WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer working party

  1. The ICRP working party on bioassay interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, F.A.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Birchall, A.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years there have been many developments in modelling the behaviour of radionuclides in the human body. The current generation of models are designed to be more 'realistic' than the previous generation of simple compartment models. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) uses these models to produce dose coefficients and recognises that there is a need to give more guidance on how these models can be used to interpret bioassay data. A working party has been set up to address the issue. This paper describes some of the problems, some approaches to solving the problems and the progress of the ICRP working party. (author)

  2. Report of the ITER Council's Ways and Means Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Beginning in 1988 and continuing through 1990, the four Parties involved, under the auspices of the IAEA, have been cooperating in the ITER Conceptual Design Activities. In order to develop ways and means to comply with the objective of the cooperation, a Working Party was chartered by the Council in July, 1989. This report contains the outcome of the Working Party's effort to fulfil the Council's charge and subsequent additional guidance, which are also given in this document. 2 figs, 13 tabs

  3. Monday (after work) is party time!

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    In this interview with Hermann Schmickler, CERN accelerator expert and, more recently, manager of the Open Day organising team, the Bulletin looks behind the scenes of the organisation of CERN’s most popular events for the public.  After the huge endeavour, the “Bosons&More” party awaits you too!   The Open Days core team. “In the early days of the preparations when we still had some spare time, we decided to take photos in two different dress codes to illustrate the spirit of “Bosons&More”: formal evening dress and festival type clothes,” says Herman Schmickler. What will your dress code be on Monday evening?   When Hermann is asked “what did you like best” about this whole adventure, he has no hesitation: “The team,” he says. “We have a wonderful team of very motivated people.” Let’s make a rough calculation: the core team compris...

  4. Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1985-01-01

    The broad objectives of the programme are to develop and assess: (a) techniques for the minimisation, treatment and encapsulation of solid PCM; (b) techniques for the measurement of plutonium in encapsulated and unencapsulated PCM; and (c) advanced treatments for alpha bearing liquid wastes, in order to provide information on their waste management implications. Development has been carried out in eight areas: (a) reduction of arisings; (b) plutonium measurement; (c) decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatments; (d) washing; (e) PCM immobilisation; (f) liquid effluent treatment; (g) sorting and packaging; and (h) engineering objectives. The work is reported. (author)

  5. Recommendations for implementing stereotactic radiotherapy in peripheral stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: report from the Quality Assurance Working Party of the randomised phase III ROSEL study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W; Cuijpers, Johan P; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A van der; Schuring, Danny; Senan, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    A phase III multi-centre randomised trial (ROSEL) has been initiated to establish the role of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with operable stage IA lung cancer. Due to rapid changes in radiotherapy technology and evolving techniques for image-guided delivery, guidelines had to be developed in order to ensure uniformity in implementation of stereotactic radiotherapy in this multi-centre study. A Quality Assurance Working Party was formed by radiation oncologists and clinical physicists from both academic as well as non-academic hospitals that had already implemented stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer. A literature survey was conducted and consensus meetings were held in which both the knowledge from the literature and clinical experience were pooled. In addition, a planning study was performed in 26 stage I patients, of which 22 were stage 1A, in order to develop and evaluate the planning guidelines. Plans were optimised according to parameters adopted from RTOG trials using both an algorithm with a simple homogeneity correction (Type A) and a more advanced algorithm (Type B). Dose conformity requirements were then formulated based on these results. Based on current literature and expert experience, guidelines were formulated for this phase III study of stereotactic radiotherapy versus surgery. These guidelines can serve to facilitate the design of future multi-centre clinical trials of stereotactic radiotherapy in other patient groups and aid a more uniform implementation of this technique outside clinical trials

  6. Guidelines, minimal requirements and standard of cancer care around the Mediterranean Area: report from the Collaborative AROME (Association of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Mediterranean Area) working parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Guidelines are produced in oncology to facilitate clinical decision making and improve clinical practice. However, existing guidelines are mainly developed for countries with a certain availability of means and cultural aspects are rarely taken into account. Around the Mediterranean Area, countries share common cultural backgrounds but also great disparities with respect to availability of means; current guidelines by most societies are not applicable to all of those countries. Association of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Mediterranean Area (AROME) is a scientific organization for the promotion and overcoming of inequalities in oncology clinical practice around the Mediterranean Area. In an effort to accomplish this goal, members of the AROME society have developed clinical recommendations for most common cancer sites in countries around the Mediterranean Area. The structure of these recommendations lies in the concept of minimal requirements vs. standard of care; they are being presented and discussed in the main text. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Working during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000834.htm Working during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Many people continue to work throughout their cancer treatment. Cancer, or the side effects of treatment, may ...

  8. Summary of Country Reports Submitted to the Energy Efficiency Working Party: October 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this summary report is to highlight energy efficiency policy action and planning in IEA member countries submited to the Energy Efficiency Working Party (EEWP) from March to September 2011.

  9. Report of the SRC working party on databases and database management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crennell, K.M.

    1980-10-01

    An SRC working party, set up to consider the subject of support for databases within the SRC, were asked to identify interested individuals and user communities, establish which features of database management systems they felt were desirable, arrange demonstrations of possible systems and then make recommendations for systems, funding and likely manpower requirements. This report describes the activities and lists the recommendations of the working party and contains a list of databses maintained or proposed by those who replied to a questionnaire. (author)

  10. Using a third party for nuclear plant civil works, one of a solution for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandeze, A.

    2010-01-01

    Issues that may happen during the construction of civil works of a nuclear power plant are numerous: concrete, reinforcement bars positioning, welding of the liner... On top of the above, quality and nuclear safety assurance is increasingly required by nuclear authorities to keep the current nuclear renaissance steady regarding public opinion. The speaker will present the benefits of using a third party during these civil works phases and about the value created for the circle of actors through a risk based inspection program. Going through the main stages of design and construction of civil works of a nuclear power plant, the main actors involved, their positioning and the role of a voluntary independent third party inspection body, the speaker demonstrates that an independent third party, voluntarily chosen by a Utility and nuclear power plant engineering company, may give confidence to each party. (authors)

  11. Management of Helicobacter pylori infection--a Working Party Report of the Malaysian Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, K L; Mahendra Raj, S; Parasakthi, N; Kew, S T; Kandasami, P; Mazlam, Z

    1998-09-01

    The Working Party Report on the Management of Helicobacter pylori serves as a clinical practice guideline for Malaysian doctors. H. pylori is not uncommon in the Malaysian population. Marked racial differences and the consistently low prevalence rates amongst Malays are noted. The working party recommends that if endoscopy is to be performed, a rapid urease test should be used for diagnosis. Where suspicion of the infection is strong and the urease test is negative, histology should be performed on gastric biopsies. Culture should be used to monitor resistance patterns to antibiotics and regional laboratories should assume this responsibility. The urea breath tests are highly accurate tests for diagnosis of H. pylori but is as yet not widely available in Malaysia. The working party strongly recommends that all peptic ulcer patients infected with H. pylori whether active, in remission and complicated ulcers should be treated for the infection. Patients with low-grade gastric mucosal lymphoid tissue lymphoma should also be treated for H. pylori infection. It is considered advisable that patients on long term nonsteroidal antinflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment with a history of peptic ulcers or dyspepsia and patients following resection of early gastric cancer or those with a family history of gastric cancer should also be tested and treated for H. pylori. The working party recommends, as first line treatment a 7-day combination therapy of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin and metronidazole or amoxicillin. High metronidazole resistance rates locally may adversely affect regimens containing the antibiotic. It should also be noted that regimens that yield lower eradication rates may result in higher long term expenditure.

  12. Initial report of the ITER Council's Ways and Means Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Under the auspices of the IAEA, the ITER Conceptual Design Activities began in April, 1988, and are scheduled to be completed in December, 1990. As part of the Terms of Reference of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities, the ITER Council chartered a Working Party which plans to define needed elements to conduct an Engineering Design of ITER, should the members wish to go on with such design. This document is an initial report of the Working Party on Ways and Means; it seeks to define the Engineering Design Activities, and to list the practical topics to be considered by the ITER EDA. 2 figs, 4 tabs

  13. Overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA/NSC working party on nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri, A.; Blomquist, R.; Bradyraap, M.; Briggs, B.; Cousinou, P.; Nomura, Y.; Weber, W.

    2003-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) started dealing with criticality-safety related subjects back in the seventies. In the mid-nineties, several activities related to criticality-safety were grouped together into the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety. This working party has since been operating and reporting to the Nuclear Science Committee. Six expert groups co-ordinate various activities ranging from experimental evaluations to code and data inter-comparisons for the study of static and transient criticality behaviours. The paper describes current activities performed in this framework and the achievements of the various expert groups. (author)

  14. Progress report for 1988/89 from the Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party covering joint funded work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, D.G.S.A.

    1989-05-01

    The report covers progress in the area of ILW Product Evaluation. This work is a continuation of a generic study programme directed by the Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party. The objective of the programme was to evaluate potential waste products arising from the treatment of ILW. (author)

  15. Progress report for 1986 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1987-11-01

    The paper covers progress during 1986 under the joint BNFL/MOD/DoE funded PCM Working Party studying the management, treatment and immobilization of plutonium contaminated materials. Development is reported under each of seven main programme headings including reduction of arisings, Pu measurement, decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment, liquid effluent treatment, sorting and packaging, PCM immobilisation and engineering objectives. (author)

  16. Extract of the report of the working party on the handling of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berest, P.

    1983-01-01

    The French government has requested a working party with Prof. Neel in the chair to submit a report on the handling of irradiated fuel. This part of the report concerns the retreated fuels. It gives important elements for the debate and formulates recommendations for radioactive waste management [fr

  17. Emotion work: disclosing cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Grace J; Aviv, Caryn; Levine, Ellen G; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for all women in the US. Current research has focused on the psychological relationship and not the sociological relationship between emotions and the experience of breast cancer survivors. This paper focuses on the emotion work involved in self-disclosing a breast cancer diagnosis in a racially or ethnically diverse population. The participants (n = 176) selected for this study were African American, Asian American, Latina, and Caucasian women who had been diagnosed with stages 0, I, or II breast cancer within the past 4 years. They completed an in-depth qualitative interview on self-disclosure and social support. The results indicate self-disclosing was done at a time when important decisions about treatment needed to be made. Different strategies for disclosure were used, all of which entailed emotion work. Respondents talked about the various elements of emotion work in the disclosure process including: managing others' worry, protecting and soothing others, and educating and instructing others. For many respondents, disclosure without calculating emotional management meant opening up to others which meant support and an increase in emotional resources. The findings in this paper have implications for women with breast cancer and demonstrate the need for women to be involved in honest disclosure and less emotional management of others' feelings. There is also a need for education about the nature of the cancer experience among people who are not well educated about the treatment and consequences of cancer. This need may be even stronger among racial and ethnic minorities.

  18. Towards Open Access Publishing in High Energy Physics Report of the SCOAP3 Working Party

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, S; Ferreira, P; Friend, F; Gargiulo, P; Hanania, R; Henrot-Versillé, S; Holtkamp, A; Igo-Kemenes, P; Jarroux-Declais, D; Jordão, M; Kämper, B-C; Krause, J; Lagrange, T; Le Diberder, F R; Lemasurier, A; Lengenfelder, A; Lindqvist, C M; Mele, S; Plaszczynski, S; Schimmer, R; Vigen, Jens; Voss, R; Wilbers, M; Yeomans, J; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    This Report concerns the implementation of a process today supported by leading actors from the particle physics community, and worked through in detail by members of an international Working Party. The initiative offers an opportunity for the cost-effective dissemination of high-quality research articles in particle physics, enabling use of the new technologies of e-Science across the literature of High Energy physics.

  19. [The advantages of a third party in the “work organization” of head nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Pierre-Philippe; Valette, Annick; Reverdy, Thomas; François, Patrice

    The organisation of production of care is a task that requires three different levels of competence: operational, structural and learning skills. The organisational requirements (OR) of the Head Nurse (HN) are often centered on the operational level, to the detriment of the other two levels. This difficulty is due to the organisation which presents limited political, cognitive and pragmatic levels of rationality.The aim of this study was to identify the impact of a third party in relation to the organisation and its effect on the HN's OR. An educational device places HN students in the position of a third party to allow them to work on an organisational problem delegated by a HN. The research-intervention followed 17 projects over a period of one year.Intervention by a third party legitimised the problem by recognizing the difficulties in nursing and reconfiguring relations between healthcare professionals in a political dimension. The methods employed by the third party reassured the HN and completed their knowledge, placing particular focus on the importance of methodology and managerial posture. In practice, the third party supported the HN's power to act and coordinate the various members of the team. The third party contributes to the development of the HN's OR and completes certain limits of the HN's rationality. Nevertheless, difficulties still remain in the development of practices outside the medical team, limiting the extension to other services.A unit managerial support, a collective schedule and open spaces of discussion are recommended to bring structure and support to the OR.

  20. On the Sources of Establishment-selective Work of the Bolshevik Party

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily P. Pashin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the archive materials from the funds of the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History, periodical publications of the 1920s and official Bolshevik Party documents, the article strives to analyze main directions in the search for creation of the nation-wide system for selection and appointment of executive staff. It shows the work of the Uchraspredotdel (Registration and Distribution Office of the Central Committee of the Russian Communist Party of Bolsheviks in its attempt to manage quality selection of staff by way of distribution, appointment and mobilization, and the transgression from the quantitative registration of all Communists to the registration based on application forms. The article also demonstrates the failure of the idea that all Bolshevik party members are potential organizers and leaders. It studies objective and subjective reasons for failures in the first attempts to select “responsible officials” on the nation-wide scale. The article also characterizes activity and opinions of a number of executives in their approaches towards creation of organization-selective work and their attitudes to it. It reveals the persistent aspiration of the Bolshevik Party to establish personal responsibility of the appointed executives, for the directive decisions, of its central authorities, which they take and implement.

  1. Progress report for 1985/86 from the Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party covering joint funded work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, D.G.S.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party (WTDWP) covered the areas of: ILW Product Evaluation, ILW and HLW Disposal Studies and ILW and HLW Quality Checking. The objectives of the programme were to evaluate potential waste products arising from the treatment of ILW, and to develop appropriate techniques which could be used to check the quality of the finished waste product. (author)

  2. Report on primate supply for biomedical scientific work in the UK. EUPREN UK Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S; Thomas, C; West, P; Wolfensohn, S; Wood, M

    1997-10-01

    A Working Party of the UK group of European Primate Resources Network (EUPREN) considered primate supply for scientific work in the UK. Through a questionnaire, which achieved a very good response, it obtained details of primate use, sources and breeding in the UK and it put forward options to ensure that animal welfare is the best possible whilst ensuring continued supply. The questionnaire showed that contract research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies use about 80% of the 4233 primates used annually at the moment, with the rest accounted for by academic establishments and public sector laboratories. Fifty-four per cent are cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), of which nearly 90% are captive-bred outside the European Union (EU), the remainder being bred in the UK. Nearly 90% of cynomolgus macaques are used by only five institutions. Thirty-seven per cent of primates used are marmosets (Callithrix jacchus jacchus), all of which are bred in the UK. Most of the rest are rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), about half of which are captive-bred outside the EU, the other half being bred in the UK. Overall primate use has increased from about 3000 per year in 1990 and users predict that requirements for all species except baboons (Papio sp.) will be maintained or increase. Marmoset breeding in the UK is already closely matched to use, and it could be increased reasonably easily if necessary. Some of the existing breeding centres of macaques in the UK would be prepared to consider expanding to supply others, although investment and imported breeding stock would be needed and it is likely that a large investment would be needed to breed a significant fraction of the macaque use in the UK. A further problem is that the users of only about 10% of the cynomolgus macaques said that they could replace this species by rhesus macaques, which are easier to breed in the UK. The questionnaire showed that much of the use of macaques would be transferred to other countries

  3. Progress report for 1984/85 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1985-01-01

    The progress report for 1984/5 from the 'Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party' is presented. The report is divided into eight main topics, each discussed separately, and include: reduction of arisings, plutonium measurement, sorting and packaging, washing of shredded combustible plutonium contaminated materials (PCM), decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment, PCM immobilization, treatment of alpha bearing liquid wastes, and engineering objectives. (U.K.)

  4. Summary of Country Reports Submitted to the Energy Efficiency Working Party - October 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this summary report is to highlight energy efficiency policy action and planning in IEA member countries since the last meeting of the Energy Efficiency Working Party (EEWP) held in March 2011. This paper provides an overview of energy efficiency developments across all sectors, but is not meant to be a comprehensive review of every energy efficiency-related policy in IEA member countries.

  5. Progress report for 1982/83 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction (definitions of plutonium contaminated materials (PCM)); organisation and role of the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party; management practices in relation to PCM; 1982/1983 Progress Report (engineering objectives; reduction of PCM arisings; plutonium measurement; development of treatment processes; decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment; washing of shredded combustible PCM; PCM immobilisation; liquid effluent treatment; actinide chemistry); programme management. (U.K.)

  6. A combined analysis of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Medical Research Council randomized clinical trials for the prophylactic treatment of stage TaT1 bladder cancer. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Genitourinary Tract Cancer Cooperative Group and the Medical Research Council Working Party on Superficial Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawinski, A.; Sylvester, R.; Kurth, K. H.; Bouffioux, C.; van der Meijden, A.; Parmar, M. K.; Bijnens, L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prophylactic agents after primary resection can decrease the incidence of tumor recurrence in patients with stage TaT1 bladder cancer. However, the long-term impact on progression to muscle invasive disease as well as on duration of survival is unknown. A combined analysis of individual

  7. Report of the second joint meeting of the Working Party on Assessment of Fish Resources and the Working Party on Stock Assessment of Shrimp and Lobster Resources, Mexico City, Mexico, 26-29 November 1979

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1981-01-01

    The final formal report of the WECAFC Working Parties on Assessment of Fish Resources and on Stock Assessment of Shrimp and Lobster Resources, held in Mexico City, Mexico, 26-29 November 1979 is presented...

  8. Fast burner reactor benchmark results from the NEA working party on physics of plutonium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Palmiotti, G.

    1995-01-01

    As part of a program proposed by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling (WPPR) to evaluate different scenarios for the use of plutonium, fast reactor physics benchmarks were developed; fuel cycle scenarios using either PUREX/TRUEX (oxide fuel) or pyrometallurgical (metal fuel) separation technologies were specified. These benchmarks were designed to evaluate the nuclear performance and radiotoxicity impact of a transuranic-burning fast reactor system. International benchmark results are summarized in this paper; and key conclusions are highlighted

  9. PWR benchmarks. From OECD working party on physics of plutonium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernnat, W.; Lutz, D.; Sartori, E.; Schlosser, G.; Cathalau, S.; Soldevila, M.

    1995-01-01

    A two year study organised by the OECD/NEACOGEMA on the physics of plutonium recycle (Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Recycle - WPPR) has just completed its final report. The study reviewed the important aspects of the physics of plutonium recycle in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs), Bolling Water reactors (BWRs) and fast reactors. The final report includes a description and analysis of the results of three physical benchmark exercises which were specified for PWRs and two for fast reactors. This paper presents a summary of the most important observations and conclusions from the PWR benchmark exercises. (authors)

  10. Report of the first session of the Working Party on Pollution and Fisheries: Accra, Ghana, 16-20 June 1986

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    The Working Party reviewed reports on the state of pollution of African Inland waters and existing pollution monitoring and research programs, and made proposals for the preparation of study papers...

  11. Summary of Country Reports Submitted to the Energy Efficiency Working Party - January 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the January 2010 Country Report Summary is to highlight energy efficiency policy action and planning in IEA member countries since the previous meeting of the Energy Efficiency Working Party (EEWP) held in September 2009. This paper is not meant to be a comprehensive review of every energy efficiency-related policy in IEA member countries. In all of the country reports received, there is evidence of significant energy efficiency policy action. The most significant observations from these country reports cover three areas. The first is that the spending focus on energy efficiency seen in the previous two country reports (31 March and 15 September 2009) appears largely unchanged, and is still concentrated in the building sector. Second, countries are actively undertaking analysis and public consultation to plan for future projects. Third, many countries reported activity taking place in the area of fiscal policy, from amendments to new fiscal measures.

  12. Materials and energy resources. Report of the research committee working party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Working Party has tried to assess the problems likely to stem from future scarcity of a number of important materials and how these interact with the simultaneous depletion of energy resources. The report examines in detail the likely areas of shortages, and their economic, social and political implications, and suggests the various choices for preventive or corrective action. In its recommendations it has delineated areas not only for research but for action by government and by professional and other bodies. The need is forseen for a nuclear power programme of possibly 35 GW(e) by the end of the century part of which could be from fast breeders. Uranium supplies would appear to be adequate only if fast breeders become available. Nuclear fusion is potentially a very large energy source but only for the distant future. (author)

  13. Basic concept of common reactor physics code systems. Final report of working party on common reactor physics code systems (CCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    A working party was organized for two years (2001-2002) on common reactor physics code systems under the Research Committee on Reactor Physics of JAERI. This final report is compilation of activity of the working party on common reactor physics code systems during two years. Objectives of the working party is to clarify basic concept of common reactor physics code systems to improve convenience of reactor physics code systems for reactor physics researchers in Japan on their various field of research and development activities. We have held four meetings during 2 years, investigated status of reactor physics code systems and innovative software technologies, and discussed basic concept of common reactor physics code systems. (author)

  14. Activity report of working party on reactor physics of subcritical system. October 2001 to March 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    Under the Research Committee on Reactor Physics, the Working Party on Reactor Physics of Subcritical System (ADS-WP) was set in July 2001 to research reactor physics of subcritical system such as Accelerator-Driven System (ADS). The WP, at the first meeting, discussed a guideline of its activity for two years and decided to perform theoretical research for the following subjects: (1) study of reactor physics for a subcritical core, (2) benchmark problems for a subcritical core and their calculations, (3) study of physical parameters affecting to set subcriticality of ADS, and (4) study of measurement and surveillance methods of subcriticality of a subcritical core. The activity of ADS-WP continued up to March 2003. In this duration, the members of the WP met together eight times, including four meetings jointly held with the Workshop on Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. This report summarizes the result obtained by the above WP activity and research. (author)

  15. Summary of Country Reports Submitted to the Energy Efficiency Working Party - September 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this summary report is to highlight energy efficiency policy action and planning in IEA member countries since the last meeting of the Energy Efficiency Working Party (EEWP)1 held in January 2010. This paper provides an overview of energy efficiency developments across all sectors, but is not meant to be a comprehensive review of every energy efficiency-related policy in IEA member countries. At the request of the EEWP, this issue of the country report summary focuses primarily on transport. Countries reported a wide range of energy efficiency policy activity. Compared with past reports, energy efficiency policy planning seems to be giving way to programme implementation in the buildings, lighting and appliances sectors. Planning and implementation is underway in the transport sector. Measures in the transport sector are diverse and include financial support for electric vehicle R&D and pilot projects, fiscal policies to encourage the purchase of efficient vehicles, eco-drive programmes and vehicle labelling. Measures of note outside the transport sector include the promotion of smart metering.

  16. Subcriticality of accelerator driven system by AESJ/JAERI working party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiko

    2002-01-01

    Under Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), a Working Party on Reactor Physics of Accelerator-Driven System (ADS-WP) has been set since March 1999 to review and investigate special subjects related to reactor physics research of Accelerator-Driven System (ADS). In the ADS-WP, the extensive and aggressive activity is being made by 25 professional members in the field of reactor physics in Japan. The ADS is now studying three subjects related to subcriticality of ADS; (1) calculation accuracy of subcriticality on ADS, (2) critical safety issues of ADS, and (3) theoretical review of subcriticality and its measurement methods. This paper describes two topics related to the subjects (1) and (2); one is an analysis of maximum reactivity potentially inserted to a subcritical core and the other is a benchmark proposal for checking calculation accuracy of subcriticality on ADS. The full specification of the calculation benchmark will be supplied by June 2002. Researchers from overseas, especially from Korea, are welcome to join this benchmark

  17. Cancer survivors. Work related issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Pamela N; Beck, Martha L; Stava, Charles; Sellin, Rena V

    2002-05-01

    New and more effective treatments for cancer have resulted in individuals living longer with a better quality of life. Many more survivors are employed in the workplace. Cancer is no longer only an issue for survivors and their families; it has become an issue for the employer and the workplace. This article describes survey results of 4,364 long term cancer survivors in which they were asked to respond to items describing their ability to work, job discrimination, and quality of life. Thirty-five percent of survivors were working at the time they completed the survey, and 8.5% considered themselves unable to work. This research has shown that age, gender, ethnic group, and cancer type affected the working status of the survivors. Of survivors continuing to work, 7.3% indicated they had experienced job discrimination. The results indicate most cancer survivors do not perceive employment related problems, and are readily assimilated into the work force. Job discrimination and the ability to work is a quality of life issue.

  18. IUFRO Fourth Meeting of Working Party 7.02.09, Phytophthoras in Forest and Natural Ecosystems: Meeting Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Frankel

    2009-01-01

    On behalf of the Fourth Phytophthoras in Forest and Natural Ecosystems local organizing committee and co-chairs Everett Hansen, Clive Brasier, and Giles Hardy, I thank you for your contributions to this Working Party meeting. The past week has stimulated much thought and discussion, thanks to the 100 participants from 15 countries, 48 papers and 31 posters, two field...

  19. Long working hours and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Madsen, Ida E. H.

    2016-01-01

    in 116 462 men and women who were free of cancer at baseline. Incident cancers were ascertained from national cancer, hospitalisation and death registers; weekly working hours were self-reported. Results: During median follow-up of 10.8 years, 4371 participants developed cancer (n colorectal cancer: 393......Background: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. Methods: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk......; n lung cancer: 247; n breast cancer: 833; and n prostate cancer: 534). We found no clear evidence for an association between working hours and the overall cancer risk. Working hours were also unrelated the risk of incident colorectal, lung or prostate cancers. Working greater than or equal to55 h...

  20. Progress report for 1983/84 from the Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party covering joint BNFL/DOE funded work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is covered in paragraphs: introduction (arisings of intermediate-level radioactive waste); organisation and role of the Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party; main objectives (to provide data on intermediate-level waste treatment systems and allow assessment of alternative processes); ILW process and flowsheeting studies; ILW product evaluation. (U.K.)

  1. Intermediate Level Waste Research Programme: Progress report for 1986/87 from the Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party covering Joint Funded Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, D.G.S.A.

    1988-06-01

    The Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party (WTDWP) covered the areas of: ILW Product Evaluation; ILW and HLW Disposal Studies, and ILW and HLW Quality Checking. The objectives of the programme were to evaluate potential waste products arising from the treatment of ILW/HLW, and to develop appropriate techniques which could be used to check the quality of the finished waste product. (author)

  2. About green political parties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Slobodan P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the author refers to some legal and political questions in connection with green political parties. Those questions cover: the ideology of green political parties, their number and influence, both in general and in Serbia. The first part of work is generally speaking about political parties - their definition, ideology, role and action. Main thesis in this work is that green political parties, by their appearance, were something new on the political scene. But quickly, because of objective and subjective reasons, they were changing original ideas and were beginning to resemble to all other political parties. In this way, they lost their vanguard and political alternativeness.

  3. Work stress and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T; Theorell, Töres

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, is associated with the overall risk of cancer and the risk of colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers.......To investigate whether work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, is associated with the overall risk of cancer and the risk of colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers....

  4. Work Sustainability Among Male Cancer Survivors After Returning to Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Motoki; Haruyama, Yasuo; Muto, Go; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kojimahara, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2018-02-05

    Few studies have investigated the work continuance rate among cancer survivors after return to work (RTW). The objective of this study was to clarify work sustainability after RTW among Japanese male cancer survivors. We collected data on male cancer survivors from an occupational health register. Inclusion criteria were as follows: employees who returned to work after an episode of sick leave due to clinically certified cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011. Of 1,033 male employees who were diagnosed with cancer, 786 employees (76.1%) returned to work after their first episode of sick leave due to cancer. Work continuance rates among all subjects were 80.1% 1 year after RTW and 48.5% 5 years after RTW. The mean duration of work after RTW was 4.5 years. The work continuance rates varied significantly by cancer type. The "Lung" and "Hepatic, Pancreatic" cancer groups had the shortest duration of work (0.9 year after RTW). Of workers who returned to work after their first episode of leave after cancer, 50% continued to work after 5 years in large-scale companies. There was a steep decrease in work continuance rates during the first year after RTW, with considerable differences according to cancer site.

  5. International society of blood transfusion working party on red cell immunogenetics and terminology: report of the Seoul and London meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storry, J. R.; Castilho, L.; Chen, Q.; Daniels, G.; Denomme, G.; Flegel, W. A.; Gassner, C.; de Haas, M.; Hyland, C.; Keller, M.; Lomas-Francis, C.; Moulds, J. M.; Nogues, N.; Olsson, M. L.; Peyrard, T.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Tani, Y.; Thornton, N.; Wagner, F.; Wendel, S.; Westhoff, C.; Yahalom, V.

    2017-01-01

    The Working Party has met twice since the last report: in Seoul, South Korea 2014, and in London, UK 2015, both in association with the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) Congress. As in previous meetings, matters pertaining to blood group antigen nomenclature were discussed. Eleven new blood group antigens were added to seven blood group systems. This brings the current total of blood group antigens recognized by the ISBT to 346, of which 308 are clustered within 36 blood groups systems. The remaining 38 antigens are currently unassigned to a known blood group system. PMID:29093749

  6. Third-party brachytherapy source calibrations and physicist responsibilities: Report of the AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Wayne M.; Bice, William S. Jr.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Hevezi, James M.; Huq, M. Saiful; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Rivard, Mark J.; Seuntjens, Jan P.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2008-01-01

    The AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group was formed to investigate and recommend quality control and quality assurance procedures for brachytherapy sources prior to clinical use. Compiling and clarifying recommendations established by previous AAPM Task Groups 40, 56, and 64 were among the working group's charges, which also included the role of third-party handlers to perform loading and assay of sources. This document presents the findings of the working group on the responsibilities of the institutional medical physicist and a clarification of the existing AAPM recommendations in the assay of brachytherapy sources. Responsibility for the performance and attestation of source assays rests with the institutional medical physicist, who must use calibration equipment appropriate for each source type used at the institution. Such equipment and calibration procedures shall ensure secondary traceability to a national standard. For each multi-source implant, 10% of the sources or ten sources, whichever is greater, are to be assayed. Procedures for presterilized source packaging are outlined. The mean source strength of the assayed sources must agree with the manufacturer's stated strength to within 3%, or action must be taken to resolve the difference. Third party assays do not absolve the institutional physicist from the responsibility to perform the institutional measurement and attest to the strength of the implanted sources. The AAPM leaves it to the discretion of the institutional medical physicist whether the manufacturer's or institutional physicist's measured value should be used in performing dosimetry calculations

  7. Summary Record of the Twenty-Sixth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document is the executive summary of WPEC's 26. meeting held in 2014. It presents a brief review of the 2 days meeting in particular the Reports on experimental activities in Europe, Japan, USA and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL) with the discussion of future plans, the Review of final or near-final subgroup reports, the Status of ongoing subgroups, the Proposals for new subgroups and some information about Conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community. A list of participants and a list of reports presented at this meeting are attached in appendix

  8. Twenty-eighth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation. Summary Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; ); Danon, Yaron; Herman, Mike; ); Dunn, Mike; ); Kahler, Albert Skip; ); Jacqmin, Robert; ); Plompen, Arjan; ); Fukahori, Tokio; ); Harada, Hideo; ); Iwamoto, Osamu; Yokoyama, Kenji; ); Grudzevich, Oleg; ); Ge, Zhigang; Ruan, Xichao; Wu, Haicheng; Koning, Arjan; ); Mills, Robert; ); Mcnabb, Dennis; ); Palmiotti, Giuseppe; ); Noguere, Gilles; ); Leal, Luiz; ); Cabellos, Oscar; )

    2016-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 28. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document is the summary record of the meeting. It presents: 1 - The reports on experimental activities: Experimental nuclear data activities of relevance to the evaluation projects were reviewed. Detailed information about the experimental activities is given in the reports and view-graphs presented at the meeting. 2 - The review of final or near-final subgroup reports. Results and conclusions of completed or near-completed subgroups were discussed. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. 3 - The status of ongoing subgroups. Activities of ongoing subgroups were presented. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. 4 - The proposals for new subgroups. The subgroup proposal was reviewed by WPEC. Detailed information about this proposal is given in the document. 5 - The forthcoming meetings of interest. The documents presented at the twenty-eight WPEC meeting are presented in the annex 2: Annex 2.1 Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation - WPEC; Annex 2.2 WPEC Long-term mandate (updated and extended) on a 'Expert Group on the High Priority Request

  9. OECD/NEA working party on nuclear criticality safety: Challenge of new realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.; Brady, M.C.; Briggs, J.B.; Sartori, E.

    1998-01-01

    New issues in criticality safety continue to emerge as spent fuel storage facilities reach the saturation point, fuel enrichments and burn-ups increase and new types of plutonium-carrying fuels are being developed. The new challenges related to the manipulation, transportation and storage of fuel demand further work to improve models predicting behavior through new experiments, especially where there is a lack of data in the present databases. This article summarizes the activities of the OECD/NEA working groups that coordinate and carry out work in the domain of criticality safety. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burn-up credit. This is aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back end of the fuel cycle

  10. OECD/NEA working party on nuclear criticality safety: challenge of new realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.; Brady, M.C.; Briggs, J.B.; Sartori, E.

    1998-01-01

    New issues in critically safety continue to emerge as spent fuel storage facilities reach the saturation point, fuel enrichments and burn-ups increase and new types of plutonium-carrying fuels are being developed. The new challenges related to the manipulation, transportation and storage of fuel demand further work to improve models predicting behaviour through new experiments, especially where there is a lack of data the present databases. This article summarizes the activities of the OECD/NEA working groups that co-ordinate and carry out work in the domain of criticality safety. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burn-up credit. This is aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back end of the fuel cycle. (authors)

  11. Improving the Work-Integrated Learning Experience through a Third-Party Advisory Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise; Ferns, Sonia; Rowbottom, David; Mclaren, Diane

    2017-01-01

    This study trialled a Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) Advisory Service, provided by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Western Australia (CCIWA) in collaboration with four WA universities. The service was established to broker relationships between industry and universities, support employers engaged in WIL and enhance the WIL experience for…

  12. Data sharing in stem cell translational science: policy statement by the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenoord, Annelien L; Mostert, Menno; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-01-01

    Data and sample sharing constitute a scientific and ethical imperative but need to be conducted in a responsible manner in order to protect individual interests as well as maintain public trust. In 2014, the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) adopted a common Framework for Responsible Sharing of Genomic and Health-Related Data. The GA4GH Framework is applicable to data sharing in the stem cell field, however, interpretation is required so as to provide guidance for this specific context. In this paper, the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party discusses those principles that are specific to translational stem cell science, including engagement, data quality and safety, privacy, security and confidentiality, risk-benefit analysis and sustainability.

  13. Publishing SNP genotypes of human embryonic stem cell lines: policy statement of the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppers, Bartha M; Isasi, Rosario; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lomax, Geoffrey; Morris, Clive; Murray, Thomas H; Lee, Eng Hin; Perry, Margery; Richardson, Genevra; Sipp, Douglas; Tanner, Klaus; Wahlström, Jan; de Wert, Guido; Zeng, Fanyi

    2011-09-01

    Novel methods and associated tools permitting individual identification in publicly accessible SNP databases have become a debatable issue. There is growing concern that current technical and ethical safeguards to protect the identities of donors could be insufficient. In the context of human embryonic stem cell research, there are no studies focusing on the probability that an hESC line donor could be identified by analyzing published SNP profiles and associated genotypic and phenotypic information. We present the International Stem Cell Forum (ISCF) Ethics Working Party's Policy Statement on "Publishing SNP Genotypes of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines (hESC)". The Statement prospectively addresses issues surrounding the publication of genotypic data and associated annotations of hESC lines in open access databases. It proposes a balanced approach between the goals of open science and data sharing with the respect for fundamental bioethical principles (autonomy, privacy, beneficence, justice and research merit and integrity).

  14. Progress report for 1984/85 from the Waste Treatment and Disposal Working Party covering joint BNFL/DOE funded work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, D.G.S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The progress report from the waste treatment and disposal working party is concerned with the management of intermediate-level radioactive waste arising from dismantled fuel assemblies, cladding removed from fuel cans, sludges from fuel cladding corrosion, flocs from liquid waste, ion exchange resins and solid wastes generated during reprocessing. It is proposed that these wastes be incorporated in a matrix for safe transport, storage and disposal and the objectives of the study are to evaluate waste products arising from the treatment of ILWS and to develop techniques to check the quality of the finished waste product. (UK)

  15. Work functioning trajectories in cancer patients: Results from the longitudinal Work Life after Cancer (WOLICA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, Heleen F; Abma, Femke I; Roelen, Corné A M; Stewart, Roy E; Amick, Benjamin C; Ranchor, Adelita V; Bültmann, Ute

    2017-11-01

    More than 60% of cancer patients are able to work after cancer diagnosis. However, little is known about their functioning at work. Therefore, the aims of this study were to (1) identify work functioning trajectories in the year following return to work (RTW) in cancer patients and (2) examine baseline sociodemographic, health-related and work-related variables associated with work functioning trajectories. This longitudinal cohort study included 384 cancer patients who have returned to work after cancer diagnosis. Work functioning was measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. Latent class growth modeling (LCGM) was used to identify work functioning trajectories. Associations of baseline variables with work functioning trajectories were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. LCGM analyses with cancer patients who completed on at least three time points the Work Role Functioning Questionnaire (n = 324) identified three work functioning trajectories: "persistently high" (16% of the sample), "moderate to high" (54%) and "persistently low" work functioning (32%). Cancer patients with persistently high work functioning had less time between diagnosis and RTW and had less often a changed meaning of work, while cancer patients with persistently low work functioning reported more baseline cognitive symptoms compared to cancer patients in the other trajectories. This knowledge has implications for cancer care and guidance of cancer patients at work. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Report of the Working Party on the conversion of HIFAR to low enrichment uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    This report states the effect on research reactor operations and applications of international and national political decisions relating to fuel enrichment. Technical work done in Australia and overseas to establish parameters for conversion of research reactors from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) to Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) have been considered in developing a strategy for HIFAR. The requirements of the research groups, isotope production group and reactor operating staff have been considered. For HIFAR to continue to provide the required facilities in support of the national need, it is concluded these should be no reduction of neutron flux

  17. neutron radiography. Report prepared from contributions by members of the MOD Working Party on Neutron Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halmshaw, R.

    1977-03-01

    Radiography with thermal or cold neutrons has some special advantages over X-rays and gamma rays, and some facilities for neutron radiography exist in the Ministry of Defence. This report gives a brief and simple description of the technique, its advantages and disadvantages, and is illustrated with a number of Ordnance applications taken from MOD work, to show examples where neutron radiographs provided extra important information not available from X- or gamma radiography. The facilities available in the UK for neutron radiography are listed. (author)

  18. Central venous catheter-related infections in hematology and oncology: 2012 updated guidelines on diagnosis, management and prevention by the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentrich, M; Schalk, E; Schmidt-Hieber, M; Chaberny, I; Mousset, S; Buchheidt, D; Ruhnke, M; Penack, O; Salwender, H; Wolf, H-H; Christopeit, M; Neumann, S; Maschmeyer, G; Karthaus, M

    2014-05-01

    Cancer patients are at increased risk for central venous catheter-related infections (CRIs). Thus, a comprehensive, practical and evidence-based guideline on CRI in patients with malignancies is warranted. A panel of experts by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) has developed a guideline on CRI in cancer patients. Literature searches of the PubMed, Medline and Cochrane databases were carried out and consensus discussions were held. Recommendations on diagnosis, management and prevention of CRI in cancer patients are made, and the strength of the recommendation and the level of evidence are presented. This guideline is an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis, management and prevention of CRI in cancer patients.

  19. Circuit parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, R

    2000-03-01

    Circuit parties are extended celebrations, lasting from a day to a week, primarily attended by gay and bisexual men in their thirties and forties. These large-scale dance parties move from city to city and draw thousands of participants. The risks for contracting HIV during these parties include recreational drug use and unsafe sex. Limited data exists on the level of risk at these parties, and participants are skeptical of outside help because of past criticism of these events. Health care and HIV advocates can promote risk-reduction strategies with the cooperation of party planners and can counsel individuals to personally reduce their own risk. To convey the message, HIV prevention workers should emphasize positive and community-centered aspects of the parties, such as taking care of friends and avoiding overdose.

  20. [Night work, shift work: Breast cancer risk factor?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabu, J-C; Stoll, F; Gonzalez, M; Mathelin, C

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review was to determine the link between night/shift work and breast cancer. The analysed articles were taken from the PUBMED database between 1996 and 2015. The keywords used were "breast cancer risk", "night work" and "shift work". In total, 25 articles were selected. Night/shift workers are more at risk to develop a breast cancer (relative risk (RR) between 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02-1.20 and 1.48; 95% CI: 1.36-1.61 in the meta-analyses). However, this risk is not found by some cohort and case-control studies. The circadian rhythm disruption, responsible of disorderliness of melatonin secretion, could be one of the mechanisms involved in the increase of that risk. Hormonal status of night/shift workers, their geographic origin, their lifestyle and their vitamin D deficiency appear as other mechanisms potentially responsible for increased risk of cancer in this professional population. Moreover, a dose-effect connection may exist, with an increase of the risk with the number of years of night/shift work. Night/shift work is associated with a moderate increased risk of breast cancer, especially among women who worked over 20 years. Recommendations concerning the breast monitoring in this population could be diffused. The benefit of melatonin supplementation remains to be assessed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Activities of working party on 'Subcritical core of accelerator-driven system' under the research committee on reactor physics of AESJ and JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishihara, K.; Kitamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The Research Committee on Reactor Physics under the Atomic Energy Society of Japan and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. organized the working party (ADS-WP) on S ubcritical Core of Accelerator-Driven System . The ADS-WP investigated reactor physics of subcriticality from the viewpoint of the accelerator driven system (ADS) since subcriticality has been almost studied from the viewpoint of critical safety. The working party was set in July 2001 and it worked for two years. The activities of the ADS-WP are (Work-I) theory of subcriticality, (Work-II) benchmark of subcritical core, (Work-III) setting of subcriticality level of ADS and (Work-JAO monitoring of subcriticality. These activities clarified about the important issues related to the subcriticality or the subcritical core from the wide ranges of theory, analysis, calculation, design and monitoring for ADS. The activities were already summarized and the report will be published in March 2004. (authors)

  2. Survey of Third-Party Parenting Options Associated With Fertility Preservation Available to Patients With Cancer Around the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra S. Rashedi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the accompanying article, “Analysis of Fertility Preservation Options Available to Patients With Cancer Around the Globe,” we showed that specific fertility preservation services may not be offered at various sites around the world because of cultural and legal barriers. We assessed global and regional experiences as well as the legal status of third-party reproduction and adoption to serve as a comprehensive international data set and resource for groups that wish to begin oncofertility interventions. Methods: We provide data on the legalities of third-party assisted reproductive technologies and other family-building options in the 28 oncofertility-practicing countries surveyed. Results: We found regional and country differences that will be important in the development of tailored resources for physicians and for patient brochures that are sensitive to these local restrictions and cultural norms. Conclusion: Because many patients first consult Web-based materials, the formal assessment of the availability of these options provides members of the global oncofertility community with data to which they might otherwise not have ready access to better serve their patients.

  3. Activity report of working party on reactor physics of accelerator-driven system. July 1999 to March 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    Under the Research Committee on Reactor Physics, the Working Party on Reactor Physics of Accelerator-Driven System (ADS-WP) was set in July 1999 to review and investigate special subjects related to reactor physics research for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System (ADS). The ADS-WP, at the first meeting, discussed a guideline of its activity for two years and decided to concentrate upon three subjects: (1) neutron transport calculations in high energy range, (2) static and kinetic (safety-related) characteristics of subcritical system, and (3) system design including ADS concepts and elemental technology developments required. The activity of ADS-WP continued from July 1999 to March 2001. In this duration, the members of ADS-WP met together four times and discussed the above subjects. In addition, the ADS-WP conducted a questionnaire on requests and proposals for the plan of Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, which is a joint project between JAERI and KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). This report summarizes the results obtained by the above ADS-WP activity. (author)

  4. ERA—European Radiochemists Association: Report on the activities of the Working Party for Nuclear and Radiochemistry of the Federation of European Chemical Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Z. I.; Ware, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Radiochemists Association started almost simultaneously with the appearance of the first issue of the Radiochemistry in Europe newsletter in August 1995. The objective of the European Radiochemists Association (ERA) is to extend and improve communication between radiochemists in Europe through a newsletter. Liaison persons within each country or group exchange details of their activities, set up a diary of relevant international events and exchange details of specialist equipment, facilities and technology. In the year 2000 the Federation of European Chemical Societies decided to form a working party on nuclear and radiochemistry. It is a formalisation of the European Radiochemists Association. Each chemical society is allowed to nominate a member to the Working Party on Nuclear and Radiochemistry. Currently we have 12 nominated members plus two invited and one observer. In addition to the ERA aims and objectives it proposes to put together a syllabus of radiochemistry for undergraduate and post-graduate students—this aspect has been a part of our support of the International Atomic Energy Agency initiative. Also the aim of the working party is to support other working parties and divisions, to press the Federation of the European Chemical Societies for financial structure. To this end an Expression of Interest has been tabled with the Framework 6 Programme for networking within radiochemistry in Europe. The WP will liaise with the International Isotope Society and the International Society on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry and Biology to seek to communicate and to consider ways of working together.

  5. Gendering transnational party politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantola, Johanna; Rolandsen-Agustín, Lise

    2016-01-01

    research traditions, we build toward an analytical framework to study gender and transnational party politics. Our empirical analysis focuses on two policy issues, the economic crisis and the sexual and reproductive health and rights, analyzing European Parliament reports, debates and voting on the issues...... from 2009 to 2014. By focusing on gender equality constructions and the way in which consensus and contestation are built around them within and between party groups, we argue that shared constructions about gender equality are issue specific and change over time. Consensus breaks down along the left......In this article, we analyze transnational party politics in the European Union from a gender perspective. This is a subject that has been neglected both by mainstream European studies on party politics and by gender scholars who work on political parties. Drawing on the insights of these two...

  6. Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09: Phytophthoras in forests and natural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.M. Goheen; S.J. Frankel

    2009-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09, Phytophthoras in Forests and Natural Ecosystems provided a forum for current research on Phytophthora species worldwide. Seventy-eight submissions describing papers and posters on recent developments in Phytophthora diseases of trees and natural ecosystems in...

  7. Clinical features and treatment outcomes of Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a nationwide survey from Korea histiocytosis working party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Eun; Koh, Kyung-Nam; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Song, Joon Sup; Lee, Ji Won; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Park, Kyung Duck; Shin, Hee Young; Choi, Hyoung Soo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Jung, Hye Lim; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Kim, Hack Ki; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Baek, Hee Jo; Kook, Hoon; Park, Jun Eun; Park, Hyeon Jin; Park, Byung-Kiu; Yoo, Eun Sun; Ryu, Kyung Ha; Lee, Kun Soo; Kim, Heung Sik; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Eun Sil; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Lee, Kwang Chul; Lee, Mee Jeong; Lim, Young Tak; Kim, Hwang Min; Park, Sang Kyu; Park, Jeong-A; Kim, Soon Ki; Park, Meerim; Lim, Yeon-Jung; Lee, Young Ho; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-03-01

    A nationwide survey was conducted to clarify the clinical features and outcomes of Korean children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Korea Histiocytosis Working Party analyzed the data of 603 patients who were diagnosed with LCH between 1986 and 2010 from 28 institutions in Korea. Median age at diagnosis was 65 months (range, 0 to 276 mo). Bone was the most frequently affected organ (79.6%) followed by skin (19.2%). Initially, 419 patients (69.5%) had single-system involvement (SS), 85 (14.1%) with multisystem (MS) disease without risk organ involvement (MS-RO), and 99 (16.4%) multisystem disease with risk organ involvement (MS-RO). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates in the SS, MS-RO, and MS-RO groups were 99.8%, 98.4%, and 77.0%, respectively (P<0.001), and the 5-year reactivation rates were 17.9%, 33.5%, and 34.3%, respectively (P<0.001). The OS rate was lower in patients with RO involvement (P=0.025) and lack of response to initial treatment (P=0.001). MS involvement (P=0.036) was an independent risk factor for reactivation. Permanent consequences were documented in 99 patients (16.4%). Reactivation of disease, MS involvement, and age at diagnosis ≤ 2 years were associated with higher incidence of permanent consequences. This study emphasized that further efforts are required to improve survival of MS-RO patients and reduce reactivation in younger patients with MS involvement.

  8. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in children with sleep-related breathing disorders: consensus statement of a UK multidisciplinary working party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, P J; Bew, S; Kubba, H; Murphy, N; Primhak, R; Rollin, A-M; Tremlett, M

    2009-07-01

    During 2008, ENT-UK received a number of professional enquiries from colleagues about the management of children with upper airway obstruction and uncomplicated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). These children with sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) are usually referred to paediatricians and ENT surgeons. In some district general hospitals, (DGHs) where paediatric intensive care (PICU) facilities to ventilate children were not available, paediatrician and anaesthetist colleagues were expressing concern about children with a clinical diagnosis of OSA having routine tonsillectomy, with or without adenoidectomy. As BAPO President, I was asked by the ENT-UK President, Professor Richard Ramsden, to investigate the issues and rapidly develop a working consensus statement to support safe but local treatment of these children. The Royal Colleges of Anaesthetists and Paediatrics and Child Health and the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists nominated expert members from both secondary and tertiary care to contribute and develop a consensus statement based on the limited evidence base available. Our terms of reference were to produce a statement that was brief, with a limited number of references, to inform decision-making at the present time. With patient safety as the first priority, the working party wished to support practice that facilitated referral to a tertiary centre of those children who could be expected, on clinical assessment alone, potentially to require PICU facilities. In contrast, the majority of children who could be safely managed in a secondary care setting should be managed closer to home in a DGH. BAPO, ENT-UK, APA, RCS-CSF and RCoA have endorsed the consensus statement; the RCPCH has no mechanism for endorsing consensus statements, but the RCPCH Clinical Effectiveness Committee reviewed the statement, concluding it was a 'concise, accurate and helpful document'. The consensus statement is an interim working tool, based on level-five evidence. It

  9. Anti-infective Vaccination Strategies in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies or Solid Tumors - Guideline of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, C T; Liss, B; Mellinghoff, S; Buchheidt, D; Cornely, O A; Egerer, G; Heinz, W J; Hentrich, M; Maschmeyer, G; Mayer, K; Sandherr, M; Silling, G; Ullmann, A; Vehreschild, M J G T; von Lilienfeld-Toal, M; Wolf, H H; Lehners, N

    2018-04-24

    Infectious complications are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with malignancies specifically when receiving anticancer treatments. Prevention of infection through vaccines is an important aspect of clinical care of cancer patients. Immunocompromising effects of the underlying disease as well as of antineoplastic therapies need to be considered when devising vaccination strategies. This guideline provides clinical recommendations on vaccine use in cancer patients including autologous stem cell transplant recipients, while allogeneic stem cell transplantation is subject of a separate guideline. The document was prepared by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) by reviewing currently available data and applying evidence-based medicine criteria.

  10. Christmas party

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The Christmas party organized by the Staff Association took place on Saturday 3 December. 200 children from 5 to 7 years old attended a magic show which filled them with wonder. Then they were served a snack in the Novae restaurant. Finally, just before their parents came to pick them up, Father Christmas gave them a present. The Staff Association wishes you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  11. Your Golden Jubilee Party!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    All staff are invited to the Golden Jubilee Staff Party on the evening of 17 September. To mark CERN's 50th anniversary, the Director General would like to invite all staff working at CERN to celebrate the success of the organization. The party will be held on the terrace of the Main Building on 17 September at 4:00 pm. The event will include an address by the DG, music, film clips, drinks and snacks. Your effort, hard work and enthusiasm have been the key to CERN's success. The first of the main events celebrating the organization's Golden Jubilee is for you, so come along and celebrate!

  12. Nuclear opponents and party politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollmann, A.

    1987-01-01

    The question treated in this article is: what do the members of the Austrian parliament - of the different parties - against nuclear energy, in particular against nuclear installations in neighbour countries? Of special interest is the Green party, now also represented in the parliament. The conclusion is that even this party, though in principle definitely anti-nuclear, is of no help to nuclear opponents in general, and to the Working Group No to Zwentendorf in particular. (qui)

  13. International reference reagents: antihuman globulin. An ISBT/ICSH joint working party report. International Society of Blood Transfusion. International Committee for Standardization in Haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, J; Ford, D S; Chung, A; Collins, R; Kochman, S; Mazda, T; Overbeeke, M; Perera, R; Sakuldamrongpanich, T; Scott, M; Voak, D; Zupańska, B

    1999-01-01

    An international working party has conducted a study designed to select a suitable reference reagent for antihuman globulin, to replace those first made available in 1987. The chosen preparation contains levels of anti-IgG and anti-C3 (anti-C3c and anti-C3d) potency that are considered suitable to serve for reference when evaluating either polyspecific antihuman globulin reagents or those containing their separate monospecific components. The reference material is available in 2-ml freeze-dried aliquots from seven assigned distribution centres.

  14. Presentations and documents submitted to the 27. meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC), NEA Headquarters, 21-22 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; Danon, Yaron; Dunn, Mike; Herman, Mike; Kahler, Albert; Fischer, Ulrich; Jacqmin, Robert; Koning, Arjan; Plompen, Arjan; Fukahori, Tokio; Harada, Hideo; Igashira, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Osamu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Golashvili, Tengiz; Ignatiev, Victor; Ignatyuk, Anatoly; Oleynik, Dimitry S.; Sinitsa, Valentin; Ge, Zhigang; Trkov, Andrej; De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Kawano, Toshihiko; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Mills, Robert; Mcnabb, Dennis; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Cabellos, Oscar; ); Lee, Young-Ouk; Kim, Do Heon; Ruan, Xichao; Wu, Haicheng

    2015-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document brings together the available documents and presentations relative to this meeting: the agenda, the Summary record of the previous meeting held on May 2014, the Reports (slides) on experimental activities from Europe, Japan, USA, Russia and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL), the presentation from Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files) and from Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections). The document ends with a preliminary proposal for a New Subgroup 42 (Thermal Scattering Kernel S(α,β): Measurement, Evaluation and Application)

  15. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). Presentations and documents submitted to the 25. meeting, NEA Headquarters, 23-24 May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JEFF (Data Bank member countries), JENDL (Japan) and RUSFOND/BROND (Russia). The participation from projects in non-NEA Member countries, such as CENDL, is channelled through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 25. meeting of the working party was held on 23-24 May 2013 at the NEA Headquarters, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. This document brings together the available presentations (slides and reports) given at this meeting Presentations (slides) on experimental activities are available for: NEA DB, Japan, USA, Russia and China (slides + report). Brief progress reports (slides) from the evaluation projects are available for: ENDF, JEFF, JENDL (slides + Report), BROND + slides on Rosatom Standard Reference Data System, CENDL, IAEA and TENDL. Presentations (slides) about the Status of subgroups are available for the following subgroups: - Subgroup 31: Meeting nuclear data needs for advanced reactors (slides + report); - Subgroup C: High Priority Request List (HPRL); - Subgroup 33: Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data (slides + report); - Subgroup 34: Coordinated evaluation of 239 Pu in the resonance region; - Subgroup 35: Scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range; - Subgroup 36: Reporting and usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region; - Subgroup 37: Improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies

  16. Your Golden Jubilee Party!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    All staff are invited to the Golden Jubilee Staff Party on the evening of 17 September. To mark CERN's 50th anniversary, the Director General would like to invite all staff working at CERN to celebrate the success of the organization. The party will be held on the terrace of the Main Building on 17 September at 4:00 pm. The event will include an address by the DG, music, film clips, drinks and snacks! Your effort, hard work and enthusiasm have been the key to CERN's success. The first of the main events celebrating the organization's Golden Jubilee is for you, so come along and celebrate! http://www.cern.ch/cern50/

  17. Your Golden Jubilee Party!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    All staff are invited to the Golden Jubilee Staff Party on the evening of 17 September To mark CERN's 50th anniversary, the Director General would like to invite all staff working at CERN to celebrate the success of the organization. The party will be held on the terrace of the Main Building on 17 September at 4:00 pm. The event will include an address by the DG, music, film clips, drinks and snacks. Your effort, hard work and enthusiasm have been the key to CERN's success. The first of the main events celebrating the organization's Golden Jubilee is for you, so come along and celebrate! http://www.cern.ch/cern50/

  18. Social impacts of the work loss in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Hideko; Nakagawa, Chizuko; Fukuda, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    As cancer frequently occurs during the most productive years of life, our purpose was to estimate the cost of work loss of cancer survivors and develop interventions to minimize the loss. We estimated the cost of the work loss from all cancers resulting from patients' inpatient, outpatient, and non-treatment days. This was calculated with a new method, the product of the "employment rate coefficient × productivity coefficient," making use of data published by the Japanese Ministries. The estimate of work loss on treatment days for all cancers was $1820.21 million in men and $939.38 million in women. In terms of disease classification, lung cancer was the largest cause in men, whereas breast cancer was the largest in women. On non-treatment days, the work losses because of gastric, colon, and lung cancers were large in men, while breast cancer was the largest in women and in total. The estimated loss for all cancers was $3685.506 million in men and $2502.565 million in women, when the product was assumed 0.5. In Japan, breast cancer was considered the leading cause for cost of work loss, and the most influential cause when the product of the "employment rate coefficient × productivity coefficient" for breast cancer was assumed the same as the product for all other types of cancers. It is necessary to establish support systems for working cancer survivors.

  19. Conflict stress and reduced well-being at work : The buffering effect of third-party help

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebels, E; Janssen, O

    This study among 108 Dutch social services workers examined whether particularly the intrapsychic tension directly associated with interpersonal conflict at work, i.e., conflict stress, is responsible for reduced well-being in terms of emotional exhaustion, absenteeism, and turnover intentions.

  20. Young adult cancer survivors and work: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Dawn S; Ganz, Patricia A; Pavlish, Carol; Robbins, Wendie A

    2017-12-01

    Sixty-three percent of cancer survivors continue to work, or return to work after treatment. Among this population, work ability and challenges encountered in the workplace by young adult cancer survivors have not been well established. The purposes of the study are to describe what is currently known about work-related issues for young adult cancer survivors diagnosed between ages 15 and 39, to identify gaps in the research literature, and to suggest interventions or improvements in work processes and occupational settings. A narrative review of articles using PubMed, CINAHL, and PsychInfo was conducted without date limitations. Search phrases included young adult cancer survivors, long-term cancer survivors, young adults affected by cancer, further combined with key terms employment, work, and occupationally active. Inclusion criteria for publications were young adult cancer survivors initially diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39, data about work or employment was presented, and articles written in English. Twenty-three publications met the inclusion criteria. Work-related issues included the potential for reduced work productivity from cancer-changed physical and cognitive functional ability that affected income, and resulted in distress. Coping style, support systems, and changing perspectives about work and life in general were also influential on career decisions among young adult cancer survivors. More research is needed to study interventions to better manage health changes in young adult cancer survivors within the context of the workplace. Since financial hardship has been shown to be especially high among young cancer survivors, employment is essential to ensure payment of cancer-associated costs and continued medical care. While young adult cancer survivors may initially grapple with cancer-related physical and psychosocial changes that impact work productivity or influence choice of occupation, employment appears to enhance overall quality of life.

  1. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC). Presentations and documents submitted to the 27. meeting, NEA Headquarters, 21-22 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 27. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document brings together the available documents of the meeting: 1 - The Proposed agenda, the list of participants and the Summary record of the previous meeting, May 2014 (Report NEA-SEN-NSC-WPEC--2014-2); 2 - The Reports on experimental activities: Europe (NEA DB), Japan, USA, Russia, China; 3 - Some Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects: ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, BROND/ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, and TENDL; 4 - The Status of some subgroups: Subgroup 35 (Scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range); Subgroup 36 (Reporting and usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region); Subgroup 37 (Improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies); Subgroup 38 (A modern nuclear database structure beyond the ENDF format); Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files); Subgroup 40 (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) Pilot Project); Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections); Subgroup C (High

  2. When your cancer treatment stops working

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... humor into your life. Watch funny movies, read comic strips or humorous books, and try to see ... with advanced cancer. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/advancedcancer.pdf . Updated May 2014. Accessed October 12, ...

  3. Your Golden Jubilee Party!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/All staff are invited to the Golden Jubilee Staff Party on the evening of 17 September. To mark CERN's 50th anniversary, the Director-General would like to invite all the people working at CERN to celebrate the success of the organization. The party will be held in the cafeteria and on the terrace (if the weather permits) of the Main Building on 17 September at 4:00 pm. The event will include an address by the DG, music, film clips, drinks, snacks and a surprise music show by the CERN Big Bang Orchestra! Your effort, hard work and enthusiasm have been the key to CERN's success. The first of the main events celebrating the organization's Golden Jubilee is for you, so come along and celebrate! Early closure of Restaurant No. 1 (Bldg. 501, Meyrin site): Friday 17 September at 2:00 p.m. On Friday, 17 September, Restaurant No. 1 (NOVAE) will close at 2:00 p.m. owing to the Golden Jubilee party for the CERN staff. No dinner will be served that evening.

  4. Your Golden Jubilee Party!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ All staff are invited to the Golden Jubilee Staff Party on the evening of 17 September. To mark CERN's 50th anniversary, the Director-General would like to invite all the people working at CERN to celebrate the success of the organization. Your Golden Jubilee Party Friday 17 September 2004 at 16:00 Restaurant 1, Main Building Programme Speech by Director-General Toast in honour of CERN Cocktails and ambient music Video projections of five decades of CERN and at 18:00 ... A surprise music show. Your effort, hard work and enthusiasm have been the key to CERN's success. The first of the main events celebrating the organization's Golden Jubilee is for you, so come along and celebrate! Early closure of Restaurant No. 1 (bldg. 501, Meyrin site): Friday 17 September at 2:00 p.m. On Friday, 17 September, Restaurant No. 1 (NOVAE) will close at 2:00 p.m. owing to the Golden Jubilee party for the CERN staff. No dinner will be served that evening.

  5. Quality of Working Life of cancer survivors: associations with health- and work-related variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Merel; Tamminga, Sietske J; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to (1) describe the Quality of Working Life (QWL) of cancer survivors and (2) explore associations between the QWL of cancer survivors and health- and work-related variables. Employed and self-employed cancer survivors were recruited through hospitals and patient organizations. They completed the Quality of Working Life Questionnaire for Cancer Survivors (QWLQ-CS) and health- and work-related variables in this cross-sectional study. The QWL scores of cancer survivors were described, and associations between QWL and health- and work-related variables were assessed. The QWLQ-CS was completed by 302 cancer survivors (28% male) with a mean age of 52 ± 8 years. They were diagnosed between 0 and 10 years ago with various types of cancer, such as breast cancers, gastrointestinal cancers, urological cancers, and haematological cancers. The QWL mean score of cancer survivors was 75 ± 12 (0-100). Cancer survivors had statistically significant lower QWL scores when they had been treated with chemotherapy or when they reported co-morbidity (p ≤ 0.05). Cancer survivors without managerial positions, with low incomes or physically demanding work, and who worked a proportion of their contract hours had statistically significantly lower QWL scores (p ≤ 0.05). This study described the QWL of cancer survivors and associations between QWL and health- and work-related variables. Based on these variables, it is possible to indicate groups of cancer survivors who need more attention and support regarding QWL and work continuation.

  6. Working situation of cancer survivors versus the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Kyung; Yun, Young Ho

    2015-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the working situation of cancer survivors and the general (cancer-free) population and investigate characteristics associated with the increased likelihood of unemployment between the two groups. We selected 1927 cancer survivors from the 2008 Korean Community Health Survey data less than 65 years of age and used propensity score matching to randomly select 1924 individuals from the general population who closely resembled the cancer survivors. Compared to the general population, cancer survivors were less likely to be engaged in paid work, particularly as permanent workers, and were more likely to work regular hours. Additionally, they tended to do less work that involved lifting or moving heavy objects and uncomfortable postures and were more willing to express their emotions. An increased probability of unemployment among cancer survivors was associated with being over 50 years old, being female, having a lower monthly income, having multiple comorbidities, belonging to a nuclear family, being a National Basic Livelihood Act beneficiary, and having a recent diagnosis. Cancer survivors may want to pursue flexible occupations and improve their working situation. Further, they perceive their workplace more positively compared to the general population. Respecting the cancer survivor's choice to find flexible working conditions that suit their health needs and status, health-care providers involved in managing work-related issues among cancer survivors should be aware of the interaction between work-related concerns and post-cancer disease management.

  7. Multi-party Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam

    2001-01-01

    We investigate definitions of and protocols for multi-party quantum computing in the scenario where the secret data are quantum systems. We work in the quantum information-theoretic model, where no assumptions are made on the computational power of the adversary. For the slightly weaker task of verifiable quantum secret sharing, we give a protocol which tolerates any t < n/4 cheating parties (out of n). This is shown to be optimal. We use this new tool to establish that any multi-party quantu...

  8. Work hard, party harder: drug use and sexual behaviour in young British casual workers in Ibiza, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Danielle; Hughes, Karen; Bellis, Mark A

    2014-09-26

    Every summer, young people flock to nightlife-focused holiday resorts around the world to find casual work. Despite being exposed to hedonistic environments, often for several months, little is known about their substance use, sexual activity and health service needs over this extended amount of time abroad. A short anonymous questionnaire examining alcohol and drug use, sexual behaviour and use of health services was administered to young British casual workers aged 16-35 in San Antonio, Ibiza (n = 171). 97.7% of casual workers used alcohol in Ibiza, and the majority (85.3%) used drugs. Almost half (43.5%) of all participants used a drug in Ibiza that they had never used in the UK. Most casual workers arrived in Ibiza without a partner or spouse (86.5%). Of these, 86.9% had sex during their stay and 50.0% had unprotected sex; often while under the influence of alcohol. Only 14.3% of those having unprotected sex with a new partner sought a sexual health check-up in Ibiza, although 84.1% intended to do this on their return to the UK. Substance use and sexual risk taking is widespread among young British casual workers in Ibiza. Such international nightlife resorts represent key settings for substance-related health and social problems, and for the international spread of sexually transmitted infections. Addressing the health needs of casual workers and the environments that permit and promote their excessive behaviour requires collaboration between authorities in home and destination countries and the tourism industry.

  9. Work Hard, Party Harder: Drug Use and Sexual Behaviour in Young British Casual Workers in Ibiza, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Kelly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Every summer, young people flock to nightlife-focused holiday resorts around the world to find casual work. Despite being exposed to hedonistic environments, often for several months, little is known about their substance use, sexual activity and health service needs over this extended amount of time abroad. Methods: A short anonymous questionnaire examining alcohol and drug use, sexual behaviour and use of health services was administered to young British casual workers aged 16–35 in San Antonio, Ibiza (n = 171. Results: 97.7% of casual workers used alcohol in Ibiza, and the majority (85.3% used drugs. Almost half (43.5% of all participants used a drug in Ibiza that they had never used in the UK. Most casual workers arrived in Ibiza without a partner or spouse (86.5%. Of these, 86.9% had sex during their stay and 50.0% had unprotected sex; often while under the influence of alcohol. Only 14.3% of those having unprotected sex with a new partner sought a sexual health check-up in Ibiza, although 84.1% intended to do this on their return to the UK. Conclusion: Substance use and sexual risk taking is widespread among young British casual workers in Ibiza. Such international nightlife resorts represent key settings for substance-related health and social problems, and for the international spread of sexually transmitted infections. Addressing the health needs of casual workers and the environments that permit and promote their excessive behaviour requires collaboration between authorities in home and destination countries and the tourism industry.

  10. Loss in working years after a breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plym, Anna; Bower, Hannah; Fredriksson, Irma; Holmberg, Lars; Lambert, Paul C; Lambe, Mats

    2018-03-06

    Breast cancer can negatively influence working life, but it is unclear how many working years women with breast cancer can expect to lose. Women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1997 and 2012 were identified in the Breast Cancer Data Base Sweden (N=19 661), together with breast cancer-free comparison women (N=81 303). Using flexible parametric survival modelling, the loss in working years was calculated as the difference in the remaining years in the work force between women with and without breast cancer. Women aged 50 years at diagnosis with stage I disease lost on average 0.5 years (95% CI, 0.2-0.7) of their remaining working time; the corresponding estimates were 0.9 years (0.5-1.2) in stage II, 2.5 years (1.9-3.1) in stage III and 8.1 years (6.5-9.7) in stage IV. Women with in situ breast cancer did not lose any working years. The strongest treatment determinant was axillary lymph node dissection. We found a loss in working years not only in late but also in early-stage breast cancer. Although it is reassuring that some groups had no or only a modest work loss, the economic consequences for society are considerable given the large number of women annually diagnosed with breast cancer.

  11. SWAB/NVALT (Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy and Dutch Association of Chest Physicians) guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersinga, W J; Bonten, M J; Boersma, W G; Jonkers, R E; Aleva, R M; Kullberg, B J; Schouten, J A; Degener, J E; Janknegt, R; Verheij, T J; Sachs, A P E; Prins, J M

    2012-03-01

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) and the Dutch Association of Chest Physicians (NVALT) convened a joint committee to develop evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The guidelines are intended for adult patients with CAP who present at the hospital and are treated as outpatients as well as for hospitalised patients up to 72 hours after admission. Areas covered include current patterns of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of causative agents of CAP in the Netherlands, the possibility to predict the causative agent of CAP on the basis of clinical data at first presentation, risk factors associated with specific pathogens, the importance of the severity of disease upon presentation for choice of initial treatment, the role of rapid diagnostic tests in treatment decisions, the optimal initial empiric treatment and treatment when a specific pathogen has been identified, the timeframe in which the first dose of antibiotics should be given, optimal duration of antibiotic treatment and antibiotic switch from the intravenous to the oral route. Additional recommendations are made on the role of radiological investigations in the diagnostic work-up of patients with a clinical suspicion of CAP, on the potential benefit of adjunctive immunotherapy, and on the policy for patients with parapneumonic effusions.

  12. The meaning of work and working life after cancer: an interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dorte M; Elverdam, Beth

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors have diverse and complex patterns of return to work, but little attention has been given to individual experiences of returning to work. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the meaning of work and working life for cancer survivors over time. METHODS: Participant observation...... was carried out at a cancer rehabilitation centre. A total of 23 participants were interviewed twice. RESULTS: Cancer survivors try to get back to work after treatment and try to re-establish their former structure of everyday-life that is seen as a normal and healthy existence. Work contributes to creating...... the individual as a social being, partaking in social relations with others. Work plays a role in establishing the individual's identity. It is difficult for many to resume work. When they are unable to work, they establish new activities in everyday-life that give meaning to a life. In order to understand...

  13. Return to work among breast cancer survivors: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanlu; Shigaki, Cheryl L; Armer, Jane M

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer survivors in their employment years are likely to try to go back to work after the primary treatment. Because the literature on return to work among breast cancer survivors is limited, we have undertaken a review of the literature to summarize what is known, including identifying important contributing variables and outcomes. This knowledge may be used to develop hypotheses and potential interventions to support breast cancer survivors who wish to return to work. We searched the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, SCOUP, and PUBMED, within a 10-year timeframe (2004 to 2014). The majority of reviewed articles (N = 25) focused on three outcomes: return-to-work period, work ability, and work performance. The most frequently studied independent variables were collapsed into the following groups: health and well-being, symptoms and functioning, work demands and work environment, individual characteristics, and societal and cultural factors. Gaps in the literature include evidence of effective interventions to support return to work among breast cancer survivors and research to better understand the roles of government and business-related policy. All the studies reported a reduced work engagement and work ability. Employment status and work performance is associated with a combination of individual factors, work environment, culture, and resources. Significant gaps are apparent in the literature addressing breast cancer survivorship and return to work. This is a complex problem and it will likely require interdisciplinary research teams to develop effective and feasible interventions for this population.

  14. Danish Party Membership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

    Political parties have as their main assignment the creation of linkage between citizens and government. They provide one of several channels of participation in modern democracies. Yet, the general trend across the Western world is that party membership figures decline. The purpose of this article...... is to report on the state of Danish party membership; the numbers and participation. The claim of the article is that total membership figures hide evidence of membership renewal and increases, and that mere party membership figures are insufficient when evaluating political parties as channels...... of participation. Instead, membership figures at party level as well as the participation of party members need to be taken into account in order to assess parties as channels of participation. This is supported by the analyses reported here which show that even though membership figures are declining, parties...

  15. Work adjustment of cancer survivors: An organisational support framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loraine Clur

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Medical advancements increase incidents of cancer survivors returning to work. Work adjustment of cancer survivors is essential for job satisfaction and productivity and should be supported and facilitated by the organisation. Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to explore cancer survivors’ return to work experience in order to explicate organisational support needed to facilitate their successful work adjustment. Motivation for the study: Despite the growing awareness of cancer survivorship, the challenges, expectations and management of the return to work process remain under researched. Research approach, design and method: Heidegger’s hermeneutic phenomenology formed the methodological foundation to the study. Purposive sampling was used to select eight participants from an oncology unit and cancer support organisation in the Southern Cape and Little Karoo regions. Participants, diagnosed with various types of cancer, were regarded as cancer survivors as they completed treatment and have returned to work. Data were collected using unstructured interviews and analysed through thematic analysis based on Ricoeur’s hermeneutic phenomenological theory of interpretation. Main findings: Results highlight four themes representing cancer survivors’ needs for organisational support. The support needs are presented in the context of the theory of work adjustment in a hierarchical schema that evolves from a basic need for emotion-focussed support to the need for knowledge and for practical guidance. Support needs culminate in the need for self-actualisation through meaning-making. An organisational support framework is proposed consisting of four integrated functions aimed at addressing the needs that emerged from the data. Practical and managerial implications: The organisational support framework provides guidance to develop an organisational policy and intervention strategy aimed at managing the successful work

  16. The meaning of work and working life after cancer: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Dorte M; Elverdam, Beth

    2008-12-01

    Cancer survivors have diverse and complex patterns of return to work, but little attention has been given to individual experiences of returning to work. To analyse the meaning of work and working life for cancer survivors over time. Participant observation was carried out at a cancer rehabilitation centre. A total of 23 participants were interviewed twice. Cancer survivors try to get back to work after treatment and try to re-establish their former structure of everyday-life that is seen as a normal and healthy existence. Work contributes to creating the individual as a social being, partaking in social relations with others. Work plays a role in establishing the individual's identity. It is difficult for many to resume work. When they are unable to work, they establish new activities in everyday-life that give meaning to a life. In order to understand the cultural meaning of work in capitalist society, we incorporate the theoretical perspective of Max Weber. Those who after cancer treatment are unable to work lose a part of their identity; they lose the personal challenge and satisfaction related to work. They are no longer part of the companionship related to work. Having had cancer means a disruption of the structure of everyday-life that is taken for granted. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Computational benchmark on the void reactivity effect in MOX lattices. Contribution to a NEA-NSC benchmark study organized by the Working Party on Plutonium Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenreich, W.E.; Aaldijk, J.K.

    1994-08-01

    The Working Party on Plutonium Recycling of the Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has initiated a benchmark study on the calculation of the void reactivity effect in MOX lattices. The results presented here were obtained with the continuous energy, generalized geometry Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The cross-section libraries used were processed from the JEF-2.2 evaluation taking into account selfshielding in the unresolved resonance ranges (selfshielding in the resolved resonance ranges is treated by MCNP). For an infinite lattice of unit cells a positive void reactivity effect was found only for the MOX fuel with the largest Pu content. For an infinite lattice of macro cells (voidable inner zone with different fuel mixtures surrounded by an outer zone of UO 2 fuel with moderator) a positive void reactivity effect was obtained for the three MOX fuel types considered. The results are not representative for MOX-loaded power reactor lattices, but serve only to intercompare reactor physics codes and libraries. (orig.)

  18. Protective environment for hematopoietic cell transplant (HSCT) recipients: The Infectious Diseases Working Party EBMT analysis of global recommendations on health-care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczynski, Jan; Tridello, Gloria; Donnelly, J Peter; Iacobelli, Simona; Hoek, Jennifer; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Gil, Lidia; Cesaro, Simone

    2018-03-13

    International guidelines on protective environment for HSCT recipients proposed a set of 10 global recommendations in 2009 on protective environment (GRPE) concerning hospital room design and ventilation. The EBMT Infectious Diseases Working Party undertook a survey on the status on protective environment for HSCT recipients with the aim of surveying current practices and their agreement with GRPE recommendations. The questionnaire consisted of 37 questions divided into 5 sections about filtration, air changes, maintenance, and the protective environment in rooms and the surrounding unit. Overall, 177 centres (response rate 33%) from 36 countries responded, indicating that 99.4% of patient rooms were equipped with HEPA filters, but only 48.6% of the centre's staff were aware of, and could confirm, regular replacement of filters based on manufacturers' recommendations. Well-sealed rooms were used in terms of windows (70.6%), ceilings (35%), and plumbing pipes (51.4%). The sensor monitors in the patient room used to determine when the HEPA filters require changing were installed only in 18.1% of centres. Only 1 centre fulfilled all 10 GRPE recommendations, while 62 centres fulfilled the 3 level "A" recommendations. In conclusion, HEPA-filtered rooms are available in almost all centres, while fewer centres fulfilled other requirements. Knowledge on the details and maintenance of protective environments in the HSCT setting was inadequate, reflecting a lack of communication between the health personnel involved, hospital infection control and the hospital maintenance services.

  19. Public access of environmental information. Report of an Interdepartmental Working Party on public access to information held by Pollution Control Authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The working party was set up to report to the Government ways of implementing the recommendations of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution that 'there should be a presumption in favour of unrestricted public access to the information which the pollution control authorities obtain or receive by virtue of their statutory powers'. Chapter 6 deals with Radioactive wastes. The present situation (eg on how the information is gathered, which department or bodies are involved etc) and the current state of the law are discussed. Licensed nuclear sites, sea disposal, inspections and defence wastes are all considered briefly. The case for improving public access to information and, recommendations on how to achieve this made, and the resource implications considered. On control of radioactive wastes there is currently no power for the responsible Government Departments to make information public. It is recommended that new legislation should confer powers to make information available, including a power to require public registers to be kept at prescribed places giving information related to certificates issued under the Radioactive Substances Act 1960. (UK)

  20. What do Parties Want?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helene Helboe

    2012-01-01

    What parties want – policy, office or votes - is important to how they represent their voters, how they make strategic decisions and how they respond to external changes in society. What parties strive to accomplish is simply important to what they do. Moreover, our knowledge of what parties want...... is important to what we expect them to do. For instance, coalition theory assumes that parties have homogeneous goals, and hence are equally likely to join coalitions given the same circumstances. However, this article investigates this basic assumption of party goal homogeneity and finds that party goals do...

  1. Quality of work life in doctors working with cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, I; Dupuis, G; Razavi, D; Reynaert, C; Etienne, A-M

    2012-01-01

    Although studies have shown that medical residents experience poor psychological health and poor organizational conditions, their quality of work life (QWL) had not been measured. A new tool, the Quality of Work Life Systemic Inventory (QWLSI), proposes to fill the gap in the definition and assessment of this concept. To confirm the convergent validity of the QWLSI, analyse Belgian medical residents' QWL with the QWLSI and discuss an intervention methodology based on the analysis of the QWLSI. One hundred and thirteen medical residents participated between 2002 and 2006. They completed the QWLSI, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Job Stress Survey to confirm the correspondence between these three tools. Residents' low QWL predicted high emotional exhaustion (β = 0.282; P work schedule (μ = 9; SD = 6.3), support offered to employee (μ = 7.6; SD = 6.1) and working relationship with superiors (μ = 6.9; SD = 5.3). The results confirm that the QWLSI can provide an indication of workers' health well-being and of organizational performance in different areas of work life. The problem factors found among Belgian medical residents suggest that prevention should focus on reduction of work hours, development of support and change in leadership style.

  2. Problems faced returning to work after cancer: a focus on breast cancer and its specificities

    OpenAIRE

    Asselain, David

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Life after cancer is one of the major issues of the 2nd "Cancer Plan" in France. In this context, our study aims at analyzing professional consequences of breast cancer, which has a relatively good prognosis and is the most common cancer in the working population. Methods: Medical and professional information about 402 workers from the Paris region who had cancer in 2005/2006 was collected by occupational physicians using a self-administered questionnaire. Multifactorial analysi...

  3. Employment and work-related issues in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Anja

    2011-02-01

    Purpose of this systematic literature review was to identify current knowledge about employment in cancer survivors. Sixty-four studies met inclusion criteria that were original papers published between 01/2000 and 11/2009. Overall, 63.5% of cancer survivors (range 24-94%) returned to work. The mean duration of absence from work was 151 days. Factors significantly associated with a greater likelihood of being employed or return to work were perceived employer accommodation, flexible working arrangements, counseling, training and rehabilitation services, younger age and cancer sites of younger individuals, higher levels of education, male gender, less physical symptoms, lower length of sick leave and continuity of care. Cancer survivors had a significantly increased risk for unemployment, early retirement and were less likely to be re-employed. Between 26% and 53% of cancer survivors lost their job or quit working over a 72-month period post diagnosis. Between 23% and 75% of patients who lost their job were re-employed. A high proportion of patients experienced at least temporary changes in work schedules, work hours, wages and a decline in work ability compared to non-cancer groups. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trends in adherence to recommended cancer screening: The US population and working cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainya C. Clarke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past decade the United States has seen a decrease in advanced cancer diagnoses. There has also been an increase in the number of cancer survivors returning to work. Cancer screening behaviors among survivors may play an important role in their return-to-work process. Adherence to a post-treatment cancer screening protocol increases early detection of secondary tumors and reduces potentially limiting side-effects. We compared screening trends among all cancer survivors, working survivors, and the general population over the last decade.Methods: Trends in adherence to recommended screening were analyzed by site-specific cancer. We used the Healthy People goals as a measure of desired adherence. We selected participants 18+ years from 1997 to 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS for years where detailed cancer screening information was available. Using the recommendations of the American Cancer Society as a guide, we assessed adherence to cancer screening across the decade. There were 174,393 participants. Analyses included 7,528 working cancer survivors representing 3.8 million US workers, and 119,374 adults representing more than 100 million working Americans with no cancer history.Results: The US population met the Healthy People 2010 goal for colorectal screening, but declined in all other recommended cancer screening. Cancer survivors met and maintained the HP2010 goal for all, except cervical cancer screening. Survivors had higher screening rates than the general population. Among survivors, white-collar and service occupations had higher screening rates than blue-collar survivors.Conclusions: Cancer survivors report higher screening rates than the general population. Nevertheless, national screening rates are lower than desired, and disparities exist by cancer history and occupation. Understanding existing disparities, and the impact of cancer screening on survivors is crucial as the number of working survivors

  5. Return to work among self-employed cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, Steffen; Syse, Jonn; Paraponaris, Alain; Gudbergsson, Sævar

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether salaried and self-employed workers differ regarding factors relevant for return to work after being diagnosed with cancer. The possible mediators of an effect of self-employment on work ability were also investigated. A total of 1115 cancer survivors (1027 salaried and 88 self-employed) of common invasive cancer types who were in work at the time of diagnosis completed a mailed questionnaire 15-39 months after diagnosis. Twenty-four percent of self-employed cancer survivors reported that they had not returned to work at the time of the survey, and 18 % of those who were salaried had not. While 9 % of the self-employed had received disability or early retirement pension, only 5 % had received such a pension among salaried employees. Compared with the salaried workers, the self-employed people reported significantly more often reduced work hours (P self-employment on total work ability seems to be mediated by reduced work hours and a negative cancer-related financial change. Compared with salaried, self-employed workers in Norway, they seem to struggle with work after cancer. This may be because the two groups have different work tasks and because self-employed people have lower social support at work and less legal support from the Working Environment Act and public health insurance. Self-employed people with cancer should be informed about the work-related challenges they may encounter and be advised to seek practical help from social workers who know about the legal rights of self-employed people.

  6. Political Parties and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Carina Saxlund; Christiansen, Flemming Juul

    2017-01-01

    parties themselves as well their impact on potentially innovative public decisions. One major expectation is that hierarchical parties with centralized leadership make more efficient decisions but that sustainable innovation outcomes promoted by collaborative efforts are easier to obtain for decentralized...... political parties with participatory internal democratic processes....

  7. Interventions to enhance return-to-work for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Taskila, Tyna K.; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Feuerstein, Michael; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients are 1.4 times more likely to be unemployed than healthy people. Therefore it is important to provide cancer patients with programmes to support the return-to-work (RTW) process. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011. To evaluate the effectiveness of

  8. Physical exercise and return to work: cancer survivors' experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Iris F.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we aimed to explore cancer survivors' experiences with (1) return to work (RtW) and work performance, (2) a physical exercise program after treatment, and (3) the perceived link between physical exercise and work. Semi-structured individual interviews were held with ten

  9. Return to work after cancer and pre-cancer job dissatisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinesen, Eskil; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Ladenburg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between pre-cancer job dissatisfaction and return-to-work probability 3 years after a cancer diagnosis. We use a Danish data set combining administrative data and a survey to breast and colon cancer survivors. We find that the return-to-work probability has a negative...... correlation with pre-cancer job dissatisfaction with mental demands (where the correlation is driven by the high-educated) and with physical demands and the superior (where the correlation is driven by the low-educated). Educational gradients in the probability of returning to work after cancer...... are not significantly affected by controlling for pre-cancer job dissatisfaction and pre-cancer ability to work....

  10. Management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults: 2016 guideline update from the Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) and Dutch Association of Chest Physicians (NVALT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersinga, W J; Bonten, M J; Boersma, W G; Jonkers, R E; Aleva, R M; Kullberg, B J; Schouten, J A; Degener, J E; van de Garde, E M W; Verheij, T J; Sachs, A P E; Prins, J M

    2018-01-01

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy in collaboration with the Dutch Association of Chest Physicians, the Dutch Society for Intensive Care and the Dutch College of General Practitioners have updated their evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults who present to the hospital. This 2016 update focuses on new data on the aetiological and radiological diagnosis of CAP, severity classification methods, initial antibiotic treatment in patients with severe CAP and the role of adjunctive corticosteroids. Other parts overlap with the 2011 guideline. Apart from the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands (2007-2010) no other shifts in the most common causative agents of CAP or in their resistance patterns were observed in the last five years. Low-dose CT scanning may ultimately replace the conventional chest X-ray; however, at present, there is insufficient evidence to advocate the use of CT scanning as the new standard in patients evaluated for CAP. A pneumococcal urine antigen test is now recommended for all patients presenting with severe CAP; a positive test result can help streamline therapy once clinical stability has been reached and no other pathogens have been detected. Coverage for atypical microorganisms is no longer recommended in empirical treatment of severe CAP in the non-intensive care setting. For these patients (with CURB-65 score >2 or Pneumonia Severity Index score of 5) empirical therapy with a 2nd/3rd generation cephalosporin is recommended, because of the relatively high incidence of Gram-negative bacteria, and to a lesser extent S. aureus. Corticosteroids are not recommended as adjunctive therapy for CAP.

  11. Cancer survivors' perspectives and experiences regarding behavioral determinants of return to work and continuation of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijts, Saskia F A; van Egmond, Martine P; Gits, Maxime; van der Beek, Allard J; Bleiker, Eveline M

    2017-10-01

    Supportive interventions to enhance return to work (RTW) in cancer survivors hardly showed positive effects so far. Behavioral determinants might have to be considered in the development of interventions to achieve sustained employability. This study aimed to explore cancer survivors' perspectives and experiences regarding behavioral determinants of RTW and continuation of work. In this qualitative study, semi-structured telephone interviews were held with 28 cancer survivors. All participants were at working age, 1-2 years after diagnosis and employed at time of diagnosis. Thematic content analysis was performed. Work turned out to be a meaningful aspect of cancer survivors' life, and most participants reported a positive attitude towards their job. Social support to RTW or to continue working was mainly received from family and friends, but pressure to RTW from the occupational physician was also experienced. Changes in expectations regarding work ability from negative to positive during the treatment process were observed. Those who applied active coping mechanisms felt equipped to deal with difficulties regarding work. Behavioral determinants should be taken into account in the development of future interventions to support cancer survivors' RTW. However, the causal relationship still has to be determined. Implications for rehabilitation Factors influencing occupational motivation among cancer survivors need to be understood in more detail. Previous studies in non-cancer populations have demonstrated that behavioral determinants, such as a positive attitude towards work, high social support and self-efficacy may increase return to work rates or shorten the time to return to work. Addressing behavioral determinants in future development of work-related interventions for cancer survivors is essential in achieving sustained employability.

  12. Early work patterns for gynaecological cancer survivors in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachreiner, N M; Ghebre, R G; Virnig, B A; Shanley, R

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the balance between work demands and treatment plans for >4.3 million working-age cancer survivors in the USA. To describe changes in work status for gynaecological cancer survivors during the first 6 months following diagnosis and their experience with their employers' programmes and policies. One hundred and ten gynaecological cancer survivors who were working at the time of their cancer diagnosis completed a survey. Case record reviews documented their clinical characteristics and treatment details. Ninety-five women (86%) had surgery; 81 (74%) received chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both in addition to surgery. Nine per cent of women said that they changed their treatment plan because of their jobs; in contrast, 62% of women said that they changed their work situation to accommodate their treatment plan. Overall, the most common month for women to stop working was Month 1 (41%), to decrease hours was Month 2 (32%) and to increase hours was Month 6 (8%). Twenty-eight per cent of women were aware of employer policies that assisted the return to work process; 70% of women were familiar with the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and 56% with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Only 26% completed a formal request for work accommodations. After 6 months, 56 of 83 women (67%) remained working or had returned to work. Work patterns varied for these gynaecological cancer survivors over the first 6 months following diagnosis. Opportunities exist to improve communication about work and treatment expectations between cancer survivors, occupational health professionals, employers and treating clinicians.

  13. Predictors of fatigue and work ability in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Muijen, P; Duijts, S F A; Bonefaas-Groenewoud, K; van der Beek, A J; Anema, J R

    2017-12-30

    Workers diagnosed with cancer are at risk for job loss or work disability. To determine predictors of fatigue and work ability at 36 months after diagnosis in a population of cancer survivors. Individuals diagnosed with cancer and who applied for work disability benefit at 24 months of sick leave were surveyed at the time of application and again 12 months later. Fatigue was measured using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness-Fatigue scale questionnaire and work ability was measured using the work ability index. Linear regression analyses were applied to identify predictors. There were 336 participants. Participants who were divorced or widowed had more physical limitations, more depressive symptoms and were more fatigued at baseline, and who worked in health care demonstrated higher levels of fatigue. Lower fatigue was predicted by having received chemotherapy. A higher level of work ability was predicted by having received chemotherapy, better global health and better work ability at baseline. Lower work ability was predicted by being principal wage earner, insecurity about being free of disease, having more physical limitations and having greater wage loss. Socio-demographic, health- and work-related factors were associated with fatigue and work ability in cancer survivors on long-term sick leave. As fatigue and poor work ability are important risk factors for work disability, addressing the identified predictive factors may assist in mitigation of work disability in cancer survivors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Meeting Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor System. A report by the Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, H.; Shibata, K.; Nishio, K.; Plompen, A.; Hambsch, F.J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; ); Igashira, M.; Gunsing, F.; Ledoux, X.; Palmiotti, G.; Haight, R.; Ullmann, J.; Tovesson, F.; Nelson, R.; Herman, M.; Hoblit, S.; Pronyaev, V.; Cano-Ott, D.; Junghans, A.; Calviani, M.; ); Schmidt, K.H.; ); Otsuka, N.; ); Dupont, E.; )

    2013-01-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) was established under the aegis of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The WPEC determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank member countries) and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries, specifically the Russian BROND and Chinese CENDL projects, are organized through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report was issued by WPEC Subgroup 31, whose mission was to utilize the collective knowledge of the international nuclear data measurement community to consider the appropriate resources to address and meet the data needs quantified by WPEC Subgroup 26 for Advanced Reactor Systems. Members of Subgroup 31 performed reviews of uncertainty evaluations by evaluators, of state-of-art experimental techniques, of current experimental situations, and summarized an appropriate path to meet the requirements. To meet the requirement of accurate nuclear data for developing advanced nuclear systems, pertinent efforts of experiments and evaluations are still required and indispensable. As described in Chapter 3, there are striking technical advancements in nuclear data measurement methods. For example, high-intensity-pulsed neutrons generated by spallation reaction at CERN in Europe, LANCE in USA, and J-PARC in Japan become available to obtain high

  15. The Party-state Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünberg, Nis

    society through its legacy as a socialist work unit (danwei). Using Polanyi’s concept of embeddedness, the paper reveals how SOEs are split into two tiers each tasked with the respective objectives of economic development and political stability, and thus as Party-state organizations are used to flexibly...

  16. Return to work and cancer: the Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Georgina; Knott, Vikki; Delfabbro, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Research suggests that for many cancer survivors, returning to work has a range of benefits. However, considerable barriers have been identified as influencing the quality of return to work outcomes. This study explored the perspectives of Australian cancer survivors, managers and employee assistance program (EAP) professionals to gain an understanding of the return to work process and factors that affect the experience. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with cancer survivors (n = 15), managers (n = 12), and EAP professionals / psychologists (n = 4) from public and private sectors. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data to identify common and unique themes from the three participant groups. A range of drivers were identified including maintaining normality and regaining identity, which could act positively or negatively depending on survivors' coping ability and self awareness. Analysis revealed communication difficulties in the workplace that impact on emotional and practical support. Negotiating an employee's return is complex, influenced by the level of consultation with the employee and use of an ad hoc or structured process. Direct and indirect ways of supporting employees with cancer were identified, as was the need for colleague and manager support. This study supports previous research findings of the impact of cancer on work, and reveals managers' lack of knowledge on how to respond appropriately. The process of returning to work is complex, influenced by employees' and managers' attitudes, communication skills and coping abilities. Areas for workplace interventions to optimise support for the cancer survivor are described.

  17. Party member recruitment and the representativeness of party membership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

    Party membership figures are in decline. However, parties are still recruiting party members. Are there any differences in the social and political characteristics of old and new party members? If there is a difference, are new party members more or less representative for party voters than old...

  18. Infants in cocktail parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rochelle S.

    2003-04-01

    Most work on listeners' ability to separate streams of speech has focused on adults. Yet infants also find themselves in noisy environments. In order to learn from their caregivers' speech in these settings, they must first separate it from background noise such as that from television shows and siblings. Previous work has found that 7.5-month-old infants can separate streams of speech when the target voice is more intense than the distractor voice (Newman and Jusczyk, 1996), when the target voice is known to the infant (Barker and Newman, 2000) or when infants are presented with an audiovisual (rather than auditory-only) signal (Hollich, Jusczyk, and Newman, 2001). Unfortunately, the paradigm in these studies can only be used on infants at least 7.5 months of age, limiting the ability to investigate how stream segregation develops over time. The present work uses a new paradigm to explore younger infants' ability to separate streams of speech. Infants aged 4.5 months heard a female talker repeat either their own name or another infants' name, while several other voices spoke fluently in the background. We present data on infants' ability to recognize their own name in this cocktail party situation. [Work supported by NSF and NICHD.

  19. Status of pseudo fission product cross sections for fast reactors. Results of the SWG 17, International working party on evaluation coordination of the nuclear science committee, NEA- OECD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Rimpault, G.; Smith, P.; Ignatyuk, A.; Koshcheev, V.; Nikolaev, M.; Thsiboulia, A.; Kawai, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Watanabe, T.; Zukeran, A.; Nakajima, Y.; Matsunobu, H.

    1998-08-01

    Within the framework of the SWG17 benchmark organized by a Working Party of the Nuclear Science Committee of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), a comparison of lumped or pseudo fission product cross sections for fast reactors has been made. Four institutions participated with data libraries based on the JEF2.2, EAF-4.2, BROND-2, FONDL-2.1, ADL-3 and JENDL-3.2 evaluated nuclear data files. Several parameters have been compared with each other: the one-group cross sections and reactivity worths of the lumped nuclide for several partial absorption and scattering cross sections, and the one-group cross sections of the individual fission products. Also graphs of the multi-group cross sections of the lumped nuclide have been compared, as well as graphs of capture cross sections for 27 nuclides. From two contributions based on JEF2.2, it can be concluded that the data processing influences the capture cross section by about 1% and the inelastic scattering cross section by 2%. The differences between the lumped cross sections of the different data libraries are surprisingly small: maximum 6% for capture and 9% for the inelastic scattering. Similar results are obtained for the reactivity effects. Since the reactivity worth of the lumped nuclide is dominated by the capture reaction, the maximum spread in the total reactivity worth is still only 5.3%. There is a systematic difference between total, elastic and capture cross sections of JENDL-3.2 and JEF2.2 of the same order of magnitude. Possible reasons for this discrepancy have been indicated. The one-group capture and inelastic scattering cross sections of most of the important individual fission products differ by less than 10% (root mean square values). Larger differences are observed for unstable nuclides where there is a lack of experimental data. For the (n,2n) group cross sections, which are rather sensitive to the weighting spectrum in the fast energy range, these differences are several tens of percents. The final

  20. Night Shift Work and Risk of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Johnni

    2017-09-01

    Night work is increasingly common and a necessity in certain sectors of the modern 24-h society. The embedded exposure to light-at-night, which suppresses the nocturnal hormone melatonin with oncostatic properties and circadian disruption, i.e., misalignment between internal and external night and between cells and organs, are suggested as main mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as probably carcinogenic to humans based on limited evidence from eight epidemiologic studies on breast cancer, in addition to sufficient evidence from animal experiments. The aim of this review is a critical update of the IARC evaluation, including subsequent and the most recent epidemiologic evidence on breast cancer risk after night work. After 2007, in total nine new case-control studies, one case-cohort study, and eight cohort studies are published, which triples the number of studies. Further, two previous cohorts have been updated with extended follow-up. The assessment of night shift work is different in all of the 26 existing studies. There is some evidence that high number of consecutive night shifts has impact on the extent of circadian disruption, and thereby increased breast cancer risk, but this information is missing in almost all cohort studies. This in combination with short-term follow-up of aging cohorts may explain why some cohort studies may have null findings. The more recent case-control studies have contributed interesting results concerning breast cancer subtypes in relation to both menopausal status and different hormonal subtypes. The large differences in definitions of both exposure and outcome may contribute to the observed heterogeneity of results from studies of night work and breast cancer, which overall points in the direction of an increased breast cancer risk, in particular after over 20 years of night shifts. Overall, there is a

  1. Worksite adjustments and work ability among employed cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, Steffen; Nielsen, Roy A; Gudbergsson, Sævar B; Dahl, Alv A

    2012-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine how many cancer survivors (CSs) make worksite adjustments and what kinds of adjustments they make. Changes in work ability among employed CSs were explored, and clinical, sociodemographic, and work-related factors associated with the current total work ability were studied. CSs of the ten most common invasive types of cancer for men and women in Norway completed a mailed questionnaire 15-39 months after being diagnosed with cancer. Included in the analyses were all participants who worked both at the time of diagnosis and at the time of the survey and who had not changed their labor force status since diagnosis (n = 563). The current total work ability was compared to the lifetime best (0-10 score). Twenty-six percent of the employed CSs had made adjustments at work, and the most common adjustment was changing the number of work hours per week. Despite the fact that 31% and 23% reported reduced physical and mental work abilities, respectively, more than 90% of the CSs reported that they coped well with their work demands. The mean total work ability score was high (8.6) among both men and women. Being self-employed and working part-time at the time of diagnosis showed significant negative correlations with total work ability, while a favorable psychosocial work environment showed a significant positive correlation. CSs with low work ability were more often in contact with the occupational health service and also made more worksite adjustments than others. The prospects of future work life seem optimistic for Norwegian employed CSs who return to work relatively soon after primary treatment.

  2. Campaigning on behalf of the party? Party constraints on candidate campaign personalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Troels; Pedersen, Helene Helboe

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses what makes political candidates run a party-focused or personalised election campaign. Prior work shows that candidates face incentives from voters and the media to personalise their campaign rhetoric and promises at the expense of party policy. This has raised concerns about...... that party control over the candidate nomination process and campaign financing constrains most political candidates in following electoral incentives for campaign personalisation. Using candidate survey data from the 2009 EP election campaign in 27 countries, we show how candidates from parties in which...... party officials exerted greater control over the nomination process and campaign finances were less likely to engage in personalised campaigning at the expense of the party programme. The findings imply that most parties, as central gatekeepers and resource suppliers, hold important control mechanisms...

  3. Preparing patients with cancer who work and treatment responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Many patients with life-limiting illnesses continue to work because of financial reasons and because work provides good psychosocial support. A lack of appropriate advice/support through patient education could, however, make having a job detrimental to well-being (eg, symptom worsening). This study investigated the frequency with which patients received information that empowers their understanding of their condition, treatment, side effects of treatment and the likely impact on occupational functioning. A cross-sectional study. An analysis of survey data from 3457 patients with cancer in employment. Logistic regression showed that patients who received information about the impact of cancer on work life or education are 1.72 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Patients who receive written information about the type of cancer are 1.99 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Also, patients who receive written information before a cancer-related operation are 1.90 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Information about the side effects of cancer treatment produces worse odds of a positive treatment outcome (0.65-1). A stepwise logistic regression analysing the effects irrespective of current employment status in 6710 patients showed that preparing them produces nearly twice better odds of cancer treatment responsiveness. Palliative care teams should consider ways of actively advising patients who work. Whereas the results showed evidence of good practice in cancer care, there is a need to ensure that all working patients with potentially life-limiting illnesses receive similar support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Party Control, Party Competition and Public Service Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Boyne, George Alexander; James, O.; John, P.; Petrovsky, Nicolai

    2012-01-01

    This article assesses party effects on the performance of public services. A policy-seeking model, hypothesizing that left and right party control affects performance, and an instrumental model, where all parties strive to raise performance, are presented. The framework also suggests a mixed model in which party effects are contingent on party competition, with parties raising performance as increasing party competition places their control of government at increasing risk. These models are t...

  5. Return to work after cancer and pre-cancer job dissatisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Heinesen, Eskil; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Ladenburg, Jacob; Andersen, Ingelise; Thielen, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between pre-cancer job dissatisfaction and return-to-work probability 3 years after a cancer diagnosis. We use a Danish data set combining administrative data and a survey to breast and colon cancer survivors. We find that the return-to-work probability has a negative correlation with pre-cancer job dissatisfaction with mental demands (where the correlation is driven by the high-educated) and with physical demands and the superior (where the correlation is drive...

  6. Managing work and cancer treatment: Experiences among survivors of hematological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D; Siminoff, Laura A

    2018-04-16

    The current study was performed to characterize the employment status of survivors of hematological cancer who have an informal caregiver from the time of diagnosis through the first 6 months of treatment. Using a mixed methods approach, semistructured interviews with survivors of hematological cancer were conducted within 6 months of the initiation of cancer treatment. Interviews assessed cancer treatment status, barriers and facilitators to employment, financial and insurance status, and relationship with the primary caregiver. These results are part of a longitudinal study of cancer survivors and informal caregivers. A total of 171 patients were enrolled. Within 6 months of beginning cancer treatments, approximately 35% were no longer employed. Reasons to remain employed included financial need, employee benefits, and a sense of purpose and normalcy. Employer accommodations and supportive colleagues facilitated continued employment. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that having a higher household income, a desire to work, nonphysical job tasks, and congruent survivor-caregiver communication were associated with greater odds of remaining employed. Within 6 months of initiating cancer treatment, the majority of survivors of hematological cancer had maintained employment. Because of the limitations imposed by the physical stress of cancer treatments, as well as the need to maintain employment to continue receiving employee benefits to cover such treatments, survivors of hematological cancer likely would benefit from employment accommodations that are sensitive to their unique needs. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  7. Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, R.G.; Hansen, J.; Costa, G.; Haus, E.; Kauppinen, T.; Aronson, K.J.; Castaño-Vinyals, G.; Davis, S.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.; Fritschi, L.; Kogevinas, M.; Kogi, K.; Lie, J.A.; Lowden, A.; Peplonska, B.; Pesch, B.; Pukkala, E.; Schernhammer, E.; Travis, R.C.; Vermeulen, R.; Zheng, T.; Cogliano, V.; Straif, K.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to

  8. Party brands and voting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sigge Winther; Larsen, Martin Vinæs

    2014-01-01

    heuristics and voting models. Next, the article measures the brand value of Danish parties by utilizing a representative association analysis. Finally, this measure is used to conduct the very first empirical analysis of a party brand's effect on voting behavior. Overall, the primary finding demonstrates...

  9. National Working Group Meeting on ALK diagnostics in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wendy; Fox, Stephen; O'Toole, Sandra; Morey, Adrienne; Frances, Glenn; Pavlakis, Nick; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Dettrick, Andrew; Leong, Trishe; Rathi, Vivek; Spagnolo, Dominic; Hemmings, Chris; Singh, Mahendra; Moffat, David; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Wilner, Keith; Buller, Richard; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Arifeen, Shams; Binko, Justin; Alam, Mahmood

    2014-04-01

    The global landscape of molecular testing is rapidly changing, with the recent publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines and the ALK Atlas. The IASLC/CAP guidelines recommend that tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) be tested for ALK rearrangements in addition to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The spur for this recommendation is the availability of novel therapies that target these rearrangements. This article is based on coverage of a Pfizer-sponsored National Working Group Meeting on ALK Diagnostics in Lung Cancer, held around the 15th World Lung Cancer Conference, in Sydney on October 31, 2013. It is based on the presentations given by the authors at the meeting and the discussion that ensued. The content for this article was discussed and agreed on by the authors. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Long-term management of radioactive waste - will the Price-Anderson system work for third party liability issues arising from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznick, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Two pieces of legislation have been enacted in the United States to provide a framework for the management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel: the Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (1980) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Neither of these statutes provide a means for resolving third party liability issues arising out of radioactive waste management. However, the Price Anderson Act (originally enacted in 1957) provides a system of financial protection that can be applied to waste management activities and that can resolve most issues pertaining to liability for nuclear damage that may result from long-term management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. (NEA) [fr

  11. Partying as Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob; Østergaard, Jeanette

    2007-01-01

    situates the event in everyday life. By drawing on Maffesoli's (1996) concept of ‘sociality' and Lincoln's (2005) concept of zoning the spatial and social logic of the house, partying is analysed using both qualitative and quantitative material. The analysis suggests that the consumption of alcohol (i.......e. collective intoxication) is one way the parents' dining room is transformed creatively into a space for teenage partying. Hence, the social logic of a party is to consume alcohol collectively as it symbolises commitment to both the party and to the specific group of friends. Finally, attention is drawn...... to reaffirm friendship and is therefore an integrated part of adolescents' everyday life.  ...

  12. Work or welfare after cancer? Explorations of identity and stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Suzanne; Noble, Emma

    2015-11-01

    With increasing numbers of people living with cancer, a greater focus is required on the social consequences of the disease. This article explores the connections between cancer and employment and the constraints imposed by ill health and wider structural conditions. Narrative data from 23 people of working age with cancer in north-east England collected longitudinally over 16 months highlight the impact of financial strain caused by temporary or permanent interruption to employment, and the positive benefits of an upstream welfare rights intervention in enabling participants to claim benefit entitlements and boost incomes. Returning to work, for those who were able, helped repair the disruption caused by the illness. For those unable to work, reliance on welfare benefits, while necessary, conferred a stigmatised identity that compounded the disruption wrought by cancer. While stigma occurs at the individual level, the structural dimensions of stigma need to be acknowledged in order to analyse the forces that cause, maintain and perpetuate the stigma associated with claiming welfare while ill. We conclude that current UK policies and welfare reforms to reduce sickness-related welfare claims will lead to greater hardship during periods of ill health and increase inequalities. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  13. Quality of Working Life of cancer survivors : Development and evaluation of a measurement instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors can experience difficulties in return-to-work or work continuation. Current outcomes in research describing the working life of cancer survivors offer little insight into cancer survivors’ experiences and perceptions of work, that is to say, the Quality of Working Life (QWL) of

  14. Third party processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, S.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of Canada's natural gas industry to remain competitive on a global level was discussed. Third party processing is a tool that the Canadian gas industry can use to overcome the relative disadvantage of smaller, and therefore more expensive, gas processing plants in Canada, and to maintain, and even improve, its competitive position vis-a-vis its US counterparts. The principal role of a third party processor is to provide midstream services such as raw gas gathering, field compression, gas processing, sales gas transmission, and natural gas liquids fractionation. Some third party processors also provide marketing services. Third party processors add value to the gas producer by reducing risk, reducing cost, improving reliability, and improving netbacks. The many variables involved in determining the economic viability of third party processing, including the quantity and deliverability of the raw resource, facility capacity, capital investment, operating costs, technology, fee structures, operational reliability, and speed, among others, were examined and the significance of each variable was explained

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF POLITICAL PARTIES AND PARTY FUNDING: MODELS AND CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje MATAKOVIC

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The first modern political parties were formed at the end of the 18th century and have, from those times up to now, undergone 4 developing phases; each of the phases is bound to ideal-type political party model: cadre parties, mass parties, catch-all parties and cartel parties. Each of these party models differentiates in various characteristics: party foundation, number of members, and way of leading the election campaigns, but also in ways of financing. This paper describes the above mentioned 4 phases of political parties’ development and 4 phases of parties' finances development; it will be analysed in detail positive and negative sides of each of the models of party financing.

  16. Long working hours and cancer risk: a multi-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T; Madsen, Ida E H; de Vroome, Ernest; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jacob J; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Erbel, Raimund; Ferrie, Jane E; Fransson, Eleonor I; Geuskens, Goedele A; Hooftman, Wendela E; Houtman, Irene L; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Lunau, Thorsten; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Shipley, Martin J; Steptoe, Andrew; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerholm, Peter J M; Westerlund, Hugo; Dragano, Nico; Rugulies, Reiner; Kawachi, Ichiro; Batty, G David; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Mika

    2016-03-29

    Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk in 116 462 men and women who were free of cancer at baseline. Incident cancers were ascertained from national cancer, hospitalisation and death registers; weekly working hours were self-reported. During median follow-up of 10.8 years, 4371 participants developed cancer (n colorectal cancer: 393; n lung cancer: 247; n breast cancer: 833; and n prostate cancer: 534). We found no clear evidence for an association between working hours and the overall cancer risk. Working hours were also unrelated the risk of incident colorectal, lung or prostate cancers. Working ⩾55 h per week was associated with 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval 1.12-2.29) increase in female breast cancer risk independently of age, socioeconomic position, shift- and night-time work and lifestyle factors, but this observation may have been influenced by residual confounding from parity. Our findings suggest that working long hours is unrelated to the overall cancer risk or the risk of lung, colorectal or prostate cancers. The observed association with breast cancer would warrant further research.

  17. Distinct work-related, clinical and psychological factors predict return to work following treatment in four different cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alethea F; Hankins, Matthew; Rixon, Lorna; Eaton, Emma; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A

    2013-03-01

    Many factors influence return to work (RTW) following cancer treatment. However specific factors affecting RTW across different cancer types are unclear. This study examined the role of clinical, sociodemographic, work and psychological factors in RTW following treatment for breast, gynaecological, head and neck, and urological cancer. A 12-month prospective questionnaire study was conducted with 290 patients. Cox regression analyses were conducted to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for time to RTW. Between 89-94% of cancer survivors returned to work. Breast cancer survivors took the longest to return (median 30 weeks), and urology cancer survivors returned the soonest (median 5 weeks). Earlier return among breast cancer survivors was predicted by a greater sense of control over their cancer at work (HR 1.2; 95% CI: 1.09-1.37) and by full-time work (HR 2.1; CI: 1.24-3.4). Predictive of a longer return among gynaecological cancer survivors was a belief that cancer treatment may impair ability to work (HR 0.75; CI: 0.62-0.91). Among urological cancer survivors constipation was predictive of longer RTW (HR 0.99; CI: 0.97-1.00), whereas undertaking flexible working was predictive of returning sooner (HR 1.70; CI: 1.07-2.7). Head and neck cancer survivors who perceived greater negative consequences of their cancer took longer to return (HR 0.27; CI: 0.11-0.68). Those reporting better physical functioning returned sooner (HR1.04; CI: 1.01-1.08). A different profile of predictive factors emerged for the four cancer types. In addition to optimal symptom management and workplace adaptations, the findings suggest that eliciting and challenging specific cancer and treatment-related perceptions may facilitate RTW. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Terrorism and Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourne, Angela

    In the paper I address the empirical puzzle arising from different responses by political authorities in Spain and the UK to the existence of political parties integrated in the terrorist groups Euskadi Ta Askatasuna (ETA, Basque Homeland and Freedom) and the Irish Republican Army (IRA). More...... for realization of free speech rights and representation is also emphasized, and where proscription is seen as inimical to resolution of conflict underpinning violence. In the context of party competition, a winning coalition is required for one discourse to predominate. However, I also argued that both ideas...

  19. Chinese Anti-Cancer Association as a non-governmental organization undertakes systematic cancer prevention work in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become the first leading cause of death in the world, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Facing the increasing trend of cancer incidence and mortality, China issued and implemented “three-early (early prevention, early diagnosis and early treatment)” national cancer prevention plan. As the main body and dependence of social governance, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) take over the role of government in the field of cancer prevention and treatment. American Cancer Society (ACS) made a research on cancer NGOs and civil society in cancer control and found that cancer NGOs in developing countries mobilize civil society to work together and advocate governments in their countries to develop policies to address the growing cancer burden. Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), Cancer Council Australia (CCA), and Malaysian cancer NGOs are the representatives of cancer NGOs in promoting cancer control. Selecting Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (CACA) as an example in China, this article is to investigate how NGOs undertake systematic cancer prevention work in China. By conducting real case study, we found that, as a NGO, CACA plays a significant role in intensifying the leading role of government in cancer control, optimizing cancer outcomes, decreasing cancer incidence and mortality rates and improving public health. PMID:26361412

  20. Partying as Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob; Østergaard, Jeanette

    2007-01-01

    situates the event in everyday life. By drawing on Maffesoli's (1996) concept of ‘sociality' and Lincoln's (2005) concept of zoning the spatial and social logic of the house, partying is analysed using both qualitative and quantitative material. The analysis suggests that the consumption of alcohol (i...... to reaffirm friendship and is therefore an integrated part of adolescents' everyday life.  ...

  1. Management of sepsis in neutropenic patients: 2014 updated guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penack, Olaf; Becker, Carolin; Buchheidt, Dieter; Christopeit, Maximilian; Kiehl, Michael; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Hentrich, Marcus; Reinwald, Marc; Salwender, Hans; Schalk, Enrico; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Weber, Thomas; Ostermann, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality during the neutropenic phase after intensive cytotoxic therapies for malignancies. Improved management of sepsis during neutropenia may reduce the mortality of cancer therapies. Clinical guidelines on sepsis treatment have been published by others. However, optimal management may differ between neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients. Our aim is to give evidence-based recommendations for haematologist, oncologists and intensive care physicians on how to manage adult patients with neutropenia and sepsis.

  2. Return to work and its relation to financial distress among Iranian cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Mostafa; Rahmani, Azad; Davoodi, Arefeh; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Ziaeei, Jamal Evazie; Abri, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Return to work after treatment completion is important for both cancer survivors and society. Financial distress is one of the factors that may influence the return to work in cancer survivors. However, this relationship has not been well investigated. This study aimed to determine the rate of return to work and its relation to financial distress among Iranian cancer survivors. This descriptive-correlational study was undertaken among 165 cancer survivors who completed their initial treatments and had no signs of active cancer. The Return to Work questionnaire and Financial Distress/Financial Well-Being Scale were used for data collection. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. After initial treatments, 120 cancer survivors (72%) had returned to work, of which 50 patients (42%) had returned to full-time work and 70 (58%) reduced their work hours and returned to part-time work. Cancer survivors also reported high levels of financial distress. In addition, the financial distress was lower among patients who had returned completely to work, in comparison to patients who had quit working for cancer-related reasons (p=0.001) or returned to work as part-time workers (p=0.001). The findings showed that a high percent of Iranian cancer survivors had not returned to their jobs or considerably reduced working hours after treatment completion. Accordingly, due to high levels of financial distress experienced by participants and its relation to return to work, designing rehabilitation programs to facilitate cancer survivor return to work should be considered.

  3. Work-specific cognitive symptoms and the role of work characteristics, fatigue and depressive symptoms in cancer patients during 18 months post return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, H F; Abma, F I; Roelen, C A M; Stewart, R; Amick, B C; Bültmann, U; Ranchor, A V

    2018-06-19

    Cancer patients can experience work-specific cognitive symptoms post return to work (RTW). The study aims to: 1) describe the course of work-specific cognitive symptoms in the first 18 months post RTW, and 2) examine the associations of work characteristics, fatigue and depressive symptoms with work-specific cognitive symptoms over time. This study used data from the 18-months longitudinal "Work Life after Cancer" cohort. The Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work, Dutch Version (CSC-W DV) was used to measure work-specific cognitive symptoms. Linear mixed models were performed to examine the course of work-specific cognitive symptoms during 18 months follow-up; linear regression analyses with generalised estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine associations over time. Working cancer patients diagnosed with different cancer types were included (n=378). Work-specific cognitive symptoms were stable over 18 months. At baseline, cancer patients reported more working memory symptoms (M=31.9, CI=23.1, 26.4) compared to executive function symptoms (M=19.3; CI=17.6, 20.9). Cancer patients holding a job with both manual and non-manual tasks reported less work-specific cognitive symptoms (unstandardized regression coefficient b=-4.80; CI=-7.76, -1.83) over time, compared to cancer patients with a non-manual job. Over time, higher depressive symptoms were related to experiencing more overall work-specific cognitive symptoms (b=1.27; CI=1.00, 1.55) and a higher fatigue score was related to more working memory symptoms (b=0.13; CI=0.04, 0.23). Job type should be considered when looking at work-specific cognitive symptoms over time in working cancer patients. To reduce work-specific cognitive symptoms, interventions targeted at fatigue and depressive symptoms might be promising. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer survivors in the workplace: sleep disturbance mediates the impact of cancer on healthcare expenditures and work absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Brian D; Grandner, Michael A; Caminiti, Courtney B; Hui, Siu-Kuen Azor

    2018-06-05

    History of cancer is significantly associated with increases in healthcare costs, worse work performance, and higher absenteeism in the workplace. This is particularly important as most cancer survivors return to employment. Sleep disturbance is a largely overlooked potential contributor to these changes. Data from 9488 state employees participating in the Kansas State employee wellness program were used to assess cancer history, sleep disturbance, healthcare expenditures, work performance ratings, and absenteeism. Participants were categorized as having had no history of breast or prostate cancer, a past history only with no current cancer treatment, or current treatment for breast or prostate cancer. Indirect mediation analyses determined whether sleep disturbance mediated the influence of cancer status on outcomes. Employees receiving treatment for breast or prostate cancer had significantly greater healthcare expenditures and absenteeism than those with a past history or no history of cancer (ps accounting for 2 and 8% of the impact of cancer on healthcare expenditure and missed full days of work, respectively. The worse outcomes observed among employees receiving treatment for breast and prostate cancer, the most common forms of cancer among women and men, were partially explained by the impacts of cancer and treatment for cancer on sleep disturbance. These findings suggest that preventing or addressing sleep disturbance may result in economic benefits in addition to improvements in health and quality of life.

  5. Enhancing the Return to Work of Cancer Survivors: Development and Feasibility of the Nurse-Led eHealth Intervention Cancer@Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Sietske J.; Van Hezel, Sanne; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is important to enhance the return to work of cancer survivors with an appropriate intervention, as cancer survivors experience problems upon their return to work but consider it an essential part of their recovery. Objective: The objective of our study was to develop an eHealth

  6. Departies: conceptualizing extended youth parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjær, Eivind Grip; Tutenges, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Every year, millions of young people travel away from home to party for days or weeks on end in permissive environments, such as music festivals, dance parties, and nightlife resorts. The studies that have been conducted on these extended youth parties have focused primarily on specific risk...

  7. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC). Presentations and documents submitted to the 28. meeting, OECD Headquarters, Conference Centre, Paris, France, 9-13 May 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 28. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document brings together the available documents of the meeting: 1 - The Reports on experimental activities: Europe (NEA DB), Japan, USA, China; 2 - Some Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects: ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, BROND/ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL; 3 - The Status of subgroups: Subgroup 37 (Improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies); Subgroup 38 (A modern nuclear database structure beyond the ENDF format); Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files); Subgroup 40 (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) Pilot Project); Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections); Subgroup 42 (Thermal Scattering Kernel S(a,b): Measurement, Evaluation and Application); Subgroup C (High Priority Request List - HPRL); New Subgroups were proposed and presented: 43 - Code infrastructure to support a general nuclear database structure; WPEC long-term sub-group proposal: International standard for a general nuclear database structure

  8. Night work and prostate cancer in men: a Swedish prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerstedt, Torbjrn; Narusyte, Jurgita; Svedberg, Pia; Kecklund, Göran; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2017-06-08

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men, but the contributing factors are unclear. One such may be night work because of the day/night alternation of work and the resulting disturbance of the circadian system. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prospective relation between number of years with night work and prostate cancer in men. Cohort study comparing night and day working twins with respect to incident prostate cancer in 12 322 men. Individuals in the Swedish Twin Registry. 12 322 male twins. Prostate cancer diagnoses obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry with a follow-up time of 12 years, with a total number of cases=454. Multiple Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, adjusted for a number of covariates, showed no association between ever night work and prostate cancer, nor for duration of night work and prostate cancer. Analysis of twin pairs discordant for prostate cancer (n=332) showed no significant association between night work and prostate cancer. The results, together with previous studies, suggest that night work does not seem to constitute a risk factor for prostate cancer. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Extreme heterogeneity of myeloablative total body irradiation techniques in clinical practice: a survey of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Sebastian; Miszczyk, Leszek; Slosarek, Krzysztof; Moukhtari, Leila; Ciceri, Fabio; Esteve, Jordi; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Nagler, Arnon; Schmid, Christoph; Mohty, Mohamad

    2014-09-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is widely used for conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. Its efficacy and toxicity may depend on many methodological aspects. The goal of the current study was to explore current clinical practice in this field. A questionnaire was sent to all centers collaborating in the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and included 19 questions regarding various aspects of TBI. A total of 56 centers from 23 countries responded. All centers differed with regard to at least 1 answer. The total maximum dose of TBI used for myeloablative transplantation ranged from 8 grays (Gy) to 14.4 Gy, whereas the dose per fraction was 1.65 Gy to 8 Gy. A total of 16 dose/fractionation modalities were identified. The dose rate ranged from 2.25 centigrays to 37.5 centigrays per minute. The treatment unit was linear accelerator (LINAC) (91%) or cobalt unit (9%). Beams (photons) used for LINAC were reported to range from 6 to 25 megavolts. The most frequent technique used for irradiation was "patient in 1 field," in which 2 fields and 2 patient positions per fraction are used (64%). In 41% of centers, patients were immobilized during TBI. Approximately 93% of centers used in vivo dosimetry with accepted discrepancies between the planned and measured doses of 1.5% to 10%. In 84% of centers, the lungs were shielded during irradiation. The maximum accepted dose for the lungs was 6 Gy to 14.4 Gy. TBI is an extremely heterogeneous treatment modality. The findings of the current study should warrant caution in the interpretation of clinical studies involving TBI. Further investigation is needed to evaluate how methodological differences influence outcome. Efforts to standardize the method should be considered. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  10. LEGO for Two-Party Secure Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Orlandi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    This paper continues the recent line of work of making Yao’s garbled circuit approach to two-party computation secure against an active adversary. We propose a new cut-and-choose based approach called LEGO (Large Efficient Garbled-circuit Optimization): It is specifically aimed at large circuits...

  11. The Working After Cancer Study (WACS: a population-based study of middle-aged workers diagnosed with colorectal cancer and their return to work experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves Nicholas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of middle-aged working individuals being diagnosed with cancer is increasing and so too will disruptions to their employment. The aim of the Working After Cancer Study is to examine the changes to work participation in the 12 months following a diagnosis of primary colorectal cancer. The study will identify barriers to work resumption, describe limitations on workforce participation, and evaluate the influence of these factors on health-related quality of life. Methods/Design An observational population-based study has been designed involving 260 adults newly-diagnosed with colorectal cancer between January 2010 and September 2011 and who were in paid employment at the time they were diagnosed. These cancer cases will be compared to a nationally representative comparison group of 520 adults with no history of cancer from the general population. Eligible cases will have a histologically confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer and will be identified through the Queensland Cancer Registry. Data on the comparison group will be drawn from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA Survey. Data collection for the cancer group will occur at 6 and 12 months after diagnosis, with work questions also asked about the time of diagnosis, while retrospective data on the comparison group will be come from HILDA Waves 2009 and 2010. Using validated instruments administered via telephone and postal surveys, data will be collected on socio-demographic factors, work status and circumstances, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL for both groups while the cases will have additional data collected on cancer treatment and symptoms, work productivity and cancer-related HRQoL. Primary outcomes include change in work participation at 12 months, time to work re-entry, work limitations and change in HRQoL status. Discussion This study will address the reasons for work cessation after cancer, the mechanisms people use

  12. The role of the general practitioner in return to work after cancer-a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Femke; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.; van Dijk, Nynke; van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi S.; van Asselt, Kristel M.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2018-01-01

    The number of cancer patients and survivors of working age is increasing. General Practitioners (GPs) may have a significant role in psychosocial cancer care, including work-related concerns. Therefore, we performed a systematic literature review to identify the role of the GP in work-related

  13. Long working hours and cancer risk: a multi-cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkila, K.; Nyberg, S.T.; Madsen, I.E.; Vroome, E. de; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Erbel, R.; Ferrie, J.E.; Fransson, E.; Geuskens, G.A.; Hooftman, W.E.; Houtman, I.L.; Jöckel, K.H.; Knutsson, A.; Koskenvuo, M.; Lunau, T.; Nielsen, M.L.; Nordin, M.; Oksanen, T.; Pejtersen, J.H.; Pentti, J.; Shipley, M.J.; Steptoe, A.; Suominen, S.B.; Theorell, T.; Vahtera, J.; Westerholm, P.J.M.; Westerlund, H.; Dragano, N.; Rugulies, R.; Kawachi, I.; Batty, G.D.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Virtanen, M.; Kivimäki, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. Methods: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk

  14. The work life and career development of young breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L; Hoffman, Mary Ann; Ginter, Amanda C; Piontkowski, Sarah; Schexnayder, Kelci; White, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors represent the largest proportion of cancer survivors, and the rate of young breast cancer survivors who are diagnosed before the age of 40 is increasing. Cancer survivorship scholarship has begun to address many aspects of survivors' quality of life, yet the role of work and career issues have been understudied, particularly for young survivors. To explore the work lives and career development of young breast cancer survivors, this study used consensual qualitative research methodology (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997) to analyze data from qualitative interviews with 13 young women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40. The 4 career-related domains that emerged from the data were (a) cancer-related work challenges, (b) coping with cancer-related work challenges, (c) reappraisal of career development after cancer, and (d) components of career and life satisfaction after cancer. Experiencing breast cancer at a young age was viewed by participants as contributing to an increased desire for work to provide a sense of meaning as well as financial security and insurance. Cancer was further viewed as contributing to lost control over career success and work choices, treatment side effects that interfere with work self-efficacy and capabilities, and interpersonal difficulties connecting within and outside of work. Women with more extensive cancer treatment and side effects reported greater work struggles. Despite this, participants' cancer narratives were characterized by a range of coping strategies, including reframing and seeking control, and by evidence of persistence, resilience, and hope. Implications for research and practice are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Work ability of survivors of breast, prostate, and testicular cancer in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindbohm, M-L; Taskila, T; Kuosma, E

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can cause adverse effects on survivors' work ability. We compared the self-assessed work ability of breast, testicular, and prostate cancer survivors to that of people without cancer. We also investigated the association of disease-related and socio-demographic factors and job-related reso......-related resources (organizational climate, social support, and avoidance behavior) with work ability and looked at whether these associations were different for the survivors and reference subjects....

  16. A study of work changes due to cancer in tumor-free primary-treated cancer patients. A NOCWO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbergsson, Saevar Berg; Fosså, Sophie D; Dahl, Alv A

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this study is to explore the characteristics of tumor-free cancer survivors (CSs) who after their primary treatment were still working but made work changes due to cancer and compare them to survivors who did not. The sample consisted of 431 CSs (219 females with breast cancer, 212 males with testicular (N = 150) or prostate cancer (N = 62)) diagnosed 2-6 years prior to the study. All CSs had good prognosis and had returned to work after primary treatment. All CSs filled in a mailed questionnaire covering demography, morbidity, life style, mental distress, fatigue, quality of life and job strain. Seventy-two CSs (17%) had made work changes due to cancer during the observation period, and 359 (83%) had not. Among CSs who made work changes, significantly more were females; they showed significantly poorer physical and mental work ability, worked fewer hours per week, reported more comorbidity, and had lower physical and mental quality of life and more neuroticism, compared to the nonchange group. Work changes were moderately correlated with current work ability. The majority of CSs did not report any work changes due to cancer during the 2-6-year observation period, which is an encouraging finding. A minority had done work changes, and this group consisted mainly of women and was also characterized by poorer physical and mental quality of life and poorer mental work ability due to cancer. The issue of work changes and work ability should be considered in the follow-up of cancer survivors.

  17. Patient-Provider Communication: Experiences of Low-Wage-Earning Breast Cancer Survivors in Managing Cancer and Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Helen M; Swanberg, Jennifer E; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2018-02-26

    In 2017, there will be more than 250,000 new diagnoses of invasive breast cancer; most cases will occur in working-age women. The goal of this qualitative study was to explore low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors' experiences communicating with their oncology team about cancer and employment issues. Twenty-four low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors in the USA were interviewed in 2012 using a structured interview protocol. Sociodemographic data, cancer history, and patient-provider communication experiences regarding the management of cancer and work were collected. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory strategy of constant comparative analysis. Low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors' experiences communicating with their oncology team about employment and cancer focused on three dimensions of patient-provider communication: extent, quality, and content. Over 70% of respondents reported no communication or only routine communication with their providers regarding work; three quarters of women reported poor or standard communication quality, and content of work-related communication covered scheduling issues, work absences, continuing to work during treatment, and financial concerns. Communication between oncology care teams and low-wage-earning cancer patients is critical to the successful management of treatment and work responsibilities given the vulnerable employment situation of these women. There is a need for education of oncology team members about how cancer and its treatment can impact employment for all workers, but especially for low-wage workers, thereby allowing the care team to address these issues proactively and help patients successfully manage both cancer treatment and work responsibilities.

  18. Factors influencing work functioning after cancer diagnosis : a focus group study with cancer survivors and occupational health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorland, H. F.; Abma, F. I.; Roelen, C. A. M.; Smink, J. G.; Ranchor, A. V.; Bultmann, U.

    Cancer survivors (CSs) frequently return to work, but little is known about work functioning after return to work (RTW). We aimed to identify barriers and facilitators of work functioning among CSs. Three focus groups were conducted with CSs (n = 6, n = 8 and n = 8) and one focus group with

  19. Parties working on continuation of ITER EDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes efforts of the 4 ITER partners, the European Atomic Energy Community and the governments of Japan, the Russian Federation and the USA, to agree to continuation of the ITER EDA. While the former 3 partners signed an Extension to the EDA, the Americans were refused funding by the US Congress und will therefore be phased out within one year. Copies of the documents signed are provided

  20. Cancer, fatigue and the return of patients to work-a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spelten, E. R.; Verbeek, J. H. A. M.; Uitterhoeve, A. L. J.; Ansink, A. C.; van der Lelie, J.; de Reijke, T. M.; Kammeijer, M.; de Haes, J. C. J. M.; Sprangers, M. A. G.

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue is a highly prevalent and debilitating symptom in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of fatigue and other cancer-related symptoms on the return to work of cancer survivors. A prospective inception cohort study with 12 months of follow-up was initiated. At 6

  1. Return to work of breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of intervention studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J. L.; Broekhuizen, M. L. A.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer management has improved dramatically in the past three decades and as a result, a population of working age women is breast cancer survivor. Interventions for breast cancer survivors have shown improvements in quality of life and in physical and psychological

  2. Trans-Agency Early-Life Exposures and Cancer Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Trans-Agency Early-Life Exposures and Cancer Working Group promotes integration of early-life events and exposures into public health cancer research, control, prevention, and policy strategies to reduce the cancer burden in the United States and globally.

  3. Medical costs of cancer attributable to work in the Basque Country (Spain) in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Gómez, Montserrat; Castañeda López, Rosario; Urbanos Garrido, Rosa; López Menduiña, Patricia; Markowitz, Steven

    2013-01-01

    [corrected] Underreporting of work-related cancer in the Basque Country (Spain) is massive. The aim of our study is to estimate the job-related cancer in the Basque Country in 2008 treated by the Basque Public Health System-Osakidetza, as well as the medical costs derived from its treatment in the same year. Scientific evidence from industrialised countries is used to estimate the number of processes of cancer attributable to work. Medical costs for specialised care (outpatient and hospital admissions) are derived from the National Health System cost accounts. Costs due to primary health care and pharmaceutical benefits are obtained from Spanish secondary sources. Figures were computed according to disease and sex. We estimate 1,331 work-attributable cancers hospitalizations and 229 work-attributable cancers specialized ambulatory cases. Medical costs borne by public health care system exceed 10 million euros. Specialized care accounts for 64.2% of the total cost. Bronchus and lung cancer represents the largest percentage of total expenditure (27%), followed by the bladder cancer (12.6%), mesothelioma (8.6%), the colon cancer (7.3%), and stomach (6.7%). The magnitude of cancer attributable to work in the Basque Country is much higher than reflected in the official Registry of Occupational Diseases. Underreporting of work-related cancers hampers prevention and shifts funding of medical costs from social security to the tax-financed public health system. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer as the cause of changes in work situation (a NOCWO study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbohm, M-L; Kuosma, E; Taskila, T; Hietanen, P; Carlsen, K; Gudbergsson, S; Gunnarsdottir, H

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the frequency of changes in work situation due to cancer and to analyze the association of physically demanding work, social support from supervisors, colleagues or occupational health services, and disease-related factors, with changing employers due to cancer. Working-aged patients with breast, testicular or prostate cancer, or lymphoma with a good prognosis between 1997 and 2002 were identified from a hospital or cancer registry in four Nordic countries. The registers provided data on the disease-related factors. Information on changes in work situation, received support, and other work-related factors was collected using a questionnaire (response rate 72%). The frequency of changes in work situation was evaluated among a total of 2030 survivors. Further analyses were carried out among 688 survivors using a multivariable logistic regression model, to investigate factors affecting the risk of changing employers due to cancer. Altogether, 5-10% of cancer survivors had changed employers, occupations or work tasks, 5% had been unemployed, and 9% had retired due to cancer. The physical demands of previous work were the most important reason behind changing employers after cancer. Among women, weak support from supervisors and occupational health personnel increased the risk of changing employers because of cancer. A minority of cancer survivors changed employers, occupations, or work tasks because of cancer. Supervisors' support in the form of lightening physically demanding jobs and taking illness into consideration when planning work tasks, and health-care workers' advice on coping at work may help survivors to maintain their jobs. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Party rules, party resources and the politics of parliamentary democracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poguntke, Thomas; Scarrow, Susan; Webb, Paul

    2016-01-01

    , then investigate what it tells us about contemporary party organization in these countries, focusing on parties’ resources, structures and internal decision-making. We examine organizational patterns by country and party family, and where possible we make temporal comparisons with older data sets. Our analyses...... suggest a remarkable coexistence of uniformity and diversity. In terms of the major organizational resources on which parties can draw, such as members, staff and finance, the new evidence largely confirms the continuation of trends identified in previous research: that is, declining membership......, but enhanced financial resources and more paid staff. We also find remarkable uniformity regarding the core architecture of party organizations. At the same time, however, we find substantial variation between countries and party families in terms of their internal processes, with particular regard to how...

  6. A work-directed intervention to enhance the return to work of employees with cancer: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Sietske J.; Verbeek, Jos H. A. M.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; van der Bij, Ria M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe how the return-to-work process evolved in an employee with cancer in the Netherlands and how a work-directed intervention supported this process. The patient was a 35-year old female employee diagnosed with cervix carcinoma. After surgery, the patient

  7. Influence of radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer on work status and working life 3 years after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sigrun; Loge, Jon Håvard; Berge, Viktor; Dahl, Alv Andreas; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie Dorothea

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to study the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer on work status and working life in men 3 years after surgery. In a prospective, questionnaire-based study on adverse effects after RP, 330 prostate cancer (PCa) patients who had been active in the workforce before RP described their work status 3 years after having surgery. We dichotomized their postoperative work status into "unchanged or increased" versus "reduced." The participants also reported whether their working life was influenced by the PCa trajectory to no, some, or a great extent. Univariate and multiple logistic regression models were established with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics as independent variables and "work status" or "influence of PCa trajectory on working life" as dependent variables. Twenty-five percent of the participants had retired. Of the remaining participants, approximately 20 % had a reduced work status, which in the multivariate analyses was significantly associated with increasing age. One third of the men still active in the workforce considered the PCa to negatively influence their working life. This was independently associated with bother related to urinary leakage, fatigue, and having undergone additional oncological therapy (pelvic radiotherapy and/or hormone treatment). Though RP does not affect work status in most men, approximately one third of them experience problems in their working life due to adverse effects related to RP and/or additional post-RP anti-cancer therapy. Most PCa survivors can expect to remain in the workforce for at least 3 years after RP, but for some, persistent adverse effects after RP and /or additional anti-cancer treatment negatively affect their working life. Pre-RP counseling of men within the workforce should cover possible post-RP changes concerning work status and working life.

  8. Issues associated with the emergence of coeliac disease in the Asia–Pacific region: a working party report of the World Gastroenterology Organization and the Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K; Mulder, Chris J J; Goh, Khean Lee; Ahuja, Vineet; Bai, Julio C; Catassi, Carlo; Green, Peter H R; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Lundin, Knut E A; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan Siddartha; Rawat, Ramakant; Sharma, Hanish; Sood, Ajit; Watanabe, Chikako; Gibson, Peter R

    2014-04-01

    Once thought to be uncommon in Asia, coeliac disease (CD) is now being increasingly recognized in Asia–Pacific region. In many Asian nations, CD is still considered to be either nonexistent or very rare. In recognition of such heterogeneity of knowledge and awareness, the World Gastroenterology Organization and the Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology commissioned a working party to address the key issues in emergence of CD in Asia. A working group consisting of members from Asia–Pacific region, Europe, North America, and South America reviewed relevant existing literature with focus on those issues specific to Asia–Pacific region both in terms of what exists and what needs to be done. The working group identified the gaps in epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of CD in Asian–Pacific region and recommended the following: to establish prevalence of CD across region, increase in awareness about CD among physicians and patients, and recognition of atypical manifestations of CD. The challenges such as variability in performance of serological tests, lack of population-specific cut-offs values for a positive test, need for expert dietitians for proper counseling and supervision of patients, need for gluten-free infrastructure in food supply and creation of patient advocacy organizations were also emphasized. Although absolute number of patients with CD at present is not very large, this number is expected to increase over the next few years or decades. It is thus appropriate that medical community across the Asia–Pacific region define extent of problem and get prepared to handle impending epidemic of CD.

  9. Twenty-Fourth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation, 24-25 May 2012, NEA Headquarters, 12 boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France - Summary record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives the summary record of the past 24. Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation: review of the experimental nuclear data activities of relevance to the evaluation projects (NEA Data Bank member countries, Japan, USA, China, Russia), brief progress reports from the evaluation projects and discussion of future plans (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, TENDL, BROND, CENDL, IAEA), review of final or near-final subgroup reports (subgroups 27 (Prompt photon production from fission products), 28 (Processing of covariance data), 29 (U-235 capture cross-section in the keV to MeV energy region), 31 (Meeting nuclear data needs for advanced reactor systems)), status of ongoing subgroups (subgroups C (High priority request list for nuclear data), 33 (Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance), 34 (Coordinated evaluation of 239 Pu in the resonance region), 35 (Scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range), 36 (Reporting and usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region)), proposals for new subgroups, discussions on the opportunity to create a World Wide Evaluated Nuclear Data File/Library, information on conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community

  10. Symptom Clusters and Work Limitations in Employed Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    gliomas (Fox, Lyon, & Farace , 2007). Across studies of breast cancer patients, similar symptom clusters have emerged: researchers have identified...Symptom clusters and quality of life in survivors of lung cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum, 33(5), 931-936. Fox, S., Lyon, D., & Farace , E. (2007

  11. Factors influencing work functioning after cancer diagnosis: a focus group study with cancer survivors and occupational health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, H F; Abma, F I; Roelen, C A M; Smink, J G; Ranchor, A V; Bültmann, U

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors (CSs) frequently return to work, but little is known about work functioning after return to work (RTW). We aimed to identify barriers and facilitators of work functioning among CSs. Three focus groups were conducted with CSs (n = 6, n = 8 and n = 8) and one focus group with occupational health professionals (n = 7). Concepts were identified by thematic analysis, using the Cancer and Work model as theoretical framework to structure the results. Long-lasting symptoms (e.g. fatigue), poor adaptation, high work ethics, negative attitude to work, ambiguous communication, lack of support and changes in the work environment were mentioned as barriers of work functioning. In contrast, staying at work during treatment, open dialogue, high social support, appropriate work accommodations and high work autonomy facilitated work functioning. Not only cancer-related symptoms affect work functioning of CSs after RTW but also psychosocial and work-related factors. The barriers and facilitators of work functioning should be further investigated in studies with a longitudinal design to examine work functioning over time.

  12. Between Party, Parents and Peers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbæk, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the lived contradictions entailed in being a young member of the Chinese Communist Party (ccp) today. The focus is on how political and existential issues intersect. It explores party membership as a strategy for personal mobility among Beijing elite university students by p...

  13. Sickness absence and return to work rates in women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, Corne A. M.; Koopmans, Petra C.; de Graaf, Jan H.; Balak, Fulya; Groothoff, Johan W.

    Most women are diagnosed with breast cancer when they are of working age. How long are breast cancer patients absent? How many of them return to work? ArboNed Occupational Health Services documents sickness absence data of 1 million workers of whom 40% were women. Between 2001 and 2005, 2,259 women

  14. Lifestyle risk factors for cancer : the relationship with psychosocial work environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, AJM; Tijhuis, M; Surtees, PG; Ormel, J

    2000-01-01

    Background Psychosocial work characteristics (job demands, control, support, job strain and iso-strain [high job strain combined with social isolation at work]) may be linked to cancer risk, by affecting cancer-related lifestyles like smoking, high alcohol consumption, low intake of fruits and

  15. Advice about Work-Related Issues to Peers and Employers from Head and Neck Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory and descriptive study is to contribute to the sparse return-to-work literature on head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Interview participants were asked to reflect upon their work-related experience with cancer by answering two specific questions: (1) What advice

  16. Which Party Gets the Mayoralty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjæveland, Asbjørn; Serritzlew, Søren

    2010-01-01

    expands the scope of these explanatory variables. However, the study also shows that being a large party is not sufficient for a party to have a good chance of winning the mayoralty. Furthermore, norms guiding appropriate behaviour seem important in addition to instrumental behaviour. It appears......In non-presidential multiparty systems, it is not only the voters but also coalition formation after the election that decides the government of the community. Some national-level studies investigate which parties are most likely to win the Prime Minister's office. The aim of this article...... is to investigate the same question at the local level:What makes a party more likely to win the post of mayor? The article finds that party size and change in size are important along with experience and ideological centrality. The results are similar to those obtained at the national level, and this study thus...

  17. Work satisfaction and quality of life in cancer survivors in the first year after oncological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Anja; Koch, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Since a growing number of patients are likely to return to work (RTW) after cancer diagnosis and treatment, there is an increasing recognition of the work situation, and the physical as well as psychosocial functioning among those survivors who returned to work. To prospectively examine Health Related quality of Life (HRQoL) and different aspects of work satisfaction in cancer survivors. N=702 employed cancer patients (85% women) were recruited on average 11 months post diagnosis and assessed at the beginning (t_1), the end (t_2) and 12 months after cancer rehabilitation program (t_3). Participants completed validated measures assessing work satisfaction, working conditions, job strain and HRQoL. Participants showed a high work satisfaction and were most satisfied with job related activities and least satisfied with work organization and leadership. Total work satisfaction was significantly associated with older age, higher monthly income, higher school education, and HRQoL, but not with any cancer- or treatment related characteristics. No significant changes in work satisfaction over time were observed except for a significant deterioration in satisfaction with job related activities (p=0.002; η ^2 =0.019), professional acknowledgement (p=0.036; η ^2 =0.009), and overall work satisfaction (p ^2 =0.087) with small to moderate effect sizes. Our findings emphasize the need for comprehensive cancer rehabilitation programs and specific vocational interventions.

  18. A cohort study of permanently reduced work ability in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglann, Beate; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Fosså, Sophie D; Dahl, Alv A

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this cohort study were to explore various longitudinal aspects of employment and disability pension due to permanently reduced work ability among women with breast cancer and to investigate the impact of breast cancer on income. In a national register-based controlled cohort study from Norway, 1,548 women diagnosed with breast cancer (all stages) between 1992 and 1996 at the age 45-54 years and 1,548 cancer-free women matched for age, municipality and civil status were followed for up to 14 years. Medical data from the Cancer Registry of Norway were linked with longitudinal data on employment, social security benefits and socio-demography collected from other national official registries. Compared to cancer-free controls, breast cancer patients were significantly more likely to receive disability pension (hazard ratio (HR) 2.7, 95% CI 2.3-3.2) after adjustment for unmatched socio-demographic variables (education, income and children employment rates were higher in non-disabled patients than in non-disabled controls (82% vs. 77%, p = 0.008). Working breast cancer patients experienced a temporary negative effect on employment income. A considerable proportion of women with breast cancer will over time experience permanently reduced work ability and become disability pension holders. In case of reduced work ability in breast cancer survivors, medical personel caring for them should consider and discuss with them rehabilitation and workplace adjustment in order to prevent early disability pension.

  19. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Working with Your Treatment Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Your Treatment Team Treatment Surgery Surgical Staging Pathology of Ovarian Cancer Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Hormone Therapy ... 20, 2016 January 17, 2017 February 21, 2017 March 22, 2017 April 18, 2017 May 16, 2017 ...

  20. Return to work after early-stage breast cancer : A cohort study into the effects of treatment and cancer-related symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balak, Fulya; Roelen, Corne A. M.; Koopmans, Petra C.; ten Berge, Elike E.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    Introduction Earlier diagnosis and better treatment have increased the survival rates of cancer patients. This warrants research on return to work of cancer survivors. What is the return to work rate following early-stage breast cancer? What is the effect of the type of treatment and cancer-related

  1. Is cancer survivorship associated with reduced work engagement? A NOCWO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg Gudbergsson, Saevar; Fosså, Sophie D; Dahl, Alv A

    2008-09-01

    This study explores work engagement in employed tumor-free cancer survivors (CSs) compared to matched controls from the general population (NORM). The sample consisted of 446 CSs tumor-free after primary treatment [226 females with breast cancer and 220 males (166 testicular cancer and 54 prostate cancer)] diagnosed 2-6 years prior to the study. All had returned to work and had favourable prognosis. NORM sample consisted of 588 employed controls (319 females, 269 males). All CSs and NORM filled in a mailed questionnaire covering demography, morbidity, and work-related issues including work engagement which was self-rated by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). No differences in work engagement were observed between the CSs and NORM measured by the UWES total scale score or by the Dedication and Absorption domain scores. The Vigor domains score was statistically lower among CSs (p = .03), but the effect size was only 0.19. The CSs reported significantly poorer work ability, poorer health status, greater numbers of disease symptoms, more anxiety, and reduced physical quality of life, and scored significantly higher on both neuroticism and extraversion. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS FOR CSS: In spite of poorer health CSs who had returned to work after their treatment for breast, prostate, and testicular cancer showed similar work engagement as individuals without cancer. In such CSs employers have no reason to expect reduced work engagement. Future research should preferably have a prospective and comparative design.

  2. Employment participation and work experience of male cancer survivors: a NOCWO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Holmfridur K; Vidarsdottir, Halldora; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Lindbohm, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether employment status and work experiences, assessed in terms of job resources (organizational culture and superiors' and co-workers' support), commitment to organization, work motives, and experiences of discrimination, differ between survivors of prostate or testicular cancer or lymphoma and cancer-free reference subjects. Questionnaires were sent to 1349 male cancer survivors and 2666 referents in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, and Norway. Valid responses were 59% and 45%, respectively. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated with logistic regression models. Compared to the referents, survivors of lymphoma and prostate cancer were less likely to be employed (OR=0.53; CI: 0.30-0.95 and OR=0.50; CI: 0.35-0.73, respectively), but decreased employment was not evident among testicular cancer survivors. Testicular cancer survivors experienced less discrimination at work than did the referents, for example, testicular cancer survivors were less likely to report that their colleagues doubted their ability to carry out their work tasks (OR=0.38; CI: 0.17-0.83). Lymphoma survivors were less likely than the referents to praise their workplace as an enjoyable place to work (OR=0.48; CI: 0.26-0.88). The prostate cancer survivors were more likely than the referents to find the organizational climate competitive, distrustful, and suspicious. Employment participation and work experiences of male cancer survivors varied substantially according to type of cancer. Occupational therapists and other health care personnel should keep this in mind when assisting cancer survivors in identifying their strengths and limitations at work.

  3. Functional challenges among late effects cancer survivors: a preliminary report on work engagement issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    While the cancer survivor rate is nearly 68% now, intervention regimens may leave residual conditions that impact engagement in work and various life tasks. Survivors are underemployed and report stigmatizing attitudes among co-workers. When late effects from cancer arise over 10 years later, the impact on individuals in the prime of their productive employment life is evident. Assisting these individuals begins with awareness of late effects in order to create work-related, adaptive strategies. Sixteen adult cancer survivors experiencing late effects completed the Occupational Self Assessment (Version 2.2) and the Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS). Knowledge of functional problems secondary to recognized late effects medical conditions reported in the literature was utilized to sort items according to professional definitions of work, performance skills and performance patterns. Late effects survivors reported that cancer illness and treatment has negatively impacted their employment. Individual response to the impact of late effects is highly variant. "Getting things done" and physical energy limitations are most pronounced. Cancer survivors report lower competence in significant work-related skills and patterns. Quality of life associated with the aftereffects of fatigue, aches and pain, and sleep changes are the lowest. Responses range across the 16 survivors to both performance skills and performance patterns. Cancer survivorship has clearly interfered with employment. An interdisciplinary focus on meaningful engagement in life activities, particularly work is crucial to support survivors through advocacy, adaptation and positive change to focus on engaging the work talents and gifts for all cancer survivors.

  4. Long-term sedentary work and the risk of subsite-specific colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Terry; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane; Bull, Fiona

    2011-05-15

    Research suggests that sedentary behavior may increase the risk of some chronic diseases. The aims of the study were to examine whether sedentary work is associated with colorectal cancer and to determine whether the association differs by subsite. A total of 918 cases and 1,021 controls participated in a population-based case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia in 2005-2007. Data were collected on lifestyle, physical activity, and lifetime job history. The estimated effects of sedentary work on the risk of cancers of the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum were analyzed by using multinomial logistic regression. Compared with participants who did not spend any time in sedentary work, participants who spent 10 or more years in sedentary work had almost twice the risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio = 1.94, 95% confidence interval: 1.28, 2.93) and a 44% increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio = 1.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.96, 2.18). This association was independent of recreational physical activity and was seen even among the most recreationally active participants. Sedentary work was not associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. These results suggest that long-term sedentary work may increase the risk of distal colon cancer and rectal cancer.

  5. Short-term effects of night shift work on breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, H. T.; Garde, A. H.; Frydenberg, M.

    2017-01-01

    .80-1.01] was observed for workers ever working night shifts during the follow-up period compared with workers only working day shifts after adjustment for age, age at first child, parity, family history of breast or ovarian cancer, sex hormones, medications related to alcoholism, family educational level, mammography......Objectives: The objective was to examine if night shift work is a short-term risk factor for breast cancer, including combined estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) breast cancer subtypes. Methods: The cohort comprised 155 540 public sector female workers in Denmark who...... were followed from 2007-2012. Day-to-day work-hour information was available from payroll registers and 1245 incident cases of breast cancer were identified in national cancer registries together with receptor subtype information. Results: A rate ratio (RR) of 0.90 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0...

  6. Shift work, light at night, and the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Virginia A

    2011-01-01

    Studies of the effect of shift work have identified several negative health outcomes, most notably breast cancer. Disruption of circadian rhythm by exposure to light at night has been identified as the mechanism likely responsible for this outcome. This article recommends that health care institutions work with occupational health nurses to develop and implement hazard communication and policies concerning shift work, exposure to light at night, and increased risk for negative health outcomes, particularly breast cancer. 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Night-shift work and breast cancer risk in a cohort of Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Anjoeka; Ji, Bu-Tian; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xue, Shouzheng; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong-Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Chow, Wong-Ho

    2010-05-01

    Shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms has been classified as a probable cause of human cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, based on limited epidemiologic evidence and abundant experimental evidence. The authors investigated this association in a population-based prospective cohort study of Chinese women. At baseline (1996-2000), information on lifetime occupational history was obtained from 73,049 women. Lifetime night-shift exposure indices were created using a job exposure matrix. During 2002-2004, self-reported data on frequency and duration of night-shift work were collected. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for major breast cancer risk factors, were calculated. During follow-up through 2007, 717 incident cases of breast cancer were diagnosed. Breast cancer risk was not associated with ever working the night shift on the basis of the job exposure matrix (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.0, 95% confidence interval: 0.9, 1.2) or self-reported history of night-shift work (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.9, 95% confidence interval: 0.7, 1.1). Risk was also not associated with frequency, duration, or cumulative amount of night-shift work. There were no indications of effect modification. The lack of an association between night-shift work and breast cancer adds to the inconsistent epidemiologic evidence. It may be premature to consider shift work a cause of cancer.

  8. Guidelines, "minimal requirements" and standard of care in glioblastoma around the Mediterranean Area: A report from the AROME (Association of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Mediterranean arEa) Neuro-Oncology working party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and the most lethal primary brain tumor in adults. Although studies are ongoing, the epidemiology of glioblastoma in North Africa (i.e. Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) remains imperfectly settled and needs to be specified for a better optimization of the neuro-oncology healthcare across the Mediterranean area and in North Africa countries. Over the last years significant therapeutic advances have been accomplished improving survival and quality of life of glioblastoma patients. Indeed, concurrent temozolomide-radiotherapy (temoradiation) and adjuvant temozolomide has been established as the standard of care associated with a survival benefit and a better outcome. Therefore, considering this validated strategy and regarding the means and some other North Africa countries specificities, we decided, under the auspices of AROME (association of radiotherapy and oncology of the Mediterranean area; www.aromecancer.org), a non-profit organization, to organize a dedicated meeting to discuss the standards and elaborate a consensus on the "minimal requirements" adapted to the local resources. Thus, panels of physicians involved in daily multidisciplinary brain tumors management in the two borders of the Mediterranean area have been invited to the AROME neuro-oncology working party. We report here the consensus, established for minimal human and material resources for glioblastoma diagnosis and treatment faced to the standard of care, which should be reached. If the minimal requirements are not reached, the patients should be referred to the closest specialized medical center where at least minimal requirements, or, ideally, the standard of care should be guaranteed to the patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between shift work and the risk of death from biliary tract cancer in Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingsong; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Kurosawa, Michiko; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2015-10-21

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that shift work involving night work may increase cancer risk. We examined the association between working rotating shifts and the risk of death from biliary tract cancer among Japanese men who participated in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study. Of the 46,395 men recruited, 22,224 men aged 40-65 at baseline (1988-1990) who reported working full-time or were self-employed were included in the present analysis. The study subjects were followed through December 31, 2009. Information regarding occupation and lifestyle factors was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the risk of death from biliary tract cancer in relation to shift work. During a mean 17-year follow-up, we observed 94 biliary tract cancer deaths, including 23 deaths from gallbladder cancer and 71 deaths from extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Overall, shift work was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in the risk of biliary tract cancer, with an HR of 1.50 (95 % CI: 0.81-2.77), among rotating shift workers. When the analysis was limited to extrahepatic bile duct cancer, a significant association appeared, with a multivariable-adjusted HR of 1.93 (95 % CI: 1.00-3.72) for rotating shift workers. Our data indicate that shift work may be associated with increased risk of death from extrahepatic bile duct cancer in this cohort of Japanese men. The association with gallbladder cancer remains unclear because of the small number of deaths.

  10. Risks for respiratory and gastric cancer in wood-working occupations in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, J H; Møller, H; Jensen, O M

    1988-01-01

    Cases of cancer notified to the Danish Cancer Registry during the period 1970 to 1984 in the age groups 16 to 66 years have been linked to information on employment kept on file in the nationwide Supplementary Pension Fund since 1964. Industrial hygienists classified industrial groups as defined by the Pension Fund with regard to exposure to wood dust, and a list of industries with major exposure to wood dust was defined. The risk for cancer of the respiratory system and the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated by means of a proportional cancer incidence analysis. A fourfold increase in risk for sinonasal cancer was found among men involved in the manufacture of wooden furniture, and a twofold increase in risk for gastric cancer was seen in all of the component industries of basic wood-processing. In contrast, no excess of gastric cancer could be detected in men working in the manufacture of wooden building materials and wooden furniture, and a risk below unity was seen for those in carpentry and joinery. The elevated risk for gastric cancer in some wood-processing industries is probably due to social factors also common to men in agriculture and manufacturing. The absence of an increased risk for gastric cancer in trades in which a high risk for sinonasal cancer is seen indicates that wood dust is not of aetiological importance for gastric cancer. No excess of total lung cancer or of the adenocarcinoma subtype was seen in any of the wood-processing industries.

  11. Economic Beliefs and Party Preference

    OpenAIRE

    Michael W.M. Roos; Andreas Orland

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a questionnaire study used to explore the economic understanding, normative positions along the egalitarian-libertarian spectrum, and the party preferences of a large student sample. The aim of the study is both to find socio-economic determinants of normative and positive beliefs and to explore how beliefs about the economy influence party support. We find that positive beliefs of lay people differ systematically from those of economic experts. Positive beli...

  12. Employment status and work-related difficulties in lung cancer survivors compared with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ae; Yun, Young Ho; Chang, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jongmog; Kim, Moon Soo; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Zo, Jae Ill; Kim, Jhingook; Choi, Yong Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Yoon, Seok-Jun

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the employment status of lung cancer survivors and the work-related problems they face. Although the number of lung cancer survivors is increasing, little is known about their employment and work-related issues. We enrolled 830 lung cancer survivors 12 months after lung cancer curative surgery (median time after diagnosis, 4.11 years) and 1000 volunteers from the general population. All participants completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, Core 30-item and a questionnaire that included items relating to their jobs. We used logistic regression analysis to identify independent predictors of unemployment. The employment rate of lung cancer survivors decreased from 68.6% at the time of diagnosis to 38.8% after treatment, which was significantly lower than the employment rate of the general population (63.5%; adjusted odds ratio = 2.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.66-3.22). The posttreatment unemployment rate was higher for women than for men. Among survivors, employment was inversely associated with older age, household income, number of comorbidities, and poor social functioning. Fatigue (78.6%) was the most common work-related problem reported by survivors. Lung cancer survivors experienced more difficulties in employment than did the general population. Age, monthly household income, number of comorbidities, and social functioning appear to be important factors influencing employment status. These findings suggest that lung cancer survivors need support to cope with the financial impact of cancer.

  13. SHIFT WORK AND BREAST CANCER AMONG WOMEN TEXTILE WORKERS IN SHANGHAI, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M.; Thomas, David B.; Davis, Scott; Yost, Michael; Breslow, Norman; Gao, Dao Li; Fitzgibbons, E. Dawn; Camp, Janice E.; Wong, Eva; Wernli, Karen J.; Checkoway, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Although night shift work has been associated with elevated risk of breast cancer in numerous epidemiologic studies, evidence is not consistent. We conducted a nested case-cohort study to investigate a possible association between shift work including a night shift and risk of breast cancer within a large cohort of women textile workers in Shanghai, China. METHODS The study included 1709 incident breast cancer cases and 4780 non-cases. Data on historical shift-work schedules were collected by categorized jobs from the factories where the study subjects had worked, and then were linked to the complete work histories of each subject. No jobs in the factories involved exclusively night shift work. Therefore, night shift was evaluated as part of a rotating shift work pattern. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Cox proportional hazards modeling adapted for the case-cohort design for years of night-shift work and the total number of nights worked. Additionally, analyses were repeated with exposures lagged by 10 and 20 years. RESULTS We observed no associations with either years of night-shift work, or number of nights worked during the entire employment period, irrespective of lag intervals. Findings from the age-stratified analyses were very similar to those observed for the entire study population. CONCLUSIONS The findings from this study provide no evidence to support the hypothesis that shift work increases breast cancer risk. The positive association between shift work and breast cancer observed in Western populations, but not observed in this and other studies of the Chinese population, suggest that the effect of shift work on breast cancer risk may be different in Asian and Caucasian women. PMID:25421377

  14. Shift work and breast cancer among women textile workers in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M; Thomas, David B; Davis, Scott; Yost, Michael; Breslow, Norman; Gao, Dao Li; Fitzgibbons, E Dawn; Camp, Janice E; Wong, Eva; Wernli, Karen J; Checkoway, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Although night-shift work has been associated with elevated risk of breast cancer in numerous epidemiologic studies, evidence is not consistent. We conducted a nested case-cohort study to investigate a possible association between shift work including a night shift and risk of breast cancer within a large cohort of women textile workers in Shanghai, China. The study included 1,709 incident breast cancer cases and 4,780 non-cases. Data on historical shift work schedules were collected by categorized jobs from the factories, where the study subjects had worked, and then were linked to the complete work histories of each subject. No jobs in the factories involved exclusively night-shift work. Therefore, night shift was evaluated as part of a rotating shift work pattern. Hazard ratios and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using Cox proportional hazards modeling adapted for the case-cohort design for years of night-shift work and the total number of nights worked. Additionally, analyses were repeated with exposures lagged by 10 and 20 years. We observed no associations with either years of night-shift work or number of nights worked during the entire employment period, irrespective of lag intervals. Findings from the age-stratified analyses were very similar to those observed for the entire study population. The findings from this study provide no evidence to support the hypothesis that shift work increases breast cancer risk. The positive association between shift work and breast cancer observed in Western populations, but not observed in this and other studies of the Chinese population, suggests that the effect of shift work on breast cancer risk may be different in Asian and Caucasian women.

  15. Night-shift work and breast cancer risk in a cohort of Chinese women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, A.; Ji, B.T.; Shu, X.O.; Xue, S.; Yang, G.; Li, H.L.; Rothman, N.; Gao, Y.T.; Zheng, W.; Chow, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms has been classified as a probable cause of human cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, based on limited epidemiologic evidence and abundant experimental evidence. The authors investigated this association in a population-based

  16. Work at night and breast cancer--report on evidence-based options for preventive actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Hansen, Johnni; Kolstad, Henrik Albert

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified shift work involving circadian disruption as probably carcinogenic to humans (group 2A), primarily based on experimental and epidemiologic evidence for breast cancer. In order to examine options for evidence-based preventive acti...

  17. The role of neuropsychological functioning in cancer survivors' return to work one year after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; de Boer, Angela; Spelten, Evelien; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Verbeek, Jos H. A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between neuropsychological functioning and the ability to work in cancer survivors. Methods: The study involved a consecutive cohort of 45 patients who had received a primary diagnosis of cancer, were gainfully employed at

  18. Development of a tailored work-related support intervention for gastrointestinal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, Anne-Claire G. N. M.; Tytgat, Kristien M. A. J.; Van Hezel, Sanne; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aim is the development of a work-related support intervention, tailored to the severity of work-related problems of patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer treated with curative intent. Two methods were used: (1) Work-related problems were identified from the literature and submitted to

  19. Co-ordinated Evaluation of Plutonium-239 in the Resonance Region - A report by the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Noguere, Gilles; Peneliau, Yannick; Bernard, David; Serot, Olivier; McKnight, Richard D.; Leal, Luiz Carlos; Derrien, Herve; Kahler, Albert C.

    2014-04-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) has been established under the aegis of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The WPEC determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: BROND (Russian Federation), ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan) and JEFF (other NEA Data Bank member countries), as well as CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report has been issued by the WPEC Subgroup 34 with a view to solving a general discrepancy when calculating criticality benchmarks with plutonium, using the most recent evaluated data libraries. This international effort enabled the delivery of a single set of resonance parameters up to 2.5 keV. The large fluctuations of the prompt neutron multiplicities were correctly reproduced with a phenomenological decomposition of the multiplicity that involved the two-step (n,γf) process. Performances of the new 239 Pu evaluation were tested over a broad set of integral data (ICSBEP, mock-up experiments performed in the CEA facilities and in power reactors). An overall good agreement was achieved between the calculations and the experimental results. The international effort performed in the framework of this Subgroup enabled delivery of a single set of resonance parameters up to 2.5 keV able to provide good C/E results over a broad set of integral data. The resonance analysis has been performed

  20. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker | "Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)" will be presented by Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, Chair of the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Date: 2/20/2018; Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm; Location: NCI Shady Grove Campus,

  1. Strategies used by breast cancer survivors to address work-related limitations during and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Joanne C; Strom, Carla; Arcury, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this exploratory study was to delineate the broad range of adjustments women breast cancer survivors draw upon to minimize cancer-related limitations at the workplace. The study also analyzed whether survivors used strategies to address work-related limitations in isolation or in combination with other strategies, and whether they used formal or informal strategies. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 14 women who were employed at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer and who continued to work during treatment or returned to work. Interviews were conducted 3 to 24 months after diagnosis. An iterative process was used to systematically analyze the data (the transcripts) using qualitative methods. Participants who worked during or after treatment adjusted their work schedule, performed fewer or other tasks, modified or changed their work environment, reduced non-work activities at the workplace, used cognitive prompts, and acted preemptively to make work tasks manageable after their return to work. Survivors used multiple adjustments and drew upon both formal and informal tactics to minimize or prevent cancer- or treatment-related effects from negatively affecting job performance. Knowledge about the broad range of both formal and informal strategies identified in this study may enable health care and social services providers, as well as cancer survivors and employers, to identify a wide range of specific strategies that may reduce the negative effects of work-related limitations in specific work settings. Insights gained from this analysis should inform future research on work and cancer survivorship. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Breast Cancer Survivors Report Similar Concerns Related to Return to Work in Developed and Developing Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shi-Xiang; Liu, Jun-E; Cheng, Andy S K; Xiao, Shu-Qin; Su, Ya-Li; Feuerstein, Michael

    2018-02-14

    Aim To determine whether breast cancer survivors (BCS) at work following the diagnosis and/or treatment of breast cancer, in a rapidly developing country such as China experience similar to return to work challenges as reported in nations with established return to work (RTW) policy and procedures for employees with cancer. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 BCS who returned to work following diagnosis and/or primary cancer treatment. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to investigate responses. Results Three recurring themes emerged: (1) challenges at work related to residual effects of diagnosis and/or primary treatment; (2) positive and negative responses from employers and/or supervisors; and (3) positive and negative responses from co-workers/colleagues. Although several participants experienced a high level of workplace support, there was a subgroup that did report challenges related to symptom burden, cognitive limitations, and both positive and negative responses by employers and co-workers were reported. Conclusions Findings indicate similar challenges in BCS who RTW during and/or following cancer treatment in both rapidly developing and developed nations. Results suggest that regardless of the existence of workplace policies and practices related to RTW for workers with a history of cancer, a subgroup of BCS experience similar challenges when returning to work. These findings highlight the international nature of RTW challenges and suggest the need for more global efforts to develop and evaluate workplace interventions to assist with these similarities.

  3. Returning to work after cancer: know your rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for you. Ability to return to work as long as you return within 12 weeks. Ability to work fewer hours if you need to. If you cannot do ... can before taking leave. You must schedule your health care visits so they disrupt ... long as the company covers the cost. The Affordable ...

  4. Relationship of Self-reported Attentional Fatigue to Perceived Work Ability in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Ah, Diane; Storey, Susan; Crouch, Adele; Johns, Shelley A; Dodson, Jill; Dutkevitch, Sarah

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) have identified attentional fatigue, a decrease in the ability to focus, as a persistent daily challenge; however, little is known regarding its impact on work ability. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between attentional fatigue and perceived work ability in BCSs controlling for the known covariates of age, education, household income, and time posttreatment. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Breast cancer survivors who were currently employed and at least 1 year post-adjuvant treatment participated. Breast cancer survivors completed the Attentional Function Index and Work Ability Index questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, linear regression, and Fisher exact test were used for analysis. Sixty-eight female BCSs, ranging from 29 to 68 years of age (mean, 52.1 [SD, 8.6]) and on average 4.97 (SD, 3.36) years posttreatment, participated. More than one-fourth of BCSs (26.5%) reported poor to moderate perceived work ability, indicating substantial concerns regarding work performance. Attentional fatigue was found to significantly predict perceived work ability (P work ability. Attentional fatigue is a prevalent symptom posttreatment that is negatively related to perceived work ability in BCSs. Nurses are in a prime position to assess and intervene to alleviate attentional fatigue to improve work ability. Findings suggest a need for individual, comprehensive survivorship care plans to effectively address symptoms that impact work ability and, ultimately, the quality of life of cancer survivors.

  5. Cancer survivors' views of work 3 years post diagnosis: a UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ziv; Neary, David; Luker, Karen

    2008-07-01

    The impact of cancer on people's working lives is an increasingly important concern but knowledge on this issue is very limited in the UK. Forty-one people of working age were purposively selected from the North Western Cancer Intelligence Service and interviewed by telephone to describe their experiences to returning to work following diagnosis and treatment. The data was subject to qualitative thematic analysis using NVIVO software. The results indicated the importance of returning to work from diagnosis and through treatment which was then followed by a re-assessment of work-life balance when people recovered from primary treatment and were back in employment. The principle motivations for returning to work were a quest for normality and financial pressures. One barrier to returning to work was the lack of medical advice from cancer specialists and general practitioners regarding the appropriate time to get back to work. A good relationship with their employer/manager was a major influence on returning to work and appeared to be related to duration of service rather than occupational status. These findings demonstrate the importance of paid work to people diagnosed with cancer and highlight the need to improve the support from medical professionals, especially oncology nurses.

  6. Glutathione modulation in cancer treatment: will it work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Cook, J.A.; DeGraff, W.; Glatstein, E.; Russo, A.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) assumes a pivotal role in numerous cellular functions including bioreductive reactions, maintenance of enzyme activity, amino acid transport, protection from harmful oxidative species, and detoxification of xenobiotics. The importance of GSH in modifying the cellular response to several anti-cancer treatment modalities has become better appreciated with the introduction of agents which can either decrease or elevate GSH levels in cells and tissues. In general, GSH depletion has been demonstrated to further enhance the cytotoxicity of several chemotherapy drugs and nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. Conversely, GSH elevation affords varying degrees of protection. Whether or not GSH modulating agents will be useful as an adjuvant to selected cancer treatment modalities will depend on whether differential levels of GSH can be achieved in tumor versus normal tissues. Accurate GSH measurements in tumor and normal tissues will be required to adequately use and interpret the results of clinical studies where GSH modulating agents are employed. Precise tumor GSH measurements pose a considerable challenge due to the complicated cellular makeup of tumors.44 references

  7. Work situation and sickness absence in the initial period after breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Lena-Marie; Wennman-Larsen, Agneta; Nilsson, Marie; Olsson, Mariann; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2011-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis in women, many of whom are of working age, and the five-year survival rate in Sweden is approaching 90%. Accordingly, aspects of working life and sickness absence are of increasing importance for breast cancer survivors and may have a long-term impact on health and quality of life of these women. The aim was to elucidate the work situation and sickness absence during the initial period after breast cancer surgery and to explore factors associated with sickness absence. This is a cross-sectional questionnaire study 4-6 weeks after breast cancer surgery of women aged 20-63 years, and living in Stockholm. A consecutive sample of 933 women were invited and 756 (81%) accepted to participate. Logistic regression analyses were computed to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios for associations between sick leave and other variables. Most women (86%) were employed (including self-employed) at diagnosis, and 91% of those worked ≥75% of full-time. At time of survey, 56% were on sick leave, the majority for full-time. Low self-rated health, poorer health than before diagnosis, having a strenuous work posture, and younger age were associated with sick leave during the initial period after breast cancer surgery in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The results of this study is not fully consistent compared to previous studies in this field, often performed in later phases after breast cancer surgery or after other cancer diagnoses. Therefore our results indicate that knowledge is needed during all phases of the breast cancer trajectory to determine factors of importance regarding sick leave and their impact throughout the disease trajectory.

  8. The role of communication and support in return to work following cancer-related absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarker, J; Munir, F; Bains, M; Kalawsky, K; Haslam, C

    2010-10-01

    Many cancer survivors experience difficulties returning to work. However, there have been relatively few attempts to understand why problems with employer support and work adjustment occur. This paper aims to extend previous work in two ways: first, through exploring the way in which communication and support at work effect cancer survivors on their return to work and during the post-return period; and second, by drawing on a research sample working in the United Kingdom. In all, 26 cancer survivors took part in a semi-structured telephone interview. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed three key findings. First, the central role of communication and support from (and between) occupational health, line managers, and colleagues was highlighted. Second, two discrete processes or periods of return to work were identified: the experience of return to work during the initial period of return and the experiences of post-return to work. Third, during the post-return period, the importance of the delayed impact of cancer on the ability to work, the lack of follow-up and monitoring, and the wear-off effect of empathy and support were highlighted as contributing to return-to-work difficulties. This qualitative study highlights the importance of communication within the workplace with regard to the return-to-work process and the need to provide better support and guidance to cancer survivors, line managers and colleagues. Research is required in delineating how employers without occupational health or human resources support manage the return-to-work process. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Intra-party democracy beyond aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkenstein, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    , discussing several functions intra-party deliberation is said to serve in the democratic theory literature. It then goes on to explore the deliberative credentials of political discussion between party members, drawing on group interviews with party members in two Social Democratic parties in Germany...

  10. Promoting Party Politics in Emerging Democracies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burnell, P.; Gerrits, A.

    2010-01-01

    This opening section briefly introduces international political party support, that is, assistance to political parties by international organizations, mostly from the US and Europe, to strengthen individual political parties, to promote peaceful interaction between parties and to help to create a

  11. Third party financing of renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IDAE.

    1994-01-01

    IDAE (Institute of Energy Saving and Diversification) Hosted the Third party on financing renewable energy sources. The meeting was articulated into chapters: 1.- Experiences in the renewable energy field. 2.- Third party financing of small hydro-power projects. 3.- Third party financing of biomass projects. 4.- Third party financing of wind energy projects

  12. Democracy, the Party, and Self-Emancipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raekstad, P.

    2017-01-01

    The Party is once again the subject of sustained discussion among academics and popular movements. Jodi Dean’s most recent book, Crowds and Party, is an attempt to re-think the party form for contemporary politics after the experiences and lessons of Occupy. Crowds and Party is engaging and

  13. Night shift work and prolactin as a breast cancer risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bukowska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin - a hormone secreted in a circadian rhythm acts as a regulator of growth and development of the mammary glands. It has been observed that working at night increases breast cancer risk in women. Night shift work, probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A IARC, can disrupt a circadian rhythm, and thus potentially alter the rhythm of prolactin secretion. The aim of our work was to review epidemiological evidence on the association between prolactin and the risk of breast cancer and the influence of work at night on prolactin secretion. Search was done in the Medline database by keywords (shift work, work at night, risk of breast cancer and prolactin. The increased proliferation of breast cells activated by prolactin can promote the development of cancer. The results of the largest epidemiological prospective studies suggest the association between prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer in women. So far, only seven studies have investigated the association between work at night and prolactin secretion. In three studies lower concentrations of prolactin have been observed in night shift workers. No relationship between the night shift work duration and prolactin level in women have been reported. Night shift work can modify the profile of prolactin secretion in night workers, probably decreasing the secretion of this hormone at night. It is therefore unlikely that prolactin plays an important role in the development of breast cancer in women working at night. This conclusion is based on the results of a few epidemiological studies. Med Pr 2013;64(2:245–257

  14. Public Funding of Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortuno-Ortin, Ignacio; Schultz, Christian

    This paper concerns public funding of parties. Parteis receive public funds depending on their vote share. Funds finance electoral campaigns. Two cases are investigated. In the first, some voters are policy motivated and some are ?impressionable? ? their vote depends directly on campaign...... expenditures. In the second, campaigning is informative and all voters are policy motivated. Public funds increase policy convergence in both cases. The effect is larger, the more funding depends on vote shares. When campaigns are informative, there may be multiple euqilibria. Intuitively, a large party can...

  15. Bewitched - The Tea Party Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbee, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the development of the Tea Party movement, the character of its thinking and the nature of the interests and constituencies to which it is tied. The article suggests that despite the importance of ideas and interests, and the process of interaction between them, the movement....... The political friction that this creates has contributed to the anger that has characterised the movement. While the Tea Party movement may, as such, have only an ephemeral existence, independent conservatives are likely to remain a significant and potent constituency and will, within the institutional...

  16. Municipal return to work management in cancer survivors undergoing cancer treatment: a protocol on a controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Christina M; Labriola, Merete; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Momsen, Anne-Mette H; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2015-07-29

    Cancer survivors are often left on their own to deal with the challenges of resuming work during or after cancer treatment, mainly due to unclear agreements between stakeholders responsible for occupational rehabilitation. Social inequality exists in cancer risk, survival probability and continues with regard to the chance of being able to return to work. The aim is to apply an early, individually tailored occupational rehabilitation intervention to cancer survivors in two municipalities parallel with cancer treatment focusing on enhancing readiness for return to work. In a controlled trial municipal job consultants use acceptance and commitment therapy dialogue and individual-placement-and-support-inspired tools with cancer survivors to engage them in behaviour changes toward readiness for return to work. The workplace is involved in the return to work process. Patients referred to surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy at the Oncology Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark for the diagnoses; breast, colon-rectal, head and neck, thyroid gland, testicular, ovarian or cervix cancer are eligible for the study. Patients must be residents in the municipalities of Silkeborg or Randers, 18-60 years of age and have a permanent or temporary employment (with at least 6 months left of their contract) at inclusion. Patients, for whom the treating physician considers occupational rehabilitation to be unethical, or who are not reading or talking Danish are excluded. The control group has identical inclusion and exclusion criteria except for municipality of residence. Return to work is the primary outcome and is indentified in a social transfer payment register. Effect is assessed as relative cumulative incidences within 52 weeks and will be analysed in generalised linear regression models using the pseudo values method. As a secondary outcome; co-morbidity and socio-economic status is analysed as effect modifiers of the intervention effect on return to work. The

  17. Experiences and concerns about 'returning to work' for women breast cancer survivors: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedtke, Corine; de Rijk, Angelique; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Donceel, Peter

    2010-07-01

    To explore how female breast cancer patients experience work incapacity during the treatment and return-to-work phases and how interactions between patients and stakeholders affect this experience. Database search for full text articles published between January 1995 and January 2008 that focused on employed female breast cancer patients, factors related to work incapacity, and returning to work. Only results based on self-report data were included. Studies focusing on treatment, financial factors, rate of return, or absence were excluded. Six articles met the inclusion criteria. Women with breast cancer receive varied reactions but little advice about returning to work. Women were primarily concerned with disclosing the diagnosis to their employer and to relatives. Uncertainties about physical appearance, ability to work, and possible job loss affected the women's decisions about working during the treatment phase. After treatment, most women wanted to regain their 'normal life', but concentration and arm or fatigue problems potentially interfered. Although supportive work environments were helpful, the individual needs of women differed. Employers and employees need to find a balance in defining accommodating work. Many women received favourable support, but some reported feeling discriminated against. Many women re-evaluated the role of work in their lives after being confronted with breast cancer. Work adjustments could help women to keep their jobs during illness and recovery. To resolve women's concerns about returning to work, employers, physicians, and insurance institutions should consider increasing and improving communication with breast cancer patients and playing a more active and supportive role. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. 16 CFR 1507.11 - Party poppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Party poppers. 1507.11 Section 1507.11... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.11 Party poppers. Party poppers (also known by other names such as “Champagne Party Poppers,” and “Party Surprise Poppers,”) shall not contain more than 0.25 grains of pyrotechnic...

  19. The niche party concept and its measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Thomas M; Miller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the niche party has become increasingly popular in analyses of party competition. Yet, existing approaches vary in their definitions and their measurement approaches. We propose using a minimal definition that allows us to compare political parties in terms of their ?nicheness?. We argue that the conceptual core of the niche party concept is based on issue emphasis and that a niche party emphasizes policy areas neglected by its rivals. Based on this definition, we propose a con...

  20. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; van der Heide, Iris; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L. J.; van Berkel, Sietske; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Wim; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  1. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients : A prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C.J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Heide, Iris Van Der; Rejda, Tomas; Van Veldhoven, Peter L.J.; Berkel, Sietske Van; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Willem H.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.; Boer, Angela G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  2. Affiliation to the work market after curative treatment of head-and-neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Trille; Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl; Olsen, Maja Halgren

    2013-01-01

    Survivors of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) are more severely affected in regard to affiliation to the work market than other cancer survivors. Few studies have investigated associations between socioeconomic and disease-related factors and work market affiliation after...

  3. Work-related experiences of head and neck cancer survivors: an exploratory and descriptive qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory and descriptive study contributes to the growing knowledge about the return-to-work (RTW) experience of head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Viewing RTW as a process, participants were asked to consider the work-related experience with HNC at different phases: (1) at

  4. Being a potentially responsible party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on CERCLA II- ability for the unlucky potentially responsible parties (PRPs) which is a Draconian form of strict, joint and several liability with limited statutory defenses that in most cases are impossible to establish. CERCLA vigorously employs these legal concepts, stretching a PRP's financial exposure to the limits necessary to meet the enormous financial costs of remediation

  5. [Ketamine as a party drug

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegop, M.P.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Vantroyen, B.; Kramers, C.

    2007-01-01

    Ketamine is a new party drug, which is easy to obtain. For this reason, it is possible that physicians will be increasingly confronted with users that have medical problems. Relatively few cases of ketamine intoxication with a fatal outcome have been reported thus far. Ketamine is very

  6. Self-reported work ability in long-term breast cancer survivors. A population-based questionnaire study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Jensen, Anette Jung; Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

    2013-01-01

    to understand the work problems experienced by cancer survivors, including their ability to work. The aim of this study was to determine whether the ability of long-term breast cancer survivors to work was different from that of a cancer-free control group.......Although up to 80% of women can return to work after treatment for breast cancer, maintaining an affiliation to the labour market may be a challenge, as shown by the fact that the risks for unemployment and early retirement are increased in the years after treatment of cancer. It is important...

  7. Work-relatedness of lung cancer by smoking and histologic type in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Il; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kang, Dong-Mug; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Young-Ki; Leem, Jong-Han; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of causative agents related to occupational lung cancer, their relationships with work, and associations between work-relatedness and the histologic type of lung cancer. We used data from the occupational surveillance system in Korea in 2013. In addition, data from 1,404 participants diagnosed with lung cancer were collected through interviews. We included the patients' longest-held job in the analysis. Work-relatedness was categorized as "definite," "probable," "possible," "suspicious," "none," or "undetermined." Among the subjects, 69.3% were men and 30.7% were women. Regarding smoking status, current smokers were the most prevalent (35.5%), followed by non-smokers (32.3%), ex-smokers (32.2%). Regarding the causative agents of lung cancer, asbestos (1.0%) and crystalline silica (0.9%) were the most common in definite work-related cases, while non-arsenical insecticide (2.8%) was the most common in probable cases followed by diesel engine exhaust (1.9%) and asbestos (1.0%). Regarding histologic type, adenocarcinoma was the most common (41.7%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (21.2%). Among current smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common among definite and probable cases (13.4%), while non-small cell lung cancer was the least common (7.1%). Among non-smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (21.4%), while the least common was adenocarcinoma (1.6%). Approximately, 9.5% of all lung cancer cases in Korea are occupational-related lung cancer. Well-known substances associated with lung cancer, such as crystalline silica, asbestos, and diesel engine exhaust, are of particular concern. However, the histologic types of lung cancer related to smoking were inconsistent with previous studies when work-relatedness was taken into account. Future studies are required to clarify the incidence of occupational lung cancer in agricultural workers exposed to non-arsenical insecticides and the associations between

  8. Energy-political ideas of environmentalist parties in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrbek, R.

    1990-01-01

    By and large the green-alternative parties embrace the same energy policies: They reject nuclear energy, they demand a radically new approach to energy politics and they want to realise their programmes within a comprehensive restructuring of the political and economic order of the respective states. The reasons for this categorical NO to nuclear energy seen in its social and environmental compatibility. In the following we will explain how this type of party works and functions. The reasons for the formation of these parties and the profile of green-alternative parties on a national and international level are described in detail as well as the resonance in society and their chances of success in general. (orig./HSCH) [de

  9. Breast Cancer Epidemiology of the Working-Age Female Population Reveals Significant Implications for the South Korean Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Se Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin-Seok; Park, Won; Yu, Jonghan; Park, Yeon Hee

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the economic loss due to the diagnosis of breast cancer within the female South Korean working-age population. A population-based cost analysis was performed for cancer-related diagnoses between 1999 and 2014, using respective public government funded databases. Among the five most common cancers, breast cancer mortality was strongly associated with the growth in gross domestic product between 1999 and 2014 (R=0.98). In the female population, breast cancer represented the greatest productivity loss among all cancers, which was a consequence of the peak in the incidence of breast cancer during mid-working age in the working-age population, in addition to being the most common and fastest growing cancer among South Korean women. Our study shows that breast cancer not only represents a significant disease burden for individual patients, but also contributes a real, nonnegligible loss in productivity in the South Korean economy.

  10. When Two of the Same Are Needed: A Multilevel Model of Intragroup Ethnic Party Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    diversification of minority groups. In states with multiple levels of governments, intra-ethnic rival parties emerge if minorities are local majorities in certain regions. Intra-ethnic party competition is limited, however, through the national electoral system, and especially high legal thresholds can restrict......Parties of ethno-regional minorities have been created in a large number of ethnically diverse countries, but sometimes one such party is not enough. While previous work has investigated the consequences of intragroup party competition, this study looks at the causes of internal political...

  11. Self-reported work ability in long-term breast cancer survivors. A population-based questionnaire study in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Jensen, Anette Jung; Rugulies, Reiner; Christensen, Jane; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold; Johansen, Christoffer; Huitfeldt Madsen, Ida Elisabeth; Dalton, Susanne O

    2013-02-01

    Although up to 80% of women can return to work after treatment for breast cancer, maintaining an affiliation to the labour market may be a challenge, as shown by the fact that the risks for unemployment and early retirement are increased in the years after treatment of cancer. It is important to understand the work problems experienced by cancer survivors, including their ability to work. The aim of this study was to determine whether the ability of long-term breast cancer survivors to work was different from that of a cancer-free control group. In this population-based cross-sectional questionnaire study, 776 breast cancer survivors were matched with 1552 cancer-free women. Women with breast cancer diagnosed in 1997-2000 were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry, and the cancer-free controls were sampled from the Central Population Registry. Work ability was measured from a single question on the 'work ability index'. Furthermore, the questionnaire contained questions on socioeconomic factors, health-related factors and factors related to the workplace. The overall response rate was 57% (493 survivors and 830 controls). After exclusions, the study population consisted of 170 survivors and 391 controls. Women with a diagnosis of breast cancer who had survived at least five years and had returned to work reported significantly poorer work ability than cancer-free controls. In models with adjustment for socioeconomic factors, health-related factors and support at work, the factors most strongly associated with impaired work ability were low income, fatigue and little help and support from a supervisor. Our findings indicate that the work ability of long-term breast cancer survivors who are disease-free and back in work is impaired in comparison with that of cancer-free women.

  12. Night-Shift Work and Breast Cancer Risk in a Cohort of Chinese Women

    OpenAIRE

    Pronk, Anjoeka; Ji, Bu-Tian; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xue, Shouzheng; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong-Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Chow, Wong-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms has been classified as a probable cause of human cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, based on limited epidemiologic evidence and abundant experimental evidence. The authors investigated this association in a population-based prospective cohort study of Chinese women. At baseline (1996–2000), information on lifetime occupational history was obtained from 73,049 women. Lifetime night-shift exposure indices were created ...

  13. Cancer in persons working in dry cleaning in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Aage; Rylander, Lars

    2006-01-01

    -cleaning workers identified from the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Dry-cleaning work in the Nordic countries during the period when tetrachloroethylene was the dominant solvent was not associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer [rate ratio (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence interval...... not found in women directly involved in dry cleaning. We found an excess risk of bladder cancer (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.93) not associated with length of employment. The finding of no excess risk of esophageal cancer in Nordic dry cleaners differs from U.S. findings. Chance, differences in level...

  14. Cancer survivorship care-planning: Practice, research, and policy implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard W; Pritzker, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of cancer survivors are living longer than 5 years from their diagnosis date. This has resulted in a growing population of cancer survivors, expected to reach 19 million by 2024. Survivors frequently experience late effects caused by cancer and its treatment, reducing survivors' quality of life in multiple domains. Survivorship care-plans may aid the many physical, psychosocial, and financial needs that emerge posttreatment. However, the lack of reimbursement mechanisms, the limited amount of effectiveness research, and minimal guidelines for content and delivery are barriers to the widespread provision of survivorship care-plans. Challenges and opportunities for social work practice, research, and policy are identified and discussed.

  15. Using intervention mapping to develop a work-related guidance tool for those affected by cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Fehmidah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Working-aged individuals diagnosed and treated for cancer require support and assistance to make decisions regarding work. However, healthcare professionals do not consider the work-related needs of patients and employers do not understand the full impact cancer can have upon the employee and their work. We therefore developed a work-related guidance tool for those diagnosed with cancer that enables them to take the lead in stimulating discussion with a range of different healthcare professionals, employers, employment agencies and support services. The tool facilitates discussions through a set of questions individuals can utilise to find solutions and minimise the impact cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment may have on their employment, sick leave and return to work outcomes. The objective of the present article is to describe the systematic development and content of the tool using Intervention Mapping Protocol (IMP. Methods The study used the first five steps of the intervention mapping process to guide the development of the tool. A needs assessment identified the ‘gaps’ in information/advice received from healthcare professionals and other stakeholders. The intended outcomes and performance objectives for the tool were then identified followed by theory-based methods and an implementation plan. A draft of the tool was developed and subjected to a two-stage Delphi process with various stakeholders. The final tool was piloted with 38 individuals at various stages of the cancer journey. Results The tool was designed to be a self-led tool that can be used by any person with a cancer diagnosis and working for most types of employers. The pilot study indicated that the tool was relevant and much needed. Conclusions Intervention Mapping is a valuable protocol for designing complex guidance tools. The process and design of this particular tool can lend itself to other situations both occupational and more health

  16. Night shift work and stomach cancer risk in the MCC-Spain study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyarmati, Georgina; Turner, Michelle C; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Alguacil, Juan; Costas, Laura; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Martin Sanchez, Vicente; Ardanaz, Eva; Moreno, Victor; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Fernández-Tardon, Guillermo; Villanueva Ballester, Vicent; Capelo, Rocio; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Santibáñez, Miguel; Pollán, Marina; Aragonés, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2016-08-01

    Night shift work has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, based on experimental studies and limited evidence on human breast cancer risk. Evidence at other cancer sites is scarce. We evaluated the association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. A total of 374 incident stomach adenocarcinoma cases and 2481 population controls were included from the MCC-Spain study. Detailed data on lifetime night shift work were collected including permanent and rotating shifts, and their cumulative duration (years). Adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were used in analysis. A total of 25.7% of cases and 22.5% of controls reported ever being a night shift worker. There was a weak positive, non-significant association between ever having had worked for at least 1 year in permanent night shifts and stomach cancer risk compared to never having worked night shifts (OR=1.2, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.8). However, there was an inverse 'U' shaped relationship with cumulative duration of permanent night shifts, with the highest risk observed in the intermediate duration category (OR 10-20 years=2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.6) (p for trend=0.19). There was no association with ever having had worked in rotating night shifts (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.2) and no trend according to cumulative duration (p for trend=0.68). We found no clear evidence concerning an association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Using intervention mapping to develop a work-related guidance tool for those affected by cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Fehmidah; Kalawsky, Katryna; Wallis, Deborah J; Donaldson-Feilder, Emma

    2013-01-05

    Working-aged individuals diagnosed and treated for cancer require support and assistance to make decisions regarding work. However, healthcare professionals do not consider the work-related needs of patients and employers do not understand the full impact cancer can have upon the employee and their work. We therefore developed a work-related guidance tool for those diagnosed with cancer that enables them to take the lead in stimulating discussion with a range of different healthcare professionals, employers, employment agencies and support services. The tool facilitates discussions through a set of questions individuals can utilise to find solutions and minimise the impact cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment may have on their employment, sick leave and return to work outcomes. The objective of the present article is to describe the systematic development and content of the tool using Intervention Mapping Protocol (IMP). The study used the first five steps of the intervention mapping process to guide the development of the tool. A needs assessment identified the 'gaps' in information/advice received from healthcare professionals and other stakeholders. The intended outcomes and performance objectives for the tool were then identified followed by theory-based methods and an implementation plan. A draft of the tool was developed and subjected to a two-stage Delphi process with various stakeholders. The final tool was piloted with 38 individuals at various stages of the cancer journey. The tool was designed to be a self-led tool that can be used by any person with a cancer diagnosis and working for most types of employers. The pilot study indicated that the tool was relevant and much needed. Intervention Mapping is a valuable protocol for designing complex guidance tools. The process and design of this particular tool can lend itself to other situations both occupational and more health-care based.

  18. Work Experiences of Patients Receiving Palliative Care at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: Exploratory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glare, Paul A; Nikolova, Tanya; Alickaj, Alberta; Patil, Sujata; Blinder, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Employment-related issues have been largely overlooked in cancer patients needing palliative care. These issues may become more relevant as cancer evolves into more of a chronic illness and palliative care is provided independent of stage or prognosis. To characterize the employment situations of working-age palliative care patients. Cross-sectional survey setting/subjects: Consecutive sample of 112 patients followed in palliative care outpatient clinics at a comprehensive cancer center. Thirty-seven-item self-report questionnaire covering demographics, clinical status, and work experiences since diagnosis. The commonest cancer diagnoses were breast, colorectal, gynecological, and lung. Eighty-one percent had active disease. Seventy-four percent were on treatment. Eighty percent recalled being employed at the time of diagnosis, with 65% working full time. At the time of the survey, 44% were employed and 26% were working full time. Most participants said work was important, made them feel normal, and helped them feel they were "beating the cancer". Factors associated with being employed included male gender, self-employed, and taking less than three months off work. Respondents with pain and/or other symptoms were significantly less likely to be working. On multivariate analysis, only pain (odds ratio [OR] 8.16, p gender (OR 2.07), self-employed (OR 3.07), and current chemotherapy (OR 1.81) were included in the model, but were not statistically significant in this small sample. Work may be an important issue for some palliative care patients. Additional research is needed to facilitate ongoing employment for those who wish or need to continue working.

  19. Knowledge level of working and student nurses on cervical cancer and human papilloma virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Ozturk, Ozlem; Eroglu, Hulya; Bahadir, Ozgur; Harma, Muge; Harma, Mehmet Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    To determine knowledge levels of working and student nurses about cervical cancer and prophylactic cancer vaccines. This study was performed on 259 nursing students in the Department of Nursing and 137 nurses working in Health Research and Practice Center, approved to participate in the study between April-June 2012. The study was performed universally without selecting a sample. A questionnaire that was prepared for evaluating participants' knowledge and attitudes about human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine was distributed to the nurses and data obtained from the forms were transferred to SPSS 15.00 program and statistically analyzed. It was found that 54.8% of the student nurses were between 21-24 years old and 13.1% of working students were between 25-28 years old. When student nurses and working nurses were compared in terms of their knowledge about the causes of cervical cancer, their ideas about prevention from cervical cancer with HPV vaccine, their ideas about possible risks of HPV vaccine and conservation ratios of HPV vaccine, it was observed that there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05). When student nurses and working nurses were compared in terms of the information-source about HPV, ways of HPV contamination, awareness about people who are susceptible to HPV contamination and age of HPV vaccination, it was determined that there was a statistically significant difference (pknowledge about cervical cancer and HPV vaccine, but this was not sufficient. Therefore; it is recommended to use verbal, written and visual communication tools intensively in order to have topics on cervical cancer, early diagnosis and prevention in bachelor and master programs for nurses, to inform society about cervical cancer and HPV vaccine for public health and to teach precautions for its prevention.

  20. The breast cancer incidence risk among females and a hazards in the microenvironments of work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunon Zemła

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the earlier examinations on the Silesia voivodeship territory was found ultimately that in the districts with greatest development of industry the incidence of breast cancer was significantly greater in native females (stationary population than in immigrants (no stationary population, which suggests that there is a harmful influence of industrial pollutants in the female population (a longer time living in such conditions. It is possible that various chemical compounds especially from industrial-communal emissions and in the place of work – in the atmosphere contribute to a rise in the incidence of breast cancer in females as well. Material and methods. In analyse case-control type two women populations, i.e. natives – 540 cases with a breast cancer and 687 cases of control (women born within Silesia voivodeship, and immigrants – 319 cases of ills for breast cancer and 446 not-ills (all ones born outside Silesia voivodeship – were examinated. Anywhere in this case checking thesis whether character and long-time of hazards in microenvironment of work is significant in a risk of breast cancer. Results. The females that manually working without hazards in the place of work were characterized a bigger breast cancer risk – independently from place of birth (natives, immigrants, age group (30, 31–40, 41–50, 51–60, 60 and total age and the endemic areas about statistically significantly high or low incidence and mortality (tab. II, III. It can not distinguished in this study no bigger females group with any characteristic impurities in the place of work comparatively suffering groups to controls ones. Conclusions. In this study the occupational risk factors are small significant mark in the incidence for female breast cancer.

  1. Are work-related stressors associated with diagnosis of more advanced stages of incident breast cancers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Stahlberg, Claudia; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2008-01-01

    work pressure (HR = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.73) nor women with self-reported low influence on work organization (0.98; 0.69, 1.39) or long working hours (0.93; 0.54, 1.58) were at higher risk of breast cancer than women with no such stressors. Women with high work tempo had a slightly higher risk......OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between work-related stressors and breast cancer incidence and prognostic characteristics (estrogen receptor status, grade, lymph node status, size, stage) at the time of diagnosis. METHODS: The 18,932 women included in the Danish Nurse Cohort reported work...... of breast cancer (1.25; 1.02, 1.54) than women with a suitable work tempo, but there was no dose-response effect. There were no clear differences in the prognostic characteristics of breast tumors diagnosed in women with and without work-related stressors. CONCLUSIONS: Work-related stressors do not affect...

  2. Return-to-work intervention during cancer treatment - The providers' experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K S; Momsen, A H; Stapelfeldt, C M

    2018-01-01

    To explore in-depth understanding of providers' experiences when involved in a return-to-work (RTW) intervention offered during cancer treatment. Semi-structured individual interviews and participant observations at a hospital department and two municipal job centers were carried out, including ten...... providers (physicians, nurses and social workers). A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was applied, involving coding, identification of themes and interpretation of findings. Three major themes were identified: Treatment first, Work as an integrated component in cancer rehabilitation, and Challenges...... in bringing up work issues. Differences in providers' experiences of the RTW intervention offered to cancer patients were found: in the hospital setting RTW was a second priority, whereas in the municipality job centers it was an integrated component. Further studies are needed to investigate how and when...

  3. Associations Among Rotating Night Shift Work, Sleep, and Skin Cancer in Nurses’ Health Study II Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Carolyn J.; Kloss, Jacqueline D.; Feskanich, Diane; Culnan, Elizabeth; Schernhammer, Eva S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Night shift work and sleep duration have been associated with breast and other cancers. Results from the few prior studies of night shift work and skin cancer risk have been mixed and not fully accounted for other potentially important health-related variables (e.g., sleep characteristics). This study evaluated the relationship between rotating night shift work and skin cancer risk and included additional skin cancer risk factors and sleep-related variables. Methods The current study used data from 74,323 Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) II participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for skin cancers across categories of shift work and sleep duration. Results Over 10 years of follow-up, 4308 BCC, 334 SCC and 212 melanoma cases were identified. Longer duration of rotating night shifts was associated with a linear decline in risk of BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.90-0.97 per 5-year increase). Shift work was not significantly associated with either melanoma (HR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.86-1.21) or SCC (HR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.80-1.06). A short sleep duration (≤6 hours per day) was associated with lower risks of melanoma (HR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.46-0.98) and BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.86-1.00) compared with the most common report of 7 hours. SCC was not associated with duration of sleep (HR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.83-1.06). Conclusions Longer duration of rotating night shift work and shorter sleep duration were associated with lower risk of some skin cancers. Further research is needed to confirm and identify the mechanisms underlying these associations. PMID:27663986

  4. Women's reflections and actions regarding working after breast cancer surgery - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M I; Olsson, M; Wennman-Larsen, A; Petersson, L-M; Alexanderson, K

    2013-07-01

    To better understand processes affecting return to work (RTW) after breast cancer, more knowledge from the perspective of sickness absentees is warranted. Still, research based on women's own reasoning and actions in RTW is very scarce. This study aims to elucidate how women with breast cancer reflect and act on work-related issues. Thematic analyses of data from four focus group interviews with 23 women who had had breast cancer surgery in the previous 3-13 months were carried out. The five following themes of reflections regarding RTW were identified: 'health and functioning', 'self-esteem/integrity', 'value of work', 'relationships at work', and 'social circumstances'. These reflections were associated with the three identified themes of actions taken by the women: 'to work or to be sickness absent', 'to adjust work according to own needs or not', and 'to disclose or to hide one's cancer'. There was a distinct difference between women who experienced work as a source of well-being and those who needed a respite from work. This study adds knowledge to the process of RTW after breast cancer and focuses on factors that lead the women to an active role in this process. We point to the interplay between women's own preferences, perceived competence, outer opportunities, and the actions each woman take with regard to RTW, which need to be recognized by all stakeholders involved. Furthermore, it continues to be essential to address the specific issue of disclosure in the workplace because this may be distressing for women. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. "The only way I know how to live is to work": a qualitative study of work following treatment for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, Elizabeth A; Drudge-Coates, Lawrence; Rixon, Lorna; Eaton, Emma; Cooper, Alethea F

    2013-01-01

    For many survivors of prostate cancer, returning to work posttreatment is a realistic goal. However, little research to date has explored work among prostate cancer survivors. The focus of this study was to explore the meaning of work among prostate cancer survivors and to describe the linkages between masculinity and work following prostate cancer treatment. Fifty prostate cancer survivors who were in paid employment prior to their diagnosis completed a semistructured interview following completion of their treatment and of these, 41 also completed a 12-month follow-up interview. Framework analysis of the 91 transcripts was undertaken. The majority of the men had returned to work at the 12-month interview. Four themes were identified, and these were labeled "Work and self-identity," "Work-related implications of treatment side effects," "Disclosure of cancer," and "Perceptions of future as a cancer survivor." A degree of embarrassment and concern about residual side effects and whether these would present a challenge within the workplace was apparent among our sample and was compounded by a reluctance to disclose these. The descriptions provided by the men in this study reveal that the experience of prostate cancer can lead to challenges for both social and work-related roles. The influence of prostate cancer on men's reports of masculinity was variable, and recognition of these differences is required. In addition, some survivors of prostate cancer may require specific interventions aimed at helping them to manage disclosure of their illness, particularly within a work environment. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Cancer in persons working in dry cleaning in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Aage; Rylander, Lars; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Lindbohm, Marja-Liisa; Pukkala, Eero; Romundstad, Pål; Jensen, Per; Clausen, Lene Bjørk; Johansen, Kristina

    2006-02-01

    U.S. studies have reported an increased risk of esophageal and some other cancers in dry cleaners exposed to tetrachloroethylene. We investigated whether the U.S. findings could be reproduced in the Nordic countries using a series of case-control studies nested in cohorts of laundry and dry-cleaning workers identified from the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Dry-cleaning work in the Nordic countries during the period when tetrachloroethylene was the dominant solvent was not associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer [rate ratio (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-1.69], but our study was hampered by some unclassifiable cases. The risks of cancer of the gastric cardia, liver, pancreas, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma were not significantly increased. Assistants in dry-cleaning shops had a borderline significant excess risk of cervical cancer not found in women directly involved in dry cleaning. We found an excess risk of bladder cancer (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.93) not associated with length of employment. The finding of no excess risk of esophageal cancer in Nordic dry cleaners differs from U.S. findings. Chance, differences in level of exposure to tetrachloroethylene, and confounding may explain the findings. The overall evidence on bladder cancer in dry cleaners is equivocal.

  7. 7 CFR 955.91 - Additional parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Marketing Agreement § 955.91 Additional parties. After the effective date thereof, any handler may become a... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... then be effective as to such new contracting party. ...

  8. Returning to work: The cancer survivor’s transformational journey of adjustment and coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Barnard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore cancer survivors’ return to work (RTW experience with a specific focus on the adjustment and coping process underlying their journey. The study was conducted in the Southern Cape, South Africa, with eight cancer survivors having returned to work following successful treatment of various types of cancer. Unstructured interviews were conducted and data were analysed following the principles of hermeneutic phenomenological reflection and analysis. Four themes emerged, representing the changing adjustment responses and coping during the RTW journey. Participants evolve from being overwhelmed with emotions and applying avoidant coping to seeking understanding and positive affectivity in their attempt to comprehend the reality of their situation. Participants’ external locus of control change to a more active approach and problem-solving orientation, demonstrating a need to take control and responsibility. Ultimately, adjustment and coping become most constructive when cancer survivors resolve to re-assess life and self through meaning-making, resulting in renewed appreciation of life, appropriate life style changes, and regained confidence in their relational role. A process perspective is proposed to facilitate an understanding of, and working with, cancer survivors’ transition through the RTW journey towards optimal coping phases.

  9. Inheritance and the Dynamics of Party Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Kroh, Martin; Selb, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Extensive research efforts notwithstanding, scholars continue to disagree on the nature and meaning of party identification. Traditionalists conceive of partisanship as a largely affective attachment to a political party that emerges in childhood through parental influences and tends to persist throughout life. The revisionist conception of partisanship is that of a running tally of party utilities that is updated based on current party performance. We attempt to reconcile both schools of tho...

  10. WORK CONTINUATION WHILE TREATED FOR BREAST CANCER: THE ROLE OF WORKPLACE ACCOMMODATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Bradley, Cathy J.; Henry, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Given the short- and long-term disabilities associated with breast cancer and its treatment, the authors investigate the influence of workplace accommodations on the employment and hours worked of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Accommodations that allow women to work fewer hours or that ease the burden of work could also generate health benefits by reducing workplace demands and allowing women more time to tend to treatment needs and recovery. In prior research, the authors found modest labor supply impacts on employment for this group of women. Evidence from this study suggests that some accommodations are associated with fewer hours worked, while some are associated with higher employment or hours. In addition, some of the accommodations that may affect hours of work—sometimes positively and sometimes negatively—are associated with positive health benefits. PMID:26778848

  11. Rotating Night-Shift Work and the Risk of Breast Cancer in the Nurses' Health Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Lani R; Tamimi, Rulla M; Rosner, Bernard A; Brown, Susan B; Stevens, Richard G; Eliassen, A Heather; Laden, Francine; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2017-09-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer declared shift work that involved circadian disruption to be a "probable" carcinogen (group 2A), noting that human evidence was limited. Using data from 2 prospective cohort studies, the Nurses' Health Study (1988-2012; n = 78,516) and Nurses' Health Study II (1989-2013; n = 114,559), we examined associations between rotating night-shift work and breast cancer risk. In the 2 cohorts, there were a total of 9,541 incident invasive breast malignancies and 24 years of follow-up. In the Nurses' Health Study, women with 30 years or more of shift work did not have a higher risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.77, 1.17; P for trend = 0.63) compared with those who never did shift work, although follow-up occurred primarily after retirement from shift work. Among participants in the Nurses' Health Study II, who were younger than participants in the other cohort, the risk of breast cancer was significantly higher in women with 20 years or more of shift work at baseline, reflecting young-adult exposure (HR = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.23, 3.73; P for trend = 0.23), and was marginally significantly higher for women with 20 years or more of cumulative shift work when we used updated exposure information (HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.97; P for trend = 0.74). In conclusion, long-term rotating night-shift work was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer, particularly among women who performed shift work during young adulthood. Further studies should explore the role of shift work timing on breast cancer risk. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Advice about Work-Related Issues to Peers and Employers from Head and Neck Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewa, Carolyn S; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory and descriptive study is to contribute to the sparse return-to-work literature on head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Interview participants were asked to reflect upon their work-related experience with cancer by answering two specific questions: (1) What advice would you give someone who has been newly diagnosed with head and neck cancer? (2) What advice would you give to employers of these people? Data were gathered through 10 individual semi-structured in-depth interviews with HNC clinic patients at a regional cancer center's head and neck clinic in Ontario, Canada. A constant comparative method of theme development was used. Codes identified in and derived from the data were discussed by research team members until consensus was reached. Codes with similar characteristics were grouped together and used to develop overarching themes. Work-related advice for peers focused on personal self-care and interactions within workplaces. Work-related advice to employers focused on demonstrating basic human values as well as the importance of communication. The study results suggest HNC clinic patients should be proactive with employers and help to set reasonable expectations and provide a realistic plan for work to be successfully completed. HNC clinic patients should develop communication skills to effectively disclose their cancer and treatment to employers. In this exploratory study, HNC clinic patients' advice was solution-focused underscoring the importance of self-care and pro-active communication and planning with employers. Employers were advised to demonstrate core human values throughout all phases of the work disability episode beginning at diagnosis.

  13. Night-shift work, sleep duration, daytime napping, and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Ren, Fang-Mei; Lin, Ying; Su, Feng-Xi; Jia, Wei-Hua; Su, Xue-Fen; Tang, Lu-Ying; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2015-04-01

    Sleep habits vary among different countries, and sleep problems may cause various health problems. The aim of our study was to evaluate the separate and combined associations of night-shift work, sleep duration, and daytime napping with breast cancer risk among the Chinese population. This study conducted face-to-face interviews with 712 women diagnosed with incident invasive breast cancer before treatment and 742 age-matched controls. Information on sleep habits, demographic characteristics, and suspected or established risk factors of breast cancer were collected from the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Night-shift work was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 1.34 (1.05-1.72)]. Compared to women with a sleep duration of 6.1-8.9 h/day, women who had shorter [(≤6.0 h/day) (OR (95% CI): 1.53 (1.10-2.12)] and longer (≥9.0 h/day) sleep duration [(OR (95% CI): 1.59 (1.17-2.17)] had an increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, daytime napping was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer among night-shift workers [OR (95% CI): 0.57 (0.36-0.90)], but no association was found among women who never had night-shift work [OR (95% CI): 1.01 (0.75-1.35)] (P for interaction = 0.054). Night-shift work and longer sleep duration also synergistically increased breast cancer risk [OR (95% CI): 3.69 (1.94-7.02)] (P for interaction = 0.009). Sleep problems, including night-shift work, and shorter and longer sleep duration, are associated with an increased breast cancer risk. In particular, the combined effects of night-shift work with no daytime napping or longer sleep duration are greater than the independent effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. When can we trust a third party?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hee, van K.M.; Sidorova, N.; Werf, van der J.M.E.M.; Koutny, M.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Yakovlev, A.

    2013-01-01

    Organizations often do not want to reveal the way a product is created or a service is delivered. As a consequence, if two organizations want to cooperate, they contact a trusted third party. Each specifies how it wants to communicate with the other party. The trusted third party then needs to

  15. 28 CFR 51.7 - Political parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.7 Political parties. Certain activities of political parties are subject to the preclearance requirement of section 5. A change affecting... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political parties. 51.7 Section 51.7...

  16. Shift work and colorectal cancer risk in the MCC-Spain case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Turner, Michelle C; Alonso-Aguado, Maria Henar; Martin, Vicente; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Pozo, Benito Mirón; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Ardanaz, Eva; Altzibar, Jone M; Peiro, Rosana; Tardon, Adonina; Lorca, José Andrés; Chirlaque, Maria Dolores; García-Palomo, Andrés; Jimenez-Moleon, Jose Juan; Ierssen, Trinidad; Ederra, Maria; Amiano, Pilar; Pollan, Marina; Moreno, Victor; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Shift work that involves circadian disruption has been associated with a higher cancer risk. Most epidemiological studies to date have focused on breast cancer risk and evidence for other common tumors is limited. We evaluated the risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) in relation to shift work history in a population-based case-control study in Spain. Methods This analysis included 1626 incident CRC cases and 3378 randomly selected population controls of both sexes, enrolled in 11 regions of Spain. Sociodemographic and lifestyle information was assessed in face-to-face interviews. Shift work was assessed in detail throughout lifetime occupational history. We estimated the risk of colon and rectal cancer associated with rotating and permanent shift work (ever, cumulative duration, age of first exposure) using unconditional logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. Results Having ever performed rotating shift work (morning, evening and/or night) was associated with an increased risk for CRC [odds ratio (OR) 1.22, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.04-1.43], as compared to day workers. Having ever worked permanent night shifts (≥3 nights/month) was not associated with CRC risk (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62-1.00). OR increased with increasing lifetime cumulative duration of rotating shift work (P-value for trend 0.005) and were highest among subjects in the top quartiles of exposure (3 rd quartile, 20-34 years, OR 1.38, 95%CI 1.06-1.81; 4 th quartile, ≥35 years, OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02-1.79). Conclusions These data suggest that rotating shift work may increase the risk of CRC especially after long-term exposures.

  17. Working Alliance and Vocational Outcomes for Cancer Survivors: An Initial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the sex differences in the perception of working alliance and the perceptions of optimism regarding future employment and job satisfaction with adult cancer survivors receiving vocational rehabilitation services. No significant differences were found between males and females in terms of the three components of the working…

  18. Supporting cancer patients with work-related problems through an oncological occupational physician: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, A C G N M; Bruinvels, D J; de Boer, A G E M; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of an oncological occupational physician (OOP) who is trained in oncological work-related problems, and in providing work-related support to cancer patients within the curative setting. We assessed facilitators and barriers that affect the activities of an OOP, and the satisfaction of the OOPs and patients with this new form of health care. Interviews were held with (1) OOPs (N = 13) to assess facilitators, barriers and their satisfaction with their ability to give supportive care and (2) cancer patients (N = 8) to assess their satisfaction concerning consulting an OOP. The main facilitators were positive feedback from health care providers and patients about the received care and support that the OOP had given, and the additional knowledge of the OOPs about cancer and work-related problems. Major barriers for being active as an OOP were lack of financial support for the OOP and the unfamiliarity of patients and health care providers with the specialised occupational physician. Both OOPs and the specialised knowledge and additional training of the OOPs facilitated providing support to cancer patients and survivors with work-related problems. Familiarity with the specialised occupational physician and financial support should be improved. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Night shift work and lung cancer risk among female textile workers in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Paul; Lundin, Jessica; Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta; Littell, Christopher; Gao, Daoli; Thomas, David B; Checkoway, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as a probable human carcinogen. Suppression of the anti-neoplastic hormone, melatonin, is a presumed mechanism of action. We conducted a case-cohort study nested within a cohort of 267,400 female textile workers in Shanghai, China. Newly diagnosed lung cancer cases (n = 1451) identified during the study period (1989-2006) were compared with an age-stratified subcohort (n = 3040). Adjusting for age, smoking, parity, and endotoxin exposure, relative risks [hazard ratios (HRs)] were estimated by Cox regression modeling to assess associations with cumulative years and nights of rotating shift work. Results did not consistently reveal any increased risk of lung cancer among rotating shift work or statistically significant trends for both cumulative years (HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.02; P(trend) = 0.294) and nights (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.00; P(trend) = 0.415). Further analyses imposing 10- and 20-year lag times for disease latency also revealed similar results. Contrary to the initial hypothesis, rotating nighttime shift work appears to be associated with a relatively reduced lung cancer risk although the magnitude of the effect was modest and not statistically significant.

  20. Sleep disruption, chronotype, shift work, and prostate cancer risk and mortality: a 30-year prospective cohort study of Finnish twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerman, Barbra A; Markt, Sarah C; Koskenvuo, Markku; Hublin, Christer; Pukkala, Eero; Mucci, Lorelei A; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2016-11-01

    Sleep disruption and shift work have been associated with cancer risk, but epidemiologic evidence for prostate cancer remains limited. We aimed to prospectively investigate the association between midlife sleep- and circadian-related parameters and later prostate cancer risk and mortality in a population-based cohort of Finnish twins. Data were drawn from the Older Finnish Twin Cohort and included 11,370 twins followed from 1981 to 2012. Over the study period, 602 incident cases of prostate cancer and 110 deaths from prostate cancer occurred. Cox regression was used to evaluate associations between midlife sleep duration, sleep quality, chronotype, and shift work with prostate cancer risk and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Within-pair co-twin analyses were employed to account for potential familial confounding. Compared to "definite morning" types, "somewhat evening" types had a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer (HR 1.3; 95 % CI 1.1, 1.6). Chronotype significantly modified the relationship between shift work and prostate cancer risk (p-interaction shift work and prostate cancer risk in the overall analyses and no significant association between any sleep- or circadian-related parameter and risk in co-twin analyses. Neither sleep- nor circadian-related parameters were significantly associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality. The association between sleep disruption, chronotype, and shift work with prostate cancer risk and mortality has never before been studied in a prospective study of male twins. Our findings suggest that chronotype may be associated with prostate cancer risk and modify the association between shift work and prostate cancer risk. Future studies of circadian disruption and prostate cancer should account for this individual-level characteristic.

  1. Rehabilitation Using High-Intensity Physical Training and Long-Term Return-to-Work in Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Karin M.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; van de Wouw, Agnès J.; Houterman, Saskia; Schep, Goof

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Due to large and increasing numbers of cancer survivors, long-term cancer-related health issues have become a major focus of attention. This study examined the relation between a high-intensity physical rehabilitation program and return-to-work in cancer survivors who had received

  2. The 19th Party Congress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik; Høyrup Christensen, Nis

    2017-01-01

    veteran leaders such as Wang Qishan (69) continue to serve on the committee? Would Xi Jinping pack the Politburo and the PSC with his own close allies, or would he try to achieve a factional balance observing the interests of former leaders such as Jiang Zemin and Hu Jintao? There was also much....... Such a report is usually a long document setting out the Party's priorities and policy objectives for the next five-year period. Would Xi Jinping's report signal new policy initiatives, and would it outline strategic guidelines reaching beyond 2022? This article examines these questions and assesses the future...

  3. Authentication method for authenticating a first party to a second party

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    An authentication system and method is presented for authenticating a first party to a second party, where an operation is performed on condition that the authentication succeeds. The authentication method verifies whether the first party is authenticated. If the first party is not authenticated,

  4. The niche party concept and its measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas M; Miller, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The concept of the niche party has become increasingly popular in analyses of party competition. Yet, existing approaches vary in their definitions and their measurement approaches. We propose using a minimal definition that allows us to compare political parties in terms of their 'nicheness'. We argue that the conceptual core of the niche party concept is based on issue emphasis and that a niche party emphasizes policy areas neglected by its rivals. Based on this definition, we propose a continuous measure that allows for more fine-grained measurement of a party's 'nicheness' than the dominant, dichotomous approaches and thereby limits the risk of measurement error. Drawing on data collected by the Comparative Manifesto Project, we show that (1) our measure has high face validity and (2) exposes differences among parties that are not captured by alternative, static or dichotomous measures.

  5. Work engagement in cancer care: The power of co-worker and supervisor support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Michael G; Khan, Asaduzzaman; Poulsen, Emma E; Khan, Shanchita R; Poulsen, Anne A

    2016-04-01

    Co-worker and supervisor support can provide knowledge, advice and expertise which may improve motivation, confidence and skills. This exploratory study aimed to examine the association of co-worker and supervisor support, and other socio-demographic and practice variables with work engagement for cancer workers. The study surveyed 573 cancer workers in Queensland (response rate 56%). Study participants completed surveys containing demographics and psychosocial questionnaires measuring work engagement, co-worker and supervisor support. Of these respondents, a total of 553 responded to the items measuring work engagement and this forms the basis for the present analyses. Oncology nurses represented the largest professional group (37%) followed by radiation therapists (22%). About 54% of the workforce was aged >35 years and 81% were female. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify explanatory variables independently associated with work engagement for cancer workers. After adjusting for the effects of other factors, co-worker and supervisor support were both significantly associated with work engagement. Having 16 years or more experience, being directly involved in patient care, having children and not being a shift worker were positively associated with work engagement. Annual absenteeism of six days or more was associated with low work engagement. The fitted model explained 23% of the total variability in work engagement. This study emphasises that health care managers need to promote co-worker and supervisor support in order to optimise work engagement with special attention to those who are not directly involved in patient care. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Narratives of women’s breast cancer experience and how this impacts on their working lives

    OpenAIRE

    Dowling, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Over 55,000 new breast cancer cases are diagnosed each year and the figures are rising. Most studies show that women want to get back to ‘normal’ and describe how returning to work helps to achieve this. For some, there are wider health implications which may affect their mobility or return to work (RTW). Disabilities are sometimes hidden, for example fatigue and emotional stress may result in a loss of confidence and work ability. Few studies focus on how the structural relations of organiza...

  7. The transition between work, sickness absence and pension in a cohort of Danish colorectal cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Harling, Henrik; Pedersen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    .91), not operated curatively 1.35 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.63) and with occurrence of postoperative complications 1.25 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.41). The opposite was found for the transition from sickness absence back to work. Conclusions: This nationwide study of colorectal cancer patients who have survived 1 year shows...... for the more vulnerable persons who have a combination of severe disease and a history of work-related problems with episodes outside the working market....

  8. Competitive and Cooperative Degree in Supply Chain: Supplier Selection between Competitors and Third-Party Suppliers

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Bo; Wang, Xianjia; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Part 5: Modelling and Simulation; International audience; This work explores the firm’s supplier selection question that the competitor firm and the third-party supplier can supply the substitutable component. We consider a supply chain with two competing original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and two third-party suppliers. The two OEMs produce the competing products which are comprised by two main components. Each OEM only can produce one component in-house and each third-party supplier onl...

  9. Mechanisms of breast cancer risk in shift workers: association of telomere shortening with the duration and intensity of night work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulin Erdem, Johanna; Notø, Heidi Ødegaard; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Jenny-Anne S; Petersen-Øverleir, Marte; Reszka, Edyta; Pepłońska, Beata; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh

    2017-08-01

    Occupational factors such as shiftwork and especially night work that involves disruption of the circadian rhythm may contribute to increased breast cancer risk. Circadian disruption may also affect telomere length (TL). While short TL generally is associated with increased cancer risk, its association with breast cancer risk is inconclusive. We suggest that working schedules might be an important factor in assessment of effects of TL on breast cancer risk. Moreover, telomere shortening might be a potential mechanism for night work-related breast cancer. In this study, effects of shift work on TL and its association with breast cancer risk were investigated in a nested breast cancer case-control study of Norwegian nurses. TL was assessed by qPCR in DNA from 563 breast cancer patients and 619 controls. Here, we demonstrate that TL is affected by intensive night work schedules, as work with six consecutive night for a period of more than 5 years was associated with decreased telomere lengths (-3.18, 95% CI: -6.46 to -0.58, P = 0.016). Furthermore, telomere shortening is associated with increased breast cancer risk in workers with long periods of consecutive night shifts. Thus, nurses with longer telomere lengths had a lower risk for breast cancer if they had worked more than four (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.79, P = 0.014) or five (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.10-0.83, P = 0.029) consecutive night shifts for a period of 5 years or more. These data suggest that telomere shortening is associated with the duration and intensity of night work and may be a contributing factor for breast cancer risk among female shift workers. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Meaning of work and the returning process after breast cancer: a longitudinal study of 56 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilliehorn, Sara; Hamberg, Katarina; Kero, Anneli; Salander, Pär

    2013-06-01

    An increasing number of women survive breast cancer and a majority return to work. However, findings based on mean values may conceal individual processes that need to be better understood to discuss meaningful rehabilitation. The purpose of this study is to describe the sick-leave pattern of a group of Swedish women with primary breast cancer but foremost to explore their ideas about what motivates and discourages their return to work. Fifty-six women were repeatedly interviewed over a period of 18-24 months. Interview sections that clearly illustrated the women's experiences and ideas about work were categorized using the comparative similarities-differences technique. The average length of sick leave was 410 days (range 0-942). Six months after the first day of sick leave, 29% worked at least their previous service grade. At 12 months, 55% and at 18 months 57% did so. Those treated with chemotherapy had in average more than twice as large sick leave as those who did not. Three categories emerged. 'Motives for not returning to work' consists of four subcategories: 'I'm still too fragile to return to work'; 'My workplace is a discouraging place'; 'I took an opportunity to pause' and 'I've lost the taste for work'. 'Motives for returning' consists of two sub-categories: 'Work generates and structures my everyday life' and 'I miss my workplace'. Finally, 'Transition in work approach' reflects a changed approach to work. The meaning of work varies over time, but first and foremost work was regarded as an important part of the healing process as it restores the disruption of everyday life. Guidelines cannot be reduced to a linear relationship with biomedical variables but the individual context of everyday life must be considered. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  11. Quality of working life of nurses in a tertiary cancer center in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhirani Nagammal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Nurses are the largest segment of professionals working in the healthcare industry, and a satisfactory quality of working life will empower them to provide the highest quality care to their patients. Aim To assess the quality of working life among nurses in a tertiary cancer care center in Qatar concerning the following variables; control at work, employee engagement, general well-being, home-work interface, job/career satisfaction, stress at work, and working conditions. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to assess the QoWL among 146 Staff Nurses working in different units of a tertiary cancer center in Qatar. A Quality of Work life Scale, a seven-point Likert’s scale was used, were nurses self-reported their QoWL. Results The mean age of the study participants were 36.48 years ± 6.74, and mean total years of clinical experience in nursing and clinical experience at the center was 14.16 years and 7.65 years respectively. The majority (69.9% of the nurses who participated in the study were working in inpatient units. Around fifty-four percentage were graduate nurses. A vast majority (89.7% of the respondents were married and among them, 84.2% of nurses lived with their family. Nurses’ perception of the factors associated with QoWL including control and stress at work were found average, and others such as employee engagement, general well-being, homework interface, job/career satisfaction, working condition, and overall quality of work life were considered good. There was no statistically significant difference in the QoWL scores and participants’ characteristics (P>0.05. Conclusion The overall QoWL was found to be good for the Oncology Nurses working at a cancer center in Qatar. However, Nurses reported having varying degrees of stress at work. Nurses require highly specialized clinical competencies to accurately determine patients' states and predict and cope with difficulties that may occur during

  12. A multidisciplinary intervention to facilitate return to work in cancer patients: intervention protocol and design of a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Iris F.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Returning to work can be problematic for cancer survivors due to suboptimal workplace support, a heavy workload, decreased physical functioning and fatigue. The timely and permanent return to work (RtW) of cancer patients favourably influences quality of life and economic independence.

  13. Work-related productivity losses in an era of ageing populations: the case of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Walsh, Paul M; O Céilleachair, Alan; Skally, Mairead; Staines, Anthony; Kapur, Kanika; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Sharp, Linda

    2013-02-01

    We investigated patterns and costs of lost productivity due to colorectal cancer in Ireland and examined how rising pension ages affect these costs. Data from a postal survey of colorectal cancer survivors (6 to 30 months after diagnosis; n = 159), taken from March 2010 to January 2011, were combined with population-level survival estimates and national wage data to calculate temporary and permanent disability, and premature mortality, costs using the human capital approach. Almost 40% of respondents left the workforce permanently after diagnosis and 90% took temporary time off work. Total costs of lost productivity per person were 205,847 in 2008 assuming retirement at the age of 65. When the retirement age was raised to 70, productivity costs increased by almost a half. Our study demonstrated the considerable productivity costs associated with colorectal cancer and highlighted the effect of rising retirement ages on costs.

  14. Associations among rotating night shift work, sleep and skin cancer in Nurses' Health Study II participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Carolyn J; Kloss, Jacqueline D; Feskanich, Diane; Culnan, Elizabeth; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2017-03-01

    Night shift work and sleep duration have been associated with breast and other cancers. Results from the few prior studies of night shift work and skin cancer risk have been mixed and not fully accounted for other potentially important health-related variables (eg, sleep characteristics). This study evaluated the relationship between rotating night shift work and skin cancer risk and included additional skin cancer risk factors and sleep-related variables. The current study used data from 74 323 Nurses' Health Study (NHS) II participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for skin cancers across categories of shift work and sleep duration. Over 10 years of follow-up, 4308 basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 334 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 212 melanoma cases were identified. Longer duration of rotating night shifts was associated with a linear decline in risk of BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.97 per 5-year increase). Shift work was not significantly associated with either melanoma (HR=1.02, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.21) or SCC (HR=0.92, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.06). A short sleep duration (≤6 hours per day) was associated with lower risks of melanoma (HR=0.68, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.98) and BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.00) compared with the most common report of 7 hours. SCC was not associated with duration of sleep (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.06). Longer duration of rotating night shift work and shorter sleep duration were associated with lower risk of some skin cancers. Further research is needed to confirm and identify the mechanisms underlying these associations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Night shift work and breast cancer risk: what do the meta-analyses tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Manisha; Labrèche, France; Demers, Paul A

    2018-05-22

    Objectives This paper aims to compare results, assess the quality, and discuss the implications of recently published meta-analyses of night shift work and breast cancer risk. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted for meta-analyses published from 2007-2017 that included at least one pooled effect size (ES) for breast cancer associated with any night shift work exposure metric and were accompanied by a systematic literature review. Pooled ES from each meta-analysis were ascertained with a focus on ever/never exposure associations. Assessments of heterogeneity and publication bias were also extracted. The AMSTAR 2 checklist was used to evaluate quality. Results Seven meta-analyses, published from 2013-2016, collectively included 30 cohort and case-control studies spanning 1996-2016. Five meta-analyses reported pooled ES for ever/never night shift work exposure; these ranged from 0.99 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-1.03, N=10 cohort studies) to 1.40 (95% CI 1.13-1.73, N=9 high quality studies). Estimates for duration, frequency, and cumulative night shift work exposure were scant and mostly not statistically significant. Meta-analyses of cohort, Asian, and more fully-adjusted studies generally resulted in lower pooled ES than case-control, European, American, or minimally-adjusted studies. Most reported statistically significant between-study heterogeneity. Publication bias was not evident in any of the meta-analyses. Only one meta-analysis was strong in critical quality domains. Conclusions Fairly consistent elevated pooled ES were found for ever/never night shift work and breast cancer risk, but results for other shift work exposure metrics were inconclusive. Future evaluations of shift work should incorporate high quality meta-analyses that better appraise individual study quality.

  16. Electronic Self-report Assessment--Cancer (ESRA-C): Working towards an integrated survey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Bryant T; Wolpin, Seth; Lober, William B; Bush, Nigel; Fann, Jesse R; Berry, Donna L

    2006-01-01

    The Clinical Informatics Research Group and Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems at the University of Washington are working with interdisciplinary teams to improve patient care and tracking of patient-reported symptoms and outcomes by creating an extensible web-based survey and intervention platform. The findings and cumulative experience from these processes have led to incremental improvements and variations in each new implementation of the platform. This paper presents progress in the first year of a three-year NIH study entitled Electronic Self Report Assessment--Cancer (ESRA-C). The project's goals are to enhance and evaluate the web-based computerized patient self-reporting and assessment system at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Preliminary work and lessons learned in the modification of the platform and enhancements to the system will be described.

  17. The Management of Large Components from Decommissioning to Storage and Disposal. A Report of the Task Group on Large Components of the NEA Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    take into account the respective requirements not only of the waste transporters and of the repository operator, but also of those of the relevant safety and transport authorities. The objectives of this study are: - to provide the basis for the different involved parties to reach convergence on the most relevant management option from an overall point of view; - to identify which criteria should be assessed in order to appreciate that relevancy, and - to promote a communication tool that benefits from the experience gained by the different countries dealing with that issue. As well as providing a tool for dialogue between all involved parties, the objective also provides a tool for assessment bodies (e.g., regulators) and stakeholders (the public) in order to appreciate the merits and the disadvantages of a given management option. Hence, this technical guide promotes an integrated approach encompassing the interests of all actors involved (e.g., decommissioners, regulators, the public at large, waste-management agencies, transporters, waste owners, etc.). Its purpose is to facilitate the review of the issues at stake through a case-by-case approach, addressing all intermediate steps, such as treatment and conditioning, transportation and relevant decision-making parameters, in order to determine the overall relevancy of potential management routes depending on given circumstances. (authors)

  18. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, is Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. McNeill's research is on the elimination of cancer-related health disparities in minority populations. Her research has particular emphasis on understanding the influence of social contextual determinants of cancer in minorities, with a special focus of the role of physical activity as a key preventive behavior and obesity as a major cancer determinant. Her research takes place in minority and underserved communities such as public housing developments, black churches, community-based clinics and low-income neighborhoods-communities with excess cancer death rates. She has been continuously funded, receiving grants from various funding agencies (i.e., National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, etc.), to better understand and design innovative solutions to address obesity in racial/ethnic minority communities. Dr. McNeill is PI of several community-based studies, primarily working with African American churches. One is a called Project CHURCH, an academic-faith-based partnership established to: 1) identify underlying reasons for health disparities in cancer and cancer risk factors (e.g., screening, diet) among AAs using a cohort study (N=2400), 2) engage AAs as partners in the research process, and 3) to ultimately eliminate disparities among AAs. In 2014 Dr. McNeill furthered her partnership through the Faith, Health, and Family (FHF) Collaborative. The goals of FHF are to enhance the Project CHURCH partnership to address family obesity in African Americans, strengthen the partnership by developing a larger coalition of organizations and stakeholders to address the problem, assess church and community interest in family obesity and develop an agenda to address obesity in faith settings. To date we have 50 churches as members. Dr. McNeill is also director of the Center for Community

  19. Gender differences in Assessments of Party Leaders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina; Hansen, Kasper Møller

    2015-01-01

    Is there a relationship between party leader gender and voters' assessments? Yes, according to theses on gender identity and stereotyping. A voter survey during the 2011 Danish general election allows for a comprehensive analysis of a less likely case with four male and four female party leaders...... of gender does not increase with age, actually, the opposite is the case among men since younger male voters have smaller sympathy for female party leaders. Furthermore, there is no support for the expectation that voters with more education or with higher levels of political interest and knowledge are more....... Female party leaders are assessed more positively by female voters than male voters both in regard to general party leader sympathy and assessment of specific characteristics, whereas it is not the case that male party leaders are assessed more positively by male voters than female voters. The impact...

  20. Party drugs - use and harm reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Matthew

    2010-08-01

    Party drug use, the intermittent use of stimulants, ecstasy and so-called 'designer drugs' at dance parties or 'raves', is now part of the culture of many young Australians. This article discusses the risks associated with the use of 'party drugs' and describes an useful approach to general practitioner assessment and management of patients who may be using party drugs. Party drug use is associated with a range of harms, including risks associated with behaviour while drug affected, toxicity and overdose, mental health complications and physical morbidity. Multiple substance use, particularly combining sedatives, further amplifies risk. If GPs have some understanding of these drugs and their effects, they are well placed to provide an effective intervention in party drug users by supporting the reduction of harm.

  1. Assessing the Influence of Political Parties on Public Opinion: The Challenge from Pretreatment Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slothuus, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Despite generations of research, political scientists have trouble pinpointing the influence of political parties on public opinion. Recently, scholars have made headway in exploring whether parties in fact shape policy preferences by relying on experimental designs. Yet, the evidence from...... this work is mixed. I argue that the typical experiment faces a design problem that likely minimizes the extent to which parties apparently matter. Because parties have policy reputations, experimental participants may already know from real-world exposure to political debate where the parties stand before...... they are told in the experiment—they are “pretreated.” This study investigates how real-world political context interferes with party cue stimulus in experiments. In two experiments I show that two types of “pretreatment” from outside the experiment—exposure-based and reputation-based—dramatically moderate...

  2. Night-shift work and breast cancer--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Sharea; Verbeek, Jos; Seidler, Andreas; Lindbohm, Marja-Liisa; Ojajärvi, Anneli; Orsini, Nicola; Costa, Giovanni; Neuvonen, Kaisa

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence on the potential relationship between nightshift work and breast cancer. We searched multiple databases for studies comparing women in shift work to those with no-shift work reporting incidence of breast cancer. We calculated incremental risk ratios (RR) per five years of night-shift work and per 300 night shift increases in exposure and combined these in a random effects dose-response meta-analysis. We assessed study quality in ten domains of bias. We identified 16 studies: 12 case-control and 4 cohort studies. There was a 9% risk increase per five years of night-shift work exposure in case-control studies [RR 1.09, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.02-1.20; I (2) = 37%, 9 studies], but not in cohort studies (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.05; I (2) = 53%, 3 studies). Heterogeneity was significant overall (I (2) = 55%, 12 studies). Results for 300 night shifts were similar (RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.00-1.10; I (2) = 58%, 8 studies). Sensitivity analysis using exposure transformations such as cubic splines, a fixed-effect model, or including only better quality studies did not change the results. None of the 16 studies had a low risk of bias, and 6 studies had a moderate risk. Based on the low quality of exposure data and the difference in effect by study design, our findings indicate insufficient evidence for a link between night-shift work and breast cancer. Objective prospective exposure measurement is needed in future studies.

  3. Breast cancer risk and night shift work in a case-control study in a Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Ardanaz, Eva; Altzibar, Jone Miren; Sanchez, Vicente Martin; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Llorca, Javier; Muñoz, David; Tardón, Adonina; Peiró, Rosana; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Pollan, Marina; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiologic and animal data indicate that night shift work might increase the risk for breast cancer. We evaluated the association of night work with different clinical types of breast cancer in a population based case-control study (MCC-Spain study) taking into account chronotype, an individual characteristic that may relate to night shift work adaptation. Lifetime occupational history was assessed by face-to-face interviews and shift work information was available for 1708 breast cancer cases and 1778 population controls from 10 Spanish regions, enrolled from 2008 to 2013. We evaluated three shift work domains, including shift work type (permanent vs rotating), lifetime cumulative duration and frequency. We estimated odds ratios (OR) for night work compared to day work using unconditional logistic regression models adjusting for confounders. Having ever worked permanent or rotating night shift was associated with an increased risk for breast cancer compared to day workers [odds ratio (OR) 1.18; 95 % CI 0.97, 1.43]. Chronotype was differentially associated with breast cancer depending on the duration of night shift work. Risk was higher in women with invasive tumors (OR 1.23; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.51) and for estrogen and progestagen positive tumors among premenopausal women (OR 1.44; 95 % CI 1.05, 1.99). Having ever performed night shift was associated with a small increased risk for breast cancer and especially in subgroups of women with particular hormone related characteristics.

  4. Social Networks and Political Parties in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Adler Lomnitz, Larissa

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the origin and evolution of two Chilean political parties (the Radical Party and the Christian Democrat Party) through the analysis of the social networks that originated and composed them. The aim of this study is to propose a model of national political cultures on the basis of the structure of social networks related to power and of the symbol system, which legitimizes it. The structure of social networks, horizontal and vertical, are based on reciprocal or redistribut...

  5. Short-term effects of night shift work on breast cancer risk; a cohort study of payroll data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Helene Tilma; Garde, Anne Helene; Frydenberg, Morten

    2017-01-01

    were followed from 2007-2012. Day-to-day work-hour information was available from payroll registers and 1245 incident cases of breast cancer were identified in national cancer registries together with receptor subtype information. Results: A rate ratio (RR) of 0.90 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0......Objectives: The objective was to examine if night shift work is a short-term risk factor for breast cancer, including combined estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) breast cancer subtypes. Methods: The cohort comprised 155 540 public sector female workers in Denmark who.......80-1.01] was observed for workers ever working night shifts during the follow-up period compared with workers only working day shifts after adjustment for age, age at first child, parity, family history of breast or ovarian cancer, sex hormones, medications related to alcoholism, family educational level, mammography...

  6. Re-designing the everyday; The use and perception of time among cancer patients combining work and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    cancer patients performing their jobs while going through demanding treatment programs found time as their main motive for working while being seriously ill. Actions at work point to a time ahead, so by taking part in the time at the workplace they were inscribed in a future presently under pressure...... by their cancer diagnosis. The article describes how cancer struck women and men perceived time in their different life-worlds, at work, at home on temporary sick leave, and at the hospital, and it shows how these perceptions changed during the process of recovery.To these people time appeared in three forms......: A time beyond control, realizing that they had cancer; taking control of time, discovering that they could go to work; the time of the future, which was their new perception of time as cured. This new perception of time reflected the incidental discovery of the cancer, realizing life as coincidental...

  7. Night shift work and breast cancer: a pooled analysis of population-based case-control studies with complete work history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Popa, Alexandru; Rabstein, Sylvia; Harth, Volker; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Fritschi, Lin; Glass, Deborah C; Heyworth, Jane S; Erren, Thomas C; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Espinosa, Ana; Kogevinas, Manolis; Grundy, Anne; Spinelli, John J; Aronson, Kristan J; Guénel, Pascal

    2018-04-01

    Night shift work has been suspected to increase breast cancer risk but epidemiological studies have been inconsistent due to heterogeneous assessment of exposure to night work. To overcome this limitation, we pooled data of five population-based case-control studies from Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and Spain into a single harmonized dataset using a common definition of night work including 6093 breast cancer cases and 6933 population controls. The odds ratio for breast cancer in women who ever worked at night for at least 3 h between midnight and 5 a.m. as compared to never night workers was 1.12 (95% CI 1.00-1.25). Among pre-menopausal women, this odds ratio was 1.26 [1.06-1.51], increasing to 1.36 [1.07-1.74] for night shifts ≥ 10 h, 1.80 [1.20-2.71] for work ≥ 3 nights/week, and 2.55 [1.03-6.30] for both duration of night work ≥ 10 years and exposure intensity ≥ 3 nights/week. Breast cancer risk in pre-menopausal women was higher in current or recent night workers (OR = 1.41 [1.06-1.88]) than in those who had stopped night work more than 2 years ago. Breast cancer in post-menopausal women was not associated with night work whatever the exposure metric. The increase in risk was restricted to ER+ tumors, particularly those who were both ER+ and HER2+ . These results support the hypothesis that night shift work increases the risk of breast cancer in pre-menopausal women, particularly those with high intensity and long duration of exposure. Risk difference between pre- and post-menopausal women deserves further scrutiny.

  8. Latin American intra-party democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Adrián Martínez Hernández

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Research proposes to determine the level of internal democracy of political parties in Latin America from perception of its members, allowing the creation of an index that has parameters for the measurement and comparison of the parties according to its democratic features. At the same time, research supports designing a profile of the parties by subjecting to analysis the relationship between ideology and internal democracy, stressing that despite the differences between left and right, parties in Latin America do not have dichotomous democratic features, while maintaining low levels despite their ideological location.

  9. Night Shift Work and Breast Cancer Incidence: Three Prospective Studies and Meta-analysis of Published Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Travis, Ruth C.; Balkwill, Angela; Fensom, Georgina K.; Appleby, Paul N.; Reeves, Gillian K.; Wang, Xiao-Si; Roddam, Andrew W.; Gathani, Toral; Peto, Richard; Green, Jane; Key, Timothy J.; Beral, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been proposed that night shift work could increase breast cancer incidence. A 2007 World Health Organization review concluded, mainly from animal evidence, that shift work involving circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans. We therefore aimed to generate prospective epidemiological evidence on night shift work and breast cancer incidence. Methods: Overall, 522 246 Million Women Study, 22 559 EPIC-Oxford, and 251 045 UK Biobank participants answered questions ...

  10. The Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work in cancer patients is related with work functioning, fatigue and depressive symptoms : a validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorland, H. F.; Abma, F. I.; Roelen, C. A. M.; Smink, A.; Feuerstein, M.; Amick, B. C.; Ranchor, A. V.; Bultmann, U.

    The study objectives are to translate the 21-item Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work (CSC-W21) to Dutch (CSC-W DV) and to validate the CSC-W DV in working cancer patients. The CSC-W21 was cross-culturally translated and adapted to a Dutch version. In this 19-item version, the dichotomous response

  11. Parliamentary committees in a party-centred context : structure, composition, functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickler, T.A.

    2017-01-01

    Beyond the immediately visible plenum, parliaments are highly complex institutions. They work through various venues in which decisions are prepared or even taken. The two main institutions in this regard are parliamentary party groups, which comprise legislators who are elected under the same party

  12. Shift work, night work, and the risk of prostate cancer: A meta-analysis based on 9 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hong-Bing; Bin, Kai-Yun; Liu, Wen-Hong; Yang, Feng-Sheng

    2017-11-01

    Epidemiology studies suggested that shift work or night work may be linked to prostate cancer (PCa); the relationship, however, remains controversy. PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Embase (Ovid) databases were searched before (started from the building of the databases) February 4, 2017 for eligible cohort studies. We pooled the evidence included by a random- or fixed-effect model, according to the heterogeneity. A predefined subgroup analysis was conducted to see the potential discrepancy between groups. Sensitivity analysis was used to test whether our results were stale. Nine cohort studies were eligible for meta-analysis with 2,570,790 male subjects. Our meta-analysis showed that, under the fixed-effect model, the pooled relevant risk (RR) of PCa was 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00, 1.11; P = .06; I = 24.00%) for men who had ever engaged in night shift work; and under the random-effect model, the pooled RR was 1.08 (0.99, 1.17; P = .08; I = 24.00%). Subgroup analysis showed the RR of PCa among males in western countries was 1.05 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.11; P = .09; I = 0.00%), while among Asian countries it was 2.45 (95% CI: 1.19, 5.04; P = .02; I = 0.00%); and the RR was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.95, 1.14; P = .40; I = 29.20%) for the high-quality group compared with 1.21 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.41; P = .02; I = 0.00%) for the moderate/low-quality group. Sensitivity analysis showed robust results. Based on the current evidence of cohort studies, we found no obvious association between night shift work and PCa. However, our subgroup analysis suggests that night shift work may increase the risk of PCa in Asian men. Some evidence of a small study effect was observed in this meta-analysis.

  13. How to hold an ethical pox party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamrozik, Euzebiusz

    2018-04-01

    Pox parties are a controversial alternative to vaccination for diseases such as chickenpox. Such parties involve parents infecting non-immune children by exposing them to a contagious child. If successful, infection will usually lead to immunity, thus preventing infection later in life, which, for several vaccine-preventable diseases, is more severe than childhood infection. Some may consider pox parties more morally objectionable than opting out of vaccination through non-medical exemptions. In this paper, I argue that this is not the case. Pox parties involve immediate risk of harm for children and reduce future harms, whereas opting out of vaccination places children at long-term risk of harms that increase with time, at least for some pathogens. Regarding harm to others through onward transmission of infection, this can be easily prevented in the case of pox parties-given the relatively controlled timing of infection-by quarantining attendees after the party, whereas opting out of vaccination involves risks to others that are more difficult to control. I defend three criteria for an ethical pox party: (1) that the disease is sufficiently low risk, (2) that parents consent to their child's attendance and (3) that children exposed to infection are quarantined and isolated appropriately. I argue that, if these criteria are met, pox parties are morally preferable to non-vaccination; such parties involve less risk to non-consenting others and, for some pathogens in some cases, even involve less risk for the children who participate. Thus, policies that permit non-medical exemption to vaccination should also permit ethical pox parties. Alternatively, if pox parties are not permitted, then vaccination should be mandated for those without medical contraindication. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Book Review: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China. Charlotte P. Lee . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. xii + 251 pp. $99.99. ISBN 978-1-107-09063-7......Review of: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China. Charlotte P. Lee . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. xii + 251 pp. $99.99. ISBN 978-1-107-09063-7...

  15. 12 CFR 747.603 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prevailing party. 747.603 Section 747.603 Banks... in NCUA Board Adjudications § 747.603 Prevailing party. An eligible applicant may be a “prevailing... dismissed. In appropriate situations an applicant may also have prevailed if the outcome of the proceeding...

  16. 12 CFR 263.102 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prevailing party. 263.102 Section 263.102 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES... Prevailing party. Only an eligible applicant that prevailed on the merits of an adversary proceeding may...

  17. 12 CFR 308.173 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prevailing party. 308.173 Section 308.173 Banks....173 Prevailing party. (a) General rule. An eligible applicant who, following an adversary adjudication has gained victory on the merits in the proceeding is a “prevailing party”. An eligible applicant may...

  18. Crossing boundaries : Involving external parties in innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    To improve the return on investments in innovation, firms increasingly open up their new product development (NPD) processes by inviting external parties to participate. This dissertation focuses on the involvement of three different types of external parties in the NPD process: suppliers,

  19. Party Governance and the Selection of Parliamentarians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Beniers (Klaas)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the incentives for a party leader in office and for a parties' rank-and-file to replace a sitting member of parliament. As to the leader's decision, we show that the leader prefers to replace a critical member of parliament who votes against the leader's policy. A

  20. Psychometric Analyses of the Birthday Party

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The present research focuses on the psychometric properties of the Birthday Party measure for ages 3-5. The Birthday Party was developed to provide a reliable, valid, and engaging measure of early mathematical content--Number and Operation, Shape, Space, and Pattern--that can be given in either a short or a long form to English and Spanish…

  1. Third party financing of renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Institut of Energy Saving and Diversification (IDAE) hosted the third party on financing Renewable Energy Sources in Spain. The main aspects were : 1) Experiences in renewable energy. 2) Financing of small hydro-power projects. 3) Third party financing of biomass projects. 4) Financing of wind energy projects

  2. Sex Parties: Female Teen Sexual Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Sharyl Eve

    2006-01-01

    Adolescent participants in a study aimed at exploring the nature and characteristics of girls' dating relationships revealed the phenomenon of sex parties. These teens defined a "sex party" as an opportunity to engage in sexual contact outside of typical dating relationships. Sexual activity could involve actual intercourse, but usually involved…

  3. Low Membership in Czech Political Parties: Party Strategy or Structural Determinants?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Linek, Lukáš; Pecháček, Š.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2007), s. 259-275 ISSN 1352-3279 R&D Projects: GA MPS 1J004/04-DP1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : political parties * party membership * antiparty sentiments * party organization Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Sciences

  4. Factors Related to Return to Work in Women After Breast Cancer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarkish, Fatemeh; Mirzaii Najmabadi, Khadijeh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Homaei Shandiz, Fatemeh

    2015-09-01

    Most women are diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) when they are still at the appropriate age for employment. The increasing survival rates of patients with BC call for more attention to their ability to return to work. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to the return to work in Iranian women underwent BC treatment. A total of 175 women with BC, who met the inclusion criteria, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The subjects were recruited from four hospitals affiliated to Mashhad university of medical sciences. These hospitals are oncology referral centers in eastern Iran. All records of employed women with BC were studied in four hospitals of Mashhad city, Iran, during 2000 - 2010. The researchers designed a questionnaire, which consisted of questions regarding social/demographic, health/disease, and work characteristics. The questionnaires were completed through interviews. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 11.5. The mean age of the patients at the time of interview was 44.3 ± 6.72 years. Mean age of "Return- to-work" group was 42.71 and "No return-to-work" group was 51.06. Most women (80%) were married. At the time of the interview, 80% had returned to work after a BC diagnosis. Older patients (OR = 0.796; 95% CI, 0.625 - 0.907, P = 0.002), and those with a great deal of work experience (OR = 0.861; 95% CI, 0.752 - 0.986, P = 0.030) were less likely to return to work. Also, women who had no pain or surgery scar (OR = 23.03; 95% CI, 4.53 - 117.02, P work (OR = 22.373; 95% CI, 4.04 - 23.892, P work after BC treatment in working women in Mashhad city, Iran. These predictors should be taken into account in order to improve the patient's life quality.

  5. Diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in hematology and oncology--guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Working Party in Haematology and Oncology of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology (AGIHO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, M; Böhme, A; Buchheidt, D; Cornely, O; Donhuijsen, K; Einsele, H; Enzensberger, R; Hebart, H; Heussel, C P; Horger, M; Hof, H; Karthaus, M; Krüger, W; Maschmeyer, G; Penack, O; Ritter, J; Schwartz, S

    2012-04-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies. Establishing a definite diagnosis of IFI in immunocompromised patients is particularly challenging and time consuming, but delayed initiation of antifungal treatment increases mortality. The limited overall outcome has led to the strategy of initiating either 'empirical' or 'preemptive' antifungal therapy before the final diagnosis. However, diagnostic procedures have been vastly improved in recent years. Particularly noteworthy is the introduction of newer imaging techniques and non-culture methods, including antigen-based assays, metabolite detection and molecular detection of fungal DNA from body fluid samples. Though varying widely in cancer patients, the risk of IFI is highest in those with allogeneic stem cell transplantation and those with acute leukemia. The AGIHO presents recommendations for the diagnosis of IFIs with risk-adapted screening concepts for febrile episodes in patients with haemato-oncological disorders.

  6. The Institutionalisation of the Romanian Party System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Volintiru

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the level of institutionalisation achieved by the Romanian political system since transitioning to democracy. Following through the key components of an institutionalised party system, the inquiry looks at the stability of interparty competition in Romania and the depth of its parties’ roots in society. These components are measured through such indicators as electoral volatility or the cohesiveness of the ideological preferences. Their levels suggest that the Romanian party system isn’t fully instituionalised, with fluctuating volatility and a rather incohesive ideological positioning of both voters and parties. This paper argues that in response to the double challenge of poor institutionalisation of the political parties and the party system as a whole, informal remedies, such as patronage of public jobs, or proprietary use of state resources, become highly attractive solutions for electoral success.

  7. A versatile mathematical work-flow to explore how Cancer Stem Cell fate influences tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Chiara; Balbo, Gianfranco; Halawani, Sami M; Ba-Rukab, Omar; Ahmad, Ab Rahman; Calogero, Raffaele A; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays multidisciplinary approaches combining mathematical models with experimental assays are becoming relevant for the study of biological systems. Indeed, in cancer research multidisciplinary approaches are successfully used to understand the crucial aspects implicated in tumor growth. In particular, the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) biology represents an area particularly suited to be studied through multidisciplinary approaches, and modeling has significantly contributed to pinpoint the crucial aspects implicated in this theory. More generally, to acquire new insights on a biological system it is necessary to have an accurate description of the phenomenon, such that making accurate predictions on its future behaviors becomes more likely. In this context, the identification of the parameters influencing model dynamics can be advantageous to increase model accuracy and to provide hints in designing wet experiments. Different techniques, ranging from statistical methods to analytical studies, have been developed. Their applications depend on case-specific aspects, such as the availability and quality of experimental data, and the dimension of the parameter space. The study of a new model on the CSC-based tumor progression has been the motivation to design a new work-flow that helps to characterize possible system dynamics and to identify those parameters influencing such behaviors. In detail, we extended our recent model on CSC-dynamics creating a new system capable of describing tumor growth during the different stages of cancer progression. Indeed, tumor cells appear to progress through lineage stages like those of normal tissues, being their division auto-regulated by internal feedback mechanisms. These new features have introduced some non-linearities in the model, making it more difficult to be studied by solely analytical techniques. Our new work-flow, based on statistical methods, was used to identify the parameters which influence the tumor growth. The

  8. The characteristics of oncology social work in Australia: Implications for workforce planning in integrated cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockett, Rosalie; Peate, Michelle; Hobbs, Kim; Dzidowska, Monika; L Bell, Melanie; Baylock, Brandi; Epstein, Irwin

    2016-12-01

    To describe the demographics, professional characteristics, self-reported professional development needs and research involvement of oncology social workers in Australia and to describe perceived barriers to provision of quality psychosocial care. A cross-sectional online survey was administered to social workers working in the oncology field who were contacted through three professional organizations; the Australian Association of Social Workers, Oncology Social Work Australia and the Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group, the University of Sydney. A snowball recruitment method was adopted to maximize the sample size. Two thirds of respondents had over 10 years professional practice experience but with lesser experience in oncology settings. Twenty-eight percent had post-graduate qualifications. Professional development needs were reported as moderate or high by 68% of respondents. No association between professional needs and work setting was found. Years of experience in oncology practice and living in an urban area increased the likelihood of involvement in research. Barriers to psychosocial care included poor understandings of the social work role, time constraints and an inadequate number of social work positions. In this first Australian study of the social work oncology workforce, the results demonstrated active, well-qualified and experienced social workers providing frontline services to people with cancer and their caregivers in geographically diverse locations across Australia. Inadequate resources and a lack of integrated psychosocial care were identified as barriers to comprehensive cancer care. The need for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social workers was identified as an urgent workforce priority. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Assessment of the Unresolved Resonance Treatment for Cross-section and Covariance Representation. A report by the Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, L.; Shibata, K.; Iwamoto, O.; Chiba, G.; Noguere, G.; Saint Jean, C. de; Sirakov, I.; Capote, R.; Sublet, J.C.; Coste-Delclaux, M.; Jouanne, C.; MacFarlane, R.E.; Kahler, A.C. Jr.; Lubitz, C.R.; Cullen, D.; Herman, M.; Ribon, P.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarises the work performed under WPEC Subgroup 32 (SG32) on issues pertinent to the methodology used in the unresolved resonance region (URR). The main purpose of SG32 was to verify the validity of the Single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) cross-section representation in the URR for self-shielding calculations. While SG32 work was under way, several other developments related to the URR on this subject came into play that had a direct impact on the results of calculations. The work described in this report focuses on: - testing of the SLBW formalism in the URR for fissile and fertile isotopes; - URR covariance representation; - interpolation issue with a URR resonance parameter for the infinitely dilute cross-section calculations; - ENDF URR parameter representation based on the LSSF = 0 or LSSF = 1 option

  10. Informal work and formal plans: articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Juul Dalsted

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories.  Methods and theory: An in-depth case study of patient trajectories at a Danish hospital and surrounding municipality using individual interviews with patients. Theory about trajectory and work by Strauss was included.  Results: Patients continuously took initiatives to organize their treatment and care. They initiated processes in the trajectories, and acquired information, which they used to form their trajectories.  Patients presented problems to the healthcare professionals in order to get proper help when needed.  Discussion: Work done by patients was invisible and not perceived as work. The patients' requests were not sufficiently supported in the professional organisation of work or formal planning. Patients' insertion and use of information in their trajectories challenged professional views and working processes. And the design of the formal pathway models limits the patients´ active participation. When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed. Introduction: Formal pathway models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories. Methods and theory: An in-depth case study of patient trajectories at a Danish hospital and surrounding municipality using individual interviews with patients. Theory about trajectory and work by Strauss was included. Results: Patients continuously took initiatives to organize their

  11. Short-term effects of night shift work on breast cancer risk: a cohort study of payroll data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistisen, Helene Tilma; Garde, Anne Helene; Frydenberg, Morten; Christiansen, Peer; Hansen, Åse Marie; Andersen, Johnni; Bonde, Jens Peter E; Kolstad, Henrik A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to examine if night shift work is a short-term risk factor for breast cancer, including combined estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) breast cancer subtypes. Methods The cohort comprised 155 540 public sector female workers in Denmark who were followed from 2007-2012. Day-to-day work-hour information was available from payroll registers and 1245 incident cases of breast cancer were identified in national cancer registries together with receptor subtype information. Results A rate ratio (RR) of 0.90 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.80-1.01] was observed for workers ever working night shifts during the follow-up period compared with workers only working day shifts after adjustment for age, age at first child, parity, family history of breast or ovarian cancer, sex hormones, medications related to alcoholism, family educational level, mammography screening, and other potential confounders. Comparable results were seen for the inception population of employees with first recorded employment after 2007. Modestly increased RR were suggested for breast cancer subtypes characterized by a positive HER2 status irrespective of ER status. Conclusions These findings do not support an overall short-term effect of night shift work on breast cancer risk. Future studies should explore further the impact of HER2 status.

  12. Work history and radioprotection practices in relation to cancer incidence and mortality in US radiologic technologists performing nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Marie Odile; Doody, Michele M; Van Dyke, Miriam E; Villoing, Daphné; Alexander, Bruce H; Linet, Martha S; Kitahara, Cari M

    2018-05-02

    Technologists working in nuclear medicine (NM) are exposed to higher radiation doses than most other occupationally exposed populations. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of cancer in NM technologists in relation to work history, procedures performed and radioprotection practices. From the US Radiologic Technologists cohort study, 72 755 radiologic technologists who completed a 2003-2005 questionnaire were followed for cancer mortality through 31 December 2012 and for cancer incidence through completion of a questionnaire in 2012-2013. Multivariable-adjusted models were used to estimate HRs for total cancer incidence and mortality by history of ever performing NM procedures and frequency of performing specific diagnostic or therapeutic NM procedures and associated radiation protection measures by decade. During follow-up (mean=7.5 years), 960 incident cancers and 425 cancer deaths were reported among the 22 360 technologists who worked with NM procedures. We observed no increased risk of cancer incidence (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.04) or death (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.19) among workers who ever performed NM procedures. HRs for cancer incidence but not mortality were higher for technologists who began performing therapeutic procedures in 1960 and later compared with the 1950s. Frequency of performing diagnostic or therapeutic NM procedures and use of radioprotection measures were not consistently associated with cancer risk. No clear associations were observed for specific cancers, but results were based on small numbers. Cancer incidence and mortality were not associated with NM work history practices, including greater frequency of procedures performed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. T-cell-depleted haploidentical stem cell transplantation results improve with time in adults with acute leukemia: A study from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestili, Simona; Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Velardi, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Maertens, Johan; Kanz, Lothar; Aversa, Franco; Lewalle, Philippe; Bunjes, Donald; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2018-05-15

    . Similarly, leukemia-free survival and GvHD-free/relapse-free survival (GRFS) improved over time: the leukemia-free survival rate was 31% (25% vs 43% in the groups who underwent transplantation before and after 2012, respectively; P = .05), and the GRFS rate was 24% (19% vs 34%, respectively; P = .09). In addition, leukemia-free survival and GRFS improved among patients who received a RIC regimen. The outcome of patients with acute leukemia who underwent T-cell-depleted haplo has improved over time. Cancer 2018;124:2142-50. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  14. Efficacy and toxicity of the combination chemotherapy of thalidomide, alkylating agent, and steroid for relapsed/refractory myeloma patients: a report from the Korean Multiple Myeloma Working Party (KMMWP) retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jihyun; Min, Chang-Ki; Kim, Kihyun; Han, Jae-Joon; Moon, Joon Ho; Kang, Hye Jin; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Won Sik; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Je-Jung; Choi, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the treatment responses, toxicities, and survival outcomes of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who received daily thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone (CTD) or daily thalidomide, melphalan, and prednisolone (MTP) at 17 medical centers in Korea. Three-hundred and seventy-six patients were enrolled. The combined chemotherapy of thalidomide, corticosteroid, and an alkylating agent (TAS) was second-line chemotherapy in 142 (37.8%) patients, and third-line chemotherapy in 135 (35.9%) patients. The response rate overall was 69.4%. Patients who were not treated with bortezomib and lenalidomide before TAS showed a higher response rate compared to those who were exposed to these agents. The estimated median progression-free survival and overall survival times were 10.4 months and 28.0 months, respectively. The adverse events during TAS were generally tolerable, but 39 (10.4%) patients experienced severe infectious complications. There were no differences in terms of efficacy between CTD and MTP, but infectious complications were more common in CTD group. TAS is an effective treatment regimen which induces a high response rate in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma patients. Due to the high incidence of grade 3 or 4 infection, proper management of infection is necessary during the TAS treatment, especially the CTD. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Physical symptoms and working performance in female breast cancer survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomkowski, Kamilla; Cruz de Souza, Bruna; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiana; Moreira, Géssica Maria; de Souza Cunha, Natália; Sperandio, Fabiana Flores

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to summarize and systematize the information about physical symptoms and its relation with work activity on female Breast Cancer Survivors (BCS). A systematic search was performed on the databases MEDLINE/PubMed (via National Library of Medicine), SCOPUS (Elsevier), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters Scientific) and CINAHL with full text (EBSCO), including papers about physical impairments experienced by female workers who have had breast cancer. The search retrieved 238 studies, and another 5 were identified in the articles' references, totaling 243 papers. After removing duplicates and applying the inclusion criteria and a full text reading, 13 articles were included for qualitative analysis. Concerning physical limitations, most complaints were related to the elevation of upper limbs, carrying heavy objects, driving and holding manual movements. The most referred symptoms were breast/arm pain, fatigue, lymphedema, reduced range of motion and weakness in the upper limbs, scar tissue adherence in the breast/axilla and paresthesia in the arm/breast. These symptoms and physical limitations led to the difficulty or impossibility of performing work tasks, which also diminished work productivity, as well as the increase in time to return to work. The present results suggest higher unemployment rates and the need for modifying work conditions. Implication for Rehabilitation Health professionals should include risk assessment at daily routine to identify possible sources of physical impairments for upper limbs. Provide the support and orientations according to personal and job characteristics of the patient. Focus the aims of treatment over upper limbs impairments, reducing the prevalence and the gravity of symptoms.

  16. Cancer Survivors' Social Context in the Return to Work Process: Narrative Accounts of Social Support and Social Comparison Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaou, M; Schumacher, L; Grunfeld, E A

    2017-10-04

    Purpose Returning to work is a process that is intertwined with the social aspects of one's life, which can influence the way in which that person manages their return to work and also determines the support available to them. This study aimed to explore cancer patients' perceptions of the role of their social context in relation to returning to work following treatment. Methods Twenty-three patients who had received a diagnosis of either urological, breast, gynaecological, or bowel cancer participated in semi-structured interviews examining general perceptions of cancer, work values and perceptions of the potential impact of their cancer diagnosis and treatment on work. Interviews were analysed using the iterative process of Framework Analysis. Results Two superordinate themes emerged as influential in the return to work process: Social support as a facilitator of return to work (e.g. co-workers' support and support outside of the workplace) and Social comparison as an appraisal of readiness to return to work (e.g. comparisons with other cancer patients, colleagues, and employees in other organisations or professions). Conclusions Two functions of the social context of returning to work after cancer were apparent in the participants' narrative: the importance of social support as a facilitator of returning to work and the utilisation of social comparison information in order to appraise one's readiness to return to work. The role of social context in returning to work has largely been absent from the research literature to date. The findings of this study suggest that social support and social comparison mechanisms may have a significant impact on an individual's successful return to the workplace.

  17. Return to work in sick-listed cancer survivors with job loss: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, Martine P; Duijts, Saskia F A; Vermeulen, Sylvia J; van der Beek, Allard J; Anema, Johannes R

    2015-02-18

    Despite long-term or permanent health problems, cancer survivors are often motivated to return to work. For cancer survivors who have lost their job, return to work can be more challenging compared to employed survivors, as they generally find themselves in a more vulnerable social and financial position. Cancer survivors with job loss may therefore be in need of tailored return to work support. However, there is a lack of return to work intervention programs specifically targeting these cancer survivors. The number of cancer survivors with job loss in developed countries is rising due to, amongst others, increases in the incidence and survivor rate of cancer, the retirement age and the proportion of flexible employment contracts. Hence, we consider it important to develop a tailored return to work intervention program for cancer survivors with job loss, and to evaluate its effectiveness compared to usual care. This study employs a two-armed randomised controlled trial with a follow-up period of 12 months. The study population (n = 164) will be recruited from a national sample of cancer survivors (18-60 years), who have been sick-listed for 12-36 months. Participants will be randomised by using computerized blocked randomisation (blocks of four). All participants will receive usual care as provided by the Dutch Social Security Agency. Additionally, participants in the intervention group will receive a tailored return to work intervention program, which includes vocational rehabilitation and supportive psychosocial components, as well as (therapeutic) placement at work. The primary outcome measure is duration until sustainable return to work; the secondary outcome measure is rate of return to work. Other parameters include, amongst others, fatigue, coping strategy and quality of life. We will perform Cox regression analyses to estimate hazard ratios for time to sustainable return to work. The hypothesis of this study is that a tailored approach for cancer

  18. Billing third party payers for pharmaceutical care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, S; Buffington, D E; Memoli, G A

    1999-01-01

    To describe the steps pharmacists must complete when seeking compensation from third party payers for pharmaceutical care services. Government publications; professional publications, including manuals and newsletters; authors' personal experience. Pharmacists in increasing numbers are meeting with success in getting reimbursed by third party payers for patient care activities. However, many pharmacists remain reluctant to seek compensation because they do not understand the steps involved. Preparatory steps include obtaining a provider/supplier number, procuring appropriate claim forms, developing data collection and documentation systems, establishing professional fees, creating a marketing plan, and developing an accounting system. To bill for specific patient care services, pharmacists need to collect the patient's insurance information, obtain a statement of medical necessity from the patient's physician, complete the appropriate claim form accurately, and submit the claim with supporting documentation to the insurer. Although many claims from pharmacists are rejected initially, pharmacists who work with third party payers to understand the reasons for denial of payment often receive compensation when claims are resubmitted. Pharmacists who follow these guidelines for billing third party payers for pharmaceutical care services should notice an increase in the number of paid claims.

  19. Party-political and electoral system of Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Decresci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Oriental Republic of Uruguay is seen by many as a pioneer among Latin American nations to modernize its state and its policy. Since the late nineteenth century to the twentieth, Uruguayan political actors operate significant changes such as the separation of church and state, labor regulation, divorce law, women's vote, etc. Because of this and the progressive modernization, it was called the “Switzerland of the Americas”. Today, it still stands out in this area by regularizing abortion, homoaffective marriage, liberalization and access to marijuana. Moreover, noteworthy that such measures were achieved largely because of governance that the executive enjoys in the midst of this political system. Thus, this work aims to analyze such Uruguayan political system. In short, a political system is understood by the government system, the electoral system and the party system. That said, it will be analyzed in the political scenario of the country, their characteristics, party and election rules, political parties, party dynamics and relations between the powers.

  20. Rehabilitation using high-intensity physical training and long-term return-to-work in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Karin M; de Boer, Angela G E M; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; van de Wouw, Agnès J; Houterman, Saskia; Schep, Goof

    2012-06-01

    Due to large and increasing numbers of cancer survivors, long-term cancer-related health issues have become a major focus of attention. This study examined the relation between a high-intensity physical rehabilitation program and return-to-work in cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy. The intervention group, consisting of 72 cancer survivors from one hospital (8 men and 64 women, mean age 49 years), followed an 18-weeks rehabilitation program including strength and interval training, and home-based activities. An age-matched control group, consisting of 38 cancer survivors (9 men and 29 women), was recruited from two other hospitals. They received only standard medical care. All subjects were evaluated during a telephone interview on employment issues, conducted at ±3 years after diagnosis. The main outcomes were change in working hours per week and time until return-to-work. Patients in the intervention group showed significant less reduction in working hours per week [-5.0 h/week vs. -10.8 h/week (P = .03)]. Multivariate analyses showed that the training intervention, the age of patients, and the number of working hours pre-diagnosis could explain the improvement in long-term participation at work. Time until (partial) return-to-work was 11.5 weeks for the intervention group versus 13.2 weeks for the control group (P = .40). On long-term follow-up, 78% of the participants from the intervention group versus 66% from the control group had returned to work on the pre-diagnosis level of working hours (P = .18). Rehabilitation using high-intensity physical training is useful for working patients to minimize the decreased ability to work resulting from cancer and its treatment.

  1. Impact of work-related cancers in Taiwan-Estimation with QALY (quality-adjusted life year) and healthcare costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lukas Jyuhn-Hsiarn; Lin, Cheng-Kuan; Hung, Mei-Chuan; Wang, Jung-Der

    2016-12-01

    This study estimates the annual numbers of eight work-related cancers, total losses of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and lifetime healthcare expenditures that possibly could be saved by improving occupational health in Taiwan. Three databases were interlinked: the Taiwan Cancer Registry, the National Mortality Registry, and the National Health Insurance Research Database. Annual numbers of work-related cancers were estimated based on attributable fractions (AFs) abstracted from a literature review. The survival functions for eight cancers were estimated and extrapolated to lifetime using a semi-parametric method. A convenience sample of 8846 measurements of patients' quality of life with EQ-5D was collected for utility values and multiplied by survival functions to estimate quality-adjusted life expectancies (QALEs). The loss-of-QALE was obtained by subtracting the QALE of cancer from age- and sex-matched referents simulated from national vital statistics. The lifetime healthcare expenditures were estimated by multiplying the survival probability with mean monthly costs paid by the National Health Insurance for cancer diagnosis and treatment and summing this for the expected lifetime. A total of 3010 males and 726 females with eight work-related cancers were estimated in 2010. Among them, lung cancer ranked first in terms of QALY loss, with an annual total loss-of-QALE of 28,463 QALYs and total lifetime healthcare expenditures of US$36.6 million. Successful prevention of eight work-related cancers would not only avoid the occurrence of 3736 cases of cancer, but would also save more than US$70 million in healthcare costs and 46,750 QALYs for the Taiwan society in 2010.

  2. Leakage Resilient Secure Two-Party Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Hazay, Carmit; Patra, Arpita

    2012-01-01

    we initiate the study of {\\em secure two-party computation in the presence of leakage}, where on top of corrupting one of the parties the adversary obtains leakage from the content of the secret memory of the honest party. Our study involves the following contributions: \\BE \\item {\\em Security...... and returns its result. Almost independently of secure computation, the area of {\\em leakage resilient cryptography} has recently been evolving intensively, studying the question of designing cryptographic primitives that remain secure even when some information about the secret key is leaked. In this paper...

  3. The Chinese Communist Party in Reform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik; Yongnian, Zheng

    Contrary to the expectations of many people, China's recent economic growth has not led to the collapse of the Chinese Communist Party. In fact, the party has recently carried out a peaceful and orderly transition to the so-called fourth generation of leadership, has revitalised itself, and created...... a new, younger and better trained cadre corps. Despite this successful transformation, there continue to be many problems that the party will need to overcome if it is to remain in power, including pressures for democratization in both urban and rural areas, widespread corruption, the emergence of new...

  4. The German Environmentalist Party - The Greens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mettke, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Greens are winning supporters throughout the FRG, quite a few of them are already members of the parliament of various lands. Will they cooperate with the established political parties in Bonn. Will they take over from the Free Democrats the role of holding the balance of power. In this book, Spiegel editors present their analyses of the changing concepts of the new political movement. The most outstanding members of the Environmentalist Party - the so-called Greens - define their position and state their opinions on the problems of coalition forming, and prominent members of the parties of the German Bundestag answer these statements. (orig.) [de

  5. The Labour Party and British Republicanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth O. MORGAN

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, once solved a case by referring to “the dog that did not bark.” In the past 250 years of British history, republicanism is another dog that did not bark. This is particularly true of supposedly our most radical major political party, the Labour Party. Over the monarchy, as over constitutional matters generally, Labour’s instincts have been conservative. Even after 1997, when the party, led by Lord Irvine, has indeed embarked upon major constitutional ref...

  6. Political Marketing Mix in Indonesia Parties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Simbolon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The reform era has changed the paradigm of Indonesian politics. Multiparty system has demanded a political party to be able to compete for their constituents. Article aimed to convey a political marketing concept that can helppolitical parties in planning a strategy to win the election. Research method used descriptive method analysis. The results suggest that the approach of the marketing mix that includes the product, price, place, and promotion areapproaches that are very helpful in presenting a plan to win the marketing strategy of political parties in elections.

  7. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership: An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-09-01

    ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program's curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers--the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers.

  8. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A.; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-01-01

    ExCEL in Social Work : Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program’s curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers - the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers. PMID:25146345

  9. Accountability in integrated working: Meaning and implications for cancer care teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colyer, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a critical evaluation of the concepts of accountability and delegated authority and how this impacts on integrated working in cancer care teams. It looks at the difficulties experienced by radiographers in establishing their roles in integrated teams through an analysis of how professional teams have developed from a sociological and historical perspective. The paper highlights the contestability of the terms and contends that many non-medical professional practitioners experience problems with assuming full accountability. The article acknowledges and advocates that the wishes of patients and clients must be prioritised in the decision making process, thus requiring professionals to embrace accountability fully and differentiate and manage risk. The importance of leadership in furthering the achievement of integrated working is recognised. In conclusion, the article proposes that shared accountability among teams is challenging for radiographers and others, and that education providers should take this into account when designing curricula.

  10. Factors associated with Danish cancer patients' return to work. A report from the population-based study 'The Cancer Patient's World'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2012-01-01

    If patients facing difficulties in the process of returning to work after treatment of cancer could be identified, these patients could be assisted in the transition. This might help some patients to stay in work. We therefore assessed demographic and clinical factors associated with returning to...

  11. Exploring team working and shared leadership in multi-disciplinary cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, Stephen George

    2018-02-05

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance of shared leadership to multi-disciplinary cancer care. It examines the policy background and applies concepts from shared leadership to this context. It includes discussion of the implications and recommendations. Design/methodology/approach This is a conceptual paper examining policy documents and secondary literature on the topic. While it focuses on the UK National Health Services, it is also relevant to other countries given they follow a broadly similar path with regard to multi-disciplinary working. Findings The paper suggests that shared leadership is a possible way forward for multi-disciplinary cancer care, particularly as policy developments are supportive of this. It shows that a shared perspective is likely to be beneficial to the further development of multi-disciplinary working. Research limitations/implications Adopting shared leadership needs to be explored further using appropriate empirical research. Practical implications The paper offers comments on the implications of introducing shared leadership and makes recommendations including being aware of the barriers to its implementation. Originality/value The paper offers an alternative view on leadership in the health-care context.

  12. A behavioural approach in the development of work-related interventions for cancer survivors: an exploratory review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijts, S F A; Bleiker, E M A; Paalman, C H; van der Beek, A J

    2017-09-01

    The application of behavioural change models and theories has not been studied, and behavioural determinants have not been considered, in the context of cancer and work. The aim of this study is to assess the relevance of a behavioural approach in the development of work-related interventions for cancer survivors. Two search strategies were conducted to identify studies on (1) lifestyle interventions (exercise, smoking, alcohol intake and diet), based on behavioural models and theories, in cancer survivors; (2) behavioural determinants regarding work. Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register were searched (2000-2015). Studies were assessed on their eligibility, and findings were listed and categorised. Thirty-four studies exploring lifestyle interventions in cancer survivors were retrieved. The behavioural change models and theories most regularly used were the Transtheoretical Model and Social Cognitive Theory. Furthermore, 26 studies on the role of behavioural determinants regarding work were found. The most frequently considered determinants were self-efficacy, social norms, workers' expectations towards work or recovery, attitude, motivation and meaning of work. The results indicate the significance of behavioural change models and theories and of behavioural determinants in related research areas, which encourages a behavioural approach in the development of work-related interventions for cancer survivors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Job resignation after cancer diagnosis among working survivors in Japan: timing, reasons and change of information needs over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Miyako; Tsuchiya, Miyako; Horio, Yoshitsugu; Funazaki, Hatsumi; Aogi, Kenjiro; Miyauchi, Kazue; Arai, Yasuaki

    2018-01-01

    Despite advances in work-related policies for cancer survivors, support systems for working survivors in healthcare settings in Japan remain underdeveloped. We aimed to reveal (i) the present situation of cancer survivors' job resignation, the timing of resignation, and reasons for resignation; (ii) healthcare providers' screening behaviors of cancer survivors' work-related difficulties and (iii) changes to cancer survivors' information/support needs over time since diagnosis. We conducted an anonymous, cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample of re-visiting outpatients at three cancer centers in Japan in 2015. The questionnaire covered participants' demographic and clinical characteristics, change to job status, timing of and reasons for job resignation, screening experience regarding work-related difficulties by healthcare providers, and information/support needs at four distinct timings (at diagnosis, between diagnosis and initial treatment, between initial treatment and return-to-work, and after return-to-work). The results of 950 participants were eligible for statistical analysis. Only 23.5% of participants were screened about work-related issues by healthcare providers despite 21.3% participants reporting resigning at least once. Among participants who resigned, 40.2% decided to do so before initial treatment began. Regarding reasons for resignation, self-regulating and pessimistic reasons were ranked highly. Respondents' work-related information and support needs were observed to change over time. While treatment-related information (schedule and cost) was ranked highly at diagnosis, the need for more individually tailored information and support on work increased after treatment began. This study provides important basic data for developing effective support systems for working survivors of cancer in hospital settings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Night Shift Work and Breast Cancer Incidence: Three Prospective Studies and Meta-analysis of Published Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Ruth C; Balkwill, Angela; Fensom, Georgina K; Appleby, Paul N; Reeves, Gillian K; Wang, Xiao-Si; Roddam, Andrew W; Gathani, Toral; Peto, Richard; Green, Jane; Key, Timothy J; Beral, Valerie

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed that night shift work could increase breast cancer incidence. A 2007 World Health Organization review concluded, mainly from animal evidence, that shift work involving circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans. We therefore aimed to generate prospective epidemiological evidence on night shift work and breast cancer incidence. Overall, 522 246 Million Women Study, 22 559 EPIC-Oxford, and 251 045 UK Biobank participants answered questions on shift work and were followed for incident cancer. Cox regression yielded multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for night shift work vs no night shift work, and likelihood ratio tests for interaction were used to assess heterogeneity. Our meta-analyses combined these and relative risks from the seven previously published prospective studies (1.4 million women in total), using inverse-variance weighted averages of the study-specific log RRs. In the Million Women Study, EPIC-Oxford, and UK Biobank, respectively, 673, 28, and 67 women who reported night shift work developed breast cancer, and the RRs for any vs no night shift work were 1.00 (95% CI = 0.92 to 1.08), 1.07 (95% CI = 0.71 to 1.62), and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.61 to 1.00). In the Million Women Study, the RR for 20 or more years of night shift work was 1.00 (95% CI = 0.81 to 1.23), with no statistically significant heterogeneity by sleep patterns or breast cancer risk factors. Our meta-analysis of all 10 prospective studies included 4660 breast cancers in women reporting night shift work; compared with other women, the combined relative risks were 0.99 (95% CI = 0.95 to 1.03) for any night shift work, 1.01 (95% CI = 0.93 to 1.10) for 20 or more years of night shift work, and 1.00 (95% CI = 0.87 to 1.14) for 30 or more years. The totality of the prospective evidence shows that night shift work, including long-term shift work, has little or no effect on

  15. Political parties Foundations and Politicization Processes in Brazil: action domain, amalgams and ambivalences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Tavares dos Reis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the space of party foundations in Brazil. This field of action is perceived as a vehicle and a reflection of processes of politicization.The work is based on two axis: 1 the (structural and sociographic configuration of these party sectors and its relative autonomy or dependence according to the party organizations; 2 the possible intersections between political logic and domain and intellectuals from the exploitation of this specific area. It presents data on the creation and the creation chronology of party foundations, its organizational structure (websites, offices, sectors, tasks/roles divisions; requirements of various experts, products such as books, magazines, courses, incomes; etc. from information available on the internet as well as the social, political and cultural profiles of its presidents and former presidents. It was also examined the case of the Perseu Abramo Foundation of the Workers Party.

  16. Parties heed (with caution): Public knowledge of and attitudes towards party finance in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanHeerde-Hudson, Jennifer; Fisher, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Despite comprehensive reform ( Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act ) and recent review (Phillips Review in 2007) of party finance in Britain, public opinion of party finance remains plagued by perceptions of corruption, undue influence from wealthy donors, carefree and wasteful spending and, more generally, from the perception that there is just 'too much money' in politics. In this article we argue that knowledge of and attitudes to party finance matter, not least because advocates of reform have cited public opinion as evidence for reform. However, because attitudes to party finance are part of a broader attitudinal structure, opinion-led reforms are unlikely to succeed in increasing public confidence. Using data generated from YouGov's online panel (N=2,008), we demonstrate that the public know little of the key provisions regulating party finance and attitudes to party finance can be explained along two underlying dimensions - Anti-Party Finance and Reformers . As such, we consider whether parties and politicians should be freed from the constraints of public opinion in reforming party finance.

  17. Association of shift-work, daytime napping, and nighttime sleep with cancer incidence and cancer-caused mortality in Dongfeng-tongji cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yansen; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Ke; Chen, Shi; Wang, Suhan; Chen, Zhuowang; Wu, Xiulong; Fu, Wenshan; Wei, Sheng; Yuan, Jing; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Yang, Handong; Wu, Tangchun; Guo, Huan

    2016-12-01

    Few studies investigated the combined effects of night-shift work, daytime napping, and nighttime sleep on cancer incidence and mortality. A total of 25,377 participants were included in this study. Information on sleep habits, cancer incidences, and mortalities were collected. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HRs, 95%CIs). Male subjects experienced ≥20 years of night-shift work, or without daytime napping had an increased risk of cancer, when compared with males who did not have night-shift work or napped for 1-30 min [HR (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.01-1.59) and 2.03 (1.01-4.13), respectively]. Nighttime sleep for ≥10 h was associated with a separate 40% and 59% increased risk of cancer [HR (95%CI) = 1.40 (1.04-1.88)] and cancer-caused mortality [HR (95%CI) = 1.59 (1.01-2.49)] than sleep for 7-8 h/night. Combined effects of three sleep habits were further identified. Male participants with at least two above risk sleep habits had a 43% increased risk of cancer [HR (95%CI) = 1.43 (1.07-2.01)] and a 2.07-fold increased cancer-caused mortality [HR (95%CI) = 2.07 (1.25-3.29)] than those who did not have any above risk sleep habits. However, no significant associations were observed among women. Long night-shift work history, without daytime napping, and long nighttime sleep duration were independently and jointly associated with higher cancer incidence among males. KEY MESSAGES Night-shift work of ≥20 years, without napping, and nighttime sleep of ≥10 h were associated with increased cancer incidence. Nighttime sleep ≥10 h was associated with a 2.07-fold increased cancer-caused mortality among males. Combined effects of night-shift work ≥20 years, without napping, and nighttime sleep ≥10 h on increasing cancer incidence were existed among males.

  18. Lebanon's Hizbollah Movement: The Party of God

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schad, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    In the summer of 1982 in Lebanon, a group of radical Shi'a Muslim clerics in association with Iranian Revolutionary Guardsmen formed the secretive and at times deadly movement known as Hizbollah, or the Party of God...

  19. Stress, Psychosocial Mediators, and Cognitive Mediators in Parents of Child Cancer Patients and Cancer Survivors: Attention and Working Memory Pathway Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Haegen, Marie; Luminet, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This review examines stress and its consequences on attention and working memory, stress symptoms in parents of child cancer patients and survivors and long-term consequences of stress on cognitive processing in parents of child cancer survivors. Eligible studies were experimental, meta-analyses, and qualitative (2000-2013) from Pubmed, Medline, the Cochrane Library, PsycArticles, and Google Scholar. We identified 92 eligible papers. They showed that elevated stress can impede performances on tasks requiring attention and memory patterns. In pediatric oncology, parental stress increased shortly after diagnosis involving depression and anxiety. Consequences of stress on cognitive performances were observed mainly among depressed individuals. As regards parents of child cancer survivors, female gender, low Socioeconomic Status (SES), and innate traits of anxiety/anger predicted the development of PTSS. Evidence of stress on attention and working memory processes in parents of child cancer survivors is insufficiently developed.

  20. Supporting 'work-related goals' rather than 'return to work' after cancer? A systematic review and meta-synthesis of 25 qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary; Williams, Brian; Firnigl, Danielle; Lang, Heidi; Coyle, Joanne; Kroll, Thilo; MacGillivray, Steve

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to systematically review and synthesise qualitative studies of employment and cancer. A rigorous systematic review and meta-synthesis process was followed. A total of 13,233 papers were retrieved from eight databases; 69 were deemed relevant following title and abstract appraisal. Four further publications were identified via contact with key authors. Screening of full texts resulted in the retention of 25 publications from six countries, which were included in the synthesis. Studies consistently indicate that for people with cancer, 'work' forms a central basis for self-identity and self-esteem, provides financial security, forms and maintains social relationships, and represents an individual's abilities, talents and health. Work is therefore more than paid employment. Its importance to individuals rests on the relative value survivors place on these constituent functions. The desirability, importance and subsequent interpretation of individuals' experience of 'return to work' appears to be influenced by the ways in which cancer affects these functions or goals of 'work'. Our synthesis draws these complex elements into a heuristic model to help illustrate and communicate these inter-relationships. The concept of 'return to work' may be overly simplistic, and as a result, misleading. The proposed benefits previously ascribed to 'return to work' may only be achieved through consideration of the specific meaning and role of work to the individual. Interventions to address work-related issues need to be person-centred, acknowledging the work-related outcomes that are important to the individual. A conceptual and operational shift towards supporting survivors to identify and achieve their 'work-related goals' may be more appropriate. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Movements in Parties: OccupyPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella della Porta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available When the United States activists called for people to Occupy#everywhere, it is unlikely they were thinking of the headquarters of the Italian centre-left party. Parties and movements are often considered to be worlds apart. In reality, parties have been relevant players in movement politics, and movements have influenced parties, often through the double militancy of many of their members. OccupyPD testifies to a continuous fluidity at the movement-party border, but also to a blockage in the party’s interactions with society that started long before the economic crisis but drastically accelerated with it. In this paper we present the OccupyPD Movement as a case of interaction between party politics and social movement politics, and in particular between the base membership of a centre-left party and the broader anti-austerity movement that diffused from the US to Europe adopting similar forms of actions and claims. Second, by locating it within the context of the economic and democratic crisis that erupted in 2007, we understand its emergence as a reaction towards politics in times of crisis of responsibility, by which we mean a drastic drop in the capacity of the government to respond to citizens’ requests. To fulfil this double aim, we bridge social movement studies with research on party change, institutional trust and democratic theory, looking at some political effects of the economic crisis in terms of a specific form of legitimacy crisis, as well as citizens’ responses to it, with a particular focus on the political meaning of recent anti-austerity protests. In this analysis, we refer to both quantitative and qualitative data from secondary liter-ature and original in-depth interviews carried out with a sample of OccupyPD activists.

  2. Jewish problem in the Polish Communist Party

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimek Henryk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jews accounted for approx. 8-10% of the population of the Second Republic and in the communist movement (Polish Communist Party and Polish Communist Youth Union the rate was approx, 30%, while in subsequent years it much fluctuated. The percentage of Jews was the highest in the authorities of the party and in the KZMP. This had a negative impact on the position of the KPP on many issues, especially in its relation to the Second Republic.

  3. Social praxis, party, and class relations today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egni Malo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s political sociologists are once again interested in the study of the crisis of mass-based parties, anti-politics and anti-parliamentarism, crisis in the authority of the political class, prevailing corporate interests within republican institutions, and populism. Political sociology however, takes the party, as a construct of political sociology alone, without consideration upon its militancy and action, as the party, which objectifies the foundation of a State, and as a result the party becomes, simply an historical category. We approach the problem of the modern state from many angles; analysing the nature of a political party as such; the ideological dangers of determinism and spontaneism which a party necessarily must struggle with; the type of non-administrative internal regime which is necessary for a party to be effective and so on. The problem we seek to elaborate is the specific character of the collective action that makes possible the passage from a sectored, corporate and subordinate role of purely negative opposition, to a leading role of conscious action towards not merely a partial adjustment within the system, but posing the issue of the State in its entirety. In developing this theme – as a study of the real relations between the political party, the classes and the State – a two-fold consideration is devoted to the study of Machiavelli and Marx: first from the angle of the real relations between the two, as thinkers of revolutionary politics, of action; and secondly from a perspective which would derive from the Marxist doctrines an articulated system of contemporary politics, as found in The Prince.

  4. Recent tendency of Nuclear Third Party Legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohara, Fumiaki

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear accidents in Three Mile Island and Chernobyl have a great influence on Nuclear Third Party Legislation of many countries. Nuclear Third Party Law of Japan is due to expire as at 31st, December, 1989, under the recent circumstances in which threre exist pros and cons to nuclear installations among people. This report describes the outline of Japanese Nuclear Law compared with foreign ones and the prospect of its revision. (author)

  5. The Hobby Horse of the Party for the Animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otjes, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Can a small, new political party increase the attention to nonhuman animal welfare? This paper traces the effect of the Party for the Animals on the Dutch parliament. This was the first animal advocacy party to enter parliament.

  6. The impact of the hospital work environment on social support from physicians in breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Lena; Wirtz, Markus; Kowalski, Christoph; Pfaff, Holger; Visser, Adriaan; Ernstmann, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    Research on determinants of a good patient-physician interaction mainly disregards systemic factors, such as the work environment in healthcare. This study aims to identify stressors and resources within the work environment of hospital physicians that enable or hinder the physicians' provision of social support to patients. Four data sources on 35 German breast cancer center hospitals were matched: structured hospital quality reports and surveys of 348 physicians, 108 persons in hospital leadership, and 1844 patients. Associations between hospital structures, physicians' social resources as well as job demands and control and patients' perceived support from physicians have been studied in multilevel models. Patients feel better supported by their physicians in hospitals with high social capital, a high percentage of permanently employed physicians, and less physically strained physicians. The results highlight the importance of the work environment for a good patient-physician interaction. They can be used to develop interventions for redesigning the hospital work environment, which in turn may improve physician satisfaction, well-being, and performance and consequently the quality of care. Health policy and hospital management could create conditions conducive to better patient-physician interaction by strengthening the social capital and by increasing job security for physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Night shift work, chronotype and prostate cancer risk in the MCC-Spain case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Burgos, Javier; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Llorca, Javier; Peiró, Rosana; Jimenez-Moleón, Jose Juan; Arredondo, Francisco; Tardón, Adonina; Pollan, Marina; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-09-01

    Night shift work has been classified as a probable human carcinogen based on experimental studies and limited human evidence on breast cancer. Evidence on other common cancers, such as prostate cancer, is scarce. Chronotype is an individual characteristic that may relate to night work adaptation. We evaluated night shift work with relation to prostate cancer, taking into account chronotype and disease severity in a population based case-control study in Spain. We included 1,095 prostate cancer cases and 1,388 randomly selected population controls. We collected detailed information on shift schedules (permanent vs. rotating, time schedules, duration, frequency), using lifetime occupational history. Sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were assessed by face-to-face interviews and chronotype through a validated questionnaire. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. Subjects who had worked at least for one year in night shift work had a slightly higher prostate cancer risk [Odds Ratio (OR) 1.14; 95%CI 0.94, 1.37] compared with never night workers; this risk increased with longer duration of exposure (≥ 28 years: OR 1.37; 95%CI 1.05, 1.81; p-trend = 0.047). Risks were more pronounced for high risk tumors [D'Amico classification, Relative Risk Ratio (RRR) 1.40; 95%CI 1.05, 1.86], particularly among subjects with longer duration of exposure (≥28 years: RRR 1.63; 95%CI 1.08, 2.45; p-trend = 0.027). Overall risk was higher among subjects with an evening chronotype, but also increased in morning chronotypes after long-term night work. In this large population based study, we found an association between night shift work and prostate cancer particularly for tumors with worse prognosis. © 2014 UICC.

  8. 25. Meeting of the NEA NSC Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) - Summary Record (23-24 May 2013, NEA Headquarters, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France) - NEA-SEN-NSC-WPEC--2013-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    This document summarized the content of the previous WPEC meeting held on 23-24 May 2013 at the NEA Headquarters. Experimental nuclear data activities of relevance to the evaluation projects were reviewed. Detailed information about the experimental activities is given in the reports and view graphs presented at the meeting (list in Annex 2). Progress in the major nuclear data evaluation projects was presented. Detailed information about the status of the evaluated nuclear data libraries is also given in the reports and view graphs presented at the meeting (see Annex 2). Results and conclusions of completed or near-completed subgroups were discussed. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. Activities of ongoing subgroups were presented. A summary table of all subgroup status is also given in Annex 3. Two new subgroup proposals were reviewed by WPEC. Detailed information about these proposals is given in the documents and view graphs presented at the meeting (list in Annex 2). Other points discussed at the 25. Meeting: presentation of the main WPEC objectives and working methods; Renewal of the WPEC mandate for the period 2013-2016; Conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community; Time and place of next meeting

  9. Breast cancer survivors: return to work and wage loss in selected hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T T; Azzani, M; Tan, F L; Loh, S Y

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed, firstly, to assess the determinants of return to work (RTW), secondly, to explore the amount of annual wage loss, and finally, to discover the determinants of wage loss among breast cancer (BC) survivors. A cross-sectional study design was used in this research. The data was collected via interview using a validated questionnaire. Logistic regression models were developed to discover the significant determinants of RTW and of wage loss among BC survivors. A total of 256 BC survivors were included in this study. The analysis showed that there was a 21% loss of or reduction in mean income within 1 year after diagnosis. The significant predictors of RTW are being a government employee, having reduced wages or wage loss, and if the case had been diagnosed 1 year or more ago. Being a private sector employee and having a late stage of cancer was a barrier to RTW. The main risk factors for reduced wages or wage loss were belonging to the age group of 40-59 years, being of Chinese or Indian ethnicity, having low educational status, and not returning to work. However, belonging to the higher monthly income group (earning > RM 2000) is a protective factor against the risk of reduced wages or wage loss. Non-RTW and wage loss after diagnosis of BC may result in the survivors experiencing a significant financial burden. Assessment of these patients is becoming more crucial because more women participate in the workforce in Malaysia nowadays and because BC is managed using multiple treatment modalities with their consequences could lead to long absences from work.

  10. Prediction of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation Mortality 100 Days After Transplantation Using a Machine Learning Algorithm: A European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Acute Leukemia Working Party Retrospective Data Mining Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouval, Roni; Labopin, Myriam; Bondi, Ori; Mishan-Shamay, Hila; Shimoni, Avichai; Ciceri, Fabio; Esteve, Jordi; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert C; Schmid, Christoph; Polge, Emmanuelle; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Kroger, Nicolaus; Craddock, Charles; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Cornelissen, Jan J; Baron, Frederic; Unger, Ron; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is potentially curative for acute leukemia (AL), but carries considerable risk. Machine learning algorithms, which are part of the data mining (DM) approach, may serve for transplantation-related mortality risk prediction. This work is a retrospective DM study on a cohort of 28,236 adult HSCT recipients from the AL registry of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. The primary objective was prediction of overall mortality (OM) at 100 days after HSCT. Secondary objectives were estimation of nonrelapse mortality, leukemia-free survival, and overall survival at 2 years. Donor, recipient, and procedural characteristics were analyzed. The alternating decision tree machine learning algorithm was applied for model development on 70% of the data set and validated on the remaining data. OM prevalence at day 100 was 13.9% (n=3,936). Of the 20 variables considered, 10 were selected by the model for OM prediction, and several interactions were discovered. By using a logistic transformation function, the crude score was transformed into individual probabilities for 100-day OM (range, 3% to 68%). The model's discrimination for the primary objective performed better than the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation score (area under the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.701 v 0.646; Prisk evaluation of patients with AL before HSCT, and is available online (http://bioinfo.lnx.biu.ac.il/∼bondi/web1.html). It is presented as a continuous probabilistic score for the prediction of day 100 OM, extending prediction to 2 years. The DM method has proved useful for clinical prediction in HSCT. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Motivated Reasoning and Political Parties: Evidence for Increased Processing in the Face of Party Cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Bang; Skov, Martin; Serritzlew, Søren

    2013-01-01

    . As part of the latter processes, the presence of party cues would make individuals engage in effortful motivated reasoning to produce arguments for the correctness of their party’s position. Following psychological research, we use response latency to measure processing effort and, in support......Extant research in political science has demonstrated that citizens’ opinions on policies are influenced by their attachment to the party sponsoring them. At the same time, little evidence exists illuminating the psychological processes through which such party cues are filtered. From...... the psychological literature on source cues, we derive two possible hypotheses: (1) party cues activate heuristic processing aimed at minimizing the processing effort during opinion formation, and (2) party cues activate group motivational processes that compel citizens to support the position of their party...

  12. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for renal cell cancer and pancreatic cancer. Literature review and practice recommendations of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panje, Cedric; Andratschke, Nikolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias; Brunner, Thomas B.; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    This report of the Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) aims to provide a literature review and practice recommendations for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of primary renal cell cancer and primary pancreatic cancer. A literature search on SBRT for both renal cancer and pancreatic cancer was performed with focus on prospective trials and technical aspects for clinical implementation. Data on renal and pancreatic SBRT are limited, but show promising rates of local control for both treatment sites. For pancreatic cancer, fractionated SBRT should be preferred to single-dose treatment to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. Motion-compensation strategies and image guidance are paramount for safe SBRT delivery in both tumor entities. SBRT for renal cancer and pancreatic cancer have been successfully evaluated in phase I and phase II trials. Pancreatic SBRT should be practiced carefully and only within prospective protocols due to the risk of severe gastrointestinal toxicity. SBRT for primary renal cell cancer appears a viable option for medically inoperable patients but future research needs to better define patient selection criteria and the detailed practice of SBRT. (orig.) [de

  13. Partis islamistes et démocratisation : expérience du Parti de la ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Partis islamistes et démocratisation : expérience du Parti de la justice et du développement (Turquie). En Turquie, les élections de novembre 2002 ont été remportées par un nouveau parti politique d'orientation islamiste, l'AKP, qui détient environ les deux tiers des sièges au Parlement. La victoire de l'AKP traduit ...

  14. Party Members in Context. Social networks and local branches as context for party membership

    OpenAIRE

    Paulis, Emilien

    2018-01-01

    In this doctoral dissertation, I put party members and activists back in context. I stress theimportance of two contextual dimensions, often overlooked in the scientific literature. On theone hand, I put forward social network explanations of party membership and activism,emphasizing the importance of social interactions, relations and structures, which were scarcelyexplored as potential triggers. Like other forms of participation, party membership haspredominantly been portrayed through indi...

  15. Effectiveness of work-related medical rehabilitation in cancer patients: study protocol of a cluster-randomized multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Schwarz, Betje; Bethge, Matthias

    2016-07-27

    Work is a central resource for cancer survivors as it not only provides income but also impacts health and quality of life. Additionally, work helps survivors to cope with the perceived critical life event. The German Pension Insurance provides medical rehabilitation for working-age patients with chronic diseases to improve and restore their work ability, and support returning to or staying at work, and thus tries to sustainably avoid health-related early retirement. Past research showed that conventional medical rehabilitation programs do not support returning to work sufficiently and that work-related medical rehabilitation programs report higher return-to-work rates across several health conditions, when compared to medical rehabilitation. Therefore, the current study protocol outlines an effectiveness study of such a program for cancer survivors. To evaluate the effectiveness of work-related medical rehabilitation in cancer patients we conduct a cluster-randomized multicenter trial. In total, 504 rehabilitation patients between 18 and 60 years with a Karnofsky Performance Status of ≥70 %, a preliminary positive social-medical prognosis of employability for at least 3 h/day within the next 6 months and an elevated risk of not returning to work will be recruited in four inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients are randomized to the work-related medical rehabilitation program or the conventional medical rehabilitation program based on their week of arrival at each rehabilitation center. The work-related medical rehabilitation program comprises additional work-related diagnostics, multi-professional team meetings, an introductory session as well as work-related functional capacity training, work-related psychological groups, and social counseling. All additional components are aimed at the adjustment of the patients' capacity in relation to their individual job demands. Role functioning defines the main study outcome and will be assessed with the EORTC

  16. Enhancing return-to-work in cancer patients, development of an intervention and design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taskila Taina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to healthy controls, cancer patients have a higher risk of unemployment, which has negative social and economic impacts on the patients and on society at large. Therefore, return-to-work of cancer patients needs to be improved by way of an intervention. The objective is to describe the development and content of a work-directed intervention to enhance return-to-work in cancer patients and to explain the study design used for evaluating the effectiveness of the intervention. Development and content of the intervention The work-directed intervention has been developed based on a systematic literature review of work-directed interventions for cancer patients, factors reported by cancer survivors as helping or hindering their return-to-work, focus group and interview data for cancer patients, health care professionals, and supervisors, and vocational rehabilitation literature. The work-directed intervention consists of: 1 4 meetings with a nurse at the treating hospital department to start early vocational rehabilitation, 2 1 meeting with the participant, occupational physician, and supervisor to make a return-to-work plan, and 3 letters from the treating physician to the occupational physician to enhance communication. Study design to evaluate the intervention The treating physician or nurse recruits patients before the start of initial treatment. Patients are eligible when they have a primary diagnosis of cancer, will be treated with curative intent, are employed at the time of diagnosis, are on sick leave, and are between 18 and 60 years old. After the patients have given informed consent and have filled out a baseline questionnaire, they are randomised to either the control group or to the intervention group and receive either care as usual or the work-directed intervention, respectively. Primary outcomes are return-to-work and quality of life. The feasibility of the intervention and direct and indirect costs will be

  17. JUDGMENT OF POLITICAL PARTIES ACCOUNTABILITY OF THE RIO GRANDE DO NORTE STATE: WHICH ASPECTS RELATE WITH APPROVAL AND DISAPPROVAL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stênnia Maria Ferreira de Brito

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify factors that relate to the judgment of political parties accountability operating in the state of Rio Grande do Norte. Twenty-four political parties with directory in the state were selected considering those who have had their accounts judged between 2006 to 2013. In order to determine which factors are related to the trial of party accounts, logistic regression were considered for the analysis. Independent variables were the total revenues received by the party (in logarithm, dummy for political parties with or without the resources of the party fund and dummy for years that there were state elections, while the trial of the accounts of parties (approval / disapproval is dependent variable. The results show that only the dummy's Party Fund positively influence the judgments of the annual accounts parties. Thus, it is understood that the parties receiving public funds are more likely to provide better information and, therefore, have its accounts approved by the Unidade Técnica do Tribunal Regional Eleitoral do Rio Grande do Norte. Moreover, one can even say that the parties receiving such government help have a trend or an indication of concern with the concept of accountability, since the party fund is a public resource. It is recommended that future studies address other indicators, for example, liquidity, debt and profitability. Moreover, as also proxies related to the disclosure of financial statements, number of persons elected by party in relation to the number of candidates and party members number could become plausible indicators for future research that would use the same methodology. In addition, replicate this metodology to other states for comparative issues, and even use the same methodology at national level could be aspects of research to be worked for the future.

  18. Night-shift work and hematological cancers: a population based case-control study in three Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talibov, Madar; Pukkala, Eero; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Hansen, Johnni

    2018-05-01

    Objective The aim of this case-control study was to assess the effect of night-shift work on the risk of hematological cancers. Methods The study included 39 371 leukemia, 56 713 non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 9322 Hodgkin lymphoma, and 26 188 multiple myeloma cases diagnosed between 1961 and 2005 in Finland, Sweden, and Iceland. Five controls for each case were selected from the Nordic Occupational Cancer Study (NOCCA) cohort, matched by year of birth, sex and country. Night-shift exposure was assessed by using the NOCCA job-exposure matrix (JEM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from conditional logistic regression models. Results Overall, night work was not associated with a risk of hematological cancers. We observed a small but non-significantly increased risk for leukemia (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.99-1.16), especially for acute myeloid leukemia (OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.97-1.36) among workers exposed to a high level of cumulative night work exposure. Night work exposure was not associated with lymphatic cancers and multiple myeloma. Conclusion This study did not support associations between night-shift work and hematological cancers.

  19. A meta-analysis including dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Ji, Alin; Zhu, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Li, Shiqi; Meng, Shuai; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2015-09-22

    A meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the correlation between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer. We searched for publications up to March 2015 using PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases, and the references of the retrieved articles and relevant reviews were also checked. OR and 95% CI were used to assess the degree of the correlation between night shift work and risk of colorectal cancer via fixed- or random-effect models. A dose-response meta-analysis was performed as well. The pooled OR estimates of the included studies illustrated that night shift work was correlated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.318, 95% CI 1.121-1.551). No evidence of publication bias was detected. In the dose-response analysis, the rate of colorectal cancer increased by 11% for every 5 years increased in night shift work (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20). In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicated that night shift work was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Further researches should be conducted to confirm our findings and clarify the potential biological mechanisms.

  20. A conceptual-practice model for occupational therapy to facilitate return to work in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Désiron, Huguette A M; Donceel, Peter; de Rijk, Angelique; Van Hoof, Elke

    2013-12-01

    Improved therapies and early detection have significantly increased the number of breast cancers survivors, leading to increasing needs regarding return to work (RTW). Occupational therapy (OT) interventions provide successful RTW assistance for other conditions, but are not validated in breast cancer. This paper aims to identify a theoretical framework for OT intervention by questioning how OT models can be used in OT interventions in RTW of breast cancer patients; criteria to be used to select these models and adaptations that would be necessary to match the OT model(s) to breast cancer patients' needs? Using research specific criteria derived from OT literature (conceptual OT-model, multidisciplinary, referring to the International Classification of functioning (ICF), RTW in breast cancer) a search in 9 electronic databases was conducted to select articles that describe conceptual OT models. A content analysis of those models complying to at least two of the selection criteria was realised. Checking for breast cancer specific issues, results were matched with literature of care-models regarding RTW in breast cancer. From the nine models initially identified, three [Canadian Model of Occupational Performance, Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), Person-Environment-Occupation-Performance model] were selected based on the selection criteria. The MOHO had the highest compliance rate with the criteria. To enhance usability in breast cancer, some adaptations are needed. No OT model to facilitate RTW in breast cancer could be identified, indicating a need to fill this gap. Individual and societal needs of breast cancer patients can be answered by using a MOHO-based OT model, extended with indications for better treatment, work-outcomes and longitudinal process factors.

  1. Radiological Characterisation for Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations - Final Report of the Task Group on Radiological Characterisation and Decommissioning (RCD) of the Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD) - Final Report, September 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Caroline; Olivier Dehaye, Catherine; Tardy, Frederic; Boisserie, Thierry; Desnoyers, Yvon; Thierfeldt, Stefan; Martin, Nieves; Henrik Efraimsson; Haakansson, Lars; Larsson, Arne; Dunlop, Alister A.; Jarman, Sean; Orr, Peter; Abu-Eid, Boby

    2013-01-01

    , or during the dismantling phase where systems, structures, components and buildings have to be characterised for decisions regarding the extent of decontamination, application of appropriate dismantling techniques, identification, classification, treatment of radioactive materials, etc. The final status survey on the site has quite distinctive features as it also has to take into account the possibility of subsurface contamination, which may lead to radionuclide transfer into ground water and surface water bodies. Careful planning and implementation of radiological characterisation campaigns will allow significant reduction of time, costs and effort. On a strategic and managerial level, there are ways to maximise the efficiency of measurement techniques (e.g. by combining several types of measurement and sampling approaches) to increase efficiency of characterisation (e.g. by integrating characterisation into other tasks), or to choose an optimum form of organisation by allocating staff and resources timely and adequately to achieve the required characterisation results when needed, thus avoiding delays in the normal decommissioning work-flow or radioactive waste management. Today, experience gained from a large number of decommissioning projects helps to implement radiological characterisation effectively. Radiological characterisation is undoubtedly one of the key factors for any successful decommissioning project. The aim of this report is to identify and give an overview of the best practice for radiological characterisation at different stages of decommissioning and to point out areas that could or should be developed further through international co-operation and co-ordination. The report summarises various issues relating to radiological characterisation in a short and succinct way, giving an overview of the issues, the techniques, possible obstacles, strategic aspects and lessons learned. The reader interested in more in-depth or detailed information should

  2. "Cancer Put My Life on Hold": Work-Related Challenges Among Middle-aged Adults 12 Months After a Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Catherine; Mihala, Gabor; Beesley, Vanessa L; Lynch, Brigid M; Graves, Nicholas; Gordon, Louisa G

    Colorectal cancer affects a wide range of working-age people. Little is known about the consequent work limitations. The aim of this study was to understand the extent and changing nature of work-related limitations of middle-aged (45-64 years) people over the first 12 months of colorectal cancer. Surveys were administered to participants recruited via the Queensland Cancer Registry, at 6 and 12 months after diagnosis. Among those who returned to work, the Work Limitations Questionnaire measured 4 job performance domains (time management, physical, mental-interpersonal, and output demands) and an overall productivity score. Open-ended questions supplemented the Work Limitations Questionnaire, and responses were thematically analyzed. Of 239 participants, 8% did not continue in the study, and 20% left employment by 12 months, leaving 171 participants eligible for this analysis. Open-ended responses for why participants stopped work included bowel problems and stoma, loss of strength, and medication adverse effects. At 12 months, 22% to 39% of participants reported work limitations, but there was no overall significant change in work limitations between 6 and 12 months. Qualitative data highlighted the key work-related issues were changes in work functioning, attitudes of employers and colleagues, financial pressures, and emotional responses. While a significant proportion left work because of treatment-related problems, and the majority of participants did not experience workplace limitations, some reported considerable work-related challenges. Discussions with health professionals about the possible impact of treatment adverse effects on employment, good communication with employers, and workplace flexibility may facilitate return to work for this population.

  3. Working memory training in survivors of pediatric cancer: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Kristina K; Willard, Victoria W; Allen, Taryn M; Bonner, Melanie J

    2013-08-01

    Survivors of pediatric brain tumors and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for neurocognitive deficits, but few empirically supported treatment options exist. We examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a home-based, computerized working memory training program, CogmedRM, with survivors of childhood cancer. Survivors of brain tumors or ALL (n = 20) with identified deficits in attention and/or working memory were randomized to either the success-adapted computer intervention or a non-adaptive, active control condition. Specifically, children in the adaptive condition completed exercises that became more challenging with each correct trial, whereas those in the non-adaptive version trained with exercises that never increased in difficulty. All participants were asked to complete 25 training sessions at home, with weekly, phone-based coaching support. Brief assessments were completed pre-intervention and post-intervention; outcome measures included both performance-based and parent-report measures of working memory and attention. Eighty-five percent of survivors were compliant with the intervention, with no adverse events reported. After controlling for baseline intellectual functioning, survivors who completed the intervention program evidenced significant post-training improvements in their visual working memory and in parent-rated learning problems compared with those in the active control group. No differences in verbal working memory functioning were evident between groups, however. Home-based, computerized cognitive training demonstrates good feasibility and acceptability in our sample. Children with higher intellectual functioning at baseline appeared to benefit more from the training, although further study is needed to clarify the strength, scope, and particularly the generalizability of potential treatment effects. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Nested case-control study of night shift work and breast cancer risk among women in the Danish military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Johnni; Lassen, Christina F

    2012-08-01

    Growing but limited evidence suggests that night shift work is associated with breast cancer. The authors conducted a nationwide case-control study nested within a cohort of 18,551 female military employees born in 1929-1968 to investigate the risk for breast cancer after night shift work and to explore the role of leisure time sun exposure and diurnal preference. The authors documented 218 cases of breast cancer (1990-2003) and selected 899 age-matched controls from the cohort by incidence density sampling. Information on shift work, sun exposure habits, diurnal preference and other potential confounders was obtained from a structured questionnaire. ORs were estimated by multivariate conditional logistic regression. Overall, the authors observed an adjusted OR of 1.4 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.1) among women with ever compared with never night shifts. The RR for breast cancer tended to increase with increasing number of years of night shift work (p=0.03) and with cumulative number of shifts (p=0.02),with a neutral risk for fewer than three night shifts per week. The OR for the group with the highest tertile of cumulative exposure was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.6). The most pronounced effect of night shift work on breast cancer risk was observed in women with morning chronotype preference and intense night shifts (OR=3.9, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Night shift workers tended to sunbathe more frequently than day workers. The results indicate that frequent night shift work increases the risk for breast cancer and suggest a higher risk with longer duration of intense night shifts. Women with morning preference who worked on night shifts tended to have a higher risk than those with evening preference.

  5. Mechanisms of Breast Cancer in Shift Workers: DNA Methylation in Five Core Circadian Genes in Nurses Working Night Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulin Erdem, Johanna; Skare, Øivind; Petersen-Øverleir, Marte; Notø, Heidi Ødegaard; Lie, Jenny-Anne S; Reszka, Edyta; Pepłońska, Beata; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh

    2017-01-01

    Shift work has been suggested to be associated with breast cancer risk, and circadian disruption in shift workers is hypothesized as one of the mechanisms of increased cancer risk. There is, however, insufficient molecular evidence supporting this hypothesis. Using the quantitative methodology of pyrosequencing, epigenetic changes in 5-methyl cytosine (5mC) in five circadian genes CLOCK , BMAL1 , CRY1, PER1 and PER2 in female nurses working night shift work (278 breast cancer cases, 280 controls) were analyzed. In breast cancer cases, a medium exposure to night work was associated with increased methylation levels of the CLOCK (p=0.050), BMAL1 (p=0.001) and CRY1 (p=0.040) genes, compared with controls. Within the cases, analysis of the effects of shift work on the methylation patterns showed that methylation of CRY1 was lower in those who had worked night shift and had a high exposure (p=0.006) compared with cases that had worked only days. For cases with a medium exposure to night work, an increase in BMAL1 (p=0.003) and PER1 (p=0.035) methylation was observed compared with day working (unexposed) cases. The methylation levels of the five core circadian genes were also analyzed in relation to the estrogen and progesterone receptors status of the tumors in the cases, and no correlations were observed. Furthermore, nineteen polymorphisms in the five circadian genes were assessed for their effects on the methylation levels of the respective genes, but no associations were found. In summary, our data suggest that epigenetic regulation of CLOCK , BMAL1, CRY1 and PER1 may contribute to breast cancer in shift workers.

  6. Institute of party leadership system of the party creation of modern Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Lavrenyuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article based on the study of the theory and practice of party­building in Ukraine examines the role of party leader in the political process and the establishment of parties, implementation of the political power, the development of political consciousness and the formation of modern political elite of our country. It is alleged that party leader – a reputable, recognized in its political environment, the person chosen to lead the party and the ability of citizens to consolidate around a common goal, most effectively represent the interests of a particular social group. It is stated that the defining feature of the phenomenon of party leadership is that under conditions of constant political development and irreversibility of democratic transformations in Ukraine part of leaders of political parties in fact is a powerful talent pool for senior government officials, local government agencies and other administrative institutions. The process of creating games as an integral part of the political process is characterized by a certain way, the mechanism of action of consciousness and culture in the public sphere, which deals with political parties. Regularities component of modern political elite of the party elite acts ­ governing the range of persons in the political party headed by its leader that are directly involved in strategic decision­making, policy formulation of this power, as well as its participation in the political process. We study the classification model of national political parties and the institutions of the party leadership. It is proposed to assess the level of correlation of the party leaders and the general dynamics of the civil society in Ukraine. It is stated that at this time a fundamental change in Ukrainian Party elite has not happened yet. However, there is a long evolution of the institute of the party leadership – a rather difficult process of internal and external, objective and subjective, economic

  7. Limitations and Implications of Product-, Sales- and Market-Oriented Political Parties: Evidence for Public Affairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first literature review of work using Lees-Marshment’s product-oriented party (POP), salesoriented party (SOP) and market-oriented party (MOP) process models with the aims of assessing the models’ usefulness to academics, practitioners and educators. This is motivated...... by an urgent need to evaluate models that claim to balance explanatory power, practical applicability and pedagogic value. Our literature review demonstrates that although the process models can be used in a classroom setting, empirical results are ambivalent as to the usefulness and even existence of the MOP...

  8. Stitching together the heterogenous party

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders; Carlsen, Hjalmar Alexander Bang; Jørgensen, Tobias Bornakke

    2017-01-01

    The era of ‘big data’ studies and computational social science has recently given rise to a number of realignments within and beyond the social sciences, where otherwise distinct data formats – digital, numerical, ethnographic, visual, etc. – rub off and emerge from one another in new ways....... This article chronicles the collaboration between a team of anthropologists and sociologists, who worked together for one week in an experimental attempt to combine ‘big’ transactional and ‘small’ ethnographic data formats. Our collaboration is part of a larger cross-disciplinary project carried out...

  9. Social Class and Party Identification During the Clinton, Bush, and Obama Presidencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Morgan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Through an analysis of the 1994 through 2016 General Social Surveys, this article demonstrates that a substantial proportion of eligible voters within the working class turned away from solid identification with either the Democratic Party or the Republican Party during the Obama presidency. Even before the 2016 election cycle commenced, conditions were uncharacteristically propitious for a Republican candidate who could appeal to prospective voters in the working class, especially those who had not voted in recent presidential elections but could be mobilized to vote. These findings support the contested position that variation in party identification is a genuine leading indicator of electoral outcomes and perhaps also, in this case, of party realignment.

  10. From Party Systems to Party Organizations: The Adaptation of Latin American Parties to Changing Environments De sistemas partidarios a la organización partidaria. La adaptación de partidos latinoamericanos a ambientes cambiantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Wills-Otero

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Review Article:Alcántara Sáez, Manuel (ed. (2008, Politicians and Politics in Latin America, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers. Greene, Kenneth F. (2007, Why Dominant Parties Lose. Mexico’s Democratization in Comparative Perspective, New York: Cambridge University Press. Levitsky, Steven (2003, Transforming Labor-based Parties in Latin America: Argentine Peronism in Comparative Perspective, New York: Cambridge University Press. The study of party systems and political parties is one of the largest subfields in political science. Classic studies in advanced democracies focused primarily on party systems and developed theories about the causes and consequences of different types of systems. In recent years, new academic work begun to differentiate parties within systems by understanding their organizational structure, their internal dynamics, the different ways in which they interact with their constituencies, and the strategies that they use to attract voters. Studies show that parties within the same system behave and react differently given their internal conditions. This article reviews three scholarly books that deal with this issue. The works analyze the internal dynamics of Latin American political parties and their capacity to respond and adapt their structures when environmental challenges take place. Review Article:Alcántara Sáez, Manuel (ed. (2008, Politicians and Politics in Latin America, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers. Greene, Kenneth F. (2007, Why Dominant Parties Lose. Mexico���s Democratization in Comparative Perspective, New York: Cambridge University Press. Levitsky, Steven (2003, Transforming Labor-based Parties in Latin America: Argentine Peronism in Comparative Perspective, New York: Cambridge University Press. El estudio de los sistemas de partidos y partidos políticos es una de las áreas más amplias en la ciencia política. Trabajos clásicos llevados a cabo en democracias avanzadas, enfocaron su atenci

  11. Parties, rituals and symbolisms in schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecilia Valencia Aguirre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analyzing school parties from interaction spaces and principals’ narratives in six schools in the state of Jalisco. A party is a ritual where participants share symbols related to imaginary –hence the importance of conducting an analysis for understanding institutions as a symbolic framework. A core argument is that established actors are configured from symbolic practices in the institutional space (schools. The repetition of these practices awash with symbolism leads to daily rituals or micro rituals that are ratified in institutions. Methodologically, interviews and non-participant observation in school interaction spaces were used. Based on the findings, it may be stated that the nuclear family, rooted in the Christian image in which authority is a central point, becomes a fundamental factor in shaping institutional life as well as the imaginary linked to school parties.

  12. Nationalism, territory and extremism in party politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourne, Angela

    In the paper I address the empirical puzzle arising from different responses by political authorities in Spain and the UK to the existence of political parties integrated in the terrorist groups Euskadi Ta Askatasuna (ETA, Basque Homeland and Freedom) and the Irish Republican Army. More specifica......In the paper I address the empirical puzzle arising from different responses by political authorities in Spain and the UK to the existence of political parties integrated in the terrorist groups Euskadi Ta Askatasuna (ETA, Basque Homeland and Freedom) and the Irish Republican Army. More...... for realization of free speech rights and representation is also emphasized, and where proscription is seen as inimical to resolution of conflict underpinning violence. In the context of party competition, a winning coalition is required for one discourse to predominate. However, I also argued that both ideas...

  13. The doctrine of party autonomy in international commercial arbitration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The freedom of parties to consensually execute arbitration agreement is known as the principle of party autonomy. The principle provides a right for the parties to international commercial arbitration to choose applicable substantive law and these laws when chosen shall govern the contractual relationship of the parties.

  14. Runtime party switch in an inter-organizational collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourmirza, S.

    2016-01-01

    During the execution of an inter-organizational business-to-business (B2B) collaboration, a collaborating party may drop out for technical reasons or for business reasons. In such a case, the leaving party must be replaced, at runtime, by a new party. Ideally, the new party can pick up where the old

  15. Electoral system, pesonal votes, and party choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Søren Risbjerg

    Using local elections in Denmark as an example this paper shows that individual party choice is influenced both by individual level, municipality level, and national level characteristics. Some hypotheses about the effects of the electoral system on personal votes derived from a theory by Carey...... & Shugart (1995) are first tested using a fixed-effects model. The effect of the personal reputation of the candidates, measured by personal votes, on party choice is then tested using a multilevel multinomial logit model suggested by Rabe-Hesketh and Skrondal (2008). The paper shows that both the electoral...

  16. A meta-analysis on dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Yeung, K L; Chan, W C; Kwok, C C H; Leung, S L; Wu, C; Chan, E Y Y; Yu, I T S; Yang, X R; Tse, L A

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to conduct a systematic review to sum up evidence of the associations between different aspects of night shift work and female breast cancer using a dose-response meta-analysis approach. We systematicly searched all cohort and case-control studies published in English on MEDLINE, Embase, PSYCInfo, APC Journal Club and Global Health, from January 1971 to May 2013. We extracted effect measures (relative risk, RR; odd ratio, OR; or hazard ratio, HR) from individual studies to generate pooled results using meta-analysis approaches. A log-linear dose-response regression model was used to evaluate the relationship between various indicators of exposure to night shift work and breast cancer risk. Downs and Black scale was applied to assess the methodological quality of included studies. Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. A pooled adjusted relative risk for the association between 'ever exposed to night shift work' and breast cancer was 1.19 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.35]. Further meta-analyses on dose-response relationship showed that every 5-year increase of exposure to night shift work would correspondingly enhance the risk of breast cancer of the female by 3% (pooled RR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05; Pheterogeneity night shifts would result in a 13% (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.21; Pheterogeneity = 0.06) increase in breast cancer risk. This systematic review updated the evidence that a positive dose-response relationship is likely to present for breast cancer with increasing years of employment and cumulative shifts involved in the work.

  17. The work of nurse case managers in a cancer and cardiovascular disease risk screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline; Schutt, Russell K; Gall, Gail B; Cruz, Elizabeth Riley; Woodford, Mary Lou

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual model of nursing and health policy-based study was to identify the frequency and correlates of activities performed by nurse case managers. Massachusetts Women's Health Network (WHN) contracting organization sites for breast and cervical cancer and cardiovascular disease risk screening. Twenty nurse case managers were interviewed. More time was spent performing client service activities than bureaucratic activities. Frequently performed client service activities were tracking test results, finding/connecting with clients, assessing client needs, and educating clients. The most frequently performed activity was documenting services; the least, discharging clients. Client service activity frequency was correlated with client caseload size, social barriers, overall workload, satisfaction with the way activities are carried out in the WHN, special training in WHN policies and procedures, and contracting organization service delivery arrangements. Bureaucratic activity frequency was correlated with caseload size, workload, months as a WHN case manager, system barriers, satisfaction with the way activities were carried out in the WHN, and special training. Documentation requires a great deal of WHN nurse case managers' time, which perhaps could be more productively spent with clients. Thus, more efficient ways to document services need to be identified. Additional research is needed to determine similarities and differences in activities performed by WHN nurse case managers and other case managers working in cancer and cardiovascular disease screening programs. Strategies need to be identified to remove all barriers that interfere with performance of case manager practice activities. Strategies are needed to reduce client fear of bills, overcome scheduling constraints, and improve translation services to lessen language barriers to effective communication.

  18. Reflexive intergroup bias in third-party punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkin, Daniel A; Rothmund, Tobias; Twardawski, Mathias; Thalla, Natasha; Van Bavel, Jay J

    2016-11-01

    Humans show a rare tendency to punish norm-violators who have not harmed them directly-a behavior known as third-party punishment. Research has found that third-party punishment is subject to intergroup bias, whereby people punish members of the out-group more severely than the in-group. Although the prevalence of this behavior is well-documented, the psychological processes underlying it remain largely unexplored. Some work suggests that it stems from people's inherent predisposition to form alliances with in-group members and aggress against out-group members. This implies that people will show reflexive intergroup bias in third-party punishment, favoring in-group over out-group members especially when their capacity for deliberation is impaired. Here we test this hypothesis directly, examining whether intergroup bias in third-party punishment emerges from reflexive, as opposed to deliberative, components of moral cognition. In 3 experiments, utilizing a simulated economic game, we varied participants' group relationship to a transgressor, measured or manipulated the extent to which they relied on reflexive or deliberative judgment, and observed people's punishment decisions. Across group-membership manipulations (American football teams, nationalities, and baseball teams) and 2 assessments of reflexive judgment (response time and cognitive load), reflexive judgment heightened intergroup bias, suggesting that such bias in punishment is inherent to human moral cognition. We discuss the implications of these studies for theories of punishment, cooperation, social behavior, and legal practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. The impact of personal-, disease- and work-related factors on work ability of women with breast cancer living in the community: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kin; Ching, Siu Yin Shirley; Chan, Amy; Cheung, Doris; Cheung, Suk Yee Polly

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the work ability (WA) of breast cancer (BC) survivors during the course of their illness, and the relationships between personal-, disease-, and work-related factors, and their WA. This is a cross-sectional survey study. One hundred fifty-one participants with the response rate of 88.9% were recruited from the community in 2014 and 2015. BC survivors' WA was at its highest before diagnosis, and then dropped to the lowest during treatment. Although their current WA had improved, it has not bounced back to that before diagnosis. The resignation rate was 35.8%. Factors positively associated with current WA included (a) age and year of diagnosis, (b) physical and psychological health and (c) WA before diagnosis or during treatment, working years, work control and mastery. However, compliance with appropriate healthy eating habits and believing in personal health controlled by chance were negatively associated with current WA. Furthermore, the participants would more likely to have higher current WA if they (a) were more optimistic with good stress management; (b) currently were not receiving treatment or other illnesses; (c) perceived less effects of their health problems, physical workloads or their cancer diagnoses on their work and (d) perceived continue to work in the next 2 years, with good ability to handle physical and mental work. This study confirmed that most BC survivors continued to work after their diagnoses. The factors affecting their WA were multifactorial. It is important to enhance their positive thinking.

  20. Authoritarian Inheritance and Conservative Party-Building in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Loxton, James Ivor

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in the late 1970s, with the onset of the third wave of democratization, a host of new conservative parties emerged in Latin America. The trajectories of these parties varied tremendously. While some went on to enjoy long-term electoral success, others failed to take root. The most successful new conservative parties all shared a surprising characteristic: they had deep roots in former dictatorships. They were "authoritarian successor parties," or parties founded by high-level in...

  1. Management of adenovirus infection in patients after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: State-of-the-art and real-life current approach: A position statement on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Kosulin, Karin; Cesaro, Simone; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Styczynski, Jan; Wynn, Robert; Lion, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    The important insights gained over the past years in diagnosis and treatment of invasive adenoviral infections provide new paradigms for the monitoring and clinical management of these life-threatening complications. A meeting was held to discuss and subsequently disseminate the current advances in our understanding of the aetiology/pathogenesis and future treatment options facilitating effective control or prevention of adenovirus-related diseases in the allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant setting. Invited experts in the field discussed recent progress with leading members of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation at the "State-of-the-art" Meeting in Poznan, Poland, in October 2017. In this review article, the panel of experts presents a concise summary of the current evidence based on published data from the last 15 years and on recent achievements resulting from real-life practice. The present position statement reflects an expert opinion on current approaches to clinical management of adenovirus infections in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant and provides graded recommendations of the panel for diagnostic approaches and preemptive therapy reflecting the present state of knowledge. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Social welfare and legal constraints associated with work among breast and prostate cancer survivors: experiences from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Linda; Timmons, Aileen

    2011-12-01

    Around 40% of cancer survivors are of working age. We investigated employment outcomes among survivors in Ireland where sick leave and sick pay are at the employers' discretion and the law affords no protection against dismissal following extended absence. A questionnaire was mailed to 1,373 survivors, identified from the National Cancer Registry, 6-24 months post-diagnosis. The analysis included breast and prostate cancer respondents who were working at diagnosis. Factors associated with work continuation post-diagnosis and work resumption after cancer-related absence were identified using logistic regression. The response rate was 54%. Three hundred forty-six respondents were working at diagnosis (breast cancer = 246; prostate cancer = 100). Sixty-two (18%) continued working post-diagnosis. Factors significantly associated with work continuation were: self-employment, prostate cancer, lower pre-diagnosis household income, and not having surgery. Two hundred eighty-four took time off work post-diagnosis; of these, 51 (18%) had left the workforce, 187 (66%) had resumed working, and 46 (16%) planned to resume working. Factors significantly associated with work resumption were: tertiary education, not having chemotherapy, receiving sick pay, and not having a medical card (which provides free access to public health services). Among those who resumed working, the median absence was 30.1 weeks (inter-quartile range = 12.9-51.6). The length of absence varied significantly by socio-demographic, financial, medical, and job- and social welfare-related factors. Median working hours pre- and post-diagnosis differed significantly (pre-diagnosis = 38/week; post-diagnosis = 30/week; p<0.001). The high level of workforce departure and associations between self-employment, sick pay and medical cards, and employment outcomes suggest that social welfare and legal provisions are important determinants of the survivors' workforce participation. IMPLICATIONS FOR

  3. Exposure Assessment Suggests Exposure to Lung Cancer Carcinogens in a Painter Working in an Automobile Bumper Shop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boowook Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old man who had worked as a bumper spray painter in an automobile body shop for 15 years developed lung cancer. The patient was a nonsmoker with no family history of lung cancer. To determine whether the cancer was related to his work environment, we assessed the level of exposure to carcinogens during spray painting, sanding, and heat treatment. The results showed that spray painting with yellow paint increased the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the air to as much as 118.33 μg/m3. Analysis of the paint bulk materials showed that hexavalent chromium was mostly found in the form of lead chromate. Interestingly, strontium chromate was also detected, and the concentration of strontium chromate increased in line with the brightness of the yellow color. Some paints contained about 1% crystalline silica in the form of quartz.

  4. Related party transactions and firms financial performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Related party transactions and firms financial performance. ... African Research Review ... financial performance using Secondary data obtained from Nigeria stock ... on Asset, Return on Equity and Earnings per share of manufacturing firms. ... Result showed RPT has no significant effects on ROA and EPS and not used to ...

  5. Related Party Transactions and Firms Financial Performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    Chien and Hsu (2010) found a positive moderating effect of corporate governance on the related transactions-firm performance relationship and deduce that presence of corporate governance could 'transfer' related party transactions 'conflict- of-interest' to be efficient. Past studies on the impact of RPT on financial reporting ...

  6. Group Cohesiveness in the Black Panther Party

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway, Carolyn R.

    1977-01-01

    This study selects for study the following propositions: 1) similarity among members increased the degree of cohesiveness within the party, 2) group devotion heightened interest in accomplishing group goals and 3) the threat of an external enemy led to interdependence among members and affected both activities and leadership styles. (Author/AM)

  7. Social media, parties, and political inequalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, K.T.E.; Spierings, C.H.B.M.

    2016-01-01

    This book examines how social media have transformed politics in established democracies. Specifically, the authors examine the influence of the unique qualities of social media on the power balance between and within parties. They present a general theory as well as an in-depth case study of the

  8. Trends in nuclear third party liability law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avossa, G.

    1992-01-01

    For some ten years now, nuclear third-party liability has been changing at an ever-faster pace, further accelerated by the Chernobyl catastrophe. Some of these changes are discussed in this article. A joint protocol drawn up by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) mutually extends the benefit of the special third-party liability system regarding nuclear damage instituted by virtue of previous Conventions and settles the conflicts of law likely to result from the simultaneous application of the two international instruments. Within the framework of the IAEA, a review procedure of the Convention of Vienna has been underway since 1989, in which the NEA has taken an integral part. At the outcome of the process underway, not only will the Convention of Vienna be revised, but so, indirectly but very rapidly, will the Conventions of Paris and Brussels. Ultimately, the entire field of nuclear third-party liability will be recast for decades to come. The texts under discussion are as yet nowhere near their final stage but two areas of consideration have already emerged, which will be discussed. Substantial modifications are made in nuclear third-party liability law. Secondly, the indemnification process for nuclear damage will be vastly modified, due to the subsidiary nature of government intervention and new obligations on operators to become members of a Nuclear Operator Pool. (author)

  9. Implementing Democratic Equality in Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolleyer, Nicole; von Nostitz, Felix-Christopher; Little, Conor

    2015-01-01

    This article theorises and empirically assesses some important intra-organisational implications of maximising democratic equality in political parties both between followers and members and between members and elites. They include weak member commitment, passivity of the rank-and-file membership...

  10. Feature Project--A Bookmaking Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Lori; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The teaching activities presented in this article focus on a bookmaking party, which gives children a format in which they can publish and share their activities in a formal way, provides them with books for recording their writing, and involves students, parents, and the community with children's writing. The paper describes the steps for…

  11. Capuchin Monkeys Judge Third-Party Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R.; Takimoto, Ayaka; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing interest is being shown in how children develop an understanding of reciprocity in social exchanges and fairness in resource distribution, including social exchanges between third parties. Although there are descriptions of reciprocity on a one-to-one basis in other species, whether nonhumans detect reciprocity and violations of…

  12. Political party affiliation, political ideology and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Kawachi, Ichiro; Muennig, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Ecological and cross-sectional studies have indicated that conservative political ideology is associated with better health. Longitudinal analyses of mortality are needed because subjective assessments of ideology may confound subjective assessments of health, particularly in cross-sectional analyses. Data were derived from the 2008 General Social Survey-National Death Index data set. Cox proportional analysis models were used to determine whether political party affiliation or political ideology was associated with time to death. Also, we attempted to identify whether self-reported happiness and self-rated health acted as mediators between political beliefs and time to death. In this analysis of 32,830 participants and a total follow-up time of 498,845 person-years, we find that political party affiliation and political ideology are associated with mortality. However, with the exception of independents (adjusted HR (AHR)=0.93, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.97), political party differences are explained by the participants' underlying sociodemographic characteristics. With respect to ideology, conservatives (AHR=1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.12) and moderates (AHR=1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.11) are at greater risk for mortality during follow-up than liberals. Political party affiliation and political ideology appear to be different predictors of mortality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. A meta-analysis including dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao; Ji, Alin; Zhu, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Li, Shiqi; Meng, Shuai; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the correlation between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer. We searched for publications up to March 2015 using PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases, and the references of the retrieved articles and relevant reviews were also checked. OR and 95% CI were used to assess the degree of the correlation between night shift work and risk of colorectal cance...

  14. Employment status and work-related problems of gastrointestinal cancer patients at diagnosis: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A. G. E. M.; Bruinvels, D. J.; Tytgat, K. M. A. J.; Schoorlemmer, A.; Klinkenbijl, J. H. G.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the employment status of patients with gastrointestinal cancer at diagnosis and to examine work-related problems of employed patients. Design New, consecutive patients were included at the Gastrointestinal Oncology Center Amsterdam, a one-stop, rapid access diagnostic assessment

  15. Work and "mass personal" communication as means of navigating nutrition and exercise concerns in an online cancer community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Brad; M Thompson, Charee; Crook, Brittani; Donovan-Kicken, Erin

    2013-05-31

    Health and psychosocial outcomes for young adults affected by cancer have improved only minimally in decades, partially due to a lack of relevant support and information. Given significant unmet needs involving nutrition and exercise, it is important to understand how this audience handles information about food and fitness in managing their cancer experiences. Using the theory of illness trajectories as a framework, we explored how four lines of work associated with living with a chronic illness such as cancer (illness, everyday life, biographical, and the recently explicated construct of communication work) impacts and is impacted by nutrition and exercise concerns. Following a search to extract all nutrition- and exercise-related content from the prior 3 years (January 2008 to February 2011), a sample of more than 1000 posts from an online support community for young adults affected by cancer were qualitatively analyzed employing iterative, constant comparison techniques. Sensitized by illness trajectory research and related concepts, 3 coders worked over 4 months to examine the English-language, de-identified text files of content. An analysis of discussion board threads in an online community for young adults dealing with cancer shows that nutrition and exercise needs affect the young adults' illness trajectories, including their management of illness, everyday life, biographical, and communication work. Furthermore, this paper helps validate development of the "communication work" variable, explores the "mass personal" interplay of mediated and interpersonal communication channels, and expands illness trajectory work to a younger demographic than investigated in prior research. Applying the valuable concepts of illness, everyday life, biographical, and communication work provides a more nuanced understanding of how young adults affected by cancer handle exercise and nutrition needs. This knowledge can help provide support and interventional guidance for the

  16. The Changing of Political Orientation of Masyumi Party During 1950-1959

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfi Hafidh Ishaqro

    2017-06-01

    The formation of the General Election Law made M. Natsir and Masyumi the symbol of the establishment and growth of democracy in the Republic of Indonesia, which became more evident when M. Natsir was ousted and the subsequent working cabinet heads failed to hold a General Election. And finally, at the end of 1955 under the leadership of Burhanuddin Harahap, who was himself a Masyumi figure, a general election was held for the first time. The political attitude shown by Masyumi indicated that Masumi Party had shifted its political orientation. Masyumi Party, which originally struggled to implement Islam by employing the Syura in forming a government was helplessly compromising its principle by following and combining itself into a democracy model the initiator of which was the leader of Masyumi Party itself. Such political behavioral changes were associated with the reasoning of the then leaders of Masyumi Party, who tended to accommodative and excessively compromising.

  17. Work and “Mass Personal” Communication as Means of Navigating Nutrition and Exercise Concerns in an Online Cancer Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Thompson, Charee; Crook, Brittani; Donovan-Kicken, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Background Health and psychosocial outcomes for young adults affected by cancer have improved only minimally in decades, partially due to a lack of relevant support and information. Given significant unmet needs involving nutrition and exercise, it is important to understand how this audience handles information about food and fitness in managing their cancer experiences. Objective Using the theory of illness trajectories as a framework, we explored how four lines of work associated with living with a chronic illness such as cancer (illness, everyday life, biographical, and the recently explicated construct of communication work) impacts and is impacted by nutrition and exercise concerns. Methods Following a search to extract all nutrition- and exercise-related content from the prior 3 years (January 2008 to February 2011), a sample of more than 1000 posts from an online support community for young adults affected by cancer were qualitatively analyzed employing iterative, constant comparison techniques. Sensitized by illness trajectory research and related concepts, 3 coders worked over 4 months to examine the English-language, de-identified text files of content. Results An analysis of discussion board threads in an online community for young adults dealing with cancer shows that nutrition and exercise needs affect the young adults’ illness trajectories, including their management of illness, everyday life, biographical, and communication work. Furthermore, this paper helps validate development of the “communication work” variable, explores the “mass personal” interplay of mediated and interpersonal communication channels, and expands illness trajectory work to a younger demographic than investigated in prior research. Conclusions Applying the valuable concepts of illness, everyday life, biographical, and communication work provides a more nuanced understanding of how young adults affected by cancer handle exercise and nutrition needs. This knowledge can

  18. Political Market Orientation and Strategic Party Postures in Danish Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.; Henneberg, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper investigates the relationship between the strategic postures and political market orientation profile of two Danish parties. Profile stability at the organisational level is used as a control variable. Design/methodology/approach – The strategic political postures of two Danish...... are used to control for organisational stability. Findings – The self-typing study revealed that Party A was perceived to follow a Relationship Builder posture, and Party B a Convinced Ideologist posture. However, both market orientation profiles resembled the organisational structures of a Convinced...... in the political sphere. More specifically it empirically links political market orientation as an issue of political marketing implementation on the one hand, and strategic postures of parties as a strategic issue on the other, following a configuration theory logic. Research limitations...

  19. Political Market Orientation and Strategic Party Postures in Danish Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.; Henneberg, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper investigates the relationship between the strategic postures and political market orientation profile of two Danish parties. Profile stability at the organisational level is used as a control variable. Design/methodology/approach – The strategic political postures of two Danish...... parties are derived using a self-typing study. Based on configuration theory, ideal organisational profiles to implement these studies are juxtaposed with the actual political market orientation profile for each party, gained from two datasets analysed using Partial Least Squares. Member activity levels...... Ideologist. Thus, Party A exhibits a mismatch between strategic orientation and implemented organisational profile, based on configuration theory. The results were generally stable across political activity levels. Originality/value – The study contributes to understanding the concept of market orientation...

  20. So Close But So Far: Voting Propensity and Party Choice for Left-�Wing Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsler, Daniel; Sciarini, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    While the bulk of the literature focuses on the vote for parties from different blocs, the purpose of our article is to study the vote for two parties that are ideologically very close to each other: The Social Democrats and the Greens in Switzerland. To that end, we develop a two-step model, where...... voters first make a selection of parties that are acceptable to them and then make their electoral choice out of this set of acceptable al- ternatives. We use voting propensities as a measure of the first, consideration step and we show that they strongly depend on the distance between voters and parties...... on the Left–Right scale. With regard to the second, choice stage of the electoral process we hypothesize about the factors that may account for the varying ability of the two par- ties to convert potential voters into real voters. Our empirical tests provide encourag- ing support for our hypotheses regarding...

  1. How do women value work shortly after breast cancer surgery and are their valuations associated with being on sick leave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Lena-Marie; Nilsson, Marie I; Alexanderson, Kristina; Olsson, Mariann; Wennman-Larsen, Agneta

    2013-09-01

    To investigate how working women, in different age and educational groups who have recently had breast cancer surgery, value work (in terms of importance, satisfaction, and dedication), and whether their valuations are associated with sick leave. This cross-sectional study investigated the value of work and its relation to sickness absence among women in Sweden who had had breast cancer surgery, were aged 20-63 years, and worked before diagnosis (n = 605). A questionnaire was distributed at inclusion, about 4-8 weeks after surgery. Inferential statistics and logistic regression were used to estimate odds ratio (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Two-thirds of the women viewed work as one of the most important things in their lives; 86 % stated that their job provided personal satisfaction; and 54 % rated their vocational situation as satisfying. Older women (≥52 years) were more vocationally satisfied (p = 0.021), as too were those with higher education (p = 0.035). Women with higher education were also more dedicated to their work (p = 0.020). Univariate analyses revealed associations of low vocational satisfaction, younger age and wanting to change profession with sickness absence. Low vocational satisfaction (OR 2.38, 95 % CI 1.66-3.41) and younger age (women valued work highly, even as one of the most important things in their lives. Accordingly, it is essential to include aspects of work early on in these patients' treatment and rehabilitation plans.

  2. Decrease social inequalities return-to-work: development and design of a randomised controlled trial among women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, Clémence; Leroyer, Ariane; Christophe, Véronique; Seillier, Mélanie; Foncel, Jérome; Van de Maële, Justine; Bonneterre, Jacques; Fantoni, Sophie

    2014-04-17

    Despite the improvement in the care management, women cancer patients who are still in employment find themselves for the most part obliged to stop working while they are having treatment. Their return-to-work probability is impacted by numerous psychosocial factors. The objective is to describe the development and the content of an intervention aimed to facilitate the return to work of female breast cancer patients and in particular the women in the most precarious situations through early active individualised psychosocial support (APAPI). The intervention proposed is made up of 4 interviews with a psychologist at the hospital, distributed over the year according to the diagnosis and conducted on the same day as a conventional follow-up consultation, then a consultation with a specialist job retention physician. We expect, in the first instance, that this intervention will reduce the social inequalities of the return-to-work rate at 12 months. The EPICES score will enable the population to be broken down according to the level of social precariousness. The other expected results are the reduction of the social inequalities in the quality of the return to work at 18 and 24 months and the disparities between the individual and collective resources of the patients. This intervention is assessed in the context of a controlled and randomised multi-centre study. The patients eligible are women aged between 18 and 55 years with a unilateral breast cancer with local extension exclusively, having received surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, in employment at the time of the diagnosis and dealt with by one of the 2 investigating centres. It is essential to assess this type of intervention before envisaging its generalisation. The study set in place will enable us to measure the impact of this intervention aiming to facilitate the return to work of breast cancer patients, in particular for those who suffer from social fragility, compared with the standard care.

  3. Internal party democracy as a factor of transitional societiy consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Tupitzya

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of intra-party democracy appearance as a sustainable and well played phenomena can only be based on the formation of political parties as a competitive and dynamic structures that have a high degree of internal relationships and a clear understanding of a common goal that is shared by both the governing parties and the basis of parties and ordinary party members. Distribution of party members in top management, middle functional rank and ordinary members is an obvious consequence of the organizational functioning of any extensive and systematic organization.

  4. REFLECTIONS ON WAGAR ' S WORLD PARTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Bergesen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Our task is to reflect upon Wagar's idea of a world party. In case such reflections are affected by the recent historical situation of the collapse of communism/existing socialism in 1989 and the implications this has for visions of progressive politics going into the 21st century. This event colors most political thinking, although for many the response has been that existing socialism was not real socialism, or that existing socialism was but the Stalinist deformation that, if avoided in the future, the 1917 project could again be resumed and human history and social relations remade anew. I don't see it that way. What existing socialism stood for in terms of the role of a vanguard party taking state power for the larger good is, now after the fall, I think off the board as a realistic program that can be sold to anyone.

  5. Simple multi-party set reconciliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitzenmacher, Michael; Pagh, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

     set reconciliation: two parties A1A1 and A2A2 each hold a set of keys, named S1S1 and S2S2 respectively, and the goal is for both parties to obtain S1∪S2S1∪S2. Typically, set reconciliation is interesting algorithmically when sets are large but the set difference |S1−S2|+|S2−S1||S1−S2|+|S2−S1| is small...

  6. Ombuds’ corner: the third party, the institution

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2012-01-01

    “The Ombuds shall provide confidential assistance for the informal resolution of interpersonal issues, in the interests of the good functioning of CERN.”*   In any institution, conflicts are inevitable. They can, however, offer an opportunity for a positive resolution. Relationships in a workplace are generally better and stronger between people who have been able to reach a positive resolution of their disagreement, than they are between people who get along moderately well. However, in disputes involving two antagonistic parties, people often forget that there is actually a third party behind the scenes: the institution. It is sometimes surprising to see that even people holding management responsibilities or hierarchical positions in projects fight each other, and completely forget that they are accountable for the good functioning of CERN. Commitment and professionalism are part of the five priority values of CERN, as expressed in its Code of Conduct: “Promot...

  7. Ordinance on nuclear third party liability (ORCN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The Ordinance exempts from the application of the 1983 Act on Nuclear Third Party Liability some substances with low radiation effects. It determines the amount of private insurance cover and defines the risks that insurers may exclude from cover. It establishes a special fund for nuclear damage made up of contributions from the nuclear operators. Specifications are given on the amount of the contributions and their conditions, as well as on administration of the fund. The Ordinance repeals the Ordinance of 13 June 1960 on funds for delayed atomic damage, the Order of 19 December 1960 on contributions to the fund for delayed atomic damage and the Ordinance of 30 November 1981 on cover for third party liability resulting from nuclear power plant operation [fr

  8. A retrospective cohort study of shift work and risk of cancer-specific mortality in German male chemical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Mei; Nasterlack, Michael; Messerer, Peter; Oberlinner, Christoph; Lang, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    Human evidence of carcinogenicity concerning shift work is inconsistent. In a previous study, we observed no elevated risk of total mortality in shift workers followed up until the end of 2006. The present study aimed to investigate cancer-specific mortality, relative to shift work. The cohort consisted of male production workers (14,038 shift work and 17,105 day work), employed at BASF Ludwigshafen for at least 1 year between 1995 and 2005. Vital status was followed from 2000 to 2009. Cause-specific mortality was obtained from death certificates. Exposure to shift work was measured both as a dichotomous and continuous variable. While lifetime job history was not available, job duration in the company was derived from personal data, which was then categorized at the quartiles. Cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for potential confounders, in which job duration was treated as a time-dependent covariate. Between 2000 and 2009, there were 513 and 549 deaths among rotating shift and day work employees, respectively. Risks of total and cancer-specific mortalities were marginally lower among shift workers when taking age at entry and job level into consideration and were statistically significantly lower when cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, job duration, and chronic disease prevalence at entry to follow-up were included as explanatory factors. With respect to mortality risks in relation to exposure duration, no increased risks were found in any of the exposure groups after full adjustment and there was no apparent trend suggesting an exposure-response relation with duration of shift work. The present analysis extends and confirms our previous finding of no excess risk of mortality associated with work in the shift system employed at BASF Ludwigshafen. More specifically, there is also no indication of an increased risk of mortality due to cancer.

  9. [Work-Related Medical Rehabilitation in Cancer Rehabilitation - Short-Term Results from a Cluster-Randomized Multicenter-Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Bethge, Matthias

    2018-05-25

    Rehabilitation programs that support return to work become increasingly relevant for cancer survivors. In Germany, such programs were established as work-related medical rehabilitation (WMR). The study investigated whether WMR leads to better results compared to medical rehabilitation (MR). We report effects on secondary outcomes when the rehabilitation program was completed. Clusters of participants were randomly assigned to WMR or MR. Patients of working age and an elevated risk of not returning to work were included. The grade of implementation was assessed by dose delivered and dose received. Study outcomes were assessed using scales measuring functioning and symptoms, coping with illness as well as self-reported work ability. Treatment effects were estimated using mixed linear models. From 232 planned randomized intervention groups, 165 (71%) were realized. In total, 476 patients were included. Mean age of participants was 50.7 years (SD=7.3). Most frequent primary diagnoses were malignant neoplasms of the breast. Participants in the WMR program reported significantly better outcomes regarding quality of life (SMD=0.17-0.25), fatigue (SMD=0.18-0.27), coping with illness (SMD=0.17-0.22), and self-reported work-ability (SMD=0.16) compared to participants in MR program (all p<0.05). The results indicate a positive effect in favor of WMR for cancer patients with an elevated risk of not returning to work at the end of their treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. The impact of colorectal cancer and self-efficacy beliefs on work ability and employment status: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, M; Munir, F; Yarker, J; Bowley, D; Thomas, A; Armitage, N; Steward, W

    2012-09-01

    We examined how colorectal cancer patients' treatment and symptom management impacted perceptions of work ability and subsequent work decisions. Fifty patients completed questionnaires at baseline (post-surgery/pretreatment), 3 months and 6 months. Questionnaires assessed fatigue, depression, quality-of-life (QoL), cancer self-efficacy, job self-efficacy (JSE) and work ability. Factors related to perceived work ability were occupation (β= 0.31, P= 0.0005) and QoL (β= 0.42, P= 0.01) at baseline, treatment type (β=-0.19, P= 0.05) at 3 months, and JSE at 3 months (β= 0.57, P= 0.0005) and 6 months (β= 0.50, P= 0.006). Factors related to being on sick leave were lower levels of JSE (OR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.17-4.13) at baseline and being employed in a manual occupation (OR = 0.03, 95% CI: 0.00-0.86), and perceived work ability (OR = 3.05, 95% CI: 1.00-12.80) at 6 months. Along with self-assessed work ability at baseline (β= 0.67, P= 0.0005), receiving chemotherapy or a combination of treatments (β=-0.24, P= 0.05) were the strongest predictors of poorer perceptions of follow-up work ability. Self-efficacy beliefs may add to understanding and should be considered in future research. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Political Parties, Clientelism, and Bureaucratic Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Cesi; Keefer, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of public administration reform is well-known: politicians often have little interest in the efficient implementation of government policy. Using new data from 439 World Bank public sector reform loans in 109 countries, we demonstrate that such reforms are significantly less likely to succeed in the presence of non-programmatic political parties. Earlier research uses evidence from a small group of countries to conclude that clientelistic politicians resist reforms that restrict...

  12. THIRD PARTY SANCTIONS IN GAMES WITH COMMUNICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Obłój Jan; Abramczuk Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the relation between communication and preservation of social norms guarded by third-party sanctions. In 2001 Jonathan Bendor and Piotr Swistak derived deductively the existence of such norms from a simple boundedly rational choice model. Their analysis was based on a perfect public information case. We take into account communication and analyse at the micro level the process of production and interpretation of information on which decisions are based. We show that when ...

  13. Social Networks and Political Parties in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler Lomnitz, Larissa

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the origin and evolution of two Chilean political parties (the Radical Party and the Christian Democrat Party through the analysis of the social networks that originated and composed them. The aim of this study is to propose a model of national political cultures on the basis of the structure of social networks related to power and of the symbol system, which legitimizes it. The structure of social networks, horizontal and vertical, are based on reciprocal or redistributive forms of exchange, on what is being exchanged and on the articulation between networks. In every society there are symmetrical and asymmetrical exchanges, which produce horizontal and vertical networks. These networks interact among themselves to form the social fabric. The dominance of some over others and how they combine, delineate the character of the political culture (authoritarian vs. egalitarian. Chile is a multiparty country within which there are cohorts of horizontal groups of friends, who informally exercise a central control over their members and create invisible boundaries setting them apart from others, in which leadership is under constrains. The result is both a strong presidential system based on an almost fanatic legitimacy, combined with factionalism and a strong parliamentary system.

  14. Shift work and cancer risk: potential mechanistic roles of circadian disruption, light at night, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Erhard L; Smolensky, Michael H

    2013-08-01

    Shift work that includes a nighttime rotation has become an unavoidable attribute of today's 24-h society. The related disruption of the human circadian time organization leads in the short-term to an array of jet-lag-like symptoms, and in the long-run it may contribute to weight gain/obesity, metabolic syndrome/type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic studies also suggest increased cancer risk, especially for breast cancer, in night and rotating female shift workers. If confirmed in more controlled and detailed studies, the carcinogenic effect of night and shift work will constitute additional serious medical, economic, and social problems for a substantial proportion of the working population. Here, we examine the possible multiple and interconnected cancer-promoting mechanisms as a consequence of shift work, i.e., repeated disruption of the circadian system, pineal hormone melatonin suppression by exposure to light at night, sleep-deprivation-caused impairment of the immune system, plus metabolic changes favoring obesity and generation of proinflammatory reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Corporate Governance and Related Parties Transactions - Evidence from Romanian Listed Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana Oana MIHAI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to offer contributions to improve the understanding of related party transactions. Our goal is to explore the role of related party transactions from the perspective of company�s corporate governance environment. Even though there is a growing interest in related party transactions, there is little academic literature to understand the nature of related party transactions and their economic consequences. Our study was conducted on a sample of 40 companies listed companies on Bucharest Stock Exchange activating in manuafacuring sector. Our objective was to analyse the way the companies follow the requirements of transparency of related party transaction. Based on our observations on companies� financial reports and companies web-sites, the level of transparency between these companies was reflected by an index estimated from producers� scores on Likert-type scales (one to five that showed to what extent they disclose or not disclose information such as relationship between parents and subsidiaries, key management personnel compensation, the value of transactions with related parties or separate disclosure for the group entities.

  16. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2018-03-01

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The value of political parties to representative democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kölln, Ann-Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Political parties play a major role in democratic processes around the world. Recent empirical research suggests that parties are increasingly less important to citizens. Simultaneously, classic and contemporary theories of representative democracy specifically still minimally incorporate accounts

  18. Inequality and anti-globalization backlash by political parties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.

    2013-01-01

    Does income inequality increase political backlash against European and global integration? This paper reports research suggesting that it can. The article analyses party opposition to and support for trade openness, European Union integration and general internationalism of political party

  19. Parteilisest tsensuurist Nõukogude Eestis. Party Censorship in Soviet Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiu Kreegipuu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the years of imposed Soviet rule in Estonia from 1940 to its collapse in 1991, Estonian culture and the written word were subject to Soviet censorship which due to its perseverance, extent and rigidity constrained creativity and self-expression. At the same time, archival documents and memories testify that considerable shifting could take place within this censorship which on the surface appeared strict and regulated, depending on the general ideological stance and the officials and party functionaries in place at the time. Soviet censorship is usually studied and described with the activities of the censorship office Glavlit as the focal point. However, for a more complete overview, it would be wise to keep in mind that a whole row of other institutions and authorities with the Communist Party in front also were involved in censorship matters. When it came to censorship, it was the party that had the final word – as it did with everything else – and if needed, it also acted as punisher. Apart from the role of censor, the Communist Party, its departments (with the Department for Propaganda and Agitation or Ideology in front and its officials also took part in hands-on censorship work, both in terms of decision-making and in dealing with concrete incidents (breach of censorship rules and censor mistakes but also in the search for and pointing out of ideological flaws. One area in which the party’s censorship activities manifested itself in a rather vivid manner was the leadership and control of the Soviet press. When analysing materials from the bureau of the Communist Party of Estonia’s Central Committee, it becomes clear that the party’s governing organs were constantly active in this area. The manifestation of problems and discussion of flaws here point to the circumstance that journalists and editors did not accept the censorship rules, but rather tried to find possibilities and means through which to modify or ignore them

  20. Activities of the wintering party of the 36th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition, 1995-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemi Meshida

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The wintering party of the 36th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-36 executed its planned activities at Syowa and Dome Fuji Stations from 1995 to 1996. The wintering party at Syowa Station, consisting of 31 personnel, carried out its observations and logistic work from February 1,1995 to January 31,1996. Routine and some specific observations for studies of upper atmosphere physics, meteorology, solid earth geophysics, biology and medical science were performed without any serious problems for a full year. Continuous observation of the magnetosphere had started using an HF radar system constructed during the austral summer of 1994/95. A seed plant was discovered near Nurume Lake, Langhovde. It was the first report of a seed plant growing in continental Antarctica. An architect took part in the wintering party for the first time and maintained decrepit buildings. Support work for the wintering party at Dome Fuji Station was one of the principal tasks at Syowa Station. A trip to the Dome Fuji Station was carried out to transport supplies and fuel in the austral spring of 1995. The first wintering activities at Dome Fuji Station started from January 29,1995. The wintering party, consisting of 9 personnel, carried out meteorological and glaciological observations together with deep ice core drilling and some construction work. Consequently, ice cores of 600m depth were obtained successfully.

  1. Australia's National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: does it work for Indigenous Australians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judith M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a lower incidence of bowel cancer overall, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage when prognosis is poor. Bowel cancer screening is an effective means of reducing incidence and mortality from bowel cancer through early identification and prompt treatment. In 2006, Australia began rolling out a population-based National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP using the Faecal Occult Blood Test. Initial evaluation of the program revealed substantial disparities in bowel cancer screening uptake with Indigenous Australians significantly less likely to participate in screening than the non-Indigenous population. This paper critically reviews characteristics of the program which may contribute to the discrepancy in screening uptake, and includes an analysis of organisational, structural, and socio-cultural barriers that play a part in the poorer participation of Indigenous and other disadvantaged and minority groups. Methods A search was undertaken of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, and other grey literature using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Articles were critically evaluated for relevance to themes that addressed the research questions. Results The NBCSP is not reaching many Indigenous Australians in the target group, with factors contributing to sub-optimal participation including how participants are selected, the way the screening kit is distributed, the nature of the test and comprehensiveness of its contents, cultural perceptions of cancer and prevailing low levels of knowledge and awareness of bowel cancer and the importance of screening. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the population-based approach to implementing bowel cancer screening to the Australian population unintentionally excludes vulnerable minorities, particularly Indigenous and other culturally and linguistically diverse groups. This potentially contributes to exacerbating

  2. Third-party online payment solutions in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The topic of this paper is third-party online payment solutions in China and the main purpose of this paper is to figure out the research question: What are the impacts of third-party online payment solutions on China? Generally speaking, the third-party online payment solutions, including mobile payments, usually used by customer who purchase online and usually used in transaction platform. However, in China, people can use third-party payment solutions in different platfor...

  3. The Organizational Weapon: Ruling Parties in Authoritarian Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This project examines party building in authoritarian regimes. The overarching puzzle I seek to address is: why are some autocratic ruling parties stronger organizations than others? What explains variation in the institutional capacity of autocratic rule? The collection of three essays in this dissertation outline the strategic logic of party institutionalization, in addition to providing new and original ways in which to measure this key concept of authoritarian party strength. It tests pre...

  4. 31 CFR 19.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 19.950 Section 19.950 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties...

  5. 45 CFR 99.22 - Rights of parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rights of parties. 99.22 Section 99.22 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Hearing Procedures § 99.22 Rights of parties. All parties may: (a...

  6. 26 CFR 301.7430-5 - Prevailing party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prevailing party. 301.7430-5 Section 301.7430-5... Prevailing party. (a) In general. For purposes of an award of reasonable administrative costs under section... prevailing party only if— (1) The position of the Internal Revenue Service was not substantially justified...

  7. The Dark Side of Altruistic Third-Party Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibbrandt, Andreas; Lopez-Perez, Raul

    2011-01-01

    This article experimentally studies punishment from unaffected third parties in ten different games. The authors show that third-party punishment exhibits several features that are arguably undesirable. First, third parties punish strongly a decider if she chooses a socially efficient or a Pareto efficient allocation and becomes the richest party…

  8. Political Party Financing and why it Matters in Tanzania | Walwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the key recommendations is that public funding for ongoing party activities and campaigns should be allocated by a mix of proportional rules and flat subsidies to all parties that meet reasonable thresholds and flat subsidies as refers here imply providing subsidies to all political parties on equal basis. The other key ...

  9. Flawed Political Party Primaries In Nigeria's Fourth Republic: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues ... However, through an assessment of extant secondary data, this paper submits that the experience in the Peoples Democratic Party; the ruling party, during the 2007 General Elections was a case of deliberate imposition of candidates by powerful party leaders.

  10. 6 CFR 13.17 - Rights of parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rights of parties. 13.17 Section 13.17 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.17 Rights of parties. Except as otherwise limited by this part, all parties may: (a) Be accompanied...

  11. 6 CFR 13.13 - Parties to the hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parties to the hearing. 13.13 Section 13.13 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.13 Parties to the hearing. (a) The parties to the hearing will be the Defendant and the Authority...

  12. Who will attack the competitors? How political parties resolve strategic and collective action dilemmas in negative campaigning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Martin; Ennser-Jedenastik, Laurenz; Müller, Wolfgang C

    2017-11-01

    Negative campaigning presents parties with a collective action problem. While parties would prefer to have their competitors attacked, potential backlash effects from negative messages mean that individual politicians typically lack the incentives to carry out such attacks. We theorize that parties solve this problem by implementing a division of labour that takes into account the incentives of individual office holders, their availability for campaign activity, and media relevance. Drawing on these arguments we expect that holders of high public office and party leaders are less likely to issue attacks, leaving the bulk of the 'dirty work' to be carried out by party floor leaders and general secretaries. Examining almost 8000 press releases issued by over 600 individual politicians during four election campaigns in Austria, we find strong support for our theoretical expectations.

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for renal cell cancer and pancreatic cancer. Literature review and practice recommendations of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panje, Cedric; Andratschke, Nikolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias [Zurich University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Brunner, Thomas B. [Freiburg University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Niyazi, Maximilian [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    This report of the Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) aims to provide a literature review and practice recommendations for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of primary renal cell cancer and primary pancreatic cancer. A literature search on SBRT for both renal cancer and pancreatic cancer was performed with focus on prospective trials and technical aspects for clinical implementation. Data on renal and pancreatic SBRT are limited, but show promising rates of local control for both treatment sites. For pancreatic cancer, fractionated SBRT should be preferred to single-dose treatment to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. Motion-compensation strategies and image guidance are paramount for safe SBRT delivery in both tumor entities. SBRT for renal cancer and pancreatic cancer have been successfully evaluated in phase I and phase II trials. Pancreatic SBRT should be practiced carefully and only within prospective protocols due to the risk of severe gastrointestinal toxicity. SBRT for primary renal cell cancer appears a viable option for medically inoperable patients but future research needs to better define patient selection criteria and the detailed practice of SBRT. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) legt eine Zusammenfassung der aktuellen Literatur und daraus resultierende Empfehlungen zur Durchfuehrung der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (SBRT) beim Nierenzellkarzinom und beim Pankreaskarzinom vor. Es erfolgte eine Literaturrecherche zur Evidenz der SBRT beim Nierenzell- und Pankreaskarzinom, wobei der Schwerpunkt auf prospektive Studien und technische Aspekte fuer die klinische Umsetzung gelegt wurde. Fuer die SBRT beim Pankreaskarzinom und Nierenzellkarzinom sind bisher nur wenige Studien veroeffentlicht worden, die jedoch konsistent eine hohe Rate an lokaler Tumorkontrolle

  14. Self-reported shift work, recall bias, and belief about disease causation in a case-control study of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama, Natalia; Heyworth, Jane; Thomson, Allyson; Slevin, Terry; Fritschi, Lin

    2017-10-01

    Recall bias is a potential source of misclassification in case-control studies. Studies have shown that the association between exposure and disease can differ according to participants' beliefs or knowledge about the effect of that exposure on disease. We investigated the association between belief about breast cancer causation and self-reported shift work exposure in a case-control study. Women completed a questionnaire asking whether they believed that shift work caused cancer either before or after reporting their history of shift work. We measured: whether belief modified the association between reported shift work and disease; whether belief was associated with reported shift work exposure; and whether being prompted to recall shift work exposure was associated with an increased likelihood of believing that shift work increased breast cancer risk. There was a significant association between believing shift work increased breast cancer risk and reporting exposure to shift work. Being prompted to recall shift work was not associated with a belief that shift work increased risk. The association between pre-existing belief about breast cancer risk and reported shift work is likely to be due to exposed individuals believing that exposure increases risk, rather than resulting from recall bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. No Value for Routine Chest Radiography in the Work-Up of Early Stage Cervical Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Zweemer, Ronald P.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; de Jong, Pim A.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verheijen, René H. M.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Evidence supporting the recommendation to include chest radiography in the work-up of all cervical cancer patients is limited. We investigated the diagnostic value of routine chest radiography in cervical cancer staging. Methods All consecutive cervical cancer patients who presented at our tertiary referral center in the Netherlands (January 2006 – September 2013), and for whom ≥6 months follow-up was available, were included. As part of the staging procedure, patients underwent a routine two-directional digital chest radiograph. Findings were compared to a composite reference standard consisting of all imaging studies and histology obtained during the 6 months following radiography. Results Of the 402 women who presented with cervical cancer, 288 (71.6%) underwent chest radiography and had ≥6 months follow-up. Early clinical stage (I/II) cervical cancer was present in 244/288 (84.7%) women, while 44 (15.3%) presented with advanced disease (stage III/IV). The chest radiograph of 1 woman – with advanced pre-radiograph stage (IVA) disease – showed findings consistent with pulmonary metastases. Radiographs of 7 other women – 4 early, 3 advanced stage disease – were suspicious for pulmonary metastases which was confirmed by additional imaging in only 1 woman (with pre-radiograph advanced stage (IIIB) disease) and excluded in 6 cases, including all women with early stage disease. In none of the 288 women were thoracic skeletal metastases identified on imaging or during 6 months follow up. Radiography was unremarkable in 76.4% of the study population, and showed findings unrelated to the cervical carcinoma in 21.2%. Conclusion Routine chest radiography was of no value for any of the early stage cervical cancer patients presenting at our tertiary center over a period of 7.7 years. PMID:26135733

  16. Electrophysiological correlates of cocktail-party listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewald, Jörg; Getzmann, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Detecting, localizing, and selectively attending to a particular sound source of interest in complex auditory scenes composed of multiple competing sources is a remarkable capacity of the human auditory system. The neural basis of this so-called "cocktail-party effect" has remained largely unknown. Here, we studied the cortical network engaged in solving the "cocktail-party" problem, using event-related potentials (ERPs) in combination with two tasks demanding horizontal localization of a naturalistic target sound presented either in silence or in the presence of multiple competing sound sources. Presentation of multiple sound sources, as compared to single sources, induced an increased P1 amplitude, a reduction in N1, and a strong N2 component, resulting in a pronounced negativity in the ERP difference waveform (N2d) around 260 ms after stimulus onset. About 100 ms later, the anterior contralateral N2 subcomponent (N2ac) occurred in the multiple-sources condition, as computed from the amplitude difference for targets in the left minus right hemispaces. Cortical source analyses of the ERP modulation, resulting from the contrast of multiple vs. single sources, generally revealed an initial enhancement of electrical activity in right temporo-parietal areas, including auditory cortex, by multiple sources (at P1) that is followed by a reduction, with the primary sources shifting from right inferior parietal lobule (at N1) to left dorso-frontal cortex (at N2d). Thus, cocktail-party listening, as compared to single-source localization, appears to be based on a complex chronology of successive electrical activities within a specific cortical network involved in spatial hearing in complex situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear third party liability under Polish law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewaszkiewic-Petrykowska, B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the system governing liability for nuclear incidents in Poland. The Atomic Energy Act of 10 April 1986, which entered into force on 1 July 1986, covers all aspects of nuclear activities, including third party liability. Such liability is channelled onto the nuclear operator who must take out insurance to cover his liability up to an amount fixed in the contract. The Act provides that questions not settled by its provisions are governed by the Civil Code; therefore, if personal injuries exceed that amount victims may claim the difference from the State under that Code (NEA) [fr

  18. Efficient secure two-party protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Hazay, Carmit

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a comprehensive study of efficient protocols and techniques for secure two-party computation -- both general constructions that can be used to securely compute any functionality, and protocols for specific problems of interest. The book focuses on techniques for constructing efficient protocols and proving them secure. In addition, the authors study different definitional paradigms and compare the efficiency of protocols achieved under these different definitions.The book opens with a general introduction to secure computation and then presents definitions of security for a

  19. Third party liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crancher, D.W.

    1976-12-01

    Basic principles of nuclear liability legislation are discussed including absolute and limited liability and the role of the Sovereign State in idemnifying the operator for damage in excess of limited liability. European counrties realised the need for unifying the law of nuclear instability and efforts were made accordingly towards producing workable international conventions. The world's first legislation on nuclear liability - the USA Price-Anderson Act - is described in detail and a digest of nuclear liability claims experience is given. Observations of the present status of nuclear third party liability are outlined. (Author)

  20. The Tibetan Policy of Chinese Communist Party

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 朝美

    2001-01-01

    This study is a part of the master degree thesis on Tibet that covers the religious policy of CCP (Chinese Communist Party) toward Tibet. For the last 50 years of 20th century, various policies by CCP have been undertaken into Tibet. Up to now, however, they are not always successful. On the contrary, it can be recognized that antagonistic feeling of Tibetan people against Hanzu race has been even accelerated. This is why one of reasons for it may be attributed to the religious policy of CCP ...

  1. Le Parti paysan d’union sociale

    OpenAIRE

    Bensoussan, David

    2015-01-01

    La fondation, le 11 juillet 1945 à Paris, du Parti paysan n’a sans doute guère suscité l’attention des contemporains alors immergés dans le contexte tumultueux de l’immédiat après-guerre. Il faut d’ailleurs attendre la parution, quelque temps plus tard, le 6 octobre, du premier numéro de L’Unité Paysanne, organe hebdomadaire de cette nouvelle formation politique, pour que sa naissance soit publiquement officialisée. Sans vouloir surévaluer l’importance d’une organisation qui n’arrivera jamais...

  2. Third-Party Software's Trust Quagmire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voas, J; Hurlburt, G

    2015-12-01

    Current software development has trended toward the idea of integrating independent software sub-functions to create more complete software systems. Software sub-functions are often not homegrown - instead they are developed by unknown 3 rd party organizations and reside in software marketplaces owned or controlled by others. Such software sub-functions carry plausible concern in terms of quality, origins, functionality, security, interoperability, to name a few. This article surveys key technical difficulties in confidently building systems from acquired software sub-functions by calling out the principle software supply chain actors.

  3. Keys to effective third-party process safety audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, John C. [Tourgee and Associates Inc., 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117 (United States)]. E-mail: jbirkmire@taiengineering.com; Lay, James R. [5644 High Tor Hill, Columbia, MD 21045 (United States)]. E-mail: jim.lay21045@gmail.com; McMahon, Mona C. [General Physics Corporation, 6095 Marshalee Drive, Suite 300, Elkridge, MD 21075 (United States)]. E-mail: mmcmahon@gpworldwide.com

    2007-04-11

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation was promulgated in 1992. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) corresponding Risk Management Program (RMP) rule followed in 1996. Both programs include requirements for triennial compliance audits. Effective compliance audits are critical in identifying program weaknesses and ensuring the safety of facility personnel and the surrounding public. Large companies with corporate and facility health, safety, and environmental groups typically have the resources and experience to conduct audits internally, either through a corporate audit team or the sharing of personnel between multiple facilities. Small to medium sized businesses frequently do not have the expertise or the resources to perform compliance audits, and rely on third-party consultants to provide these services. This paper will discuss the observations of the authors in performing audits and working with PSM/RMP programs across a number of market sectors (e.g. chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, food and beverage, water treatment), including effective practices, hurdles to successful implementation and execution of programs, and typical program shortcomings. The paper will also discuss steps to improve the audit process and increase effectiveness whether performed by a third party or internally.

  4. Keys to effective third-party process safety audits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkmire, John C.; Lay, James R.; McMahon, Mona C.

    2007-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation was promulgated in 1992. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) corresponding Risk Management Program (RMP) rule followed in 1996. Both programs include requirements for triennial compliance audits. Effective compliance audits are critical in identifying program weaknesses and ensuring the safety of facility personnel and the surrounding public. Large companies with corporate and facility health, safety, and environmental groups typically have the resources and experience to conduct audits internally, either through a corporate audit team or the sharing of personnel between multiple facilities. Small to medium sized businesses frequently do not have the expertise or the resources to perform compliance audits, and rely on third-party consultants to provide these services. This paper will discuss the observations of the authors in performing audits and working with PSM/RMP programs across a number of market sectors (e.g. chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, food and beverage, water treatment), including effective practices, hurdles to successful implementation and execution of programs, and typical program shortcomings. The paper will also discuss steps to improve the audit process and increase effectiveness whether performed by a third party or internally

  5. Turkish Political Market and the Perception of Political Parties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihat Polat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to describe the Turkish political market and determine where and how Turkish political parties are perceived by voters. The study uses a two-dimensional map to determine the voter perceptions of the parties in the Turkish political market based on a survey questionnaire applied to 400 young voters. It also investigates whether there are any major differences in the perception of parties in the political space based on voter ideologies. The study finds that young voters have clear perceptions of the positions of Turkish parties. It also finds that voter perceptions of parties vary based on voters’ ideological positions.

  6. Political parties in the Sverdlovsk region: stages of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhametov Ruslan Salikhovich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the processes of party building in the Russian Federation. On the example of a single region – the Sverdlovsk region – we study the evolution of political parties. The factors favoring the process of formation and functioning of regional political parties and political movements in the Middle Urals are identified and classified. Much attention is paid to such factors of development of the parties in the region as a party-electoral law and the electoral system view.

  7. Report of the 33rd Japanese Antarctic Research ExpeditionーActivities of the summer party(1991-1992and wintering party(1992ー

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuo Fukuchi

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Summer activities in the 1991/92 austral summer and winter activities in 1992 of the 33rd Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE are described. The JARE-33 consisted of 16 members of the summer party and 37 members of the wintering party (one member of the wintering party returned with the summer party. Two Brazilian fish physiologists joined the summer party based on the exchange scientist program of the Antarctic Treaty. The icebreaker SHIRASE left Tokyo on 14 November 1991 and arrived at Breid Bay on 18 December, where the closing of Asuka Camp was completed. Then she headed to Syowa Station and arrived there on 4 January 1992. Transportation of cargo by helicopter to Syowa Station was carried out between 23 December 1991 and 18 January 1992. A total of 848t of cargo, including pipe transport of light oil (342kl and freight by oversnow vehicles (215t, were transported. A new central building was constructed from 23 December to 17 February as the start of an 8-year reintegration project of Syowa Station. Three generator engines of 200kVA capacity were overhauled. Concurrently, various research programs such as absolute gravity measurement and field surveys including inland oversnow traverse were performed. However, there were some problems with a super conducting gravity meter while the gravity meter was being tested for winter operation. Therefore, one scientist working on the gravity meter who planned to winter-over decided to leave Syowa Station with the gravity meter. all of the summer party left Syowa Station on 17 February and headed to Sydney, Australia, while oceanographic and marine biological observations were carried out on board. Members of the summer party of JARE-33 and the wintering party of JARE-32 returned to Narita by air on 27 March 1992. The wintering party of JARE-33 worked at Syowa Station from 1 February 1992 to 31 January 1993. The scientific research programs cover the following four major disciplines : (1 upper

  8. Efficient Multi-Party Computation over Rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Ronald; Fehr, Serge; Ishai, Yuval

    2003-01-01

    Secure multi-party computation (MPC) is an active research area, and a wide range of literature can be found nowadays suggesting improvements and generalizations of existing protocols in various directions. However, all current techniques for secure MPC apply to functions that are represented by ...... the usefulness of the above results by presenting a novel application of MPC over (non-field) rings to the round-efficient secure computation of the maximum function. Basic Research in Computer Science (www.brics.dk), funded by the Danish National Research Foundation.......Secure multi-party computation (MPC) is an active research area, and a wide range of literature can be found nowadays suggesting improvements and generalizations of existing protocols in various directions. However, all current techniques for secure MPC apply to functions that are represented...... by (boolean or arithmetic) circuits over finite fields. We are motivated by two limitations of these techniques: – Generality. Existing protocols do not apply to computation over more general algebraic structures (except via a brute-force simulation of computation in these structures). – Efficiency. The best...

  9. LES PARTIES DU CONTRAT DE CONCESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian OLARU

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The essential feature of the administrative contract, which is part of the concession contract, differentiates from the civil contract with at least one of the topics of administrative contract that is a physical person of public law. Thus, if the subject of civil contract can be any physical or juridical person that has full the capacity to exercise, then, in the case of the administrative contract, at least one subject must have the special “quality”, namely to be a public authority or a moral person of public law. If one of the contracting parties is a public figure and the other is a person of private law, the contract may be administrative. “This condition is necessary, but not sufficient”. By the definition given to concession in article 1 line 1 of the Law on concessions, the legislator determines not only the name of the contracting parties, which formed the juridical report (the conceded, the concessionaire but also the subject concession contract, which makes it different from other administrative contracts. Moreover, in the article 4 of the cited law, it is determined the scope of the public authorities, juridical persons of public law that may have the quality of conceded, while article 5 provides the scope of persons who may have the quality of concessionaire.

  10. Marmoset monkeys evaluate third-party reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yasue, Miyuki; Banno, Taku; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2014-05-01

    Many non-human primates have been observed to reciprocate and to understand reciprocity in one-to-one social exchanges. A recent study demonstrated that capuchin monkeys are sensitive to both third-party reciprocity and violation of reciprocity; however, whether this sensitivity is a function of general intelligence, evidenced by their larger brain size relative to other primates, remains unclear. We hypothesized that highly pro-social primates, even with a relatively smaller brain, would be sensitive to others' reciprocity. Here, we show that common marmosets discriminated between human actors who reciprocated in social exchanges with others and those who did not. Monkeys accepted rewards less frequently from non-reciprocators than they did from reciprocators when the non-reciprocators had retained all food items, but they accepted rewards from both actors equally when they had observed reciprocal exchange between the actors. These results suggest that mechanisms to detect unfair reciprocity in third-party social exchanges do not require domain-general higher cognitive ability based on proportionally larger brains, but rather emerge from the cooperative and pro-social tendencies of species, and thereby suggest this ability evolved in multiple primate lineages. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Picturing the Party: Instagram and Party Campaigning in the 2014 Swedish Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Filimonov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores Swedish parties’ activities on Instagram during the 2014 elections. Understanding party campaign communication as highly strategic, that is, communication to persuade and mobilize voters in order to win the elections, we ask whether Instagram was used to (1 broadcast campaign messages, (2 mobilize supporters, (3 manage the party’s image, and (4 amplify and complement other campaign material (i.e., hybrid campaign use. With this study, we follow previous studies on the use of digital communication platforms in the hands of campaigning political actors, but we direct our attention to a new platform. We conducted a content analysis of 220 party postings on Instagram, collected during the hot phase of the campaign. The result shows that the platform was mainly used for broadcasting rather than for mobilization. The image the parties were presenting leaned toward personalization with a strong presence of top candidates in their postings. Top candidates were primarily displayed in a political/professional context. Finally, half of the analyzed postings showed signs of hybridized campaign practices. The presented findings give a first glimpse on how political parties use and perform on Instagram.

  12. 76 FR 69595 - Application of Third Party Testing Requirements; Reducing Third Party Testing Burdens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... material change in the product's design or manufacturing process, including the sourcing of component parts...)) defines a ``children's product,'' in relevant part, as a consumer product designed or intended primarily... testing by a third party) be designed to show the similarity between the products? Also, sampling...

  13. Political Parties and the Institutionalization of Education: A Comparative Analysis of Party Manifestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Anja P.

    2011-01-01

    Education has been featured prominently in recent election campaigns in different countries. This article explains this observation by the idea of a world culture and the global institutionalization of education. It compares party manifestors of 25 OECD countries from 1946 onward, analyzing how education developed in election campaigns over time…

  14. Knowledge and Practices of Nurses Working in an Education Hospital on Early Diagnosis of Breast and Cervix Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Ozdemir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This research has aimed to determine knowledge and practice status of nurses about breast self-examination (BSE, clinical breast examination (CBE, mammography and Pap smear and about influencing status of some variables related to these examinations. METHOD: This descriptive study was conducted in an education hospital in Ankara between March 1st and May 30th, 2008. Three hundred-fifty nurses (82.7% have accepted to participate in the study. Data were collected by a questionnaire form including questions about demographics, their knowledge and practice status about BSE, CBE, mammography and Pap smear. Chi-square test, numbers and percentages were used for evaluating the data. RESULTS: Overall, 46.9% of nurses had enough knowledge about early diagnosis of breast and cervix cancer. 60.2% of them can carry BSE, 18.8% can carry out CBE and 7.3% can carry out mammography. Pap smear is carried out by 23.7% of the nurses. Negligence, fear of cancer and thought of finding them unnecessary were determined as reasons for avoidance. Their knowledge and practice were significantly different (p<0.05 according to their age and service where they work. CONCLUSION: It has been concluded that although knowledge and practices of nurses on breast and cervix cancer are at a good level, this isn’t enough when importance of early diagnosis in breast and cervix cancer are taken into consideration, which are among common cancers in women. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(6.000: 605-612

  15. Party Organizational Change: Formal Distribution of Power between National and Regional Levels in Italian Political Parties (1991-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Calossi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years an increasing number of scholars have centred their attention on the relationships between party national structures and party sub-national branches. A relevant part of the specialized literature has interpreted party change as the by-product of the denationalization of party politics. The aim of this contribution is to investigate to what extent eight relevant Italian parties have followed patterns of organizational change, after the reforms of the municipal, provincial and regional election sys-tems; and the process of devolution of administrative powers begun during the Nineties. By focusing on two analytical dimensions (the level of involvement and the level of autonomy of party regional units, we analyse diachronically continuity and change in party formal organization, through an in-depth analysis of the statutes adopted from 1992 to 2012

  16. Efficient privacy preserving K-means clustering in a three-party setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beye, Michael; Erkin, Zekeriya; Erkin, Zekeriya; Lagendijk, Reginald L.

    2011-01-01

    User clustering is a common operation in online social networks, for example to recommend new friends. In previous work [5], Erkin et al. proposed a privacy-preserving K-means clustering algorithm for the semi-honest model, using homomorphic encryption and multi-party computation. This paper makes

  17. Librarians and Party Girls: Cultural Studies and the Meaning of the Librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Marie L.; Radford, Gary P.

    2003-01-01

    Responds to Wayne Wiegand's article that criticizes library and information science by suggesting a cultural studies approach to the field. Applies the work of Stuart Hall to a media stereotype of the female librarian based on the film "Party Girl" to allow new interpretations of media images of the profession. (Author/LRW)

  18. Nuclear third party liability in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzke, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The German system of nuclear third party liability has always been, and arguably still is, the object of considerable interest in the international nuclear law community. This may seem surprising since Germany adheres to the Paris Convention and is therefore a party to a community of 15 states all following the same principles enshrined in this Convention. In fact, when implementing the PC, Germany chose the approach ensuring the most literal adherence to the PC's principles: it adopted the PC in its entirety, thus directly transposing the PC text into binding German law, instead of enacting a national law derived from, but not literally translating, the PC. At the same time, perhaps no other nation has made use of the options, choices and margins offered or abandoned by the PC to the national legislators, or kept in store by way of a reservation at signature of the Convention, in such an extended manner, testing - and as has even been contended in the past: stressing - the boundaries of the PC system. Unlimited liability introduced in 1985, the highest financial security of any PC state (EUR 2.5 billion), unlimited territorial scope combined with the principle of reciprocity and liability of German operators even in the force majeure cases of Article 9 of the PC are probably the most interesting decisions made by Germany in this context, established in the Atomic Energy Act (Atomgesetz). These choices betray a certain tendency of the German government to give the greatest possible benefit to victims, and in parallel to achieve a 'normalisation' of the nuclear liability regime, without stifling the industry. Within the compromise underlying the international nuclear liability regime - enabling the nuclear industry to create and sustain an energy sector highly relevant for national electricity production on the one hand and protecting potential victims on the other - Germany has more and more shifted the balance, as far as practically possible, to the

  19. Third party objection and action against enforcement: Request for exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a right of a third party to prevent enforcement on the basis of a claim and evidence that rights or assets seized in enforcement proceeding belong to him (third party and not to the enforcement debtor. In most of jurisdictions that were subject of analysis of this paper, this right of a third party is exercised by filing an objection to the court conducting enforcement proceedings. The claim of the third party is directed towards the enforcement creditor as well as against the enforcement debtor. In the event the claim of the third party is being contested, the court instructs the third party to initiate litigation proceedings for determining whether the third party is entitled to exclusion of such rights or assets from enforcement, especially if such third party holds property rights or some other rights over the assets that are being subject to enforcement proceedings. In majority of analyzed jurisdictions, enforcement proceedings are being suspended provided the third party, in the objection being filed makes prima facie likely, on the basis of credible evidence, that his assets were seized in the enforcement proceedings. However, according to the law of the Republic of Serbia, a credible objection of a third party does not result in suspension of enforcement proceedings, something that is being criticized in this paper. As a result of this provision of the law, a bona fide third party is forced to endure the enforcement although his claim has been made likely and subsequently confirmed in the litigation proceedings. The author, in particular, points to the legal consequences of mala fide enforcement creditor that knew that the assets that are being subject of the enforcement proceedings do not belong to the enforcement debtor. The author is of the opinion that, in such cases, the enforcement creditor should be obliged to pay to the third party damages that such party suffered as a result of enforcement proceedings being

  20. Relationship Intimacy: Associations with Psychological Distress and Work Productivity in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    scale as a reliable tool for assessment of quality of marital relationship in patients on long-term hemodialysis . Iran J Kidney Dis, 3(4), 242-245...A. J. (1989). Spouse criticism and support: their association with coping and psychological adjustment among women with rheumatoid arthritis ...experience for patients , partners, family members, and close friends. Breast cancer patients not only face the psychological distress of a life

  1. Informal work and formal plans: articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, Rikke Juul; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Brostrøm Kousgaard, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Formal pathway models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer ...... participation. When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed....

  2. Informal work and formal plans: Articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, R.; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kousgaard, MB

    2013-01-01

    Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories........ When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed....

  3. Night Shift Work Increases the Risks of Multiple Primary Cancers in Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of 61 Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xia; Zhu, Chenjing; Wang, Manni; Mo, Fei; Du, Wei; Ma, Xuelei

    2018-01-01

    A growing number of studies have examined associations between night shift work and the risks of common cancers among women, with varying conclusions. We did a meta-analysis to identify whether long-term night shift work increased the risks of common cancers in women. We enrolled 61 articles involving 114,628 cases and 3,909,152 participants from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Risk estimates were performed with a random-effect model or a fixed-effect model. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression analyses about breast cancer were conducted to explore possible sources of heterogeneity. In addition, we carried out a dose-response analysis to quantitatively estimate the accumulative effect of night shift work on the risk of breast cancer. A positive relationship was revealed between long-term night shift work and the risks of breast [OR = 1.316; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.196-1.448], digestive system (OR = 1.177; 95% CI, 1.065-1.301), and skin cancer (OR = 1.408; 95% CI, 1.024-1.934). For every 5 years of night shift work, the risk of breast cancer in women was increased by 3.3% (OR = 1.033; 95% CI, 1.012-1.056). Concerning the group of nurses, long-term night shift work presented potential carcinogenic effect in breast cancer (OR = 1.577; 95% CI, 1.235-2.014), digestive system cancer (OR = 1.350; 95% CI, 1.030-1.770), and lung cancer (OR = 1.280; 95% CI, 1.070-1.531). This systematic review confirmed the positive association between night shift work and the risks of several common cancers in women. We identified that cancer risk of women increased with accumulating years of night shift work, which might help establish and implement effective measures to protect female night shifters. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(1); 25-40. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. An Empirical Investigation into the Matching Problems among Game Theoretically Coordinating Parties in a Virtual Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yasir

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Virtual organization emerged as a highly flexible structure in response to the rapidly changing environment of 20th century. This organization consists of independently working parties that combine their best possible resources to exploit the emerging market opportunities. There are no formal control and coordination mechanisms employed by the classical hierarchical structures. Parties, therefore, manage their dependencies on each other through mutual understanding and trust.Mathematician John Nash, having significant contributions in Game Theory suggests that in every non-cooperative game there is at least one equilibrium point. At this point, according to him, every strategy of the player represents a response to the others’ strategies. Such equilibria could exist in a virtual organization, at which parties coordinate which each other to optimize their performance.Coordination/Matching problems are likely to arise among game theoretically coordinating parties in a virtual organization, mainly due to lack of binding agreements. By identifying and resolving these matching problems, virtual organizations could achieve efficiency and better coordination among parties.  

  5. AN APPLICATION ON BRAND POSITIONING ACTIVITIES OF POLITICAL PARTIES: GAZIANTEP SAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent DEMİRAĞ

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim in political marketing is to be able to determine the needs and desires of the voters correctly, to form and implement the policies towards the electorate and finally to be able to sustain the electorate in the political process and to form the electoral loyalty accordingly. Particularly, regardless of the voting rate, in the elections, the second party is considered to have lost the election, and for this reason, it is very important for the political parties that are political practitioners to come to the forefront in the politically high society where competition is experienced in the ruthless dimensions. In order to create this differentiation, it is crucial that the competitors, the market and other variables are analyzed well, the segmentation of the market, the formation and application of positioning-related policies and recertification-related strategies. The aim of the work is to measure perceptions of the characteristics of voters who are thought to be influential in political party preferences. In this context, it has been investigated whether 11 different characteristics determined by voters make a meaningful difference with their demographic characteristics. The identification of these characteristics and their importance will provide significant advantages for political parties in their positioning strategies. Within this scope, face to face surveys and data were collected from the voters voting in the province of Gaziantep. The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis. In this context, it was concluded that the factors affecting political party election differed significantly with demographic criteria.

  6. Multi-party Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution Based on Cluster States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanqi; Zhu, Changhua; Ma, Shuquan; Pei, Changxing

    2018-03-01

    We propose a novel multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on cluster states. A four-photon analyzer which can distinguish all the 16 cluster states serves as the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Any two out of four participants can build secure keys after the analyzers obtains successful outputs and the two participants perform post-processing. We derive a security analysis for the protocol, and analyze the key rates under different values of polarization misalignment. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 280 km in the optical fiber channel when the key rate is about 10- 6 with the polarization misalignment parameter 0.015. Moreover, our work takes an important step toward a quantum communication network.

  7. Sub-linear, Secure Comparison With Two Non-Colluding Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    The classic problem in the field of secure computation is Yao’s millionaires’ problem; we consider two new protocols solving a variation of this: a number of parties, P1, . . . , Pn, securely hold two - bit values, x and y – e.g. x and y could be encrypted or secret shared. They wish to obtain...... a bit stating whether x is greater than y using only secure arithmetic; this should be done without revealing any information, even the output should remain secret. The present setting is special in the sense that it is assumed that two specific parties, referred to as Alice and Bob, are non......-colluding. Though this assumption is not satisfied in general, it clearly is for the main example of this work: two-party computation based on Paillier encryption. The first solution requires O(log()(κ + loglog())) secure arithmetic operations in O(log()) rounds, where κ is a correctness parameter. The second...

  8. Device-independence for two-party cryptography and position verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Jeremy; Thinh, Le Phuc; Kaniewski, Jedrzej

    Quantum communication has demonstrated its usefulness for quantum cryptography far beyond quantum key distribution. One domain is two-party cryptography, whose goal is to allow two parties who may not trust each other to solve joint tasks. Another interesting application is position......-based cryptography whose goal is to use the geographical location of an entity as its only identifying credential. Unfortunately, security of these protocols is not possible against an all powerful adversary. However, if we impose some realistic physical constraints on the adversary, there exist protocols for which...... security can be proven, but these so far relied on the knowledge of the quantum operations performed during the protocols. In this work we give device-independent security proofs of two-party cryptography and Position Verification for memoryless devices under different physical constraints on the adversary...

  9. Application of Blind Quantum Computation to Two-Party Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Li, Qin; Yu, Fang; Chan, Wai Hong

    2018-03-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client who has only limited quantum power to achieve quantum computation with the help of a remote quantum server and still keep the client's input, output, and algorithm private. Recently, Kashefi and Wallden extended BQC to achieve two-party quantum computation which allows two parties Alice and Bob to perform a joint unitary transform upon their inputs. However, in their protocol Alice has to prepare rotated single qubits and perform Pauli operations, and Bob needs to have a powerful quantum computer. In this work, we also utilize the idea of BQC to put forward an improved two-party quantum computation protocol in which the operations of both Alice and Bob are simplified since Alice only needs to apply Pauli operations and Bob is just required to prepare and encrypt his input qubits.

  10. Application of Blind Quantum Computation to Two-Party Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Li, Qin; Yu, Fang; Chan, Wai Hong

    2018-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client who has only limited quantum power to achieve quantum computation with the help of a remote quantum server and still keep the client's input, output, and algorithm private. Recently, Kashefi and Wallden extended BQC to achieve two-party quantum computation which allows two parties Alice and Bob to perform a joint unitary transform upon their inputs. However, in their protocol Alice has to prepare rotated single qubits and perform Pauli operations, and Bob needs to have a powerful quantum computer. In this work, we also utilize the idea of BQC to put forward an improved two-party quantum computation protocol in which the operations of both Alice and Bob are simplified since Alice only needs to apply Pauli operations and Bob is just required to prepare and encrypt his input qubits.

  11. THIRD PARTY SANCTIONS IN GAMES WITH COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obłój Jan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the relation between communication and preservation of social norms guarded by third-party sanctions. In 2001 Jonathan Bendor and Piotr Swistak derived deductively the existence of such norms from a simple boundedly rational choice model. Their analysis was based on a perfect public information case. We take into account communication and analyse at the micro level the process of production and interpretation of information on which decisions are based. We show that when information is fully private and we allow for communication a state of anomie can result. If some social control mechanisms are available, social stability can be maintained. The less efficient the social control mechanisms however, the more restrictive rules will be needed to sustain the social norms. Furthermore not all cognitive strategies for interpreting received messages are equally effective. Strategies based on reputation are better than strategies based on profit analysis.

  12. Public funding of political parties when campaigns are informative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortín, Ignacio Ortuño; Schultz, Christian

    dependence on vote shares induces fur- ther moderation and improves welfare. If parties are asymmetric, vote share dependent public funding bene…ts the large party and makes it moderate its candidate, while the smaller party reacts by choosing a more extremist candidate. On balance, however, if the parties......The paper considers public funding of political parties when some voters are poorly informed about parties’ candidates and campaigns are informative. For symmetric equilibria, it is shown that more pub- lic funding leads parties to chose more moderate candidates, and that an increase in the funding’s...... are not too asymmetric, an increase in vote share dependent funding improves welfare and increases the likelihood that a moderate candidate wins the election...

  13. 'It is hard for mums to put themselves first': how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer manage the sociological boundaries between paid work, family and caring for the self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine Ruth

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to increase understanding of how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer while in the paid workforce experience and manage their multiple demands of taking care of themselves, their children and their paid work. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 women who were mothers of dependent children and in the paid workforce at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. The sample includes women living in urban and rural Australia. The study found that after a breast cancer diagnosis, participants tended to prioritise their health and wellbeing over paid work. Yet dominance of gendered identity meant that they tended to place the needs of family, especially children, above their own health and wellbeing. The key factors that influenced mothers' decisions to continue in, return to, or leave paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis included: a change in perspective regarding what was important in their lives; level of support from the workplace and home; the extent to which participating in paid work was a financial necessity; the extent to which their identity was connected to paid work, and; ongoing level of pain or fatigue. The paper concludes that using the sociological concepts of the fateful moment, boundary maintenance and a feminist ethic of care produces a more nuanced understanding of women's participation in paid work after breast cancer than examining paid workforce participation, or unpaid responsibilities and mothering, separately. The nature of the permeability or malleability of boundaries between work, family and taking care of the self affects women's participation in paid work during and/or after breast cancer treatment. Increased boundary permeability or malleability brought about more by cooperation than conflict facilitated positive experiences of re-negotiating boundaries, whereas increased permeability or malleability brought about more by conflict than cooperation created difficulties for women in finding an

  14. Changing the Rules of the Game : the development and reform of party law in Latin America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, F.F.

    2017-01-01

    Party law, or the legal regulation of political parties, has become a prominent feature of party systems. Some party laws are designed to have a much larger political impact than others. It remains unknown why some countries adopt party laws that have substantial implications for party

  15. The Changing of Political Orientation of Masyumi Party During 1950-1959

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfi Hafidh Ishaqro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Through historical method, this article studies the Shifts in Political Ideological Orientation of Masyumi Party during the Liberal Democracy Era 1950–1959. The shifted orientations of Masyumi Party included a shif of orientation in its principle, form of government and the government executive system. The establishment of Masyumi Party was the apex of the Japanese concern in trying to map the axis of the powers of various groups in Indonesia. The formations of PUTERA, which bore the nationalist inclination and MIAI, which tended to accommodate urban Muslims were not attractive enough to win the hearts and empathy from the Indonesian native communities for its occupation in Indonesia. Masyumi Party made Islam as a its struggling principle, not only as a symbol but also tha ideology and spirits in conducting the various siyasah preaches within the scope of political struggles. Numerous internal dynamics were then occuring in the body Masymi Party. The Party’s change in its orientation began to be visible, indicated by the idea suggested by M. Natsir to formulate the Constitution or Law of General Election. The formation of the General Election Law made M. Natsir and Masyumi the symbol of the establishment and growth of democracy in the Republic of Indonesia, which became more evident when M. Natsir was ousted and the subsequent working cabinet heads failed to hold a General Election. And finally, at the end of 1955 under the leadership of Burhanuddin Harahap, who was himself a Masyumi figure, a general election was held for the first time. The political attitude shown by Masyumi indicated that Masumi Party had shifted its political orientation. Masyumi Party, which originally struggled to implement Islam by employing the Syura in forming a government was helplessly compromising its principle by following and combining itself into a democracy model the initiator of which was the leader of Masyumi Party itself. Such political behavioral changes

  16. The {open_quotes}Command and Control{close_quotes} philosophy of the Communist party of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kominiak, G.J.; Eisenberger, J.C.; Menaul, K.L. [and others

    1996-01-01

    China`s central political authorities have constructed a system which is designed to enable them to exert their personal influence and control over each level of every organization in the country -- both civil and military. The Communist Party of China (CPC) is represented at all levels of each and every organization, including the People`s Liberation Army (PLA). These Party entities are intended to both provide oversight and to ensure that Party policies, directives and orders are obeyed. This penchant for political control, which may have its roots in China`s imperial past, appears to have been reinforced by the early developmental path chosen by the Party`s leadership. Current attempts aimed at maintaining political control of its resources, especially the military, are embodied in the formal system of {open_quotes}Political Work.{close_quotes} In the PLA, this system of political control results in the involvement of political organs in day-to-day military matters to an extent unheard of in the West. Further work is needed in order to understand, more fully, both the system of {open_quotes}Political Work{close_quotes} and its contributions to the overall military (and civil) command and control philosophic of the Communist Party of China.

  17. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - Responsible Parties at CERCLIS Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Responsible Parties at CERCLIS Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access...

  18. Direct and indirect welfare chauvinism as party strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Careja, Romana; Elmelund-Præstekær, Christian; Klitgaard, Michael Baggesen

    2016-01-01

    negatively affect immigrants the most. Combining quantitative and qualitative analysis of labour market reforms in Denmark, where one of the most successful populist right-wing parties in Europe – the Danish People's Party – held a pivotal position in the period 2001–11, the article traces the intentions...... and deliberate policy-making strategies of the party. It shows that the distinction between direct and indirect chauvinism is a useful theoretical tool for understanding how the Danish People's Party can fulfill the expectations of both its electorate and its coalition partners, even if they point in different...

  19. Server-Aided Two-Party Computation with Simultaneous Corruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cascudo Pueyo, Ignacio; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Ranellucci, Samuel

    We consider secure two-party computation in the client-server model where there are two adversaries that operate separately but simultaneously, each of them corrupting one of the parties and a restricted subset of servers that they interact with. We model security via the local universal composab......We consider secure two-party computation in the client-server model where there are two adversaries that operate separately but simultaneously, each of them corrupting one of the parties and a restricted subset of servers that they interact with. We model security via the local universal...

  20. From Protest to Political Parties: Online Deliberation in New Parties in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Borge Bravo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The new parties that emerged following the 15-M movement and against the austerity measures in Spain want to build parties open to the participation and deliberation for all the citizenry. To what extent are these ideals being fulfilled? The aim of this article is to describe and assess some of the main online deliberative processes of the two most important parties, Podemos and Barcelona En Comú, following commonly accepted criteria in the literature for measuring online deliberation. Specifically, we have examined the two most-voted proposals from the online platform Plaza Podemos and the online development of the electoral programme of Barcelona En Comú. Thus, we have conducted a content analysis of 713 (Plaza Podemos and 563 (Barcelona En Comú posts. Both platforms meet the structural and technical criteria for fostering deliberation, but the external impact is high only in the case of Barcelona En Comú. The deliberative quality of the communication is good but not the criteria of reflexivity, inclusion and plurality.

  1. Perceptions of Breast Cancer Survivors on the Supporting Practices of Their Supervisors in the Return-to-Work Process: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Maryse; Durand, Marie-José; Tremblay, Dominique

    2018-03-01

    Purpose Supervisors are known to be key actors in ensuring the success of absent employees in their return-to-work process. However, to date, little is known about the perceptions of breast cancer survivors on the practices put in place by their supervisors to support them during this process. The objective of this study was to describe the perceptions of breast cancer survivors on the practices put in place by their supervisors to support them during their return-to-work process. Method A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with breast cancer survivors (n = 10) who had returned to work after treatment and were still at work more than 18 months later. Each interview was audio recorded and then transcribed verbatim for qualitative thematic content analysis using a semi-open codification framework. Results Participants identified three main practices put in place by their supervisors to support them and which they perceived as particularly helpful during the return-to-work process: (1) maintaining communication during their period of absence; (2) working with them to structure their return-to-work process before their actual return; and (3) allowing them flexibility in their schedule for a certain period, particularly at the beginning of the return-to-work process. Breast cancer survivors also identified an omission in the practice of employers: lack of follow-up over time. Conclusion Knowledge about the practices perceived as helpful by breast cancer survivors during their return-to-work process lays the groundwork for the eventual development of services to help breast cancer survivors in their return to work.

  2. Working after a metastatic cancer diagnosis: Factors affecting employment in the metastatic setting from ECOG-ACRIN's Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaarwerk, Amye J; Lee, Ju-Whei; Terhaar, Abigail; Sesto, Mary E; Smith, Mary Lou; Cleeland, Charles S; Fisch, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Improved survival for individuals with metastatic cancer accentuates the importance of employment for cancer survivors. A better understanding of how metastatic cancer affects employment is a necessary step toward the development of tools for assisting survivors in this important realm. The ECOG-ACRIN Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns study was analyzed to investigate what factors were associated with the employment of 680 metastatic cancer patients. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare patients stably working with patients no longer working. There were 668 metastatic working-age participants in the analysis: 236 (35%) worked full- or part-time, whereas 302 (45%) had stopped working because of illness. Overall, 58% reported some change in employment due to illness. A better performance status and non-Hispanic white ethnicity/race were significantly associated with continuing to work despite a metastatic cancer diagnosis in the multivariate analysis. The disease type, time since metastatic diagnosis, number of metastatic sites, location of metastatic disease, and treatment status had no significant impact. Among the potentially modifiable factors, receiving hormonal treatment (if a viable option) and decreasing symptom interference were associated with continuing to work. A significant percentage of the metastatic patients remained employed; increased symptom burden was associated with a change to no longer working. Modifiable factors resulting in work interference should be minimized so that patients with metastatic disease may continue working if this is desired. Improvements in symptom control and strategies developed to help address workplace difficulties have promise for improving this aspect of survivorship. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  3. Party-state relationship, an effect of the political competition. The party system and patronage in Romanian politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lonean

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the party-state relationship in post-communist Romania. It shows the connections between the existence of patronage, corruption and the states’ weak administrative capacity, on one hand, and the dynamics of the political party system, as an explanatory variable, on the other hand. The instability of the political parties in Romania and their changing relations within the system make the electorates’ task of anticipating and sanctioning their politics impossible. Consequently, the political parties have the possibility of extracting resources from the state without being held accountable in elections, as an effect of their dynamic, but non-robust competition.

  4. A Qualitative Inquiry of the Lived Experiences of Music Therapists Who Have Survived Cancer Who Are Working with Medical and Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a debilitating illness that affects more than one in every three Americans at sometime in their life time regardless of their social, cultural, ethnic, religious, or economic status. A few studies in the psychotherapy literature have investigated the impact of cancer on the personal and professional lives of psychotherapists. However, such investigations are yet unknown in medical or music therapy literature. In this descriptive phenomenological study, the researcher interviewed five American music therapists who have survived cancer and also work with patients in medical hospitals or hospice settings. The purpose of this study was to fully describe their lived experience of surviving cancer and examine how the cancer experience affected their clinical work thereafter. The data was analyzed using an open coding method from grounded theory which identified four major themes: (a) personal significance; (b) relational significance; (c) musical significance and (d) professional significance. The descriptions provided by these participants of their cancer experience as patients, survivors, and cancer surviving therapists, have revealed various psychosocial and physical issues encountered, and numerous coping methods they employed, and poignantly explained how their clinical approach evolved and expanded due to the personal experience of cancer. Specific issues in relation to countertransference, self-disclosure, and ways of developing empathic approaches without having such personal experience were discussed in addition to suggestions for future research.

  5. A Qualitative Inquiry of the Lived Experiences of Music Therapists who have Survived Cancer who are Working with Medical and Hospice Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hyung Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a debilitating illness that affects more than one in every three Americans at sometime in their life time regardless of their social, cultural, ethnic, religious, or economic status. A few studies in the psychotherapy literature have investigated the impact of cancer on the personal and professional lives of psychotherapists. However, such investigations are yet unknown in medical or music therapy literature. In this descriptive phenomenological study, the researcher interviewed five American music therapists who have survived cancer and also work with patients in medical hospitals or hospice settings. The purpose of this study was to fully describe their lived experience of surviving cancer and examine how the cancer experience affected their clinical work thereafter. The data was analyzed using an open coding method from grounded theory which identified four major themes: (a personal significance; (b relational significance; (c musical significance and (d professional significance. The descriptions provided by these participants of their cancer experience as patients, survivors, and cancer surviving therapists, have revealed various psychosocial and physical issues encountered, and numerous coping methods they employed, and poignantly explained how their clinical approach evolved and expanded due to the personal experience of cancer. Specific issues in relation to countertransference, self-disclosure, and ways of developing empathic approaches without having such personal experience were discussed in addition to suggestions for future research.

  6. Sedentary work and the risks of colon and rectal cancer by anatomical sub-site in the Canadian census health and environment cohort (CanCHEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Manisha; Harris, M Anne; MacLeod, Jill; Tjepkema, Michael; Peters, Paul A; Demers, Paul A

    2017-08-01

    Sedentary behaviour is a potential risk factor for colorectal cancer. We examined the association between sedentary work, based on body position, and colorectal cancer risk in Canadians. A working body position category (a. sitting; b. standing and walking; c. sitting, standing, and walking; d. other) was assigned to occupations reported by 1991 Canadian Census respondents based on national occupational counselling guidelines. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for cancers of the colon (overall, proximal, and distal) and rectum in men and women newly diagnosed from 1992 to 2010. Compared to "sitting" jobs, men in occupations with "other" (non-sitting, -standing, or -walking) body positions had a weakly significant reduced colon cancer risk (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.89, 0.98) primarily attributed to protection at the distal site (HR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.84, 0.97). Men in "standing and walking" and "sitting, standing, and walking" jobs did not have significantly reduced colon cancer risks. No effects were observed for rectal cancer in men or colon and rectal cancer in women. The two significant findings of this analysis should be followed-up in further investigations with additional information on potential confounders. Null findings for rectal cancer were consistent with other studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Successful strategies in implementing a multidisciplinary team working in the care of patients with cancer: an overview and synthesis of the available literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soukup T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tayana Soukup,1 Benjamin W Lamb,2 Sonal Arora,3 Ara Darzi,3 Nick Sevdalis,1 James SA Green4,5 1Health Service and Population Research Department, Centre for Implementation Science, King’s College London, London, UK; 2Department of Surgical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Surgery and Cancer, Center for Patient Safety and Service Quality, Imperial College London, 4Whipps Cross University Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, 5Faculty of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: In many health care systems globally, cancer care is driven by multidisciplinary cancer teams (MDTs. A large number of studies in the past few years and across different literature have been performed to better understand how these teams work and how they manage patient care. The aim of our literature review is to synthesize current scientific and clinical understanding on cancer MDTs and their organization; this, in turn, should provide an up-to-date summary of the current knowledge that those planning or leading cancer services can use as a guide for service implementation or improvement. We describe the characteristics of an effective MDT and factors that influence how these teams work. A range of factors pertaining to teamwork, availability of patient information, leadership, team and meeting management, and workload can affect how well MDTs are implemented within patient care. We also review how to assess and improve these teams. We present a range of instruments designed to be used with cancer MDTs – including observational tools, self-assessments, and checklists. We conclude with a practical outline of what appears to be the best practices to implement (Dos and practices to avoid (Don’ts when setting up MDT-driven cancer care. Keywords: cancer MDT, MDM, cancer meeting, patients with cancer

  8. "A small cog in a large wheel": an exploratory study into the experiences of porters, ward clerks and domestics working in an English Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Hazel; Froggatt, Katherine; McClinton, Pam

    2003-09-01

    The effect of working in an oncology environment on nurses has been widely researched but the experiences of non-clinical staff such as ancillary workers in the oncology environment have rarely been examined. This exploratory study had three aims: to explore ancillary workers' understandings of cancer, their experiences of working in a Cancer Centre and their training and support needs. Working within a naturalistic paradigm, a descriptive exploratory design was utilised employing in-depth interviews and drawing on aspects of grounded theory for data analysis. Findings indicated that these ancillary workers lacked an in-depth understanding of cancer. The experience of working in a Cancer Centre appeared to bring both costs and benefits to these ancillary workers. These ancillary workers enjoyed the level of contact they have with patients in a Cancer Centre and subsequently ascribed great value to their jobs. However, they felt that health-care professional colleagues did not always value their contribution to the care of patients. There are implications for nurses and other health-care staff working in oncology alongside these ancillary staff in terms of valuing and supporting them in the work that they do.

  9. Improvement of nuclear third party liability system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. W.; Oh, B. J.; Yoo, S. O.; Kang, S. C.; Lee, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    A special regime for nuclear third party liability is necessary since the ordinary common law is not well suited to deal with the particular problems in the field of nuclear industry. The basic principles of this regime is i) strict liability (other than traditional fault liability), ii) channelling and the exclusive liability of operator, iii) compulsory financial security, iv) limits on liability in amount and in time v) intervention by the state, etc. In Korea, a revision was made to the Nuclear Damage Compensation Act on 16th January, 2001. The revision aimed at the reflection of the spirit of the new Vienna Convention on Nuclear Liability (1997) such as i) limit of liability to an amount of 300mil SDR, ii) increase of the level of financial protection (in the presidential decree, the 'Phasing-In' system would be introduced), iii) Extension of the definition 'nuclear damage', iv) extension of the scope of application to EEZ, v) deletion of 'natural calamity' from the causes of immunity, vi) extension of prescription period for personal injury to a length of 30 year

  10. CERN clubs join the fiftieth anniversary party!

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    CERN's clubs are planning to celebrate the Organization's 50th anniversary by organising a variety of special events. It's raining projects! CERN's clubs have chosen to celebrate the Organization's Golden Jubilee, each in its own style, by organising a whole host of anniversary events. While the Cine-Club continues to screen films made in the Member States on Thursday evenings, other clubs are organising special races and tournaments to honour CERN's 50th year. The CERN Rugby Club led the way in early April when it hosted a children's tournament which brought the Laboratory firmly into the view of its many young participants. On 24 April, the Cycling Club moves to centre stage as it takes its members on a unique 50-km discovery trip around the countryside above the tunnel of the future LHC. The Croquet Club, the Running Club, the Horse Riding Club and the Golf Club will all be joining the party in May and June. After that, football, softball, cycling, pétanque and sailing are just some of the items on a sp...

  11. Return-to-work intervention for cancer survivors: budget impact and allocation of costs and returns in the Netherlands and six major EU-countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mewes, Janne C.; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Boer, Angela G.E.M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Return-to-work (RTW)-interventions support cancer survivors in resuming work, but come at additional healthcare costs. The objective of this study was to assess the budget impact of a RTW-intervention, consisting of counselling sessions with an occupational physician and an

  12. Working after a metastatic cancer diagnosis: factors affecting employment in the metastatic setting from ECOG’s Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns (SOAPP) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaarwerk, Amye; Lee, Ju-Whei; Terhaar, Abigail; Sesto, Mary; Smith, Mary Lou; Cleeland, Charles; Fisch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Improved survival for individuals with metastatic cancer accentuates the importance of employment for cancer survivors. Better understanding of how metastatic cancer affects employment is a necessary step towards the development of tools to assist survivors in this important realm. Methods We analyzed the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group’s “Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns (SOAPP)” study to investigate what factors were associated with employment of 680 metastatic cancer patients. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare patients stably working (Group A) to patients no longer working (Group B). Results There were 668 metastatic working-age participants in our analysis; 236 (35%) worked full or part-time while 302 (45%) stopped working due to illness. Overall, 58% reported some change in employment due to illness. Better performance status and non-Hispanic White ethnicity/race were significantly associated with continuing to work despite a metastatic cancer diagnosis on multivariable analysis. Disease type, time since metastatic diagnosis, number of metastatic sites, location of metastatic disease, and treatment status had no significant impact. Among the potentially modifiable factors, receiving hormonal treatment (if a viable option) and decreasing symptom interference were associated with continuing to work. Conclusions A significant percentage of metastatic patients remain employed; symptom burden was associated with change to no longer working. Modifiable factors resulting in work interference should be minimized so that patients with metastatic disease may continue working, if desired. Improvements in symptom control and strategies developed to help address work place difficulties have promise to improve this aspect of survivorship. PMID:26687819

  13. Secure Two-Party Computation with Low Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Hazay, Carmit

    2011-01-01

    We propose a 2-party UC-secure computation protocol that can compute any function securely. The protocol requires only two messages, communication that is poly-logarithmic in the size of the circuit description of the function, and the workload for one of the parties is also only poly-logarithmic...

  14. Developing Product Lines with 3rd-party components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonge, M.

    2007-01-01

    The trends toward product line development and toward adopting more 3rd-party software are hard to combine. The reason is that productlines demand fine control over the software (e.g., for diversity management), while 3rd-party software (almost by definition) provides only little or no control. A

  15. Risk based approach and interactions between interested parties in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... interested parties in QSE management systems. Hanae DAHMAN EL ... relevant interested parties participating in the logistics chain and who contribute to the ... huge logistic crossroads of loads and flows: supply of aircraft in kerosene, ... Swissport which represents the global supplier of services to the ...

  16. STEM and the Evolution of the Astronomical Star Party

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B. H.; Munive, P.; Franco, J.; Jones, A. P.; Shaner, A. J.; Buxner, S.; Bleacher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The astronomical star party has long been a powerful and effective way to engage the public and enhance cohesiveness within the amateur astronomy community. Early star parties tended to be strictly small, local events. But with improvements in transportation, larger regional star parties became popular. These advanced the considerable capabilities for citizen science in the amateur community, shared technology and engineering innovations in the field of telescope making, and refined numerous mathematical techniques in areas such instrument design and ephemeris generation, covering the full breadth of STEM. Advancements in astrophotography showcased at these events brought the star party from STEM to STEAM. Now, the advent of social media, web streaming, and virtual presence has facilitated the phenomenon of very large, networked star parties with international scope. These mega star parties take public engagement to a new, far greater levels, giving a vastly larger and more diverse public the opportunity to directly participate in exciting first-hand STEM activities. This presentation will recount the evolution of the star party and will focus on two examples of large, multinational, networked star parties, International Observe the Moon Night and Noche de las Estrellas. We will look at lessons learned and ways to participate.

  17. 34 CFR 81.19 - Costs and fees of parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Costs and fees of parties. 81.19 Section 81.19 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GENERAL EDUCATION PROVISIONS ACT-ENFORCEMENT General Provisions § 81.19 Costs and fees of parties. The Equal Access to Justice Act, 5 U.S.C. 504...

  18. Features of modern security policy UK political parties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Stalovierova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The security policy of the British coalition government of D. Cameron (2010-2015 is summarized; it’s been proved that political forces of Tory and Liberal Democrat should have compromised to carry out unanimous course in the scope of national security, and the problems of the security strategy on parliamentary elections in 2015 are analyzed, particularly the comparative analysis of the modern safety strategy of leading British parties is exercised. Under conditions of the appearance of new challenges and threats, transformation of international safety system, the questions of safety policy often become the object of attention of the British community and experts. The absence of cross-party consensus on most terms of safety strategy of the United Kingdom during the election campaign in 2015 makes the discussion about perspectives of the British safety policy still more urgent. During the election campaign there was no unity on any aspect of security subject between parties. First of all, Labourists, Liberal Democrats, Scottish National Party and Green Party made a statement about readiness to develop cooperation with the EU and the Conservatives and the UK Independence Party were on the side of the Eurosceptics. The opinions of the parties were also divided on military operations abroad, financing and force level. In terms of one-party government and presence of majority in the House of Commons, the Conservatives have opportunities to realize their own vision of British safety policy.

  19. Inequality and anti-globalization backlash by political parties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.

    2011-01-01

    Does inequality fuel anti-globalization backlash? This paper answers this question by analyzing how income inequality affects the embrace or eschew of globalization by political parties. It focuses on party opposition to and support for trade openness, European-Union integration, and general

  20. The Political Parties and Political Participation in Rivers State, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Political Parties and Political Participation in Rivers State, Nigeria: A Case Study of 2015 General Elections. Goddey Wilson. Abstract. The study reviewed the activities of the political parties and its impact on voters' participation in the political activities in Rivers State. In pursuit of this objective, the study generated ...