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Sample records for cancer-a phantom study

  1. The potential role of positron emission mammography for detection of breast cancer. A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, R R; Majewski, S; Wojcik, R; Weisenberger, A G; Kross, B; Popov, V; Bishop, H A

    2000-08-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is a new, specialized imaging modality utilizing PET radiopharmaceuticals to detect breast cancer. The capabilities and limitations of PEM in detecting breast tumors were investigated with a series of phantom experiments. The PEM imager was mounted on a standard Lorad biopsy table (separated by 18 cm). In the initial phase of the investigation, basic scanner parameters (resolution, sensitivity, and scatter fraction) were measured. The effects of a number of breast imaging parameters (length of acquisition, breast thickness, and breast density) on detection of breast lesions were then explored utilizing special phantoms. Moderately compressed breasts were simulated with a block of gelatin containing amounts of FDG consistent with 370 MBq injections. Lesions were simulated with four hollow spheres (inner diameters=5 mm, 8 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm) filled with amounts of FDG representative of uptake in malignant breast tumors (target-to-background concentration ratio=8.5:1). Resolution at the center of the imager was 3.9 mm, sensitivity was 0.059 kcps/kBq/ml and the Compton scatter fraction was approximately 12%. Objects as small as 8 mm in diameter could be detected after 30 s of data acquisition; 5 mm spheres were detectable after 300 s. Object detection capabilities were reduced with increasing breast thickness. In thin compressed breasts (2 cm) even the smallest sphere (5 mm in diameter) could be detected; increasing breast thickness increased the minimum detectable sphere diameter to 8 mm. Increased background activity caused by FDG uptake in metabolically active normal tissue more prevalent in radiodense breasts compared to "fatty" breasts was simulated and shown to reduce the minimum detectable lesion size to 12 mm for the densest breasts. These results demonstrate the potential of PEM for the detection of breast lesions. The addition of the system to a standard biopsy apparatus indicates its potential for use to guide some core

  2. Experimental phantom verification studies for simulations of light interactions with skin: liquid phantoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available phantoms to verify model Slide 5 Verification comparison •Layered structure of skin can be modelled • Solid or liquid phantoms can be used for verification • Solid phantoms prepared from resin, absorbing and scattering particles – advantage: multi... layers possible and phantoms stable and durable for repeatability studies • Liquid samples made from Intralipid® and black ink – optical properties of Intralipid® is well documented in literature •Manufacture phantoms – use phantom parameters...

  3. A comparative study on patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the results of patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom. Methods: Fifteen intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans already planned on treatment planning system (TPS for head-and-neck cancer patients were exported on all three kinds of phantoms viz. slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom, and dose was calculated using anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA. All the gantry angles were set to zero in case of slab phantom while set to as it is in actual plan in case of other two phantoms. All the plans were delivered by linear accelerator (LA and dose for each plan was measured by 0.13 cc ion chamber. The percentage (% variations between planned and measured doses were calculated and analyzed. Results: The mean % variations between planned and measured doses of all IMRT quality assurance (QA plans were as 0.65 (Standard deviation (SD: 0.38 with confidence limit (CL 1.39, 1.16 (SD: 0.61 with CL 2.36 and 2.40 (SD: 0.86 with CL 4.09 for slab phantom, acrylic head phantom and goat head phantom respectively. Conclusion: Higher dose variations found in case of real tissue phantom compare to results in case of slab and acrylic body phantoms. The algorithm AAA does not calculate doses in heterogeneous medium as accurate as it calculates in homogeneous medium. Therefore the patient specific absolute dosimetry should be done using heterogeneous phantom mimicking density wise as well as design wise to the actual human body.  

  4. Validation study of the thorax phantom Lungman for optimization purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Pérez, Sunay; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Struelens, Lara; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-03-01

    This work aims to investigate the advantages and limitations of the Kyoto Kagaku thorax phantom Lungman for use in chest radiography optimization studies. First, patient survey data were gathered for chest posterior anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) examinations in a standard chest X-ray room over a period of one year, using a Caesium Iodide (CsI) based flat panel detector with automatic exposure control (AEC). Parameters surveyed included exposure index (EI), dose area product (DAP) and AEC exposure time. PA and LAT projections of the phantom were then compared to these values. Additionally, the equivalence in millimetres of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was established for the different regions of the Lungman phantom (lungs and mediastinum). Finally, a voxel model of the Lungman phantom was developed by the segmentation of a volumetric dataset of the phantom acquired using CT scanning. Subsequently, the model was used in Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE/penEasy code to calculate the energy deposited in the organs of the phantom. This enabled comparison of the phantom tissue-equivalent materials with materials defined by ICRP 89 in terms of energy deposition. For the survey data, close agreement was found between phantom and the median values for the patient data (deviations ranged from 4% to 31%, one outlier). The phantom lung region is equivalent to 89 mm to 106 mm of PMMA, depending on tube voltage. Energy deposited in the phantom material compared to those for ICRP defined material differed by at most 36% in AP irradiations and 49% in PA irradiations.

  5. Phantom breast sensations and phantom breast pain : A 2-year prospective study and a methodological analysis of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Rietman, J.S.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    The first aim of this study was to assess prospectively the incidence of phantom breast sensations (PB sensations) and phantom breast pain (PB pain) in a sample of patients treated for breast cancer (n = 204) by means of a modified radical mastectomy (n = 82). Patients were assessed 6 weeks, 6, 12

  6. Phantom breast sensations and phantom breast pain: A 2-year prospective study and a methodological analysis of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    The first aim of this study was to assess prospectively the incidence of phantom breast sensations (PB sensations) and phantom breast pain (PB pain) in a sample of patients treated for breast cancer (n = 204) by means of a modified radical mastectomy (n = 82). Patients were assessed 6 weeks, 6, 12

  7. The impact of anthropometric patient-phantom matching on organ dose: A hybrid phantom study for fluoroscopy guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Perry B.; Geyer, Amy; Borrego, David; Ficarrotta, Kayla; Johnson, Kevin; Bolch, Wesley E. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Radiology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32209 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological/Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching for determining organ dose during fluoroscopy guided interventions. Methods: In this study, 27 CT datasets representing patients of different sizes and genders were contoured and converted into patient-specific computational models. Each model was matched, based on height and weight, to computational phantoms selected from the UF hybrid patient-dependent series. In order to investigate the influence of phantom type on patient organ dose, Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate two cardiac projections (PA/left lateral) and two abdominal projections (RAO/LPO). Organ dose conversion coefficients were then calculated for each patient-specific and patient-dependent phantom and also for a reference stylized and reference hybrid phantom. The coefficients were subsequently analyzed for any correlation between patient-specificity and the accuracy of the dose estimate. Accuracy was quantified by calculating an absolute percent difference using the patient-specific dose conversion coefficients as the reference. Results: Patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to heavy patients. In these cases, the improvement over using a reference stylized phantom ranged from approximately 50% to 120% for abdominal projections and for a reference hybrid phantom from 20% to 60% for all projections. For lighter individuals, patient-phantom matching was clearly superior to using a reference stylized phantom, but not significantly better than using a reference hybrid phantom for certain fields and projections. Conclusions: The results indicate two sources of error when patients are matched with phantoms: Anatomical error, which is inherent due to differences in organ size and location, and error attributed to differences in the total soft tissue attenuation. For small patients, differences in soft tissue attenuation are minimal and are exceeded by inherent anatomical differences

  8. The impact of anthropometric patient-phantom matching on organ dose: A hybrid phantom study for fluoroscopy guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Perry B.; Geyer, Amy; Borrego, David; Ficarrotta, Kayla; Johnson, Kevin; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching for determining organ dose during fluoroscopy guided interventions. Methods: In this study, 27 CT datasets representing patients of different sizes and genders were contoured and converted into patient-specific computational models. Each model was matched, based on height and weight, to computational phantoms selected from the UF hybrid patient-dependent series. In order to investigate the influence of phantom type on patient organ dose, Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate two cardiac projections (PA/left lateral) and two abdominal projections (RAO/LPO). Organ dose conversion coefficients were then calculated for each patient-specific and patient-dependent phantom and also for a reference stylized and reference hybrid phantom. The coefficients were subsequently analyzed for any correlation between patient-specificity and the accuracy of the dose estimate. Accuracy was quantified by calculating an absolute percent difference using the patient-specific dose conversion coefficients as the reference. Results: Patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to heavy patients. In these cases, the improvement over using a reference stylized phantom ranged from approximately 50% to 120% for abdominal projections and for a reference hybrid phantom from 20% to 60% for all projections. For lighter individuals, patient-phantom matching was clearly superior to using a reference stylized phantom, but not significantly better than using a reference hybrid phantom for certain fields and projections. Conclusions: The results indicate two sources of error when patients are matched with phantoms: Anatomical error, which is inherent due to differences in organ size and location, and error attributed to differences in the total soft tissue attenuation. For small patients, differences in soft tissue attenuation are minimal and are exceeded by inherent anatomical differences

  9. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time

  10. A feasiblity study of an ultrasonic test phantom arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philip

    This thesis is a feasibility study for the creation of a test phantom that replicates the physiological features, from an acoustic and mechanical standpoint, of that of a human arm. Physiological feature set includes; Heart, Arteries, Veins, Bone, Muscle, Fat, Skin, and Dermotographic Features (finger prints). Mechanical Aspects include, vascular compression and distention, elasticity of tissue layers, mechanics of human heart. The end goal of which to have a working understanding of each component in order to create a controllable, real time, physiologically accurate, test phantom for a wide range of ultrasonic based applications. These applications can range from devices like wearable technologies to medical training, to biometric "Liveness" detection methods. The proposed phantom would allow for a number of natural bodily functions to be measured including but not limited to vascular mapping, blood pressure, heart rate, subdermal imaging, and general ultrasonic imaging.

  11. A Dosimetric Study on Slab-pinewood-slab Phantom for Developing the Heterogeneous Chest Phantom Mimicking Actual Human Chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Paliwal, Radha Kishan; Mishra, Surendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    The aim is to study the density, isodose depths, and doses at different points in slab-pinewood-slab (SPS) phantom, solid phantom SP34 (made up of polystyrene), and chest level of actual patient for developing heterogeneous chest phantom mimicking thoracic region of human body. A 6 MV photon beam of field size of 10 cm × 10 cm was directed perpendicular to the surface of computed tomography (CT) images of chest level of patient, SPS phantom, and SP34 phantom. Dose was calculated using anisotropic analytical algorithm. Hounsfield units were used to calculate the density of each medium. Isodose depths in all the three sets of CT images were measured. Variations between planned doses on treatment planning system (TPS) and measured on linear accelerator (LA) were calculated for three points, namely, near slab-pinewood interfaces (6 and 18 cm depths) and 10 cm depth in SPS phantom and at the same depths in SP34 phantom. Density of pinewood, SP34 slabs, chest wall, lung, and soft tissue behind lung was measured as 0.329 ± 0.08, 0.999 ± 0.02, 0.898 ± 0.02, 0.291 ± 0.12, and 1.002 ± 0.03 g/cc, respectively. Depths of 100% and 90% isodose curves in all the three sets of CT images were found to be similar. Depths of 80%, 70%, 60%, 50%, and 40% isodose lines in SPS phantom images were found to be equivalent to that in chest images, while it was least in SP34 phantom images. Variations in doses calculated at 6, 10, and 18 cm depths on TPS and measured on LA were found to be 0.36%, 1.65%, and 2.23%, respectively, in case of SPS phantom, while 0.24%, 0.90%, and 0.93%, respectively, in case of SP34 slab phantom. SPS phantom seemed equivalent to the chest level of human body. Dosimetric results of this study indicate that patient-specific quality assurance can be done using chest phantom mimicking thoracic region of human body, which has been fabricated using polystyrene and pinewood.

  12. Optimization for PET imaging based on phantom study and NECdensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Shimada, Naoki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In consideration of the requirement for global standardization and quality control of PET imaging, the present studies gave an outline of phantom study to decide both scan and reconstruction parameters based on FDG-PET/CT procedure guideline in Japan, and optimization of scan duration based on NEC density was performed continuously. In the phantom study, scan and reconstruction parameters were decided by visual assessment and physical indexes (N 10mm , NEC phantom , Q H,10mm /N 10mm ) to visualize hot spot of 10 mm diameter with standardized uptake value (SUV)=4 explicitly. Simultaneously, Recovery Coefficient (RC) was evaluated to recognize that PET images had enough quantifiably. Scan durations were optimized by Body Mass Index (BMI) based on retrospective analysis of NEC density . Correlation between visual score in clinical FDG-PET images and NEC density fell after the optimization of scan duration. Both Inter-institution and inter-patient variability were decreased by performing the phantom study based on the procedure guideline and the optimization of scan duration based on NEC density which seem finally useful to practice highly precise examination and promote high-quality controlled study. (author)

  13. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  14. Gaussian process classification of superparamagnetic relaxometry data: Phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovizi, Javad; Mathieu, Kelsey B; Thrower, Sara L; Stefan, Wolfgang; Hazle, John D; Fuentes, David

    2017-10-01

    Superparamagnetic relaxometry (SPMR) is an emerging technology that holds potential for use in early cancer detection. Measurement of the magnetic field after the excitation of cancer-bound superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) enables the reconstruction of SPIONs spatial distribution and hence tumor detection. However, image reconstruction often requires solving an ill-posed inverse problem that is computationally challenging and sensitive to measurement uncertainty. Moreover, an additional image processing module is required to automatically detect and localize the tumor in the reconstructed image. Our goal is to examine the use of data-driven machine learning technique to detect a weak signal induced by a small cluster of SPIONs (surrogate tumor) in presence of background signal and measurement uncertainty. We aim to investigate the performance of both data-driven and image reconstruction models to characterize situations that one can replace the computationally-challenging reconstruction technique by the data-driven model. We utilize Gaussian process (GP) classification model and a physics-based image reconstruction method, tailored to SPMR datasets that are obtained from (i) in silico simulations designed based on mouse cancer models and (ii) phantom experiments using MagSense system (Imagion Biosystems, Inc.). We investigate the performance of the GP classifier against the reconstruction technique, for different levels of measurement noise, different scenarios of SPIONs distribution, and different concentrations of SPIONs at the surrogate tumor. In our in silico source detection analysis, we were able to achieve high sensitivity results using GP model that outperformed the image reconstruction model for various choices of SPIONs concentration at the surrogate tumor and measurement noise levels. Moreover, in our phantom studies we were able to detect the surrogate tumor phantoms with 5% and 7.3% of the total used SPIONs, surrounded by 9 low

  15. Preliminary Study on Hybrid Computational Phantom for Radiation Dosimetry Based on Subdivision Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Hwi; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2007-01-01

    The anthropomorphic computational phantoms are classified into two groups. One group is the stylized phantoms, or MIRD phantoms, which are based on mathematical representations of the anatomical structures. The shapes and positions of the organs and tissues in these phantoms can be adjusted by changing the coefficients of the equations in use. The other group is the voxel phantoms, which are based on tomographic images of a real person such as CT, MR and serially sectioned color slice images from a cadaver. Obviously, the voxel phantoms represent the anatomical structures of a human body much more realistically than the stylized phantoms. A realistic representation of anatomical structure is very important for an accurate calculation of radiation dose in the human body. Consequently, the ICRP recently has decided to use the voxel phantoms for the forthcoming update of the dose conversion coefficients. However, the voxel phantoms also have some limitations: (1) The topology and dimensions of the organs and tissues in a voxel model are extremely difficult to change, and (2) The thin organs, such as oral mucosa and skin, cannot be realistically modeled unless the voxel resolution is prohibitively high. Recently, a new approach has been implemented by several investigators. The investigators converted their voxel phantoms to hybrid computational phantoms based on NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surface, which is smooth and deformable. It is claimed that these new phantoms have the flexibility of the stylized phantom along with the realistic representations of the anatomical structures. The topology and dimensions of the anatomical structures can be easily changed as necessary. Thin organs can be modeled without affecting computational speed or memory requirement. The hybrid phantoms can be also used for 4-D Monte Carlo simulations. In this preliminary study, the external shape of a voxel phantom (i.e., skin), HDRK-Man, was converted to a hybrid computational

  16. iPads in Breast Imaging – A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammon, M.; Schlechtweg, P. M.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Uder, M.; Schwab, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Modern tablet PCs as the iPad are becoming more and more integrated into medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the display quality of iPads regarding digital mammography. Materials and Methods: Three experienced readers compared the display quality of the iPad 2 and 3 with a dedicated 10 megapixel (MP) mammography liquid crystal display (LCD) screen in consensus using the standardized Contrast Detail Mammography (CDMAM) phantom. Phantom fields without agreement between the readers were classified as “uncertain”, correct 2 : 1 decisions were classified as “uncertain/readable”. In a second step display quality of the three reading devices was judged subjectively in a side by side comparison. Results: The 10 MP screen was superior to both iPads in 4 (phantom-)fields and inferior in 2 fields. Comparing the iPads, version 3 was superior in 4 fields and version 2 was superior in 1 field. However these differences were not significant. Total number of “uncertain” fields did not show significant differences. The number of “uncertain” fields was 15 with the 10 MP screen, 16 with the iPad 2 and 17 with the iPad 3 (p > 0.05), the number of “uncertain/readable” fields was 4, 7 and 8, respectively. Subjective image quality of the iPad 3 and the 10 MP screen was rated superior to the iPad 2. Conclusion: The evaluated iPads, especially in version 3, seem to be adequate to display mammograms in a diagnostic quality and thus could be useful e.g. for patient consultation, clinical demonstration or educational and teaching purposes. However primary mammogram reading should still be performed on dedicated large sized reading screens. PMID:24741126

  17. iPads in Breast Imaging - A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammon, M; Schlechtweg, P M; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Uder, M; Schwab, S A

    2014-02-01

    Introduction: Modern tablet PCs as the iPad are becoming more and more integrated into medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the display quality of iPads regarding digital mammography. Materials and Methods: Three experienced readers compared the display quality of the iPad 2 and 3 with a dedicated 10 megapixel (MP) mammography liquid crystal display (LCD) screen in consensus using the standardized Contrast Detail Mammography (CDMAM) phantom. Phantom fields without agreement between the readers were classified as "uncertain", correct 2 : 1 decisions were classified as "uncertain/readable". In a second step display quality of the three reading devices was judged subjectively in a side by side comparison. Results: The 10 MP screen was superior to both iPads in 4 (phantom-)fields and inferior in 2 fields. Comparing the iPads, version 3 was superior in 4 fields and version 2 was superior in 1 field. However these differences were not significant. Total number of "uncertain" fields did not show significant differences. The number of "uncertain" fields was 15 with the 10 MP screen, 16 with the iPad 2 and 17 with the iPad 3 (p > 0.05), the number of "uncertain/readable" fields was 4, 7 and 8, respectively. Subjective image quality of the iPad 3 and the 10 MP screen was rated superior to the iPad 2. Conclusion: The evaluated iPads, especially in version 3, seem to be adequate to display mammograms in a diagnostic quality and thus could be useful e.g. for patient consultation, clinical demonstration or educational and teaching purposes. However primary mammogram reading should still be performed on dedicated large sized reading screens.

  18. Development of polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms: Preliminary study for posture change

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    Nguyen, Tat Thang; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Even though International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) officially adopted a set of adult male and female voxel phantoms as the ICRP reference phantoms, there are several critical limitations due to the nature of voxel geometry and their low voxel resolutions. In order to overcome these limitations of the ICRP phantoms, we are currently developing polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP voxel phantoms to polygonal surface geometries. Among the many advantages of the ICRP polygonal surface phantom, especially, it is flexible and deformable. In principle, it is, therefore, possible to make the posture-changed ICRP phantoms which can provide more accurate dose values for exposure situations strongly relevant to worker's postures. As a preliminary study for developing the posture-changed ICRP phantoms, in this work we changed the posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom constructed in the previous study. Organ doses were then compared between original and posture-changed phantoms. In the present study, we successfully changed a posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom to the walking posture. From this results, it was explicitly shown that the polygon-surface version of the ICRP phantoms can be sufficiently modified to be various postures with the posture-changing method used in this study. In addition, it was demonstrated that phantom's posture must be considered in certain exposure situations, which can differ dose values from the conventional standing-posture phantom.

  19. A suitability study of the fission product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption phantom for calibration of in vivo bioassay equipment for the DOELAP accreditation testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, P.C.; Lynch, T.P.

    1991-08-01

    Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) conducted an intercomparison study of the Fission Product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption (BOMAB) phantom for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the consistency of calibration response of the two phantoms and their suitability for certification and use under a planned bioassay laboratory accreditation program. The study was initiated to determine calibration factors for both types of phantoms and to evaluate the suitability of their use in DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) round-robin testing. The BOMAB was found to be more appropriate for the DOELAP testing program. 9 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Oral cancer: A multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, Somsri; Thosaporn, Watcharaporn; Kintarak, Sompid; Subarnbhesaj, Ajiravudh; Darling, Mark; Kryshtalskyj, Eugene; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, So-Young; Lee, Sang-shin; Shakib, Pouyan-Amini

    2018-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Material and Methods Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Results Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conclusions Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as

  1. Oral cancer: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuthai, K; Rojanawatsirivej, S; Thosaporn, W; Kintarak, S; Subarnbhesaj, A; Darling, M; Kryshtalskyj, E; Chiang, C-P; Shin, H-I; Choi, S-Y; Lee, S-S; Aminishakib, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as between Asian and non-Asian oral cancer patients.

  2. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  3. Factors associated with phantom limb pain : a 31/2-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, J.C.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    Objective: To analyse the prevalence of phantom (limb) pain over time and to analyse factors associated with phantom (limb) pain in a prospective cohort of amputees. Design: A multicentre longitudinal study. Patients: One hundred and thirty-four patients scheduled for amputation were included.

  4. Monte Carlo and phantom study in the brain edema models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubing Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Because the brain edema has a crucial impact on morbidity and mortality, it is important to develop a noninvasive method to monitor the process of the brain edema effectively. When the brain edema occurs, the optical properties of the brain will change. The goal of this study is to access the feasibility and reliability of using noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS monitoring method to measure the brain edema. Specifically, three models, including the water content changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, gray matter and white matter, were explored. Moreover, these models were numerically simulated by the Monte Carlo studies. Then, the phantom experiments were performed to investigate the light intensity which was measured at different detecting radius on the tissue surface. The results indicated that the light intensity correlated well with the conditions of the brain edema and the detecting radius. Briefly, at the detecting radius of 3.0cm and 4.0cm, the light intensity has a high response to the change of tissue parameters and optical properties. Thus, it is possible to monitor the brain edema noninvasively by NIRS method and the light intensity is a reliable and simple parameter to assess the brain edema.

  5. Quantitative evaluation in tumor SPECT and the effect of tumor size. Fundamental study with phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Takashi; Yui, Nobuharu; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Yanagisawa, Masamichi

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study with phantoms was performed in order to evaluate the effect of the tumor volume on the quantitative estimation in tumor SPECT. The ratio of mean count/pixel in the phantom to that of the background (T/N ratio) was well correlated with the size of the phantom; even when the concentration of the Tc-99m O 4 - solution of globular phantoms with diameters of 29, 37 and 46 mm was constant, the greater the size of the phantom, the higher was the T/N ratio. This study showed that we should understand that the T/N ratio was certainly affected by the reduction of the tumor size itself whenever we evaluate treatment response or assess tumor viability after treatment by reference to the T/N ratio. (author)

  6. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbas Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  7. Pre-evaluation study in SPECT images using a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Marina de Sa; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi; Abe, Rubens; Moura, Lincoln

    1996-01-01

    An alternative solution for the reconstruction of SPECT images using a Poisson Noise Model is presented. The proposed algorithm was applied on a real phantom and compared to the standard clinical procedures. Results have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of the SPECT images

  8. Control volume based hydrocephalus research; a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Madsen, Joseph; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a complex spectrum of neurophysiological disorders involving perturbation of the intracranial contents; primarily increased intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume and intracranial pressure are observed. CSF dynamics are highly coupled to the cerebral blood flows and pressures as well as the mechanical properties of the brain. Hydrocephalus, as such, is a very complex biological problem. We propose integral control volume analysis as a method of tracking these important interactions using mass and momentum conservation principles. As a first step in applying this methodology in humans, an in vitro phantom is used as a simplified model of the intracranial space. The phantom's design consists of a rigid container filled with a compressible gel. Within the gel a hollow spherical cavity represents the ventricular system and a cylindrical passage represents the spinal canal. A computer controlled piston pump supplies sinusoidal volume fluctuations into and out of the flow phantom. MRI is used to measure fluid velocity and volume change as functions of time. Independent pressure measurements and momentum flow rate measurements are used to calibrate the MRI data. These data are used as a framework for future work with live patients and normal individuals. Flow and pressure measurements on the flow phantom will be presented through the control volume framework.

  9. Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography : a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, C. P.; Malone, L.; Thornton, J.; Brennan, P.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: We measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.

  10. Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shortt, C P

    2008-08-01

    We measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.

  11. Balloon sheaths for gastrointestinal guidance and access: a preliminary phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Woo, Cheol Woong; Woo, Sung Ha; Choi, Won Chan; Kim, Jong Gyu; Lim, Jin Oh; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yoon, Chang Jin; Song, Ho Young [Univerisyt of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Wee Chang [Daejeon University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of a newly designed balloon sheath for gastrointestinal guidance and access by conducting a phantom study. The newly designed balloon sheath consisted of an introducer sheath and a supporting balloon. A coil catheter was advanced over a guide wire into two gastroduodenal phantoms (one was with stricture and one was without stricture); group I was without a balloon sheath, group II was with a deflated balloon sheath, and groups III and IV were with an inflated balloon and with the balloon in the fundus and body, respectively. Each test was performed for 2 minutes and it was repeated 10 times in each group by two researchers, and the positions reached by the catheter tip were recorded. Both researchers had better performances with both phantoms in order of group IV, III, II and I. In group IV, both researchers advanced the catheter tip through the fourth duodenal segment in both the phantoms. In group I, however, the catheter tip never reached the third duodenal segment in both the phantoms by both the researchers. The numeric values for the four study groups were significantly different for both the phantoms ({rho} < 0.001). A significant difference was also found between group III and IV for both phantoms ({rho} < 0.001). The balloon sheath seems to be feasible for clinical use, and it has good clinical potential for gastrointestinal guidance and access, particularly when the inflated balloon is placed in the gastric body.

  12. Balloon sheaths for gastrointestinal guidance and access: a preliminary phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Woo, Cheol Woong; Woo, Sung Ha; Choi, Won Chan; Kim, Jong Gyu; Lim, Jin Oh; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yoon, Chang Jin; Song, Ho Young; Kang, Wee Chang

    2005-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of a newly designed balloon sheath for gastrointestinal guidance and access by conducting a phantom study. The newly designed balloon sheath consisted of an introducer sheath and a supporting balloon. A coil catheter was advanced over a guide wire into two gastroduodenal phantoms (one was with stricture and one was without stricture); group I was without a balloon sheath, group II was with a deflated balloon sheath, and groups III and IV were with an inflated balloon and with the balloon in the fundus and body, respectively. Each test was performed for 2 minutes and it was repeated 10 times in each group by two researchers, and the positions reached by the catheter tip were recorded. Both researchers had better performances with both phantoms in order of group IV, III, II and I. In group IV, both researchers advanced the catheter tip through the fourth duodenal segment in both the phantoms. In group I, however, the catheter tip never reached the third duodenal segment in both the phantoms by both the researchers. The numeric values for the four study groups were significantly different for both the phantoms (ρ < 0.001). A significant difference was also found between group III and IV for both phantoms (ρ < 0.001). The balloon sheath seems to be feasible for clinical use, and it has good clinical potential for gastrointestinal guidance and access, particularly when the inflated balloon is placed in the gastric body

  13. Development of a tissue phantom for experimental studies on laser interstitial thermotherapy of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Nelson, Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Chapon, Pascal F.; Milne, Peter J.; Mendoza, Sergio G.; Denham, David B.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Robinson, David S.

    2000-05-01

    A tissue phantom for experimental studies in Laser Interstitial ThermoTherapy (LITT) for the treatment of small breast tumors was developed and evaluated. The tissue phantom consists of a polyacrylamide/acrylate hydrogel matrix containing various concentrations of an absorber (Nigrosin) and a scatterer (Intralipid 10% solution), allowing the optical properties to be varied in accordance to experimental need. Temperature measurements in the phantom were performed with a thermocouple array placed symmetrically around the fiber axis during laser irradiation for different output powers, treatment duration, and different concentrations of absorber. A 980 nm diode laser system was used in conjunction with an REM LightStic 360 diffusing tip fiber. The polyacrylamide/acrylate matrix tissue phantom remained stable during laser irradiation and produced reproducible results. The behavior of the temperature curves produced by the phantom during laser irradiation was similar to the behavior of the temperature curves in ex-vivo tissue. Therefore, this tissue phantom can be used as a model for the thermal response of tissue during laser interstitial thermotherapy. The phantom will be used as an experimental model to determine a set of optimum laser treatment parameters for laser interstitial thermotherapy of breast cancer.

  14. Biopsy guided by real-time sonography fused with MRI: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C.; Grossjohann, Hanne Sønder; Nielsen, Kristina Rue

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to test the accuracy of sonographically guided biopsies in a phantom of structures not visible on sonography but shown on MRI by using commercially available sonography systems with image fusion software. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A previously recorded MRI...... examination from a custom-made phantom was loaded into the sonography system. The phantom contained spheres that were invisible to sonography and contained red dye. The red dye was visible in the biopsy if it was successful. The images were coregistered using structures visible on both sonography and MRI...... successful at the first needle pass. The median number of needle passes until a successful biopsy was obtained was one (range, 1-7). CONCLUSION: The described method was successful in obtaining an adequate sample in a phantom Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  15. Dosimetric study on head CT scans using adult and newborn phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva de O, G. A.; Prata M, A., E-mail: giovanni_paiva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography is the radiodiagnostic method that most contributes to the dose deposition in population. Therefore, the dose reductions used in these tests are very important, especially for pediatric patients who have a life expectancy greater than the rest of the population. This study purpose to compare the doses generated from newborns compared to adult patients in head computed tomography scans. Two head phantoms in a cylindrical shape made in PMMA were used, one to adult and another to newborn patient dimensions. The pediatric routine scan protocol from a radiological service was used for the computed tomography scans. They were performed in General Electric Computed Tomography scanner, Bright Speed model with 4 channels. The absorbed dose measurements were performed with a pencil chamber placed into both phantoms. The newborn head phantom was developed in order to compare the amount of absorbed dose by the phantoms when it is used the same acquisition protocol. The dose found for newborn phantom was 29.9% higher than the adult phantom. (Author)

  16. Scatter correction method for x-ray CT using primary modulation: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hewei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert; Sun Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Scatter correction is a major challenge in x-ray imaging using large area detectors. Recently, the authors proposed a promising scatter correction method for x-ray computed tomography (CT) using primary modulation. Proof of concept was previously illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments on a small phantom with a simple geometry. In this work, the authors provide a quantitative evaluation of the primary modulation technique and demonstrate its performance in applications where scatter correction is more challenging. Methods: The authors first analyze the potential errors of the estimated scatter in the primary modulation method. On two tabletop CT systems, the method is investigated using three phantoms: A Catphan(c)600 phantom, an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the Catphan(c)600 phantom with two annuli. Two different primary modulators are also designed to show the impact of the modulator parameters on the scatter correction efficiency. The first is an aluminum modulator with a weak modulation and a low modulation frequency, and the second is a copper modulator with a strong modulation and a high modulation frequency. Results: On the Catphan(c)600 phantom in the first study, the method reduces the error of the CT number in the selected regions of interest (ROIs) from 371.4 to 21.9 Hounsfield units (HU); the contrast to noise ratio also increases from 10.9 to 19.2. On the anthropomorphic chest phantom in the second study, which represents a more difficult case due to the high scatter signals and object heterogeneity, the method reduces the error of the CT number from 327 to 19 HU in the selected ROIs and from 31.4% to 5.7% on the overall average. The third study is to investigate the impact of object size on the efficiency of our method. The scatter-to-primary ratio estimation error on the Catphan(c)600 phantom without any annulus (20 cm in diameter) is at the level of 0.04, it rises to 0.07 and 0.1 on the phantom with an

  17. A phantom study of the accuracy of CT, MR and PET image registrations with a block matching-based algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isambert, A; Bonniaud, G; Lavielle, F; Malandain, G; Lefkopoulos, D

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitatively assess the performance of a block matching-based automatic registration algorithm integrated within the commercial treatment planning system designated ISOgray from Dosisoft. The accuracy of the process was evaluated by a phantom study on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. Two phantoms were used to carry out this study: the cylindrical Jaszczak phantom and the anthropomorphic Liqui-Phil Head Phantom (the Phantom Laboratory), containing fillable spheres. External fiducial markers were used to quantify the accuracy of 41 CT/CT, MR/CT and PET/CT automatic registrations with images of the rotated and tilted phantoms. The study first showed that a cylindrical phantom was not adapted for the evaluation of the performance of a block matching-based registration software. Secondly, the Liqui-Phil Head Phantom study showed that the algorithm was able to perform automatic registrations of CT/CT and MR/CT images with differences of up to 40 degrees in phantom rotation and of up to 20-30 degrees for PET/CT with accuracy below the image voxel size. The study showed that the block matching-based automatic registration software under investigation was robust, reliable and yielded very satisfactory results. This phantom-based test can be integrated into a periodical quality assurance process and used for any commissioning of image registration software for radiation therapy.

  18. Development of respiration gating RT technique using moving phantom and ultrasound sensor: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk; Yang, Dae Sik; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Yong [Korea University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon [Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Ho [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    In radiotherapy of tumors in liver, enough planning target volume (PTV) margins are necessary to compensate breathing-related movement of tumor volumes. To overcome the problems, this study aims to obtain patients' body movements by using a moving phantom and an ultrasonic sensor, and to develop respiration gating techniques that can adjust patients' beds by using reversed values of the data obtained. The phantom made to measure patients' body movements is composed of a micorprocessor (BS II, 20 MHz, 8K Byte), a sensor (Ultra-Sonic, range 3 {approx} 3 m), host computer (RS232C) and stepping motor (torque 2.3 Kg) etc., and the program to control and operate it was developed. The program allows the phantom to move within the maximum range of 2 cm, its movements and corrections to take place in order, and x, y and z to move successively. After the moving phantom was adjusted by entering random movement data (three dimensional data from with distance of 2 cm), and the phantom movements were acquired using the ultra sonic sensor, the two data were compared and analyzed. And then, after the movements by respiration were acquired by using guinea pigs, the real-time respiration gating techniques were drawn by operating the phantom with the reversed values of the data. The result of analyzing the acquisition-correction delay time for the three types of data values and about each value separately shows that the data values coincided with one another within 1% and that the acquisition-correction delay time was obtained real-time (2.34 x 10{sup -4} sec). This study successfully confirms the clinic application possibility of respiration gating techniques by using a moving phantom and an ultrasonic sensor. With ongoing development of additional analysis system, which can be used in real-time set-up reproducibility analysis, it may be beneficially used in radiotherapy of moving tumors.

  19. Comparison study of reconstruction algorithms for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis using various breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-suk; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a recently developed system for three-dimensional imaging that offers the potential to reduce the false positives of mammography by preventing tissue overlap. Many qualitative evaluations of digital breast tomosynthesis were previously performed by using a phantom with an unrealistic model and with heterogeneous background and noise, which is not representative of real breasts. The purpose of the present work was to compare reconstruction algorithms for DBT by using various breast phantoms; validation was also performed by using patient images. DBT was performed by using a prototype unit that was optimized for very low exposures and rapid readout. Three algorithms were compared: a back-projection (BP) algorithm, a filtered BP (FBP) algorithm, and an iterative expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. To compare the algorithms, three types of breast phantoms (homogeneous background phantom, heterogeneous background phantom, and anthropomorphic breast phantom) were evaluated, and clinical images were also reconstructed by using the different reconstruction algorithms. The in-plane image quality was evaluated based on the line profile and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and out-of-plane artifacts were evaluated by means of the artifact spread function (ASF). Parenchymal texture features of contrast and homogeneity were computed based on reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. The clinical images were studied to validate the effect of reconstruction algorithms. The results showed that the CNRs of masses reconstructed by using the EM algorithm were slightly higher than those obtained by using the BP algorithm, whereas the FBP algorithm yielded much lower CNR due to its high fluctuations of background noise. The FBP algorithm provides the best conspicuity for larger calcifications by enhancing their contrast and sharpness more than the other algorithms; however, in the case of small-size and low

  20. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  1. Quality control within the multicentre perfusion CT study of primary colorectal cancer (PROSPeCT): results of an iodine density phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Maria; Honey, Ian [Trust, Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Beggs, Shaun [Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiation Physics Services, Bradford (United Kingdom); Bridges, Andrew; Wayte, Sarah [Radiology Physics University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry (United Kingdom); Clewer, Philip [Medical Physics Department, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Davis, Anne [Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Foy, Trevelyan [Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Truro (United Kingdom); Fuller, Karen [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, Sheffield (United Kingdom); George, Jennifer [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Higginson, Antony [Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Iball, Gareth [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mutch, Steve [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiation Physics and Protection Department, Oxford (United Kingdom); Neil, Shellagh; Sutton, David [NHS Tayside, Medical Physics Department, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Rivett, Cat [Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Clinical and Radiation Physics, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Slater, Andrew [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Weir, Nick [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Collaboration: on behalf of the PROSPeCT Investigators

    2014-09-15

    To assess the cross-centre consistency of iodine enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation dose in a multicentre perfusion CT trial of colorectal cancer. A cylindrical water phantom containing different iodine inserts was examined on seven CT models in 13 hospitals. The relationship between CT number (Hounsfield units, HU) and iodine concentration (milligrams per millilitre) was established and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) calculated. Radiation doses (CTDI{sub vol}, DLP) were compared across all sites. There was a linear relationship between CT number and iodine density. Iodine enhancement varied by a factor of at most 1.10, and image noise by at most 1.5 across the study sites. At an iodine concentration of 1 mg ml{sup -1} and 100 kV, CNRs ranged from 3.6 to 4.8 in the 220-mm phantom and from 1.4 to 1.9 in the 300-mm phantom. Doses varied by a factor of at most 2.4, but remained within study dose constraints. Iterative reconstruction algorithms did not alter iodine enhancement but resulted in reduced image noise by a factor of at most 2.2, allowing a potential dose decrease of at most 80 % compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Quality control of CT performance across centres indicates that CNR values remain relatively consistent across all sites, giving acceptable image quality within the agreed dose constraints. (orig.)

  2. Phantom study of PET/CT guided delineation of radiation therapy volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Zheng Rong; Wang Yibin; Geng Jianhua; Wu Ning; Zhao Ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To propose a model-based method for calculating the threshold in GTV determination by 18 F-FDG PET in a phantom study. Methods: A phantom was constructed of a 9 L cylindrical tank.Glass spheres with volumes ranging from 0.5 to 16 ml (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 ml) were suspended within the tank. The six spheres were filled with an identical concentration of FDG (203.5 MBq/L) and suspended within 3 different background baths of FDG (6.179, 16.021, 0 MBq/L) solutions, creating 3 target-to-background ratios of 32.96 : 1, 12.69 : 1 and target to zero background. A linear regressive function was constructed which represented the relationship between the threshold and the average activity concentration of the target. A 40% of maximum intensity threshold and the linear regressive function method were applied to define the spheres filled with 18 F-FDG. The volume differences between the two methods and the true volumes of the spheres were compared with t-test. Results: The linear regressive function model was derived as:threshold =(mean target concentration + 2.6227)/1.9752. The results indicated that a smaller deviation occurred when the function was utilized to estimate the volumes of the phantoms as compared to the 40% of maximum intensity threshold method, but there were no significant differences between them (t=0.306, P>0.05). The effect of the linear regressive function on volume was such that when the phantom sphere volumes were ≥ 1 ml, the average deviation between the defined volumes and the true volumes of phantoms was 1.01%; but when the phantom sphere volume was 0.5 ml, the average deviation was 9.53%. When the 40% of maximum intensity threshold method was applied to define the phantom spheres of volume ≥2 ml, the average deviation between the defined volumes and the true volumes of phantoms was -4.62%; but, the average deviation of that was 19.9% when the volumes of spheres were 0.5 and 1 ml. When the linear regressive function was applied to

  3. A comparative study of strain and shear-wave elastography in an elasticity phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Jonathan F.; Pedersen, Malene R; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of strain and shear-wave elastography for determining targets of varying stiffness in a phantom. The effect of target diameter on elastographic assessments and the effect of depth on shear-wave velocity were also investiga......OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of strain and shear-wave elastography for determining targets of varying stiffness in a phantom. The effect of target diameter on elastographic assessments and the effect of depth on shear-wave velocity were also...

  4. Evaluation of penetration and scattering components in conventional pinhole SPECT: phantom studies using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deloar, Hossain M [Department of Investigative Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka, 565-8565 (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi [Department of Investigative Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka, 565-8565 (Japan); Aoi, Toshiyuki [Department of Investigative Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka, 565-8565 (Japan); Iida, Hidehiro [Department of Investigative Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka, 565-8565 (Japan)

    2003-04-21

    In quantitative pinhole SPECT, photon penetration through the collimator edges (penetration), and photon scattering by the object (object scatter) and collimator (collimator scatter) have not been investigated rigorously. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate these three physical processes for different tungsten knife-edge pinhole collimators using uniform, hotspot and donut phantoms filled with {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 123}I and {sup 131}I solutions. For the hotspot phantom, the penetration levels with respect to total counts for a 1 mm pinhole aperture were 78%, 28% and 23% for {sup 131}I, {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, respectively. For a 2 mm aperture, these values were 65% for {sup 131}I, 16% for {sup 123}I and 12% for {sup 99m}Tc. For all pinholes, {sup 201}Tl penetration was less than 4%. The evaluated scatter (from object and collimator) with a hotspot phantom for the 1 mm pinhole was 24%, 16%, 18% and 13% for {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 123}I and {sup 131}I, respectively. Summation of the object and collimator scatter for the uniform phantom was approximately 20% higher than that for the hotspot phantom. Significant counts due to penetration and object and collimator scatter in the reconstructed image were observed inside the core of the donut phantom. The collimator scatter can be neglected for all isotopes used in this study except for {sup 131}I. Object scatter correction for all radionuclides used in this study is necessary and correction for the penetration contribution is necessary for all radionuclides but {sup 201}Tl.

  5. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...

  6. Study on Compression Induced Contrast in X-ray Mammograms Using Breast Mimicking Phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. M. Aowlad Hossain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray mammography is commonly used to scan cancer or tumors in breast using low dose x-rays. But mammograms suffer from low contrast problem. The breast is compressed in mammography to reduce x-ray scattering effects. As tumors are stiffer than normal tissues, they undergo smaller deformation under compression. Therefore, image intensity at tumor region may change less than the background tissues. In this study, we try to find out compression induced contrast from multiple mammographic images of tumorous breast phantoms taken with different compressions. This is an extended work of our previous simulation study with experiment and more analysis. We have used FEM models for synthetic phantom and constructed a phantom using agar and n-propanol for simulation and experiment. The x-ray images of deformed phantoms have been obtained under three compression steps and a non-rigid registration technique has been applied to register these images. It is noticeably observed that the image intensity changes at tumor are less than those at surrounding which induce a detectable contrast. Addition of this compression induced contrast to the simulated and experimental images has improved their original contrast by a factor of about 1.4

  7. Performance of an automatic dose control system for CT: anthropomorphic phantom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosch, D; Stumpp, P; Kahn, T; Nagel, H D

    2011-02-01

    To assess the performance and to provide more detailed insight into characteristics and limitations of devices for automatic dose control (ADC) in CT. A comprehensive study on DoseRight 2.0, the ADC system provided by Philips for its Brilliance CT scanners, was conducted with assorted tests using an anthropomorphic phantom that allowed simulation of the operation of the system under almost realistic conditions. The scan protocol settings for the neck, chest and abdomen with pelvis were identical to those applied in the clinical routine. Using the appropriate ADC functionalities, dose reductions equal 40% for the neck, 20% for the chest and 10% for the abdomen with pelvis. Larger dose reductions can be expected for average patients, since their attenuating properties differ significantly from the anthropomorphic phantom. Adverse effects due to increased image noise were only moderate as a consequence of the "adequate noise system" design and the complementary use of adaptive filtration. The results of specific tests also provided deeper insight into the operation of the ADC system that helps to identify the causes of suspected malfunctions and to prevent potential pitfalls. Tests with anthropomorphic phantoms allow verification of the characteristics of devices for ADC in CT under almost realistic conditions. However, differences in phantom shape and material composition require supplementary patient studies on representative patient groups. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles as Radiosensitisers: An In vitro and Phantom-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youkhana, Esho Qasho; Feltis, Bryce; Blencowe, Anton; Geso, Moshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Radiosensitisation caused by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 -NPs) is investigated using phantoms (PRESAGE ® dosimeters) and in vitro using two types of cell lines, cultured human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and prostate cancer (DU145) cells. Methods: Anatase TiO 2 -NPs were synthesised, characterised and functionalised to allow dispersion in culture-medium for in vitro studies and halocarbons (PRESAGE ® chemical compositions). PRESAGE ® dosimeters were scanned with spectrophotometer to determine the radiation dose enhancement. Clonogenic and cell viability assays were employed to determine cells survival curves from which the dose enhancement levels "radiosensitisation" are deduced. Results: Comparable levels of radiosensitisation were observed in both phantoms and cells at kilovoltage ranges of x-ray energies (slightly higher in vitro) . Significant radiosensitisation (~67 %) of control was also noted in cells at megavoltage energies (commonly used in radiotherapy), compared to negligible levels detected by phantoms. This difference is attributed to biochemical effects, specifically the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radicals ( • OH), which are only manifested in aqueous environments of cells and are non-existent in case of phantoms. Conclusions: This research shows that TiO 2 -NPs improve the efficiency of dose delivery, which has implications for future radiotherapy treatments. Literature shows that Ti 2 O 3 -NPs can be used as imaging agents hence with these findings renders these NPs as theranostic agents.

  9. Development of newborn chest phantom for dosimetric study in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aburjaile, W.N.; Lima, L.T.A.; Mourao, A.P., E-mail: wadia.namen@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Biomédica

    2017-11-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a radiodiagnostic technique that allows evaluating the patient internal structures. In the last ten years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. The use dissemination of this technique has a significant increase in the patient dose. CT equipment installed in radiodiagnostic services present technological variations in the speed of acquisition or in the protocols used to obtain sectional images. The dose deposited in pediatric patients is directly related to energy retained during the exposure process to ionizing radiation, and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity allied to the life expectancy of the child. The risk associated with a radiological examination can be considered quite low compared to the natural risk. However, any additional risk, no matter how small, is unacceptable if it does not benefit the patient. The knowledge of dose distribution is important when considering the variation of the acquisition parameters in order to reduce the dose. The objective of this work is to develop a newborn chest phantom for realize a comparative dosimetric study with the an adult standard phantom in order to evaluate the dose variation in CT scans. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantoms, in helical mode. The measurements have allowed to obtain the volumetric dose index values for the adult and newborn

  10. Accuracy evaluation of the optical surface monitoring system on EDGE linear accelerator in a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: Antonella.Fogliata@humanitas.it; Stravato, Antonella; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-07-01

    Frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) requires dedicated systems to monitor the patient position during the treatment to avoid target underdosage due to involuntary shift. The optical surface monitoring system (OSMS) is here evaluated in a phantom-based study. The new EDGE linear accelerator from Varian (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) integrates, for cranial lesions, the common cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kV-MV portal images to the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), a device able to detect real-time patient's face movements in all 6 couch axes (vertical, longitudinal, lateral, rotation along the vertical axis, pitch, and roll). We have evaluated the OSMS imaging capability in checking the phantoms' position and monitoring its motion. With this aim, a home-made cranial phantom was developed to evaluate the OSMS accuracy in 4 different experiments: (1) comparison with CBCT in isocenter location, (2) capability to recognize predefined shifts up to 2° or 3 cm, (3) evaluation at different couch angles, (4) ability to properly reconstruct the surface when the linac gantry visually block one of the cameras. The OSMS system showed, with a phantom, to be accurate for positioning in respect to the CBCT imaging system with differences of 0.6 ± 0.3 mm for linear vector displacement, with a maximum rotational inaccuracy of 0.3°. OSMS presented an accuracy of 0.3 mm for displacement up to 1 cm and 1°, and 0.5 mm for larger displacements. Different couch angles (45° and 90°) induced a mean vector uncertainty < 0.4 mm. Coverage of 1 camera produced an uncertainty < 0.5 mm. Translations and rotations of a phantom can be accurately detect with the optical surface detector system.

  11. Impact of patient weight on tumor visibility based on human-shaped phantom simulation study in PET imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarudin, M.; Saripan, M. I.; Mashohor, S.; Saad, W. H. M.; Nordin, A. J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-10-01

    Energy window technique has been implemented in all positron emission tomography (PET) imaging protocol, with the aim to remove the unwanted low energy photons. Current practices in our institution however are performed by using default energy threshold level regardless of the weight of the patient. Phantom size, which represents the size of the patient's body, is the factor that determined the level of scatter fraction during PET imaging. Thus, the motivation of this study is to determine the optimum energy threshold level for different sizes of human-shaped phantom, to represent underweight, normal, overweight and obese patients. In this study, the scanner was modeled by using Monte Carlo code, version MCNP5. Five different sizes of elliptical-cylinder shaped of human-sized phantoms with diameter ranged from 15 to 30 cm were modeled. The tumor was modeled by a cylindrical line source filled with 1.02 MeV positron emitters at the center of the phantom. Various energy window widths, in the ranged of 10-50% were implemented to the data. In conclusion, the phantom mass volume did influence the scatter fraction within the volume. Bigger phantom caused more scattering events and thus led to coincidence counts lost. We evaluated the impact of phantom sizes on the sensitivity and visibility of the simulated models. Implementation of wider energy window improved the sensitivity of the system and retained the coincidence photons lost. Visibility of the tumor improved as an appropriate energy window implemented for the different sizes of phantom.

  12. Anthropometric approaches and their uncertainties to assigning computational phantoms to individual patients in pediatric dosimetry studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Scott; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-01-01

    Current efforts to reconstruct organ doses in children undergoing diagnostic imaging or therapeutic interventions using ionizing radiation typically rely upon the use of reference anthropomorphic computational phantoms coupled to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. These phantoms are generally matched to individual patients based upon nearest age or sometimes total body mass. In this study, we explore alternative methods of phantom-to-patient matching with the goal of identifying those methods which yield the lowest residual errors in internal organ volumes. Various thoracic and abdominal organs were segmented and organ volumes obtained from chest-abdominal-pelvic (CAP) computed tomography (CT) image sets from 38 pediatric patients ranging in age from 2 months to 15 years. The organs segmented included the skeleton, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs and spleen. For each organ, least-squared regression lines, 95th percentile confidence intervals and 95th percentile prediction intervals were established as a function of patient age, trunk volume, estimated trunk mass, trunk height, and three estimates of the ventral body cavity volume based on trunk height alone, or in combination with circumferential, width and/or breadth measurements in the mid-chest of the patient. When matching phantom to patient based upon age, residual uncertainties in organ volumes ranged from 53% (lungs) to 33% (kidneys), and when trunk mass was used (surrogate for total body mass as we did not have images of patient head, arms or legs), these uncertainties ranged from 56% (spleen) to 32% (liver). When trunk height is used as the matching parameter, residual uncertainties in organ volumes were reduced to between 21 and 29% for all organs except the spleen (40%). In the case of the lungs and skeleton, the two-fold reduction in organ volume uncertainties was seen in moving from patient age to trunk height—a parameter easily measured in the clinic. When ventral body cavity volumes were used

  13. Impact of Reconstruction Algorithms and Gender-Associated Anatomy on Coronary Calcium Scoring with CT: An Anthropomorphic Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Liu, Songtao; Myers, Kyle J; Gavrielides, Marios A; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Different computed tomography imaging protocols and patient characteristics can impact the accuracy and precision of the calcium score and may lead to inconsistent patient treatment recommendations. The aim of this work was to determine the impact of reconstruction algorithm and gender characteristics on coronary artery calcium scoring based on a phantom study using computed tomography. Four synthetic heart vessels with vessel diameters corresponding to female and male left main and left circumflex arteries containing calcification-mimicking materials (200-1000 HU) were inserted into a thorax phantom and were scanned with and without female breast plates (male and female phantoms, respectively). Ten scans were acquired and were reconstructed at 3-mm slices using filtered-back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction with medium and strong denoising (IR3 and IR5) algorithms. Agatston and calcium volume scores were estimated for each vessel. Calcium scores for each vessel and the total calcium score (summation of all four vessels) were compared between the two phantoms to quantify the impact of the breast plates and reconstruction parameters. Calcium scores were also compared among vessels of different diameters to investigate the impact of the vessel size. The calcium scores were significantly larger for FBP reconstruction (FBP > IR3>IR5). Agatston scores (calcium volume score) for vessels in the male phantom scans were on average 4.8% (2.9%), 8.2% (7.1%), and 10.5% (9.4%) higher compared to those in the female phantom with FBP, IR3, and IR5, respectively, when exposure was conserved across phantoms. The total calcium scores from the male phantom were significantly larger than those from the female phantom (P phantom. Calcium scores significantly decreased with iterative reconstruction and tended to be underestimated for female anatomy (smaller vessels and presence of breast plates). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Prevalence of phantom limb pain, stump pain, and phantom limb sensation among the amputated cancer patients in India: A prospective, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The phantom limb pain (PLP and phantom limb sensation (PLS are very common among amputated cancer patients, and they lead to considerable morbidity. In spite of this, there is a lack of epidemiological data of this phenomenon among the Asian population. This study was done to provide the data from Indian population. Methods: The prevalence of PLP, stump pain (SP, and PLS was prospectively analyzed from the amputated cancer patients over a period of 2 years in Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The risk factors and the impact of phantom phenomenon on patients were also noted. Results: The prevalence of PLP was 41% at 3 and 12 months and 45.3% at 6 months, whereas that of SP and PLS was 14.4% and 71.2% at 3 months, 18.75% and 37.1% at 6 months, 15.8% and 32.4% at 12 months, respectively. There was higher prevalence of PLP and PLS among the patients with history of preamputation pain, smoking with proximal level of amputation, receiving general anesthesia, receiving intravenous (IV opioid postoperative analgesia, and developing neuroma or infection. Conclusion: The prevalence of PLP and PLS was higher among the cancer amputees as compared to SP, and a few risk factors responsible for their higher prevalence were found in our study. The PLP and PLS lead to considerable morbidity in terms of sleep disturbance and depression.

  15. A Monte Carlo study for optimizing the detector of SPECT imaging using a XCAT human phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Pirayesh Islamian, Jalil; Abedi, Seyyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak; Shayesteh Azar, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring a high quality image has assigned an important concern for obtaining accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. Detector is a critical component of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging system for giving accurate information from exact pattern of radionuclide distribution in the target organ. The images are strongly affected by the attenuation, scattering, and response of the detector. The conventional detector is mainly made from sodium iodide activated by thallium [NaI(Tl)] in nuclear medicine imaging. This study has planned to introduce a suitable for an optimized SPECT imaging. SIMIND Monte Carlo program was utilized for simulating a SPECT imaging system with a NaI(Tl) detector, and a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator. The Planar and SPECT scans of a 99mTc point source and also an extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) computerized phantom with the experiment and simulated systems were prepared. After verification and validation of the simulated system, the similar scans of the phantoms were compared from the point of view of image quality for 7 scintillator crystals including: NaI(Tl), BGO, YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, LuAG:Ce, LaBr3 and CZT. The parameters of energy and spatial resolution, and sensitivity of the systems were compared. Images were analyzed quantitatively by SSIM algorithm with Zhou Wang and Rouse/Hemami methods, and also qualitatively by two nuclear medicine specialists. Energy resolutions of the mentioned crystals obtained were: 9.864, 9.8545, 10.229, 10.221, 10.230, 10.131and10.223 percentage for 99mTc photopeak 140 Kev, respectively. Finally, SSIM indexes for the related phantom images were calculated to 0.794, 0.738, 0.735, 0.607, 0.760 and 0.811 compared to the NaI(Tl) acquired images, respectively. Medical diagnosis of the SPECT images of the phantom showed that the system with BGO crystal potentially provides a better detectability for hot and cold lesions in the liver of XCAT phantom. The results showed that BGO

  16. Simulated study of solid materials used as phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmonte, Eduardo P.; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G.; Pinto, Nivia G.Villela; Braz, Delson; Pereira Junior, Sielso B.; Lima, Gilberto S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the behavior of electrons in water and compares them with the behavior in the materials you want to analyze. It were simulated, using Monte Carlo code EGS4 (MC), 24 irradiation with electrons of 6 and 20 MeV in different materials (polyethylene C 2 H 4 ) n , polystyrene (C 8 H 8 ) n , lucite (C 5 H 8 O 2 ), nylon (C 6 H 11 NO), water (H 2 O) and solid water (55% polyethylene, polystyrene and 5% 40% calcium oxide). The data show that for the two energies most of radiation does not interact with the first 20 mm materials. However, when analyzed plates of 1 cm, most of the energy is deposited in the first 4 plates in case 6 MeV and in the first ten to 20 MeV electrons, for all materials. In case of similarity in behavior of radiation in water and other materials, it is observed that is in polyethylene and polystyrene that the behaviour of electrons more resembles the behavior in water

  17. Optimization of yttrium-90 PET for simultaneous PET/MR imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Mootaz; Oesingmann, Niels; Faul, David D; Kostakoglu, Lale; Knešaurek, Karin; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of yttrium-90 in the liver post radioembolization has been shown useful for personalized dosimetry calculations and evaluation of extrahepatic deposition. The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of several MR-based data correction approaches offered by using a combined PET/MR system to improve Y-90 PET imaging. In particular, the feasibility of motion and partial volume corrections were investigated in a controlled phantom study. The ACR phantom was filled with an initial concentration of 8 GBq of Y-90 solution resulting in a contrast of 10:1 between the hot cylinders and the background. Y-90 PET motion correction through motion estimates from MR navigators was evaluated by using a custom-built motion stage that simulated realistic amplitudes of respiration-induced liver motion. Finally, the feasibility of an MR-based partial volume correction method was evaluated using a wavelet decomposition approach. Motion resulted in a large (∼40%) loss of contrast recovery for the 8 mm cylinder in the phantom, but was corrected for after MR-based motion correction was applied. Partial volume correction improved contrast recovery by 13% for the 8 mm cylinder. MR-based data correction improves Y-90 PET imaging on simultaneous PET/MR systems. Assessment of these methods must be studied further in the clinical setting.

  18. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...... in the imaging plane showed a variation of less than 10 per cent within 10 cm from the centre of the magnet in all three imaging planes. Changing the gradient field strength apparently had no influence on the T2 values recorded. Consequently diffusion processes seem without significance. It is concluded...

  19. The experimental study of the optimized kVp and it's relationships with the surface dose of phantom and the phantom thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yinghui; Han Yuedong; Gao Kai; Deng Houjun; Sun Lijun; Mu Xuanxin; Ren Dongqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationships of X-ray tube voltage (kVp) with surface dose of the phantom and phantom-thickness on the basis of the particular signal to noise ratio of X-ray images. Methods X-ray digital subtraction angiography was simulated using a phantom made of acrylic acids. Under the particular surface dose of X-ray image intensifier, the curve of the surface doses of phantom surface-kVp and the curve of the phantom thickness-kVp were acquired with different exposure combinations of kVp and mAs. Results: According to the curve of the surface dose of phantom-kVp, it suggestsd that the gradual increase in kVp corresponded to the gradually decreased surface dose of phantom, with the slope tending to zero. However, the gradual increased phantom thickness corresponded to the gradually increased kVp on the basis of the curve of the phantom thickness-kVp, with the presentation of kVp = 64 + 0.89D (phantom thickness, cm) between the phantom thickness and kVp. Conclusion: The graduall increased in kVp might result in the gradual decrease in surface dose of phantom, the optimized kVp relating directly to the phantom thickness. (authors)

  20. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopic Studies on Broiler Chicken Tissue Suitable for the Development of Practical Phantoms in Multifrequency EIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kanti Bera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Phantoms are essential for assessing the system performance in Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. Saline phantoms with insulator inhomogeneity fail to mimic the physiological structure of real body tissue in several aspects. Saline or any other salt solutions are purely resistive and hence studying multifrequency EIT systems cannot be assessed with saline phantoms because the response of the purely resistive materials do not change over frequency. Animal tissues show a variable response over a wide band of signal frequency due to their complex physiological and physiochemical structures and hence they can suitably be used as bathing medium and inhomogeneity in the phantoms of multifrequency EIT system. An efficient assessment of a multifrequency EIT system with real tissue phantom needs a prior knowledge of the impedance profile of the bathing medium as well as the inhomogeneity. In this direction Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS of broiler chicken muscle tissue paste and broiler chicken fat tissue is conducted from 10 Hz to 2 MHz using an impedance analyzer and their impedance profiles are thoroughly studied. Results show that the broiler chicken muscle tissue paste is less resistive than the fat tissue and hence it can be successfully used as the bathing medium of the phantoms for resistivity imaging in multifrequency EIT. Fat tissue is found more resistive than the muscle tissue which makes it more suitable for the inhomogeneity in phantoms of resistivity imaging study. doi:10.5617/jeb.174 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 48-63, 2011

  1. Electromagnetic navigation versus fluoroscopy in aortic endovascular procedures: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tystad Lund, Kjetil; Tangen, Geir Arne; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode

    2017-01-01

    To explore the possible benefits of electromagnetic (EM) navigation versus conventional fluoroscopy during abdominal aortic endovascular procedures. The study was performed on a phantom representing the abdominal aorta. Intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of the phantom was acquired and merged with a preoperative multidetector CT (MDCT). The CBCT was performed with a reference plate fixed to the phantom that, after merging the CBCT with the MDCT, facilitated registration of the MDCT volume with the EM space. An EM field generator was stationed near the phantom. Navigation software was used to display EM-tracked instruments within the 3D image volume. Fluoroscopy was performed using a C-arm system. Five operators performed a series of renal artery cannulations using modified instruments, alternatingly using fluoroscopy or EM navigation as the sole guidance method. Cannulation durations and associated radiation dosages were noted along with the number of cannulations complicated by loss of guidewire insertion. A total of 120 cannulations were performed. The median cannulation durations were 41.5 and 34.5 s for the fluoroscopy- and EM-guided cannulations, respectively. No significant difference in cannulation duration was found between the two modalities (p = 0.736). Only EM navigation showed a significant reduction in cannulation duration in the latter half of its cannulation series compared with the first half (p = 0.004). The median dose area product for fluoroscopy was 0.0836 [Formula: see text]. EM-guided cannulations required a one-time CBCT dosage of 3.0278 [Formula: see text]. Three EM-guided and zero fluoroscopy-guided cannulations experienced loss of guidewire insertion. Our findings indicate that EM navigation is not inferior to fluoroscopy in terms of the ability to guide endovascular interventions. Its utilization may be of particular interest in complex interventions where adequate visualization or minimal use of contrast agents is

  2. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabel, M; Biederer, J; Jochens, A; Bornemann, L; Soza, G; Heller, M; Bolte, H

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of tumour burden in oncology requires accurate and reproducible image evaluation. The current standard is one-dimensional measurement (e.g. RECIST) with inherent disadvantages. Volumetric analysis is discussed as an alternative for therapy monitoring of lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph node metastases in a phantom study. Fifty artificial lymph nodes were produced in a size range from 10 to 55mm; some of them enhanced using iodine contrast media. All nodules were placed in an artificial chest phantom (artiCHEST®) within different surrounding tissues. MDCT was performed using different collimations (1-5 mm) at varying reconstruction kernels (B20f, B40f, B60f). Volume and RECIST measurements were performed using Oncology Software (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) and were compared to reference volume and diameter by calculating absolute percentage errors. The software performance allowed a robust volumetric analysis in a phantom setting. Unsatisfying segmentation results were frequently found for native nodules within surrounding muscle. The absolute percentage error (APE) for volumetric analysis varied between 0.01 and 225%. No significant differences were seen between different reconstruction kernels. The most unsatisfactory segmentation results occurred in higher slice thickness (4 and 5 mm). Contrast enhanced lymph nodes showed better segmentation results by trend. The semi-automated 3D-volumetric analysis software tool allows a reliable and convenient segmentation of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom setting. Lymph nodes adjacent to tissue of similar density cause segmentation problems. For volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in clinical routine a slice thickness of ≤3mm and a medium soft reconstruction kernel (e.g. B40f for Siemens scan systems) may be a suitable compromise for semi-automated volumetric analysis. Copyright

  3. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabel, M.; Biederer, J.; Jochens, A.; Bornemann, L.; Soza, G.; Heller, M.; Bolte, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of tumour burden in oncology requires accurate and reproducible image evaluation. The current standard is one-dimensional measurement (e.g. RECIST) with inherent disadvantages. Volumetric analysis is discussed as an alternative for therapy monitoring of lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph node metastases in a phantom study. Materials and methods: Fifty artificial lymph nodes were produced in a size range from 10 to 55 mm; some of them enhanced using iodine contrast media. All nodules were placed in an artificial chest phantom (artiCHEST ® ) within different surrounding tissues. MDCT was performed using different collimations (1–5 mm) at varying reconstruction kernels (B20f, B40f, B60f). Volume and RECIST measurements were performed using Oncology Software (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) and were compared to reference volume and diameter by calculating absolute percentage errors. Results: The software performance allowed a robust volumetric analysis in a phantom setting. Unsatisfying segmentation results were frequently found for native nodules within surrounding muscle. The absolute percentage error (APE) for volumetric analysis varied between 0.01 and 225%. No significant differences were seen between different reconstruction kernels. The most unsatisfactory segmentation results occurred in higher slice thickness (4 and 5 mm). Contrast enhanced lymph nodes showed better segmentation results by trend. Conclusion: The semi-automated 3D-volumetric analysis software tool allows a reliable and convenient segmentation of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom setting. Lymph nodes adjacent to tissue of similar density cause segmentation problems. For volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in clinical routine a slice thickness of ≤3 mm and a medium soft reconstruction kernel (e.g. B40f for Siemens scan systems) may be a suitable

  4. Study of the CT peripheral dose variation in a head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2009-01-01

    The computed tomography is frequently used for the brain diagnosis and it is responsible for the largest doses in the head among the X-ray examinations. Established indexes define a reference dose value for a scan routine; however the dose value has a longitudinal variation in the scan. The purpose of this study is to investigate the variation of the peripheral doses in the head scan using a polymethylmethacrylate head phantom. The studies were performed using two different computed tomography scanners in the option single slice with a routine of a head adult protocol (i.e. default protocol in the scanner software). Radiation doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeter (LiF - TLD) rod model, distributed inside the PMMA head phantom in periphery and central area. The results allowed registering the variation dose curve, longitudinally the scan, for the peripheral area and to determine the MSAD value. The peripheral maximum dose value measured can be compared with the maximum dose value in the center of the phantom in each different routine (author)

  5. Study of dose distributions in voxel phantoms for brachytherapy sources using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maximiano C.; Santos, Denison S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Begalli, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    This work studies the effects of corrections in the calculation of dose distribution for brachytherapy sources when they are inserted in a male human voxel phantom. The sources studied here are the Best Industries 125 I 2301 model for low dose rate and the Amersham Buchler G0814 model 192 Ir seed for high dose rate, in the simulation of prostate treatments. The presence of organs around the interest point scatters radiation in a different form than a water cube, the situation that is usually configured in these calculations. The insertion of the sources in an anthropomorphic phantom brings results closer to the real situation. The chosen phantom was the head and torso voxel phantom created by Zubal. The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used to simulate the radiation transportation along the source shielding and the human organs of the voxel phantom. After inserting the source in the phantom, the energy deposition in each voxel is computed, allowing the construction of isodose curves. The source insertion in the anthropomorphic phantom aims also at a further knowledge about the brachytherapy treatment planning and additional information such as the target volume dose and in neighbor organs, data that will be useful for medical staff working with this technique. (author)

  6. Dual-Energy CT for Quantification of Urinary Stone Composition in Mixed Stones: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Huang, Alice; Cardona, Juan Montoya; Duan, Xinhui; Williams, James C; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of using dual-energy CT to accurately quantify uric acid and non-uric acid components in urinary stones of mixed composition. A total of 24 urinary stones were analyzed with micro CT to serve as the reference standard for uric acid and non-uric acid composition. These stones were placed in water phantoms to simulate body attenuation of slim to obese adults and scanned with a third-generation dual-source CT scanner by use of dual-energy modes adaptively selected on the basis of phantom size. CT number ratio, which is distinct for different materials, was calculated for each pixel of the stones. Each pixel was then classified as uric acid and non-uric acid by comparison of the CT number ratio with preset thresholds ranging from 1.10 to 1.70. Minimal, maximal, and root-mean-square errors were calculated by comparing composition with the reference standard, and the threshold with the minimal root-mean-square error was determined. A paired t test was performed to compare the stone composition determined with dual-energy CT with the reference standard obtained with micro CT. The optimal CT number ratio threshold ranged from 1.27 to 1.55, dependent on phantom size. The root-mean-square error ranged from 9.60% to 12.87% across all phantom sizes. Minimal absolute error ranged from 0.04% to 1.24% and maximal absolute error from 22.05% to 35.46%. Dual-energy CT and the reference micro CT did not differ significantly on uric acid and non-uric acid composition (paired t test, p = 0.20-0.96). Accurate quantification of uric acid and non-uric acid composition in mixed stones is possible with dual-energy CT.

  7. Study of Skin Phantoms by Photothermal Radiometry in Frequency Domain and Multivariate Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Gutiérez-Juárez, G.; Landa-Hernandez, A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Ivanov, R.; Huerta-Franco, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper the use of the photothermal radiometry technique in the frequency domain (PRTF) and the use of multivariate methods in the study of two types of skin phantoms: (a) one in which skin pigmentation was simulated dyeing the gel phantom and (b) the other consists of exposure of animal skin samples to different degrees of thermal damage. In experiment (a), gel phantoms were prepared with different concentrations of methylene blue (MB). The mean values of the radiometry signal (RS) show significant differences in only those cases in which changes in the concentration of MB were higher than 0.38 mM. This result was confirmed with a t test for independent samples of the data ( p analysis (PCA) demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between phantoms with changes in molar concentration equal to 0.38 mM (for the phase signal). In the case of experiment (b), the following four groups of pork skin samples were analyzed: one consists of samples of fresh skin, while the other three consist of samples exposed to thermal damage at 45 °C (the exposure time was 4 s) and 80 °C (exposure times were 4 s and 8 s, respectively). The mean values of the RS for each group of samples did not show a clear visual discrimination. However, the t test for independent samples applied to the data demonstrated significant differences only between fresh skin and skin exposure to thermal damage at 80 °C (with exposure times of 4 s and 8 s). PCA was used to discriminate between the four different skin samples.

  8. Dosimetric study in chest computed tomography scans of adult and pediatric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namen A, W.; Prata M, A.; Guedes, G.

    2016-10-01

    The computed tomography scan is a radiological technique that permits an evaluation of the patient internal structures. In the last ten years, this technique has had a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, cancer and pediatric trauma. Widespread of this technique has a significant increase in the patient dose. The risk associated with the radiological examination can be considered very low compared to the natural risk. However, any additional risk, no matter how small, is unacceptable if it does not benefit the patient. To be aware of the dose distribution is important when the objective is to vary the acquisition parameters aiming a dose reduction. The aim os this study is develop a pediatric chest phantom to evaluate the dose variation in CT scans. In this work, a cylindrical adult chest phantom made in polymethyl methacrylate was used and a second chest phantom was developed, based on dimensions of in eight year old patient in oblong shape. The two simulators have 5 openings, one is central and four are peripheral lagged by 90 degrees Celsius, which allow positioning a pencil chamber aiming and observation of the dose in 5 regions. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model and 64 channels, the central slice of both simulators were irradiated successively to obtain dose measurements using a pencil chamber. The irradiation of the central slice was conducted using the service protocol. The registered dose values showed that the pediatric phantom had higher doses especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. The results also enabled a comparison among the index dose values obtained from the measurements with the pencil chamber. (Author)

  9. Dosimetric study in chest computed tomography scans of adult and pediatric phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namen A, W.; Prata M, A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Guedes, G., E-mail: wadia.namen@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    The computed tomography scan is a radiological technique that permits an evaluation of the patient internal structures. In the last ten years, this technique has had a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, cancer and pediatric trauma. Widespread of this technique has a significant increase in the patient dose. The risk associated with the radiological examination can be considered very low compared to the natural risk. However, any additional risk, no matter how small, is unacceptable if it does not benefit the patient. To be aware of the dose distribution is important when the objective is to vary the acquisition parameters aiming a dose reduction. The aim os this study is develop a pediatric chest phantom to evaluate the dose variation in CT scans. In this work, a cylindrical adult chest phantom made in polymethyl methacrylate was used and a second chest phantom was developed, based on dimensions of in eight year old patient in oblong shape. The two simulators have 5 openings, one is central and four are peripheral lagged by 90 degrees Celsius, which allow positioning a pencil chamber aiming and observation of the dose in 5 regions. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model and 64 channels, the central slice of both simulators were irradiated successively to obtain dose measurements using a pencil chamber. The irradiation of the central slice was conducted using the service protocol. The registered dose values showed that the pediatric phantom had higher doses especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. The results also enabled a comparison among the index dose values obtained from the measurements with the pencil chamber. (Author)

  10. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko; Lampinen, Anniina [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmu, Kirsi [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); School of Science, Aalto University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki (Finland); Reijonen, Vappu; Kortesniemi, Mika [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); Leikola, Junnu [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, Riku [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-15

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  11. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  12. Dose reduction in multidetector CT of the urinary tract. Studies in a phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppenrath, E.; Meindl, T.; Herzog, P.; Khalil, R.; Mueller-Lisse, U.; Krenn, L.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.

    2006-01-01

    A novel ureter phantom was developed for investigations of image quality and dose in CT urography. The ureter phantom consisted of a water box (14 cm x 32 cm x 42 cm) with five parallel plastic tubes (diameter 2.7 mm) filled with different concentrations of contrast media (1.88-30 mg iodine/ml). CT density of the tubes and noise of the surrounding water were determined using two multidetector scanners (Philips MX8000 with four rows, Siemens Sensation 16 with 16 rows) with varying tube current-time product (15-100 mAs per slice), voltage (90 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV), pitch (0.875-1.75), and slice thickness (1 mm, 2 mm, 3.2 mm). Contrast-to-noise ratio as a parameter of image quality was correlated with dose (CTDI) and was compared with image evaluation by two radiologists. The CT densities of different concentrations of contrast media and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher when low voltages (90 kV versus 120 kV, 100 kV versus 120 kV) were applied. Smaller slice thickness (1 mm versus 2 mm) did not change CT density but decreased contrast-to-noise ratio due to increased noise. Contrast phantom studies showed favourable effects of low tube voltage on image quality in the low dose range. This may facilitate substantial dose reduction in CT urography. (orig.)

  13. Hydrogel based tissue mimicking phantom for in-vitro ultrasound contrast agents studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Conversano, Francesco; Casciaro, Sergio; Distante, Alessandro; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasound medical imaging (UMI) is the most widely used image analysis technique, and often requires advanced in-vitro set up to perform morphological and functional investigations. These studies are based on contrast properties both related to tissue structure and injectable contrast agents (CA). In this work, we present a three-dimensional structure composed of two different hydrogels reassembly the microvascular network of a human tissue. This phantom was particularly suitable for the echocontrastographic measurements in human microvascular system. This phantom has been characterized to present the acoustic properties of an animal liver, that is, acoustic impedance (Z) and attenuation coefficient (AC), in UMI signal analysis in particular; the two different hydrogels have been selected to simulate the target organ and the acoustic properties of the vascular system. The two hydrogels were prepared starting from cellulose derivatives to simulating the target organ parenchyma and using a PEG-diacrylate to reproduce the vascular system. Moreover, harmonic analysis was performed on the hydrogel mimicking the liver parenchyma hydrogel to evaluate the ultrasound (US) distortion during echographic measurement. The phantom was employed in the characterization of an experimental US CA. Perfect agreement was found when comparing the hydrogel acoustical properties materials with the corresponding living reference tissues (i.e., vascular and parenchimal tissue).

  14. Study of the CT peripheral dose variation in a chest phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T. C.; Da Silva, T. A. [Development Center of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Mourao F, A. P., E-mail: alonso@cdtn.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Nuclear Energy Department, Program of Nuclear Science and Techniques, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Computed Tomography (CT) grows every year and is a diagnostic method that has revolutionized radiology with advances in procedures for obtaining image. However, the indiscriminate use of this method generates relatively high doses in patients. The diagnostic reference levels (DRL) is a practical tool to promote the evaluation of existing protocols. The optimization and the periodic review of the protocols are important to balance the risk of radiation. The purpose of this study is to investigate, in a chest scan, the variation of dose in CT. To measure the dose profile are used lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a phantom of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The data obtained allow to observe the variation of the dose profile inside the phantom. The peripheral region shows higher dose values than the central region. The longitudinal variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom (15,99 ± 2,80) mGy at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The results will contribute to disseminate the proper procedure and optimize the dosimetry and the tests of quality control in CT, as well as make a critical analysis of the DRL. (Author)

  15. Technical Note: A safe, cheap, and easy-to-use isotropic diffusion MRI phantom for clinical and multicenter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullens, Pim; Bladt, Piet; Sijbers, Jan; Maas, Andrew I R; Parizel, Paul M

    2017-03-01

    Since Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) data acquisition and processing are not standardized, substantial differences in DWI derived measures such as Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) may arise which are related to the acquisition or MRI processing method, but not to the sample under study. Quality assurance using a standardized test object, or phantom, is a key factor in standardizing DWI across scanners. Current diffusion phantoms are either complex to use, not available in larger quantities, contain substances unwanted in a clinical environment, or are expensive. A diffusion phantom based on a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution, together with a phantom holder, is presented and compared to existing diffusion phantoms for use in clinical DWI scans. An ADC vs. temperature calibration curve was obtained. ADC of the phantom (808 to 857 ± 0.2 mm 2 /s) is in the same range as ADC values found in brain tissue. ADC measurements are highly reproducible across time with an intra-class correlation coefficient of > 0.8. ADC as function of temperature (in Kelvin) can be estimated as ADCm(T)=[exp(-7.09)·exp-2903.81T-1293.55] with a total uncertainty (95% confidence limit) of ± 1.7%. We present an isotropic diffusion MRI phantom, together with its temperature calibration curve, that is easy-to-use in a clinical environment, cost-effective, reproducible to produce, and that contains no harmful substances. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Comparison of two electromagnetic navigation systems for CT-guided punctures. A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putzer, D.; Arco, D.; Schamberger, B.; Schanda, F.; Mahlknecht, J.; Widmann, G.; Schullian, P.; Jaschke, W.; Bale, R. [Innsbruck Medical University (Austria). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-05-15

    We compared the targeting accuracy and reliability of two different electromagnetic navigation systems for manually guided punctures in a phantom. CT data sets of a gelatin filled plexiglass phantom were acquired with 1, 3, and 5 mm slice thickness. After paired-point registration of the phantom, a total of 480 navigated stereotactic needle insertions were performed manually using electromagnetic guidance with two different navigation systems (Medtronic Stealth Station: AxiEM; Philips: PercuNav). A control CT was obtained to measure the target positioning error between the planned and actual needle trajectory. Using the Philips PercuNav, the accomplished Euclidean distances were 4.42 ± 1.33 mm, 4.26 ± 1.32 mm, and 4.46 ± 1.56 mm at a slice thickness of 1, 3, and 5 mm, respectively. The mean lateral positional errors were 3.84 ± 1.59 mm, 3.84 ± 1.43 mm, and 3.81 ± 1.71 mm, respectively. Using the Medtronic Stealth Station AxiEM, the Euclidean distances were 3.86 ± 2.28 mm, 3.74 ± 2.1 mm, and 4.81 ± 2.07 mm at a slice thickness of 1, 3, and 5 mm, respectively. The mean lateral positional errors were 3.29 ± 1.52 mm, 3.16 ± 1.52 mm, and 3.93 ± 1.68 mm, respectively. Both electromagnetic navigation devices showed excellent results regarding puncture accuracy in a phantom model. The Medtronic Stealth Station AxiEM provided more accurate results in comparison to the Philips PercuNav for CT with 3 mm slice thickness. One potential benefit of electromagnetic navigation devices is the absence of visual contact between the instrument and the sensor system. Due to possible interference with metal objects, incorrect position sensing may occur. In contrast to the phantom study, patient movement including respiration has to be compensated for in the clinical setting.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of adult and pediatric computed tomography exams: Validation studies of organ doses with physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Daniel J.; Lee, Choonsik; Tien, Christopher; Fisher, Ryan; Hoerner, Matthew R.; Hintenlang, David; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and a 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT

  18. Can nontriggered thoracic CT be used for coronary artery calcium scoring? A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xueqian [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700RB Groningen, The Netherlands and Center for Medical Imaging – North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Greuter, Marcel J. W. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Groen, Jaap M. [Department of Radiology, Zaans Medical Center, 1500EE Zaandam (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [Center for Medical Imaging – North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, University of Utrecht, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700RB Groningen, The Netherlands and Center for Medical Imaging – North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Coronary artery calcium score, traditionally based on electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered computed tomography (CT), predicts cardiovascular risk. However, nontriggered CT is extensively utilized. The study-purpose is to evaluate the in vitro agreement in coronary calcium score between nontriggered thoracic CT and ECG-triggered cardiac CT.Methods: Three artificial coronary arteries containing calcifications of different densities (high, medium, and low), and sizes (large, medium, and small), were studied in a moving cardiac phantom. Two 64-detector CT systems were used. The phantom moved at 0–90 mm/s in nontriggered low-dose CT as index test, and at 0–30 mm/s in ECG-triggered CT as reference. Differences in calcium scores between nontriggered and ECG-triggered CT were analyzed by t-test and 95% confidence interval. The sensitivity to detect calcification was calculated as the percentage of positive calcium scores.Results: Overall, calcium scores in nontriggered CT were not significantly different to those in ECG-triggered CT (p > 0.05). Calcium scores in nontriggered CT were within the 95% confidence interval of calcium scores in ECG-triggered CT, except predominantly at higher velocities (≥50 mm/s) for the high-density and large-size calcifications. The sensitivity for a nonzero calcium score was 100% for large calcifications, but 46%± 11% for small calcifications in nontriggered CT.Conclusions: When performing multiple measurements, good agreement in positive calcium scores is found between nontriggered thoracic and ECG-triggered cardiac CT. Agreement decreases with increasing coronary velocity. From this phantom study, it can be concluded that a high calcium score can be detected by nontriggered CT, and thus, that nontriggered CT likely can identify individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, a zero calcium score in nontriggered CT does not reliably exclude coronary calcification.

  19. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    Despite the complexity of biologic tissues, a monoexponential behaviour is usually assumed when estimating relaxation processes in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to evaluate the potential of biexponential decomposition of T1 and T2 relaxation curves obtained at 1.......5 tesla (T). Measurements were performed on a phantom of bicompartmental perspex boxes with combinations of different CuSO4 concentrations. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination was provided by a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...

  20. Experimental study on blood flow patterns through the phantoms of the intracranial arterial aneurysms using color Doppler imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Jeong, Eun Kee; Rhim, Yoon Chul; Kim, Sung Bin; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dae In

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence, growth, thrombosis, and rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms can be directly related to the effect of hemodynamic forces. We developed the phantom flow models and compared with the computer simulation program to analyse the flow pattern and hemodynamics that might be responsible for the intracranial arterial aneurysms. We designed the arterial phantoms of three major sites of intracranial arterial aneurysm ; 1) basilar artery tip, 2) internal carotid artery bifurcation, 3) curved area of internal carotid artery. Flow patterns in the aneurysmal portion of phantoms were evaluated with color Doppler system on the connection with automatic closed type of circulation system. Then, we compared the results with computer simulation. The hemodynamic characteristics of the phantoms were identical with those obtained by computerisation's. Three distinct zones of flow were identified by color Doppler studies on the aneurysm of the curved area of an internal carotid artery : 1) an inflow zone entering the aneurysm at the distal aspect of its orifice, 2) an outflow zone exiting the aneurysm at the proximal aspect of its orifice, 3) a central slow vortex.However, the phantoms of basilar artery tip and artery bifurcation showed a direct inflow stream at the dome of an aneurysm. Flow dynamics in the various phantoms of the aneurysms can be successfully evaluated with color Doppler imaging, and were consistent with those predicted by computer simulations

  1. Options for radiation dose optimisation in pelvic digital radiography: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning-Stanley, Anthony S.; Ward, Anthony J.; England, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of phantom orientation and AEC chamber selection on radiation dose and image quality (IQ) for digital radiography (DR) examinations of the pelvis. Methods: A phantom study was conducted using a DR detector, utilising all AEC chamber combinations. Current recommended orientation (Cr-AEC) was with the outer AEC chambers cranially orientated. mAs (given), source-to-skin distance and kV p data facilitated entrance surface dose and effective dose calculations. Six anatomical areas were blindly graded by two observers (3-point scale) for IQ. Statistical differences in radiation dose were determined using the paired Student’s t-test. IQ data was analysed for inter-observer variability (ICC) and statistical differences (Wilcoxon test). Results: Switching phantom orientation (caudally orientated outer AEC chambers: Ca-AEC) reduced mean radiation dose by 36.8%, (p < 0.001). A minor reduction in median IQ (15.5 vs. 15) was seen (p < 0.001). One Ca-AEC orientated image (1.6%) had all anatomical areas graded ‘inadequate’ by at least one observer; all other images were considered ‘adequate’ for all areas. In the Ca-AEC orientation, at least a 44% dose reduction was achievable (p < 0.001) when only the outer AEC chambers were used. In the Cr-AEC orientation, at least 11% dose reduction was achieved (p < 0.001); here the central chamber was used alone, or in combination. IQ scores fell, but remained ‘adequate’. Conclusion: Switching pelvic orientation relative to AEC chamber position can optimise radiation dose during pelvic radiography. AEC chamber position should be clearly marked on equipment to facilitate this. AEC selection should be an active process.

  2. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara; Krauss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [de

  3. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 16, 2014. Phantom pain Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  4. Radiofrequency ablation: importance of background tissue electrical conductivity--an agar phantom and computer modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzo, Stephanie A; Liu, Zhengjun; Lobo, S Melvyn; Ahmed, Muneeb; Hines-Peralta, Andrew U; Lenkinski, Robert E; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2005-08-01

    To determine whether radiofrequency (RF)-induced heating can be correlated with background electrical conductivity in a controlled experimental phantom environment mimicking different background tissue electrical conductivities and to determine the potential electrical and physical basis for such a correlation by using computer modeling. The effect of background tissue electrical conductivity on RF-induced heating was studied in a controlled system of 80 two-compartment agar phantoms (with inner wells of 0.3%, 1.0%, or 36.0% NaCl) with background conductivity that varied from 0.6% to 5.0% NaCl. Mathematical modeling of the relationship between electrical conductivity and temperatures 2 cm from the electrode (T2cm) was performed. Next, computer simulation of RF heating by using two-dimensional finite-element analysis (ETherm) was performed with parameters selected to approximate the agar phantoms. Resultant heating, in terms of both the T2cm and the distance of defined thermal isotherms from the electrode surface, was calculated and compared with the phantom data. Additionally, electrical and thermal profiles were determined by using the computer modeling data and correlated by using linear regression analysis. For each inner compartment NaCl concentration, a negative exponential relationship was established between increased background NaCl concentration and the T2cm (R2= 0.64-0.78). Similar negative exponential relationships (r2 > 0.97%) were observed for the computer modeling. Correlation values (R2) between the computer and experimental data were 0.9, 0.9, and 0.55 for the 0.3%, 1.0%, and 36.0% inner NaCl concentrations, respectively. Plotting of the electrical field generated around the RF electrode identified the potential for a dramatic local change in electrical field distribution (ie, a second electrical peak ["E-peak"]) occurring at the interface between the two compartments of varied electrical background conductivity. Linear correlations between the E

  5. New weighting factor of weighted CTDI equation for PMMA phantom diameter from 8 to 40 cm: A Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2017-12-01

    The weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI w ) uses measured CTDI values at the center and periphery of a cylindrical phantom. The CTDI w value is calculated using conventional, Bakalyar's, and Choi's weighting factors. However, these weighting factors were produced from only 16- and 32-cm-diameter cylindrical phantoms. This study aims to devise new weighting factors to provide more accurate average dose in the central cross-sectional plane of cylindrical phantoms over a wide range of object diameters, by using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed by modeling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute the cross-sectional dose profiles of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylindrical phantoms of each diameter (8-40 cm at 4-cm steps), for various tube voltages and longitudinal beam widths. Two phantom models were simulated, corresponding to the CTDI 100 method and the method recommended by American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 111. The dose-computation PMMA cylinders of 1 mm diameter were located between the phantom surfaces and the centers at intervals of 1 mm, from which cross-sectional dose profiles were calculated. By using linear least-squares fits to the obtained cross-sectional dose profiles data, we determined new weighting factors to estimate more accurate average doses in the PMMA cylindrical phantoms by using the CTDI w equation: CTDI w = W center ・ CTDI center + W periphery ・ CTDI periphery . In order to demonstrate the validity of the devised new weighting factors, the percentage difference between average dose and CTDI w value was evaluated for the weighting factors (conventional, Bakalyar's, Choi's, and devised new weighting factors) in each calculated cross-sectional dose profile. With the use of linear least-squares techniques, new weighting factors (W center = 3/8 and W periphery = 5/8 where W center and W periphery are weighting factors for CTDI center and CTDI periphery ) were

  6. Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors in clinical photon beams using liquid water and PMMA phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, Luciana C., E-mail: lmatsushima@ipen.br [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Veneziani, Glauco R. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sakuraba, Roberto K. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Jose C. da [Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was the dosimetric evaluation of thermoluminescent detectors of calcium sulphate doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) produced by IPEN compared to the TL response of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg,Ti) dosimeters and microdosimeters produced by Harshaw Chemical Company to clinical photon beams dosimetry (6 and 15 MV) using liquid water and PMMA phantoms. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg,Ti and {mu}LiF:Mg,Ti. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clinical (6 and 15 MV) photon beams dosimetry using liquid water and PMMA phantom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear behavior to the dose range (0.1 to 5 Gy). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL response reproducibility better than {+-}4.34%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaSO{sub 4}:Dy represent a cheaper alternative to the TLD-100.

  7. Trajectory of phantom limb pain relief using mirror therapy: Retrospective analysis of two studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Sarah C; Curran, Sean; Chan, Annie W Y; Finn, Sacha B; Baker, Chris I; Pasquina, Paul F; Tsao, Jack W

    2017-04-01

    Research indicates that mirror therapy reduces phantom limb pain (PLP). Objectives were to determine when mirror therapy works in those who respond to treatment, the relevance of baseline PLP to when pain relief occurs, and what pain symptoms respond to mirror therapy. Data from two independent cohorts with unilateral lower limb amputation were analyzed for this study (n=33). Mirror therapy consisted of 15-min sessions in which amputees performed synchronous movements of the phantom and intact legs/feet. PLP was measured using a visual analogue scale and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. The severity of PLP at the beginning of treatment predicted when pain relief occurred. Those with low baseline PLP experienced a reduction (ppain relief by session 14 of treatment, and those with high baseline PLP experienced pain relief by session 21 of treatment. Mirror therapy reduced throbbing, shooting, stabbing, sharp, cramping, aching, tender, splitting, tiring/exhausting, and punishing-cruel pain symptoms. The degree of PLP at baseline predicts when mirror therapy relieves pain. This article indicates that the degree of baseline PLP affects when mirror therapy relieves pain: relief occurs by session 7 in patients with low PLP but by session 21 in patients with high PLP. Clinicians should anticipate slower pain relief in patients who begin treatment with high levels of pain. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers:NCT00623818 and NCT00662415. Copyright © 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. All rights reserved.

  8. Phantom and animal imaging studies using PLS synchrotron X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Hee Joung Kim; Kyu Ho Lee; Hai Jo Jung; Eun Kyung Kim; Jung Ho Je; In Woo Kim; Yeukuang, Hwu; Wen Li Tsai; Je Kyung Seong; Seung Won Lee; Hyung Sik Yoo

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-high resolution radiographs can be obtained using synchrotron X-rays. A collaboration team consisting of K-JIST, POSTECH and YUMC has recently commissioned a new beamline (5C1) at Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea for medical applications using phase contrast radiology. Relatively simple image acquisition systems were set up on 5C1 beamline, and imaging studies were performed for resolution test patterns, mammographic phantom, and animals. Resolution test patterns and mammographic phantom images showed much better image resolution and quality with the 5C1 imaging system than the mammography system. Both fish and mouse images with 5C1 imaging system also showed much better image resolution with great details of organs and anatomy compared to those obtained with a conventional mammography system. A simple and inexpensive ultra-high resolution imaging system on 5C1 beamline was successfully implemented. The authors were able to acquire ultra-high resolution images for, resolution test patterns, mammograph...

  9. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara [Regensburg University Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany); Krauss, Andreas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [German] Metallische Implantate verursachen streifenfoermige Artefakte in CT-Bildern, welche die Dosisberechnung beeinflussen. In dieser Studie soll der Nutzen des iterativen Metall-Artefakt-Reduktions-Algorithmus iMAR hinsichtlich der Wiedergabetreue von Hounsfield-Werten (HU) und der Genauigkeit von Dosisberechnungen untersucht werden. Es wurden heterogene Phantome aus verschiedenen Arten gewebeaequivalenten Materials mit

  10. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient—a hybrid computational phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S. Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-03-01

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values—absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue—are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms—were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for

  11. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A G M; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Hansen, Hendrik H G; De Korte, Chris L; Milkowski, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s −1 ) and by three protocols: Go–Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go–Return (similar to Go–Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go–Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNR e and SNR e ) than Go–Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go–Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go–Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to

  12. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...... scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1–89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain. Conclusions: Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain...

  13. Accuracy of visual scoring and semi-quantification of ultrasound strain elastography--a phantom study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Frederik Carlsen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of strain elastography in an elasticity phantom and to assess which factors influenced visual scoring, strain histograms and strain ratios. Furthermore this study aimed to evaluate the effect of observer experience on visual scorings.Two operators examined 20 targets of various stiffness and size (16.7 to 2.5 mm in an elasticity phantom at a depth of 3.5 cm with a 5-18 MHz transducer. Two pre-settings were used yielding 80 scans. Eight evaluators, four experienced, four inexperienced, performed visual scorings. Cut-offs for semi-quantitative methods were established for prediction of target stiffness. Data was pooled in two categories allowing calculations of sensitivity and specificity. Statistical tests chi-square test and linear regression as relevant.Strain ratios and strain histograms were superior to visual scorings of both experienced and inexperienced observers (p = 0.025, strain histograms vs. experienced observers, p<0.001, strain histograms vs. inexperienced observers, p = 0.044 strain ratios vs. experienced observers and p = 0.002 strain ratios vs. inexperienced observers. No significant difference in predicting target stiffness between strain ratios and strain histograms (p = 0.83 nor between experienced and inexperienced observers (p = 0.054 was shown when using four categories. When pooling data in two groups (80 kPa/45 kPa vs. 14/8 kPa the difference between the observers became significant (p<0.001. Target size had a significant influence on strain ratios measurements (p = 0.017 and on visual scorings (p<0.001 but not on the strain histograms(p = 0.358. Observer experience had significant effect on visual scorings(p = 0.003.Strain ratios and strain histograms are superior to visual scoring in assessing target stiffness in a phantom. Target size had a significant impact on strain ratios and visual scoring, but not on strain histograms

  14. Simulated increased soft tissue thickness artefactually decreases trabecular bone score: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amnuaywattakorn, Sasithorn; Sritara, Chanika; Utamakul, Chirawat; Chamroonrat, Wichana; Kositwattanarerk, Arpakorn; Thamnirat, Kanungnij; Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong

    2016-01-13

    Trabecular bone score (TBS), which has been proposed to be used in complementary with bone mineral density (BMD) to improve the assessment of fracture risk, is negatively associated with body mass index (BMI). The effect of soft tissue, which is expected to be thicker in subjects with high BMI, on TBS was studied using three scan types: Hologic with fast array mode (Hfa), Hologic with high definition mode (Hhd), and GE-Lunar iDXA. A spine phantom provided by Hologic for routine quality control procedure was scanned using three scan types: Hfa, Hhd, and iDXA. The phantom was scanned with an overlying soft tissue equivalent material (bolus used in radiotherapy) of 0 (without), 1, 2.5, 3.5, 5 and 7.5 cm thick. For each setting, 30 acquisitions were performed in the same way as for the quality control procedure. TBS was calculated using TBS iNsight® software version 2.1 on the same regions of interest as those used for lumbar spine BMD. Mean ± SD TBS of the phantom (without overlying soft tissue) were 1.379 ± 0.018, 1.430 ± 0.009, and 1.423 ± 0.005 using Hfa, Hhd, and iDXA, respectively. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA showed that there were statistically differences in TBS due to different thicknesses of soft tissue equivalent materials for all three scan types (p < 0.001). A Tukey post-hoc test revealed that the decrease in TBS was statistically significant (p < 0.001) when the soft tissue thickness was 1 cm (-0.0246 ± 0.0044, -0.0319 ± 0.0036, and -0.0552 ± 0.0015 for Hfa, Hhd, and iDXA, respectively). Although to a lesser degree, the effects were also statistically significant for BMD (p < 0.05): an increase for Hfa and Hhd but a decrease for iDXA. However, these changes did not exceed the least significant change (LSC) derived from patients. Increased soft tissue thickness results in lower TBS value. Although BMD is also affected, it is unlikely to pose a clinical problem because the change is unlikely to exceed

  15. Investigations of interference between electromagnetic transponders and wireless MOSFET dosimeters: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhong; Zhang, Lisha; Ramakrishnan, V; Hagan, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell

    2011-05-01

    .5 mm. For hypothesis 2, analysis of variance indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between the dosimeter readings with and without the presence of transponders. Both orthogonal and parallel configurations had difference of polynomial-fit dose to measured dose values within 1.75%. The phantom study indicated that the Calypso System's localization accuracy was not affected clinically due to the presence of DVS wireless MOSFET dosimeters and the dosimeter-measured doses were not affected by the presence of transponders. Thus, the same patients could be implanted with both transponders and dosimeters to benefit from improved accuracy of radiotherapy treatments offered by conjunctional use of the two systems.

  16. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, X John

    2016-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to characterize image quality and dose performance with GE CT iterative reconstruction techniques, adaptive statistical iterative recontruction (ASiR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), over a range of typical to low-dose intervals using the Catphan 600 and the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantoms. The scope of the project was to quantitatively describe the advantages and limitations of these approaches. The Catphan 600 phantom, supplemented with a fat-equivalent oval ring, was scanned using a GE Discovery HD750 scanner at 120 kVp, 0.8 s rotation time, and pitch factors of 0.516, 0.984, and 1.375. The mA was selected for each pitch factor to achieve CTDIvol values of 24, 18, 12, 6, 3, 2, and 1 mGy. Images were reconstructed at 2.5 mm thickness with filtered back-projection (FBP); 20%, 40%, and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. The potential for dose reduction and low-contrast detectability were evaluated from noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements in the CTP 404 module of the Catphan. Hounsfield units (HUs) of several materials were evaluated from the cylinder inserts in the CTP 404 module, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated from the air insert. The results were con-firmed in the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantom at 6, 3, 2, and 1mGy. MBIR reduced noise levels five-fold and increased CNR by a factor of five compared to FBP below 6mGy CTDIvol, resulting in a substantial improvement in image quality. Compared to ASiR and FBP, HU in images reconstructed with MBIR were consistently lower, and this discrepancy was reversed by higher pitch factors in some materials. MBIR improved the conspicuity of the high-contrast spatial resolution bar pattern, and MTF quantification confirmed the superior spatial resolution performance of MBIR versus FBP and ASiR at higher dose levels. While ASiR and FBP were relatively insensitive to changes in dose and pitch, the spatial resolution for MBIR

  17. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Diffusion MR imaging with PSIF and SPLICE. Experiences in phantom studies and the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikoshi, Masato; Ueda, Takashi; Kaji, Yasushi

    2001-01-01

    Studies have shown that diffusion MR imaging is a reliable method for the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases, especially acute cerebral infarction. Although echo planar imaging (EPI) is a promising tool for that purpose, it is vulnerable to susceptibility artifacts that are responsible for image distortion or signal loss. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion MR imaging with PSIF (reversed fast imaging SSFP) and split acquisition of fast-spin-echo signals for diffusion imaging (SPLICE) in the central nervous system (CNS). First, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the phantoms. Each phantom, including acetone, acetic acid, and water, was analyzed for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) based on SPLICE and for diffusion-related coefficient (DRC) based on PSIF. The ADCs based on SPLICE were 4.36±0.89 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, 1.25±0.04 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, and 2.35±0.04 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, and the DRCs based on PSIF were 0.353±0.25, 0.178±0.07, and 0.273±0.018 for acetone, acetic acid, and water, respectively. These calculated ADCs based on SPLICE were well correlated with known diffusion coefficients, showing a correlation coefficient of 0.995. Second, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the CNS. The advantage of PSIF and SPLICE was that susceptibility artifacts were reduced in the images of spinal cord and brain stem. PSIF was especially useful for diffusion MR imaging in the spinal cord. The disadvantage of SPLICE was the decreased SN ratio. We conclude that PSIF or SPLICE may be helpful when EPI diffusion MR imaging is insufficient. (author)

  19. The Effects of Metal on Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) in CT: A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, Maram M.

    Over the past number of years there has been a significant increase in the awareness of radiation dose from use of computed tomography (CT). Efforts have been made to reduce radiation dose from CT and to better quantify dose being delivered. However, unfortunately, these dose metrics such as CTDI vol are not a specific patient dose. In 2011, the size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) was introduced by AAPM TG-204 which accounts for the physical size of the patient. However, the approach presented in TG-204 ignores the importance of the attenuation differences in the body. In 2014, a newer methodology that accounted for tissue attenuation was introduced by the AAPM TG-220 based on the concept of water equivalent diameter, Dw. One of the limitation of TG-220 is that there is no estimation of the dose while highly attenuating objects such as metal is present in the body. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the accuracy of size-specific dose estimates in CT in the presence of simulated metal prostheses using a conventional PMMA CTDI phantom at different phantom diameter (body and head) and beam energy. Titanium, Cobalt- chromium and stainless steel alloys rods were used in the study. Two approaches were used as introduced by AAPM TG-204 and 220 utilizing the effective diameter and the Dw calculations. From these calculations, conversion factors have been derived that could be applied to the measured CTDIvol to convert it to specific patient dose, or size specific dose estimate, (SSDE). Radiation dose in tissue (f-factor = 0.94) was measured at various chamber positions with the presence of metal. Following, an average weighted tissue dose (AWTD) was calculated in a manner similar to the weighted CTDI (CTDIw). In general, for the 32 cm body phantom SSDE220 provided more accurate estimates of AWTD than did SSDE204. For smaller patient size, represented by the 16 cm head phantom, the SSDE204 was a more accurate estimate of AWTD that that of SSDE220. However, as the

  20. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  1. Virtual endoscopy of the small bowel: phantom study and preliminary clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogalla, P.; Werner-Rustner, M.; Meiri, N.; Hamm, B.; Huitema, A.; van Est, A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scanning technique for lesion detection in a small bowel phantom and to evaluate the virtual endoscopy (VE) technique in patients. A small bowel phantom with a fold thickness of 7 mm and length of 115 cm was prepared with nine round lesions (3 x 1 mm, 2 x 2 mm, 2 x 3 mm, 2 x 4 mm). Spiral CT parameters were 7/7/4, 3/5/2, 3/5/1, 1.5/3/1 (slice thickness/table feed/reconstruction interval). VE was done using volume rendering technique with 1 cm distance between images and 120 viewing angle. Two masked readers were asked to determine the number and location of the lesions. Seven patients underwent an abdominal CT during one breathhold after placement of a duodenal tube and filling of the small bowel with methyl cellulose contrast solution. VE images were compared with the axial slices with respect to detectability of pathology. With the 7/7/4 protocol only the 4-mm lesions were visualised with fuzzy contours. The 3/5/2 protocol showed both 4-mm lesions, one 3-mm lesion and one false positive lesion. The 3/5/1 protocol showed both 4-mm and both 3-mm (one uncertain) lesions with improved sharpness, and no false positive lesions. One 2-mm and one 1-mm lesion were additionally seen with the 1.5/3/1 protocol. Path definition was difficult in sharp turns or kinks in the lumen. In all patients, no difference was found between VE and axial slices for bowel pathology; however, axial slices showed 'outside' information that was not included in VE. We conclude that the 3/5/2 protocol may be regarded as an optimal compromise between lesion detection, coverage during one breathhold, and number of reconstructed images in patients; round lesions of 4 mm in diameter can be detected with high certainty. (orig.)

  2. Radiation dose and cancer risk from pediatric CT examinations on 64-slice CT: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi-Ting; Law, Martin Wai-Ming; Huang, Bingsheng; Ng, Sherry; Li, Zi-Ping; Meng, Quan-Fei; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2010-11-01

    To measure the radiation dose from CT scans in an anthropomorphic phantom using a 64-slice MDCT, and to estimate the associated cancer risk. Organ doses were measured with a 5-year-old phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Four protocols; head CT, thorax CT, abdomen CT and pelvis CT were studied. Cancer risks, in the form of lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence, were estimated by linear extrapolation using the organ radiation doses and the LAR data. The effective doses for head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis CT, were 0.7mSv, 3.5mSv, 3.0mSv, 1.3mSv respectively. The organs with the highest dose were; for head CT, salivary gland (22.33mGy); for thorax CT, breast (7.89mGy); for abdomen CT, colon (6.62mGy); for pelvis CT, bladder (4.28mGy). The corresponding LARs for boys and girls were 0.015-0.053% and 0.034-0.155% respectively. The organs with highest LARs were; for head CT, thyroid gland (0.003% for boys, 0.015% for girls); for thorax CT, lung for boys (0.014%) and breast for girls (0.069%); for abdomen CT, colon for boys (0.017%) and lung for girls (0.016%); for pelvis CT, bladder for both boys and girls (0.008%). The effective doses from these common pediatric CT examinations ranged from 0.7mSv to 3.5mSv and the associated lifetime cancer risks were found to be up to 0.16%, with some organs of higher radiosensitivity including breast, thyroid gland, colon and lungs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Accuracy of bone mineral density quantification using dual-layer spectral detector CT: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamersvelt, Robbert W. van; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Harder, Annemarie M. den; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de; Willemink, Martin J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Engelke, Klaus [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Keizer, Bart de [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaar, Harald J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-10-15

    To investigate the accuracy of bone mineral density (BMD) quantification using dual-layer spectral detector CT (SDCT) at various scan protocols. Two validated anthropomorphic phantoms containing inserts of 50-200 mg/cm{sup 3} calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) were scanned using a 64-slice SDCT scanner at various acquisition protocols (120 and 140 kVp, and 50, 100 and 200 mAs). Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in each insert and mean attenuation profiles at monochromatic energy levels (90-200 keV) were constructed. These profiles were fitted to attenuation profiles of pure HA and water to calculate HA concentrations. For comparison, one phantom was scanned using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). At both 120 and 140 kVp, excellent correlations (R = 0.97, P < 0.001) were found between true and measured HA concentrations. Mean error for all measurements at 120 kVp was -5.6 ± 5.7 mg/cm{sup 3} (-3.6 ± 3.2%) and at 140 kVp -2.4 ± 3.7 mg/cm{sup 3} (-0.8 ± 2.8%). Mean measurement errors were smaller than 6% for all acquisition protocols. Strong linear correlations (R{sup 2} ≥ 0.970, P < 0.001) with DXA were found. SDCT allows for accurate BMD quantification and potentially opens up the possibility for osteoporosis evaluation and opportunistic screening in patients undergoing SDCT for other clinical indications. However, patient studies are needed to extend and translate our findings. (orig.)

  4. Realistic aortic phantom to study hemodynamics using MRI and cardiac catheterization in normal and aortic coarctation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Jesús; Sotelo, Julio A; Springmüller, Daniel; Montalba, Cristian; Letelier, Karis; Tejos, Cristián; Irarrázaval, Pablo; Andia, Marcelo E; Razavi, Reza; Valverde, Israel; Uribe, Sergio A

    2016-09-01

    To design and characterize a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible aortic phantom simulating normal and aortic coarctation (AoCo) conditions and to compare its hemodynamics with healthy volunteers and AoCo patients. The phantom is composed of an MRI-compatible pump, control unit, aortic model, compliance chamber, nonreturn, and shutoff valves. The phantom without and with AoCo (13, 11, and 9 mm) was studied using 2D and 3D phase-contrast data and with a catheterization unit to measure pressures. The phantom data were compared with the mean values of 10 healthy volunteers and two AoCo patients. Hemodynamic parameters in the normal phantom and healthy volunteers were: heart rate: 68/61 bpm, cardiac output: 3.5/4.5 L/min, peak flow and peak velocity (Vpeak) in the ascending aorta (AAo): 270/357 mL/s (significantly, P phantom of 131/58 mmHg. Hemodynamic parameters in the 13, 11, and 9 mm coarctation phantoms and Patients 1 and 2 were: heart rate: 75/75/75/97/78 bpm, cardiac output: 3.3/3.0/2.9/4.0/5.8 L/min, peak flow in the AAo: 245/265/215/244/376 mL/s, Vpeak in the AAo: 96/95/81/196/187 cm/s, Vpeak after the AoCo: 123/187/282/247/165 cm/s, pressure in the AAo: 124/56, 127/51, 133/50, 120/51 and 87/39 mmHg, and a trans-coarctation systolic pressure gradient: 7, 10, 30, 20, and 11 mmHg. We propose and characterize a normal and an AoCo phantom, whose hemodynamics, including velocity, flow, and pressure data are within the range of healthy volunteers and patients with AoCo. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:683-697. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. A Movable Phantom Design for Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Correction Studies on High Resolution PET Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Svarer, C.; Sibomana, M.

    2010-01-01

    , movable, mechanical PET phantom to simulate patients' head movements while being scanned. This can be used for evaluating motion correction methods. A low-cost phantom controlled by a rotary stage motor was built and tested for axial rotations of 1 degrees - 10 degrees with the multiple acquisition frame...... method. The phantom is able to perform stepwise and continuous axial rotations with submillimeter accuracy, and the movements are repeatable. The scans were acquired on the high resolution research tomograph dedicated brain scanner. The scans were reconstructed with the new 3-D ordered subset expectation...... maximization algorithm with modeling of the point spread function (3DOSEM-PSF), and they were corrected for motions based on external tracking information using the Polaris Vicra real-time stereo motion-tracking system. The new automatic, movable phantom has a robust design and is a potential quality...

  6. A Method for Manufacturing Oncological Phantoms for the Quantification of 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gallivanone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a method to manufacture oncological phantoms for quantitation purposes in 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI studies. Radioactive and diffusion materials were prepared using a mixture of agarose and sucrose radioactive gels. T2 relaxation and diffusion properties of gels at different sucrose concentrations were evaluated. Realistic oncological lesions were created using 3D-printed plastic molds filled with the gel mixture. Once solidified, gels were extracted from molds and immersed in a low-radioactivity gel simulating normal background tissue. A breast cancer phantom was manufactured using the proposed method as an exploratory feasibility study, including several realistic oncological configurations in terms of both radioactivity and diffusion. The phantom was acquired in PET with 18F-FDG, immediately after solidification, and in DW-MRI the following day. Functional volumes characterizing the simulated BC lesions were segmented from PET and DW-MRI images. Measured radioactive uptake and ADC values were compared with gold standards. Phantom preparation was straightforward, and the time schedule was compatible with both PET and MRI measurements. Lesions appeared on 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI images as expected, without visible artifacts. Lesion functional parameters revealed the phantom’s potential for validating quantification methods, in particular for new generation hybrid PET-MRI systems.

  7. Investigating the limit of detectability of a positron emission mammography device: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkumat, Nicholas A; Springer, Adam; Walker, Christopher M; Rohren, Eric M; Yang, Wei T; Adrada, Beatriz E; Arribas, Elsa; Carkaci, Selin; Chuang, Hubert H; Santiago, Lumarie; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-09-01

    A new positron emission mammography (PEM) device (PEM Flex Solo II, Naviscan Inc., San Diego, CA) has recently been introduced and its performance characteristics have been documented. However, no systematic assessment of its limit of detectability has been evaluated. The aim of this work is to investigate the limit of detectability of this new PEM system using a novel, customized breast phantom. Two sets of F-18 infused gelatin breast phantoms of varying thicknesses (2, 4, 6, and 8 cm) were constructed with and without (blank) small, shell-less contrast objects (2 mm thick disks) of varying diameters (3-14.5 mm) [volumes: 0.15-3.3 cc] and activity concentration to background ratio (ACR) (2.7-58). For the phantom set with contrast objects, the disks were placed centrally inside the phantoms and both phantom sets were imaged for a period of 10 min on the PEM device. In addition, scans for the 2 and 6 cm phantoms were repeated at different times (0, 90, and 150 min) post phantom construction to evaluate the impact of total activity concentration (count density) on lesion detectability. Each object from each phantom scan was then segmented and placed randomly in a corresponding blank phantom image. The resulting individual images were presented blindly to seven physician observers (two nuclear medicine and five breast imaging radiologists) and scored in a binary fashion (1-correctly identified object, 0-incorrect). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of lesion detectability were calculated and plots of sensitivity versus ACR and lesion diameters for different phantom thicknesses and count density were generated. The overall (mean) detection sensitivity across all variables was 0.68 (95% CI: [0.64, 0.72]) with a corresponding specificity of 0.93 [0.87, 0.98], and diagnostic accuracy of 0.72 [0.70, 0.75]. The smallest detectable object varied strongly as a function of ACR, as sensitivity ranged from 0.36 [0.29, 0.44] for the smallest lesion size (3 mm) to 0.80 [0

  8. Stress phase angle depicts differences in arterial stiffness: phantom and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lili; Meng, Long; Xu, Lisheng; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qiwen; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-06-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs) lining of a blood vessel wall are exposed to both the wall shear stress (WSS) of blood flow and the circumferential strain (CS) of pulsing artery wall motion. Both WSS and CS keep involved in the modulation of ECs’ biochemical response and function and the temporal phase angle between the two is called stress phase angle (SPA). Previous studies at the cellular level have indicated that SPA is highly negative at sites that are prone to atherosclerosis, and hypothesized that large SPA may contribute to atherogenesis. Till now, there is no experimental data to support this hypothesis, probably due to the lack of a proper tool for measuring WSS and CS simultaneously and real time. In this study, a non-invasive ultrasonic biomechanics method was utilized to quantitatively calculate the SPA and experimentally evaluate the role of SPA in predicting early atherosclerosis. Three silicon tubes with a stiffness of 1.15, 3.62, 9.38 MPa were assembled in a pulsatile flow circuit and the values of SPA were measured to be -101.86 ± 3.65°,-170.19 ± 17.77° and -260.63 ± 18.62°, respectively. For the PVA-c phantoms, stiffness was 162.45, 235.68 and 374.24 kPa, the SPA corresponding to -170.32 ± 17.55°,-207.56 ± 10.78° and -261.08 ± 10.90°, respectively. Both phantom studies results demonstrated that SPA was highly negative in stiffer arteries. Further, experiments were taken in healthy living rats as control group (n = 3), atherosclerotic model group (n = 3), and drug treated group (n = 3), and the results showed that SPA was most negative in the model group, and SPA was least negative in the control group. Together, this study suggested that highly negative SPA appeared to be a prominent mechanical feature of vessels prone to atherosclerotic disease.

  9. Influence of cold walls on PET image quantification and volume segmentation: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthon, B.; Marshall, C.; Edwards, A.; Spezi, E.; Evans, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Commercially available fillable plastic inserts used in positron emission tomography phantoms usually have thick plastic walls, separating their content from the background activity. These “cold” walls can modify the intensity values of neighboring active regions due to the partial volume effect, resulting in errors in the estimation of standardized uptake values. Numerous papers suggest that this is an issue for phantom work simulating tumor tissue, quality control, and calibration work. This study aims to investigate the influence of the cold plastic wall thickness on the quantification of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose on the image activity recovery and on the performance of advanced automatic segmentation algorithms for the delineation of active regions delimited by plastic walls.Methods: A commercial set of six spheres of different diameters was replicated using a manufacturing technique which achieves a reduction in plastic walls thickness of up to 90%, while keeping the same internal volume. Both sets of thin- and thick-wall inserts were imaged simultaneously in a custom phantom for six different tumor-to-background ratios. Intensity values were compared in terms of mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the spheres and mean SUV of the hottest 1 ml region (SUV max , SUV mean , and SUV peak ). The recovery coefficient (RC) was also derived for each sphere. The results were compared against the values predicted by a theoretical model of the PET-intensity profiles for the same tumor-to-background ratios (TBRs), sphere sizes, and wall thicknesses. In addition, ten automatic segmentation methods, written in house, were applied to both thin- and thick-wall inserts. The contours obtained were compared to computed tomography derived gold standard (“ground truth”), using five different accuracy metrics.Results: The authors' results showed that thin-wall inserts achieved significantly higher SUV mean , SUV max , and RC values (up to 25%, 16

  10. Comparison of 3DCRT,VMAT and IMRT techniques in metastatic vertebra radiotherapy: A phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Sonay; Tunc, Sema; Kahraman, Arda; Kahraman Cetintas, Sibel; Kurt, Meral

    2017-09-01

    Vertebra metastases can be seen during the prognosis of cancer patients. Treatment ways of the metastasis are radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. Three-dimensional conformal therapy (3D-CRT) is widely used in the treatment of vertebra metastases. Also, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) are used too. The aim of this study is to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the different radiotherapy techniques. In the aspect of this goal, it is studied with a randophantom in Uludag University Medicine Faculty, Radiation Oncology Department. By using a computerized tomography image of the phantom, one 3DCRT plan, two VMAT and three IMRT plans for servical vertebra and three different 3DCRT plans, two VMAT and two IMRT plans for lomber vertebra are calculated. To calculate 3DCRT plans, CMS XiO Treatment System is used and to calculate VMAT and IMRT plans Monaco Treatment Planning System is used in the department. The study concludes with the dosimetric comparison of the treatment plans in the spect of critical organ doses, homogeneity and conformity index. As a result of this study, all critical organ doses are suitable for QUANTEC Dose Limit Report and critical organ doses depend on the techniques which used in radiotherapy. According to homogeneity and conformity indices, VMAT and IMRT plans are better than one in 3DCRT plans in servical and lomber vertebra radiotherapy plans.

  11. Comparison of image quality between mammography dedicated monitor and UHD 4K monitor, using standard mammographic phantom: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Young; Cha, Soon Joo; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Su Young; Kim, Yong Hoon; Kim, You Sung; Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Inje Unveristy Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Using standard mammographic phantom images, we compared the image quality obtained between a mammography dedicated 5 megapixel monitor (5M) and a UHD 4K (4K) monitor with digital imaging and communications in medicine display, to investigate the possibility of clinical application of 4K monitors. Three different exposures (autoexposure, overexposure and underexposure) images of mammographic phantom were obtained, and six radiologists independently evaluated the images in 5M and 4K without image modulation, by scoring of fibers, groups of specks and masses within the phantom image. The mean score of each object on both monitors was independently analyzed, using t-test and interobserver reliability by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of SPSS. The overall mean scores of fiber, group of specks, and mass in 5M were 4.25, 3.92, and 3.28 respectively, and scores obtained in 4K monitor were 3.81, 3.58, and 3.14, respectively. No statistical difference was seen in scores of fiber and mass between the two monitors at all exposure conditions, but the score of group of specks in 4K was statistically lower in the overall (p = 0.0492) and in underexposure conditions (p = 0.012). The ICC for interobserver reliability was excellent (0.874). Our study suggests that since the mammographic phantom images are appropriate with no significant difference in image quality observed between the two monitors, the 4K monitor could be used for clinical studies. Since this is a small preliminary study using phantom images, the result may differ in actual mammographic images, and subsequent investigation with clinical mammographic images is required.

  12. The potential of positron emission tomography for intratreatment dynamic lung tumor tracking: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jaewon; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Mazin, Samuel R.; Graves, Edward E.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the potential and feasibility of positron emission tomography for dynamic lung tumor tracking during radiation treatment. The authors propose a center of mass (CoM) tumor tracking algorithm using gated-PET images combined with a respiratory monitor and investigate the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Methods: The proposed PET dynamic lung tumor tracking algorithm estimated the target position information through the CoM of the segmented target volume on gated PET images reconstructed from accumulated coincidence events. The information was continuously updated throughout a scan based on the assumption that real-time processing was supported (actual processing time at each frame ≈10 s). External respiratory motion and list-mode PET data were acquired from a phantom programmed to move with measured respiratory traces (external respiratory motion and internal target motion) from human subjects, for which the ground truth target position was known as a function of time. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The measured respiratory traces consisted of two sets: (1) 1D-measured motion from ten healthy volunteers and (2) 3D-measured motion from four lung cancer patients. The authors evaluated the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm by quantifying estimation errors (Euclidean distance) between the actual motion of targets (1D-motion and 3D-motion traces) and CoM trajectories estimated by the proposed algorithm as a function of time. Results: The time-averaged error of 1D-motion traces over all trajectories of all targets was 1.6 mm. The error trajectories decreased with time as coincidence events were accumulated. The overall error trajectory of 1D-motion traces converged to within 2 mm in approximately 90 s. As expected, more accurate results were obtained for larger targets. For example, for the 37 mm target, the average error over all 1D

  13. Depth Dose Distribution Study within a Phantom Torso after Irradiation with a Simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis; Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are compounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body itself Astronauts' radiation exposures are measured by means of personal dosimetry, but there remains substantial uncertainty associated with the computational extrapolation of skin dose to organ dose, which can lead to over- or underestimation of the health risk. Comparisons of models to data showed that the astronaut's Effective dose (E) can be predicted to within about a +10% accuracy using space radiation transport models for galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and trapped radiation behind shielding. However for solar particle event (SPE) with steep energy spectra and for extra-vehicular activities on the surface of the moon where only tissue shielding is present, transport models predict that there are large differences in model assumptions in projecting organ doses. Therefore experimental verification of SPE induced organ doses may be crucial for the design of lunar missions. In the research experiment "Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso" at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL, Brookhaven, USA the large 1972 SPE spectrum was simulated using seven different proton energies from 50 up to 450 MeV. A phantom torso constructed of natural bones and realistic distributions of human tissue equivalent materials, which is comparable to the torso of the MATROSHKA phantom currently on the ISS, was equipped with a comprehensive set of thermoluminescence detectors and human cells. The detectors are applied to assess the depth dose distribution and radiation transport codes (e.g. GEANT4) are used to assess the radiation field and interactions of the radiation field

  14. Phantom movements from physiologically inappropriate muscles: A case study with a high transhumeral amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Julie; Hugosdottir, Rosa; Kamavuako, Ernest N

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with high-level amputation have a great need for functional prostheses because of their vast functional deficits. Conventional techniques are considered inappropriate for high-level amputees due to the lack of physiologically appropriate muscles. This study investigates how accurate phantom movements (PMs) can be classified from physiologically inappropriate muscles. The study involves a case study of a 42-year-old transhumeral amputee. Suitable PMs and best electrode configuration were identified using the sequential forward selection method and brute-force technique. Using linear discriminant analysis, the best PMs (elbow extension/flexion, wrist supination/pronation) and rest were classified with error ranging from 3% to 0.18% when using 3 to 8 EMG channels respectively. A completion rate of 93 % was obtained during a targeted achievement control test in a virtual reality environment. This case indicates that a proximal transhumeral amputee can generate muscle activation patterns related to distinct PMs; and these PMs can be decoded from physiologically inappropriate muscles.

  15. CT tube current for attenuation map in a combined PET/CT system. Obese patient simulated phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaki, Akio; Matsutomo, Norikazu; Onoguchi, Masahisa

    2012-01-01

    The CT portion of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT provides attenuation correction of the PET emission scan. This study was performed to evaluate how much the CT tube current can be lowered while still providing attenuation maps on PET images. Two body phantoms (outside diameters of 300 and 500 mm) were used to investigate, and PET/CT acquisitions were performed with an Aquiduo PCA-7000B (Toshiba Medical Systems, Otawara, Japan). The CT scan was performed with the following parameters (120 kVp; 0.5-s rotation; 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, 200, 320, 460 mA). After the CT scan, PET images for 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) (5.3 kBq/mL) were obtained for 4 min/bed position. The linear attenuation coefficients for 18 F-FDG in 300- and 500-mm phantoms, pixel values and SD of CT images, radioactivity concentration values and hot- and cold-sphere contrast on PET images in the 500-mm phantom were evaluated. In the 300-mm phantom, all eight tube currents gave average linear attenuation coefficients of approximately 0.095 cm -1 . In contrast, the average linear attenuation coefficients of the 500-mm phantom at 10, 20, and 40 mA were significantly decreased (0.081, 0.087, and 0.092 cm -1 , respectively; p -1 of the other tube currents. Further, CT pixel values decreased 10 and 20 mA. Thus, the background radioactivity concentration values at 10 and 20 mA were substantially underestimated to be 57 and 80%, respectively (p<0.05); the hot-sphere contrast values at 10 and 20 mA were 0.26 and 0.29; the cold-sphere contrast values at 10, 20, and 40 mA were -0.33, -0.16, and 0.08. Although the linear attenuation coefficients in the 300-mm phantom remained the same with varying CT tube currents, the 500-mm phantom yielded significant differences in the range 10-40 mA. Therefore, the CT tube currents for attenuation correction should be adjusted over 40 mA in obese patients. (author)

  16. Nanoparticle-mediated radiofrequency capacitive hyperthermia: A phantom study with magnetic resonance thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Soo; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2015-01-01

    In hyperthermia, focusing heat generation on tumour tissues and precisely monitoring the temperature around the tumour region is important. To focus heat generation in radiofrequency (RF) capacitive heating, magnetic nanoparticles suspended in sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) solution were used, based on the hypothesis that the nanoparticle suspension would elevate electrical conductivity and RF current density at the nanoparticle-populated region. A tissue-mimicking phantom with compartments with and without nanoparticles was made for RF capacitive heating experiments. An FDTD model of the phantom was developed to simulate temperature increases at the phantom. To monitor temperature inside the phantom, MR thermometry was performed intermittently during RF heating inside a 3Tesla MRI magnet bore. FDTD simulation on the phantom model was performed in two steps: electromagnetic simulation to compute specific absorption rate and thermal simulation to compute temperature changes. Experimental temperature maps were similar to simulated temperature maps, demonstrating that nanoparticle-populated regions drew more heat than background regions. Nanoparticle-mediated RF heating could mitigate concerns about normal tissue death during RF capacitive hyperthermia.

  17. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  18. Evaluation of radiation dose in pediatric head CT examination: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhasrina Nik Din, Nik; Zainon, Rafidah; Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose in pediatric head Computed Tomography examination. It was reported that decreasing tube voltage in CT examination can reduce the dose to patients significantly. A head phantom was scanned with dual-energy CT at 80 kV and 120 kV. The tube current was set using automatic exposure control mode and manual setting. The pitch was adjusted to 1.4, 1.45 and 1.5 while the slice thickness was set at 5 mm. The dose was measured based on CT Dose Index (CTDI). Results from this study have shown that the image noise increases substantially with low tube voltage. The average dose was 2.60 mGy at CT imaging parameters of 80 kV and 10 - 30 mAs. The dose increases up to 17.19 mGy when the CT tube voltage increases to 120 kV. With the reduction of tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV, the radiation dose can be reduced by 12.1% to 15.1% without degradation of contrast-to-noise ratio.

  19. Real-time compounding of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic volumes: the phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Gang; Reddy, Kiran; Ma, Yingliang; Rhode, Kawal S

    2009-01-01

    3D ultrasound has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a low cost, mobile and real-time imaging modality for interventional cardiac applications. However, the low image quality and small field of view have been two major barriers preventing 3D ultrasound from being widely accepted as a solution to the guidance of cardiac interventions. By using the 3D transesophageal echographic (TEE) probe, it is possible to acquire images with better quality compared to the images acquired from traditional transthoracic probe (TTE). However, the 3D TEE volume has even smaller field of view and is insufficient to cover the whole geometry of the heart. Previously, we have developed a technique to compound 3D TTE volumes in real-time. In this study, we extend this technique to compound 3D TEE volumes by using an electromagnetic tracking system. In this pilot study, two different types of phantoms were used to evaluate our technique. The results suggest our method is accurate and efficient. The compounding error is approximately 2.5mm.

  20. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis-Najera, S. E., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx; Neria-Pérez, J. A., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx; Medina, L., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Garipov, R., E-mail: ruslan.garipov@mrsolutions.co.uk [MR Solutions Ltd, Surrey (United Kingdom); Rodríguez, A. O., E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento Ingeniería Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, México, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  1. Dual-energy CT iodine overlay technique for characterization of renal masses as cyst or solid: a phantom feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.L.; Hartman, R.P.; Dzyubak, O.P.; Takahashi, N.; Kawashima, A.; McCollough, C.H.; Bruesewitz, M.R.; Primak, A.M.; Fletcher, J.G. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) to classify phantom renal lesions as cysts or enhancing masses. Six cylinders ranging in diameter from 0.5 to 3.0 cm were filled with distilled water or titrated iodinated contrast solutions with CT attenuation values at 120 kVp of 0 Hounsfield units (HU) for a cyst proxy or 10, 20, or 40 HU to represent enhancing masses. These were placed in a 12-cm-diameter renal phantom containing pureed beef mixed with iodinated contrast medium to simulate enhancing renal parenchyma of 100 and 250 HU and submerged within a 28-cm water bath. These combinations produced 48 individual phantom renal lesions of differing sizes, internal and parenchymal enhancement (12 cysts and 36 enhancing masses). DECT using 80 and 140 kVp was performed on a dual-source CT scanner. Commercial software created a color-encoded overlay indicating the location of iodine within the phantom. The lesions were individually graded as a cyst or enhancing mass by blinded, consensus interpretation of two genitourinary radiologists. Thirty-five of 36 enhancing masses and 10/12 cysts were correctly identified, equating to a sensitivity and specificity of 97% (95% CI 84-100%) and 83% (95% CI 51-97%), respectively. All lesions of 20- and 40-HU enhancement and 92% of 10-HU lesions were identified correctly. In a phantom model, the DECT iodine overlay technique is highly sensitive in detecting enhancing renal masses. Refinement of the technique remains necessary to improve specificity. If validated in patients, this may obviate the need for unenhanced acquisitions for renal mass characterization. (orig.)

  2. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  3. A feasibility study of the Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of beam profiles at various gantry angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C.; Chu, James C.H.; Bernard, Damian B.; Abrams, Ross A.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20×12×6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross‐beam‐profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full‐size (60×60×50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full‐size water phantom was first performed at a 0° gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8 mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC‐shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  4. Transmural transverse stiffness estimation in vascular shear wave imaging: A simulation and phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuexin; Lo, Ho Yuen; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2017-05-01

    Shear wave imaging has emerged as a potential non-invasive technique for the quantitative assessment of the arterial shear modulus. Nonetheless, the arterial elasticity estimation in the transverse direction has been overlooked compared with the longitudinal direction, and the estimated transmural stiffness has rarely been evaluated. Accurate depiction of the transverse stiffness across the thin arterial wall warrants comprehensive characterization in both normal and pathological conditions. This study estimated the transmural arterial shear modulus in both the longitudinal ( μ Long) and transverse directions ( μ Trans) using group ( c T) and phase velocities ( c p h) in finite element models and hollow cylindrical tissue-mimicking phantoms with various shape factors. The results were validated against mechanical testing. Zero-order antisymmetric Lamb wave and circumferential Lamb type wave models were considered in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the thin-walled hollow cylinder, respectively. The results derived from the model with the thin plate assumption confirmed that c T underestimated μ Long and μ Trans. Unlike the c p h-based μ Long estimates that were in excellent agreement with measured values, the c p h-based μ Trans estimates were found to be comparable to c p h-based μ Long at the inner wall but increased radially outward. Transmural μ Trans estimation using c p h was demonstrated to be feasible for thin-walled hollow cylinders but necessitated careful account of the wall geometry, in particular the shape factor.

  5. Alternative fiducial markers for Vero real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy: A phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of potential fiducial markers consisting of various materials in a Vero real-time tumor-tracking (RTTT) system. In order to determine the applicability of fiducial markers for the Vero RTTT system, we tested various markers consisting of 8 kinds of material (titanium, stainless steel, high-carbon steel, pure steel, copper, silver, tantalum, and gold) with various diameters ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm and a length of 5 mm. Additionally, a commercial gold coil marker (Visicoil™, IBA dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) of diameter 0.5 mm and length 1 cm was included for evaluation. The radiologic visibility on kV fluoroscopy/kV CT scan images of the fiducial markers was evaluated. The detectability on the RTTT system was tested using a two-dimensional moving phantom (Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), producing sinusoidal motion. The target center's accuracy was evaluated by calculating the deviation of the position of a metal sphere from the center on the dose profile. Dose profiles were measured using Gafchromic EBT2 films (International Specialty Products, NJ, USA). All markers were visible on kV fluoroscopy/kV CT while markers with atomic number ≥ 25.7 were detectable on the Vero RTTT system. All the detected markers showed excellent geometric accuracy.

  6. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: amlgphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  7. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for measuring maturing cartilage: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Jennifer R; Sussman, Marshall S; Moineddin, Rahim; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Rayner, Tammy; Doria, Andrea S

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of cartilage tissue-mimicking phantoms and to determine a combination of magnetic resonance imaging parameters to optimize accuracy while minimizing scan time. Edge dimensions from 4 rectangular agar phantoms ranging from 10.5 to 14.5 mm in length and 1.25 to 5.5 mm in width were independently measured by two readers using a steel ruler. Coronal T1 spin echo (T1 SE), fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) and multiplanar gradient-recalled echo (GRE MPGR) sequences were used to obtain phantom images on a 1.5-T scanner. Inter- and intra-reader reliability were high for both direct measurements and for magnetic resonance imaging measurements of phantoms. Statistically significant differences were noted between the mean direct measurements and the mean magnetic resonance imaging measurements for phantom 1 when using a GRE MPGR sequence (512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 5:49 min scan time), while borderline differences were noted for T1 SE sequences with the following parameters: 320x320 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; 320x320 pixels, 4-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; and 512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 9:48 min scan time. Borderline differences were also noted when using a FSPGR sequence with 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 3:36 min scan time. FSPGR sequences, regardless of the magnetic resonance imaging parameter combination used, provided accurate measurements. The GRE MPGR sequence using 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 5:49 min scan time and, to a lesser degree, all tested T1 SE sequences produced suboptimal accuracy when measuring the widest phantom.

  8. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of relaxation time measurements of spectroscopic inversion recovery and CPMG multi-echo pulse sequences together with ISIS and stimulated echo-pulse methods have been tested on a reference phantom (test object no. 5, of the EEC Concerted Research Project). For the measurements...... a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  9. Capsaicin 8% patch treatment for amputation stump and phantom limb pain: a clinical and functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privitera R

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rosario Privitera,1 Rolfe Birch,1 Marco Sinisi,2 Iordan R Mihaylov,3 Robert Leech,4 Praveen Anand1 1Peripheral Neuropathy Unit, Centre for Clinical Translation, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Peripheral Nerve Injury Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex, UK; 3Department of Pain Medicine, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, UK; 4Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to measure the efficacy of a single 60 min application of capsaicin 8% patch in reducing chronic amputation stump and phantom limb pain, associated hypersensitivity with quantitative sensory testing, and changes in brain cortical maps using functional MRI (fMRI scans. Methods: A capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza treatment study was conducted on 14 patients with single limb amputation, who reported pain intensity on the Numerical Pain Rating Scale ≥4/10 for chronic stump or phantom limb pain. Pain assessments, quantitative sensory testing, and fMRI (for the lip pursing task were performed at baseline and 4 weeks after application of capsaicin 8% patch to the amputation stump. The shift into the hand representation area of the cerebral cortex with the lip pursing task has been correlated with phantom limb pain intensity in previous studies, and was the fMRI clinical model for cortical plasticity used in this study. Results: The mean reduction in spontaneous amputation stump pain, phantom limb pain, and evoked stump pain were −1.007 (p=0.028, −1.414 (p=0.018, and −2.029 (p=0.007, respectively. The areas of brush allodynia and pinprick hypersensitivity in the amputation stump showed marked decreases: −165 cm2, −80% (p=0.001 and −132 cm2, −72% (p=0.001, respectively. fMRI analyses provided objective evidence of the restoration of the brain map, that is

  10. Digital tomosynthesis for verifying spine position during radiotherapy: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J.; Dahele, Max; Mostafavi, Hassan; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring the stability of patient position is essential during high-precision radiotherapy such as spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We evaluated the combination of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and triangulation for spine position detection, using non-clinical DTS software and an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom that includes a bone-like spine structure. Kilovoltage cone beam CT projection images over 2-16° gantry rotation were used to generate single slice DTS images. Each DTS slice was registered to a digitally reconstructed DTS derived from the planning CT scan to determine 2D shifts between actual phantom and treatment plan position. Two or more DTS registrations, central axes 4-22° apart, were triangulated to determine the 3D phantom position. Using sequentially generated DTS images, the phantom position can be updated every degree with a small latency of DTS and triangulation angle. The precision of position determination was investigated as function of DTS and triangulation angle. To mimic the scenario of spine SBRT, the effect on the standard deviation of megavoltage radiation delivery during kV image acquisition was tested. In addition, the ability of the system to detect different types of movement was investigated for a variety of small sudden and gradual movements during kV image acquisition.

  11. A skull-based multiple dipole phantom for EEG and MEG studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, M.E.; Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    A versatile phantom for use in evaluating forward and inverse methods for MEG and EEG has been designed and is currently being constructed. The phantom consists of three major components: (i) a 32-element cur- rent dipole array, (ii) a PC-controlled dipole driver with 32 isolated channels allowing independent control of each dipole, (iii) spherical and human-skull mounts in which the dipole array is placed. Materials were selected throughout the phantom to produce minimal field distortions and artifacts to enable acquisition of high quality EEG and MEG data. The dipoles are made from a rigid narrow (0.84 mm) stainless steel coax cable. The dipole drivers can be configured as either current or voltage sources, are independently programmable and fully isolated, and are capable of producing arbitrary bipolar waveforms up to a 200 Hz bandwidth. The spherical mount is a single shell sphere filled with conductive gelatin. The human skull mount has three shells: ``brain`` (conducting gelatin), ``skull`` (the skull is impregnated with a low conductivity conducting gelatin), and ``scalp`` (a thin layer of rubber latex mixed with NaCl to achieve a conductivity matched to the brain). The conductivities will be adjusted to achieve approximately an 80:1:80 ratio. Data collected to date from the spherical phantom shows excellent agreement between measured surface potentials and that predicted from theory (27 of the 32 dipoles give better than 99.9% rms fit) and negligible leakage between dipoles. We are currently completing construction of the skull mount.

  12. Digital tomosynthesis for verifying spine position during radiotherapy: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R; Mostafavi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring the stability of patient position is essential during high-precision radiotherapy such as spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We evaluated the combination of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and triangulation for spine position detection, using non-clinical DTS software and an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom that includes a bone-like spine structure. Kilovoltage cone beam CT projection images over 2–16° gantry rotation were used to generate single slice DTS images. Each DTS slice was registered to a digitally reconstructed DTS derived from the planning CT scan to determine 2D shifts between actual phantom and treatment plan position. Two or more DTS registrations, central axes 4–22° apart, were triangulated to determine the 3D phantom position. Using sequentially generated DTS images, the phantom position can be updated every degree with a small latency of DTS and triangulation angle. The precision of position determination was investigated as function of DTS and triangulation angle. To mimic the scenario of spine SBRT, the effect on the standard deviation of megavoltage radiation delivery during kV image acquisition was tested. In addition, the ability of the system to detect different types of movement was investigated for a variety of small sudden and gradual movements during kV image acquisition. (paper)

  13. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    .5 tesla (T). Measurements were performed on a phantom of bicompartmental perspex boxes with combinations of different CuSO4 concentrations. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination was provided by a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...

  14. Impact of low-dose CT scan in dual timepoint investigations: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micheelsen, M A; Jensen, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    compromising attenuation correction, lesion detection and quantification. Using a standard NEMA phantom with the GE Discovery PET/CT scanner, taken in and out between scan sessions, we have tried to find the minimal CT dose necessary for the second scan while still reaching tissue activity quantification...

  15. SU-E-T-507: Internal Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Using GATE and XCAT Phantom: A Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sen, A [University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Parach, A [Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalantari, F [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Monte Carlo simulations are routinely used for internal dosimetry studies. These studies are conducted with humanoid phantoms such as the XCAT phantom. In this abstract we present the absorbed doses for various pairs of source and target organs using three common radiotracers in nuclear medicine. Methods The GATE software package is used for the Monte Carlo simulations. A typical female XCAT phantom is used as the input. Three radiotracers 153Sm, 131I and 99mTc are studied. The Specific Absorbed Fraction (SAF) for gamma rays (99mTc, 153Sm and 131I) and Specific Fraction (SF) for beta particles (153Sm and 131I) are calculated for all 100 pairs of source target organs including brain, liver, lung, pancreas, kidney, adrenal, spleen, rib bone, bladder and ovaries. Results The source organs themselves gain the highest absorbed dose as compared to other organs. The dose is found to be inversely proportional to distance from the source organ. In SAF results of 153Sm, when the source organ is lung, the rib bone, gain 0.0730 (Kg-1) that is more than lung itself. Conclusion The absorbed dose for various organs was studied in terms of SAF and SF. Such studies hold importance for future therapeutic procedures and optimization of induced radiotracer.

  16. Time-resolved imaging of fluorescent inclusions in optically turbid medium — phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzak, M.; Liebert, A.; Sawosz, P.; Żołek, N.; Milej, D.; Maniewski, R.

    2010-03-01

    We present results of application of a time-resolved optical system for imaging of fluorescence excited in an inclusion containing indocyanine green (ICG), and located in optically turbid medium. The developed imaging system enabled simultaneous acquisition of fluorescence and diffusive reflectance. Eight independent time-resolved measurement channels based on time-correlated single photon counting technique were applied. In four of these channels, used for the fluorescence detection, sets of filters were applied in order to block the excitation light. Fast optomechanical switches allowed us to illuminate sequentially nine different spots on the surface of the studied object and finally 4×4 pixels maps at excitation and emission wavelengths were obtained. A liquid phantom used in this study consists of the fish tank filed with a solution ofmilk and water with black ink added to obtain optical properties in the range of the optical properties typical for the living tissue. A gel ball of a diameter of 5 mm with precisely controlled concentration of ICG was immersed in the liquid. The measurements were performed for inclusion located at different depths and for various ICG concentrations in the gel ball and in the surrounding liquid. The recorded distributions of times of arrival (DTA) of fluorescence photons and times of flight (DTOF) of diffusely reflected photons were analyzed by calculation of their statistical moments. We observed specific changes in moments of the measured DTAs as a function of depth of immersion of the fluorescent inclusion in the medium. We noted also that the changes of moments depend significantly on concentration of the dye in the fluorescence inclusion as well as in the surrounding liquid.

  17. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based evaluation of biological tissue phantoms to study multifrequency electrical impedance tomography (Mf-EIT) systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Tushar Kanti

    2016-03-18

    Abstract: Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) phantoms are essential for the calibration, comparison and evaluation of the EIT systems. In EIT, the practical phantoms are typically developed based on inhomogeneities surrounded by a homogeneous background to simulate a suitable conductivity contrast. In multifrequency EIT (Mf-EIT) evaluation, the phantoms must be developed with the materials which have recognizable or distinguishable impedance variations over a wide range of frequencies. In this direction the impedance responses of the saline solution (background) and a number vegetable and fruit tissues (inhomogeneities) are studied with electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the frequency responses of bioelectrical impedance and conductivity are analyzed. A number of practical phantoms with different tissue inhomogeneities and different inhomogeneity configurations are developed and the multifrequency impedance imaging is studied with the Mf-EIT system to evaluate the phantoms. The conductivity of the vegetable inhomogeneities reconstructed from the EIT imaging is compared with the conductivity values obtained from the EIS studies. Experimental results obtained from multifrequency EIT reconstruction demonstrate that the electrical impedance of all the biological tissues inhomogenity decreases with frequency. The potato tissue phantom produces better impedance image in high frequency ranges compared to the cucumber phantom, because the cucumber impedance at high frequency becomes lesser than that of the potato at the same frequency range. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2016 The Visualization Society of Japan

  18. Real-time bladder lesion registration and navigation: a phantom study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Agenant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in men, with a recurrence rate of 33-64%. Tumor documentation during cystoscopy of the bladder is suboptimal and might play a role in these high recurrence rates. OBJECTIVE: In this project, a bladder registration and navigation system was developed to improve bladder tumor documentation and consequently increase reproducibility of the cystoscopy. MATERIALS/METHODS: The bladder registration and navigation system consists of a stereo-tracker that tracks the location of a newly developed target, which is attached to the endoscope during cystoscopy. With this information the urology registration and navigation software is able to register the 3D position of a lesion of interest. Simultaneously, the endoscopic image is captured in order to combine it with this 3D position. To enable navigation, navigational cues are displayed on the monitor, which subsequently direct the cystoscopist to the previously registered lesion. To test the system, a rigid and a flexible bladder phantom was developed. The system's robustness was tested by measuring the accuracy of registering and navigating the lesions. Different calibration procedures were compared. It was also tested whether system accuracy is limited by using a previously saved calibration, to avoid surgical delay due to calibration. Urological application was tested by comparing a rotational camera (fixed to the rotating endoscope to a non-rotational camera (dangling by gravity used in standard urologic practice. Finally, the influence of volume differences on registering and navigating was tested. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: The bladder registration and navigation system has an acceptable accuracy for bladder lesion registration and navigation. Limitations for patient determinants included changes in bladder volume and bladder deformation. In vivo studies are required to measure the effect of these limitations and functionality in urological

  19. Treating intractable phantom limb pain with ambulatory continuous peripheral nerve blocks: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilfeld, Brian M; Moeller-Bertram, Tobias; Hanling, Steven R; Tokarz, Kyle; Mariano, Edward R; Loland, Vanessa J; Madison, Sarah J; Ferguson, Eliza J; Morgan, Anya C; Wallace, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    There is currently no reliable treatment for phantom limb pain (PLP). Chronic PLP and associated cortical abnormalities may be maintained from abnormal peripheral input, raising the possibility that a continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB) of extended duration may permanently reorganize cortical pain mapping, thus providing lasting relief. Three men with below-the-knee (2) or -elbow (1) amputations and intractable PLP received femoral/sciatic or infraclavicular perineural catheter(s), respectively. Subjects were randomized in a double-masked fashion to receive perineural ropivacaine (0.5%) or normal saline for over 6 days as outpatients using portable electronic infusion pumps. Four months later, subjects returned for repeated perineural catheter insertion and received an ambulatory infusion with the alternate solution ("crossover"). Subjects were followed for up to 1 year. By chance, all three subjects received saline during their initial infusion and reported little change in their PLP. One subject did not receive crossover treatment, but the remaining two subjects reported complete resolution of their PLP during and immediately following treatment with ropivacaine. One subject experienced no PLP recurrence through the 52-week follow-up period and the other reported mild PLP occurring once each week of just a small fraction of his original pain (pretreatment: continuous PLP rated 10/10; posttreatment: no PLP at baseline with average of one PLP episode each week rated 2/10) for 12 weeks (lost to follow-up thereafter). A prolonged ambulatory CPNB may be a reliable treatment for intractable PLP. The results of this pilot study suggest that a large, randomized clinical trial is warranted. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Modeling and phantom studies of ultrasonic wall shear rate measurements using coded pulse excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Jean K; Liu, Jie; Insana, Michael F

    2006-04-01

    Wall shear rate (WSR) is the derivative of blood velocity with respect to vessel radius at the endothelial cell (EC) surface. The product of WSR and blood viscosity is the wall shear stress (WSS) that has been identified as an important factor for atherosclerosis development. High echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) and high spatial resolution are crucial for minimizing the errors in WSR estimates. By transmitting coded pulses with time-bandwidth product greater than one, high eSNR from weak blood scatter can be achieved without increasing instantaneous power or sacrificing spatial resolution. This paper summarizes a series of measurements in a straight tube (5-mm diameter), constant velocity flow phantom using a 10 MHz transducer (60% bandwidth, f/1.5) imaged with a 72 degrees Doppler angle, 125 MHz sampling frequency and 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Measurements were made using a frequency-modulated (FM) code, phase-modulated (PM) codes, and uncoded broadband and narrow band pulse transmissions. Both simulation and experimental results show that coded-pulse excitation increases accuracy and precision in WSR estimation for laminar flow over a broad range of peak velocity values when compared to standard pulsing techniques in noise-limited conditions (eSNR < 30 dB). The code sequence and its length are selected to balance range lobe suppression with eSNR and echo coherence enhancements to minimize WSR errors. In our study, the combination of an eight bit Optimal coded pulse with a Wiener compression filter yielded the highest WSR estimation performance.

  1. Study of the influence of radionuclide biokinetics on in vivo counting using voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamart, St.

    2008-10-01

    The in vivo measurement is an efficient method to estimate the retention of activity in case of internal contamination. However, it is currently limited by the use of physical phantoms for the calibration, not enabling to reproduce neither the morphology of the measured person nor the actual distribution of the contamination. The current method of calibration therefore leads to significant systematic uncertainties on the quantification of the contamination. To improve the in vivo measurement, the Laboratory of Internal Dose Assessment (LEDI, IRSN) has developed an original numerical calibration method with the OEDIPE software. It is based on voxel phantoms created from the medical images of persons, and associated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code of particle transport. The first version of this software enabled to model simple homogeneous sources and to better estimate the systematic uncertainties in the lung counting of actinides due to the detector position and to the heterogeneous distribution of activity inside the lungs. However, it was not possible to take into account the dynamic feature, and often heterogeneous distribution between body organs and tissues of the activity. Still, the efficiency of the detection system depends on the distribution of the source of activity. The main purpose of the thesis work is to answer to the question: what is the influence of the biokinetics of the radionuclides on the in vivo counting? To answer it, it was necessary to deeply modify OEDIPE. This new development enabled to model the source of activity more realistically from the reference biokinetic models defined by the ICRP. The first part of the work consisted in developing the numerical tools needed to integrate the biokinetics in OEDIPE. Then, a methodology was developed to quantify its influence on the in vivo counting from the results of simulations. This method was carried out and validated on the model of the in vivo counting system of the LEDI. Finally, the

  2. Optimal Scanning Protocols for Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Stents: An in Vitro Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Almutairi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the optimal dual-energy computed tomography (DECT scanning protocol for peripheral arterial stents while achieving a low radiation dose, while still maintaining diagnostic image quality, as determined by an in vitro phantom study. Methods: Dual-energy scans in monochromatic spectral imaging mode were performed on a peripheral arterial phantom with use of three gemstone spectral imaging (GSI protocols, three pitch values, and four kiloelectron volts (keV ranges. A total of 15 stents of different sizes, materials, and designs were deployed in the phantom. Image noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR, and the four levels of monochromatic energy for DECT imaging of peripheral arterial stents were measured and compared to determine the optimal protocols. Results: A total of 36 scans with 180 datasets were reconstructed from a combination of different protocols. There was a significant reduction of image noise with a higher SNR from monochromatic energy images between 65 and 70 keV in all investigated preset GSI protocols (p < 0.05. In addition, significant effects were found from the main effect analysis for these factors: GSI, pitch, and keV (p = 0.001. In contrast, there was significant interaction on the unstented area between GSI and ASIR (p = 0.015 and a very high significant difference between keV and ASIR (p < 0.001. A radiation dose reduction of 50% was achieved. Conclusions: The optimal scanning protocol and energy level in the phantom study were GSI-48, pitch value 0.984, and 65 keV, which resulted in lower image noise and a lower radiation dose, but with acceptable diagnostic images.

  3. Effect of CT scanning parameters on volumetric measurements of pulmonary nodules by 3D active contour segmentation: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, Ted W; Chan, H-P; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Zhou Chuan; Chughtai, Aamer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of CT scanning and reconstruction parameters on automated segmentation and volumetric measurements of nodules in CT images. Phantom nodules of known sizes were used so that segmentation accuracy could be quantified in comparison to ground-truth volumes. Spherical nodules having 4.8, 9.5 and 16 mm diameters and 50 and 100 mg cc -1 calcium contents were embedded in lung-tissue-simulating foam which was inserted in the thoracic cavity of a chest section phantom. CT scans of the phantom were acquired with a 16-slice scanner at various tube currents, pitches, fields-of-view and slice thicknesses. Scans were also taken using identical techniques either within the same day or five months apart for study of reproducibility. The phantom nodules were segmented with a three-dimensional active contour (3DAC) model that we previously developed for use on patient nodules. The percentage volume errors relative to the ground-truth volumes were estimated under the various imaging conditions. There was no statistically significant difference in volume error for repeated CT scans or scans taken with techniques where only pitch, field of view, or tube current (mA) were changed. However, the slice thickness significantly (p < 0.05) affected the volume error. Therefore, to evaluate nodule growth, consistent imaging conditions and high resolution should be used for acquisition of the serial CT scans, especially for smaller nodules. Understanding the effects of scanning and reconstruction parameters on volume measurements by 3DAC allows better interpretation of data and assessment of growth. Tracking nodule growth with computerized segmentation methods would reduce inter- and intraobserver variabilities

  4. Multi institutional quantitative phantom study of yttrium-90 PET in PET/MRI: the MR-QUEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Nichole M; Eldib, Mootaz; Faul, David; Conti, Maurizio; Elschot, Mattijs; Knešaurek, Karin; Leek, Francesca; Townsend, David; DiFilippo, Frank P; Jackson, Kimberly; Nekolla, Stephan G; Lukas, Mathias; Tapner, Michael; Parikh, Parag J; Laforest, Richard

    2018-04-04

    Yttrium-90 ( 90 Y) radioembolization involves the intra-arterial delivery of radioactive microspheres to treat hepatic malignancies. Though this therapy involves careful pre-treatment planning and imaging, little is known about the precise location of the microspheres once they are administered. Recently, there has been growing interest post-radioembolization imaging using positron-emission tomography (PET) for quantitative dosimetry and identifying lesions that may benefit from additional salvage therapy. In this study, we aim to measure the inter-center variability of 90 Y PET measurements as measured on PET/MRI in preparation for a multi-institutional prospective phase I/II clinical trial. Eight institutions participated in this study and followed a standardized phantom filling and imaging protocol. The NEMA NU2-2012 body phantom was filled with 3 GBq of 90 Y chloride solution. The phantom was imaged for 30 min in listmode on a Siemens Biograph mMR non-TOF PET/MRI scanner at five time points across 10 days (0.3-3.0 GBq). Raw PET data were sent to a central site for image reconstruction and data analysis. Images were reconstructed with optimal parameters determined from a previous study. Volumes of interest (VOIs) matching the known sphere diameters were drawn on the vendor-provided attenuation map and propagated to the PET images. Recovery coefficients (RCs) and coefficient of variation of the RCs (COV) were calculated from these VOIs for each sphere size and activity level. Mean RCs ranged from 14.5 to 75.4%, with the lowest mean RC coming from the smallest sphere (10 mm) on the last day of imaging (0.16 MBq/ml) and the highest mean RC coming from the largest sphere (37 mm) on the first day of imaging (2.16 MBq/ml). The smaller spheres tended to exhibit higher COVs. In contrast, the larger spheres tended to exhibit lower COVs. COVs from the 37 mm sphere were  25%. Post-radioembolization dosimetry of lesions or other VOIs ≥ 22 mm in diameter can

  5. A Study for Reappearance According to the Scan Type, the CT Scanning by a Moving Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyock; Jeong, Do Hyeong; Choi, Gye Suk; Jang, Yo Jong; Kim, Jae Weon; Lee, Hui Seok

    2007-01-01

    CT scan shows that significant tumor movement occurs in lesions located in the proximity of the heart, diaphragm, and lung hilus. There are differences concerning three kinds of type to get images following the Scan type called Axial, Helical, Cine (4D-CT) mode, when the scanning by CT. To know how each protocol describe accurately, this paper is going to give you reappearance using the moving phantom. To reconstruct the movement of superior-inferior and anterior-posterior, the manufactured moving phantom and the motor following breathing were used. To distinguish movement from captured images by CT scanning, a localizer adhered to the marker on the motor. The moving phantom fixed the movement of superior-inferior upon 1.3 cm /1 min. The motor following breathing fixed the movement of anterior-posterior upon 0.2 cm /1 min. After fixing each movement, CT scanning was taken by following the CT protocols. The movement of A localizer and volume-reappearance analyzed by RTP machine. Total volume of a marker was 88.2 cm 3 considering movement of superior-inferior. Total volume was 184.3 cm 3 . Total volume according to each CT scan protocol were 135 cm 3 by axial mode, 164.9 cm 3 by helical mode, 181.7 cm 3 by cine (4D-CT) mode. The most closely describable protocol about moving reappearance was cine mode, the marker attached localizer as well. CT scan should reappear concerning a exact organ-description and target, when the moving organ is being scanned by three kinds of CT protocols. The cine (4D-CT) mode has the advantage of the most highly reconstructible ability of the three protocols in reappearance of the marker using a moving phantom. The marker on the phantom has always regular motion but breathing patients don't move like a phantom. Breathing education and devices setting patients were needed so that images reconstruct breathing as exactly as possible. Users should also consider that an amount of radiation to patients is being bombed.

  6. Measurements of doses from photon beam irradiation and scattered neutrons in an anthropomorphic phantom model of prostate cancer: a comparison between 3DCRT, IMRT and tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik Anna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The rapid development of new radiotherapy technologies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or tomotherapy, has resulted in the capacity to deliver a more homogenous dose in the target. However, the higher doses associated with these techniques are a reason for concern because they may increase the dose outside the target. In the present study, we compared 3DCRT, IMRT and tomotherapy to assess the doses to organs at risk (OARs resulting from photon beam irradiation and scattered neutrons.

  7. Study of Image Quality From CT Scanner Multi-Detector by using Americans College of Radiology (ACR) Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadin; Dewang, Syamsir; Abdullah, Bualkar; Tahir, Dahlang

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the image quality of CT scan using phantom American College of Radiology (ACR) was determined. Scanning multidetector CT is used to know the image quality parameters by using a solid phantom containing four modules and primarily from materials that are equivalent to water. Each module is 4 cm in diameter and 20 cm in diameter. There is white alignment marks painted white to reflect the alignment laser and there are also “HEAD”, “FOOT”, and “TOP” marks on the phantom to help align. This test obtains CT images of each module according to the routine inspection protocol of the head. Acceptance of image quality obtained for determination: CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Number Uniformity and Noise, Linearity CT Number, Slice Technique, Low Contrast Resolution and High Contrast Resolution represent image quality parameters. In testing CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Uniform number and Noise are in the range of tolerable values allowed. In the test, Linearity CT Number obtained correlation value above 0.99 is the relationship between electron density and CT Number. In a low contrast resolution test, the smallest contrast groups are visible. In contrast, the high resolution is seen up to 7 lp/cm. The quality of GE CT Scan is very high, as all the image quality tests obtained are within the tolerance brackets of values permitted by the Nuclear Power Control Agency (BAPETEN). Image quality test is a way to get very important information about the accuracy of snoring result by using phantom ACR.

  8. Cherenkov excited phosphorescence-based pO2 estimation during multi-beam radiation therapy: phantom and simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Robert W; Zhang, Rongxiao; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Glaser, Adam K; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-09-21

    Megavoltage radiation beams used in External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) generate Cherenkov light emission in tissues and equivalent phantoms. This optical emission was utilized to excite an oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe, PtG4, which has been developed specifically for NIR lifetime-based sensing of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Phosphorescence emission, at different time points with respect to the excitation pulse, was acquired by an intensifier-gated CCD camera synchronized with radiation pulses delivered by a medical linear accelerator. The pO2 distribution was tomographically recovered in a tissue-equivalent phantom during EBRT with multiple beams targeted from different angles at a tumor-like anomaly. The reconstructions were tested in two different phantoms that have fully oxygenated background, to compare a fully oxygenated and a fully deoxygenated inclusion. To simulate a realistic situation of EBRT, where the size and location of the tumor is well known, spatial information of a prescribed region was utilized in the recovery estimation. The phantom results show that region-averaged pO2 values were recovered successfully, differentiating aerated and deoxygenated inclusions. Finally, a simulation study was performed showing that pO2 in human brain tumors can be measured to within 15 mmHg for edge depths less than 10-20 mm using the Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen imaging (CEPhOx) method and PtG4 as a probe. This technique could allow non-invasive monitoring of pO2 in tumors during the normal process of EBRT, where beams are generally delivered from multiple angles or arcs during each treatment fraction.

  9. Does standoff material affect acoustic radiation force impulse elastography? A preclinical study of a modified elastography phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerieth, Katharina; Gaßmann, Bernhard; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Kemmner, Stephan; Heemann, Uwe; Stock, Konrad Friedrich

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of standoff material on acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) measurements in an elasticity phantom by using two different probes. Using ARFI elastography, 10 observers measured the shear wave velocity (SWV, m/sec) in different lesions of an elasticity phantom with a convex 4C1 probe and a linear 9L4 probe. The experimental setup was expanded by the use of an interposed piece of porcine muscle as standoff material. The probe pressure on the phantom was registered. Faulty ARFI measurements occurred more often when quantifying the hardest lesion (74.0 kPa 4.97 m/sec) by the 9L4 probe with the porcine muscle as a standoff material interposed between the probe and the phantom. The success rate for ARFI measurements in these series was 52.4%, compared with 99.5% in the other series. The SWV values measured with the 9L4 probe were significantly higher (3.33±1.39 m/sec vs. 2.60±0.74 m/sec, Pmaterial were lower than those without the muscle (significant for 9L4, P=0.040). The deviation from the reference value and the variance increased significantly with the 9L4 probe if the muscle was in situ (B=0.27, P=0.004 and B=0.32, Pmaterial influenced the occurrence of failed measurements as well as the variance and the accuracy of the measured values. The linear high-frequency probe was particularly affected.

  10. Abdominal CT during pregnancy: a phantom study on the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomou, G.; Damilakis, J. [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 2208, Crete (Greece); Papadakis, A.E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Crete (Greece)

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality in abdominal CT during pregnancy. Three anthropomorphic phantoms that represent a pregnant woman at the three trimesters of gestation were subjected to a routine abdominal CT. Examinations were performed with fixed mAs (mAs{sub f}) and with the automatic exposure control system (AEC) activated. The percent reduction between mAs{sub f} and modulated mAs (mAs{sub mod}) was calculated. Conceptus dose (D{sub c}) was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. To study the effect of misplacement of pregnant women on D{sub c}, each phantom was positioned at various locations relative to gantry isocentre. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The maximum reduction between mAs{sub f} and mAs{sub mod} was 59.8 %, while the corresponding D{sub C} reduction was 59.3 %. D{sub C} was found to decrease by up to 25 % and 7.9 % for phantom locations below and above the isocentre, respectively. Image quality deteriorated when AEC was activated, and it was progressively improved from lower to higher than the isocentre locations. Centring errors do not result in an increase in D{sub c}. To maintain image quality, accurate centring is required. (orig.)

  11. Hollow agarose microneedle with silver coating for intradermal surface-enhanced Raman measurements: a skin-mimicking phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2015-06-01

    Human intradermal components contain important clinical information beneficial to the field of immunology and disease diagnosis. Although microneedles have shown great potential to act as probes to break the human skin barrier for the minimally invasive measurement of intradermal components, metal microneedles that include stainless steel could cause the following problems: (1) sharp waste production, and (2) contamination due to reuse of microneedles especially in developing regions. In this study, we fabricate agarose microneedles coated with a layer of silver (Ag) and demonstrate their use as a probe for the realization of intradermal surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements in a set of skin-mimicking phantoms. The Ag-coated agarose microneedle quantifies a range of glucose concentrations from 5 to 150 mM inside the skin phantoms with a root-mean-square error of 5.1 mM within 10 s. The needle is found enlarged by 53.9% after another 6 min inside the phantom. The shape-changing capability of this agarose microneedle ensures that the reuse of these microneedles is impossible, thus avoiding sharp waste production and preventing needle contamination, which shows the great potential for safe and effective needle-based measurements.

  12. Dual-axis rotational coronary angiography can reduce peak skin dose and scattered dose: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiliang; Jin, Zhigeng; Deng, Yunpeng; Jing, Limin

    2014-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate peak skin dose received by the patient and scattered dose to the operator during dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (DARCA), and to compare with those of standard coronary angiography (SA). An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate a patient undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography. Cine imaging was applied on the phantom for 2 s, 3 s, and 5 s in SA projections to mimic clinical situations with normal vessels, and uncomplicated and complicated coronary lesions. DARCA was performed in two curved trajectories around the phantom. During both SA and DARCA, peak skin dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeter arrays and scattered dose with a dosimeter at predefined height (approximately at the level of left eye) at the operator's location. Compared to SA, DARCA was found lower in both peak skin dose (range: 44%-82%, p < 0.001) and scattered dose (range: 40%-70%, p < 0.001). The maximal reductions were observed in the set mimicking complicated lesion examinations (82% reduction for peak skin dose, p < 0.001; 70% reduction for scattered dose, p < 0.001). DARCA reduces both peak skin dose and scattered dose in comparison to SA. The benefi t of radiation dose reduction could be especially signifi cant in complicated lesion examinations due to large reduction in X-ray exposure time. The use of DARCA could, therefore, be recommended in clinical practice to minimize radiation dose.

  13. Quantitative cardiac SPECT in three dimensions: validation by experimental phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical framework for quantitative SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) reconstruction of the heart is presented. An efficient simultaneous compensation approach to the reconstruction task is described. The implementation of the approach on a digital computer is delineated. The approach was validated by experimental data acquired from chest phantoms. The phantoms consisted of a cylindrical elliptical tank of Plexiglass, a cardiac insert made of Plexiglass, a spine insert of packed bone meal and lung inserts made of styrofoam beads alone. Water bags were added to simulate different body characteristics. Comparison between the quantitative reconstruction and the conventional FBP (filtered backprojection) method was performed. The FBP reconstruction had a poor quantitative accuracy and varied for different body configurations. Significant improvement in reconstruction accuracy by the quantitative approach was demonstrated with a moderate computing time on a currently available desktop computer. Furthermore, the quantitative reconstruction was robust for different body characteristics. Therefore, the quantitative approach has the potential for clinical use. (author)

  14. A phantom study on temporal and subband Minimum Variance adaptive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Voxen, Iben Holfort; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares experimentally temporal and subband implementations of the Minimum Variance (MV) adaptive beamformer for medical ultrasound imaging. The performance of the two approaches is tested by comparing wire phantom measurements, obtained by the research ultrasound scanner SARUS. A 7 MHz...... BK8804 linear transducer was used to scan a wire phantom in which wires are separated by 10 mm. Performance is then evaluated by the lateral Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM), the Peak Sidelobe Level (PSL), and the computational load. Beamformed single emission responses are also compared with those...... from conventional Delay-and-Sum (DAS) beamformer. FWHM measured at the depth of 46.6 mm, is 0.02 mm (0.09λ) for both adaptive methods while the corresponding values for Hanning and Boxcar weights are 0.64 and 0.44 mm respectively. Between the MV beamformers a -2 dB difference in PSL is noticed in favor...

  15. Quantification of Urinary Stone Composition in Mixed Stones Using Dual-Energy CT: A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Huang, Alice; Montoya, Juan; Duan, Xinhui; Williams, James C.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using dual-energy computed tomography to accurately quantify uric acid and non-uric-acid components in urinary stones having mixed composition. Materials and Methods A total of 24 urinary stones were analyzed with microCT to serve as the reference standard for uric acid and non-uric-acid composition. These stones were placed in water phantoms to simulate body attenuation of slim to obese adults and scanned on a third-generation dual-source scanner using dual-energy modes adaptively selected based on phantom size. CT number ratio, which is distinct for different materials, was calculated for each pixel of the stones. Each pixel was then classified as uric acid and non-uric-acid by comparing the CT number ratio with preset thresholds ranging from 1.1 to 1.7. Minimal, maximal and root-mean-square errors were calculated by comparing composition to the reference standard and the threshold with the minimal root-mean-square-error was determined. A paired t-test was performed to compare the stone composition determined with dual-energy CT with the reference standard obtained with microCT. Results The optimal CT number ratio threshold ranged from 1.27 to 1.55, dependent on phantom size. The root-mean-square error ranged from 9.60% to 12.87% across all phantom sizes. Minimal and maximal absolute error ranged from 0.04% to 1.24% and from 22.05% to 35.46%, respectively. Dual-energy CT and the reference microCT did not differ significantly on uric acid and non-uric-acid composition (P from 0.20 to 0.96, paired t-test). Conclusion Accurate quantification of uric acid and non-uric-acid composition in mixed stones is possible using dual-energy CT. PMID:27224260

  16. Lethal isotherms of cryoablation in a phantom study: effects of heat load, probe size, and number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littrup, Peter J; Jallad, Bassel; Vorugu, Vinaya; Littrup, Gunnar; Currier, Brandt; George, Mikhail; Herring, Donald

    2009-10-01

    To assess the effects on the proportions of lethal ice (ie, colder than -30 degrees C) in phantoms with different heat loads created by varying the size and number of cryoprobes spaced 2 cm apart. Thermocouples at 0.5-, 1.0-, and 1.5-cm intervals from 1.7- or 2.4-mm-diameter cryoprobes were held by jigs accommodating a maximum of four cryoprobes. Agar phantoms (N = 24) used three sets of baseline temperatures: approximately 6 degrees C, 24 degrees C, and 39 degrees C. Temperatures during 15-minute freeze cycles were correlated with actual thermocouple locations seen within the ice by computed tomography (CT). Diameters and surface areas of the -30 degrees C lethal isotherm were assessed over time as percentages of the overall ice ball. The high-heat load phantom experiments (39 degrees C) showed the greatest impact on lethal zones by percentage for all probe configurations. At 15 minutes, single-, double-, triple-, and quadruple-probe arrangements of 2.4-mm cryoprobes had average lethal ice diameters of 1.2, 3.3, 4.1, and 4.9 cm, respectively, comprising 13%, 46%, 51%, and 56% surface areas of lethal ice, respectively. Surface areas and diameters of lethal ice made by 1.7-mm cryoprobes were 71% and 84% of those made by 2.4-mm cryoprobes, respectively. Lethal ice resides less than 1 cm behind the leading edge for nearly all probe configurations and heat loads. Single cryoprobes create very low percentages of lethal ice. Multiple cryoprobes overcome the high heat load of body temperature phantoms and help compensate for the lower freeze capacity of thinner cryoprobes.

  17. Comparison of two co-registration methods for real-time ultrasonography fused with MRI: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C; Ellegaard, K; Boesen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To test the accuracy of spatial registration of real-time ultrasonography (US) fused with MRI in a phantom.......To test the accuracy of spatial registration of real-time ultrasonography (US) fused with MRI in a phantom....

  18. Comparison of windowing effects on elastography images: Simulation, phantom and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rifat; Arfin, Rishad; Rubel, Monir Hossan; Islam, Kazi Khairul; Jia, Congxian; Metaxas, Dimitris; Garra, Brian S; Alam, S Kaisar

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we have evaluated the use of smooth windows for ultrasound elastography. In ultrasound elastography, local tissue strain is estimated using operations such as cross-correlation on local segments of RF data. In this process, local data segments are selected by multiplying the RF data by a rectangular window. Such data truncation causes non-ideal spectral behavior, which can be mitigated by using smooth windows. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the use of smooth windows may improve the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe) of strain images. The effects of using smooth windows have not been fully characterized for time-domain strain estimators. Thus, we have compared the elastographic performance of rectangular, Hanning, Gaussian, and Chebyshev windows used in conjunction with cross-correlation based algorithm and adaptive stretching algorithm using finite element method (FEM) simulation, experimental phantom, and in vivo data. Smooth windows are found to improve the SNRe by up to 3.94 for FEM data and by up to 1.76 for phantom data which represent 76% and 60.52% improvements, respectively. CNRe improves by up to 12.23 for FEM simulated data and by up to 4.28 for phantom data which represent 213.07% and 248.2% improvements, respectively. Mean structural similarity (MSSIM) was used for assessing the image perceptual quality and smooth windows improved it by up to 0.22 (85.98% improvement) for simulated data. We have evaluated these parameters at 1-6% applied strains for the experimental phantom and at 1%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, and 12% applied strains for FEM simulation. We observed a maximum deterioration in axial resolution of 0.375 mm (which is on the order of the wavelength, 0.3mm) due to smooth windows. "Salt-and-pepper" noise from false-peak errors has also been reduced. Smooth windows increased the lesion-to-background contrast (by increasing the CNRe by 213.07%) of a low contrast lesion (10-dB). For the in vivo

  19. Agency over a phantom limb and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu eImaizumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Most patients, post-amputation, report the experience of a phantom limb. Some even sense voluntary movements when viewing a mirror image of the intact limb superimposed onto the phantom limb. While delayed visual feedback of an action is known to reduce a sense of agency, the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation (i.e., sense of controlling a phantom limb has not been examined. Using a video-projection system, we examined the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation in an upper-limb amputee (male; left upper-limb amputation. He was instructed to view mirrored video images of his intact hand clasping and unclasping during a phantom limb movement. He then rated the intensity of the phantom motor sensation. Three types of hand movement images were presented as follows: synchronous, asynchronous with a 250-ms delay, and asynchronous with a 500-ms delay. Results showed that phantom motor sensation decreased when the image was delayed by 250 and 500 ms. However, when we instructed the patient to adjust the phase of phantom limb movement to that of the image with a 500-ms delay, phantom motor sensation increased. There was also a positive correlation between intensity of phantom motor sensation and electromyographic activity on deltoids at the patient’s stump. These results suggest that phantom motor sensation and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony and top-down effects.

  20. Extended localization and adaptive dose calculation using HU corrected cone beam CT: Phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafic, K Mohamathu; Amalan, S; Timothy Peace, B S; Ravindran, B Paul

    2018-01-01

    The practicability of computing dose calculation on cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely investigated. In most clinical scenarios, the craniocaudal scanning length of CBCT is found to be inadequate for localization. This study aims to explore extended tomographic localization and adaptive dose calculation strategies using Hounsfield unit (HU) corrected CBCT image sets. Planning CT (pCT) images of the Rando phantom (T 12 -to-midthigh) were acquired with pelvic-protocol using Biograph CT-scanner. Similarly, half-fan CBCT were acquired with fixed parameters using Clinac2100C/D linear accelerator integrated with an on-board imager with 2-longitudinal positions of the table. For extended localization and dose calculation, two stitching strategies viz., one with "penumbral-overlap" (S 1 ) and the other with "no-overlap" (S 2 ) and a local HU-correction technique were performed using custom-developed MATLAB scripts. Fluence modulated treatment plans computed on pCT were mapped with stitched CBCT and the dosimetric analyses such as dose-profile comparison, 3D-gamma (γ) evaluation and dose-volume histogram (DVH) comparison were performed. Localizing scanning length of CBCT was extended by up to 15 cm and 16 cm in S 1 and S 2 strategies, respectively. Treatment plan mapping resulted in minor variations in the volumes of delineated structures and the beam centre co-ordinates. While the former showed maximum variations of -1.4% and -1.6%, the latter showed maximum of 1.4 mm and 2.7 mm differences in anteroposterior direction in S 1 and S 2 protocols, respectively. Dosimetric evaluations viz., dose profile and DVH comparisons were found to be in agreement with one another. In addition, γ-evaluation results showed superior pass-rates (≥98.5%) for both 3%/3 mm dose-difference (DD) and distance-to-agreement (DTA) and 2%/2 mm DD/DTA criteria with desirable dosimetric accuracy. Cone beam tomographic stitching and local HU-correction strategies developed to facilitate

  1. Technical Note: Phantom study to evaluate the dose and image quality effects of a computed tomography organ-based tube current modulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Diksha; Crotty, Dominic J; Stevens, Grant M; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2015-11-01

    This technical note quantifies the dose and image quality performance of a clinically available organ-dose-based tube current modulation (ODM) technique, using experimental and simulation phantom studies. The investigated ODM implementation reduces the tube current for the anterior source positions, without increasing current for posterior positions, although such an approach was also evaluated for comparison. Axial CT scans at 120 kV were performed on head and chest phantoms on an ODM-equipped scanner (Optima CT660, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, England). Dosimeters quantified dose to breast, lung, heart, spine, eye lens, and brain regions for ODM and 3D-modulation (SmartmA) settings. Monte Carlo simulations, validated with experimental data, were performed on 28 voxelized head phantoms and 10 chest phantoms to quantify organ dose and noise standard deviation. The dose and noise effects of increasing the posterior tube current were also investigated. ODM reduced the dose for all experimental dosimeters with respect to SmartmA, with average dose reductions across dosimeters of 31% (breast), 21% (lung), 24% (heart), 6% (spine), 19% (eye lens), and 11% (brain), with similar results for the simulation validation study. In the phantom library study, the average dose reduction across all phantoms was 34% (breast), 20% (lung), 8% (spine), 20% (eye lens), and 8% (brain). ODM increased the noise standard deviation in reconstructed images by 6%-20%, with generally greater noise increases in anterior regions. Increasing the posterior tube current provided similar dose reduction as ODM for breast and eye lens, increased dose to the spine, with noise effects ranging from 2% noise reduction to 16% noise increase. At noise equal to SmartmA, ODM increased the estimated effective dose by 4% and 8% for chest and head scans, respectively. Increasing the posterior tube current further increased the effective dose by 15% (chest) and 18% (head) relative to SmartmA. ODM reduced

  2. Technical Note: Phantom study to evaluate the dose and image quality effects of a computed tomography organ-based tube current modulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat, E-mail: taly.gilat-schmidt@marquette.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Crotty, Dominic J.; Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This technical note quantifies the dose and image quality performance of a clinically available organ-dose-based tube current modulation (ODM) technique, using experimental and simulation phantom studies. The investigated ODM implementation reduces the tube current for the anterior source positions, without increasing current for posterior positions, although such an approach was also evaluated for comparison. Methods: Axial CT scans at 120 kV were performed on head and chest phantoms on an ODM-equipped scanner (Optima CT660, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, England). Dosimeters quantified dose to breast, lung, heart, spine, eye lens, and brain regions for ODM and 3D-modulation (SmartmA) settings. Monte Carlo simulations, validated with experimental data, were performed on 28 voxelized head phantoms and 10 chest phantoms to quantify organ dose and noise standard deviation. The dose and noise effects of increasing the posterior tube current were also investigated. Results: ODM reduced the dose for all experimental dosimeters with respect to SmartmA, with average dose reductions across dosimeters of 31% (breast), 21% (lung), 24% (heart), 6% (spine), 19% (eye lens), and 11% (brain), with similar results for the simulation validation study. In the phantom library study, the average dose reduction across all phantoms was 34% (breast), 20% (lung), 8% (spine), 20% (eye lens), and 8% (brain). ODM increased the noise standard deviation in reconstructed images by 6%–20%, with generally greater noise increases in anterior regions. Increasing the posterior tube current provided similar dose reduction as ODM for breast and eye lens, increased dose to the spine, with noise effects ranging from 2% noise reduction to 16% noise increase. At noise equal to SmartmA, ODM increased the estimated effective dose by 4% and 8% for chest and head scans, respectively. Increasing the posterior tube current further increased the effective dose by 15% (chest) and 18% (head

  3. SU-E-T-13: A Feasibility Study of the Use of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Improved Historical Dose Reconstruction in the Study of Late Radiation Effects for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroccia, H; O' Reilly, S; Bolch, W [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, N; Li, Z; Slopsema, R [Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced cancer effects are well-documented following radiotherapy. Further investigation is needed to more accurately determine a dose-response relationship for late radiation effects. Recent dosimetry studies tend to use representative patients (Taylor 2009) or anthropomorphic phantoms (Wirth 2008) for estimating organ mean doses. In this study, we compare hybrid computational phantoms to patient-specific voxel phantoms to test the accuracy of University of Florida Hybrid Phantom Library (UFHP Library) for historical dose reconstructions. Methods: A cohort of 10 patients with CT images was used to reproduce the data that was collected historically for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (i.e. caliper measurements and photographs). Four types of phantoms were generated to show a range of refinement from reference hybrid-computational phantom to patient-specific phantoms. Each patient is matched to a reference phantom from the UFHP Library based on height and weight. The reference phantom is refined in the anterior/posterior direction to create a ‘caliper-scaled phantom’. A photograph is simulated using a surface rendering from segmented CT images. Further refinement in the lateral direction is performed using ratios from a simulated-photograph to create a ‘photograph and caliper-scaled phantom’; breast size and position is visually adjusted. Patient-specific hybrid phantoms, with matched organ volumes, are generated and show the capabilities of the UF Hybrid Phantom Library. Reference, caliper-scaled, photograph and caliper-scaled, and patient-specific hybrid phantoms are compared with patient-specific voxel phantoms to determine the accuracy of the study. Results: Progression from reference phantom to patient specific hybrid shows good agreement with the patient specific voxel phantoms. Each stage of refinement shows an overall trend of improvement in dose accuracy within the study, which suggests that computational phantoms can show

  4. SU-E-T-13: A Feasibility Study of the Use of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Improved Historical Dose Reconstruction in the Study of Late Radiation Effects for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroccia, H; O'Reilly, S; Bolch, W; Mendenhall, N; Li, Z; Slopsema, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced cancer effects are well-documented following radiotherapy. Further investigation is needed to more accurately determine a dose-response relationship for late radiation effects. Recent dosimetry studies tend to use representative patients (Taylor 2009) or anthropomorphic phantoms (Wirth 2008) for estimating organ mean doses. In this study, we compare hybrid computational phantoms to patient-specific voxel phantoms to test the accuracy of University of Florida Hybrid Phantom Library (UFHP Library) for historical dose reconstructions. Methods: A cohort of 10 patients with CT images was used to reproduce the data that was collected historically for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (i.e. caliper measurements and photographs). Four types of phantoms were generated to show a range of refinement from reference hybrid-computational phantom to patient-specific phantoms. Each patient is matched to a reference phantom from the UFHP Library based on height and weight. The reference phantom is refined in the anterior/posterior direction to create a ‘caliper-scaled phantom’. A photograph is simulated using a surface rendering from segmented CT images. Further refinement in the lateral direction is performed using ratios from a simulated-photograph to create a ‘photograph and caliper-scaled phantom’; breast size and position is visually adjusted. Patient-specific hybrid phantoms, with matched organ volumes, are generated and show the capabilities of the UF Hybrid Phantom Library. Reference, caliper-scaled, photograph and caliper-scaled, and patient-specific hybrid phantoms are compared with patient-specific voxel phantoms to determine the accuracy of the study. Results: Progression from reference phantom to patient specific hybrid shows good agreement with the patient specific voxel phantoms. Each stage of refinement shows an overall trend of improvement in dose accuracy within the study, which suggests that computational phantoms can show

  5. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, Ch.

    2006-11-01

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of ±15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  6. Salivary glands scintigraphy with partial volume effects quantification: A phantom feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpumelelo Nyathi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Salivary gland scintigraphy gives functional information on irradiated glands. Upon irradiation, their size may become less than 2–3 times the resolution of the gamma camera hence underestimation of the regional distribution of administered activity due to partial volume effects (PVEs which hinder accurate quantification of their function. Aim To accurately quantify planar images of spheres mimicking irradiated parotid and submandibular glands with view of implementing salivary gland scintigraphy that involves quantification of PVEs. Methods A hollow head and neck phantom was fitted with spheres (diameters: 20mm; 14mm; 12mm and 10mm filled with technetium-99m solution of activity concentration of 300kBq/mL. The spheres mimicked irradiated parotid glands (right (RP and left (LP and submandibular glands (right (RSM and left (LSM respectively. The phantom was filled with technetium-99m solution of activity concentration 144kBq/mL.1 A planar image was acquired in 5 minutes using Siemens E-Cam dual head gamma camera detector positioned 5cm vertically above the phantom, on 128×128 matrix size following a thyroid protocol. The detector was fitted with low energy high resolution collimators. ImageJ software was used for quantification. Results The image counts post PVEs quantification were: LP=252,690; LP=160,836; RSM=149,315; LSM=68,292. The percentage quantification errors were: 44 per cent, 48 per cent, 51 per cent and 75 per cent for the LP, RP, RSM and LSM glands respectively. Conclusion ImageJ software improved quantitative accuracy of sphere images hence it provides a robust quantification tool for irradiated salivary glands.

  7. Full experimental modelling of a liver tissue mimicking phantom for medical ultrasound studies employing different hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, Sergio; Conversano, Francesco; Musio, Stefano; Casciaro, Ernesto; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    Tissue mimicking phantoms have been widely reported to be an important tool for development, optimisation and performance testing of ultrasound-based diagnostic techniques. In particular, modern applications of tissue mimicking phantoms often include characterisation of the nonlinear behaviour of experimental ultrasound contrast agents. In such cases, the tissue-mimicking materials should be chosen not only based on the values of their density, speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, but also considering their effect on the appearance of "native harmonics" due to nonlinear distortion of ultrasound signal during propagation. In a previous paper it was demonstrated that a cellulose-based hydrogel is suitable to simulate nonlinear acoustical behaviour of liver tissue for thicknesses up to 8 cm. In this paper we present the experimental characterisation of the nonlinear acoustical behaviour of a different polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA)-based hydrogel, in order to assess whether and how it can improve the performances and overcome some limitations of the cellulose-based hydrogel as liver tissue-mimicking material. Samples of pig liver tissue, cellulose-based hydrogel and PEGDA-based hydrogel were insonified in a through-transmission set-up, employing 2.25-MHz pulses with different mechanical index (MI) values. Second harmonic and first harmonic amplitudes were extracted from the spectra of received signals and their difference was then used to compare sample behaviours. Obtained results show how a new more accurate and combined experimental model of linear and nonlinear acoustical behaviour of liver tissue is feasible. In fact, a further confirmation of the cellulose-based hydrogel effectiveness to precisely simulate the liver tissue for penetration depths up to 8 cm was provided, and it was also shown that the employment of the PEGDA-based hydrogel can extend the range of useful tissue-mimicking material thicknesses up to 11 cm, moreover allowing a

  8. Internal strain estimation for quantification of human heel pad elastic modulus: A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Karen; Liebgott, Hervé; Wilhjelm, Jens E.

    2013-01-01

    Shock absorption is the most important function of the human heel pad. However, changes in heel pad elasticity, as seen in e.g. long-distance runners, diabetes patients, and victims of Falanga torture are affecting this function, often in a painful manner. Assessment of heel pad elasticity is usu......, and the three hard phantoms were 89kPa, 153kPa, and 168kPa, respectively. The combination of ultrasound images and force measurements provided an effective way of assessing the elastic properties of the heel pad due to the internal strain estimation....

  9. Phantom studies of triple photon absorptiometry and bone mineral measurement at a hip prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, T.J.; Webber, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using triple photon absorptiometry (TPA) for the measurement of bone mineral mass about a hip prosthesis was examined. A theoretical expression describing the variance of TPA measurements was verified using a triple photon source and phantom materials which simulate the soft tissue-bone mineral-metal prosthesis system. The expression for the variance was used to determine an optimized set of photon energies. It was shown that a precision of 3% could be obtained for reasonable measurement times using this optimized set of energies and that TPA should be a feasible approach for measurement of bone mineral about a hip prosthesis. (orig.)

  10. SU-F-J-174: A Series of Computational Human Phantoms in DICOM-RT Format for Normal Tissue Dose Reconstruction in Epidemiological Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyakuryal, A; Moroz, B; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Lee, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients often require individualized dose estimates of normal tissues. Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D radiological images or not even available. Generic patient CT images are often used in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) to reconstruct normal tissue doses. The objective of the current work was to develop a series of reference size computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format for direct use in dose reconstruction in TPS. Methods: Contours of 93 organs and tissues were extracted from a series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational human phantoms (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old, and adult males and females) using Rhinoceros software. A MATLAB script was created to convert the contours into the DICOM-RT structure format. The simulated CT images with the resolution of 1×1×3 mm3 were also generated from the binary phantom format and coupled with the DICOM-structure files. Accurate volumes of the organs were drawn in the format using precise delineation of the contours in converted format. Due to complex geometry of organs, higher resolution (1×1×1 mm3) was found to be more efficient in the conversion of newborn and 1-year-old phantoms. Results: Contour sets were efficiently converted into DICOM-RT structures in relatively short time (about 30 minutes for each phantom). A good agreement was observed in the volumes between the original phantoms and the converted contours for large organs (NRMSD<1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD<7.7%). Conclusion: A comprehensive series of computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format was created to support epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in radiotherapy patients. We confirmed the DICOM-RT phantoms were successfully imported into the TPS programs of major vendors.

  11. A phantom study of dose compensation behind hip prosthesis using portal dosimetry and dynamic MLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Martin Skovmos; Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: A dose compensation method is presented for patients with hip prosthesis based on Dynamic Multi Leaves Collimator (DMLC) planning. Calculations are done from an exit Portal Dose Image (PDI) from 6 MV Photon beam using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) from Varian. Four different hip prostheses are used for this work. Methods: From an exit PDI the fluence needed to yield a uniform dose distribution behind the prosthesis is calculated. To back-project the dose distribution through the phantom, the lateral scatter is removed by deconvolution with a point spread function (PSF) determined for depths from 10 to 40 cm. The dose maximum, D max , is determined from the primary plan which delivers the PDI. A further deconvolution to remove the dose glare effect in the EPID is performed as well. Additionally, this calculated fluence distribution is imported into the Treatment Planning System (TPS) for the final calculation of a DMLC plan. The fluence file contains information such as the relative central axis (CAX) position, grid size and fluence size needed for correct delivery of the DMLC plan. GafChromic EBT films positioned at 10 cm depth are used as verification of uniform dose distributions behind the prostheses. As the prosthesis is positioned at the phantom surface the dose verifications are done 10 cm from the prosthesis. Conclusion: The film measurement with 6 MV photon beam shows uniform doses within 5% for most points, but with hot/cold spots of 10% near the femoral head prostheses

  12. A Simulation Study on Patient Setup Errors in External Beam Radiotherapy Using an Anthropomorphic 4D Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Samadi Miandoab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Patient set-up optimization is required in radiotherapy to fill the accuracy gap between personalized treatment planning and uncertainties in the irradiation set-up. In this study, we aimed to develop a new method based on neural network to estimate patient geometrical setup using 4-dimensional (4D XCAT anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods To access 4D modeling of motion of dynamic organs, a phantom employs non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso method with spline-based model to generate 4D computed tomography (CT images. First, to generate all the possible roto-translation positions, the 4D CT images were imported to Medical Image Data Examiner (AMIDE. Then, for automatic, real time verification of geometrical setup, an artificial neural network (ANN was proposed to estimate patient displacement, using training sets. Moreover, three external motion markers were synchronized with a patient couch position as reference points. In addition, the technique was validated through simulated activities by using reference 4D CT data acquired from five patients. Results The results indicated that patient geometrical set-up is highly depended on the comprehensiveness of training set. By using ANN model, the average patient setup error in XCAT phantom was reduced from 17.26 mm to 0.50 mm. In addition, in the five real patients, these average errors were decreased from 18.26 mm to 1.48 mm various breathing phases ranging from inhalation to exhalation were taken into account for patient setup. Uncertainty error assessment and different setup errors were obtained from each respiration phase. Conclusion This study proposed a new method for alignment of patient setup error using ANN model. Additionally, our correlation model (ANN could estimate true patient position with less error.

  13. A multivendor phantom study comparing the image quality produced from three state-of-the-art SPECT-CT systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tyler; Celler, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Ongoing advancements in single photon emission computed tomography with on-board X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) hardware and software raise important questions regarding the relative performances of various cameras and their respective image-processing software. This phantom-based study compares images produced from three state-of-the-art cameras using four image quality measurements. A thorax phantom modeling the spine, lungs, a healthy heart, and three tumors (cylindrical bottles) was scanned using the following SPECT-CT systems: Philips' Precedence (PP), GE's Infinia-Hawkeye (GH), and Siemens' Symbia-T6 (SS). For each scan, Tc-99m solutions were injected into the heart, three bottles, and thorax to yield activity concentration ratios of roughly 6:1 for both heart:thorax and tumor:thorax. The data were reconstructed using the most advanced software available on the cameras, namely, Evolution for Bone and Evolution for Cardiac (EVB and EVC, respectively), Astonish (AST), and Flash3D (FLA) for GH, PP, and SS, respectively. In addition, all sets of data were reconstructed using our in-house software. The mean values of activity error, uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast error were used as figures of merit (FOM). No significant differences were observed for all FOM between all in-house reconstructions using PP, GH, and SS acquisition data. The mean activity error for the AST reconstruction (-24.0±1.6%) was significantly closer to the truth relative to EVB (-38.0±1.6%), EVC (-34.5±2.3%), and FLA (-33.8±1.6%). No significant differences were found between EVC and FLA for all FOM. In this phantom-based study, Philips' AST provided the most quantitatively accurate and highest contrast images, whereas Siemens' FLA and GE's EVC provided relatively higher signal-to-noise ratios and more uniform images.

  14. Lesion detection and quantification performance of the Tachyon-I time-of-flight PET scanner: phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Peng, Qiyu; Zhou, Jian; Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2018-03-01

    The first generation Tachyon PET (Tachyon-I) is a demonstration single-ring PET scanner that reaches a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps using LSO scintillator crystals coupled to conventional photomultiplier tubes. The objective of this study was to quantify the improvement in both lesion detection and quantification performance resulting from the improved time-of-flight (TOF) capability of the Tachyon-I scanner. We developed a quantitative TOF image reconstruction method for the Tachyon-I and evaluated its TOF gain for lesion detection and quantification. Scans of either a standard NEMA torso phantom or healthy volunteers were used as the normal background data. Separately scanned point source and sphere data were superimposed onto the phantom or human data after accounting for the object attenuation. We used the bootstrap method to generate multiple independent noisy datasets with and without a lesion present. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a channelized hotelling observer (CHO) was calculated for each lesion size and location combination to evaluate the lesion detection performance. The bias versus standard deviation trade-off of each lesion uptake was also calculated to evaluate the quantification performance. The resulting CHO-SNR measurements showed improved performance in lesion detection with better timing resolution. The detection performance was also dependent on the lesion size and location, in addition to the background object size and shape. The results of bias versus noise trade-off showed that the noise (standard deviation) reduction ratio was about 1.1–1.3 over the TOF 500 ps and 1.5–1.9 over the non-TOF modes, similar to the SNR gains for lesion detection. In conclusion, this Tachyon-I PET study demonstrated the benefit of improved time-of-flight capability on lesion detection and ROI quantification for both phantom and human subjects.

  15. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-07

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom for highly penetrating radiations such as photons and neutrons

  16. A New Method of Measuring the Amount of Soft Tissue in Pulmonary Ground-Glass Opacity Nodules: a Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Won; Kim, Tae Jung; Dae, Chang Min [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jung Gi [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To devise a new method to measure the amount of soft tissue in pulmonary ground-glass opacity nodules, and to compare the use of this method with a previous volumetric measurement method by use of a phantom study. Phantom nodules were prepared with material from fixed normal swine lung. Forty nodules, each with a diameter of 10 mm, were made with a variable mean attenuation. The reference-standard amount of soft tissue in the nodules was obtained by dividing the weight by the specific gravity. The imaging data on the phantom nodules were acquired with the use of a 16- channel multidetector CT scanner. The CT-measured amount of soft tissue of the nodules was calculated as follows: soft tissue amount = volume x (1 + mean attenuation value / 1,000). The relative percentage error (RPE) between the CT-measured amount of the soft tissue and the reference-standard amount of the soft tissue was also measured. The RPEs determined with use of the new method were compared with the RPEs determined with the current volumetric measurement method by the use of the paired t test. The CT-measured amount of soft tissue showed a strong correlation with the reference-standard amount of soft tissue (R2 = 0.996, p < 0.01). The mean RPE of the CT-measured amount of soft tissue in the nodules was 7.79 {+-} 1.88%. The mean RPE of the CT-measured volume was 114.78 {+-} 51.02%, which was significantly greater than the RPE of the CT-measured amount of soft tissue (p < 0.01). The amount of soft tissue measured by the use of CT reflects the reference-standard amount of soft tissue in the ground-glass opacity nodules much more accurately than does the use of the CT-measured volume.

  17. CT image quality in sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction phantom study - is there a point of diminishing returns?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infante, Juan C. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Yu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    In our pediatric practice, we have observed qualitatively limited improvement in the image quality of images generated with sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) compared to series generated with filtered back projection (FBP), particularly in cases near or below a CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of 1-mGy. To determine whether the image quality advantage of SAFIRE remains constant across clinically used CT dose levels in an American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation phantom including the lower dose range used in pediatric imaging. An exemption from institutional review board approval was obtained for this phantom-based study. An ACR quality phantom was scanned in incremental kV steps and effective tube current intervals. Acquisitions were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strengths of 1, 3 and 5. Image quality measures were calculated including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), low-contrast resolution and high-contrast resolution. Peak SNR was also calculated. Descriptive and nonparametric statistics were used to compare these image quality metrics while normalizing to CT dose index (CTDI). The percent improvement in SNR and peak SNR of SAFIRE reconstructions compared to FBP decreased from about 70% for image sets acquired above a 1.42 mGy CTDI to 25% at a 0.25 mGy CTDI. CNR improvement with SAFIRE did not vary with dose. No significant difference was seen in the low-contrast resolution or high-contrast resolution of SAFIRE images compared to FBP. SNR did not improve equally after applying SAFIRE across a spectrum clinically used CTDIs. Below a threshold CTDI, the incremental improvement of SAFIRE compared to FBP decreased. (orig.)

  18. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa; McCullough, William P.; Mecca, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash registered CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by visual

  19. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McCullough, William P. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mecca, Patricia [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash {sup registered} CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by

  20. Regular phantom black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  1. Towards assessing cortical bone porosity using low-frequency quantitative acoustics: A phantom-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Vogl

    Full Text Available Cortical porosity is a key characteristic governing the structural properties and mechanical behaviour of bone, and its quantification is therefore critical for understanding and monitoring the development of various bone pathologies such as osteoporosis. Axial transmission quantitative acoustics has shown to be a promising technique for assessing bone health in a fast, non-invasive, and radiation-free manner. One major hurdle in bringing this approach to clinical application is the entanglement of the effects of individual characteristics (e.g. geometry, porosity, anisotropy etc. on the measured wave propagation. In order to address this entanglement problem, we therefore propose a systematic bottom-up approach, in which only one bone property is varied, before addressing interaction effects. This work therefore investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency quantitative acoustics to changes in porosity as well as individual pore characteristics using specifically designed cortical bone phantoms.14 bone phantoms were designed with varying pore size, axial-, and radial pore number, resulting in porosities (bone volume fraction between 0% and 15%, similar to porosity values found in human cortical bone. All phantoms were manufactured using laser sintering, measured using axial-transmission acoustics and analysed using a full-wave approach. Experimental results were compared to theoretical predictions based on a modified Timoshenko theory.A clear dependence of phase velocity on frequency and porosity produced by increasing pore size or radial pore number was demonstrated, with the velocity decreasing by between 2-5 m/s per percent of additional porosity, which corresponds to -0.5% to -1.0% of wave speed. While the change in phase velocity due to axial pore number was consistent with the results due to pore size and radial pore number, the relative uncertainties for the estimates were too high to draw any conclusions for this parameter.This work has

  2. Intermanufacturer Comparison of Dual-Energy CT Iodine Quantification and Monochromatic Attenuation: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Megan C; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Wood, Cayla A; Tamm, Eric P; Godoy, Myrna C; Sun, Jia; Cody, Dianna D

    2018-04-01

    Purpose To determine the accuracy of dual-energy computed tomographic (CT) quantitation in a phantom system comparing fast kilovolt peak-switching, dual-source, split-filter, sequential-scanning, and dual-layer detector systems. Materials and Methods A large elliptical phantom containing iodine (2, 5, and 15 mg/mL), simulated contrast material-enhanced blood, and soft-tissue inserts with known elemental compositions was scanned three to five times with seven dual-energy CT systems and a total of 10 kilovolt peak settings. Monochromatic images (50, 70, and 140 keV) and iodine concentration images were created. Mean iodine concentration and monochromatic attenuation for each insert and reconstruction energy level were recorded. Measurement bias was assessed by using the sum of the mean signed errors measured across relevant inserts for each monochromatic energy level and iodine concentration. Iodine and monochromatic errors were assessed by using the root sum of the squared error of all measurements. Results At least one acquisition paradigm per scanner had iodine biases (range, -2.6 to 1.5 mg/mL) with significant differences from zero. There were no significant differences in iodine error (range, 0.44-1.70 mg/mL) among the top five acquisition paradigms (one fast kilovolt peak switching, three dual source, and one sequential scanning). Monochromatic bias was smallest for 70 keV (-12.7 to 15.8 HU) and largest for 50 keV (-80.6 to 35.2 HU). There were no significant differences in monochromatic error (range, 11.4-52.0 HU) among the top three acquisition paradigms (one dual source and two fast kilovolt peak switching). The lowest accuracy for both measures was with a split-filter system. Conclusion Iodine and monochromatic accuracy varies among systems, but dual-source and fast kilovolt-switching generally provided the most accurate results in a large phantom. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  3. Extension of RPI-adult male and female computational phantoms to obese patients and a Monte Carlo study of the effect on CT imaging dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping; Mille, Matthew M.; Liu, Tianyu; Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George

    2012-05-01

    Although it is known that obesity has a profound effect on x-ray computed tomography (CT) image quality and patient organ dose, quantitative data describing this relationship are not currently available. This study examines the effect of obesity on the calculated radiation dose to organs and tissues from CT using newly developed phantoms representing overweight and obese patients. These phantoms were derived from the previously developed RPI-adult male and female computational phantoms. The result was a set of ten phantoms (five males, five females) with body mass indexes ranging from 23.5 (normal body weight) to 46.4 kg m-2 (morbidly obese). The phantoms were modeled using triangular mesh geometry and include specified amounts of the subcutaneous adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue. The mesh-based phantoms were then voxelized and defined in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended code to calculate organ doses from CT imaging. Chest-abdomen-pelvis scanning protocols for a GE LightSpeed 16 scanner operating at 120 and 140 kVp were considered. It was found that for the same scanner operating parameters, radiation doses to organs deep in the abdomen (e.g., colon) can be up to 59% smaller for obese individuals compared to those of normal body weight. This effect was found to be less significant for shallow organs. On the other hand, increasing the tube potential from 120 to 140 kVp for the same obese individual resulted in increased organ doses by as much as 56% for organs within the scan field (e.g., stomach) and 62% for those out of the scan field (e.g., thyroid), respectively. As higher tube currents are often used for larger patients to maintain image quality, it was of interest to quantify the associated effective dose. It was found from this study that when the mAs was doubled for the obese level-I, obese level-II and morbidly-obese phantoms, the effective dose relative to that of the normal weight phantom increased by 57%, 42% and 23%, respectively. This set

  4. Reduction of peristalsis-related gastrointestinal streak artifacts with dual-energy CT: a patient and phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklhofer, Sebastian; Lambert, Jack W; Wang, Zhen Jane; Sun, Yuxin; Gould, Robert G; Zagoria, Ronald J; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the ability of rapid-kV switching (rs) dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) to reduce peristalsis-related streak artifact. rsDECT images of 100 consecutive patients (48 male, 52 female, mean age 57 years) were retrospectively evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Image reconstructions included virtual monochromatic 70 and 120 keV images, as well as iodine(-water) and water(-iodine) material decomposition images. We recorded the presence and severity of artifacts qualitatively (4-point scale) and quantitatively [iodine/water concentrations, Hounsfield units, gray scale values (GY)] and compared to corresponding unaffected reference tissue. Similar measures were obtained in DECT images of a peristalsis phantom. Wilcoxon signed-rank and paired t tests were used to compare results between different image reconstructions. Peristalsis-related streak artifacts were found in 49 (49%) of the DECT examinations. Artifacts were significantly more severe in 70, 120, and water(-iodine) images than in iodine(-water) images (qualitative readout P peristalsis DECT phantom study. Peristalsis-related streak artifacts seen in 70, 120 keV, and water(-iodine) images are substantially reduced in iodine(-water) images at rsDECT.

  5. 3D Surface Realignment Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Phantom Study with PET Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2011-01-01

    on a plastic mannequin head equipped with two positron emitting line sources. Two experiments were performed. The rst simulates rapid and short head movements, while the second simulates slow and contin- uous movements. In both cases, the system was able to produce PET scans with focus the PET reconstructions......We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph PET brain scanner. The structured light system...... of recon- structed PET frames. To align the structured light system with the PET coordinate system a novel registration algorithm based on the PET trans- mission scan and an initial surface has been developed. The performance of the complete setup has been evaluated using a custom made phantom based...

  6. 3D Surface Realignment Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Phantom Study with PET Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2013-01-01

    -made phantom, based on a plastic mannequin head equipped with two positron-emitting line sources. Two experiments were performed. The first simulates rapid and short head movements, while the second simulates slow and continuous movements. In both cases, the system was able to produce PET scans with focused......We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The system is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET brain scanner...... to reposition a sequence of reconstructed PET frames. To align the structured light system with the PET coordinate system, a novel registration algorithm based on the PET transmission scan and an initial surface has been developed. The performance of the complete setup has been evaluated using a custom...

  7. Simultaneous estimation of bidirectional particle flow and relative flux using MUSIC-OCT: phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-11-01

    In an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan from a living tissue, red blood cells (RBCs) are the major source of backscattering signal from moving particles within microcirculatory system. Measuring the concentration and velocity of RBC particles allows assessment of RBC flux and flow, respectively, to assess tissue perfusion and oxygen/nutrition exchange rates within micro-structures. In this paper, we propose utilizing spectral estimation techniques to simultaneously quantify bi-directional particle flow and relative flux by spectral estimation of the received OCT signal from moving particles within capillary tubes embedded in tissue mimicking phantoms. The proposed method can be directly utilized for in vivo quantification of capillaries and microvessels. Compared to the existing methods in the literature that can either quantify flow direction or power, our proposed method allows simultaneous flow (velocity) direction and relative flux (power) estimation.

  8. Streak artifacts in dynamic CT. A phantom study of the anterior upper abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partanen, K. (Kuopio Central Hospital (Finland)); Kormano, M. (Turku Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Radiology)

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a body phantom during dynamic CT scanning with the Somatom 2 CT scanner indicate that the periodic streak artifacts seen on the anterior part of the liver in patients are caused by peristalsis of the stomach and resulting motion of the air fluid level. Therefore, the attenuation values of the anterior portion of the liver artifactually oscillate around the baseline value during the dynamic series of scans. This artifact is produced by a change in the position of the stomach air fluid level and is dependent on the direction of tube rotation. The mean of the artifactually oscillating attenuation readings is close to the mean density but usually useless in dynamic CT because the attenuation values change so rapidly in the dynamic phase that averaging measurements also will cause errors.

  9. Geometrical accuracy and fusion of multimodal vascular images: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussion, Nicolas; Soulez, Gilles; De Guise, Jacques A.; Daronat, Michel; Qin Zhao; Cloutier, Guy

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the geometrical accuracy of x-ray angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), x-ray computed tomography (XCT), and ultrasound imaging (B-mode and IVUS, or intravascular ultrasound) for measuring the lumen diameters of blood vessels. An image fusion method was also developed to improve these measurements. The images were acquired from a phantom that mimic vessels of known diameters. After acquisition, the multimodal images were coregistered by manual alignment of fiducial markers, and then by maximization of mutual information. The fusion method was performed by means of a fuzzy logic modeling approach followed by a combination process based on a possibilistic theory. The results showed (i) the better geometrical accuracy of XCT and IVUS compared to the other modalities, and (ii) the better accuracy and smaller variability of fused images compared to single modalities, with respect to most diameters investigated. For XCT, the error varied from 0.4% to 5.4%, depending on the vessel diameter that ranged from 0.93 to 6.24 mm. For IVUS, the error ranged from -0.3% to 1.7% but the smallest vessel (0.93 mm) could not be investigated because of the probe size. Compared to others fusion schemes, the XCT-MRI fused images provided the best results for both accuracy (from -1.6% to 0.2% for the three largest vessels) and robustness (mean relative error of 1.9%). To conclude, this work underlined both the usefulness of the multimodality vascular phantom as a validation tool and the utility of image fusion in the vascular context

  10. Scattered dose to gonads and associated risks from radiotherapy for common pediatric malignancies. A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, M.; Zacharopoulou, F.; Damilakis, J.; Kachris, S.; Varveris, C.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the scattered dose to ovaries and testes from radiotherapy for common pediatric malignancies and to assess the relevant risks for radiation-induced gonadal damage and hereditary disorders in future generations. Material and Methods: Radiotherapy for central nervous system tumors, acute leukemia, neuroblastoma, Hodgkin's disease, Wilms' tumor, and sarcoma was simulated on three humanoid phantoms representing patients of 5, 10, and 15 years of age. Ovarian and testicular dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters on a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator (MLC) producing 6-MV X-rays. The effect of lead block introduction into the primary beam on the gonadal dose was evaluated. Gonadal dose from radiotherapy for abdominal tumors was measured using an 18-MV photon beam. Results: For a tumor dose range of 12-55 Gy, the scattered dose to ovaries was 0.5-62.4 cGy depending upon the patient's age (corresponding phantom) and treatment site. The corresponding dose to testes was 0.4-145.0 cGy. The use of blocks for field shaping can increase the gonadal dose up to a factor of 2.0 compared to that measured using MLC. Abdominal irradiation with 18-MV instead of 6-MV X-rays reduced the gonadal dose by more than 1.3 times. For female and male patients, the risk for induction of hereditary disorders was less than 81 x 10 -4 and 188 x 10 -4 , respectively. Conclusion: The present dosimetric data suggest that pediatric radiotherapy is not associated with a risk for permanent damage to gonads excluded from the treatment volume. The risk for development of hereditary disorders in offspring conceived after exposure is low. (orig.)

  11. Scattered dose to gonads and associated risks from radiotherapy for common pediatric malignancies. A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, M.; Zacharopoulou, F.; Damilakis, J. [Univ. Hospital of Iraklion, Crete (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics; Kachris, S.; Varveris, C. [Univ. Hospital of Iraklion, Crete (Greece). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology; Gourtsoyiannis, N. [Univ. Hospital of Iraklion, Crete (Greece). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the scattered dose to ovaries and testes from radiotherapy for common pediatric malignancies and to assess the relevant risks for radiation-induced gonadal damage and hereditary disorders in future generations. Material and Methods: Radiotherapy for central nervous system tumors, acute leukemia, neuroblastoma, Hodgkin's disease, Wilms' tumor, and sarcoma was simulated on three humanoid phantoms representing patients of 5, 10, and 15 years of age. Ovarian and testicular dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters on a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator (MLC) producing 6-MV X-rays. The effect of lead block introduction into the primary beam on the gonadal dose was evaluated. Gonadal dose from radiotherapy for abdominal tumors was measured using an 18-MV photon beam. Results: For a tumor dose range of 12-55 Gy, the scattered dose to ovaries was 0.5-62.4 cGy depending upon the patient's age (corresponding phantom) and treatment site. The corresponding dose to testes was 0.4-145.0 cGy. The use of blocks for field shaping can increase the gonadal dose up to a factor of 2.0 compared to that measured using MLC. Abdominal irradiation with 18-MV instead of 6-MV X-rays reduced the gonadal dose by more than 1.3 times. For female and male patients, the risk for induction of hereditary disorders was less than 81 x 10{sup -4} and 188 x 10{sup -4}, respectively. Conclusion: The present dosimetric data suggest that pediatric radiotherapy is not associated with a risk for permanent damage to gonads excluded from the treatment volume. The risk for development of hereditary disorders in offspring conceived after exposure is low. (orig.)

  12. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  13. Registration accuracy enhancement of a surgical navigation system for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A phantom and cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjun; Lee, Byung Hoon; Mekuria, Kinde; Cho, Hyunchul; Park, Sehyung; Wang, Joon Ho; Lee, Deukhee

    2017-03-01

    Recently, surgical navigation systems have been widely used to improve the results of various orthopaedic surgeries. However, surgical navigation has not been successful in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, owing to its inaccuracy and inconvenience. This study investigated the registration of preoperative and intraoperative data, which are the key components in improving accuracy of the navigation system. An accurate registration method was proposed using new optical tracking markers and landmark retake. A surgical planning and navigation system for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was developed and implemented. The accuracy of the proposed system has been evaluated using phantoms and eight cadaveric knees. The present study investigated only the registration accuracy excluding the errors of optical tracking hardware and surgeon. The target registration errors of femoral tunnelling for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in phantoms were found to be 0.24±0.03mm and 0.19±0.10° for the tunnel entry position and tunnel direction, respectively. The target registration errors measured using cadavers were 0.9mm and 1.94°, respectively. The preclinical experimental results showed that the proposed methods enhanced the registration accuracy of the developed system. As the system becomes more accurate, surgeons could more precisely position and orient the femoral and tibial tunnels to their original anatomical locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  15. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  16. Treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP) based on augmented reality and gaming controlled by myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study of a chronic PLP patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max; Sander, Nichlas; Kristoffersen, Morten B; Håkansson, Bo; Brånemark, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    A variety of treatments have been historically used to alleviate phantom limb pain (PLP) with varying efficacy. Recently, virtual reality (VR) has been employed as a more sophisticated mirror therapy. Despite the advantages of VR over a conventional mirror, this approach has retained the use of the contralateral limb and is therefore restricted to unilateral amputees. Moreover, this strategy disregards the actual effort made by the patient to produce phantom motions. In this work, we investigate a treatment in which the virtual limb responds directly to myoelectric activity at the stump, while the illusion of a restored limb is enhanced through augmented reality (AR). Further, phantom motions are facilitated and encouraged through gaming. The proposed set of technologies was administered to a chronic PLP patient who has shown resistance to a variety of treatments (including mirror therapy) for 48 years. Individual and simultaneous phantom movements were predicted using myoelectric pattern recognition and were then used as input for VR and AR environments, as well as for a racing game. The sustained level of pain reported by the patient was gradually reduced to complete pain-free periods. The phantom posture initially reported as a strongly closed fist was gradually relaxed, interestingly resembling the neutral posture displayed by the virtual limb. The patient acquired the ability to freely move his phantom limb, and a telescopic effect was observed where the position of the phantom hand was restored to the anatomically correct distance. More importantly, the effect of the interventions was positively and noticeably perceived by the patient and his relatives. Despite the limitation of a single case study, the successful results of the proposed system in a patient for whom other medical and non-medical treatments have been ineffective justifies and motivates further investigation in a wider study.

  17. Treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP based on augmented reality and gaming controlled by myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study of a chronic PLP patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max eOrtiz-Catalan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A variety of treatments have been historically used to alleviate phantom limb pain (PLP with varying efficacy. Recently, virtual reality (VR has been employed as a more sophisticated mirror therapy. Despite the advantages of VR over a conventional mirror, this approach has retained the use of the contralateral limb and is therefore restricted to unilateral amputees. Moreover, this strategy disregards the actual effort made by the patient to produce phantom motions. In this work, we investigate a treatment in which the virtual limb responds directly to myoelectric activity at the stump, while the illusion of a restored limb is enhanced through augmented reality (AR. Further, phantom motions are facilitated and encouraged through gaming.The proposed set of technologies was administered to a chronic PLP patient who has shown resistance to a variety of treatments (including mirror therapy for 48 years. Individual and simultaneous phantom movements were predicted using myoelectric pattern recognition and were then used as input for VR and AR environments, as well as for a racing game.The sustained level of pain reported by the patient was gradually reduced to complete pain-free periods. The phantom posture initially reported as a strongly closed fist was gradually relaxed, interestingly resembling the neutral posture displayed by the virtual limb. The patient acquired the ability to freely move his phantom limb and a telescopic effect was observed where the position of the phantom hand was restored to the anatomically correct distance. More importantly, the effect of the interventions was positively and noticeably perceived by the patient and his relatives.Despite the limitation of a single case study, the successful results of the proposed system in a patient for whom other medical and non-medical treatments have been ineffective justifies and motivates further investigation in a wider study.

  18. A new head-mounted display-based augmented reality system in neurosurgical oncology: a study on phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Fabrizio; Meola, Antonio; Carbone, Marina; Sinceri, Sara; Cagnazzo, Federico; Denaro, Ennio; Esposito, Nicola; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2017-12-01

    Benefits of minimally invasive neurosurgery mandate the development of ergonomic paradigms for neuronavigation. Augmented Reality (AR) systems can overcome the shortcomings of commercial neuronavigators. The aim of this work is to apply a novel AR system, based on a head-mounted stereoscopic video see-through display, as an aid in complex neurological lesion targeting. Effectiveness was investigated on a newly designed patient-specific head mannequin featuring an anatomically realistic brain phantom with embedded synthetically created tumors and eloquent areas. A two-phase evaluation process was adopted in a simulated small tumor resection adjacent to Broca's area. Phase I involved nine subjects without neurosurgical training in performing spatial judgment tasks. In Phase II, three surgeons were involved in assessing the effectiveness of the AR-neuronavigator in performing brain tumor targeting on a patient-specific head phantom. Phase I revealed the ability of the AR scene to evoke depth perception under different visualization modalities. Phase II confirmed the potentialities of the AR-neuronavigator in aiding the determination of the optimal surgical access to the surgical target. The AR-neuronavigator is intuitive, easy-to-use, and provides three-dimensional augmented information in a perceptually-correct way. The system proved to be effective in guiding skin incision, craniotomy, and lesion targeting. The preliminary results encourage a structured study to prove clinical effectiveness. Moreover, our testing platform might be used to facilitate training in brain tumour resection procedures.

  19. Low contrast detectability and spatial resolution with model-based iterative reconstructions of MDCT images: a phantom and cadaveric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millon, Domitille; Coche, Emmanuel E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Vlassenbroek, Alain [Philips Healthcare, Brussels (Belgium); Maanen, Aline G. van; Cambier, Samantha E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Statistics Unit, King Albert II Cancer Institute, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    To compare image quality [low contrast (LC) detectability, noise, contrast-to-noise (CNR) and spatial resolution (SR)] of MDCT images reconstructed with an iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm and a filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. The experimental study was performed on a 256-slice MDCT. LC detectability, noise, CNR and SR were measured on a Catphan phantom scanned with decreasing doses (48.8 down to 0.7 mGy) and parameters typical of a chest CT examination. Images were reconstructed with FBP and a model-based IR algorithm. Additionally, human chest cadavers were scanned and reconstructed using the same technical parameters. Images were analyzed to illustrate the phantom results. LC detectability and noise were statistically significantly different between the techniques, supporting model-based IR algorithm (p < 0.0001). At low doses, the noise in FBP images only enabled SR measurements of high contrast objects. The superior CNR of model-based IR algorithm enabled lower dose measurements, which showed that SR was dose and contrast dependent. Cadaver images reconstructed with model-based IR illustrated that visibility and delineation of anatomical structure edges could be deteriorated at low doses. Model-based IR improved LC detectability and enabled dose reduction. At low dose, SR became dose and contrast dependent. (orig.)

  20. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiya Noto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was evaluated in comparison to noninterrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds. The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to noninterrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany. Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater.

  1. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noto, K.; Ueda, Sh.; Kojima, H.; Isomura, N.; Takemura, A.; Takamatsu, Sh.; Kumano, T.; Takanaka, T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was evaluated in comparison to non interrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds). The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to non interrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater

  2. Comparison of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) generated from 4-slice and 64-slice helical CT scanners, a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Vinod; Deshpande, S.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are generated from CT data sets and playa vital role for verifying patient position for many radiotherapy treatments. The present study aimed to investigate the impact on the image quality of DRRs due to changes in the original CT data acquisition; specifically a 4-slice CT scanner and a 64-slice CT scanner have been considered. A specifically designed CT simulation phantom (Nuclear Associates Model 76--417) with test patterns to measure low contrast and modulation transfer function (MTF) was used to evaluate DRR characteristics for Siemens Somatom Sensation 4 and Sensation 64 CT scanners. The phantom was scanned as described in the manufacturer's manual, using the departmental protocol for head CT. The CT images were obtained with 120 kV, 300 mAs, a scanning and reconstruction pitch of I and collimation of I mm. Each of the test patterns from the DRRs was compared for the 4-slice and the 64-slice helical scans. Results The calculated relative MTF (RMTF) showed higher spatial resolution for DRRs generated from 64-slice scans compared with 4-slice scans, Fig. 1. The low contrast values for hole diameter patterns on the DRRs ranged from 0.01-8.04% for 64 slice scans and 0.06-6.15% for 4 slice scans.

  3. Computer tomographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonn, A.H.R.; Jacobsen, D.R.; Zech, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A reference phantom for computer tomography employs a flexible member with means for urging the flexible member into contact along the curved surface of the lumbar region of a human patient. In one embodiment, the reference phantom is pre-curved in an arc greater than required. Pressure from the weight of a patient laying upon the reference phantom is effective for straightening out the curvature sufficiently to achieve substantial contact along the lumbar region. The curvature of the reference phantom may be additionally distorted by a resilient pad between the resilient phantom and a table for urging it into contact with the lumbar region. In a second embodiment of the invention, a flexible reference phantom is disposed in a slot in the top of a resilient cushion. The resilient cushion and reference phantom may be enclosed in a flexible container. A partially curved reference phantom in a slot in a resilient cushion is also contemplated. (author)

  4. Rapid prototyping compliant arterial phantoms for in-vitro studies and device testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biglino Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compliant vascular phantoms are desirable for in-vitro patient-specific experiments and device testing. TangoPlus FullCure 930® is a commercially available rubber-like material that can be used for PolyJet rapid prototyping. This work aims to gather preliminary data on the distensibility of this material, in order to assess the feasibility of its use in the context of experimental cardiovascular modelling. Methods The descending aorta anatomy of a volunteer was modelled in 3D from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR images and rapid prototyped using TangoPlus. The model was printed with a range of increasing wall thicknesses (0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.5 mm, keeping the lumen of the vessel constant. Models were also printed in both vertical and horizontal orientations, thus resulting in a total of ten specimens. Compliance tests were performed by monitoring pressure variations while gradually increasing and decreasing internal volume. Knowledge of distensibility was thus derived and then implemented with CMR data to test two applications. Firstly, a patient-specific compliant model of hypoplastic aorta suitable for connection in a mock circulatory loop for in-vitro tests was manufactured. Secondly, the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT of a patient necessitating pulmonary valve replacement was printed in order to physically test device insertion and assess patient’s suitability for percutaneous pulmonary valve intervention. Results The distensibility of the material was identified in a range from 6.5 × 10-3 mmHg-1 for the 0.6 mm case, to 3.0 × 10-3 mmHg-1 for the 1.5 mm case. The models printed in the vertical orientation were always more compliant than their horizontal counterpart. Rapid prototyping of a compliant hypoplastic aorta and of a RVOT anatomical model were both feasible. Device insertion in the RVOT model was successful. Conclusion Values of distensibility, compared with literature data, show that Tango

  5. Ultrasound elastography: advantages, limitations and artefacts of the different techniques from a study on a phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi-Abella, S; Elie, C; Correas, J-M

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a technique currently under development. Its use in clinical practice is complicated because of the wide range of techniques used by the different manufacturers and the parameters proposed to characterise tissues. A comparative analysis on five ultrasound diagnostic systems has been performed on a calibrated elasticity phantom and demonstrated that: (1) all systems tested are reliable for simple qualitative analysis: is a nodule present and is it harder or softer than neighbouring tissues? (2) the deformation or hardness ratios between two regions are usually, however, not proportional to the theoretical ratios and only a binary analysis greater than 1 (harder) and less than 1 (softer) is reliable and could be used as a negative predictive value (NPV) for malignant lesions, as has been suggested by some authors; (3) finally, quantitative analysis using shear wave techniques performed variably, reliable measurements being obtained with only one of the systems. Measurements produced by these different systems must not be compared in clinical practice to monitor a patient and the threshold values proposed in the literature must only be used in an analysis carried out with the same system and same probe. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. ACCURATUM: improved calcium volume scoring using a mesh-based algorithm - a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saur, Stefan C.; Szekely, Gabor; Alkadhi, Hatem; Desbiolles, Lotus; Cattin, Philippe C.

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of the classical volume scoring method for quantifying coronary calcifications, including accuracy, variability between examinations, and dependency on plaque density and acquisition parameters, a mesh-based volume measurement method has been developed. It was evaluated and compared with the classical volume scoring method for accuracy, i.e., the normalized volume (measured volume/ground-truthed volume), and for variability between examinations (standard deviation of accuracy). A cardiac computed-tomography (CT) phantom containing various cylindrical calcifications was scanned using different tube voltages and reconstruction kernels, at various positions and orientations on the CT table and using different slice thicknesses. Mean accuracy for all plaques was significantly higher (p<0.0001) for the proposed method (1.220±0.507) than for the classical volume score (1.896±1.095). In contrast to the classical volume score, plaque density (p=0.84), reconstruction kernel (p=0.19), and tube voltage (p=0.27) had no impact on the accuracy of the developed method. In conclusion, the method presented herein is more accurate than classical calcium scoring and is less dependent on tube voltage, reconstruction kernel, and plaque density. (orig.)

  7. Coronary calcium mass scores measured by identical 64-slice MDCT scanners are comparable : a cardiac phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Groen, Jaap M.; Vliegenthart-Proenca, Rozemarijn; Renema, KlaasJan W. K.; de Lange, Frank; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    To assess whether absolute mass scores are comparable or differ between identical 64-slice MDCT scanners of the same manufacturer and to compare absolute mass scores to the physical mass and between scan modes using a calcified phantom. A non-moving anthropomorphic phantom with nine calcifications

  8. Influence of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on CT calcium scores : a multi-manufacturer dynamic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    To evaluate the influence of dose reduction in combination with iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary calcium scores (CCS) in a dynamic phantom on state-of-the-art CT systems from different manufacturers. Calcified inserts in an anthropomorphic chest phantom were translated at 20 mm/s

  9. Post-mortem computed tomography angiography utilizing barium sulfate to identify microvascular structures : a preliminary phantom model and case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haakma, Wieke; Rohde, Marianne; Kuster, Lidy; Uhrenholt, Lars; Pedersen, Michael; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of computer tomography angiography (CTA) to visualize microvascular structures in a vessel-mimicking phantom and post-mortem (PM) bodies. A contrast agent was used based on 22% barium sulfate, 20% polyethylene glycol and 58% distilled water. A vessel-mimicking phantom

  10. Effect of phantom voxelization in CT simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Beekman, Freek J.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2002-01-01

    In computer simulations of x-ray CT systems one can either use continuous geometrical descriptions for phantoms or a voxelized representation. The voxelized approach allows arbitrary phantoms to be defined without being confined to geometrical shapes. The disadvantage of the voxelized approach is that inherent errors are introduced due to the phantom voxelization. To study effects of phantom discretization, analytical CT simulations were run for a fan-beam geometry with phantom voxel sizes ranging from 0.0625 to 2 times the reconstructed pixel size and noise levels corresponding to 10 3 -10 7 photons per detector pixel prior to attenuation. The number of rays traced per detector element was varied from 1 to 16. Differences in the filtered backprojection images caused by changing the phantom matrix sizes and number of rays traced were assessed by calculating the difference between reconstructions based on the finest matrix and coarser matrix simulations. In noise free simulations, all phantom matrix sizes produced a measurable difference in comparison with the finest phantom matrix used. When even a small amount of noise was added to the projection data, the differences due to the phantom discretization were masked by the noise, and in all cases there was almost no improvement by using a phantom matrix that was more than twice as fine as the reconstruction matrix. No substantial improvement was achieved by tracing more than 4 rays per detector pixel

  11. Optical imaging of green fluorescent protein markers for tracking vascular gene expression: a feasibility study in human tissue-like phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ananda; Chen, Hunter H.; Long, Erin; Wang, Danming; Yang, Xiaoming

    2002-06-01

    Vascular gene therapy is an exciting approach to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, to date, there are no imaging modalities available for non-invasive detection of vascular gene expression. We have developed an optical imaging method to track vascular gene expression by detecting fluorescent signals emitted from arterial walls following gene transfer. To investigate the feasibility of this new technique, we performed experiments on a set of human tissue-like phantoms using a common biological marker in gene therapy, the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The phantoms were constructed to mimic the arterial geometry beneath a tissue layer. Human smooth muscle cells transfected with GFP were embedded in a capillary tube in the phantom. Monte Carlo modeling of the phantom experiment was performed to optimize the performance of the optical imaging system. We compared the fluence rates among three types of light beams, including ring beam, Gaussian beam, and flat beam. The results showed that our optical imaging system was able to detect fluorescent signals up to 5-mm depth in the phantom, and that flat beam geometry would produce the optimum fluorescence remittance. This study provides valuable insights for improvements to the optical imaging system and refinement of the new technique to non-invasively detect/track vascular gene expression.

  12. Fabrication of an anthropomorphous phantom equipped with sensors to assess the efficient dose at workstations submitted to photonic fields: experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darreon, J.

    2009-12-01

    The efficient dose is a reference value in radioprotection. It allows the harmfulness of ionizing radiations received by organs and tissues to be assessed. It is used on a legal basis but is not directly measurable. This research thesis reports a practical feasibility study of an anthropomorphous dummy or phantom equipped with sensors to assess the efficient dose from selective measurements. A first part deals with the dose measurement system, i.e. the sensors which will be embedded in the phantom. The second part, based on a simulation performed with a Monte Carlo code, reports the study of the efficient dose assessment accuracies for different irradiation configurations which could be obtained with this measurement instrument. The author shows that the estimation accuracy can be improved by modifying the sensor locations with respect to doses deposited in future reference phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  13. Iterative reconstruction for CT perfusion with a prior-image induced hybrid nonlocal means regularization: Phantom studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangdong 510515, China and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Lyu, Qingwen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 and Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangdong 510280 (China); Ma, Jianhua [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangdong 510515 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging, an initial phase CT acquired with a high-dose protocol can be used to improve the image quality of later phase CT acquired with a low-dose protocol. For dynamic regions, signals in the later low-dose CT may not be completely recovered if the initial CT heavily regularizes the iterative reconstruction process. The authors propose a hybrid nonlocal means (hNLM) regularization model for iterative reconstruction of low-dose CTP to overcome the limitation of the conventional prior-image induced penalty. Methods: The hybrid penalty was constructed by combining the NLM of the initial phase high-dose CT in the stationary region and later phase low-dose CT in the dynamic region. The stationary and dynamic regions were determined by the similarity between the initial high-dose scan and later low-dose scan. The similarity was defined as a Gaussian kernel-based distance between the patch-window of the same pixel in the two scans, and its measurement was then used to weigh the influence of the initial high-dose CT. For regions with high similarity (e.g., stationary region), initial high-dose CT played a dominant role for regularizing the solution. For regions with low similarity (e.g., dynamic region), the regularization relied on a low-dose scan itself. This new hNLM penalty was incorporated into the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) for CTP reconstruction. Digital and physical phantom studies were performed to evaluate the PWLS-hNLM algorithm. Results: Both phantom studies showed that the PWLS-hNLM algorithm is superior to the conventional prior-image induced penalty term without considering the signal changes within the dynamic region. In the dynamic region of the Catphan phantom, the reconstruction error measured by root mean square error was reduced by 42.9% in PWLS-hNLM reconstructed image. Conclusions: The PWLS-hNLM algorithm can effectively use the initial high-dose CT to reconstruct low-dose CTP in the

  14. Influence of difference in cross-sectional dose profile in a CTDI phantom on X-ray CT dose estimation: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Ida, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal dose profile in a computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom had been studied by many researchers. The cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom, however, has not been studied. It is also important to understand the cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom for dose estimation in X-ray CT. In this study, the cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom was calculated by use of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. A helical or a 320-detector-row cone-beam X-ray CT scanner was simulated. The cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom from surface to surface through the center point was calculated by MC simulation. The shape of the calculation region was a cylinder of 1-mm-diameter. The length of the cylinder was 23, 100, or 300 mm to represent various CT ionization chamber lengths. Detailed analyses of the energy depositions demonstrated that the cross-sectional dose profile was different in measurement methods and phantom sizes. In this study, we also focused on the validation of the weighting factor used in weighted CTDI (CTDI w ). As it stands now, the weighting factor used in CTDI w is (1/3, 2/3) for the (central, peripheral) axes. Our results showed that an equal weighting factor, which is (1/2, 1/2) for the (central, peripheral) axes, is more suitable to estimate the average cross-sectional dose when X-ray CT dose estimation is performed.

  15. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Naldi

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine, hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap and hormone refractory (DU145 prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs drug delivery system (DDS carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  16. A phantom study on fetal dose reducing factors in pregnant patients with breast cancer during radiotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Ogretici

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to investigate the factors that reduce fetal dose in pregnant patients with breast cancer throughout their radiation treatment. Two main factors in a standard radiation oncology center are considered as the treatment planning systems (TPSs and simple shielding for intensity modulated radiation therapy technique. Materials and Methods: TPS factor was evaluated with two different planning algorithms: Anisotropic analytical algorithm and Acuros XB (external beam. To evaluate the shielding factor, a standard radiological purpose lead apron was chosen. For both studies, thermoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure the point dose, and an Alderson RANDO-phantom was used to simulate a female pregnant patient in this study. Thirteen measurement points were chosen in the 32nd slice of the phantom to cover all possible locations of a fetus up to 8th week of gestation. Results: The results show that both of the TPS algorithms are incapable of calculating the fetal doses, therefore, unable to reduce them at the planning stage. Shielding with a standard lead apron, however, showed a slight radiation protection (about 4.7% to the fetus decreasing the mean fetal dose from 84.8 mGy to 80.8 mGy, which cannot be disregarded in case of fetal irradiation. Conclusions: Using a lead apron for shielding the abdominal region of a pregnant patient during breast irradiation showed a minor advantage; however, its possible side effects (i.e., increased scattered radiation and skin dose should also be investigated further to solidify its benefits.

  17. Dose optimization in pelvic radiography by air gap method on CR and DR systems – A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.T.P.; Fung, K.K.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the feasibility of replacing the anti-scatter grid with an air gap at a pelvic radiographic examination in order to reduce patient dose while retaining diagnostic image quality. Methods: An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom was placed on a device that allowed the adjustment of different air gap thicknesses introduced between the phantom and the image receptor of Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR) systems. Grid and non-grid images with different air gap thicknesses of both systems were produced. Ovary and testes doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Radiographic quality of all images was rated by 5 experienced radiographers blindly using the Image Quality Score (IQS) and Visual Grading Analysis (VGA) systems. Results: Images of diagnostic quality were produced while the grid was replaced by a range of 0–25 cm air gap thickness in the pelvic radiographic examination. At non-grid examination with 10 cm air gap thickness, a maximum of relative dose reduction by 70.7% and 81.6% at CR; 68.6% and 79.4% at DR were achieved respectively at ovary and testes locations of the phantom as compared with their corresponding grid examinations. Conclusion: 10 cm was found to be the optimal air gap thickness at the tested pelvic examination. Effective dose was found to be reduced by 2 and 2.3 times respectively at the CR and DR examinations while the anti-scatter grid was replaced by 10 cm air gap. However, dose reduction effect by air gap method was found to be more pronounced in CR than in DR. - Highlights: • 10 cm air gap was found to be a substitute to replace grid in pelvic RANDO in CR/DR. • Over 68.6% of dose reduction effect were achieved at the ovary and testes regions. • Over 76.4% of reduction in effective dose were achieved at both the tested regions. • Dose reduction by air gap method was found to be more pronounced in CR than in DR

  18. PET/CT imaging for treatment verification after proton therapy: a study with plastic phantoms and metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Cascio, Ethan; Flanz, Jacob B; Bonab, Ali A; Alpert, Nathaniel M; Lohmann, Kevin; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of off-line positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for routine three dimensional in-vivo treatment verification of proton radiation therapy is currently under investigation at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In preparation for clinical trials, phantom experiments were carried out to investigate the sensitivity and accuracy of the method depending on irradiation and imaging parameters. Furthermore, they addressed the feasibility of PET/CT as a robust verification tool in the presence of metallic implants. These produce x-ray CT artifacts and fluence perturbations which may compromise the accuracy of treatment planning algorithms. Spread-out Bragg peak proton fields were delivered to different phantoms consisting of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), PMMA stacked with lung and bone equivalent materials, and PMMA with titanium rods to mimic implants in patients. PET data were acquired in list mode starting within 20 min after irradiation at a commercial luthetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT scanner. The amount and spatial distribution of the measured activity could be well reproduced by calculations based on the GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. This phantom study supports the potential of millimeter accuracy for range monitoring and lateral field position verification even after low therapeutic dose exposures of 2 Gy, despite the delay between irradiation and imaging. It also indicates the value of PET for treatment verification in the presence of metallic implants, demonstrating a higher sensitivity to fluence perturbations in comparison to a commercial analytical treatment planning system. Finally, it addresses the suitability of LSO-based PET detectors for hadron therapy monitoring. This unconventional application of PET involves countrates which are orders of magnitude lower than in diagnostic tracer imaging, i.e., the signal of interest is comparable to the noise originating from the intrinsic radioactivity of

  19. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chuan; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Reese, Timothy G.; Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  20. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chuan, E-mail: chuan.huang@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Departments of Radiology, Psychiatry, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Petibon, Yoann [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Reese, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  1. CT Image Contrast of High-Z Elements: Phantom Imaging Studies and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Paul F; Colborn, Robert E; Edic, Peter M; Lambert, Jack W; Torres, Andrew S; Bonitatibus, Peter J; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the computed tomographic (CT) image contrast produced by potentially useful contrast material elements in clinically relevant imaging conditions. Equal mass concentrations (grams of active element per milliliter of solution) of seven radiodense elements, including iodine, barium, gadolinium, tantalum, ytterbium, gold, and bismuth, were formulated as compounds in aqueous solutions. The compounds were chosen such that the active element dominated the x-ray attenuation of the solution. The solutions were imaged within a modified 32-cm CT dose index phantom at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp at CT. To simulate larger body sizes, 0.2-, 0.5-, and 1.0-mm-thick copper filters were applied. CT image contrast was measured and corrected for measured concentrations and presence of chlorine in some compounds. Each element tested provided higher image contrast than iodine at some tube potential levels. Over the range of tube potentials that are clinically practical for average-sized and larger adults-that is, 100 kVp and higher-barium, gadolinium, ytterbium, and tantalum provided consistently increased image contrast compared with iodine, respectively demonstrating 39%, 56%, 34%, and 24% increases at 100 kVp; 39%, 66%, 53%, and 46% increases at 120 kVp; and 40%, 72%, 65%, and 60% increases at 140 kVp, with no added x-ray filter. The consistently high image contrast produced with 100-140 kVp by tantalum compared with bismuth and iodine at equal mass concentration suggests that tantalum could potentially be favorable for use as a clinical CT contrast agent.

  2. High-Definition Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Stent Imaging: a Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wen Jie; Chen, Ke Min; Pang, Li Fang; Zhang, Huang; Pan, Zi Lai [Rui Jin Hospital, Medical School, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shangha (China); Guo, Ying; Li, Jian Ying [Beijing Economic and Technology Development Area, Beijing (China)

    2012-01-15

    To assess the performance of a high-definition CT (HDCT) for imaging small caliber coronary stents ({<=} 3 mm) by comparing different scan modes of a conventional 64-row standard-definition CT (SDCT). A cardiac phantom with twelve stents (2.5 mm and 3.0 mm in diameter) was scanned by HDCT and SDCT. The scan modes were retrospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated helical and prospective ECG-triggered axial with tube voltages of 120 kVp and 100 kVp, respectively. The inner stent diameters (ISD) and the in-stent attenuation value (AVin-stent) and the in-vessel extra-stent attenuation value (AVin-vessel) were measured by two observers. The artificial lumen narrowing (ALN = [ISD - ISDmeasured]/ISD) and artificial attenuation increase between in-stent and in-vessel (AAI = AVin-stent - AVin-vessel) were calculated. All data was analyzed by intraclass correlation and ANOVA-test. The correlation coefficient of ISD, AVin-vessel and AVin-stent between the two observers was good. The ALNs of HDCT were statistically lower than that of SDCT (30 {+-} 5.7% versus 35 {+-} 5.4%, p < 0.05). HDCT had statistically lower AAI values than SDCT (15.7 {+-} 81.4 HU versus 71.4 {+-} 90.5 HU, p < 0.05). The prospective axial dataset demonstrated smaller ALN than the retrospective helical dataset on both HDCT and SDCT (p < 0.05). Additionally, there were no differences in ALN between the 120 kVp and 100 kVp tube voltages on HDCT (p = 0.05). High-definition CT helps improve measurement accuracy for imaging coronary stents compared to SDCT. HDCT with 100 kVp and the prospective ECG-triggered axial technique, with a lower radiation dose than 120 kVp application, may be advantageous in evaluating coronary stents with smaller calibers ({<=} 3 mm).

  3. Element-specific spectral imaging of multiple contrast agents: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, R. K.; Bell, S. T.; Healy, J. L.; Aamir, R.; Bateman, C. J.; Moghiseh, M.; Butler, A. P. H.; Anderson, N. G.

    2018-02-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous discrimination of multiple contrast agents based on their element-specific and energy-dependent X-ray attenuation properties using a pre-clinical photon-counting spectral CT. We used a photon-counting based pre-clinical spectral CT scanner with four energy thresholds to measure the X-ray attenuation properties of various concentrations of iodine (9, 18 and 36 mg/ml), gadolinium (2, 4 and 8 mg/ml) and gold (2, 4 and 8 mg/ml) based contrast agents, calcium chloride (140 and 280 mg/ml) and water. We evaluated the spectral imaging performances of different energy threshold schemes between 25 to 82 keV at 118 kVp, based on K-factor and signal-to-noise ratio and ranked them. K-factor was defined as the X-ray attenuation in the K-edge containing energy range divided by the X-ray attenuation in the preceding energy range, expressed as a percentage. We evaluated the effectiveness of the optimised energy selection to discriminate all three contrast agents in a phantom of 33 mm diameter. A photon-counting spectral CT using four energy thresholds of 27, 33, 49 and 81 keV at 118 kVp simultaneously discriminated three contrast agents based on iodine, gadolinium and gold at various concentrations using their K-edge and energy-dependent X-ray attenuation features in a single scan. A ranking method to evaluate spectral imaging performance enabled energy thresholds to be optimised to discriminate iodine, gadolinium and gold contrast agents in a single spectral CT scan. Simultaneous discrimination of multiple contrast agents in a single scan is likely to open up new possibilities of improving the accuracy of disease diagnosis by simultaneously imaging multiple bio-markers each labelled with a nano-contrast agent.

  4. Computer-assisted polyp matching between optical colonoscopy and CT colonography: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Holger R.; Hampshire, Thomas E.; Helbren, Emma; Hu, Mingxing; Vega, Roser; Halligan, Steve; Hawkes, David J.

    2014-03-01

    Potentially precancerous polyps detected with CT colonography (CTC) need to be removed subsequently, using an optical colonoscope (OC). Due to large colonic deformations induced by the colonoscope, even very experienced colonoscopists find it difficult to pinpoint the exact location of the colonoscope tip in relation to polyps reported on CTC. This can cause unduly prolonged OC examinations that are stressful for the patient, colonoscopist and supporting staff. We developed a method, based on monocular 3D reconstruction from OC images, that automatically matches polyps observed in OC with polyps reported on prior CTC. A matching cost is computed, using rigid point-based registration between surface point clouds extracted from both modalities. A 3D printed and painted phantom of a 25 cm long transverse colon segment was used to validate the method on two medium sized polyps. Results indicate that the matching cost is smaller at the correct corresponding polyp between OC and CTC: the value is 3.9 times higher at the incorrect polyp, comparing the correct match between polyps to the incorrect match. Furthermore, we evaluate the matching of the reconstructed polyp from OC with other colonic endoluminal surface structures such as haustral folds and show that there is a minimum at the correct polyp from CTC. Automated matching between polyps observed at OC and prior CTC would facilitate the biopsy or removal of true-positive pathology or exclusion of false-positive CTC findings, and would reduce colonoscopy false-negative (missed) polyps. Ultimately, such a method might reduce healthcare costs, patient inconvenience and discomfort.

  5. A further investigation of the centroid-to-centroid method for stereotactic lung radiotherapy: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Bo; Samant, Sanjiv; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lee, Soyoung; Huang, Yin; Li, Jonathan; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study [B. Lu et al., “A patient alignment solution for lung SBRT setups based on a deformable registration technique,” Med. Phys. 39(12), 7379–7389 (2012)] proposed a deformable-registration-based patient setup strategy called the centroid-to-centroid (CTC) method, which can perform an accurate alignment of internal-target-volume (ITV) centroids between averaged four-dimensional computed tomography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Scenarios with variations between CBCT and simulation CT caused by irregular breathing and/or tumor change were not specifically considered in the patient study [B. Lu et al., “A patient alignment solution for lung SBRT setups based on a deformable registration technique,” Med. Phys. 39(12), 7379–7389 (2012)] due to the lack of both a sufficiently large patient data sample and a method of tumor tracking. The aim of this study is to thoroughly investigate and compare the impacts of breathing pattern and tumor change on both the CTC and the translation-only (T-only) gray-value mode strategies by employing a four-dimensional (4D) lung phantom.Methods: A sophisticated anthropomorphic 4D phantom (CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom model 008) was employed to simulate all desired respiratory variations. The variation scenarios were classified into four groups: inspiration to expiration ratio (IE ratio) change, tumor trajectory change, tumor position change, tumor size change, and the combination of these changes. For each category the authors designed several scenarios to demonstrate the effects of different levels of breathing variation on both of the T-only and the CTC methods. Each scenario utilized 4DCT and CBCT scans. The ITV centroid alignment discrepancies for CTC and T-only were evaluated. The dose-volume-histograms (DVHs) of ITVs for two extreme cases were analyzed.Results: Except for some extreme cases in the combined group, the accuracy of the CTC registration was about 2 mm for all cases for

  6. SU-E-J-158: Audiovisual Biofeedback Reduces Image Artefacts in 4DCT: A Digital Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, S; Kipritidis, J; Lee, D; Keall, P; Bernatowicz, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Irregular breathing motion has a deleterious impact on 4DCT image quality. The breathing guidance system: audiovisual biofeedback (AVB) is designed to improve breathing regularity, however, its impact on 4DCT image quality has yet to be quantified. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of AVB on thoracic 4DCT image quality by utilizing the digital eXtended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) phantom driven by lung tumor motion patterns. Methods: 2D tumor motion obtained from 4 lung cancer patients under two breathing conditions (i) without breathing guidance (free breathing), and (ii) with guidance (AVB). There were two breathing sessions, yielding 8 tumor motion traces. This tumor motion was synchronized with the XCAT phantom to simulate 4DCT acquisitions under two acquisition modes: (1) cine mode, and (2) prospective respiratory-gated mode. Motion regularity was quantified by the root mean square error (RMSE) of displacement. The number of artefacts was visually assessed for each 4DCT and summed up for each breathing condition. Inter-session anatomic reproducibility was quantified by the mean absolute difference (MAD) between the Session 1 4DCT and Session 2 4DCT. Results: AVB improved tumor motion regularity by 30%. In cine mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 61 in free breathing to 40 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 34%. In gated mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 63 in free breathing to 51 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 23%. Conclusion: This was the first study to compare the impact of breathing guidance on 4DCT image quality compared to free breathing, with AVB reducing the amount of artefacts present in 4DCT images in addition to improving inter-session anatomic reproducibility. Results thus far suggest that breathing guidance interventions could have implications for improving radiotherapy treatment planning and interfraction reproducibility

  7. Effect of lateral target motion on image registration accuracy in CT-guided helical tomotherapy: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimisation of imaging modes for kilovoltage CT (kVCT) used for treatment planning and megavoltage CT (MVCT) image guidance used in ungated helical tomotherapy was investigated for laterally moving targets. Computed tomography images of the QUASAR™ Respiratory Motion Phantom were acquired without target motion and for lateral motion of the target, with 2-cm peak-to-peak amplitude and a period of 4 s. Reference kVCT images were obtained using a 16-slice CT scanner in standard fast helical CT mode, untagged average CT mode and various post-processed 4D-CT modes (0% phase, average and maximum intensity projection). Three sets of MVCT images with different inter-slice spacings of were obtained on a Hi-Art tomotherapy system with the phantom displaced by a known offset position. Eight radiation therapists performed co-registration of MVCT obtained with 2-, 4- and 6-mm slice spacing and kVCT studies independently for all 15 CT imaging combinations. In the investigated case, the untagged average kVCT and 4-mm slice spacing for the MVCT yielded more accurate registration in the transverse plane. The average residual uncertainty of this combination of imaging procedures was 0.61 ± 0.16 mm in the longitudinal direction, 0.45 ± 0.14 mm in the anterior–posterior direction and insignificant in the lateral direction. Manual registration of MVCT–kVCT study pairs is necessary to account for a target in significant lateral motion with respect to bony structures.

  8. Phantom and Clinical Study of Differences in Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Registration When Aligned to Maximum and Average Intensity Projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Kiyonori; Nishiyama, Kinji; Katsuda, Toshizo; Teshima, Teruki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Tsujii, Katsutomo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether maximum or average intensity projection (MIP or AIP, respectively) reconstructed from 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is preferred for alignment to cone beam CT (CBCT) images in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Stationary CT and 4DCT images were acquired with a target phantom at the center of motion and moving along the superior–inferior (SI) direction, respectively. Motion profiles were asymmetrical waveforms with amplitudes of 10, 15, and 20 mm and a 4-second cycle. Stationary CBCT and dynamic CBCT images were acquired in the same manner as stationary CT and 4DCT images. Stationary CBCT was aligned to stationary CT, and the couch position was used as the baseline. Dynamic CBCT was aligned to the MIP and AIP of corresponding amplitudes. Registration error was defined as the SI deviation of the couch position from the baseline. In 16 patients with isolated lung lesions, free-breathing CBCT (FBCBCT) was registered to AIP and MIP (64 sessions in total), and the difference in couch shifts was calculated. Results: In the phantom study, registration errors were within 0.1 mm for AIP and 1.5 to 1.8 mm toward the inferior direction for MIP. In the patient study, the difference in the couch shifts (mean, range) was insignificant in the right-left (0.0 mm, ≤1.0 mm) and anterior–posterior (0.0 mm, ≤2.1 mm) directions. In the SI direction, however, the couch position significantly shifted in the inferior direction after MIP registration compared with after AIP registration (mean, −0.6 mm; ranging 1.7 mm to the superior side and 3.5 mm to the inferior side, P=.02). Conclusions: AIP is recommended as the reference image for registration to FBCBCT when target alignment is performed in the presence of asymmetrical respiratory motion, whereas MIP causes systematic target positioning error

  9. A Software Phantom : Application in Digital Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazos, D.; Kolitsi, Z.; Badea, C.; Pallikarakis, N.

    1998-01-01

    A software phantom intended to be used in radiographic applications has been developed. The application was used for research in the field of Digital Tomosynthesis and specifically for studying tomographic noise removal methods. The application consists of a phantom design and a phantom imaging module. The radiation-matter interaction is based on the exponential relation of attenuation. Projections are formed by simulated irradiation with selectable geometrical parameters, source spectrum and detector response. Phantoms are defined either as sets containing certain geometrical objects or as groups of voxels. Comparison with real projections taken from a physical phantom with identical geometry and composition with the simulated one, showed good approximation with improved contrast due to the absence of scatter in the simulated projections. The software phantom proved to be a very useful tool for DTS investigations. Further development to include scatter is expected to expand the use of the application to more areas in radiological imaging research. (author)

  10. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  11. Multi-centre evaluation of accuracy and reproducibility of planar and SPECT image quantification. An IAEA phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Brian E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Grosev, Darko [Univ. Hospital Centre Zagreb (Croatia); Buvat, Irene [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Paris (France); and others

    2017-08-01

    Accurate quantitation of activity provides the basis for internal dosimetry of targeted radionuclide therapies. This study investigated quantitative imaging capabilities at sites with a variety of experience and equipment and assessed levels of errors in activity quantitation in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and planar imaging. Participants from 9 countries took part in a comparison in which planar, SPECT and SPECT with X ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging were used to quantify activities of four epoxy-filled cylinders containing {sup 133}Ba, which was chosen as a surrogate for {sup 131}I. The sources, with nominal volumes of 2, 4, 6 and 23 mL, were calibrated for {sup 133}Ba activity by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, but the activity was initially unknown to the participants. Imaging was performed in a cylindrical phantom filled with water. Two trials were carried out in which the participants first estimated the activities using their local standard protocols, and then repeated the measurements using a standardized acquisition and analysis protocol. Finally, processing of the imaging data from the second trial was repeated by a single centre using a fixed protocol. In the first trial, the activities were underestimated by about 15% with planar imaging. SPECT with Chang's first order attenuation correction (Chang-AC) and SPECT-CT overestimated the activity by about 10%. The second trial showed moderate improvements in accuracy and variability. Planar imaging was subject to methodological errors, e.g., in the use of a transmission scan for attenuation correction. The use of Chang-AC was subject to variability from the definition of phantom contours. The project demonstrated the need for training and standardized protocols to achieve good levels of quantitative accuracy and precision in a multicentre setting. Absolute quantification of simple objects with no background was possible with the strictest protocol to

  12. Adjustable cerebrospinal fluid shunt valves in 3.0-Tesla MRI: a phantom study using explanted devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, M; Aschoff, A; Georgi, J C; Nennig, E; Heiland, S; Abel, R; Stippich, C

    2010-07-01

    Considering the rapidly increasing number of clinical high-field MR imagers and the lack of data regarding interference with magnetically adjustable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt valves, valve safety was assessed with regard to magnetic field interactions: imaging artifacts, heating, magnetic forces, and functional changes in a phantom study at 3.0 Tesla using explanted devices as a realistic model for in vivo conditions. Sixteen explanted Codman-Medos and Sophy-SU8 shunt valves, all in perfect working order, were selected and exposed to a 3.0 T static magnetic field. Valve-induced imaging artifacts and signal drop-outs and the heating experiments were evaluated using standard diagnostic MR sequences with different SAR values. Translational attraction for the adjustable valves was assessed using the deflection angle method. To test adjustability and function, the spherical phantom containing the valve was placed in the isocenter of the MR scanner and exposed to a static magnetic field of 3.0 T for 0.25 to 12 hours (repeated exposure 1-12 times), including typical entrance and move-out procedures. The diameters of imaging artifacts ranged from 10-70 mm and were most prominent on T2*w sequences. There was no relevant MR-imaging-related heating. Magnetic forces were not critical. Reproducible adjustment failures occurred in 6 valves. Until suggestions can be made concerning the exposure of hydrocephalic patients to 3.0 T-MRI, further testing is necessary. Copyright (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  13. Influence of wall thickness and diameter on arterial shear wave elastography: a phantom and finite element study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksuti, Elira; Bini, Fabiano; Fiorentini, Stefano; Blasi, Giulia; Urban, Matthew W.; Marinozzi, Franco; Larsson, Matilda

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative, non-invasive and local measurements of arterial mechanical properties could be highly beneficial for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and follow up of treatment. Arterial shear wave elastography (SWE) and wave velocity dispersion analysis have previously been applied to measure arterial stiffness. Arterial wall thickness (h) and inner diameter (D) vary with age and pathology and may influence the shear wave propagation. Nevertheless, the effect of arterial geometry in SWE has not yet been systematically investigated. In this study the influence of geometry on the estimated mechanical properties of plates (h  =  0.5-3 mm) and hollow cylinders (h  =  1, 2 and 3 mm, D  =  6 mm) was assessed by experiments in phantoms and by finite element method simulations. In addition, simulations in hollow cylinders with wall thickness difficult to achieve in phantoms were performed (h  =  0.5-1.3 mm, D  =  5-8 mm). The phase velocity curves obtained from experiments and simulations were compared in the frequency range 200-1000 Hz and showed good agreement (R 2  =  0.80  ±  0.07 for plates and R 2  =  0.82  ±  0.04 for hollow cylinders). Wall thickness had a larger effect than diameter on the dispersion curves, which did not have major effects above 400 Hz. An underestimation of 0.1-0.2 mm in wall thickness introduces an error 4-9 kPa in hollow cylinders with shear modulus of 21-26 kPa. Therefore, wall thickness should correctly be measured in arterial SWE applications for accurate mechanical properties estimation.

  14. Evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT studies using wide area-detector scanners: a phantom study with cadaveric correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Formery, Anne-Sophie; Blum, Alain [CHRU-Nancy Hopital Central, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Hossu, Gabriela [Universite de Lorraine, IADI U947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CIC-IT 1433, Nancy (France); Winninger, Daniel [IDCmem, Nancy (France); Batch, Toufik [Hopital de Mercy, Service de Radiologie, Metz (France); Gervaise, Alban [Legouest Military Instruction Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Metz (France)

    2017-02-15

    To establish evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT on wide area-detector CT. In order to assess factors influencing image quality in kinematic CT studies, a phantom consisting of a polymethylmethacrylate rotating disk with round wells of different sizes was imaged with various acquisition protocols. Cadaveric acquisitions were performed on the ankle joint during motion in two different axes and at different speeds to allow validation of phantom data. Images were acquired with a 320 detector-row CT scanner and were evaluated by two readers. Motion artefacts were significantly correlated with various parameters (movement axis, distance to centre, rotation speed and volume acquisition speed) (p < 0.0001). The relation between motion artefacts and distance to motion fulcrum was exponential (R{sup 2} 0.99). Half reconstruction led to a 23 % increase in image noise and a 40 % decrease in motion artefacts. Cadaveric acquisitions confirmed phantom data. Based on these findings, high tube rotation speed and half reconstruction are recommended for kinematic CT. The axis of motion significantly influences image artefacts and should be considered in patient training and evaluation of acquisition protocol suitability. This study provides evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT. (orig.)

  15. Influence of the Accuracy of Angiography-Based Reconstructions on Velocity and Wall Shear Stress Computations in Coronary Bifurcations: A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, Jelle T. C.; Karanasos, Antonios; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Aben, Jean-Paul; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Wall shear stress (WSS) plays a key role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis in human coronary arteries. Especially sites with low and oscillating WSS near bifurcations have a higher propensity to develop atherosclerosis. WSS computations in coronary bifurcations can be performed in angiography-based 3D reconstructions. It is essential to evaluate how reconstruction errors influence WSS computations in mildly-diseased coronary bifurcations. In mildly-diseased lesions WSS could potentially provide more insight in plaque progression. Materials Methods Four Plexiglas phantom models of coronary bifurcations were imaged with bi-plane angiography. The lumens were segmented by two clinically experienced readers. Based on the segmentations 3D models were generated. This resulted in three models per phantom: one gold-standard from the phantom model itself, and one from each reader. Steady-state and transient simulations were performed with computational fluid dynamics to compute the WSS. A similarity index and a noninferiority test were used to compare the WSS in the phantoms and their reconstructions. The margin for this test was based on the resolution constraints of angiography. Results The reconstruction errors were similar to previously reported data; in seven out of eight reconstructions less than 0.10 mm. WSS in the regions proximal and far distal of the stenosis showed a good agreement. However, the low WSS areas directly distal of the stenosis showed some disagreement between the phantoms and the readers. This was due to small deviations in the reconstruction of the stenosis that caused differences in the resulting jet, and consequently the size and location of the low WSS area. Discussion This study showed that WSS can accurately be computed within angiography-based 3D reconstructions of coronary arteries with early stage atherosclerosis. Qualitatively, there was a good agreement between the phantoms and the readers. Quantitatively, the

  16. High-Definition Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Stent Imaging: a Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wen Jie; Chen, Ke Min; Pang, Li Fang; Zhang, Huang; Pan, Zi Lai; Guo, Ying; Li, Jian Ying

    2012-01-01

    To assess the performance of a high-definition CT (HDCT) for imaging small caliber coronary stents (≤ 3 mm) by comparing different scan modes of a conventional 64-row standard-definition CT (SDCT). A cardiac phantom with twelve stents (2.5 mm and 3.0 mm in diameter) was scanned by HDCT and SDCT. The scan modes were retrospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated helical and prospective ECG-triggered axial with tube voltages of 120 kVp and 100 kVp, respectively. The inner stent diameters (ISD) and the in-stent attenuation value (AVin-stent) and the in-vessel extra-stent attenuation value (AVin-vessel) were measured by two observers. The artificial lumen narrowing (ALN = [ISD - ISDmeasured]/ISD) and artificial attenuation increase between in-stent and in-vessel (AAI = AVin-stent - AVin-vessel) were calculated. All data was analyzed by intraclass correlation and ANOVA-test. The correlation coefficient of ISD, AVin-vessel and AVin-stent between the two observers was good. The ALNs of HDCT were statistically lower than that of SDCT (30 ± 5.7% versus 35 ± 5.4%, p < 0.05). HDCT had statistically lower AAI values than SDCT (15.7 ± 81.4 HU versus 71.4 ± 90.5 HU, p < 0.05). The prospective axial dataset demonstrated smaller ALN than the retrospective helical dataset on both HDCT and SDCT (p < 0.05). Additionally, there were no differences in ALN between the 120 kVp and 100 kVp tube voltages on HDCT (p = 0.05). High-definition CT helps improve measurement accuracy for imaging coronary stents compared to SDCT. HDCT with 100 kVp and the prospective ECG-triggered axial technique, with a lower radiation dose than 120 kVp application, may be advantageous in evaluating coronary stents with smaller calibers (≤ 3 mm).

  17. Fabricating optical phantoms to simulate skin tissue properties and microvasculatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shuwei; Wu, Qiang; Han, Yilin; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces novel methods to fabricate optical phantoms that simulate the morphologic, optical, and microvascular characteristics of skin tissue. The multi-layer skin-simulating phantom was fabricated by a light-cured 3D printer that mixed and printed the colorless light-curable ink with the absorption and the scattering ingredients for the designated optical properties. The simulated microvascular network was fabricated by a soft lithography process to embed microchannels in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms. The phantoms also simulated vascular anomalies and hypoxia commonly observed in cancer. A dual-modal multispectral and laser speckle imaging system was used for oxygen and perfusion imaging of the tissue-simulating phantoms. The light-cured 3D printing technique and the soft lithography process may enable freeform fabrication of skin-simulating phantoms that embed microvessels for image and drug delivery applications.

  18. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K; Morishita, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body

  19. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Morishita, J [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JP (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body.

  20. Which Phantom Is Better for Assessing the Image Quality in Full-Field Digital Mammography?: American College of Radiology Accreditation Phantom versus Digital Mammography Accreditation Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Eun; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Ku, Bon Kyung; Kim, Hee Young; Cho, Kyu Ran; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwa; Hwang, Kyu Won; Yie, An

    2012-01-01

    To compare between the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and digital mammography accreditation phantom in assessing the image quality in full-field digital mammography (FFDM). In each week throughout the 42-week study, we obtained phantom images using both the ACR accreditation phantom and the digital mammography accreditation phantom, and a total of 42 pairs of images were included in this study. We assessed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in each phantom image. A radiologist drew a square-shaped region of interest on the phantom and then the mean value of the SNR and the standard deviation were automatically provided on a monitor. SNR was calculated by an equation, measured mean value of SNR-constant coefficient of FFDM/standard deviation. Two breast radiologists scored visible objects (fibers, specks, and masses) with soft-copy images and calculated the visible rate (number of visible objects/total number of objects). We compared SNR and the visible rate of objects between the two phantoms and calculated the k-coefficient for interobserver agreement. The SNR of the ACR accreditation phantom ranged from 42.0 to 52.9 (Mean, 47.3 ± 2.79) and that of Digital Phantom ranged from 24.8 to 54.0 (Mean, 44.1 ± 9.93) (p = 0.028). The visible rates of all three types of objects were much higher in the ACR accreditation phantom than those in the digital mammography accreditation phantom (p < 0.05). Interobserver agreement for visible rates of objects on phantom images was fair to moderate agreement (k-coefficients: 0.34-0.57). The ACR accreditation phantom is superior to the digital mammography accreditation phantom in terms of SNR and visibility of phantom objects. Thus, ACR accreditation phantom appears to be satisfactory for assessing the image quality in FFDM.

  1. Real-time Classification of Non-Weight Bearing Lower-Limb Movements Using EMG to Facilitate Phantom Motor Execution: Engineering and Case Study Application on Phantom Limb Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Lendaro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phantom motor execution (PME, facilitated by myoelectric pattern recognition (MPR and virtual reality (VR, is positioned to be a viable option to treat phantom limb pain (PLP. A recent clinical trial using PME on upper-limb amputees with chronic intractable PLP yielded promising results. However, further work in the area of signal acquisition is needed if such technology is to be used on subjects with lower-limb amputation. We propose two alternative electrode configurations to conventional, bipolar, targeted recordings for acquiring surface electromyography. We evaluated their performance in a real-time MPR task for non-weight-bearing, lower-limb movements. We found that monopolar recordings using a circumferential electrode of conductive fabric, performed similarly to classical bipolar recordings, but were easier to use in a clinical setting. In addition, we present the first case study of a lower-limb amputee with chronic, intractable PLP treated with PME. The patient’s Pain Rating Index dropped by 22 points (from 32 to 10, 68% after 23 PME sessions. These results represent a methodological advancement and a positive proof-of-concept of PME in lower limbs. Further work remains to be conducted for a high-evidence level clinical validation of PME as a treatment of PLP in lower-limb amputees.

  2. Comparison of axial, coronal, and primary 3D review in MDCT colonography for the detection of small polyps: a phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mang, Thomas; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Schima, Wolfgang; Maier, Andrea; Schober, Ewald; Mueller-Mang, Christina; Weber, Michael; Prokop, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this phantom study is to compare the influence of the reading technique (axial images alone in comparison to 3D endoluminal, coronal, and combined 2D/3D review methods) on the sensitivity and inter-reader variability with MDCT colonography for the detection of small colonic polyps. An

  3. Modification of trunk thickness of MIRD phantom based on the comparison of organ doses with voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Sik; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Ki

    2003-01-01

    Because the MIRD phantom, the representative mathematical phantom was developed for the calculation of internal radiation dose, and simulated by the simplified mathematical equations for rapid computation, the appropriateness of application to external dose calculation and the closeness to real human body should be justified. This study was intended to modify the MIRD phantom according to the comparison of the organ absorbed doses in the two phantoms exposed to monoenergetic broad parallel photon beams of the energy between 0.05 MeV and 10 MeV. The organ absorbed doses of the MIRD phantom and the Zubal voxel phantom were calculated for AP and PA geometries by MCNP4C, general-purpose Monte Carlo code. The MIRD phantom received higher doses than the Zubal phantom for both AP and PA geometries. Effective dose in PA geometry for 0.05MeV photon beams showed the difference up to 50%. Anatomical axial views of the two phantoms revealed the thinner trunk thickness of the MIRD phantom than that of the Zubal phantom. To find out the optimal thickness of trunk, the difference of effective doses for 0.5MeV photon beams for various trunk thickness of the MIRD phantom from 20 cm to 36 cm were compared. The optimal trunk thickness, 24 cm and 28 cm for AP and PA geometries, respectively, showed the minimum difference of effective doses between the two phantoms. The trunk model of the MIRD phantom was modified and the organ doses were recalculated using the modified MIRD phantom. The differences of effective dose for AP and PA geometries reduced to 7.3% and the overestimation of organ doses decreased, too. Because MIRD-type phantoms are easier to be adopted in Monte Carlo calculations and to standardize, the modifications of the MIRD phantom allow us to hold the advantage of MIRD-type phantoms over a voxel phantom and alleviate the anatomical difference and consequent disagreement in dose calculation

  4. Empowerment Needs of Women With Breast Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Taleghani, Fariba; Bahrami, Masoud; Loripoor, Marzeyeh; Yousefi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the increasing number of women suffering from breast cancer worldwide, promoting the empowerment of these patients is an important factor affecting their survival. Objectives: Few studies have investigated the empowerment needs of the breast cancer women, especially in Iran. Therefore, this study was performed to explain the empowerment needs of women with breast cancer in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this qualitative study, 19 women with breast cancer were interviewed re...

  5. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV peak and SUV max , respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4–30.9 min), which was significantly—but not completely—reduced by the linear correction method. SUV peak and SUV max from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV peak and SUV max were significantly lower than supine in both

  6. Empowerment needs of women with breast cancer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, Fariba; Bahrami, Masoud; Loripoor, Marzeyeh; Yousefi, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    Due to the increasing number of women suffering from breast cancer worldwide, promoting the empowerment of these patients is an important factor affecting their survival. Few studies have investigated the empowerment needs of the breast cancer women, especially in Iran. Therefore, this study was performed to explain the empowerment needs of women with breast cancer in Iran. In this qualitative study, 19 women with breast cancer were interviewed regarding their empowerment needs using the individual open-ended and, in-depth interviews and then the qualitative data were analyzed through content analysis. Three main categories of empowerment needs from the participants' perspectives were as follows: 1- information: the initial empowerment plans (timely and comprehensive information, coordination and continuity of information, easy and full-time access to information), 2- beliefs: the approval of the empowerment plans for execution (actuality, trust and hope and new beliefs), and 3- skills: efficient execution of the empowerment plans (communication skills, expression the needs, emotions, questions and use of the internet). It seems that promoting the empowerment of women with breast cancer is essential. Factors found in this study and also in similar studies, in which empowerment needs are explained in-depth through the experiences of the patients, should be considered and used in the treatment, educational and counseling programs to promote the empowerment of women with breast cancer.

  7. Thyroid cancers: a three year retrospective histopathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Than-Than-Htwe; Maung-Ko

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory based retrospective study was done on thyroid tissue specimen that were received from the surgically removed thyroid swellings of various reasons. It was a three year study from 1996-1998 with a total number of cases as (n=1690). Cases were between the age range of 8-88 years including both sexes. A routine histopathological examination was done according to the standard WHO classification, using conventional methods and techniques of specimen sectioning and processing. Occurrence of thyroid cancer among total cases of thyroid dysfunction is highly significant (P 0.860). The results obtained were discussed. (author)

  8. Oral cancer: a retrospective study of 100 Danish cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Rindum, J; Pindborg, J J

    1997-01-01

    One hundred Danes with oral cancer who were collected consecutively from 1986 to 1991 were evaluated retrospectively. The study included subjective and objective observations in 56% men and in 44% women. M:F ratio was 1.2:1. Fifty percent of the patients were non-smokers. Nine percent were women...

  9. Reproducibility of trabecular bone score with different scan modes using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni [Unita di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Pastor Lopez, Maria Juana; Ulivieri, Fabio M. [Servizio di Medicina Nucleare, Ospedale Maggiore, Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata e Ambulatorio Malattie Metabolismo Minerale e Osseo, Milano (Italy); Mai, Alessandro [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Tecniche di Radiologia Medica, per Immagini e Radioterapia, Milano (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [Unita di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2014-08-12

    The trabecular bone score (TBS) accounts for the bone microarchitecture and is calculated on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We estimated the reproducibility of the TBS using different scan modes compared to the reproducibility bone mineral density (BMD). A spine phantom was used with a Hologic QDR-Discovery A densitometer. For each scan mode [fast array, array, high definition (HD)], 25 scans were automatically performed without phantom repositioning; a further 25 scans were performed with phantom repositioning. For each scan, the TBS was obtained. The coefficient of variation (CoV) was calculated as the ratio between standard deviation and mean; percent least significant change (LSC%) as 2.8 x CoV; reproducibility as the complement to 100 % of LSC%. Differences among scan modes were assessed using ANOVA. Without phantom repositioning, the mean TBS (mm{sup -1}) was: 1.352 (fast array), 1.321 (array), and 1.360 (HD); with phantom repositioning, it was 1.345, 1.332, and 1.362, respectively. Reproducibility of the TBS without phantom repositioning was 97.7 % (fast array), 98.3 % (array), and 98.2 % (HD); with phantom repositioning, it was 97.9 %, 98.7 %, and 98.4 %, respectively. LSC% was ≤2.26 %. Differences among scan modes were all statistically significant (p ≤ 0.019). Reproducibility of BMD was 99.1 % with all scan modes, while LSC% was from 0.86 % to 0.91 %. Reproducibility error of the TBS was 2-3-fold higher than that of BMD. Although statistically significant, differences in TBS among scan modes were within the highest LSC%. Thus, the three scan modes can be considered interchangeable. (orig.)

  10. Social ties and risk for cancer - a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergelt, Corinna; Prescott, Eva; Grønbaek, Morten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor social support and small social networks have been associated with increased risks for conditions such as coronary heart disease as well as with overall mortality. We investigated the association between social ties and risk for cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study sample...... consisted of 8 548 Danes who had been examined in 1991-1994 within the Copenhagen City Heart Study. The median length of follow-up was 9.3 years (range, 0-11.2 years). Social ties were measured from answers to a questionnaire on social networks. Regression analyses for cancers at the most frequent sites...... (breast, lung, prostate and colon and rectum) were conducted with the Cox proportional hazards model, with adjustment for a number of well-known risk factors for cancer. RESULTS: While we found no significant association between social ties and risk for cancer in men, women with high social network scores...

  11. Social ties and risk for cancer - a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergelt, C.; Prescott, E.; Gronbaek, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Poor social support and small social networks have been associated with increased risks for conditions such as coronary heart disease as well as with overall mortality. We investigated the association between social ties and risk for cancer. Material and methods. The study sample...... consisted of 8 548 Danes who had been examined in 1991-1994 within the Copenhagen City Heart Study. The median length of follow-up was 9.3 years (range, 0-11.2 years). Social ties were measured from answers to a questionnaire on social networks. Regression analyses for cancers at the most frequent sites...... (breast, lung, prostate and colon and rectum) were conducted with the Cox proportional hazards model, with adjustment for a number of well-known risk factors for cancer. Results. While we found no significant association between social ties and risk for cancer in men, women with high social network scores...

  12. Oral cancer: a retrospective study of 100 Danish cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Rindum, J; Pindborg, J J

    1997-01-01

    One hundred Danes with oral cancer who were collected consecutively from 1986 to 1991 were evaluated retrospectively. The study included subjective and objective observations in 56% men and in 44% women. M:F ratio was 1.2:1. Fifty percent of the patients were non-smokers. Nine percent were women...... in 14% of the cases while 72% of the patients were the cause themselves for the delayed referral....

  13. Nutrition and lung cancer: a case control study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Naghan, Parisa Adimi; Jafari, Ali Moghadas; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Taslimi, Shervin; Khodadad, Kian; Mohammadi, Forouzan; Sadr, Makan; Rezaei, Mansour; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-21

    Despite many prospective and retrospective studies about the association of dietary habit and lung cancer, the topic still remains controversial. So, this study aims to investigate the association of lung cancer with dietary factors. In this study 242 lung cancer patients and their 484 matched controls on age, sex, and place of residence were enrolled between October 2002 to 2005. Trained physicians interviewed all participants with standardized questionnaires. The middle and upper third consumer groups were compared to the lower third according to the distribution in controls unless the linear trend was significant across exposure groups. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association with lung cancer. In a multivariate analysis fruit (Ptrend bread (Ptrend = 0.04), liver (P = 0.004), butter (Ptrend = 0.04), white cheese (Ptrend cancer. Generally, we found positive trend between consumption of beef (P = 0.002), bread (P cancer. In contrast, only fruits were inversely related to lung cancer (P bread, rice, beef, liver, dairy products, vegetable ghee, and animal ghee found to be possible risk factors for the development of lung cancer in Iran.

  14. [Laparoscopic versus open surgery for colorectal cancer. A comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas-Martin, Antonio; Díaz-Pizarro-Graf, José Ignacio; Muñoz-Hinojosa, Jorge Demetrio; Valdés-Castañeda, Alberto; Cruz-Ramírez, Omar; Bertrand, Martin Marie

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is currently accepted and widespread worldwide. However, according tol the surgical experience on this approach, surgical and short-term oncologic results may vary. Studies comparing laparoscopic vs. open surgery in our population are scarce. To determine the superiority of the laparoscopic vs. open technique for colorectal cancer surgery. This retrospective and comparative study collected data from patients operated on for colorectal cancer between 1999 and 2011 at the Angeles Lomas Hospital, Mexico. A total of 82 patients were included in this study; 47 were operated through an open approach and 35 laparoscopically. Mean operative time was significantly lower in the open approach group (p= 0.008). There were no significant difference between both techniques for intraoperative bleeding (p= 0.3980), number of lymph nodes (p= 0.27), time to initiate oral feeding (p= 0.31), hospital stay (p= 0.12), and postoperative pain (p= 0.19). Procedure-related complications rate and type were not significantly different in both groups (p= 0.44). Patients operated laparoscopically required significantly less analgesic drugs (p= 0.04) and less need for epidural postoperative analgesia (p= 0.01). Laparoscopic approach is as safe as the traditional open approach for colorectal cancer. Early oncological and surgical results confirm its suitability according to this indication.

  15. Effect of Scanning and Reconstruction Parameters on Three Dimensional Volume and CT Value Measurement of Pulmonary Nodules: A Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datong SU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The computed tomography (CT follow-up of indeterminate pulmonary nodules aiming to evaluate the change of the volume and CT value is the common strategy in clinic. The CT dose needs to considered on serious CT scans in addition to the measurement accuracy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the precision of pulmonary nodule volumetric measurement and CT value measurement with various tube currents and reconstruction algorithms in a phantom study with dual-energy CT. Methods A chest phantom containing 9 artificial spherical solid nodules with known diameter (D=2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm and density (-100 HU, 60 HU and 100 HU was scanned using a 64-row detector CT canner at 120 Kilovolt & various currents (10 mA, 20 mA, 50 mA, 80 mA,100 mA, 150 mA and 350 mA. Raw data were reconstructed with filtered back projection and three levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm (FBP, ASIR; 30%, 50% and 80%. Automatic volumetric measurements were performed using commercially available software. The relative volume error (RVE and the absolute attenuation error (AAE between the software measures and the reference-standard were calculated. Analyses of the variance were performed to evaluate the effect of reconstruction methods, different scan parameters, nodule size and attenuation on the RPE. Results The software substantially overestimated the very small (D=2.5 mm nodule's volume [mean RVE: (100.8%±28%] and underestimated it attenuation [mean AAE: (-756±80 HU]. The mean RVEs of nodule with diameter as 5 mm and 10 mm were small [(-0.9%±1.1% vs (0.9%±1.4%], however, the mean AAEs [(-243±26 HU vs (-129±7 HU] were large. The ANOVA analysis for repeated measurements showed that different tube current and reconstruction algorithm had no significant effect on the volumetric measurements for nodules with diameter of 5 mm and 10 mm (F=5.60, P=0.10 vs F=11.13, P=0.08, but significant effects on the measurement of CT

  16. Sexual Dysfunction in Breast Cancer: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Ebrahimi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual dysfunction in breast cancer patients is considered as a common and distressing problem. Considering the increasing number of breast cancer survivors living for longer periods of time with the disease and the importance of their quality of life, we conducted the present study to compare the sexual functioning in breast cancer patients with their healthy counterparts.Methods: In this case-control study, breast cancer patients who completed their treatment protocol and were followed up for at least six months were included. The controls were healthy women with normal clinical breast examinations. All subjects filled-in the Persian version of Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire.Results: A total of 165 subjects including 71 breast cancer patients and 94 healthy women were studied. The frequency of sexual dysfunction in cases and controls was 52.6% and 47.4%, respectively (P = 0.09. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding domain scores, except for vaginal lubrication (P = 0.045. Logistic regression analysis indicated that significant determinants of sexual dysfunction in breast cancer group was patients' age (OR = 4.0, 95%CI: 1.3 – 11.5, P = 0.01 and age of the spouse (OR= 9.8, 95% CI: 1.8-51.9, P= 0.007, while in controls, only emotional relationship with the husband was the significant predictive factor (OR = 6.3, 95%CI: 1.9 – 20.5, P = 0.002.Conclusions: Our findings indicated that sexual dysfunction is prevalent in Iranian women regardless of their physical health status. The frequency of vaginal dryness in breast cancer patients was significantly higher than controls. Age of the patient and the spouse (>40 were the only significant predictors of sexual dysfunction among women with breast cancer. Preventive strategies, sexual education and access to effective treatment should be planned in supportive care of breast cancer patients.

  17. Uranium miner lung cancer. A study about two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madelrieux, J.-M.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of lung cancer in uranium miners is analyzed on the basis of the two cases observed. Epidemiological studies establish conclusively the existence of increased hazards in the case of early working conditions, which gave rise to large accumulated doses of irradiation. Unfortunately these studies have their limits, the most important being inadequacy of sampling, and doubts remain about the low exposure levels prevailing nowadays and which concerns the cases investigated. The absence of certainty over long-term effects of low exposure levels is leading to the development of research to establish the exact nature of the dose-effect relationship and the possible existence of a radiotoxicity threshold on the basis of which the protective measures from the CMA angle could be revised. Biological research has proved the responsibility of α radiation from active radon deposits as a source of lung cancer in uranium miners, but other contributing factors must not be neglected: tobacco for instance, which plays an important part, but also the presence of engine exhaust gases and non-specific lung aggressions connected with dampness and ventilation. The occupational risk examined concerns only 600 miners now working at the bottom of uranium mines in France, and since extraction began a dozen cancers have been detected including 10 in heavy smokers. 2 cases correspond to exposures of 300 WLM, 3 to values between 150 and 100WLM and the rest to very slight exposures, 10 to 50 WLM. Although these figures are not conclusive the fact that exposure in French mines averages 0.3 WL means that the results of the French epidemiological study can be awaited with some optimism [fr

  18. Pixelized measurement of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP micro particles formed in gamma correction phantom pinhole scan: A reference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joo Young; Yoon, Do Kyun; Chung, Yong An [Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Yun Sang; Ha, Seunggyun [Radiopharmaceutical Science Laboratory, Dept. of Nuclear MedicineSeoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bahk, Yong Whee [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Sung Ae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Currently, traumatic bone diseases are diagnosed by assessing the micro {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HDP) uptake in injured trabeculae with ongoing osteoneogenesis demonstrated by gamma correction pinhole scan (GCPS). However, the mathematic size quantification of micro-uptake is not yet available. We designed and performed this phantom-based study to set up an in-vitro model of the mathematical calculation of micro-uptake by the pixelized measurement. The micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposits used in this study were spontaneously formed both in a large standard flood and small house-made dish phantoms. The processing was as follows: first, phantoms were flooded with distilled water and {sup 99m}Tc-HDP was therein injected to induce micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposition; second, the deposits were scanned using parallel-hole and pinhole collimator to generally survey {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposition pattern; and third, the scans underwent gamma correction (GC) to discern individual deposits for size measurement. In original naïve scans, tracer distribution was simply nebulous in appearance and, hence, could not be measured. Impressively, however, GCPS could discern individual micro deposits so that they were calculated by pixelized measurement. Phantoms naturally formed micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposits that are analogous to {sup 99m}Tc-HDP uptake on in-vivo bone scan. The smallest one we measured was 0.414 mm. Flooded phantoms and therein injected {sup 99m}Tc-HDP form nebulous micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposits that are rendered discernible by GCPB and precisely calculable using pixelized measurement. This method can be used for precise quantitative and qualitative diagnosis of bone and joint diseases at the trabecular level.

  19. Canine scent detection of canine cancer: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorman DC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available David C Dorman,1 Melanie L Foster,2 Katherine E Fernhoff,1 Paul R Hess2 1Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: The scent detection prowess of dogs has prompted interest in their ability to detect cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dogs could use olfactory cues to discriminate urine samples collected from dogs that did or did not have urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC, at a rate greater than chance. Dogs with previous scent training (n=4 were initially trained to distinguish between a single control and a single TCC-positive urine sample. All dogs acquired this task (mean =15±7.9 sessions; 20 trials/session. The next training phase used four additional control urine samples (n=5 while maintaining the one original TCC-positive urine sample. All dogs quickly acquired this task (mean =5.3±1.5 sessions. The last training phase used multiple control (n=4 and TCC-positive (n=6 urine samples to promote categorical training by the dogs. Only one dog was able to correctly distinguish multiple combinations of TCC-positive and control urine samples suggesting that it mastered categorical learning. The final study phase evaluated whether this dog would generalize this behavior to novel urine samples. However, during double-blind tests using two novel TCC-positive and six novel TCC-negative urine samples, this dog did not indicate canine TCC-positive cancer samples more frequently than expected by chance. Our study illustrates the need to consider canine olfactory memory and the use of double-blind methods to avoid erroneous conclusions regarding the ability of dogs to alert on specimens from canine cancer patients. Our results also suggest that sample storage, confounding odors, and other factors need to be considered in the design of future studies that evaluate the detection of

  20. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Junichi; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Seki, Noriko; Hongo, Atsushi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Miyagi, Yasunari; Yoshinouchi, Mitsuo; Kudo, Takafumi

    2001-01-01

    Recently, attempts have made to use radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in various solid tumors including cervical cancer. Twenty-four patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with concurrent Carboplatin (16-24 mg/m 2 /day) or Nedaplatin (20 mg/m 2 /week) and conventional radiotherapy. Of 13 evaluable patients, there were nine complete responders and four partial responders. There was no renal damage or grade 4 hematological toxicity. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions were mild. One patient had grade 3 dermatologic toxicity after delayed radiation therapy. This pilot study suggests that daily Carboplatin or weekly Nedaplatin administered with standard radiation therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and thus may be useful as a radiation sensitizer in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. (author)

  1. Method and phantom to study combined effects of in-plane (x,y) and z-axis resolution for 3D CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, David; Levy, Josh; Kristinsson, Smari; Fredriksson, Jesper; Olafsdottir, Hildur; Healy, Austin

    2016-09-08

    Increasingly, the advent of multislice CT scanners, volume CT scanners, and total body spiral acquisition modes has led to the use of Multi Planar Reconstruction and 3D datasets. In considering 3D resolution properties of a CT system it is important to note that both the in-plane (x,y) and z-axis (slice thickness) influence the visual-ization and detection of objects within the scanned volume. This study investigates ways to consider both the in-plane resolution and the z-axis resolution in a single phantom wherein analytic or visualized analysis can yield information on these combined effects. A new phantom called the "Wave Phantom" is developed that can be used to sample the 3D resolution properties of a CT image, including in-plane (x,y) and z-axis information. The key development in this Wave Phantom is the incorporation of a z-axis aspect of a more traditional step (bar) resolution gauge phantom. The phantom can be examined visually wherein a cutoff level may be seen; and/or the analytic analysis of the various characteristics of the waveform profile by including amplitude, frequency, and slope (rate of climb) of the peaks, can be extracted from the Wave Pattern using mathematical analysis such as the Fourier transform. The combined effect of changes in in-plane resolution and z-axis (thickness), are shown, as well as the effect of changes in either in-plane resolu-tion, or z-axis thickness. Examples of visual images of the Wave pattern as well as the analytic characteristics of the various harmonics of a periodic Wave pattern resulting from changes in resolution filter and/or slice thickness, and position in the field of view are shown. The Wave Phantom offers a promising way to investigate 3D resolution results from combined effect of in-plane (x-y) and z-axis resolution as contrasted to the use of simple 2D resolution gauges that need to be used with separate measures of z-axis dependency, such as angled ramps. It offers both a visual pattern as well as a

  2. Verifying 4D gated radiotherapy using time-integrated electronic portal imaging: a phantom and clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slotman Ben J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT can decrease treatment toxicity by allowing for smaller treatment volumes for mobile tumors. RGRT is commonly performed using external surrogates of tumor motion. We describe the use of time-integrated electronic portal imaging (TI-EPI to verify the position of internal structures during RGRT delivery Methods TI-EPI portals were generated by continuously collecting exit dose data (aSi500 EPID, Portal vision, Varian Medical Systems when a respiratory motion phantom was irradiated during expiration, inspiration and free breathing phases. RGRT was delivered using the Varian RPM system, and grey value profile plots over a fixed trajectory were used to study object positions. Time-related positional information was derived by subtracting grey values from TI-EPI portals sharing the pixel matrix. TI-EPI portals were also collected in 2 patients undergoing RPM-triggered RGRT for a lung and hepatic tumor (with fiducial markers, and corresponding planning 4-dimensional CT (4DCT scans were analyzed for motion amplitude. Results Integral grey values of phantom TI-EPI portals correlated well with mean object position in all respiratory phases. Cranio-caudal motion of internal structures ranged from 17.5–20.0 mm on planning 4DCT scans. TI-EPI of bronchial images reproduced with a mean value of 5.3 mm (1 SD 3.0 mm located cranial to planned position. Mean hepatic fiducial markers reproduced with 3.2 mm (SD 2.2 mm caudal to planned position. After bony alignment to exclude set-up errors, mean displacement in the two structures was 2.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively, and corresponding reproducibility in anatomy improved to 1.6 mm (1 SD. Conclusion TI-EPI appears to be a promising method for verifying delivery of RGRT. The RPM system was a good indirect surrogate of internal anatomy, but use of TI-EPI allowed for a direct link between anatomy and breathing patterns.

  3. Multi-centre evaluation of accuracy and reproducibility of planar and SPECT image quantification: An IAEA phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Brian E; Grošev, Darko; Buvat, Irène; Coca Pérez, Marco A; Frey, Eric C; Green, Alan; Krisanachinda, Anchali; Lassmann, Michael; Ljungberg, Michael; Pozzo, Lorena; Quadir, Kamila Afroj; Terán Gretter, Mariella A; Van Staden, Johann; Poli, Gian Luca

    2017-06-01

    Accurate quantitation of activity provides the basis for internal dosimetry of targeted radionuclide therapies. This study investigated quantitative imaging capabilities at sites with a variety of experience and equipment and assessed levels of errors in activity quantitation in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and planar imaging. Participants from 9 countries took part in a comparison in which planar, SPECT and SPECT with X ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging were used to quantify activities of four epoxy-filled cylinders containing 133 Ba, which was chosen as a surrogate for 131 I. The sources, with nominal volumes of 2, 4, 6 and 23mL, were calibrated for 133 Ba activity by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, but the activity was initially unknown to the participants. Imaging was performed in a cylindrical phantom filled with water. Two trials were carried out in which the participants first estimated the activities using their local standard protocols, and then repeated the measurements using a standardized acquisition and analysis protocol. Finally, processing of the imaging data from the second trial was repeated by a single centre using a fixed protocol. In the first trial, the activities were underestimated by about 15% with planar imaging. SPECT with Chang's first order attenuation correction (Chang-AC) and SPECT-CT overestimated the activity by about 10%. The second trial showed moderate improvements in accuracy and variability. Planar imaging was subject to methodological errors, e.g., in the use of a transmission scan for attenuation correction. The use of Chang-AC was subject to variability from the definition of phantom contours. The project demonstrated the need for training and standardized protocols to achieve good levels of quantitative accuracy and precision in a multicentre setting. Absolute quantification of simple objects with no background was possible with the strictest protocol to about 6% with planar

  4. Quantifying the optical properties and chromophore concentrations of turbid media using polarization sensitive hyperspectral imaging: optical phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Saager, Rolf; Durkin, Anthony J.; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Gussakovsky, Eugene; Chave, Robert; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2013-02-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive hyperspectral imaging system (SkinSpect) that employs a spectrally-programmable light source in the visible and NIR domains. Multiple tissue-mimicking phantoms were fabricated to mimic the optical properties of normal skin as well as pigmented light and dark moles. The phantoms consist of titanium dioxide and a mixture of coffee, red food dye, and naphthol green as the scattering and the three absorptive agents in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) base. Phantoms were produced with both smooth and rough textured surfaces and tested using Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) and Spatially Modulated Quantitative Spectroscopy (SMoQS) for homogeneity as well as determining absorption and scattering variance, respectively. The reflectance spectral images were also recorded using the SkinSpect research prototype; the spectral signatures of the phantoms were calculated using a two-flux single-layer Kubelka-Munk model and non-negative least square fitting routine was applied to extract the relative concentrations of the individual phantom components.

  5. Development of a percutaneous optical imaging system for tracking vascular gene expression: a feasibility study using human tissuelike phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sourav K.; Kumar, Ananda; Yang, Xiaoming

    2004-05-01

    Noninvasive tracking of vascular gene delivery and expression forms an important part of successfully implementing vascular gene therapy methods for the treatment of atherosclerosis and various cardiovascular disorders. While ultrasound and MR imaging have shown promise in the monitoring of gene delivery to the vasculatures, optical imaging has shown promise for tracking gene expression. Optical imaging using bioreporter genes like Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), Red Fluorescent Protein (RFP) and Luciferase to track and localize the therapeutic gene have helped provide an in vivo detection method of the process. The usage of GFP and RFP entails the detection of the fluorescent signal emitted by them on excitation with light of appropriate wavelength. We have developed a novel percutaneous optical imaging system that may be used for in vivo tracking vascular fluorescent gene expression in deep-seated vessels. It is based on the detection of the fluorescent signal emitted from GFP tagged cells. This phantom study was carried out to investigate the performance of the optical imaging system and gain insights into its performance record and study improvisation possibilities.

  6. Improved precision of syndesmophyte measurement for the evaluation of ankylosing spondylitis using CT: a phantom and patient study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M.

    2012-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease characterized by abnormal bone formation (syndesmophyte) at the margins of inter-vertebral disc spaces. Syndesmophyte growth is currently typically monitored by the visual inspection of radiographs. The limitations inherent to the modality (2D projection of a 3D object) and rater (qualitative human judgment) may compromise sensitivity. With newly available treatments, more precise measures of syndesmophytes are needed to determine whether treatment can slow rates of syndesmophyte growth. We previously presented a computer algorithm measuring syndesmophyte volumes and heights in the 3D space of CT scans. In this study, we present improvements to the original algorithm and evaluate the gain in precision as applied to an anthropomorphic vertebral phantom and patients. Each patient was scanned twice in one day, thus providing two syndesmophyte volume and height measures. The difference between those two measures (ideally zero) determines our algorithm's precision. The technical improvements to the algorithm decreased the mean volume difference (standard deviation) between scans from 3.01% (2.83%) to 1.31% (0.95%) and the mean height difference between scans from 3.16% (2.99%) to 1.56% (1.13%). The high precision of the improved algorithm holds promise for application to longitudinal clinical studies.

  7. Screening for skin cancer: A pilot study in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza M Robati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of skin cancers by screening could be very beneficial to decrease their morbidity or mortality. There is limited study about skin cancer screening in Iran. Aim: This essay was planned as a pilot skin cancer screening campaign in Tehran, Iran to evaluate its profit and failure and further design large-scale screening program more definitely. Materials and Methods: Thirty one public health centers of Shahid Beheshti Medical University were selected in different areas of Tehran. The project was announced via media and invited all the people above 40 years old to come for the whole-body skin examination in a one-week period. Patients with any suspected lesions were referred to the dermatology clinics of the university. Results: 1314 patients, 194 males (14.8% and 120 females (85.2%, with mean age of 51.81 ± 10.28 years participated in this screening campaign. Physicians found suspected lesions in 182 (13.85% of participants. The diagnosis of skin cancer was confirmed in 15 (1.14% patients. These malignancies included 10 (0.76% cases of basal cell carcinoma, 2 (0.15% cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 3 (0.23% cases of malignant melanoma. Conclusion: Skin cancer screening seems to be valuable to detect skin malignancies in their early course. Regarding the considerable amount of facilities needed to perform skin cancer screening program, it might be more beneficial to perform the targeted screening programs for the high-risk groups or emphasis more on public education of skin cancer risk factors and their early signs.

  8. Phantom Torso model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Phantom Torso is a tissue-muscle plastic anatomical model of a torso and head. It contains over 350 radiation measuring devices to calculate the radiation that penetrates internal organs in space travel. The Phantom Torso is one of three radiation experiments in Expedition Two including the Borner Ball Neutron Detector and Dosimetric Mapping.

  9. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Zhuo, W; Liu, H [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Y; Chen, T [Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  10. A Comparative Study on the Influence of Probe Placement on Quality Assurance Measurements in B-mode Ultrasound by Means of Ultrasound Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, A; Conforto, S; D'Anna, C; Sciuto, S A

    2015-01-01

    To check or to prevent failures in ultrasound medical systems, some tests should be scheduled for both clinical suitability and technical functionality evaluation: among them, image quality assurance tests performed by technicians through ultrasound phantoms are widespread today and their results depend on issues related to scanner settings as well as phantom features and operator experience. In the present study variations on some features of the B-mode image were measured when the ultrasound probe is handled by the technician in a routine image quality test: ultrasound phantom images from two array transducers are processed to evaluate measurement dispersion in distance accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution and penetration depth when probe is handled by the operator. All measurements are done by means of an in-house image analysis software that minimizes errors due to operator's visual acuity and subjective judgment while influences of ultrasound transducer position on quality assurance test results are estimated as expanded uncertainties on parameters above (measurement reproducibility at 95 percent confidence level): depending on the probe model, they ranged from ±0.1 to ±1.9 mm in high contrast spatial resolution, from ±0.1 to ±5.5 percent in distance measurements error and from ±1 to ±10 mm in maximum depth of signal visualization. Although numerical results are limited to the two examined probes, they confirm some predictions based on general working principles of diagnostic ultrasound systems: (a) measurements strongly depend on settings as well on phantoms features, probes and parameters investigated; (b) relative uncertainty due to probe manipulation on spatial resolution can be very high, i.e. from 10 to more than 30 percent; (c) Field of View settings must be taken into account for measurement reproducibility as well as Dynamic Range compression and phantom attenuation.

  11. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q; Zhuo, W; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Chen, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  12. VPAC1 receptors for imaging breast cancer: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Mathew L; Zhang, Kaijun; Berger, Adam; Cavanaugh, Barbara; Kim, Sung; Channappa, Chaitra; Frangos, Andrea J; Wickstrom, Eric; Intenzo, Charles M

    2013-07-01

    VPAC1 encodes G-protein-coupled receptors expressed on all breast cancer (BC) cells at the onset of the disease, but not on benign lesions. Our extensive preclinical studies have shown that (64)Cu-TP3805 has a high affinity for VPAC1, is stable in vivo, and has the ability to distinguish spontaneously grown malignant BC masses from benign lesions. Our long-term goal is to develop (64)Cu-TP3805 as an agent to perform in vivo histology, to distinguish malignant lesions from benign masses noninvasively and thereby avoid patient morbidity and the excess economic costs of benign biopsies. (18)F-FDG obtained commercially served as a control. (64)Cu-TP3805 was prepared using a sterile kit containing 20 μg of TP3805. Radiochemical purity and sterility were examined. Nineteen consenting women with histologically proven BC were given 370 MBq of (18)F-FDG. One hour later, 6 of these patients were imaged with PET/CT and 13 with positron emission mammography (PEM). Two to 7 d later, 6 PET/CT patients received 111 MBq (± 10%) (n = 2), 127 MBq (± 10%) (n = 2), or 148 MBq (± 10%) (n = 2) of (64)Cu-TP3805 and were imaged 2 and 4 h later. Thirteen PEM patients received 148 MBq (± 10%) of (64)Cu-TP3805 and were imaged 15 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h later. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated for PET/CT patients, and PUV/BGV (PEM uptake value/background value) was calculated for PEM patients. Tumor volume was also calculated. The radiochemical purity of (64)Cu-TP3805 was 97% ± 2%, and specific activity was 44.4 GBq (1.2 Ci)/μmol. In 19 patients, a total of 24 lesions were imaged (15 invasive ductal carcinoma, 1 high-grade mammary carcinoma, 3 lobular carcinoma, 1 invasive papilloma, and 4 sentinel lymph nodes). All lesions were unequivocally detected by (64)Cu-TP3805 and by (18)F-FDG. The average tumor volume as determined by PET/CT with (64)Cu-TP3805 was 90.6% ± 16.1% of that with (18)F-FDG PET/CT, and the average SUV was 92% ± 26.4% of that with (18)F-FDG. For PEM, the

  13. Phantom pain : A sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, Susanne; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Geertzen, JHB; Dijkstra, PU

    2004-01-01

    Purpose : To analyse how decisions to dichotomise the frequency and impediment of phantom pain into absent and present influence the outcome of studies by performing a sensitivity analysis on an existing database. Method : Five hundred and thirty-six subjects were recruited from the database of an

  14. Ultrasonographic Quantification of Fat Content in Fatty Liver Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Joo, Gyung Soo; Kim, Ho Jung; Kim, Young Beom; Lee, Byoung Ho

    1995-01-01

    Assuming that the fat content of certain tissue might be quantified by measurirrg the ultrasound echo level, we analyzed the ultrasound histograms obtained from the fatty liver phantoms that contained various amount of fat. Various amount of margarine(Mazola. Cliff wood. USA) was mixed with 2% of agarin solution state to produce fatty liver phantoms that contained 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of fat. We obtained ultrasound histogram from each fatty liver phantom in gel state. We used 2% agar gel as a control. The ultrasound histograms from the control phantom showed gradual increase in echo level as the depth from the surface increased. The echo level from the phantom that contained 5% of fat showed gradual increase and subsequent decrease with the peak echo level at the depth of 3cm. The echo levels from the phantoms that contained more in 5% of fat gradually decreased as the depth from the surface increased; the change becoming more pronounced as the fat content of the phantom increased. The echo levels measured at the depth of 1cm were 9.3(control), 29.6(5%phantom), 3l.3 (10% phantom), 26.3 (20% phantom), l8.8 (30% phantom), and l6dB (40% phantom). Fat content of fatty phantoms can not be quantified by measuring only echo level. Simultaneous measurement of attenuation of ultrasound, which is not easy to do and not done in this study, is prerequisite to quantify fat content

  15. Shear-wave sonoelastography for assessing masseter muscle hardness in comparison with strain sonoelastography: study with phantoms and healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Nakayama, Miwa; Nishiyama, Wataru; Nozawa, Michihito; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Shear-wave sonoelastography is expected to facilitate low operator dependency, high reproducibility and quantitative evaluation, whereas there are few reports on available normative values of in vivo tissue in head and neck fields. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliabilities on measuring hardness using shear-wave sonoelastography and to clarify normal values of masseter muscle hardness in healthy volunteers. Methods Phantoms with known hardness ranging from 20 to 140 kPa were scanned with shear-wave sonoelastography, and inter- and intraoperator reliabilities were examined compared with strain sonoelastography. The relationships between the actual and measured hardness were analyzed. The masseter muscle hardness in 30 healthy volunteers was measured using shear-wave sonoelastography. The inter- and intraoperator intraclass correlation coefficients were almost perfect. Strong correlations were seen between the actual and measured hardness. The mean hardness of the masseter muscles in healthy volunteers was 42.82 ± 5.56 kPa at rest and 53.36 ± 8.46 kPa during jaw clenching. The hardness measured with shear-wave sonoelastography showed high-level reliability. Shear-wave sonoelastography may be suitable for evaluation of the masseter muscles.

  16. [Evaluation study of abnormal detectability with Thurstone and Scheffé (Nakaya) of paired comparison method using chest phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Monitors are increasingly being used as diagnostic imaging devices. In this study, using an all-purpose liquid-crystal display (LCD), the rate of detection of abnormalities was investigated using Thurstone's and Scheffé's (Nakaya) paired comparison methods. A chest phantom was prepared as a test sample with acryl and aluminum plates and intensities suggesting small adenocarcinomas. For the acquisition conditions for computed radiography, after setting the baseline at a dose at which the film density of the standard screen-film system at the same as those for the lung, costal bone, and mediastinum, 5 steps of 2-fold serial doses were then set: 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, and 4. The test sample was observed by 10 students. On the Thurstone scale, detectability decreased with a decrease in the dose in the lung, costal bone, and mediastinum. When the significance of differences between the values at adjacent doses was investigated using the yardstick method, using Scheffé's method revealed a significant difference between the 4- and 2-fold doses and between the 1/2 and 1/4 doses in the pulmonary region. A significant difference was also noted between the baseline and 1/2 doses in the mediastinum. Changes in the order of the scale values may not occur in the intervals in which significant differences were noted using Scheffé's methods.

  17. Evaluation study of abnormal detectability with thurstone and Scheffe (Nakaya) of paired comparison method using chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Monitors are increasingly being used as diagnostic imaging devices. In this study, using an all-purpose liquid-crystal display (LCD), the rate of detection of abnormalities was investigated using Thurstone's and Scheffe's (Nakaya) paired comparison methods. A chest phantom was prepared as a test sample with acryl and aluminum plates and intensities suggesting small adenocarcinomas. For the acquisition conditions for computed radiography, after setting the baseline at a dose at which the film density of the standard screen-film system at the same as those for the lung, costal bone, and mediastinum, 5 steps of 2-fold serial doses were then set: 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, and 4. The test sample was observed by 10 students. On the Thurstone scale, detectability decreased with a decrease in the dose in the lung, costal bone, and mediastinum. When the significance of differences between the values at adjacent doses was investigated using the yardstick method, using Scheffe's method revealed a significant difference between the 4- and 2-fold doses and between the 1/2 and 1/4 doses in the pulmonary region. A significant difference was also noted between the baseline and 1/2 doses in the mediastinum. Changes in the order of the scale values may not occur in the intervals in which significant differences were noted using Scheffe's methods. (author)

  18. Aortic stentgraft movement detection using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis on plane film radiographs - initial results of a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, C.; Welker, V.; Eidam, H.; Alfke, H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of aortic stentgraft micromovement detection using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis on plane film radiographs. Material and Methods: An aortic stentgraft used for demonstration purposes was marked with 10 tantalum markers of 0.8 mm in diameter. The stentgraft was placed on a Plexiglas phantom with 5 tantalum markers of 1 mm in diameter simulating a fixed segment needed for mathematical analysis. In a subsequent step, the stentgraft was placed onto an orthopaedic spine model to simulate in vivo conditions in a next step.Two radiographs taken simultaneously from different angles were used for simulating different stentgraft movement, e.g. translation, angulation, aortic pulsation and migration in the spine model. Movement of the stentgraft markers was analysed using a commercially available digital RSA setup (UmRSA registered 4.1, RSA Biomedical, Umea, Sweden). Results: Our study shows the feasibility of measuring aortic stentgraft movement and changes in stentgraft shape in the submillimeter range using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Translation along the 3 cardinal axes, change in stentgraft shape, simulation of aortic pulsation and simulation of in vivo conditions could be described precisely. Conclusion: Aortic stentgraft movement detection using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis on plane film radiographs is a very promising, precise method. (orig.)

  19. A computational model unifies apparently contradictory findings concerning phantom pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Kim J; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Weiss, Thomas; Puta, Christian; Wagner, Heiko

    2014-06-16

    Amputation often leads to painful phantom sensations, whose pathogenesis is still unclear. Supported by experimental findings, an explanatory model has been proposed that identifies maladaptive reorganization of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) as a cause of phantom pain. However, it was recently found that BOLD activity during voluntary movements of the phantom positively correlates with phantom pain rating, giving rise to a model of persistent representation. In the present study, we develop a physiologically realistic, computational model to resolve the conflicting findings. Simulations yielded that both the amount of reorganization and the level of cortical activity during phantom movements were enhanced in a scenario with strong phantom pain as compared to a scenario with weak phantom pain. These results suggest that phantom pain, maladaptive reorganization, and persistent representation may all be caused by the same underlying mechanism, which is driven by an abnormally enhanced spontaneous activity of deafferented nociceptive channels.

  20. Assessment of the effect of strontium, lead, and aluminum in bone on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and quantitative ultrasound measurements: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Deok Hyun; Da Silva, Eric; Tavakkoli, Jahan; Slatkovska, Lubomira; Cheung, Angela M; Pejović-Milić, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the gold standard technique to measure areal bone mineral density (aBMD) for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Because DXA relies on the attenuation of photon to estimate aBMD, deposition of bone-seeking metallic elements such as strontium, lead, and aluminum that differ in atomic numbers from calcium can cause inaccurate estimation of aBMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is another technique available to assess bone health by measuring broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and an empirically derived quantity called stiffness index (SI). Because the acoustic properties are not prone to significant change due to changes in microscopic atomic composition of bone, it is hypothesized that QUS is unaffected by the presence of bone-seeking elements in the bone. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of strontium, lead, and aluminum on DXA-derived aBMD and QUS parameters using bone-mimicking phantoms compatible with both techniques. Bone-mimicking phantoms were produced by homogeneously mixing finely powdered hydroxyapatite compounds that contain varying concentrations of strontium, lead, or aluminum with porcine gelatin solution. Seven strontium-substituted phantoms were produced with varying molar ratio of Sr/(Sr + Ca) ranging from 0% to 2%. Four lead-doped phantoms and four aluminum-doped phantoms were constructed with the respective analyte concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 ppm. An additional 0 ppm phantom was produced to be used as a baseline for the lead and aluminum phantom measurements. All phantoms had uniform volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) of 200 mg/cm 3 , and were assessed using a Hologic Horizon ® DXA device and a Hologic Sahara ® QUS device. Furthermore, theoretical aBMD bias for mol/mol% substitution of calcium with the three bone-seeking elements was calculated. Strong positive linear relationship was found between aBMD measured by DXA and strontium concentration

  1. Phantom limb pain: a case of maladaptive CNS plasticity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Herta; Nikolajsen, Lone; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Phantom pain refers to pain in a body part that has been amputated or deafferented. It has often been viewed as a type of mental disorder or has been assumed to stem from pathological alterations in the region of the amputation stump. In the past decade, evidence has accumulated that phantom pain...... studies and derive suggestions for innovative interventions aimed at alleviating phantom pain....

  2. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D.; Dudoignon, N.; Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E.; Bottlaender, M.

    2006-01-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  3. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D. [IRSN/DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Dudoignon, N. [IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRPAT, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E. [CEA/DSV/DRR/SRCA/LRT BP no 12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Bottlaender, M. [CEA/SHFJ, 4, place du General Leclerc F-91400 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  4. A European myocardial (123)I-mIBG cross-calibration phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Derk O.; Poel, Edwin; Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; Somsen, G. Aernout; Verberne, Hein J.

    2017-01-01

    Planar myocardial (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG) scintigraphy is a highly reproducible technique. However, differences in collimator use are one of the most important factors that cause variation among institutions and studies in heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio. Therefore,

  5. Optimal scanning protocols of 64-slice CT angiography in coronary artery stents: An in vitro phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almutairi, Abdulrahman Marzouq [Discipline of Medical Imaging, Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Sun Zhonghua [Discipline of Medical Imaging, Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)], E-mail: z.sun@curtin.edu.au; Ng, Curtise [Discipline of Medical Imaging, Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Al-Safran, Zakariya A.; Al-Mulla, Abeer A.; Al-Jamaan, Abdulaziz I. [Department of Medical Imaging, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the optimal scanning protocol of 64-slice CT angiography for assessment of coronary artery stents based on a phantom study. Materials and methods: Coronary stents with a diameter of 2.5 mm was implanted in thin plastic tubes with an inner diameter of 3.0 mm to simulate a coronary artery. The tubes were filled with iodinated contrast medium diluted to 178 HU, closed at both ends and positioned in a plastic container filled with vegetable oil (-70 to -100 HU). A series of scans were performed with a 64-slice CT scanner with the following protocols: section thickness: 0.67 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, pitch value: 0.2, 0.3, 0.5 and reconstruction interval of 50% overlap of the section thickness. 2D axial and multiplanar reformatted images were generated to assess the visibility of stent lumen, while virtual intravascular endoscopy (VIE) was reconstructed to evaluate the artery wall and stent surface. Results: Our results showed that a scanning protocol of 1.0 mm slice thickness with a pitch of 0.3 produced acceptable images with best demonstration of the intrastent lumen and stent surface with minimal image noise or artifacts. In contrast, submillimeter scans with 0.67 mm resulted in moderate artifacts which affected visualization of the coronary lumen, in addition to the increased noise. When the section thickness increased to 1.5 mm and 2.0 mm, visualization of the artery wall and stent surface was compromised, although the intrastent lumen was still visible. Conclusion: Our in vitro study suggested that a scanning protocol of 1.0 mm section thickness with pitch of 0.3 is the optimal protocol for evaluation of coronary artery stents as it allows generation of acceptable images with better visualization of stent lumen, stent surface and coronary artery wall.

  6. Research article – Optimisation of paediatrics computed radiographyfor full spine curvature measurements using a phantom: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniel de Linde; Loris Franco; Catarina Serrenho; Peter Hogg; Ifrah Akhtar; José Antonio Garcia; Seraphine de Haan; Martine Thorskog; Cláudia Reis; Junior Ndlovu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Optimise a set of exposure factors, with the lowest effective dose, to delineate spinal curvature with the modified Cobb method in a full spine using computed radiography (CR) for a 5-year-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: Images were acquired by varying a set of parameters:

  7. Accuracy and speed of robotic assisted needle interventions using a modern cone beam computed tomography intervention suite: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Boris [Goethe University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Eichler, Katrin; Siebenhandl, Petra; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Vogl, Thomas Josef; Zangos, Stephan [Goethe University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Czerny, Christoph [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Trauma Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To analyse the feasibility and accuracy of robotic aided interventions on a phantom when using a modern C-arm-mounted cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) device in combination with needle guidance software. A small robotic device capable of holding and guiding needles was attached to the intervention table. After acquiring a 3D data set the access path was planned on the CBCT workstation and shown on the intervention monitor. Then the robot was aligned to the live fluoroscopic image. A total of 40 punctures were randomly conducted on a phantom armed with several targets (diameter 2 mm) in single and double oblique trajectory (n = 20 each). Target distance, needle deviation and time for the procedures were analysed. All phantom interventions (n = 40) could be performed successfully. Mean target access path within the phantom was 8.5 cm (min 4.2 cm, max 13.5 cm). Average needle tip deviation was 1.1 mm (min 0 mm, max 4.5 mm), time duration was 3:59 min (min 2:07 min, max 10:37 min). When using the proposed robot device in a CBCT intervention suite, highly accurate needle-based interventional punctures are possible in a reasonable timely manner in single as well as in double oblique trajectories. (orig.)

  8. Accuracy and speed of robotic assisted needle interventions using a modern cone beam computed tomography intervention suite: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Boris; Eichler, Katrin; Siebenhandl, Petra; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Vogl, Thomas Josef; Zangos, Stephan; Czerny, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    To analyse the feasibility and accuracy of robotic aided interventions on a phantom when using a modern C-arm-mounted cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) device in combination with needle guidance software. A small robotic device capable of holding and guiding needles was attached to the intervention table. After acquiring a 3D data set the access path was planned on the CBCT workstation and shown on the intervention monitor. Then the robot was aligned to the live fluoroscopic image. A total of 40 punctures were randomly conducted on a phantom armed with several targets (diameter 2 mm) in single and double oblique trajectory (n = 20 each). Target distance, needle deviation and time for the procedures were analysed. All phantom interventions (n = 40) could be performed successfully. Mean target access path within the phantom was 8.5 cm (min 4.2 cm, max 13.5 cm). Average needle tip deviation was 1.1 mm (min 0 mm, max 4.5 mm), time duration was 3:59 min (min 2:07 min, max 10:37 min). When using the proposed robot device in a CBCT intervention suite, highly accurate needle-based interventional punctures are possible in a reasonable timely manner in single as well as in double oblique trajectories. (orig.)

  9. Evolution of water equivalent phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabutani, Toshimine; Ida, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    In radiation therapy, the dose absorbed by the target tissue needs to be extremely accurate. In order to obtain the target absorbed dose, radiation dose measurements are performed using a phantom instead of the patient's body, because the target absorbed dose cannot be directly measured. Although water is the best human muscle equivalent phantom, it is not useful for this purpose. Therefore, water equivalent solid phantoms are usually used for the measurements. We compared the following water equivalent solid phantoms for water: Tough water phantom, 457 Solid water phantom, RW-3, Mix-DP, polystyrene resin, polyethylene resin, and acrylic resin. The measurements obtained were ionization current in the phantoms as determined by ionization chamber, tissue-maximum ratio, transmission measurements in water with and without the phantoms, Hounsfield units of the phantoms for uniformity of inside phantoms as determined by computed tomography, and accuracy of the phantoms. Results showed the phantoms to be almost equivalent to water, except for the acrylic resin phantom. However, the phantoms had various characteristics that affected accuracy, and the phantoms underwent change with time. Measurement error was caused by the characteristics of the phantoms. Therefore, it is important to measure the calibration coefficient of phantoms for water, regardless of what is stated on paper. (author)

  10. Proposal for study on IR light and glucose phantom interaction for human glucose quantification applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Cárdenas, Gerardo S.; Sanchez-Lopez, Juan D.; Nieto-Hipolito, Juan I.; Cosio-León, María.; Luque-Morales, Priscy; Vazquez-Briseno, Mabel

    2016-09-01

    It has been established the importance of a constant glucose monitoring in order to keep a regular control for diabetes patients. Several medical studies accept the necessity of exploring alternatives for the traditional digital glucometer, given the pain and discomfort related to this technique, which can lead to a compromised control of the disease. Several efforts based on the application of IR spectroscopy had been done with favorable, yet not conclusive results. Therefore it's necessary to apply a comprehensive and interdisciplinary study based on the biochemical and optical properties of the glucose in the human body, in order to understand the interaction between this substance, its surroundings and IR light. These study propose a comprehensive approach of the glucose and IR light interaction, considering and combining important biochemical, physiological and optical properties, as well as some machine learning techniques for the data analysis. The results of this work would help to define the right parameters aiming to obtain an optical glucose quantification system and protocol.

  11. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  12. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  13. SU-F-J-159: Influence of the Elevated Posterior Position by Using the Customized Vacuum-Bag On the Abdominal MR Image Quality: A Quantitative Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, O; Yuan, J; Law, M; Ding, A; Yu, S; Cheung, K [Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Hong Kong, N/A (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) of MR abdominal imaging in diagnostic radiology is maximized by minimizing the coil-to-patient distance. However, for radiotherapy applications, customized vacuum-bag is needed for abdominal immobilization at the cost of the increasing distance to the posterior spine coil. This sub-optimized coil setting for RT applications may compromise image quality, such as SNR and homogeneity, thus potentially affect tissue delineation. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate the effect of the vertical position change on SNR and image quality change using an ACR MR phantom. Methods: An ACR MR phantom was placed on the flat couch top. Images were acquired using an 18-channel body array coil and spine coil on a dedicated 1.5T MR-simulator. The scan was repeated three times with the ACR phantom elevated up to 7.5cm from the couch top, with a step size of 2.5cm. All images were acquired using standard ACR test sequence protocol of 2D spin-echo T1-weighted(TR/TE=500/200ms) and T2-weighted(TR/TE1/TE2=2000/20/80) sequences. For all scans, pre-scan normalization was turned on, and the distance between the phantom and the anterior 18-channel body array coil was kept constant. SNR was calculated using the slice with a large water-only region of the phantom. Percent intensity uniformity(PIU) and low contrast object detectability(LCD) were assessed by following ACR test guidelines. Results: The decrease in image SNR(from 335.8 to 169.3) and LCD(T1: from 31 to 19 spokes, T2: 26 to 16 spokes) were observed with increasing vertical distance. After elevating the phantom by 2.5cm(approximately the thickness of standard vacuum-bag), SNR change(from 335.8 to 275.5) and LCD(T1: 31 to 26 spokes, T2: 26 to 21 spokes) change were noted. However, similar PIU was obtained for all choices of vertical distance (T1: 94.5%–95.0%, T2: 94.4%–96.8%). Conclusion: After elevating the scan object, reduction in SNR level and contrast detectability but no change in image

  14. Proton radiography and fluoroscopy of lung tumors: A Monte Carlo study using patient-specific 4DCT phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Xu, X. George; Chen, George T. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods are used to simulate and optimize a time-resolved proton range telescope (TRRT) in localization of intrafractional and interfractional motions of lung tumor and in quantification of proton range variations. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with a particle tracking feature was employed to evaluate the TRRT performance, especially in visualizing and quantifying proton range variations during respiration. Protons of 230 MeV were tracked one by one as they pass through position detectors, patient 4DCT phantom, and finally scintillator detectors that measured residual ranges. The energy response of the scintillator telescope was investigated. Mass density and elemental composition of tissues were defined for 4DCT data. Results: Proton water equivalent length (WEL) was deduced by a reconstruction algorithm that incorporates linear proton track and lateral spatial discrimination to improve the image quality. 4DCT data for three patients were used to visualize and measure tumor motion and WEL variations. The tumor trajectories extracted from the WEL map were found to be within ∼1 mm agreement with direct 4DCT measurement. Quantitative WEL variation studies showed that the proton radiograph is a good representation of WEL changes from entrance to distal of the target. Conclusions:MCNPX simulation results showed that TRRT can accurately track the motion of the tumor and detect the WEL variations. Image quality was optimized by choosing proton energy, testing parameters of image reconstruction algorithm, and comparing to ground truth 4DCT. The future study will demonstrate the feasibility of using the time resolved proton radiography as an imaging tool for proton treatments of lung tumors. PMID:21626923

  15. Determination of photon backscatter from several calibration phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Murphy, M.K.; Traub, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards recommend the use of different phantoms for the calibration and proficiency testing of personnel dosimeters. The ANSI N13.11 standard describes a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom measuring 30 x 30 x 15 cm. ISO draft standard 4037, part 3, recommends the use of a 30 x 30x 15-cm water-filled phantom with PMMA walls. An additional phantom with dimensions identical to the other two, but constructed of a tissue-equivalent plastic mixture, RS-1, was also used in these studies. The photon backscatter factor for these phantoms was compared to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reference phantom that has the same dimensions as the above mentioned phantoms, but has the elemental composition of ICRU four element tissue. Calculations of the photon backscatter over the range from 10 to 2,000 keV were performed using the MCNP 4A code for each of the phantoms. Measurements of the backscatter were carried out using thin-walled ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters that were exposed to x-ray beams With narrow energy spectra, either free-in-air or placed on the surface of the phantoms. The measurements and calculations were consistent and demonstrated that the ISO water filled phantom and the RS-1 plastic phantom generate photon backscatter that is nearly the same as that produced by the ICRU tissue reference phantom, but the backscatter from the PMMA phantom was up to about 8% higher. The conclusion drawn from these measurements is that either an ISO water-filled phantom or one constructed of RS-1 plastic would provide photon backscatter more comparable to an ICRU tissue reference phantom than a PMMA phantom

  16. Experimental techniques for studying poroelasticity in brain phantom gels under high flow microinfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanchenko, O; Sindhwani, N; Linninger, A

    2010-05-01

    Convection enhanced delivery is an attractive option for the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and brain tumors. However, the occurrence of a backflow is a major problem impeding the widespread use of this technique. In this paper, we analyze experimentally the force impact of high flow microinfusion on the deformable gel matrix. To investigate these fluid structure interactions, two optical methods are reported. First, gel stresses during microinfusion were visualized through a linear polariscope. Second, the displacement field was tracked using 400 nm nanobeads as space markers. The corresponding strain and porosity fields were calculated from the experimental observations. Finally, experimental data were used to validate a computational model for fluid flow and deformation in soft porous media. Our studies demonstrate experimentally, the distribution and magnitude of stress and displacement fields near the catheter tip. The effect of fluid traction on porosity and hydraulic conductivity is analyzed. The increase in fluid content in the catheter vicinity enhances the gel hydraulic conductivity. Our computational model takes into account the changes in porosity and hydraulic conductivity. The simulations agree with experimental findings. The experiments quantified solid matrix deformation, due to fluid infusion. Maximum deformations occur in areas of relatively large fluid velocities leading to volumetric strain of the matrix, causing changes in hydraulic conductivity and porosity close to the catheter tip. The gradual expansion of this region with increased porosity leads to decreased hydraulic resistance that may also create an alternative pathway for fluid flow.

  17. Twelve automated thresholding methods for segmentation of PET images: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; Lecumberri, Pablo; Pagola, Miguel; Gómez, Marisol; Bilbao, Izaskun; Ecay, Margarita; Peñuelas, Iván; Martí-Climent, Josep M.

    2012-06-01

    Tumor volume delineation over positron emission tomography (PET) images is of great interest for proper diagnosis and therapy planning. However, standard segmentation techniques (manual or semi-automated) are operator dependent and time consuming while fully automated procedures are cumbersome or require complex mathematical development. The aim of this study was to segment PET images in a fully automated way by implementing a set of 12 automated thresholding algorithms, classical in the fields of optical character recognition, tissue engineering or non-destructive testing images in high-tech structures. Automated thresholding algorithms select a specific threshold for each image without any a priori spatial information of the segmented object or any special calibration of the tomograph, as opposed to usual thresholding methods for PET. Spherical 18F-filled objects of different volumes were acquired on clinical PET/CT and on a small animal PET scanner, with three different signal-to-background ratios. Images were segmented with 12 automatic thresholding algorithms and results were compared with the standard segmentation reference, a threshold at 42% of the maximum uptake. Ridler and Ramesh thresholding algorithms based on clustering and histogram-shape information, respectively, provided better results that the classical 42%-based threshold (p < 0.05). We have herein demonstrated that fully automated thresholding algorithms can provide better results than classical PET segmentation tools.

  18. Linearity of patient positioning detection : a phantom study of skin markers, cone beam computed tomography, and 3D ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhausen, Hendrik; Hieber, Sheila; Li, Minglun; Parodi, Katia; Belka, Claus; Reiner, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) is a modality complementary to kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and skin markers for patient positioning detection. This study compares the linearity of evaluations based on measurements using a modern 3D-US system (Elekta Clarity®; Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden), a kV-CBCT system (Elekta iView®), and skin markers. An investigator deliberately displaced a multimodal phantom by up to ± 30 mm along different axes. The following data points were acquired: 27 along the lateral axis, 29 along the longitudinal axis, 27 along the vertical axis, and 27 along the space diagonal. At each of these 110 positions, the displacements according to skin' markers were recorded and scans were performed using both 3D-US and kV-CBCT. Shifts were detected by matching bony anatomy or soft tissue density to a reference planning CT in the case of kV-CBCT and for 3D-US, by matching ultrasound volume data to a reference planning volume. A consensus value was calculated from the average of the four modalities. With respect to this consensus value, the linearity (offset and regression coefficient, i.e., slope), average offset, systematic error, and random error of all four modalities were calculated for each axis. Linearity was similar for all four modalities, with regression coefficients between 0.994 and 1.012, and all offsets below 1 mm. The systematic errors of skin markers and 3D-US were higher than for kV-CBCT, but random errors were similar. In particular, 3D-US demonstrated an average offset of 0.36 mm to the right, 0.08 mm inferiorly, and 0.15 mm anteriorly; the systematic error was 0.36 mm laterally, 0.35 mm longitudinally, and 0.22 mm vertically; the random error was 0.15 mm laterally, 0.30 mm longitudinally, and 0.12 mm vertically. A total of 109 out of 110 (99 %) 3D-US measurements were within 1 mm of the consensus value on either axis. The linearity of 3D-US was no worse than that of skin

  19. Phantom limb pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limb is still there. This is called phantom sensation. You may feel: Pain in your limb even though it is physically not there Tingly Prickly Numb Hot or cold Like your missing toes or fingers are moving ...

  20. Lung pair phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  1. Feasibility and accuracy of dual-layer spectral detector computed tomography for quantification of gadolinium: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamersvelt, Robbert W. van; Willemink, Martin J.; Jong, Pim A. de; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Leiner, Tim [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Milles, Julien [CT Clinical Science, Philips HealthCare, Best (Netherlands); Vlassenbroek, Alain [CT Clinical Science, Philips HealthCare, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of dual-layer spectral detector CT (SDCT) for the quantification of clinically encountered gadolinium concentrations. The cardiac chamber of an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom was equipped with 14 tubular inserts containing different gadolinium concentrations, ranging from 0 to 26.3 mg/mL (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.1, 10.6, 15.7, 20.7 and 26.3 mg/mL). Images were acquired using a novel 64-detector row SDCT system at 120 and 140 kVp. Acquisitions were repeated five times to assess reproducibility. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on three slices per insert. A spectral plot was extracted for every ROI and mean attenuation profiles were fitted to known attenuation profiles of water and pure gadolinium using in-house-developed software to calculate gadolinium concentrations. At both 120 and 140 kVp, excellent correlations between scan repetitions and true and measured gadolinium concentrations were found (R > 0.99, P < 0.001; ICCs > 0.99, CI 0.99-1.00). Relative mean measurement errors stayed below 10% down to 2.0 mg/mL true gadolinium concentration at 120 kVp and below 5% down to 1.0 mg/mL true gadolinium concentration at 140 kVp. SDCT allows for accurate quantification of gadolinium at both 120 and 140 kVp. Lowest measurement errors were found for 140 kVp acquisitions. (orig.)

  2. MO-FG-BRA-04: A Novel Time Weighted Density Correction for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohatt, D; Malhotra, H [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Conventional treatment plans for lung radiotherapy are created using either the free breathing (FB) scheme which represents the tumor at an arbitrary breathing phase of the patient’s respiratory cycle, or the average computed tomography (ACT) intensity projection over 10-binned phases. Neither method is entirely accurate because of the absence of time dependence of tumor movement. In the present “Hybrid” method, the HU of tumor in 3D space is determined by relative weighting of the HU of the tumor and lung in proportion to the time they spend at that location during the entire breathing cycle. Methods: A Quasar respiratory motion phantom was employed to simulate lung tumor movement. Utilizing 4DCT image scans, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were generated for three treatment planning scenarios which included conventional FB and ACT schemes, along with a third alternative Hybrid approach. Our internal target volume (ITV) hybrid structure was created using Boolean operation in Eclipse (ver. 11) treatment planning system, where independent sub-regions created by the gross tumor volume (GTV) overlap from the 10 motion phases were each assigned a time weighted CT value. The dose-volume-histograms (DVH) for each scheme were compared and analyzed. Results: Using our hybrid technique, we have demonstrated a reduction of 1.9% – 3.4% in total monitor units with respect to conventional treatment planning strategies, along with a 6 fold improvement in high dose spillage over the FB plan. The higher density ACT and Hybrid schemes also produced a slight enhancement in target conformity and reduction in low dose spillage. Conclusion: All treatment plans created in this study exceeded RTOG protocol criteria. Our results determine the free breathing approach yields an inaccurate account of the target treatment density. A significant decrease in unnecessary lung irradiation can be achieved by implementing Hybrid HU method with ACT method second best.

  3. 3D dosimetry estimation for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using SPECT/CT images: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debebe, Senait A.; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a common way to treat liver cancer that cannot be treated surgically. SIRT involves administration of Yttrium - 90 (90Y) microspheres via the hepatic artery after a diagnostic procedure using 99mTechnetium (Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect extrahepatic shunting to the lung or the gastrointestinal tract. Accurate quantification of radionuclide administered to patients and radiation dose absorbed by different organs is of importance in SIRT. Accurate dosimetry for SIRT allows optimization of dose delivery to the target tumor and may allow for the ability to assess the efficacy of the treatment. In this study, we proposed a method that can efficiently estimate radiation absorbed dose from 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT images of liver and the surrounding organs. Bremsstrahlung radiation from 90Y was simulated using the Compton window of 99mTc (78keV at 57%). 99mTc images acquired at the photopeak energy window were used as a standard to examine the accuracy of dosimetry prediction by the simulated bremsstrahlung images. A Liqui-Phil abdominal phantom with liver, stomach and two tumor inserts was imaged using a Philips SPECT/CT scanner. The Dose Point Kernel convolution method was used to find the radiation absorbed dose at a voxel level for a three dimensional dose distribution. This method will allow for a complete estimate of the distribution of radiation absorbed dose by tumors, liver, stomach and other surrounding organs at the voxel level. The method provides a quantitative predictive method for SIRT treatment outcome and administered dose response for patients who undergo the treatment.

  4. Image quality for five modern chest radiography techniques: a modified FROC study with an anthropomorphic chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maansson, L.G.; Lanhede, B.; Kheddache, S.; Tylen, U.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the image quality for one conventional and four digital chest radiography techniques. Three storage phosphor systems, one selenium drum system, and one film-screen system were compared using a modified receiver-operating-characteristics method. Simulated pathology was randomly positioned over the parenchymal regions and the mediastinum of an anthropomorphic phantom. Eight observers (four chest radiologists, one specialist in general radiology, one hospital physicist, and two radiographers) evaluated 60 images for each technique. The selenium drum system (Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) rated best for the detection of parenchymal nodules. Together with the storage phosphor system of generation IIIN (Philips/Fuji), the selenium drum system also rated best for detection of thin linear structures. The storage phosphor system of generation V (Fuji) rated best for the detection of mediastinal nodules. The first generation of the storage phosphor system from Agfa (Mortsel, Belgium) rated worst for the detection of parenchymal nodules and thin linear structures. These differences were significant (p < 0.0001). Averaging the results for all test objects, the selenium drum system and the storage phosphor system of generation V were significantly better than the other systems tested. The film/screen system performed significantly better than the first-generation storage phosphor system from Agfa, equal to the generation IIIN storage phosphor system (Philips/Fuji) and significantly worse than the selenium drum system (Philips) and the generation-V storage phosphor system (Fuji). The conclusion is therefore that the image quality of selenium-based digital technique and of the more recent generations of storage phosphor systems is superior to both conventional technique and storage phosphor systems using image plates of older types. (orig.)

  5. The impact of imaging speed of MR-guided punctures and interventions in static organs—A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rump, Jens C.; Jonczyk, Martin; Seebauer, Christian J.; Streitparth, Florian; Güttler, Felix V.; Walter, Thula; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgräber, Ulf K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Verification of MR-guidance with image acquisitions slower than 1 image per second as it is inevitable for some interventions. Therefore, we quantified solely the effect of acquisition-time on the efficiency of MR-guided interventions in a static phantom study. Materials and methods: We measured the duration, accuracy and error rate of simulated interventions for different acquisition-times using a simplified interventional setup. All measurements were performed in a 1.0 T open MRI scanner. Imaging was performed with a gradient-echo sequence (flipangle = 20°; TR/TE = 12/6 ms; voxelsize = 1 mm × 1 mm; slicethickness = 5 mm; FOV = 230 mm × 200 mm; acquisition-time = 1 s). Variable acquisition times were simulated with intermediate pauses of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 s. The interventions were performed by a total of 20 volunteers including 7 experienced interventionalists. Results: The mean duration of the intervention was 2 min. Significant differences between experienced and unexperienced volunteers were limited to the localization of the image plane and corrections made. The mean accuracy was 5.6 mm. The time to localize the image plane increased with deceleration of imaging from 24 s to 49 s. A similar increase was observed for the intervention time (55–108 s). A significant influence of the acquisition-time on durations and corrections was only found with acquisition-times greater than 4 s per image. Conclusion: Even image rates of several seconds per image are sufficient enough for efficient interventions in static organs. Thus, the main attention has to be turned on the visibility of the needle when sequences are optimized for MR-guidance. The minimization of imaging speed is rather of secondary interest.

  6. Effect of phantom size and composition on neutron dosemeter reading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Tanner, J.E.; Stewart, R.D.; Michel, R.; Murphy, M.K.; Traub, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Unmoderated and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron sources were used to irradiate several types of personal neutron dosemeters. The dosemeters were irradiated on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms with frontal dimensions of 40 x 40 cm 2 and 30 x 30 cm 2 ; both phantoms were 15 cm thick. Monte Carlo computer calculations of the neutron spectra and the ratios of dose equivalents at the surfaces of these phantoms were performed using the MCNP computer code. Additional calculations were performed for a 241 Am-Be neutron source and for phantoms composed of International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) tissue and of water; the water phantom used the design specified recently by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The calculations indicated negligible differences in the effects that either of the PMMA phantoms produced on the neutron energy spectra studied. However, the dose equivalent at the surface of the 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 PMMA phantom differed from the dose equivalents at the surfaces of the water phantom and the ICRU tissue phantom by about 4%. Dosemeters irradiated on the two different sized PMMA phantoms, using unmoderated and D 2 O moderated 252 Cf neutron sources, gave nearly identical readings. All of the phantoms had similar effects on the neutron spectra, producing additional low energy neutrons. It was concluded that either size of PMMA phantom could be used for the irradiations required by the US dosimetry accreditation programmes. (author)

  7. Study on motion artifacts in coronary arteries with an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated multidetector computed tomography unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Dorgelo, Joost; Tukker, Wim G.J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    Acquisition time plays a key role in the quality of cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and is directly related to the rotation time of the scanner. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of heart rate and a multisector reconstruction algorithm on the image quality of coronary arteries of an anthropomorphic adjustable moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated MDCT unit. The heart phantom and a coronary artery phantom were used on a MDCT unit with a rotation time of 500 ms. The movement of the heart was determined by analysis of the images taken at different phases. The results indicate that the movement of the coronary arteries on the heart phantom is comparable to that in a clinical setting. The influence of the heart rate on image quality and artifacts was determined by analysis of several heart rates between 40 and 80 bpm where the movement of the heart was synchronized using a retrospective ECG-gated acquisition protocol. The resulting reformatted volume rendering images of the moving heart and the coronary arteries were qualitatively compared as a result of the heart rate. The evaluation was performed on three independent series by two independent radiologists for the image quality of the coronary arteries and the presence of artifacts. The evaluation shows that at heart rates above 50 bpm the influence of motion artifacts in the coronary arteries becomes apparent. In addition the influence of a dedicated multisector reconstruction technique on image quality was determined. The results show that the image quality of the coronary arteries is not only related to the heart rate and that the influence of the multisector reconstruction technique becomes significant above 70 bpm. Therefore, this study proves that from the actual acquisition time per heart cycle one cannot determine an actual acquisition time, but only a mathematical acquisition time. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic utility of helical CT for laryngeal cancer. A study on surgical specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Hirokazu; Fujii, Takashi; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Sato, Takeo [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (Japan); Miyahara, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Takehiko

    2000-11-01

    Helical CT, in which X-ray source rotation and patient transition occur simultaneously during data acquisition, has the feature that a volume data set is obtained in a short period of time. The data can be viewed as conventional transaxial images or with MPR (multiplanar reconstruction) and 3-D (three-dimensional) methods. With the latest helical CT and software, anatomical structures and lesions are easily evaluated in detail. In this study, we compared surgical specimens of laryngeal cancer to images with MPR and 3-D methods to determine the advantage and limitation of helical CT. Thinking of helical-CT-scanning for diagnosis of tumor extension, images with 3-D methods have limitations of motion-artifact, phantom images, and difficulty in showing details of small lesions. It is accordingly necessary to give patients an understandable explanation before helical-CT-scanning, and to use 3-D images in careful consideration of MPR images. (author)

  9. Linearity of patient positioning detection. A phantom study of skin markers, cone beam computed tomography, and 3D ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballhausen, Hendrik; Hieber, Sheila; Li, Minglun; Belka, Claus; Reiner, Michael [University Hospital of LMU, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Parodi, Katia [Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Department of Experimental Physics - Medical Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) is a modality complementary to kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and skin markers for patient positioning detection. This study compares the linearity of evaluations based on measurements using a modern 3D-US system (Elekta Clarity {sup registered}; Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden), a kV-CBCT system (Elekta iView {sup registered}), and skin markers. An investigator deliberately displaced a multimodal phantom by up to ± 30 mm along different axes. The following data points were acquired: 27 along the lateral axis, 29 along the longitudinal axis, 27 along the vertical axis, and 27 along the space diagonal. At each of these 110 positions, the displacements according to skin' markers were recorded and scans were performed using both 3D-US and kV-CBCT. Shifts were detected by matching bony anatomy or soft tissue density to a reference planning CT in the case of kV-CBCT and for 3D-US, by matching ultrasound volume data to a reference planning volume. A consensus value was calculated from the average of the four modalities. With respect to this consensus value, the linearity (offset and regression coefficient, i.e., slope), average offset, systematic error, and random error of all four modalities were calculated for each axis. Linearity was similar for all four modalities, with regression coefficients between 0.994 and 1.012, and all offsets below 1 mm. The systematic errors of skin markers and 3D-US were higher than for kV-CBCT, but random errors were similar. In particular, 3D-US demonstrated an average offset of 0.36 mm to the right, 0.08 mm inferiorly, and 0.15 mm anteriorly; the systematic error was 0.36 mm laterally, 0.35 mm longitudinally, and 0.22 mm vertically; the random error was 0.15 mm laterally, 0.30 mm longitudinally, and 0.12 mm vertically. A total of 109 out of 110 (99 %) 3D-US measurements were within 1 mm of the consensus value on either axis. The linearity of 3D-US was no worse than that of skin

  10. SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, G; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent advances in cancer treatments have greatly increased the likelihood of post-treatment patient survival. Secondary malignancies, however, have become a growing concern. Epidemiological studies determining secondary effects in radiotherapy patients require assessment of organ-specific dose both inside and outside the treatment field. An essential input for Monte Carlo modeling of particle transport is radiological images showing full patient anatomy. However, in retrospective studies it is typical to only have partial anatomy from CT scans used during treatment planning. In this study, we developed a multi-step method to extend such limited patient anatomy to full body anatomy for estimating dose to normal tissues located outside the CT scan coverage. Methods: The first step identified a phantom from a library of body size-dependent computational human phantoms by matching the height and weight of patients. Second, a Python algorithm matched the patient CT coverage location in relation to the whole body phantom. Third, an algorithm cut the whole body phantom and scaled them to match the size of the patient. Then, merged the two anatomies into one whole body. We entitled this new approach, Anatomically Predictive Extension (APE). Results: The APE method was examined by comparing the original chest-abdomen-pelvis CT images of the five patients with the APE phantoms developed from only the chest part of the CAP images and whole body phantoms. We achieved average percent differences of tissue volumes of 25.7%, 34.2%, 16.5%, 26.8%, and 31.6% with an average of 27% across all patients. Conclusion: Our APE method extends the limited CT patient anatomy to whole body anatomy by using image processing and computational human phantoms. Our ongoing work includes evaluating the accuracy of these APE phantoms by comparing normal tissue doses in the APE phantoms and doses calculated for the original full CAP images under generic radiotherapy simulations. This

  11. Comparison of longitudinal excursion of a nerve-phantom model using quantitative ultrasound imaging and motion analysis system methods: A convergent validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Philippe; El Khamlichi, Youssef; Lamontagne, Martin; Higgins, Johanne; Gagnon, Dany H

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative ultrasound imaging is gaining popularity in research and clinical settings to measure the neuromechanical properties of the peripheral nerves such as their capability to glide in response to body segment movement. Increasing evidence suggests that impaired median nerve longitudinal excursion is associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. To date, psychometric properties of longitudinal nerve excursion measurements using quantitative ultrasound imaging have not been extensively investigated. This study investigates the convergent validity of the longitudinal nerve excursion by comparing measures obtained using quantitative ultrasound imaging with those determined with a motion analysis system. A 38-cm long rigid nerve-phantom model was used to assess the longitudinal excursion in a laboratory environment. The nerve-phantom model, immersed in a 20-cm deep container filled with a gelatin-based solution, was moved 20 times using a linear forward and backward motion. Three light-emitting diodes were used to record nerve-phantom excursion with a motion analysis system, while a 5-cm linear transducer allowed simultaneous recording via ultrasound imaging. Both measurement techniques yielded excellent association ( r  = 0.99) and agreement (mean absolute difference between methods = 0.85 mm; mean relative difference between methods = 7.48 %). Small discrepancies were largely found when larger excursions (i.e. > 10 mm) were performed, revealing slight underestimation of the excursion by the ultrasound imaging analysis software. Quantitative ultrasound imaging is an accurate method to assess the longitudinal excursion of an in vitro nerve-phantom model and appears relevant for future research protocols investigating the neuromechanical properties of the peripheral nerves.

  12. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng-Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co-electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4-month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10(-4) mm(2) /s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet-normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Comparison of system identification techniques in the analysis of a phantom for studying shaken-baby syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintern, Thomas O; Finch, Mark C; Taberner, Andrew J; Nielsen, Poul M F; Nash, Martyn P

    2011-01-01

    This article compares two techniques for estimating the parameters describing the motion of a phantom designed to investigate shaking baby syndrome. Parameters of a simple computational model and an impulse response function for a linear second order system were both fitted using kinematic measurements of the motion of an inverted jointed pendulum. From the two methods respectively, the rotational stiffness of the joint was calculated to be 1.396 kgm(2) s(-2) and 1.355 kgm(2) s(-2) and the damping coefficient was calculated to be 0.0142 kgm(2) s(-1) and 0.0133 kgm(2) s(-1). The parameter estimates were similar demonstrating that the two techniques were comparable. Identifying accurate parameters will allow more complex phantoms to be modeled, and will provide insight into the relationship between the shaking of the torso and the resultant head motion during shaken baby syndrome.

  14. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J. D., E-mail: j.d.thompson@salford.ac.uk [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU, United Kingdom and Department of Radiology, Furness General Hospital, University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Dalton Lane, Barrow-in-Furness LA14 4LF (United Kingdom); Chakraborty, D. P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, FARP Building, Room 212, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Szczepura, K.; Tootell, A. K. [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom); Vamvakas, I. [Department of Radiology, Christie Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 550 Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Manning, D. J. [Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster Medical School, Furness College, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YG (United Kingdom); Hogg, P. [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU, United Kingdom and Department of Radiography, Karolinksa Institute, Solnavägen 1, Solna 171 77 (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR{sup 3D}) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would generate CT images for the observer study; (ii) a whole-body dosimetry verification phantom was used to ultimately estimate effective dose and risk according to the model of the BEIR VII committee. Both phantoms were scanned over a mAs range (10, 20, 30, and 40), while all other acquisition parameters remained constant. Images were reconstructed with both AIDR{sup 3D} and FBP. For the observer study, 34 normal cases (no nodules) and 34 abnormal cases (containing 1–3 nodules, mean 1.35 ± 0.54) were chosen. Eleven observers evaluated images from all mAs and reconstruction methods under the free-response paradigm. A crossed-modality jackknife alternative free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis method was developed for data analysis, averaging data over the two factors influencing nodule detection in this study: mAs and image reconstruction (AIDR{sup 3D} or FBP). A Bonferroni correction was applied and the threshold for declaring significance was set at 0.025 to maintain the overall probability of Type I error at α = 0.05. Contrast-to-noise (CNR) was also measured for all nodules and evaluated by a linear least squares analysis. Results: For random-reader fixed-case crossed-modality JAFROC analysis, there was no significant difference in nodule detection between AIDR{sup 3D} and FBP when data were averaged over mAs [F(1, 10) = 0.08, p = 0.789]. However, when data were averaged over reconstruction methods, a significant difference was seen between

  15. A study of magnification effect to precision of computerized diameter measurement of a 3-mm vessel phantom in cineangiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Yoshio; Sugahara, Tetsuo; Sugimoto, Naozou; Fukunishi, Yasunobu.

    1994-01-01

    To estimate influence of magnification on digitizing to Precision of computerized measurement of coronary vessel diameter, the two measurement methods, i.e., a combined filter and Entropy filter, were applied to magnified images (x1-x6) of cineangiograms radiographed for a 3-mm vessel phantom. In conclusion, the desirable precision in clinical use, we thought, was obtainable at the magnification of x3 to x4. (author)

  16. The effect of scatter correction on planar and tomographic semiquantitative 123I cardiac imaging. A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Emmanouil; Moralidis, Efstratios; Siountas, Anastasios

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac I-123 ( 123 I) imaging downscatter from high energy emissions degrades the image and introduces distortion of semi-quantitative analysis when using a low energy collimator. The effect of a triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction technique, using windows immediately above and below the principal window centered on 159keV, was examined. A hemispherical cardiac phantom was inserted into a cylindrical phantom and both were filled with radioactive 123 I water solutions. Phantoms were submitted to planar and tomographic scintigraphy under various acquisition and processing conditions, including the use of medium energy (ME) and low energy (LE) collimation. In planar imaging, there was a distance dependent count loss with the LEHR collimator which was partly restored with TEW correction. There was minimal dependence of count rate with distance in using ME collimation. Conversely, the heart to background (H/B) ratio increased with increasing distance with the LEHR collimator, but in applying the TEW correction that ratio paralleled the minimally affected values obtained with the ME collimation. In tomographic imaging the acquired H/B ratio was lower with LE collimation alone, in comparison to the ME collimator, but it was raised significantly when applying the TEW scatter correction. Quantitative measurements also depended on the background method and the reconstruction algorithm applied. In cardiac 123 I imaging with a LE collimator the use of TEW scatter correction provides a semi-quantitative assessment comparable to that attained with ME collimation and may moderate inter-institutional inconsistencies.

  17. Assessment of renal artery stenosis of transplanted kidney by time resolved gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography. Preliminary phantom study and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayano, Toshio

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine a suitable imaging parameters of time-resolved Gd-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (TRE3DMRA) for the evaluation of renal artery stenosis of transplanted kidneys and to investigate the usefulness of TRE3DMRA in 166 clinical cases. Source images were obtained 3dFLASH with zero-filling interpolation (turbo MRA) using Siemens Magneton 1.5T. Acrylate tubes with 6 mm inner diameter filled with diluted Gd-DTPA were used as special phantoms. In the tubes, 25%, 50%, and 75% stenosis were made for simulating arterial stenosis, respectively. According to our clinical experiences, we decided 10 seconds or less acquisition time to obtaining renal artery images without overlapping with renal veins. To determine slice thickness, the degrees of stenosis of the phantom images obtained 8-second acquisition time in variable slice thickness were independently interpreted with visual inspection by two experienced diagnostic radiologists. One hundred sixty-six patients underwent renal transplantation were evaluated clinically. Using a power injector, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA was injected after the test scan with 1 ml Gd-DTPA for the determination of acquisition timing. MR images were obtained in the following imaging parameters; 4-mm slice thickness and 8-second acquisition time based on the results of phantom studies. Source images were noted in oblique coronal direction encompassing the entire renal arteries from iliac arteries to renal hili. Based on phantom study, slice thickness must be less than 4-mm to demonstrate the significant stenotic portion (>50%) of the phantom simulating transplanted renal artery. In 150 of 166 patients, excellent images of renal arteries were obtained without overlapping with renal veins. Causes of poor images were mainly inadequate timing of image acquisition. We can decide the imaging parameters of TRE3DMRA for the evaluation of renal artery stenosis of transplanted kidneys. Using these parameters, in 150

  18. Simultaneous 99mTc-MDP/123I-MIBG tumor imaging using SPECT-CT: phantom and constructed patient studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Lim, Ruth; Bonab, Ali A; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2013-10-01

    Authors' goal is to evaluate the performance of simultaneous (99m)Tc-MDP/(123)I-MIBG tumor imaging with fast Monte-Carlo (MC) based joint iterative reconstruction as compared to sequential (99m)Tc-MDP and (123)I-MIBG tumor imaging. Noise-free (99m)Tc and (123)I SPECT projections were acquired separately using an anthropomorphic torso phantom modified to include a fillable tube around the lungs to mimic ribs. Additionally, (99m)Tc and (123)I projections were acquired separately using a 1-cm spherical "tumor" placed at various distances from one detector. Tumor-present data were generated by adding tumor projections to the torso phantom data, which were scaled to the total counts in typical clinical studies. Twenty-five noise realizations were generated by adding Poisson noise to the projection data for each radionuclide. Dual-radionuclide data were synthesized by summing the (99m)Tc and (123)I projections. Image reconstruction was performed using: (1) SR-OSEM, ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) without scatter correction (SC) using single-radionuclide (SR) data; (2) SR-MC-OSEM, OSEM with a fast MC-based SC using SR data; (3) DR-OSEM, OSEM without SC using dual-radionuclide (DR) data; and (4) DR-MC-JOSEM, joint OSEM with a fast MC-based SC using DR data. Ten (99m)Tc-MDP and ten (123)I-MIBG data sets, which had tumors mathematically inserted, were also used to evaluate the performance of authors' approach. For the phantom study, relative bias and relative standard deviation of tumor uptake were computed for each tumor using the tumor uptake in the noise-free single-radionuclide images, which were reconstructed by SR-MC-OSEM, as the gold standard. For both the phantom and constructed patient studies, mean contrast and standard deviation of contrast were computed for each tumor for both the single- and dual-radionuclide images. Additionally, contrast recovery was computed as the ratio between mean contrast and the mean contrast for SR-MC-OSEM. For the

  19. Optimized point dose measurement for monitor unit verification in intensity modulated radiation therapy using 6 MV photons by three different methodologies with different detector-phantom combinations: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Biplab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to compare accuracy of monitor unit verification in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT using 6 MV photons by three different methodologies with different detector phantom combinations. Sixty patients were randomly chosen. Zero degree couch and gantry angle plans were generated in a plastic universal IMRT verification phantom and 30Χ30Χ30 cc water phantom and measured using 0.125 cc and 0.6 cc chambers, respectively. Actual gantry and couch angle plans were also measured in water phantom using 0.6 cc chamber. A suitable point of measurement was chosen from the beam profile for each field. When the zero-degree gantry, couch angle plans and actual gantry, couch angle plans were measured by 0.6 cc chamber in water phantom, the percentage mean difference (MD was 1.35%, 2.94 % and Standard Deviation (SD was 2.99%, 5.22%, respectively. The plastic phantom measurements with 0.125 cc chamber Semiflex ionisation chamber (SIC showed an MD=4.21% and SD=2.73 %, but when corrected for chamber-medium response, they showed an improvement, with MD=3.38 % and SD=2.59 %. It was found that measurements with water phantom and 0.6cc chamber at gantry angle zero degree showed better conformity than other measurements of medium-detector combinations. Correction in plastic phantom measurement improved the result only marginally, and actual gantry angle measurement in a flat- water phantom showed higher deviation.

  20. Optimized point dose measurement for monitor unit verification in intensity modulated radiation therapy using 6 MV photons by three different methodologies with different detector-phantom combinations: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Biplab; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Sriramprasath; Mahendramohan, Sukumaran; Basu, Ayan; Goswami, Jyotirup; Ray, Amitabh

    2010-01-01

    The study was aimed to compare accuracy of monitor unit verification in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using 6 MV photons by three different methodologies with different detector phantom combinations. Sixty patients were randomly chosen. Zero degree couch and gantry angle plans were generated in a plastic universal IMRT verification phantom and 30 x 30 x 30 cc water phantom and measured using 0.125 cc and 0.6 cc chambers, respectively. Actual gantry and couch angle plans were also measured in water phantom using 0.6 cc chamber. A suitable point of measurement was chosen from the beam profile for each field. When zero-degree gantry, cough angle plans and actual gantry, cough angle plans were measured by 0.6 cc chamber in water phantom, the percentage mean difference (MD) was 1.35%, 2.94% and standard deviation (SD) was 2.99%, 5.22%, respectively. The plastic phantom measurements with 0.125 cc chamber Semiflex ionisation chamber (SIC) showed an MD = 4.21% and SD = 2.73%, but when corrected for chamber-medium response, they showed an improvement, with MD = 3.38% and SD = 2.59%. It was found that measurements with water phantom and 0.6 cc chamber at gantry angle zero degree showed better conformity than other measurements of medium-detector combinations. Correction in plastic phantom measurement improved the result only marginally, and actual gantry angle measurement in a flat-water phantom showed higher deviation. (author)

  1. Evaluation of six-point modified dixon and magnetic resonance spectroscopy for fat quantification: a fat-water-iron phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Kei; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Junji; Yoshihara, Chiharu; Tano, Masakatsu; Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Saitoh, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate (1) the agreement between the true fat fraction (FF) and proton density FF (PDFF) measured using a six-echo modified Dixon (6mDixon) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and (2) the influence of fat on T2* values. The study was performed using phantoms of varying fat and iron content. Point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) and stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) with single-echo (S) and multiecho (M) (PRESS-S, PRESS-M, STEAM-S, and STEAM-M) were used for MRS. In phantoms without iron, the agreement between the true FF and measured PDFF was tested using Bland-Altman analysis. The influence of iron on PDFF was evaluated in phantoms with iron. The relationship between the true FF and T2* value was assessed in phantoms without iron, wherein the mean differences (limits of agreement) for each method were as follows: 6mDixon 2.9% (-2.4 to 8.1%); STEAM-S 3.2% (-9.5 to 16.0%); STEAM-M -0.7% (-6.9 to 5.5%); PRESS-S 8.9% (-14.5 to 32.4%); and PRESS-M -5.8% (-18.3 to 6.7%). In the 20% fat phantoms with iron, as iron increased, PDFFs with STEAM-S, PRESS-S, and PRESS-M were considerably overestimated, while, PDFF with STEAM-M was stable at 0.04-0.2 mM iron concentrations (17.2 and 21.4%, respectively), and PDFF with 6mDixon was reliable at even 0.4 mM iron concentration (24.8%). The T2* value showed a negative correlation with the true FF (r = -0.942, P = 0.005). STEAM-M and 6mDixon were reliable methods of fat quantification in the absence of iron, and the T2* value was shortened by fat.

  2. Pediatric thoracic CT angiography at 70 kV: a phantom study to investigate the effects on image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, Robert D.; Kleinman, Patricia L.; Lee, Edward Y.; Yu, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that 70-kilovolt (kV) imaging enhances the contrast of iodine, potentially affording a reduction in radiation dose while maintaining the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). There is a maximum amount of image noise beyond which increased contrast does not improve structure visualization. Thus, noise should be constrained during protocol optimization. This phantom study investigated the effect of 70-kV imaging for pediatric thoracic CT angiography on image quality and radiation dose in a pediatric population when a noise constraint was considered. We measured contrast and noise using anthropomorphic thoracic phantoms ranging in size from newborn age equivalent to 10-year-old age equivalent. We inserted contrast rods into the phantoms to simulate injected contrast material used in a CT angiography study. The image-quality metric ''iodine CNR with a noise constraint'' was used to determine the relative dose factor for each phantom size, kV setting (70-140 kV) and noise constraint (1.00-1.20). A noise constraint of 1.20 indicates that noise should not increase by more than 20% of the noise level in images performed at the reference kV, selected to be 80 kV in this study. The relative dose factor can be applied to the original dose obtained at 80 kV in order to maintain iodine CNR with the noise constraint. A relative dose factor <1.0 indicates potential for dose reduction while a relative dose factor >1.0 indicates a dose penalty. Iodine contrast was highest for 70 kV and decreased with higher kV settings for all phantom sizes. The relative dose factor at 70 kV was <1.0 for all noise constraint >1.0, indicating potential for dose reduction, for the newborn, 1-year-old and 5-year-old age-equivalent phantom sizes. For the 10-year-old age-equivalent phantom, relative dose factor at 70 kV=1.22, 1.11, 1.01, 0.92 and 0.83 for noise constraint=1.00, 1.05, 1.10, 1.15, 1.20, respectively, indicating a dose penalty for noise constraint

  3. Toxicology Analysis of Tissue-Mimicking Phantom Made From Gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbashid, A. S.; Hamzah, N.; Zaman, W. S. W. K.; Mokhtar, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    Skin phantom mimics the biological skin tissues as it have the ability to respond to changes in its environment. The development of tissue-mimicking phantom could contributes towards the reduce usage of animal in cosmetics and pharmacokinetics. In this study, the skin phantoms made from gelatin were tested with four different commonly available cosmetic products to determine the toxicity of each substance. The four substances used were; mercury-based whitening face cream, carcinogenic liquid make-up foundation, paraben-based acne cleanser, and organic lip balm. Toxicity test were performed on all of the phantoms. For toxicity testing, topographical and electrophysiological changes of the phantoms were evaluated. The ability of each respective phantom to react with mild toxic substances and its electrical resistance were analysed in to determine the toxicity of all the phantom models. Four-electrode method along with custom made electrical impedance analyser was used to differentiate electrical resistance between intoxicated phantom and non-intoxicated phantom in this study. Electrical resistance values obtained from the phantom models were significantly higher than the control group. The result obtained suggests the phantom as a promising candidate to be used as alternative for toxicology testing in the future.

  4. Phantom-Calibrated versus Automatic Coronary Artery Mass Quantification with Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Z.; Lasek, W.; Laskowska, K. (Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland))

    2008-11-15

    Background: Coronary artery calcium scoring is used as a method for cardiovascular risk stratification and monitoring of coronary heart disease. Automatic software-based calcium mass calculation has been proposed to improve the performance of the procedure. Purpose: To compare two algorithms of calcium mass measurement, automatic and phantom calibrated, with respect to correlation, measurement error, and accuracy in vitro and in vivo. Material and Methods: A cardiac phantom with calcium cylinder inserts was scanned with sequential non-overlapping collimation 4x2.5 mm, at 120 kV and 165 mAs. Fifty adults (37 men; mean age 46.2 years) were examined with the same settings using prospective electrocardiographic triggering to detect and quantify coronary artery calcifications. Calculations were performed with two methods: software-based automatic calcium mass measurement (ACM) and phantom-calibrated calcium mass measurement (CCM). Results: The total phantom calcium masses measured with ACM and CCM were 175.0+-13.8 mg and 163.0+-4.4 mg, respectively (P<0.0001), and ACM produced a higher mean error (4.5 vs. 3.2; P<0.05). Results of ACM and CCM were strongly correlated to each other (R=0.73-0.96; P<0.0001). Mean image noise in the patient study was 8.72+-1.68 HU. Results of patient calcium scoring with ACM and CCM were significantly different (median 70.3 mg and 59.7 mg, respectively; P<0.0001), with a mean systematic error of 17.5% (limit of agreement between 14.6% and 20.4%). The use of ACM resulted in an altered quartile classification for 14% of patients, as compared to CCM; all of these patients were classified into a higher category. Conclusion: Our data indicate that multidetector-row computed tomography coronary calcium mass determination based on dedicated phantom calibration shows lower measurement error than an automatic software-based calculation method. The tested automatic software does not yet seem to be a reliable option for calcium mass measurement

  5. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, I.V.B.; Vieira, J.W.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  6. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, Eric D; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Barney, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use. (paper)

  7. A novel breast software phantom for biomechanical modeling of elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Syeda Naema; Sridhar-Keralapura, Mallika

    2012-04-01

    In developing breast imaging technologies, testing is done with phantoms. Physical phantoms are normally used but their size, shape, composition, and detail cannot be modified readily. These difficulties can be avoided by creating a software breast phantom. Researchers have created software breast phantoms using geometric and/or mathematical methods for applications like image fusion. The authors report a 3D software breast phantom that was built using a mechanical design tool, to investigate the biomechanics of elastography using finite element modeling (FEM). The authors propose this phantom as an intermediate assessment tool for elastography simulation; for use after testing with commonly used phantoms and before clinical testing. The authors design the phantom to be flexible in both, the breast geometry and biomechanical parameters, to make it a useful tool for elastography simulation. The authors develop the 3D software phantom using a mechanical design tool based on illustrations of normal breast anatomy. The software phantom does not use geometric primitives or imaging data. The authors discuss how to create this phantom and how to modify it. The authors demonstrate a typical elastography experiment of applying a static stress to the top surface of the breast just above a simulated tumor and calculate normal strains in 3D and in 2D with plane strain approximations with linear solvers. In particular, they investigate contrast transfer efficiency (CTE) by designing a parametric study based on location, shape, and stiffness of simulated tumors. The authors also compare their findings to a commonly used elastography phantom. The 3D breast software phantom is flexible in shape, size, and location of tumors, glandular to fatty content, and the ductal structure. Residual modulus, maps, and profiles, served as a guide to optimize meshing of this geometrically nonlinear phantom for biomechanical modeling of elastography. At best, low residues (around 1-5 KPa) were

  8. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  9. Comparison of calcium scoring with 4-multidetector computed tomography (4-MDCT) and 64-MDCT: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Rusak, Grazyna; Strześniewski, Piotr; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Lasek, Władysław

    2012-01-01

    To determine differences in coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement performed with the use of 2 generations of multidetector computed tomography (CT) scanners of the same manufacturer. Agatston Score (AS) and calcium mass (CM) were measured with a 4-row scanner (AS4 and CM4) and a 64-row scanner (AS64 and CM64) using a cardiac phantom with calcium inserts. The results of the AS measurements (mean ± SD) varied significantly between the equipment: 880.6 ± 30.1 (AS4) vs 586.5 ± 24.0 (AS64; P < 0.0001). The AS interscanner variability was 31.6% for the phantom and from 25.5% to 110.1% for particular inserts. Mean ± SD CM values were different as well: 192.8 ± 5.0 mg (CM4) vs 152.4 ± 2.6 mg (CM64; P < 0.0001). Determination of CM with 64-row CT was more accurate than that with an older scanner; the mean relative error was -9.1% and 15.0%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The CM interscanner variability was 23.3% for the phantom and from 19.0% to 122.8% for particular inserts. The interexamination variability ranged from 1.7% (CM64) to 5.6% (AS4). Coronary artery calcium scoring with the 64-row CT scanner is more accurate than with the 4-row device The difference between the results of AS and CM measurements carried out with both scanners is statistically significant.

  10. 3-D Imaging using Row–Column-Addressed 2-D Arrays with a Diverging Lens: Phantom Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Beers, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    A double-curved diverging lens over a flat row– column-addressed (RCA) 2-D array can extend its inherent rectilinear 3-D imaging field-of-view (FOV) to a curvilinear volume region, which is necessary for applications such as abdominal and cardiac imaging. A concave lens with radius of 12.7 mm...... was manufactured using RTV664 silicone. The diverging properties of the lens were evaluated based on measurements on several phantoms. The measured 6 dB FOV in contact with a material similar to human soft tissue was less than 15% different from the theoretical predictions, i.e., a curvilinear FOV of 32...

  11. Use of scatter correction in quantitative I-123 MIBG scintigraphy for differentiating patients with Parkinsonism: Results from Phantom experiment and clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Suzuki, T.; Nakahara, T.; Kubo, A.; Ohira, M.; Takao, M.; Ogawa, K.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to elucidate the feasibility of scatter correction in improving the quantitative accuracy of the Heart-to-Mediastinum (H/M) ratio in I-123 MIBG imaging and to clarify whether the H/M ratio calculated from the scatter corrected image improves the accuracy of differentiating patients with Parkinsonism from other neurological disorders. The H/M ratio was calculated using the counts from planar images processed with and without scatter correction in the phantom and on patients. The triple energy window (TEW) method was used for scatter correction. Fifty five patients were enrolled in the clinical study. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curve analysis was used to evaluate diagnostic performance. The H/M ratio was found to be increased after scatter correction in the phantom simulating normal cardiac uptake, while no changes were observed in the phantom simulating no uptake. It was observed that scatter correction stabilized the H/M ratio by eliminating the influence of scatter photons originating from the liver, especially in the condition of no cardiac uptake. Similarly, scatter correction increased the H/M ratio in conditions other than Parkinson's disease but did not show any change in Parkinson's disease itself to widen the differences in the H/M ratios between the two groups. The overall power of the test did not show any significant improvement after scatter correction in differentiating patients with Parkinsonism. Based on the results of this study it has been concluded that scatter correction improves the quantitative accuracy of H/M ratio in MIBG imaging, but it does not offer any significant incremental diagnostic value over conventional imaging (without scatter correction). Nevertheless it is felt that the scatter correction technique deserves special consideration in order to make the test more robust and obtain stable H/M ratios. (author)

  12. A phantom-based JAFROC observer study of two CT reconstruction methods: the search for optimisation of lesion detection and effective dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John D.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Szczepura, Katy; Vamvakas, Ioannis; Tootell, Andrew; Manning, David J.; Hogg, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose saving potential of iterative reconstruction (IR) in a computed tomography (CT) examination of the thorax. Materials and Methods: An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing various configurations of simulated lesions (5, 8, 10 and 12mm; +100, -630 and -800 Hounsfield Units, HU) was imaged on a modern CT system over a tube current range (20, 40, 60 and 80mA). Images were reconstructed with (IR) and filtered back projection (FBP). An ATOM 701D (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) dosimetry phantom was used to measure organ dose. Effective dose was calculated. Eleven observers (15.11+/-8.75 years of experience) completed a free response study, localizing lesions in 544 single CT image slices. A modified jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was completed to look for a significant effect of two factors: reconstruction method and tube current. Alpha was set at 0.05 to control the Type I error in this study. Results: For modified JAFROC analysis of reconstruction method there was no statistically significant difference in lesion detection performance between FBP and IR when figures-of-merit were averaged over tube current (F(1,10)=0.08, p = 0.789). For tube current analysis, significant differences were revealed between multiple pairs of tube current settings (F(3,10) = 16.96, pConclusion: The free-response study suggests that lesion detection can be optimized at 40mA in this phantom model, a measured effective dose of 0.97mSv. In high-contrast regions the diagnostic value of IR, compared to FBP, is less clear.

  13. Head phantoms for transcranial focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D C; Farnum, Mercy; Khaled, Mohamad; Elias, W Jeff; Hananel, Arik; Snell, John W; Kassell, Neal F; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2015-04-01

    In the ongoing endeavor of fine-tuning, the clinical application of transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS), ex-vivo studies wlkiith whole human skulls are of great use in improving the underlying technology guiding the accurate and precise thermal ablation of clinically relevant targets in the human skull. Described here are the designs, methods for fabrication, and notes on utility of three different ultrasound phantoms to be used for brain focused ultrasound research. Three different models of phantoms are developed and tested to be accurate, repeatable experimental options to provide means to further this research. The three models are a cadaver, a gel-filled skull, and a head mold containing a skull and filled with gel that mimics the brain and the skin. Each was positioned in a clinical tcMRgFUS system and sonicated at 1100 W (acoustic) for 12 s at different locations. Maximum temperature rise as measured by MR thermometry was recorded and compared against clinical data for a similar neurosurgical target. Results are presented as heating efficiency in units (°C/kW/s) for direct comparison to available clinical data. The procedure for casting thermal phantom material is presented. The utility of each phantom model is discussed in the context of various tcMRgFUS research areas. The cadaveric phantom model, gel-filled skull model, and full head phantom model had heating efficiencies of 5.3, 4.0, and 3.9 °C/(kW/s), respectively, compared to a sample clinical heating efficiency of 2.6 °C/(kW/s). In the seven research categories considered, the cadaveric phantom model was the most versatile, though less practical compared to the ex-vivo skull-based phantoms. Casting thermal phantom material was shown to be an effective way to prepare tissue-mimicking material for the phantoms presented. The phantom models presented are all useful in tcMRgFUS research, though some are better suited to a limited subset of applications depending on the researchers

  14. A CT simulator phantom for geometrical test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Chul Kee; Yi, Byong Yong; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook

    2000-01-01

    To design and test the CT simulator phantom for geometrical test. The PMMA phantom was designed as a cylinder which is 20 cm in diameter and 24 cm in length, along with a 25x25x31 cm 3 rectangular parallelepiped. Radio-opaque wires of which diameter is 0.8 mm are attached on the other surface of the phantom as a spiral. The rectangular phantom was made of four 24x24xO.5 cm 3 square plates and each plate had a 24x24 cm 2 . 12x12 cm 2 , 6x6 cm 2 square line. The squares were placed to face the cylinder at angles 0 .deg., 15 .deg., 30 .deg., respectively. The rectangular phantom made it possible to measure the field size, couch angle, the collimator angle, the isocenter shift and the SSD, the measurements of the gantry angle from the cylindrical part. A virtual simulation Software, AcQSim TM , offered various conditions to perform virtual simulations and these results were used to perform the geometrical quality assurance of CT simulator. A 0.3-0.5 mm difference was found on the 24 cm field size which was created with the DRR measurements obtained by scanning of the rectangular phantom. The isocenter shift, the collimator rotation, the couch rotation, and the gantry rotation test showed 0.5-1 mm, 0.5-1 .deg. 0.5-1 .deg. , and 0.5-1 .deg. differences, respectively. We could not find any significant differences between the results from the two scanning methods. The geometrical test phantom developed in the study showed less than 1 mm (or 1 .deg. ) differences. The phantom could be used as a routine geometrical QC/OA tools, since the differences are within clinically acceptable ranges

  15. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinming; Lai Chaojen; Whitman, Gary J.; Geiser, William R.; Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement factor was 1.89 for

  16. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  17. The Phantom Menace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vium, Christian

    2013-01-01

    as a phantom menace, which asserts itself through a form of omnipresent fear, nurtured by an inherent opaqueness. As this fundamental fear progressively permeates the nomadic landscape, it engenders a recasting of mobile strategies among the nomadic pastoralist groups who inhabit the interstitial desert spaces....

  18. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Nagle, Scott K.; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Robinson, Terry E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (Veo TM , GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  19. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head and brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshvari, J; Kivento, M; Christ, A; Bit-Babik, G

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases. (paper)

  20. Type of wine and risk of lung cancer: a case-control study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Ravina, A; Figueiras, A; Barros-Dios, J M

    2004-11-01

    Few epidemiological studies have examined the effect of wine on the risk of lung cancer. A study was therefore undertaken to estimate the effect of wine consumption, both overall and by type of wine, on the risk of developing lung cancer. A hospital based case-control study was conducted on 319 subjects (132 cases, 187 controls) in 1999-2000. All subjects were interviewed about their lifestyles with particular reference to alcohol consumption and tobacco use. The results were analysed using non-parametric logistic regression. The main outcome measure was the risk of lung cancer associated with consumption of wine and its individual types. A very slight but significant association was observed between the risk of lung cancer and white wine consumption (odds ratio (OR) 1.20 for each daily glass). Red wine consumption, on the other hand, had an OR of 0.43 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.96), with each daily glass of red wine having an inverse association with the development of lung cancer (OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.99)). There was no apparent association between lung cancer and consumption of beer or spirits. These results suggest that the consumption of red wine is negatively associated with the development of lung cancer. Further studies are needed to test this finding in cancer induced laboratory animals.

  1. Phantom studies on the artifacts of barium on 18F-FDG DHC/CT images induced by X-ray attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Zhu Jiarui; Wang Xinqiang; Zhao Wenrui; Chuan Ling; Xu Genxiang; Gao Chunhua; Fang Tingzheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Attenuation correction (AC) based on X-ray transmission map may result in false positive readings or artifacts on PET images, some of them due to the internal residue of high density contrast media used in diagnostic X-ray imaging. The aim of this study was to experimentally estimate the impacts of different concentrations and volumes of barium contrast on X-CT AC (CTAC) for dual-head coincidence (DHC/CT) images. Methods: A cylindrical phantom containing 18 F solution (3.7 kBq/ml), in which plastic fingertips enclosed with different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 kg/L)and volumes(0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 ml) of BaSO 4 contrast media were inserted, was used to modulate routine 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging study on a DHC/CT scanner (GE Discovery VH). Sequential 18 F emission and X-CT transmission acquisitions followed by data processing and reconstruction were carried out in clinical settings. For comparison, both visual and quantitative analyses were performed on CTAC and non-AC (NAC) images of the phantom. Results: In NAC images, the radioactivity distribution within the whole phantom was non-uniform with lower counts in the center; the plastic fingertips were all seen as 'cold spots' with much lower counts in the contrast region than in their surrounding areas. On the contrary, in CTAC images, the radioactivity distribution within the whole phantom was almost uniform; while most plastic fingertips with media concentration ≥0.1 kg/L and volume >0.5 ml were all depicted as 'hot spots' with higher counts than in surrounding areas. Conclusions: Barium contrast with relative high concentration or large volume can induce artifacts on CTAC DHC/CT images. In clinical setting, proper interpretation of CTAC DHC/CT images should refer to NAC DHC/CT images to exclude any artifacts related to the contrast media residues. (authors)

  2. Phantom testis syndrome: prevalence, phenomenology and putative mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pühse, Gerald; Wachsmuth, Julia Urte; Kemper, Sebastian; Husstedt, Ingo W; Kliesch, Sabine; Evers, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    Chronic phantom pain has been found in up to 78% of limb amputees and is a major complication of limb amputation. Less is known about phantom phenomena after the amputation of other, i.e. visceral, parts of the body. In a retrospective design, we identified 539 patients in whom one testis was removed between 1995 and 2005. The operative technique was a unilateral standard radical inguinal orchiectomy. The underlying pathology in all cases was a testicular germ cell tumour. All patients received a detailed questionnaire asking about the occurrence of phantom testis pain (pain felt in the removed testis), phantom testis sensations (non-painful sensations as if the removed testis was still intact) and hallucinations (illusionary perceptions on the removed testis). Furthermore, we asked about the occurrence and clinical presentation of pain before and after surgery and about pre-operative testicular pain. Out of 238 respondents, 125 patients (53%) reported any kind of phantom experience. The prevalence of phantom testis pain was 25% (60/238), non-painful phantom sensations 16% (37/238) and male gonad hallucinations 12% (28/238). Patients with phantom symptoms reported pre-operative pain in the removed testis more often than patients without phantom symptoms. This study presents first data on the clinical characteristics and possible mechanisms of the phantom testis syndrome after surgical removal of one testis.

  3. Use of a digital phantom developed by QIBA for harmonizing SUVs obtained from the state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Tadaki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Iimori, Takashi; Miyagawa, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Tomoya; Owaki, Yoshiki; Yada, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Koichi; Tokorodani, Ryotaro; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Although quantitative analysis using standardized uptake value (SUV) becomes realistic in clinical single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, reconstruction parameter settings can deliver different quantitative results among different SPECT/CT systems. This study aims to propose a use of the digital reference object (DRO), which is a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) phantom-like object developed by the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance (QIBA) fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography technical committee, for the purpose of harmonizing SUVs in Tc-99m SPECT/CT imaging. The NEMA body phantom with determined Tc-99m concentration was scanned with the four state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems. SPECT data were reconstructed using different numbers of the product of subset and iteration numbers (SI) and the width of 3D Gaussian filter (3DGF). The mean (SUV mean ), maximal (SUV max ), and peak (SUV peak ) SUVs for six hot spheres (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm) were measured after converting SPECT count into SUV using Becquerel calibration factor. DRO smoothed by 3DGF with a FWHM of 17 mm (DRO 17 mm ) was generated, and the corresponding SUVs were measured. The reconstruction condition to yield the lowest root mean square error (RMSE) of SUV means for all the spheres between DRO 17 mm and actual phantom images was determined as the harmonized condition for each SPECT/CT scanner. Then, inter-scanner variability in all quantitative metrics was measured before (i.e., according to the manufacturers' recommendation or the policies of their own departments) and after harmonization. RMSE was lowest in the following reconstruction conditions: SI of 100 and 3DGF of 13 mm for Brightview XCT, SI of 160 and 3DGF of 3 pixels for Discovery NM/CT, SI of 60 and 3DGF of 2 pixels for Infinia, and SI of 140 and 3DGF of 15 mm for Symbia. In pre-harmonized conditions, coefficient of variations (COVs) among the SPECT

  4. SU-E-T-410: Evaluation of Treatment Modalities for Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohatt, D; Malhotra, H [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and verify the accuracy of alternative treatment modalities for stereotactic lung therapy with end-to-end testing. We compared three dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) and 10 MV FFF photons. Methods: A QUASAR respiratory motion phantom was utilized with custom ion chamber and gafchromatic EBT2 film inserts. The phantom contained a low density lung medium with a cylindrical polystyrene tumor (35 cc). Pseudo representative structures for various organs at risk (OAR) were created. All treatment plans were created using Eclipse ver. 11 using the same image and structure sets, and delivered via Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator equipped with high definition MLC. Evaluation of plan quality followed ROTG 0813 criterion for conformity index (CI100%), high dose spillage, D2cm, and R50%. Results: All treatment plans met the OAR dose constraints per protocol and could be delivered without any beam hold offs or other interlocks and hence were deemed clinically safe. For equivalent beam energies, target conformity was improved for all modalities when switching to FFF mode. Treatment efficiency increased for VMAT FFF by a factor of 3–4 over IMRT, and up to factor of 7 when compared to 3DCRT. Pass rates were > 97% for all treatment using gamma criteria of 3%, 3mm. Absolute dose at iso-center was verified with ion chamber, and found to be within 2% of the treatment planning system. Conclusion: The higher dose rate associated with FFF not only reduces delivery times, but in most cases enhances plan quality. The one modality with succeeding best results for all RTOG criterions was VMAT 6 MV FFF. This end-to-end testing provides necessary confidence in the entire dose delivery chain for lung SBRT patients.

  5. In vitro study of relationship between bile duct stone and posterior acoustic shadow using human liver phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.W.; KIm, M.J.; Yu, H. S.; Lee, C. T.; Park, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The ultrasonic diagnosis of bile duct stone is still difficult and disappointing, especially compared with the diagnostic accuracy of gall stone. We analyzed ultrasonic findings of the relationship between bile duct stone and posterior acoustic shadow under different conditions in vitro real time scans of bile duct stones using human liver tissue phantom. The results were as follows: 1. In vitro real time scans of each 1 to 6mm sized 23 stones, even the detection of the 1mm sized stones were possible in 3 cases among 5 cases when using 5MHz transducer, however there shows no definite posterior acoustic shadow in all cases of 1mm sized stones when using 2.4 MHz probe. 2. The posterior acoustic shadows were demonstrated in almost all the stones more than 2mm size except two stones, each 2mm and 4mm stones, among 13 stones, and the reflected echoes from the stones and posterior acoustic shadows were more evident when using higher frequency probe. 3. In real time scans of 4 to 6 mm sized 3 stones using 3.5MHz probe at different depth, only faint posterior acoustic shadows were noted when the stones were placed deeper than the focal range of the probe, while dense posterior acoustic shadows were identified when the stones were placed within the focal range of the probe. 4. When 7 to 9 mm sized stones were scanned in different tubes, posterior acoustic shadows were not dense in thick rubber tuber as in condom or thin rubber tube. After pulling of thick rubber tube for the purpose of reducing fluid-stone interface, previous posterior acoustic shadows were no more identified. 5 When the 1 to 3 mm sized multiple stones were evenly distributed in rubber tube, multiple dense acoustic shadows were demonstrated, while there shows no definite posterior acoustic shadows after impaction of these stones by inclining the phantom box

  6. Quantifying surgical access in eyebrow craniotomy with and without orbital bar removal: cadaver and surgical phantom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zador, Zsolt; Coope, David J; Gnanalingham, Kanna; Lawton, Michael T

    2014-04-01

    Eyebrow craniotomy is a recently described minimally invasive approach for tackling primarily pathology of the anterior skull base. The removal of the orbital bar may further expand the surgical corridor of this exposure, but the extent of benefit is poorly quantified. We assessed the effect of orbital bar removal with regards to surgical access in the eyebrow craniotomy using classic morphometric measurements in cadaver heads. Using surgical phantoms and neuronavigation, we also measured the 'working volume', a new parameter for characterising the volume of surgical access in these approaches. Silicon injected cadaver heads (n = 5) were used for morphometric analysis of the eyebrow craniotomy with and without orbital bar removal. Working depths and 'working areas' of surgical access were measured as defined by key anatomical landmarks. The eyebrow craniotomy with or without orbital bar removal was also simulated using surgical phantoms (n = 3, 90-120 points per trial), calibrated against a frameless neuronavigation system. Working volume was derived from reference coordinates recorded along the anatomical borders of the eyebrow craniotomy using the "α-shape algorithm" in R statistics. In cadaver heads, eyebrow craniotomy with removal of the orbital bar reduced the working depth to the ipsilateral anterior clinoid process (42 ± 2 versus 33 ± 3 mm; p craniotomies was increased with orbital bar removal (16 ± 1 cm(3) versus 21 ± 1 cm(3); p craniotomy provides a modest reduction in working depth and increase in the working volume. But this must be weighed up against the added morbidity of the procedure. Working volume, a newly developed parameter may provide a more meaningful endpoint for characterising the surgical access for different surgical approaches and it could be applied to other operative cases undertaken with frameless neuronavigation.

  7. CT doses in cylindrical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, J.V.; Huda, W.

    1995-01-01

    A single CT scan of thickness T in a cylindrical phantom produces a three-dimensional dose distribution, which depends primarily on the photon energy spectrum, the x-ray beam shaping filter and the size and composition of the irradiated phantom. Monte Carlo simulations employing monoenergetic photons were employed to investigate the effect of each of these factors on phantom dose distributions. The fractional energies scattered, imparted and transmitted through the CT phantom were calculated. A dose index (D(r)), which is a function of phantom radius r, was computed. Phantom materials investigated included lung, fat, water, soft tissue, acrylic and bone with calculations performed for head (160 mm diameter) and body (320 mm diameter) phantoms. All dose and energy imparted data generated for CT phantoms were normalized using an 'in air' dose (D air ), which is defined as the axial dose (in acrylic) at the isocentre in the absence of any phantom. Results obtained show how CT parameters impact on doses in cylindrical phantoms. These dosimetry data are likely to be useful to estimate energy imparted to phantoms (and patients) undergoing CT examinations. (author)

  8. A dynamic phantom for radionuclide renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test a dynamic phantom simulating radionuclide renography. The phantom consisted of five partly lead covered plastic containers simulating kidneys, heart, bladder and background (soft tissues, liver and spleen). Dynamics were performed with multiple movable steel plates between containers and a gamma camera. Control of the plates is performed manually with a stopwatch following exact time schedules. The containers were filled with activities ( 99m Tc) which produce count rates close to clinical situations. Count rates produced by the phantom were compared with ten clinical renography cases: five 99m Tc MAG3 and five 99m Tc DTPA examinations. Two phantom simulations were repeated three times with separate fillings, acquisitions and analyses. Precision errors as a coefficient of variation (CV) of repeated measurements were calculated and theoretical values were compared with the corresponding measured ones. A multicentre comparison was made between 19 nuclear medicine laboratories and three clinical cases were simulated with the phantom. Correlations between count rates produced by the phantom and clinical studies were r=0.964 for 99m Tc MAG3 (p 99m Tc DTPA (p max was 4.0±1.6%. Images and curves of the scanned phantom were close to a real patient in all 19 laboratories but calculated parameters varied: the difference between theoretical and measured values for T max was 6.8±6.2%. The difference between laboratories is most probably due to variations in acquisition protocols and analysis programs: 19 laboratories with 18 different protocols and 8 different programs. The dynamics were found to be repeatable and suitable for calibration purposes for radionuclide renography programs and protocols as well as for multicentre comparisons. (author)

  9. Quantitative analysis of hepatic fat fraction by single-breath-holding MR spectroscopy with T₂ correction: phantom and clinical study with histologic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Norio; Miyati, Tosiaki; Minami, Takashi; Takeshita, Yumie; Ryu, Yasuji; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Takashi; Kato, Kenichiro; Takamura, Toshinari; Matsui, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study was on the investigation of the accuracy of the fat fraction of the liver by use of single-breath-holding magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with T (2) correction. Single-voxel proton MRS was performed with several TE values, and the fat fraction was determined with and without T (2) correction. MRS was also performed with use of the point-resolved spectroscopy sequence in single breath holding. The T (2) values of both water and fat were determined separately at the same time, and the effect of T (2) on the fat fraction was corrected. In addition, MRS-based fat fractions were compared with the degree of hepatic steatosis (HS) by liver biopsy in human subjects. With T (2) correction, the MRI-derived fat fractions were in good agreement with the fat fractions in all phantoms, but the fat fractions were overestimated without T (2) correction. R (2) values were in good agreement with the preset iron concentrations in the phantoms. The MRI-derived fat fraction was well correlated with the degree of HS. Iron deposited in the liver affects the signal strength when proton MRS is used for detection of the fat signal in the liver. However, the fat signal can be evaluated more accurately when the T (2) correction is applied. Breath-holding MRS minimizes the respiratory motion, and it can be more accurate in the quantification of the hepatic fat fraction.

  10. Solid water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguiropulo, M.Y.; Ghilardi Neto, T.; Pela, C.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A phantom were developed for simulating water, based in plastics. The material was evaluated for different energies, and the measures of relative transmission showed that the transmission and the water were inside of 0,6% for gamma rays. The results of this new material were presented, showing that it could be used in photon beam calibration with energies on radiotherapy range. (C.G.C.)

  11. Breast phantom for mammary tissue characterization by near infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, D A; Cristiano, K L; Gutiérrez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated to a high morbidity and mortality in the entire world. In the study of early detection of breast cancer the development of phantom is so important. In this research we fabricate a breast phantom using a ballistic gel with special modifications to simulate a normal and abnormal human breast. Optical properties of woman breast in the near infrared region were modelled with the phantom we developed. The developed phantom was evaluated with near infrared spectroscopy in order to study its relation with breast tissue. A good optical behaviour was achieved with the model fabricated

  12. Evaluation of time-of-flight and phase-contrast MRA sequences at 1.0 T for diagnosis of carotid artery disease. Pt. 1. A phantom and volunteer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronqvist, M.; Staahlberg, F.; Larsson, E.M.; Loenntoft, M.; Holtaas, S.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work was, firstly, to compare different manufacturer-provided MRA sequences in a 1.0 T MR unit, with respect to the visibility of an artificial stenosis in a flow phantom and, secondly, to evaluate the same sequences in healthy volunteers with respect to S/N ratio levels and practical in vivo implementation routines. The studied sequences were 2D and 3D TOF and sequences with an acquisition time of approximately 10 min. Quantitative signal evaluation was made using single transverse partitions in all phantom experiments. MIP angiograms and MPR reconstructions were made for visual inspection of image quality. In vivo, the images were individually evaluated by visual inspection by experienced neuroradiologists. In the evaluation of the grade and length of a stenosis, a combination of MIP and MPR was seen to be the optimal and necessary procedure. A shortening of TE played an important and significant role in the visualization of the poststenotic flow in the phantom using TOF MRA. However, the shortest TE values gave poor S/N ratio in vivo. The good results achieved in the phantom studies for 3D phase-contrast were somewhat reversed in the volunteer studies, whereas 3D TOF sequences showed good results in both the phantom and the volunteer studies. (orig.)

  13. Low-dose single acquisition rest {sup 99m}Tc/stress {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT protocol: phantom studies and clinical validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Imaging and Computer Vision, Aachen (Germany); Backus, Barbra E.; Romijn, R.Leo [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Wieczorek, Herfried [Philips Research, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Verzijlbergen, J.F. [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    We developed and tested a single acquisition rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi/stress {sup 201}Tl dual isotope protocol (SDI) with the intention of improving the clinical workflow and patient comfort of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The technical feasibility of SDI was evaluated by a series of anthropomorphic phantom studies on a standard SPECT camera. The attenuation map was created by a moving transmission line source. Iterative reconstruction including attenuation correction, resolution recovery and Monte Carlo simulation of scatter was used for simultaneous reconstruction of dual tracer distribution. For clinical evaluation, patient studies were compared to stress {sup 99m}Tc and rest {sup 99m}Tc reference images acquired in a 2-day protocol. Clinical follow-up examinations like coronary angiography (CAG) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) were included in the assessment if available. Phantom studies demonstrated the technical feasibility of SDI. Artificial lesions inserted in the phantom mimicking ischaemia could be clearly identified. In 51/53 patients, the image quality was adequate for clinical evaluation. For the remaining two obese patients with body mass index > 32 the injected {sup 201}Tl dose of 74 MBq was insufficient for clinical assessment. In answer to this the {sup 201}Tl dose was adapted for obese patients in the rest of the study. In 31 patients, SDI and {sup 99m}Tc reference images resulted in equivalent clinical assessment. Significant differences were found in 20 patients. In 18 of these 20 patients additional examinations were available. In 15 patients the diagnosis based on the SDI images was confirmed by the results of CAG or FFR. In these patients the SDI images were more accurate than the {sup 99m}Tc reference study. In three patients minor ischaemic lesions were detected by SDI but were not confirmed by CAG. In one of these cases this was probably caused by pronounced apical thinning. For two patients

  14. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, R.A.D.; Maia, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers. - Highlights: ► Two thyroid phantoms were developed (OSCT and OSAP) with different types of acrylics. ► Thyroid glands were represented anthropomorphically in the both phantoms. ► Different prototypes of thyroid were built of simulate healthy or unhealthy glands. ► Images indicate that anthropomorphic phantoms correctly simulate the thyroid gland

  15. Characterisation of urinary stones in the presence of iodinated contrast medium using dual-energy CT: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia; Qu, Mingliang; Duan, Xinhui; Takahashi, Naoki; Kawashima, Akira; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-12-15

    To develop a dual-energy CT (DECT) method for differentiating uric acid (UA) from non-UA stones in the presence of iodinated contrast medium. Thirty UA and 45 non-UA stones were selected after infra-red spectroscopic analysis and independently placed in a 1.5-ml vial, which was filled first with saline and then with increasing concentrations of iodine. For each condition, tubes were put in a 35-cm water phantom and examined using a dual-source CT system at 100 and 140 kV. Virtual unenhanced images created from CT data sets of the stones in iodine-containing solutions provided position and volume information. This map was used to calculate a CT number ratio to differentiate stone type. A region-growing method was developed to improve the ability to differentiate between UA and non-UA stones with iodinated contrast medium. The sensitivity for detecting UA stones was 100 % for unenhanced images but fell to 18 % with 20 mgI/ml iodine solution and 0 % for higher concentrations. With region growing, the sensitivity for detecting UA stones was increased to 100 %, 82 %, 57 %, 50 % and 21 % for iodine solutions of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mgI/ml. The region-growing method improves differentiation of UA from non-UA stones on contrast-enhanced DECT urograms. (orig.)

  16. Dual energy x-ray imaging and scoring of coronary calcium: physics-based digital phantom and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Wen, Di; Nye, Katelyn; Gilkeson, Robert C.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) as assessed with CT calcium score is the best biomarker of coronary artery disease. Dual energy x-ray provides an inexpensive, low radiation-dose alternative. A two shot system (GE Revolution-XRd) is used, raw images are processed with a custom algorithm, and a coronary calcium image (DECCI) is created, similar to the bone image, but optimized for CAC visualization, not lung visualization. In this report, we developed a physicsbased, digital-phantom containing heart, lung, CAC, spine, ribs, pulmonary artery, and adipose elements, examined effects on DECCI, suggested physics-inspired algorithms to improve CAC contrast, and evaluated the correlation between CT calcium scores and a proposed DE calcium score. In simulation experiment, Beam hardening from increasing adipose thickness (2cm to 8cm) reduced Cg by 19% and 27% in 120kVp and 60kVp images, but only reduced Cg by <7% in DECCI. If a pulmonary artery moves or pulsates with blood filling between exposures, it can give rise to a significantly confounding PA signal in DECCI similar in amplitude to CAC. Observations suggest modifications to DECCI processing, which can further improve CAC contrast by a factor of 2 in clinical exams. The DE score had the best correlation with "CT mass score" among three commonly used CT scores. Results suggest that DE x-ray is a promising tool for imaging and scoring CAC, and there still remains opportunity for further DECCI processing improvements.

  17. Detecting breast microcalcifications using super-resolution and wave-equation ultrasound imaging: a numerical phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simonetti, Francesco [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Huthwaite, Peter [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Rosenberg, Robert [UNM; Williamson, Michael [UNM

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound image resolution and quality need to be significantly improved for breast microcalcification detection. Super-resolution imaging with the factorization method has recently been developed as a promising tool to break through the resolution limit of conventional imaging. In addition, wave-equation reflection imaging has become an effective method to reduce image speckles by properly handling ultrasound scattering/diffraction from breast heterogeneities during image reconstruction. We explore the capabilities of a novel super-resolution ultrasound imaging method and a wave-equation reflection imaging scheme for detecting breast microcalcifications. Super-resolution imaging uses the singular value decomposition and a factorization scheme to achieve an image resolution that is not possible for conventional ultrasound imaging. Wave-equation reflection imaging employs a solution to the acoustic-wave equation in heterogeneous media to backpropagate ultrasound scattering/diffraction waves to scatters and form images of heterogeneities. We construct numerical breast phantoms using in vivo breast images, and use a finite-difference wave-equation scheme to generate ultrasound data scattered from inclusions that mimic microcalcifications. We demonstrate that microcalcifications can be detected at full spatial resolution using the super-resolution ultrasound imaging and wave-equation reflection imaging methods.

  18. Influence of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction algorithms for measurement accuracy and reproducibility of pulmonary nodule volumetry: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Chang Min; Song, Yong Sub; Lee, Sang Min; Goo, Jin Mo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of radiation dose settings and reconstruction algorithms on the measurement accuracy and reproducibility of semi-automated pulmonary nodule volumetry. Materials and methods: CT scans were performed on a chest phantom containing various nodules (10 and 12 mm; +100, −630 and −800 HU) at 120 kVp with tube current–time settings of 10, 20, 50, and 100 mAs. Each CT was reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), iDose 4 and iterative model reconstruction (IMR). Semi-automated volumetry was performed by two radiologists using commercial volumetry software for nodules at each CT dataset. Noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio of CT images were also obtained. The absolute percentage measurement errors and differences were then calculated for volume and mass. The influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on measurement accuracy, reproducibility and objective image quality metrics was analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Measurement accuracy and reproducibility of nodule volume and mass were not significantly associated with CT radiation dose settings or reconstruction algorithms (p > 0.05). Objective image quality metrics of CT images were superior in IMR than in FBP or iDose 4 at all radiation dose settings (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Semi-automated nodule volumetry can be applied to low- or ultralow-dose chest CT with usage of a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm without losing measurement accuracy and reproducibility

  19. A segmentation framework towards automatic generation of boost subvolumes for FDG-PET tumors: A digital phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fei; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-01-01

    Potential benefits of administering nonuniform radiation dose to heterogeneous tumors imaged with FDG-PET have been widely demonstrated; whereas the number of discrete dose levels to be utilized and corresponding locations for prescription inside tumors vary significantly with current existing methods. In this paper, an automated and unsupervised segmentation framework constituted mainly by an image restoration mechanism based on variational decomposition and a voxel clustering scheme based on spectral clustering was presented towards partitioning FDG-PET imaged tumors into subvolumes characterized with the total intra-subvolume activity similarity and the total inter-subvolume activity dissimilarity being simultaneously maximized. Experiments to evaluate the proposed system were carried out with using FDG-PET data generated from a digital phantom that employed SimSET (Simulation System for Emission Tomography) to simulate PET acquisition of tumors. The obtained results show the feasibility of the proposed system in dividing FDG-PET imaged tumor volumes into subvolumes with intratumoral heterogeneity being properly characterized, irrespective of variation in tumor morphology as well as diversity in intratumoral heterogeneity pattern.

  20. Image reconstruction for tomographic mapping of cerebral hemodynamics using time-domain detection: simulation and phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Tanikawa, Yukari; Yamada, Yukio

    2003-10-01

    One of the primary applications of diffuse optical imaging is to localize the changes in the cerebral oxygenation during physical or mental activities. Up to now, data from an optical imager is simply presented as a two-dimensional (2-D) topographic map using the modified Beer-Lambert law that assumes the homogeneous optical properties beneath each optode. Due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the optical properties in the brain, the assumption are evidently invalid, leading to both low spatial resolution and inaccurate quantification in the assessment of hemodynamic changes. To cope with the difficulties, we propose a nonlinear image reconstruction algorithm for a two-layered slab geometry using time-resolved reflected light. The algorithm is based on the previously developed generalized pulse spectrum technique, and implemented within a semi three-dimensional (3-D) framework to conform to the topographic visualization and to reduce computational load. We demonstrate the advantages of the algorithm in quantifying simulated changes in hemoglobin concentrations and investigate its robustness to the uncertainties in the cortical structure and optical properties. The methodology is also validated with experiments on a layered phantom.

  1. The Advantage of a Ureteroscopic Navigation System with Magnetic Tracking in Comparison with Simulated Fluoroscopy in a Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Yokomizo, Akira; Matsuda, Tadashi; Hamasaki, Tsutomu; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamaguchi, Kunihisa; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Wakumoto, Yoshiaki; Horie, Shigeo; Naito, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether our ureteroscopic real-time navigation system has the possibility to reduce radiation exposure and improve performance of ureteroscopic maneuvers in surgeons of various ages and experience levels. Our novel ureteroscopic navigation system used a magnetic tracking device to detect the position of the ureteroscope and display it on a three-dimensional image. We recruited 31 urologists from five institutions to perform two tasks. Task 1 consisted of finding three internal markings on the phantom calices. Task 2 consisted of identifying all calices by ureteroscopy. In both tasks, participants performed with simulated fluoroscopy first, followed by our navigation system. Accuracy rates (AR) for identification, required time (T) for completing the task, migration length (ML), and time exposed to simulated fluoroscopy were recorded. The AR, T, and ML for both tasks were significantly better with the navigation system than without it (Task 1 with simulated fluoroscopy vs with navigation: AR 87.1 % vs 98.9%, P=0.003; T 355 s vs 191 s, Pfluoroscopy about 20% of the total task time. Our navigation system, while still under development, could help surgeons of all levels to achieve better performances for ureteroscopic maneuvers compared with using fluoroscopic guidance. It also has the potential to reduce radiation exposure during fluoroscopy.

  2. Characterisation of urinary stones in the presence of iodinated contrast medium using dual-energy CT: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jia; Qu, Mingliang; Duan, Xinhui; Takahashi, Naoki; Kawashima, Akira; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-01-01

    To develop a dual-energy CT (DECT) method for differentiating uric acid (UA) from non-UA stones in the presence of iodinated contrast medium. Thirty UA and 45 non-UA stones were selected after infra-red spectroscopic analysis and independently placed in a 1.5-ml vial, which was filled first with saline and then with increasing concentrations of iodine. For each condition, tubes were put in a 35-cm water phantom and examined using a dual-source CT system at 100 and 140 kV. Virtual unenhanced images created from CT data sets of the stones in iodine-containing solutions provided position and volume information. This map was used to calculate a CT number ratio to differentiate stone type. A region-growing method was developed to improve the ability to differentiate between UA and non-UA stones with iodinated contrast medium. The sensitivity for detecting UA stones was 100 % for unenhanced images but fell to 18 % with 20 mgI/ml iodine solution and 0 % for higher concentrations. With region growing, the sensitivity for detecting UA stones was increased to 100 %, 82 %, 57 %, 50 % and 21 % for iodine solutions of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mgI/ml. The region-growing method improves differentiation of UA from non-UA stones on contrast-enhanced DECT urograms. (orig.)

  3. 3D flow study in a mildly stenotic coronary artery phantom using a whole volume PIV method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, J; Mongrain, R; Laurier, J; Galaz, R; Tardif, J C

    2008-11-01

    Blood flow dynamics has an important role in atherosclerosis initiation, progression, plaque rupture and thrombosis eventually causing myocardial infarction. In particular, shear stress is involved in platelet activation, endothelium function and secondary flows have been proposed as possible variables in plaque erosion. In order to investigate these three-dimensional flow characteristics in the context of a mild stenotic coronary artery, a whole volume PIV method has been developed and applied to a scaled-up transparent phantom. Experimental three-dimensional velocity data was processed to estimate the 3D shear stress distributions and secondary flows within the flow volume. The results show that shear stress reaches values out of the normal and atheroprotective range at an early stage of the obstructive pathology and that important secondary flows are also initiated at an early stage of the disease. The results also support the concept of a vena contracta associated with the jet in the context of a coronary artery stenosis with the consequence of higher shear stresses in the post-stenotic region in the blood domain than at the vascular wall.

  4. Evaluation of a BGO-Based PET System for Single-Cell Tracking Performance by Simulation and Phantom Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ouyang PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A recent method based on positron emission was reported for tracking moving point sources using the Inveon PET system. However, the effect of scanner background noise was not further explored. Here, we evaluate tracking with the Genisys4, a bismuth germanate-based PET system, which has no significant intrinsic background and may be better suited to tracking lower and/or faster activity sources. Position-dependent sensitivity of the Genisys4 was simulated in Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE using a static 18F point source. Trajectories of helically moving point sources with varying activity and rotation speed were reconstructed from list-mode data as described previously. Simulations showed that the Inveon’s ability to track sources within 2 mm of localization error is limited to objects with a velocity-to-activity ratio < 0.13 mm/decay, compared to < 0.29 mm/decay for the Genisys4. Tracking with the Genisys4 was then validated using a physical phantom of helically moving [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-in-oil droplets (< 0.24 mm diameter, 139-296 Bq, yielding < 1 mm localization error under the tested conditions, with good agreement between simulated sensitivity and measured activity (Pearson correlation R = .64, P << .05 in a representative example. We have investigated the tracking performance with the Genisys4, and results suggest the feasibility of tracking low activity, point source-like objects with this system.

  5. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold [(18)F]FDG PET-CT on 4-rings scanners in evaluating lung lesions: evidences from a phantom and a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caobelli, Federico; Puta, Erinda; Kaiser, Stefano Ren; Massetti, Valentina; Andreoli, Michela; Mostarda, Angelica; Soffientini, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of a Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) (18)F-FDG PET-CT acquisition in apnea and compare the results obtained between these acts of acquisition in apnea and in Free Breathing in the evaluation of lung lesions. A pre-clinical phantom study was performed to evaluate the shortest simulated DIBH time according to the minimum detectable lesion that can be detected by our ultrasound scanner. This study was conducted by changing acquisition time and sphere-to-background activity ratio values and by using radioactivity densities similar to those generally found in clinical examinations. In the clinical study, 25 patients with pulmonary lesions underwent a standard whole body (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan in free breathing followed by a 20s single thorax acquisition PET/CT in DIBH acquisition. The phantom study indicated that a 20-s acquisition time provides an accurate evaluation of smallest sphere shaped lesions. In the clinical study, PET-CT scans obtained in DIBH studies showed a significant reduction of misalignment between the PET and CT scan images and an increase of SUVmax compared to free breathing acquisitions. A correlation between the %BH-index and lesion displacement between PET and CT images in FB acquisition was demonstrated, significantly higher for lesions with a displacement>8mm. The single 20s acquisition of DIBH PET-CT is a feasible technique for lung lesion detection in the clinical setting. It only requires a minor increase in examination time without special patient training. 20s DIBH scan provided a more precise measurement of SUVmax, especially for lesions in the lower lung lobes which usually show greater displacement between PET and CT scan images in FB acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  6. WE-EF-303-06: Feasibility of PET Image-Based On-Line Proton Beam-Range Verification with Simulated Uniform Phantom and Human Brain Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, K; Sun, X; Zhu, X; Grosshans, D; Clark, J; Shao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of clinical on-line proton beam range verification with PET imaging Methods: We simulated a 179.2-MeV proton beam with 5-mm diameter irradiating a PMMA phantom of human brain size, which was then imaged by a brain PET with 300*300*100-mm 3 FOV and different system sensitivities and spatial resolutions. We calculated the mean and standard deviation of positron activity range (AR) from reconstructed PET images, with respect to different data acquisition times (from 5 sec to 300 sec with 5-sec step). We also developed a technique, “Smoothed Maximum Value (SMV)”, to improve AR measurement under a given dose. Furthermore, we simulated a human brain irradiated by a 110-MeV proton beam of 50-mm diameter with 0.3-Gy dose at Bragg peak and imaged by the above PET system with 40% system sensitivity at the center of FOV and 1.7-mm spatial resolution. Results: MC Simulations on the PMMA phantom showed that, regardless of PET system sensitivities and spatial resolutions, the accuracy and precision of AR were proportional to the reciprocal of the square root of image count if image smoothing was not applied. With image smoothing or SMV method, the accuracy and precision could be substantially improved. For a cylindrical PMMA phantom (200 mm diameter and 290 mm long), the accuracy and precision of AR measurement could reach 1.0 and 1.7 mm, with 100-sec data acquired by the brain PET. The study with a human brain showed it was feasible to achieve sub-millimeter accuracy and precision of AR measurement with acquisition time within 60 sec. Conclusion: This study established the relationship between count statistics and the accuracy and precision of activity-range verification. It showed the feasibility of clinical on-line BR verification with high-performance PET systems and improved AR measurement techniques. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas grant RP120326, NIH grant R21CA187717, The Cancer Center Support (Core) Grant CA016672

  7. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  8. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and 90 Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of 90 Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, 67 Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and 111 In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict 90 Y MoAb therapy

  9. ViP MRI: virtual phantom magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Eliat, Pierre-Antoine; Bezy-Wendling, Johanne; Bordelois, Alejandro; Gambarota, Giulio

    2014-10-01

    The ability to generate reference signals is of great benefit for quantitation of the magnetic resonance (MR) signal. The aim of the present study was to implement a dedicated experimental set-up to generate MR images of virtual phantoms. Virtual phantoms of a given shape and signal intensity were designed and the k-space representation was generated. A waveform generator converted the k-space lines into a radiofrequency (RF) signal that was transmitted to the MR scanner bore by a dedicated RF coil. The k-space lines of the virtual phantom were played line-by-line in synchronization with the magnetic resonance imaging data acquisition. Virtual phantoms of complex patterns were reproduced well in MR images without the presence of artifacts. Time-series measurements showed a coefficient of variation below 1% for the signal intensity of the virtual phantoms. An excellent linearity (coefficient of determination r (2) = 0.997 as assessed by linear regression) was observed in the signal intensity of virtual phantoms. Virtual phantoms represent an attractive alternative to physical phantoms for providing a reference signal. MR images of virtual phantoms were here generated using a stand-alone, independent unit that can be employed with MR scanners from different vendors.

  10. Determining the Minimal Required Radioactivity of 18F-FDG for Reliable Semiquantification in PET/CT Imaging: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Kai; Menard, David H; Cheng, David W

    2016-03-01

    In pursuit of as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) doses, this study investigated the minimal required radioactivity and corresponding imaging time for reliable semiquantification in PET/CT imaging. Using a phantom containing spheres of various diameters (3.4, 2.1, 1.5, 1.2, and 1.0 cm) filled with a fixed (18)F-FDG concentration of 165 kBq/mL and a background concentration of 23.3 kBq/mL, we performed PET/CT at multiple time points over 20 h of radioactive decay. The images were acquired for 10 min at a single bed position for each of 10 half-lives of decay using 3-dimensional list mode and were reconstructed into 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 10-min acquisitions per bed position using an ordered-subsets expectation maximum algorithm with 24 subsets and 2 iterations and a gaussian 2-mm filter. SUVmax and SUVavg were measured for each sphere. The minimal required activity (±10%) for precise SUVmax semiquantification in the spheres was 1.8 kBq/mL for an acquisition of 10 min, 3.7 kBq/mL for 3-5 min, 7.9 kBq/mL for 2 min, and 17.4 kBq/mL for 1 min. The minimal required activity concentration-acquisition time product per bed position was 10-15 kBq/mL⋅min for reproducible SUV measurements within the spheres without overestimation. Using the total radioactivity and counting rate from the entire phantom, we found that the minimal required total activity-time product was 17 MBq⋅min and the minimal required counting rate-time product was 100 kcps⋅min. Our phantom study determined a threshold for minimal radioactivity and acquisition time for precise semiquantification in (18)F-FDG PET imaging that can serve as a guide in pursuit of achieving ALARA doses. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Quality control for quantitative multicenter whole-body PET/MR studies: A NEMA image quality phantom study with three current PET/MR systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, R.; Rausch, I.; Beyer, T.; Delso, G.; Yaqub, M.; Quick, H.H.; Sattler, B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems derive the PET attenuation correction (AC) from dedicated MR sequences. While MR-AC performs reasonably well in clinical patient imaging, it may fail for phantom-based quality control (QC). The authors assess the

  12. Response rates in studies of couples coping with cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Meirav; Hagedoorn, Mariët

    2014-08-01

    Recruiting couples for psychological studies can be challenging. This brief report is the first to examine the average couples' response rate and to systematically review the quality of reporting of couples' response rate in studies of couples coping with cancer. A systematic review (1980-2011) was conducted, including 83 studies meeting the inclusion criteria of being published in peer-reviewed journals, describing quantitative findings using a cross-sectional or longitudinal design. Overall reporting was unsatisfactory in more than half of the included studies. As a consequence, the couples' response rate (CRR; all analyzed couples divided by the number of eligible partnered patients/couples approached) could be calculated for only 33 samples. This CRR varied considerably across studies from 25% to 90% (CRRM = 58%, SD = 17%). The rates reported in the articles (M = 65%) were often higher than the average CRR (CRRM = 57%) of these samples. This systematic review revealed incomplete reporting of response rate. Therefore, it cannot be firmly concluded that the average CRR reported is representative for all studies on couples coping with cancer. Finally, the figures presented, which are often more favorable than the CRR, may create the impression that the sample is more representative of the target population than it actually is. This has consequences for implementing the findings of such studies into practice. The results are critically discussed, and recommendations for improvement are provided.

  13. The Phantom of Liberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    One of the few things we have in common in contemporary society is the future of our children. But it seems that even the “we” of childhood, of learning and free play, has turned into a common ground for instrumentalization and competition. Today, the pedagogical paradox—Kant’s meditation on the ......? These are some of the questions addressed by The Phantom of Liberty, which sets out to reestablish a social and aesthetic dialogue between visual art and psychology, philosophy, pedagogy, and critical journalism....

  14. Submillisievert CT using model-based iterative reconstruction with lung-specific setting: An initial phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Akinori; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Honda, Osamu; Gyobu, Tomoko; Ueda, Ken; Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    To assess image quality of filtered back-projection (FBP) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) with a conventional setting and a new lung-specific setting on submillisievert CT. A lung phantom with artificial nodules was scanned with 10 mA at 120 kVp and 80 kVp (0.14 mSv and 0.05 mSv, respectively); images were reconstructed using FBP and MBIR with conventional setting (MBIR{sub Stnd}) and lung-specific settings (MBIR{sub RP20/Tx} and MBIR{sub RP20}). Three observers subjectively scored overall image quality and image findings on a 5-point scale (1 = worst, 5 = best) compared with reference standard images (50 mA-FBP at 120, 100, 80 kVp). Image noise was measured objectively. MBIR{sub RP20/Tx} performed significantly better than MBIR{sub Stnd} for overall image quality in 80-kVp images (p < 0.01), blurring of the border between lung and chest wall in 120p-kVp images (p < 0.05) and the ventral area of 80-kVp images (p < 0.001), and clarity of small vessels in the ventral area of 80-kVp images (p = 0.037). At 120 kVp, 10 mA-MBIR{sub RP20} and 10 mA-MBIR{sub RP20/Tx} showed similar performance to 50 mA-FBP. MBIR{sub Stnd} was better for noise reduction. Except for blurring in 120 kVp-MBIR{sub Stnd}, MBIRs performed better than FBP. Although a conventional setting was advantageous in noise reduction, a lung-specific setting can provide more appropriate image quality, even on submillisievert CT. (orig.)

  15. Gel phantom study of a cryosurgical probe with a thermosiphon effect and liquid nitrogen-cooled aluminum thermal storage blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Haruo; Takehara, Yasuo; Fujino, Hitoshi; Sone, Kazuya; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tsuzaki, Yoshinari; Miyazaki, Kouji; Fujie, Michio; Sakahara, Harumi; Maekawa, Yasuaki

    2015-08-01

    Cryosurgery is a minimally invasive treatment for certain types of cancers. Argon-based cryosurgical devices are available at present, however a large compressed gas cylinder with the pressure of 300 atmospheres is needed. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed a new cryosurgical probe measuring about 50 cm in length with separate lumens inside for liquid and gaseous ethylene to be used as a thermosiphon and liquid nitrogen-cooled aluminum thermal storage blocks. The probe needle was 8 cm in length and 3 mm in outer diameter. To investigate the freezing capabilities of our new cryosurgical system we inserted the needle 5cm into a poly-acrylamide gel phantom warmed to 36.5 ℃. Thermal storage blocks made of aluminum, cooled at -196 ℃ in liquid nitrogen, were attached to the condenser of the probe and replaced with thermal storage blocks every 4 to 5 minutes to compensate for warming. We took digital camera images of the ice ball at the needle and measured the temperature in certain locations of the cryoprobe. Ice ball formation started at one minute after cooling. The sizes (longest diameter × minimum diameter) at 10, 20 and 30 minutes after the start of the procedure were 4.5×2.1, 4.5×3.1 and 4.6×3.7 cm, respectively. During the procedure the minimum temperature of the condenser was -85 ℃ and the needle was -65 ℃. This newly developed compact cryosurgical probe with thermosiphon effect and cooled thermal storage blocks created an ice ball that can be used for cryosurgery within 20 minutes.

  16. A Dirichlet process mixture model for automatic (18)F-FDG PET image segmentation: Validation study on phantoms and on lung and esophageal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Maria Grazia; Cavedon, Carlo; Mazzarotto, Renzo; Ferdeghini, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to implement a Dirichlet process mixture (DPM) model for automatic tumor edge identification on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) images by optimizing the parameters on which the algorithm depends, to validate it experimentally, and to test its robustness. The DPM model belongs to the class of the Bayesian nonparametric models and uses the Dirichlet process prior for flexible nonparametric mixture modeling, without any preliminary choice of the number of mixture components. The DPM algorithm implemented in the statistical software package R was used in this work. The contouring accuracy was evaluated on several image data sets: on an IEC phantom (spherical inserts with diameter in the range 10-37 mm) acquired by a Philips Gemini Big Bore PET-CT scanner, using 9 different target-to-background ratios (TBRs) from 2.5 to 70; on a digital phantom simulating spherical/uniform lesions and tumors, irregular in shape and activity; and on 20 clinical cases (10 lung and 10 esophageal cancer patients). The influence of the DPM parameters on contour generation was studied in two steps. In the first one, only the IEC spheres having diameters of 22 and 37 mm and a sphere of the digital phantom (41.6 mm diameter) were studied by varying the main parameters until the diameter of the spheres was obtained within 0.2% of the true value. In the second step, the results obtained for this training set were applied to the entire data set to determine DPM based volumes of all available lesions. These volumes were compared to those obtained by applying already known algorithms (Gaussian mixture model and gradient-based) and to true values, when available. Only one parameter was found able to significantly influence segmentation accuracy (ANOVA test). This parameter was linearly connected to the uptake variance of the tested region of interest (ROI). In the first step of the study, a calibration curve was determined to

  17. A Dirichlet process mixture model for automatic 18F-FDG PET image segmentation: Validation study on phantoms and on lung and esophageal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, Maria Grazia; Cavedon, Carlo; Mazzarotto, Renzo; Ferdeghini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to implement a Dirichlet process mixture (DPM) model for automatic tumor edge identification on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) images by optimizing the parameters on which the algorithm depends, to validate it experimentally, and to test its robustness. Methods: The DPM model belongs to the class of the Bayesian nonparametric models and uses the Dirichlet process prior for flexible nonparametric mixture modeling, without any preliminary choice of the number of mixture components. The DPM algorithm implemented in the statistical software package R was used in this work. The contouring accuracy was evaluated on several image data sets: on an IEC phantom (spherical inserts with diameter in the range 10–37 mm) acquired by a Philips Gemini Big Bore PET-CT scanner, using 9 different target-to-background ratios (TBRs) from 2.5 to 70; on a digital phantom simulating spherical/uniform lesions and tumors, irregular in shape and activity; and on 20 clinical cases (10 lung and 10 esophageal cancer patients). The influence of the DPM parameters on contour generation was studied in two steps. In the first one, only the IEC spheres having diameters of 22 and 37 mm and a sphere of the digital phantom (41.6 mm diameter) were studied by varying the main parameters until the diameter of the spheres was obtained within 0.2% of the true value. In the second step, the results obtained for this training set were applied to the entire data set to determine DPM based volumes of all available lesions. These volumes were compared to those obtained by applying already known algorithms (Gaussian mixture model and gradient-based) and to true values, when available. Results: Only one parameter was found able to significantly influence segmentation accuracy (ANOVA test). This parameter was linearly connected to the uptake variance of the tested region of interest (ROI). In the first step of the study, a calibration curve

  18. A Dirichlet process mixture model for automatic {sup 18}F-FDG PET image segmentation: Validation study on phantoms and on lung and esophageal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, Maria Grazia, E-mail: mariagrazia.giri@ospedaleuniverona.it; Cavedon, Carlo [Medical Physics Unit, University Hospital of Verona, P.le Stefani 1, Verona 37126 (Italy); Mazzarotto, Renzo [Radiation Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Verona, P.le Stefani 1, Verona 37126 (Italy); Ferdeghini, Marco [Nuclear Medicine Unit, University Hospital of Verona, P.le Stefani 1, Verona 37126 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to implement a Dirichlet process mixture (DPM) model for automatic tumor edge identification on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) images by optimizing the parameters on which the algorithm depends, to validate it experimentally, and to test its robustness. Methods: The DPM model belongs to the class of the Bayesian nonparametric models and uses the Dirichlet process prior for flexible nonparametric mixture modeling, without any preliminary choice of the number of mixture components. The DPM algorithm implemented in the statistical software package R was used in this work. The contouring accuracy was evaluated on several image data sets: on an IEC phantom (spherical inserts with diameter in the range 10–37 mm) acquired by a Philips Gemini Big Bore PET-CT scanner, using 9 different target-to-background ratios (TBRs) from 2.5 to 70; on a digital phantom simulating spherical/uniform lesions and tumors, irregular in shape and activity; and on 20 clinical cases (10 lung and 10 esophageal cancer patients). The influence of the DPM parameters on contour generation was studied in two steps. In the first one, only the IEC spheres having diameters of 22 and 37 mm and a sphere of the digital phantom (41.6 mm diameter) were studied by varying the main parameters until the diameter of the spheres was obtained within 0.2% of the true value. In the second step, the results obtained for this training set were applied to the entire data set to determine DPM based volumes of all available lesions. These volumes were compared to those obtained by applying already known algorithms (Gaussian mixture model and gradient-based) and to true values, when available. Results: Only one parameter was found able to significantly influence segmentation accuracy (ANOVA test). This parameter was linearly connected to the uptake variance of the tested region of interest (ROI). In the first step of the study, a

  19. Cosmological perturbations in transient phantom inflation scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarte, Martin G. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria 1428, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    We present a model of inflation where the inflaton is accommodated as a phantom field which exhibits an initial transient pole behavior and then decays into a quintessence field which is responsible for a radiation era. We must stress that the present unified model only deals with a single field and that the transition between the two eras is achieved in a smooth way, so the model does not suffer from the eternal inflation issue. We explore the conditions for the crossing of the phantom divide line within the inflationary era along with the structural stability of several critical points. We study the behavior of the phantom field within the slow-climb approximation along with the necessary conditions to have sufficient inflation. We also examine the model at the level of classical perturbations within the Newtonian gauge and determine the behavior of the gravitational potential, contrast density and perturbed field near the inflation stage and the subsequent radiation era. (orig.)

  20. Cosmological perturbations in transient phantom inflation scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richarte, Martin G.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a model of inflation where the inflaton is accommodated as a phantom field which exhibits an initial transient pole behavior and then decays into a quintessence field which is responsible for a radiation era. We must stress that the present unified model only deals with a single field and that the transition between the two eras is achieved in a smooth way, so the model does not suffer from the eternal inflation issue. We explore the conditions for the crossing of the phantom divide line within the inflationary era along with the structural stability of several critical points. We study the behavior of the phantom field within the slow-climb approximation along with the necessary conditions to have sufficient inflation. We also examine the model at the level of classical perturbations within the Newtonian gauge and determine the behavior of the gravitational potential, contrast density and perturbed field near the inflation stage and the subsequent radiation era. (orig.)

  1. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  2. Do you believe in phantoms?

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    “Phantoms” are tools that simulate a therapy’s response by mimicking the conditions of the human body. They are required in hadron therapy in order to optimise and verify the therapy before performing it on the patient. The better the phantom, the more accurate the treatment plan and the more effective the therapy. In the framework of the EU-funded project ENTERVISION*, a team of CERN researchers has designed an innovative piece of equipment able to evaluate radiobiology-related parameters in a very accurate way.   The ENTERVISION phantom being tested at HIT. A key challenge in hadron therapy – i.e. the medical use of hadrons to treat cancer – is to evaluate the biological effect of the delivered radiation. This can be achieved by using accurate dosimetry techniques to study the biological response in terms of the dose deposited and other physical parameters of the beam, such as the Linear Energy Transfer (LET). The job of the “phan...

  3. The phantom limb in dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. (2008). Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266-1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of the phantom limb in dreams. A summary of published investigations is complemented by a note on phantom phenomena in the dreams of paraplegic patients and persons born without a limb. Integration of the available data allows the recommendation for prospective studies to consider dream content in more detail. For instance, "adaptation" to the loss of a limb can also manifest itself by seeing oneself surrounded by amputees. Such projective types of anosognosia ("transitivism") in nocturnal dreams should also be experimentally induced in normally-limbed individuals, and some relevant techniques are mentioned.

  4. The T2-Shortening Effect of Gadolinium and the Optimal Conditions for Maximizing the CNR for Evaluating the Biliary System: a Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi Jung; Kim, Myung Joon [Severance Children' s Hospital, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon Sik [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Young [Severance Hospital, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Soo [Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Sun [Seoul Nationa University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Clear depiction of the common bile duct is important when evaluating neonatal cholestasis in order to differentiate biliary atresia from other diseases. During MR cholangiopancreatography, the T2-shortening effect of gadolinium can increase the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the bile duct and enhance its depiction. The purpose of this study was to confirm, by performing a phantom study, the T2-shortening effect of gadolinium, to evaluate the effect of different gadolinium chelates with different gadolinium concentrations and different magnetic field strengths for investigating the optimal combination of these conditions, and for identifying the maximum CNR for the evaluation of the biliary system. MR imaging using a T2-weighted single-shot fast spin echo sequence and T2 relaxometry was performed with a sponge phantom in a syringe tube. Two kinds of contrast agents (Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA) with different gadolinium concentrations were evaluated with 1.5T and 3T scanners. The signal intensities, the CNRs and the T2 relaxation time were analyzed. The signal intensities significantly decreased as the gadolinium concentrations increased (p < 0.001) with both contrast agents. These signal intensities were higher on a 3T (p < 0.001) scanner. The CNRs were higher on a 1.5T (p < 0.001) scanner and they showed no significant change with different gadolinium concentrations. The T2 relaxation time also showed a negative correlation with the gadolinium concentrations (p < 0.001) and the CNRs showed decrease more with Gd-EOB-DTPA (versus Gd-DTPA; p < 0.001) on a 3T scanner (versus 1.5T; p < 0.001). A T2-shortening effect of gadolinium exhibits a negative correlation with the gadolinium concentration for both the signal intensities and the T2 relaxation time. A higher CNR can be obtained with Gd-DTPA on a 1.5T MRI scanner.

  5. Static phantom wormholes of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Orellana, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we derive new static phantom traversable wormholes by assuming a shape function with a quadratic dependence on the radial coordinate r . We mainly focus our study on wormholes sustained by exotic matter with positive energy density (as seen by any static observer) and a variable equation of state pr/ρ wormhole spacetimes extending to infinity, we show that a quadratic shape function allows us to construct static spacetimes of finite size, composed of a phantom wormhole connected to an anisotropic spherically symmetric distribution of dark energy. The wormhole part of the full spacetime does not fulfill the dominant energy condition, while the dark energy part does.

  6. The Effects of Misalignment between PET and CT Scans on Brain PET Study Using CT-based Attenuation Correction: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Akihide; Terakawa, Yusuke; Morita, Naomi; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of inaccurate attenuation correction due to the misalignment between the computed tomography (CT)-based μ-map and the positron emission tomography (PET) data on a brain PET. CT and PET scans were performed on a 3-dimension (3D) brain phantom, in which the grey matter region was filled with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), and the skull region was filled with/without the bone-equivalent solution. The shifted PET images relative to the CT image were generated by the software-based translation of PET data in the cephalad/caudal and right directions, with a magnitude of the shift up to 30 mm and a step size of 5 mm. The regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on the areas of the temporal lobes, parietal lobes, thalami, and cerebellums in the no-shifted image (reference). For each ROI, the radioactivity concentrations in the shifted images were compared with those of the reference. The errors in the radioactivity concentrations were increased with the increasing magnitude of the shift in all brain regions except for thalamus. For a 5 mm shift in the right direction, ± 10% errors were observed in the left/right temporal lobes. The accuracy of the radioactivity concentration in the temporal lobe was very sensitive to misalignment in the right directions. The misalignment between CT-based μ-map and PET data had larger effects on the surface regions of the brain rather than on deep brain structures.

  7. Anisotropic Bianchi-I universe with phantom field and cosmological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study an anisotropic Bianchi-I universe in the presence of a phantom field and a cosmological constant. Cosmological solutions are obtained when the kinetic energy of the phantom field is of the order of anisotropy and dominates over the potential energy of the field. The anisotropy of the universe decreases and the ...

  8. Accuracy of multislice CT angiography for the assessment of in-stent restenoses in the iliac arteries at reduced dose: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisinakis, K; Manousaki, E; Zourari, K; Tsetis, D; Tzedakis, A; Papadakis, A; Karantanas, A; Damilakis, J

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the potential of low-dose CT angiography for accurate assessment of in-stent restenoses (ISRs) of the iliac artery. A Rando anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson Research Labs, Stanford, CA), custom-made wax simulating hyperplastic tissue and a nitinol stent were used to simulate a patient with clinically relevant iliac artery ISRs. The cylindrical lumen was filled with a solution of iodine contrast medium diluted in saline, representing a patient's blood during CT angiography. The phantom was subjected to standard- and low-dose angiographic exposures using a modern multidetector (MD) CT scanner. The percentage of ISR was determined using the profile along a line normal to the lumen axis on reconstructed images of 2 and 5 mm slice thickness. Percentage ISRs derived using the standard- and low-dose protocols were compared. In a preliminary study, seven patients with stents were subjected to standard- and low-dose MDCT angiography during follow-up. The resulting images were assessed and compared by two experienced radiologists. The accuracy in measuring the percentage ISR was found to be better than 12% for all simulated stenoses. The differences between percentage ISRs measured on images obtained at 120 kVp/160 mAs and 80 kVp/80 mAs were below 6%. Patient image sets acquired using low-exposure factors were judged to be of satisfactory diagnostic quality. The assessment of ISR did not differ significantly between image sets acquired using the standard factors and those acquired using the low-exposure factors, although the mean reduction in patient effective dose was 48%. A reduction in exposure factors during MDCT angiography of the iliac artery is possible without affecting the accuracy in the determination of ISRs.

  9. Influence of Contrast Agent Dilution on Ballon Deflation Time and Visibility During Tracheal Balloon Dilation: A 3D Printed Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Tae; Park, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Sunghyun Daniel; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Kun Young; Kim, Guk Bae; Song, Ho-Young

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo determine the effect of contrast medium dilution during tracheal balloon dilation on balloon deflation time and visibility using a 3-dimensional (3D) printed airway phantom.Materials and MethodsA comparison study to investigate balloon deflation times and image quality was performed using two contrast agents with different viscosities, i.e., iohexol and ioxithalamate, and six contrast dilutions with a 3D printed airway phantom.ResultsCompared to 1:0 concentration, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, contrast/saline ratios resulted in a 46% (56.2 s), 59.8% (73.1 s), 74.9% (91.6 s), 81.7% (99.8 s), and 83.5% (102 s) reduction for iohexol, respectively, and a 51.8% (54.7 s), 63.8% (67.6 s), 74.7% (79.2 s), 80.5% (85.3 s), and 82.4% (87.4 s) reduction for ioxithalamate, respectively, in the mean balloon deflation time, although at the expense of decreased balloon opacity (3.5, 6.9, 11.1, 12.4, and 13.9%, for iohexol, respectively, and 3.2, 6, 9.6, 10.8, and 12.4%, for ioxithalamate, respectively).ConclusionsUse of a lower viscosity contrast agent and higher contrast dilution is considered to be able to reduce balloon deflation times and then simultaneously decrease visualization of balloons. The rapid balloon deflation time is likely to improve the safe performance of interventional procedures.

  10. High signal intensity on T1-weighted MR image related to vacuum cleft in the intervertebral disk; clinical and phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Tae Gyun; Kim, Yong Sun; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Young Hwan; Ryeom, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Chang Hyon; Kim, Tae Hun [Kyungpook National Univ. College of Medicine , Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Suh and Joo MRI Center, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To determine the possible mechanism by which an area of high signal intensity appears on T1-weighted MR images adjacent to a vacuum cleft in intervertebral disks. We analyzed a total of 14 disks in nine patients in whom a vacuum cleft with T1-signal hyperintensity was observed. Lesions were present from T11-12 to L5-S1 using a 1.5-T whole-body imager, sagittal spine-echo T1-weighted and gradient-echo images (flip angle, 20 .deg. and 60 .deg.) were obtained. In order to identify the vacuum cleft, using plain radiographs in all patients and CT scans in two were also obtained. A 3% agar-gel block containing empty slits to form a magnetic susceptibility difference, a phantom was designed. The air spaces were 1.6mm in thickness, 25mm in width, and 20 to 25mm in depth with 1.6-mm spacing. In all patients, vacuum clefts were confirmed by plain radiographs and CT scans. At the level containing air, T1-weighted images (both spin-echo and gradient-echo) showed a signal void resulting from the intervertebral disk vacuum cleft. A hyperintense band adjacent to the vacuum cleft was, however, observed. A gradient-echo image with a 60 .deg. flip angle showed a brighter signal intensity than one with a 20 .deg. angle. Our phantom study gave the same results. The magnetic susceptibility artifact may be responsible for the T1-signal hyperintensity observed adjacent to the vacuum cleft in intervertebral disks. In addition, in order to generate signal hyperintensity, the desiccating disk material must contain a certain amount of water molecules.

  11. Influence of Contrast Agent Dilution on Ballon Deflation Time and Visibility During Tracheal Balloon Dilation: A 3D Printed Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Tae; Park, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Sunghyun Daniel; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Kun Young; Kim, Guk Bae; Song, Ho-Young

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect of contrast medium dilution during tracheal balloon dilation on balloon deflation time and visibility using a 3-dimensional (3D) printed airway phantom. A comparison study to investigate balloon deflation times and image quality was performed using two contrast agents with different viscosities, i.e., iohexol and ioxithalamate, and six contrast dilutions with a 3D printed airway phantom. Compared to 1:0 concentration, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, contrast/saline ratios resulted in a 46% (56.2 s), 59.8% (73.1 s), 74.9% (91.6 s), 81.7% (99.8 s), and 83.5% (102 s) reduction for iohexol, respectively, and a 51.8% (54.7 s), 63.8% (67.6 s), 74.7% (79.2 s), 80.5% (85.3 s), and 82.4% (87.4 s) reduction for ioxithalamate, respectively, in the mean balloon deflation time, although at the expense of decreased balloon opacity (3.5, 6.9, 11.1, 12.4, and 13.9%, for iohexol, respectively, and 3.2, 6, 9.6, 10.8, and 12.4%, for ioxithalamate, respectively). Use of a lower viscosity contrast agent and higher contrast dilution is considered to be able to reduce balloon deflation times and then simultaneously decrease visualization of balloons. The rapid balloon deflation time is likely to improve the safe performance of interventional procedures.

  12. Influence of Contrast Agent Dilution on Ballon Deflation Time and Visibility During Tracheal Balloon Dilation: A 3D Printed Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Tae; Park, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon, E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, Namkug, E-mail: namkugkim@gmail.com [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghyun Daniel [Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Kun Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering Research Center, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    PurposeTo determine the effect of contrast medium dilution during tracheal balloon dilation on balloon deflation time and visibility using a 3-dimensional (3D) printed airway phantom.Materials and MethodsA comparison study to investigate balloon deflation times and image quality was performed using two contrast agents with different viscosities, i.e., iohexol and ioxithalamate, and six contrast dilutions with a 3D printed airway phantom.ResultsCompared to 1:0 concentration, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, contrast/saline ratios resulted in a 46% (56.2 s), 59.8% (73.1 s), 74.9% (91.6 s), 81.7% (99.8 s), and 83.5% (102 s) reduction for iohexol, respectively, and a 51.8% (54.7 s), 63.8% (67.6 s), 74.7% (79.2 s), 80.5% (85.3 s), and 82.4% (87.4 s) reduction for ioxithalamate, respectively, in the mean balloon deflation time, although at the expense of decreased balloon opacity (3.5, 6.9, 11.1, 12.4, and 13.9%, for iohexol, respectively, and 3.2, 6, 9.6, 10.8, and 12.4%, for ioxithalamate, respectively).ConclusionsUse of a lower viscosity contrast agent and higher contrast dilution is considered to be able to reduce balloon deflation times and then simultaneously decrease visualization of balloons. The rapid balloon deflation time is likely to improve the safe performance of interventional procedures.

  13. Image quality assessment of single-shot turbo spin echo diffusion-weighted imaging with parallel imaging technique: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tsukasa; Urikura, Atsushi; Shirata, Kensei; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Shingo; Hosokawa, Yoichiro

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the image quality and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of single-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) diffusion-weighted (DW) images obtained using a parallel imaging (PI) technique. All measurements were performed on a 3.0-T whole-body MRI system and 32-channel phased-array coil. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and ADC values were measured with a DW imaging (DWI) phantom comprising granulated sugar and agar. The SNRs were calculated using a subtraction method and compared among TSE-DW images at acceleration factors (AFs) of 1-4. Image blur was visually assessed on TSE-DW images of a pin phantom at AFs of 1-4. The ADC values were calculated using DW images with b = 0 and 1000 s mm(-2). The ADC values of TSE-DW images and echo-planar imaging EPI-DW images were compared. The SNRs decreased as AFs increased, despite selecting the shortest echo time. A lower AF caused increased image blur in the phase-encoding direction. The ADC values of TSE-DWI tended to be lower than those of EPI-DWI, and AFs of 3 and 4 yielded variable ADC values on TSE-DW images. TSE-DWI with an AF of 3 or 4 yielded reduced SNRs; in addition, the image noise and artefacts associated with PI technique may have affected ADC measurements, despite improving image blur in the phase-encoding direction. Optimizing the imaging parameters of TSE-DWI is useful for providing good image quality and accurate ADC measurements.

  14. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  15. SU-F-R-36: Validating Quantitative Radiomic Texture Features for Oncologic PET: A Digital Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, F; Yang, Y; Young, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiomic texture features derived from the oncologic PET have recently been brought under intense investigation within the context of patient stratification and treatment outcome prediction in a variety of cancer types; however, their validity has not yet been examined. This work is aimed to validate radiomic PET texture metrics through the use of realistic simulations in the ground truth setting. Methods: Simulation of FDG-PET was conducted by applying the Zubal phantom as an attenuation map to the SimSET software package that employs Monte Carlo techniques to model the physical process of emission imaging. A total of 15 irregularly-shaped lesions featuring heterogeneous activity distribution were simulated. For each simulated lesion, 28 texture features in relation to the intensity histograms (GLIH), grey-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCOM), neighborhood difference matrices (GLNDM), and zone size matrices (GLZSM) were evaluated and compared with their respective values extracted from the ground truth activity map. Results: In reference to the values from the ground truth images, texture parameters appearing on the simulated data varied with a range of 0.73–3026.2% for GLIH-based, 0.02–100.1% for GLCOM-based, 1.11–173.8% for GLNDM-based, and 0.35–66.3% for GLZSM-based. For majority of the examined texture metrics (16/28), their values on the simulated data differed significantly from those from the ground truth images (P-value ranges from <0.0001 to 0.04). Features not exhibiting significant difference comprised of GLIH-based standard deviation, GLCO-based energy and entropy, GLND-based coarseness and contrast, and GLZS-based low gray-level zone emphasis, high gray-level zone emphasis, short zone low gray-level emphasis, long zone low gray-level emphasis, long zone high gray-level emphasis, and zone size nonuniformity. Conclusion: The extent to which PET imaging disturbs texture appearance is feature-dependent and could be substantial. It is thus

  16. Association of sedentary behaviour with colon and rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Y J; Gan, Y; Sun, H L; Deng, J; Cao, S Y; Xu, X; Lu, Z X

    2014-02-04

    Sedentary behaviour is ubiquitous in modern society. Emerging studies have focused on the health consequences of sedentary behaviour, including colorectal cancer, but whether sedentary behaviour is associated with the risks of colon and rectal cancer remains unclear. No systematic reviews have applied quantitative techniques to independently compute summary risk estimates. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to investigate this issue. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases up to May 2013 to identify cohort and case-control studies that evaluated the association between sedentary behaviour and colon or rectal cancer. A random-effect model was used to pool the results of included studies. Publication bias was assessed by using Begg's funnel plot. Twenty-three studies with 63 reports were included in our meta-analysis. These groups included 4,324,462 participants (27,231 colon cancer cases and 13,813 rectal cancer cases). Sedentary behaviour was significantly associated with colon cancer (relative risk (RR): 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-1.39) but did not have a statistically significant association with rectal cancer (RR 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98-1.13). Subgroup analyses suggested that the odds ratio (OR) of colon cancer was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.22-1.68) in the case-control studies, and the RR was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.18-1.36) in the cohort studies, the OR of rectal cancer was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.85-1.33) in the case-control studies, and the RR was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.12) in the cohort studies. Sedentary behaviour is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. Subgroup analyses suggest a positive association between sedentary behaviour and risk of rectal cancer in cohort studies. Reducing sedentary behaviour is potentially important for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  17. Report of the Second Asian Prostate Cancer (A-CaP Study Meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choung-Soo Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Asian Prostate Cancer (A-CaP Study is an Asia-wide initiative that has been developed over the course of 2 years. The study was launched in December 2015 in Tokyo, Japan, and the participating countries and regions engaged in preparations for the study during the course of 2016, including patient registration and creation of databases for the purpose of the study. The Second A-CaP Meeting was held on September 8, 2016 in Seoul, Korea, with the participation of members and collaborators from 12 countries and regions. Under the study, each participating country or region will begin registration of newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients and conduct prognostic investigations. From the data gathered, common research themes will be identified, such as comparisons among Asian countries of background factors in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients. This is the first Asia-wide study of prostate cancer and has developed from single country research efforts in this field, including in Japan and Korea. At the Second Meeting, participating countries and regions discussed the status of preparations and discussed various issues that are being faced. These issues include technical challenges in creating databases, promoting participation in each country or region, clarifying issues relating to data input, addressing institutional issues such as institutional review board requirements, and the need for dedicated data managers. The meeting was positioned as an opportunity to share information and address outstanding issues prior to the initiation of the study. In addition to A-CaP-specific discussions, a series of special lectures was also delivered as a means of providing international perspectives on the latest developments in prostate cancer and the use of databases and registration studies around the world.

  18. Phantom breast sensations are frequent after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorthe Marie Helbo; Kehlet, Henrik; Gærtner, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Phantom breast sensation (PBS) following mastectomy has been recognized for many years. PBS is a feeling that the removed breast is still there. The reported prevalence and risk factors have not been established in large well-defined patient series. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  19. Evaluation of DQA for tomography using 3D volumetric phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic University of Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The study investigates the necessity of 3 dimensional dose distribution evaluation instead of point dose and 2 dimensional dose distribution evaluation. Treatment plans were generated on the RANDO phantom to measure the precise dose distribution of the treatment site 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 cm with the prescribed dose; 1,200 cGy, 5 fractions. Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) of dose distribution was evaluated with gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom. The average error of absolute dose was measured at 0.76±0.59% and 1.37±0.76% in cheese phantom and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. The average passing ratio for 3%/3 mm were 97.72±0.02% and 99.26±0.01% in gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. The average passing ratio for 2%/2 mm were 94.21±0.02% and 93.02±0.01% in gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. There was a more accurate dose distribution of 3D volume phantom than cheese phantom in patients DQA using tomotherapy. Therefor it should be evaluated simultaneously 3 dimensional dose evaluation on target and peripheral area in rotational radiotherapy such as tomotherapy.

  20. Development of the Reference Korean Female Voxel Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Bo Kyoung; Cho, Kun Woo; Yeom, Yoen Soo; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is for development of the reference Korean female phantom, HDRK-Woman. The phantom was constructed by adjusting a Korean woman voxel phantom to the Reference Korean data. The Korean woman phantom had been developed based on the high-resolution color slice images obtained from an adult Korean female cadaver. There were a total of 39 organs including the 27 organs specified in ICRP 103 for effective dose calculation. The voxel resolution of the phantom was 1.967 X 1.967 X X 2.0619 mm 3 and the voxel array size is 261 X 109 X 825 in the x, y and z directions. Then, the voxel resolution was changed to 2.0351 X 2.0351 X 2.0747 mm 3 for adjustment of the height and total bone mass of the phantom to the Reference Korean data. Finally, the internal organs and tissue were adjusted using in-house software program developed for 3D volume adjustment of the organs and tissue. The effective dose values of HDRK phantoms were calculated for broad parallel photon beams using MCNPX Monte Carlo code and compared with those of ICRP phantoms.

  1. Use of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in reduced-dose CT for routine follow-up of patients with malignant lymphoma: dose savings, image quality and phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herin, Edouard; Chiaradia, Melanie; Cavet, Madeleine; Deux, Jean-Francois; Rahmouni, Alain [AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); Gardavaud, Francois; Beaussart, Pauline [AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); Richard, Philippe [GE Healthcare France, Buc (France); Haioun, Corinne [Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Hemopathies Lymphoides, Creteil (France); Itti, Emmanuel [Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Medecine Nucleaire, Creteil (France); Luciani, Alain [AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); INSERM Unite U 955, Creteil (France); AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor Albert Chenevier, Imagerie Medicale, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate both in vivo and in phantom studies, dose reduction, and image quality of body CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), performed during patient follow-ups for lymphoma. This study included 40 patients (mean age 49 years) with lymphoma. All underwent reduced-dose CT during follow-up, reconstructed using MBIR or 50 % advanced statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). All had previously undergone a standard dose CT with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), the density measures in liver, spleen, fat, air, and muscle, and the image quality (noise and signal to noise ratio, SNR) (ANOVA) observed using standard or reduced-dose CT were compared both in patients and a phantom study (Catphan 600) (Kruskal Wallis). The CTDIvol was decreased on reduced-dose body CT (4.06 mGy vs. 15.64 mGy p < 0.0001). SNR was higher in reduced-dose CT reconstructed with MBIR than in 50 % ASIR or than standard dose CT with FBP (patients, p ≤ 0.01; phantoms, p = 0.003). Low contrast detectability and spatial resolution in phantoms were not altered on MBIR-reconstructed CT (p ≥ 0.11). Reduced-dose CT with MBIR reconstruction can decrease radiation dose delivered to patients with lymphoma, while keeping an image quality similar to that obtained on standard-dose CT. (orig.)

  2. Use of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in reduced-dose CT for routine follow-up of patients with malignant lymphoma: dose savings, image quality and phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herin, Edouard; Chiaradia, Melanie; Cavet, Madeleine; Deux, Jean-Francois; Rahmouni, Alain; Gardavaud, Francois; Beaussart, Pauline; Richard, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne; Itti, Emmanuel; Luciani, Alain

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate both in vivo and in phantom studies, dose reduction, and image quality of body CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), performed during patient follow-ups for lymphoma. This study included 40 patients (mean age 49 years) with lymphoma. All underwent reduced-dose CT during follow-up, reconstructed using MBIR or 50 % advanced statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). All had previously undergone a standard dose CT with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), the density measures in liver, spleen, fat, air, and muscle, and the image quality (noise and signal to noise ratio, SNR) (ANOVA) observed using standard or reduced-dose CT were compared both in patients and a phantom study (Catphan 600) (Kruskal Wallis). The CTDIvol was decreased on reduced-dose body CT (4.06 mGy vs. 15.64 mGy p < 0.0001). SNR was higher in reduced-dose CT reconstructed with MBIR than in 50 % ASIR or than standard dose CT with FBP (patients, p ≤ 0.01; phantoms, p = 0.003). Low contrast detectability and spatial resolution in phantoms were not altered on MBIR-reconstructed CT (p ≥ 0.11). Reduced-dose CT with MBIR reconstruction can decrease radiation dose delivered to patients with lymphoma, while keeping an image quality similar to that obtained on standard-dose CT. (orig.)

  3. Tea consumption and the risk of ovarian cancer: A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xin; Wang, Jie; Pan, Shufen; Lu, Caijuan

    2017-06-06

    A large number of epidemiological studies have provided conflicting results about the relationship between tea consumption and ovarian cancer. This study aimed to clarify the association between tea consumption and ovarian cancer. A literature search of the MEDICINE, Scopus, PubMed, and Web of Science databases was performed in April 2016. A total of 18 (11 case-control and 7 cohort) studies, representing data for 701,857 female subjects including 8,683 ovarian cancer cases, were included in the meta-analysis. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to compute the pooled relative risks (RR), meta regression, and publication bias, and heterogeneity analyses were performed for the included trials. We found that tea consumption had a significant protective effect against ovarian cancer (relative risk [RR] = 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.76, 0.96). The relationship was confirmed particularly after adjusting for family history of cancer (RR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.97), menopause status (RR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.98), education (RR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68, 0.96), BMI (RR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.00) , smoking (RR = 0.83; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.93) and Jadad score of 3 (RR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.56, 0.95) and 5 (RR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.89). The Begg's and Egger's tests (all P > 0.01) showed no evidence of publication bias. In conclusion, our meta-analysis showed an inverse association between tea consumption and ovarian cancer risk. High quality cohort-clinical trials should be conducted on different tea types and their relationship with ovarian cancer.

  4. Influence of different types of phantoms on the calibration of dosemeters for eye lens dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitomi, H.; Kowatari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Both a cylinder and a slab phantom have been recommended to be used as calibration phantoms for eye lens dosimetry in the International Atomic Energy Agency TECDOC. This study describes investigations on the influence of the type of phantom on the calibration of dosemeters. In order to fulfil the purpose, backscatter radiation from practically used water-filled phantoms was evaluated by calculations and experiments. For photons, the calculations showed that the cylinder phantom had 10 % lower backscattered effect at maximum than a slab phantom, and simulated well the backscattered effect of the human head or neck to within ±10 %. The irradiation results of non-filtered optically stimulated luminescence and radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeters indicated that the differences of the calibration factors between the two types of phantoms were up to 20 and 10 %, respectively, reflecting the response to backscattered photons. For electrons, no difference was found between the two types of phantoms. (authors)

  5. Outcome differences in younger and older patients with laryngeal cancer: a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B; Alfonso, A; Sabin, S; Poluri, A; Shaha, A R; Sundaram, K; Lucente, F E

    2000-01-01

    Younger or older age has a significant impact on the outcome of patients with head and neck cancer. However, the data regarding outcomes based on age are conflicting. The aim of this article is to determine the impact of age on the outcome of laryngeal cancer. A retrospective study was performed including all patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx for over a 9-year period. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on age. The younger age group included patients 40 years of age and younger, the older group included patients over 80 years of age, and the remaining patients served as the control group. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize study data. Nonparametric quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher's exact test, respectively. Survival analysis was performed using the generalized Wilcoxon test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis. Of the 209 patients with laryngeal carcinoma presenting to our institution over a 9-year period, 20 (10%) were or =80 years of age. No differences in TNM stage at presentation, treatment, or treatment-associated complications were observed based on age. However, younger patients were less likely to report tobacco (50%; P likely to have human immunodeficiency virus infection (50%; Pcause-specific survival significantly poorer for both younger and older patients (P = .002). The presentation and outcome of laryngeal cancer is influenced by the age at presentation. The differences may be related exact reason for the observed survival differences needs to be determined.

  6. The decision-making journey of malaysian women with early breast cancer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Adina; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Yip, Cheng Har; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2013-01-01

    The survival outcomes for women presenting with early breast cancer are influenced by treatment decisions. In Malaysia, survival outcome is generally poor due to late presentation. Of those who present early, many refuse treatment for complementary therapy. This study aimed to explore the decision making experiences of women with early breast cancer. A qualitative study using individual in-depth interviews was conducted to capture the decision making process of women with early breast cancer in Malaysia. We used purposive sampling to recruit women yet to undergo surgical treatment. A total of eight participants consented and were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. These women were recruited from a period of one week after they were informed of their diagnoses. A topic guide, based on the Ottawa decision support framework (ODSF), was used to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. We identified four phases in the decision-making process of women with early breast cancer: discovery (pre-diagnosis); confirmatory ('receiving bad news'); deliberation; and decision (making a decision). These phases ranged from when women first discovered abnormalities in their breasts to them making final surgical treatment decisions. Information was vital in guiding these women. Support from family members, friends, healthcare professionals as well as survivors also has an influencing role. However, the final say on treatment decision was from themselves. The treatment decision for women with early breast cancer in Malaysia is a result of information they gather on their decision making journey. This journey starts with diagnosis. The women's spouses, friends, family members and healthcare professionals play different roles as information providers and supporters at different stages of treatment decisions. However, the final treatment decision is influenced mainly by women's own experiences, knowledge

  7. Exposure to road traffic and railway noise and postmenopausal breast cancer: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mette; Ketzel, Matthias; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to traffic noise may result in stress and sleep disturbances. Studies on self-reported sleep duration and breast cancer risk have found inconsistent results. In a population-based Danish cohort of 29,875 women aged 50-64 years at enrolment in 1993-1997, we identified 1219 incident, postmenopausal breast cancer cases during follow-up through 2010. Mean follow-up time was 12.3 years. Road traffic and railway noise was calculated for all present and historical residential addresses from 1987 to 2010. We used Cox proportional hazard model for analyses and adjusted for hormone replacement therapy use, parity, alcohol consumption and other potential confounders. We found no overall association between residential road traffic or railway noise and breast cancer risk. Among women with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer, a 10-dB higher level of road traffic noise (continuous scale) during the previous 1, 5 and 10 years were associated with 28% (95% CI: 1.04-1.56), 23% (95% CI: 1.00-1.51) and 20% (95% CI: 0.97-1.48) higher risks of estrogen receptor negative breast cancer, respectively, in fully adjusted models. Similarly, a 10-dB increase in railway noise (1-year mean at diagnosis address) increased risk for estrogen receptor negative breast cancer by 38% (95% CI: 1.01-1.89). There was no association between road traffic or railway noise and estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. In conclusion, these results suggest that residential road traffic and railway noise may increase risk of estrogen receptor negative breast cancer. As the first study on traffic noise and breast cancer results should be treated with caution. © 2013 UICC.

  8. The prognostic value of p53 positive in colorectal cancer: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Liang, Jianwei; Wang, Zheng; Hou, Huirong; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Zhixiang

    2017-05-01

    This retrospective cohort study aimed to discuss the prognostic value of p53 positive in colorectal cancer. A total of 124 consecutive patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were evaluated at the National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. The expression of p53 in colorectal cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry. Based on the expression levels of p53, the 124 patients were divided into a p53 positive group and a p53 negative group. In this study, 72 patients were in the p53 positive group and 52 in the p53 negative group. The two groups were well balanced in gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists scores, and number of lymph nodes harvested. p53 positive was associated with carcinoembryonic antigen ≥5 ng/mL ( p = 0.036), gross type ( p = 0.037), degree of tumor differentiation ( p = 0.026), pathological tumor stage ( p = 0.019), pathological node stage ( p = 0.004), pathological tumor-node-metastasis stage ( p = 0.017), nerve invasion ( p = 0.008), and vessel invasion ( p = 0.018). Tumor site, tumor size, and pathological pattern were not significantly different between these two groups. Disease-free survival and overall survival in the p53 positive group were significantly shorter than the p53 negative group ( p = 0.021 and 0.025, respectively). Colorectal cancer patients with p53 positive tended to be related to a higher degree of malignancy, advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage, and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. p53 positive was independently an unfavorable prognostic marker for colorectal cancer patients.

  9. Flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography with a circle-plus-two-arcs data acquisition orbit: Preliminary phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Ruola; Tang Xiangyang; Conover, David; Yu Rongfeng

    2003-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been investigated in the past two decades due to its potential advantages over a fan beam CT. These advantages include (a) great improvement in data acquisition efficiency, spatial resolution, and spatial resolution uniformity, (b) substantially better utilization of x-ray photons generated by the x-ray tube compared to a fan beam CT, and (c) significant advancement in clinical three-dimensional (3D) CT applications. However, most studies of CBCT in the past are focused on cone beam data acquisition theories and reconstruction algorithms. The recent development of x-ray flat panel detectors (FPD) has made CBCT imaging feasible and practical. This paper reports a newly built flat panel detector-based CBCT prototype scanner and presents the results of the preliminary evaluation of the prototype through a phantom study. The prototype consisted of an x-ray tube, a flat panel detector, a GE 8800 CT gantry, a patient table and a computer system. The prototype was constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT gantry such that both a single-circle cone beam acquisition orbit and a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit can be achieved. With a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit, a complete set of cone beam projection data can be obtained, consisting of a set of circle projections and a set of arc projections. Using the prototype scanner, the set of circle projections were acquired by rotating the x-ray tube and the FPD together on the gantry, and the set of arc projections were obtained by tilting the gantry while the x-ray tube and detector were at the 12 and 6 o'clock positions, respectively. A filtered backprojection exact cone beam reconstruction algorithm based on a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit was used for cone beam reconstruction from both the circle and arc projections. The system was first characterized in terms of the linearity and dynamic range of the detector. Then the uniformity, spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were assessed using

  10. Tissue quantification for development of pediatric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.F.F.; Miranda, J.R.A.; Pina, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of the risk- benefit ratio is a major concern in the pediatric radiology, due to the greater vulnerability of children to the late somatic effects and genetic effects of exposure to radiation compared to adults. In Brazil, it is estimated that the causes of death from head trauma are 18 % for the age group between 1-5 years and the radiograph is the primary diagnostic test for the detection of skull fracture . Knowing that the image quality is essential to ensure the identification of structures anatomical and minimizing errors diagnostic interpretation, this paper proposed the development and construction of homogeneous phantoms skull, for the age group 1-5 years. The construction of the phantoms homogeneous was performed using the classification and quantification of tissue present in the skull of pediatric patients. In this procedure computational algorithms were used, using Matlab, to quantify distinct biological tissues present in the anatomical regions studied , using pictures retrospective CT scans. Preliminary data obtained from measurements show that between the ages of 1-5 years, assuming an average anteroposterior diameter of the pediatric skull region of the 145.73 ± 2.97 mm, can be represented by 92.34 mm ± 5.22 of lucite and 1.75 ± 0:21 mm of aluminum plates of a provision of PEP (Pacient equivalent phantom). After its construction, the phantoms will be used for image and dose optimization in pediatric protocols process to examinations of computerized radiography

  11. The impact of image reconstruction settings on 18F-FDG PET radiomic features. Multi-scanner phantom and patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiri, Isaac; Abdollahi, Hamid [Iran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ghaffarian, Pardis [Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, PET/CT and Cyclotron Center, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geramifar, Parham [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Nuclear Medicine, Shariati Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad [Iran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the robustness of different PET/CT image radiomic features over a wide range of different reconstruction settings. Phantom and patient studies were conducted, including two PET/CT scanners. Different reconstruction algorithms and parameters including number of sub-iterations, number of subsets, full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Gaussian filter, scan time per bed position and matrix size were studied. Lesions were delineated and one hundred radiomic features were extracted. All radiomics features were categorized based on coefficient of variation (COV). Forty seven percent features showed COV ≤ 5% and 10% of which showed COV > 20%. All geometry based, 44% and 41% of intensity based and texture based features were found as robust respectively. In regard to matrix size, 56% and 6% of all features were found non-robust (COV > 20%) and robust (COV ≤ 5%) respectively. Variability and robustness of PET/CT image radiomics in advanced reconstruction settings is feature-dependent, and different settings have different effects on different features. Radiomic features with low COV can be considered as good candidates for reproducible tumour quantification in multi-center studies. (orig.)

  12. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: An initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Kenichiro [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Shimizu, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8648 (Japan); Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated.Methods: A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3}, in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data.Results: With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was {+-}2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the

  13. Dietary calcium intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Changwoo; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Jeonghee; Lee, Jeeyoo; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-12-16

    High intake of dietary calcium has been thought to be a protective factor against colorectal cancer. To explore the dose-response relationship in the associations between dietary calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk by cancer location, we conducted a case-control study among Korean population, whose dietary calcium intake levels are relatively low. The colorectal cancer cases and controls were recruited from the National Cancer Center in Korea between August 2010 and August 2013. Information on dietary calcium intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and locations of the colorectal cancers were classified as proximal colon cancer, distal colon cancer, and rectal cancer. Binary and polytomous logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between dietary calcium intake and risk of colorectal cancer. A total of 922 colorectal cancer cases and 2766 controls were included in the final analysis. Compared with the lowest calcium intake quartile, the highest quartile group showed a significantly reduced risk of colorectal cancer in both men and women. (Odds ratio (OR): 0.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.11-0.24 for men; OR: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.09-0.29 for women). Among the highest calcium intake groups, decrease in cancer risk was observed across all sub-sites of colorectum in both men and women. In conclusion, calcium consumption was inversely related to colorectal cancer risk in Korean population where national average calcium intake level is relatively lower than Western countries. A decreased risk of colorectal cancer by calcium intake was observed in all sub-sites in men and women.

  14. Dietary risk factors for colon and rectal cancers: a comparative case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Kenji; Hirose, Kaoru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Kuriki, Kiyonori; Suzuki, Takeshi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Takashi; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Tajima, Kazuo

    2006-05-01

    In Japan, the incidence rate of colon cancer has more rapidly increased than that of rectal cancer. The differential secular trends may be due to different dietary factors in the development of colon and rectal cancers. To compare dietary risk factors between colon and rectal cancers, we undertook a case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Japan. Subjects were 507 patients with newly diagnosed colon (n = 265) and rectal (n = 242) cancers, and 2,535 cancer-free outpatients (controls). Intakes of nutrients and food groups were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire, and multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using unconditional logistic models. We found a decreasing risk of colon cancer with increasing intakes of calcium and insoluble dietary fiber; the multivariate ORs across quartiles of intake were 1.00, 0.90, 0.80, and 0.67 (trend p = 0.040), and 1.00, 0.69, 0.64, and 0.65 (trend p = 0.027), respectively. For rectal cancer, a higher consumption of carotene and meat was associated with a reduced risk; the corresponding ORs were 1.00, 1.10, 0.71, and 0.70 for carotene (trend p = 0.028), and 1.00, 0.99, 0.68, and 0.72 for meat (trend p = 0.036). Carbohydrate intake was positively correlated with the risk of rectal cancer (ORs over quartiles: 1.00, 1.14, 1.42, and 1.54; trend p = 0.048). This association was stronger in women, while fat consumption was inversely correlated with the risk of female colon and rectal cancers. Dietary risk factors appear to considerably differ between colon and rectal cancers.

  15. Mathematically defined phantoms for organ dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki

    1998-01-01

    There are physical and mathematical phantoms which, for simulating the radiation reactions in the body, composed from more than one tissue equivalent material(s). This review concerns the latter one, particularly the human phantom, for its characteristics, actual models, examples of dose calculation and problems in future. The human phantom is classified into the formula phantom where sizes and properties of human organs/tissues are expressed by the combination of formula, and the voxel phantom where they are expressed by the combination of small cubes (voxel). The formula phantom usually uses quadratic equations for expressing the organ shape and was firstly developed as a MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee)-5 phantom. Based on the MIRD-5, many versions such as female, male and child phantoms have been developed. Voxel phantoms are rather new and are based on CT data of a person. Both phantoms require human numerical data: e.g., from reference man for formula phantom and actual precise CT data for voxel phantom. Dose calculation revealed that, for the low energy photon, doses are rather different between the two phantoms. Future problems involve the further examination on the size and properties of organs, improvement of expression of the phantoms, preparation of standard phantoms, modulation and simplification of the procedure for preparing the voxel phantom and an idea for automatic construction of the human phantom with appropriate parameters. (K.H.)

  16. Active phantoms: a paradigm for ultrasound calibration using phantom feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K; Kang, Hyun Jae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M

    2017-07-01

    In ultrasound (US)-guided medical procedures, accurate tracking of interventional tools is crucial to patient safety and clinical outcome. This requires a calibration procedure to recover the relationship between the US image and the tracking coordinate system. In literature, calibration has been performed on passive phantoms, which depend on image quality and parameters, such as frequency, depth, and beam-thickness as well as in-plane assumptions. In this work, we introduce an active phantom for US calibration. This phantom actively detects and responds to the US beams transmitted from the imaging probe. This active echo (AE) approach allows identification of the US image midplane independent of image quality. Both target localization and segmentation can be done automatically, minimizing user dependency. The AE phantom is compared with a crosswire phantom in a robotic US setup. An out-of-plane estimation US calibration method is also demonstrated through simulation and experiments to compensate for remaining elevational uncertainty. The results indicate that the AE calibration phantom can have more consistent results across experiments with varying image configurations. Automatic segmentation is also shown to have similar performance to manual segmentation.

  17. Phantom study and accuracy evaluation of an image-to-world registration approach used with electro-magnetic tracking system for neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Senhu; Sarment, David

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive neurosurgery needs intraoperative imaging updates and high efficient image guide system to facilitate the procedure. An automatic image guided system utilized with a compact and mobile intraoperative CT imager was introduced in this work. A tracking frame that can be easily attached onto the commercially available skull clamp was designed. With known geometry of fiducial and tracking sensor arranged on this rigid frame that was fabricated through high precision 3D printing, not only was an accurate, fully automatic registration method developed in a simple and less-costly approach, but also it helped in estimating the errors from fiducial localization in image space through image processing, and in patient space through the calibration of tracking frame. Our phantom study shows the fiducial registration error as 0.348+/-0.028mm, comparing the manual registration error as 1.976+/-0.778mm. The system in this study provided a robust and accurate image-to-patient registration without interruption of routine surgical workflow and any user interactions involved through the neurosurgery.

  18. Dispersion characteristics of the flexural wave assessed using low frequency (50-150kHz) point-contact transducers: