared amphiphilic push-pull chromophores exhibiting both large TPA cross-sections and very large first hyperpolarizabilities in the near-IR region. These NLO-probes have proved to be particularly useful for imaging of biological membranes by simultaneous SHG and TPEF microscopy and offer attractive prospects for real-time imaging of fundamental biological processes such as adhesion, fusion or reporting of membrane potentials.

  17. How was teleology eliminated in early molecular biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Phillip R

    2012-03-01

    This paper approaches the issue of the status of teleological reasoning in contemporary biology through a historical examination of events of the 1930s that surrounded Niels Bohr's efforts to introduce 'complementarity' into biological discussions. The paper examines responses of three theoretical physicists who engaged boundary questions between the biological and physical sciences in this period in response to Bohr-Ernst Pascual Jordan (1902-80), Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961), and Max Delbrück (1906-81). It is claimed that none of these physicists sufficiently understood Bohr's 'critical' teleological arguments, which are traced to the lineage of Kant and Harald Høffding and their respective resolutions of the Antinomy of Teleological Judgment. The positions of these four historical actors are discussed in terms of Ernst Mayr's distinction of 'teleological,' 'teleomatic,' and 'teleonomic' explanations. A return to some of the views articulated by Bohr, and behind him, to Høffding and Kant, is claimed to provide a framework for reintroducing a 'critical' teleology into biological discussions. PMID:22326083

  18. A conundrum in molecular toxicology: molecular and biological changes during neoplastic transformation of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, G E; Shuler, C F; Lee, H; Casto, B C

    1995-12-01

    The process of multistage carcinogenesis lends itself to the concept that the effects of carcinogens are mediated through dose-related, multi-hit, linear changes. Multiple in vitro model systems have been developed that are designed to examine the cellular changes associated with the progression of cells through the different stages in the process; however, these systems may have inherent limitations due to the cell lines used for these studies, the manner of assessing the effects of the carcinogens, and the subsequent growth and differentiation of the exposed cells. Each of these variables results in increasing levels of uncertainty relative to the correlation of the events with the actual process of human tumor development. Therefore, the prediction of the ultimate effect of any carcinogen is difficult. Moreover, relationships between individual biological endpoints resulting from carcinogen treatment appear at best to be approximations. The presence of an activated carcinogen inside the cell can give rise to multiple outcomes, only some of which may be critical events. For example, site-specific modification of the 12th and 13th codons of H-ras is different than that in the adjacent 14th and 15th codons. It is interesting to speculate what effect these differences might have on a biological outcome, e.g., transformation to anchorage-independent growth. The use of different model systems to examine the effects of activated carcinogens also creates additional problems. Comparisons of in vitro transformed cells with similar cells isolated from human tumors indicate that the culture environment appears to influence the expression of a particular phenotype, in that human tumor cells in culture express many of the same parameters as those found in cells transformed with carcinogens in vitro. If the process of transformation is linear, then less aggressive phenotypes should progress to a more aggressive transformed stage. However, in carcinogen-transformed human cells

  19. Biology and Molecular Markers of Malignant Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Jonna

    2009-01-01

    Germ cell tumors occur both in the gonads of both sexes and in extra-gonadal sites during adoles-cence and early adulthood. Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of all cases of ovarian malignancy. In contrast, testicular cancer is the most common malignancy among young males. Most of patients survive the disease. Prognostic factors of gonadal germ cell tumors include histology, clinical stage, size of the primary tumor and residua, and levels of tu...

  20. RVB1/RVB2: running rings around molecular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Sudhakar; Dutta, Anindya

    2009-01-01

    RVB1/RVB2 are two highly conserved members of the AAA+ family that are present in different protein and nucleoprotein complexes. Recent studies implicate that RVB-containing complexes play a role in variable cellular processes such as transcription, DNA damage response, snoRNP assembly, cellular transformation and cancer metastasis. In this review we discuss recent advances in the understanding of RVB-containing complexes and the functions of RVBs in these pathways.