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Sample records for cancer volume iii

  1. Predictive and prognostic value of tumor volume and its changes during radical radiotherapy of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaesmann, Lukas [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Niyazi, Maximilian; Fleischmann, Daniel [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site Munich, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Blanck, Oliver; Baumann, Rene [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Baues, Christian; Klook, Lisa; Rosenbrock, Johannes; Trommer-Nestler, Maike [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiotherapy, Cologne (Germany); Dobiasch, Sophie [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Eze, Chukwuka [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Gauer, Tobias; Goy, Yvonne [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Sautter, Lisa [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany); Hausmann, Jan [University Medical Center Duesseldorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Kaul, David; Thieme, Alexander H. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Krug, David; Schmitt, Daniela [University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO) and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Maeurer, Matthias [University Medical Center Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Panje, Cedric M. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Suess, Christoph [University Medical Center Regensburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg (Germany); Ziegler, Sonia [University Medical Center Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Ebert, Nadja [University Medical Center Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medenwald, Daniel [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Ostheimer, Christian [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Halle (Saale) (Germany); Collaboration: Young DEGRO Trial Group

    2018-02-15

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes heterogeneous presentation of the disease including lymph node involvement and large tumour volumes with infiltration of the mediastinum, heart or spine. In the treatment of stage III NSCLC an interdisciplinary approach including radiotherapy is considered standard of care with acceptable toxicity and improved clinical outcome concerning local control. Furthermore, gross tumour volume (GTV) changes during definitive radiotherapy would allow for adaptive replanning which offers normal tissue sparing and dose escalation. A literature review was conducted to describe the predictive value of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy especially focussing on overall survival. The literature search was conducted in a two-step review process using PubMed registered /Medline registered with the key words ''stage III non-small cell lung cancer'' and ''radiotherapy'' and ''tumour volume'' and ''prognostic factors''. After final consideration 17, 14 and 9 studies with a total of 2516, 784 and 639 patients on predictive impact of GTV, GTV changes and its impact on overall survival, respectively, for definitive radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC were included in this review. Initial GTV is an important prognostic factor for overall survival in several studies, but the time of evaluation and the value of histology need to be further investigated. GTV changes during RT differ widely, optimal timing for re-evaluation of GTV and their predictive value for prognosis needs to be clarified. The prognostic value of GTV changes is unclear due to varying study qualities, re-evaluation time and conflicting results. The main findings were that the clinical impact of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy is still unclear due to heterogeneous study designs with varying quality

  2. Predictive and prognostic value of tumor volume and its changes during radical radiotherapy of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaesmann, Lukas; Niyazi, Maximilian; Fleischmann, Daniel; Blanck, Oliver; Baumann, Rene; Baues, Christian; Klook, Lisa; Rosenbrock, Johannes; Trommer-Nestler, Maike; Dobiasch, Sophie; Eze, Chukwuka; Gauer, Tobias; Goy, Yvonne; Giordano, Frank A.; Sautter, Lisa; Hausmann, Jan; Henkenberens, Christoph; Kaul, David; Thieme, Alexander H.; Krug, David; Schmitt, Daniela; Maeurer, Matthias; Panje, Cedric M.; Suess, Christoph; Ziegler, Sonia; Ebert, Nadja; Medenwald, Daniel; Ostheimer, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes heterogeneous presentation of the disease including lymph node involvement and large tumour volumes with infiltration of the mediastinum, heart or spine. In the treatment of stage III NSCLC an interdisciplinary approach including radiotherapy is considered standard of care with acceptable toxicity and improved clinical outcome concerning local control. Furthermore, gross tumour volume (GTV) changes during definitive radiotherapy would allow for adaptive replanning which offers normal tissue sparing and dose escalation. A literature review was conducted to describe the predictive value of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy especially focussing on overall survival. The literature search was conducted in a two-step review process using PubMed registered /Medline registered with the key words ''stage III non-small cell lung cancer'' and ''radiotherapy'' and ''tumour volume'' and ''prognostic factors''. After final consideration 17, 14 and 9 studies with a total of 2516, 784 and 639 patients on predictive impact of GTV, GTV changes and its impact on overall survival, respectively, for definitive radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC were included in this review. Initial GTV is an important prognostic factor for overall survival in several studies, but the time of evaluation and the value of histology need to be further investigated. GTV changes during RT differ widely, optimal timing for re-evaluation of GTV and their predictive value for prognosis needs to be clarified. The prognostic value of GTV changes is unclear due to varying study qualities, re-evaluation time and conflicting results. The main findings were that the clinical impact of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy is still unclear due to heterogeneous study designs with varying quality

  3. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  4. Olympic Training Film Profiles. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971

    Approximately 250 instructional films are described in Volume Three (1970-1971) of this review. After an introduction which considers film discussions from the instructor's point of view and offers some ideas for conducting a film showing and ordering the films, profiles of the films are presented grouped under such areas as management…

  5. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The DART II is a remote, interactive, microprocessor-based data acquistion system suitable for use with air monitors. This volume of DART II documentation contains the following appendixes: adjustment and calibration procedures; mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets; ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction list, octal listing; and cable lists. (RWR)

  6. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  7. Introduction to "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future, Volume III"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Tanioka, Yuichiro; Geist, Eric L.

    2018-04-01

    Twenty papers on the study of tsunamis are included in Volume III of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future". Volume I of this topical issue was published as PAGEOPH, vol. 173, No. 12, 2016 and Volume II as PAGEOPH, vol. 174, No. 8, 2017. Two papers in Volume III focus on specific details of the 2009 Samoa and the 1923 northern Kamchatka tsunamis; they are followed by three papers related to tsunami hazard assessment for three different regions of the world oceans: South Africa, Pacific coast of Mexico and the northwestern part of the Indian Ocean. The next six papers are on various aspects of tsunami hydrodynamics and numerical modelling, including tsunami edge waves, resonant behaviour of compressible water layer during tsunamigenic earthquakes, dispersive properties of seismic and volcanically generated tsunami waves, tsunami runup on a vertical wall and influence of earthquake rupture velocity on maximum tsunami runup. Four papers discuss problems of tsunami warning and real-time forecasting for Central America, the Mediterranean coast of France, the coast of Peru, and some general problems regarding the optimum use of the DART buoy network for effective real-time tsunami warning in the Pacific Ocean. Two papers describe historical and paleotsunami studies in the Russian Far East. The final set of three papers importantly investigates tsunamis generated by non-seismic sources: asteroid airburst and meteorological disturbances. Collectively, this volume highlights contemporary trends in global tsunami research, both fundamental and applied toward hazard assessment and mitigation.

  8. Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant applicability study. Volume III. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Volume III suppliees supporting information to assist Congress in making a decision on the optimum utilization of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant. Included are applicable fuel cycle policies; properties of reference fuels; description and evaluation of alternative operational (flue cycle) modes; description and evaluation of safeguards systems and techniques; description and evaluation of spiking technology; waste and waste solidification evaluation; and Department of Energy programs relating to nonproliferation

  9. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  10. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  11. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  13. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material...... were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  15. Volume of hydration in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, E; Belzile, M; Watanabe, S; Fainsinger, R L

    1996-03-01

    In this retrospective study we reviewed the volume and modality of hydration of consecutive series of terminal cancer patients in two different settings. In a palliative care unit 203/290 admitted patients received subcutaneous hydration for 12 +/- 8 days at a daily volume of 1015 +/- 135 ml/day. At the cancer center, 30 consecutive similar patients received intravenous hydration for 11.5 +/- 5 days (P > 0.2) but at a daily volume of 2080 +/- 720 ml/day (P palliative care unit patients required discontinuation of hydration because of complications. Hypodermoclysis was administered mainly as a continuous infusion, an overnight infusion, or in one to three 1-h boluses in 62 (31%), 98 (48%) and 43 (21%) patients, respectively. Our findings suggest that, in some settings, patients may be receiving excessive volumes of hydration by less comfortable routes such as the intravenous route. Increased education and research in this area are badly needed.

  16. Safety Specialist Manpower, Manpower Resources. Volumes II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    These second and third volumes of a four-volume study of manpower in state highway safety programs over the next decade estimate manpower resources by state and in national aggregate and describe present and planned training programs for safety specialists. For each educational level, both total manpower and manpower actually available for…

  17. Locally advanced breast cancer (stage III and stage IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baracat, F.F.; Grabert, H.; Lima, G.R. de; Pontes, M.; Ferraro, O.; Santana, A.; Brook, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    The results concerning to the treatment of 193 patients with locally advanced breast cancer-stage III and stage IV are analysed. All the patients were treated with radical radiotherapy plus total mastectomy about 6 weeks later; 53 pacients received also chemotherapy (CMF - 12 courses) and 52 were oophorectomized. (M.A.C) [pt

  18. INEL environmental characterization report. Volume III. Appendices E-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) INEL subsurface hydrology; (2) cultural resources assessment of two study areas on the INEL; (3) description of INEL facilities; and (4) effluent measurements and environmental monitoring programs

  19. Cancer of the larynx: radiation therapy. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for a T1 and T2 tumor with normal cord mobility and/or an exophytic lesion. It not only provides excellent control of the disease, but also preserves a good, useful voice in approximately 90 percent of the irradiated patients. For a T2 lesion with impaired cord mobility and/or moderate ulceration, a trial course of radiotherapy is initially given. If the tumor shows good regression and/or a return of normal cord mobility after a dose of 4000 rads, radiation therapy may be continued to a curative dose level, about 6500 rads. Surgery is reserved for treating residual disease six to eight weeks after radiation therapy or for recurrence. A T3 lesion with complete cord fixation and/or deep ulceration with nodes does not respond favorably to radiation therapy, and a planned combination of irradiation and laryngectomy is advised. Disease that extends beyond the larynx, T4, is rarely curable by radiation therapy alone. If the lesion is still operable, a combined approach of radiation and surgery is preferred; if not, palliative radiation therapy is given. Lymph node metastases from laryngeal carcinoma indicate advanced disease and is managed by preoperative irradiation and radical neck dissection. Under a program of therapeutic individualization, two-thirds to three-quarters of patients with cancer of the larynx can be cured by irradiation with preservation of a good, useful voice. In the remainder, the larynx must be sacrificed to save the patient's life. The ultimate control of laryngeal cancer lies in eradicating the extensive primary lesion and metastatic nodes, a common problem in the management of squamous cell carcinoma elsewhere in the body

  20. Baseline metal enrichment from Population III star formation in cosmological volume simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaacks, Jason; Thompson, Robert; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Bromm, Volker

    2018-04-01

    We utilize the hydrodynamic and N-body code GIZMO coupled with our newly developed sub-grid Population III (Pop III) Legacy model, designed specifically for cosmological volume simulations, to study the baseline metal enrichment from Pop III star formation at z > 7. In this idealized numerical experiment, we only consider Pop III star formation. We find that our model Pop III star formation rate density (SFRD), which peaks at ˜ 10- 3 M⊙ yr- 1 Mpc- 1 near z ˜ 10, agrees well with previous numerical studies and is consistent with the observed estimates for Pop II SFRDs. The mean Pop III metallicity rises smoothly from z = 25 to 7, but does not reach the critical metallicity value, Zcrit = 10-4 Z⊙, required for the Pop III to Pop II transition in star formation mode until z ≃ 7. This suggests that, while individual haloes can suppress in situ Pop III star formation, the external enrichment is insufficient to globally terminate Pop III star formation. The maximum enrichment from Pop III star formation in star-forming dark matter haloes is Z ˜ 10-2 Z⊙, whereas the minimum found in externally enriched haloes is Z ≳ 10-7 Z⊙. Finally, mock observations of our simulated IGM enriched with Pop III metals produce equivalent widths similar to observations of an extremely metal-poor damped Lyman alpha system at z = 7.04, which is thought to be enriched by Pop III star formation only.

  1. Small Business Management Volume III: Curriculum. An Adult Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Edgar A.; Swanson, Gordon I.

    The small business management adult education program outlined in this curriculum guide is designed to help small business entrepreneurs solve their business management problems and attain the goals they have established for their businesses and their families. (An instructor's manual and practice problems are in separate volumes.) The 3-year…

  2. Systems Support Mapping in Guiding Self-Management in Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8

  3. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  4. Handbook of natural resource and energy economics. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneese, A.V.; Sweeney, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The last of a three-volume series of handbooks focuses on the economics of energy, minerals and exhaustible resources, and the forecasting issues. The relationship between energy, the environment and economic growth is also examined. Chapter headings are: economic theory of depletable resources; the optimal use of exhaustible resources; intertemporal consistency issues in depletable resources; buying energy and non-fuel minerals; mineral resource stocks and information; strategies for modelling exhaustible resource supply; natural resources in an age of substitutability; natural resource cartels; the economics of energy security; natural resource use and the environment; and energy, the environment and economic growth

  5. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume III, Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-03-01

    were allowed to regenerate to radioactive gold implants for the treatment of 52 the fingerbud stage. pa t ien ts wi th advanced head and neck cancer are...program is corn- (BRH) researcher in experimental embryology , d i ed V pleted , Burdette expects to receive a follow-up November 10 at the age of 75. Dr...I-a lbumin was carried out over a 5-hrperi od , after exposure of the dog’ s head for 20 mm 04 36 NAVY ENVIRONMENT : MICROWAVE DISPERS ION AND to

  6. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Foxall, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lindsey, Nathaniel [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stringfellow, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Shonkoff, Seth [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brandt, Adam [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Ferrar, Kyle [The FracTracker Alliance, Oakland, CA (United States); Gautier, Donald [DonGautier LLC., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Phillips, Scott [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Greenfield, Ben [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jerrett, Michael L.B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, issued in July 2015, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, this volume, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. The Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  7. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume III.- Extremadura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, C; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Roquero, C; Magister, M.

    1998-01-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-13 7 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalized and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Extremadura. (Author) 50 refs

  8. Prostate cancer: Doses and volumes of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Rivera, S.; Quero, L.; Latorzeff, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is nowadays a major therapeutic option in prostate cancer. Technological improvements allowed dose escalation without increasing late toxicity. Some randomized trials have shown that dose escalation decreases the biochemical failure rate, without any benefit in survival with the present follow-up. However, some studies indicate that the distant metastases rate is also decreased. Most of these studies have been done without hormonal treatment, and the role of dose escalation in case of long-term androgen deprivation is unknown. The target volume encompassed the whole gland: however, complete or partial focal treatment of the prostate can be done with sophisticated IMRT technique and must be evaluated. Proximal part of the seminal vesicles must be included in the target volumes. The role of nodal irradiation is another debate, but it could be logically proposed for the unfavourable group. (authors)

  9. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage II and III rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Liting; Song Yongwen; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao; Qian Tunan; Li Yexiong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy, compared with surgery alone for rectal cancer. Methods: From January 1994 to October 1997, 192 patients with stage II or III rectal cancer were treated by radical resection and postoperative radiotherapy (Group S + R) and 51 patients with the same stage lesions underwent surgery alone (Group S). The median dose of radiation was 50(32-62) Gy. Kaplan-Meier method and Log-rank test were used for analysis. Results: The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 60.3% and 58.3%, respectively. The overall 5-year survival rate was 59.4% in Group S + R and 64.7% in Group S, and the 5-year disease-free survival rates were 57.0% and 66.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences between either group (P=0.601 and P=0.424). The disease-free survival was not significantly prolonged in Group S + R as compared with that of Group S. The local recurrence rate was evidently reduced in Group S + R (15.8% v 26.8%, P=0.043). Conclusion: Local recurrence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rectal cancer. Postoperative radiotherapy, though reduces the incidence of local recurrence, does not improve the survival in the treatment of stage II and III diseases

  10. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  11. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  12. Improvements in 5-year outcomes of stage II/III rectal cancer relative to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Hay, John; Phang, P Terry; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Kennecke, Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Stage for stage, rectal cancer has historically been associated with inferior survival compared with colon cancer. Randomized trials of rectal cancer have generally demonstrated improvements in locoregional relapse but not survival. We compared therapy and outcomes of colon versus rectal cancer in 2 time cohorts to determine if relative improvements have occurred. Patients with resected stage II/III colorectal cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency in 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 were identified. The higher of clinical or pathologic stage was used for patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared for rectal and colon cancer between the 2 cohorts. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 1427 patients were included, with 375 from 1989/1990 and 1052 from 2001/2002. Between 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 there were significant increases in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for both rectal and colon cancer (Prectal cancer. DSS significantly improved for rectal (Pcolon cancer (P=0.069). Five-year OS was significantly inferior for rectal versus colon cancer in 1989/1990 (46.1% vs. 57.2%, P=0.023) and was similar to that of colon cancer in 2001/2002 (63.7% vs. 66.2%, P=0.454). Advances in locoregional and systemic therapy significantly improved survival among patients with rectal cancer. DSS and OS are now similar between colon and rectal cancer for both stage II and III disease.

  13. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Estrogen Receptor Status; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Status; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. [Diagnostic values of serum type III procollagen N-terminal peptide in type IV gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, S; Fujiki, T; Kanda, Y; Kumai, R; Yoshida, S

    1985-04-01

    Since increased synthesis of collagen has been demonstrated in tissue of type IV gastric cancer, we attempted to distinguish type IV gastric cancer from other cancers by measuring serum levels of type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (type III-N-peptide). Mean serum levels in type IV gastric cancer patients without metastasis were found to be elevated above normal values and developed a tendency to be higher than those in types I, II and III gastric cancer patients without metastasis. Highly positive ratios were found in patients with liver diseases including hepatoma and colon cancer, biliary tract cancer, and esophageal cancer patients with liver, lung or bone metastasis, but only 2 out of 14 of these cancer patients without such metastasis showed positive serum levels of type III-N-peptide. Positive cases in patients with type IV gastric cancer were obtained not only in the group with clinical stage IV but also in the groups with clinical stages II and III. In addition, high serum levels of type III-N-peptide in patients with type IV gastric cancer were seen not only in the cases with liver, lung or bone metastasis but also in cases with disseminated peritoneal metastasis alone. These results suggest that if the serum level of type III-N-peptide is elevated above normal values, type IV gastric cancer should be suspected after ruling out liver diseases, myelofibrosis and liver, lung or bone metastasis.

  15. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume III. Program descriptions. [SIMWEST CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume III, the SIMWEST program description contains program descriptions, flow charts and program listings for the SIMWEST Model Generation Program, the Simulation program, the File Maintenance program and the Printer Plotter program. Volume III generally would not be required by SIMWEST user.

  16. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II

  17. Three-Dimensional Eyeball and Orbit Volume Modification After LeFort III Midface Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smektala, Tomasz; Nysjö, Johan; Thor, Andreas; Homik, Aleksandra; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dowgierd, Krzysztof; Olszewski, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate orbital volume modification with LeFort III midface distraction in patients with craniosynostosis and its influence on eyeball volume and axial diameter modification. Orbital volume was assessed by the semiautomatic segmentation method based on deformable surface models and on 3-dimensional (3D) interaction with haptics. The eyeball volumes and diameters were automatically calculated after manual segmentation of computed tomographic scans with 3D slicer software. The mean, minimal, and maximal differences as well as the standard deviation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for intraobserver and interobserver measurements reliability were calculated. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare measured values before and after surgery. P eyeball volume were 0.87 and 0.86, respectively. The orbital volume increased significantly after surgery: 30.32% (mean, 5.96  mL) for the left orbit and 31.04% (mean, 6.31  mL) for the right orbit. The mean increase in eyeball volume was 12.3%. The mean increases in the eyeball axial dimensions were 7.3%, 9.3%, and 4.4% for the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, respectively. The Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that preoperative and postoperative eyeball volumes, as well as the diameters along the X- and Y-axes, were statistically significant. Midface distraction in patients with syndromic craniostenosis results in a significant increase (P eyeball volumes. The 2 methods (haptic-aided semiautomatic segmentation and manual 3D slicer segmentation) are reproducible techniques for orbit and eyeball volume measurements.

  18. Treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and limited-disease small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Sharouni, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and limited disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). We described a systematic review on the clinical results of radiotherapy, combined or not with chemotherapy, for inoperable NSCLC stage III with the aim to define the

  19. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  20. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  1. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume III. Country data, LY-PO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. III, are Libya, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, and Portugal. The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy supplies; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  2. The relation between lymph node status and survival in Stage I-III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J.; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study involved a large nationwide Danish cohort to evaluate the hypothesis that a high lymph node harvest has a positive effect on survival in curative resected Stage I-III colon cancer and a low lymph node ratio has a positive effect on survival in Stage III colon cancer. Method......: Analysis of overall survival was conducted using a nationwide Danish cohort of patients treated with curative resection of Stage I-III colon cancer. All 8901 patients in Denmark diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and treated with curative resection in the period 2003-2008 were identified from...... independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High lymph node count was associated with improved overall survival in colon cancer. Lymph node ratio was superior to N-stage in differentiating overall survival in Stage III colon cancer. Stage migration was observed....

  3. FDG-PET imaging for the assessment of physiologic volume response during radiotherapy in cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lilie L.; Yang Zhiyun; Mutic, Sasa; Miller, Tom R.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the physiologic tumor volume response during treatment in cervical cancer using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Patients and Methods: This was a prospective study of 32 patients. Physiologic tumor volume in cubic centimeters was determined from the FDG-PET images using the 40% threshold method. Results: The mean pretreatment tumor volume was 102 cm 3 . The mean volume by clinical Stages I, II, and III were 54, 79, and 176 cm 3 , respectively. After 19.8 Gy external irradiation to the pelvis, the reduction in tumor volume was 29% (72 cm 3 ). An additional 13 Gy from high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy reduced the mean volume to 15.4 cm 3 , and this was subsequently reduced to 8.6 cm 3 with 13 Gy additional HDR brachytherapy (26 Gy, HDR). Four patients had physiologic FDG uptake in the cervix at 3 months after the completion of therapy. The mean time to the 50% reduction in physiologic tumor volume was 19.9 days and after combined external irradiation and HDR to 24.9 Gy. Conclusion: These results indicate that physiologic tumor volume determination by FDG-PET is feasible and that a 50% physiologic tumor volume reduction occurs within 20 days of starting therapy

  4. Endoscopic stenting in bile duct cancer increases liver volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae Ghon; Yang, Jae Do; Yu, Hee Chul; Cho, Baik Hwan; Lee, Seung Ok

    2014-09-01

    Objective evaluation tools for assessing the effectiveness of stenting in palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction are not satisfactory. Effects of biliary stenting on liver volume change have never been studied. We aimed to use volumetry to analyze liver volume changes after endoscopic stenting in bile duct cancer according to the location and number of stents. Retrospective review. University hospital. Patients with a diagnosis of hilar or distal bile duct cancer and who underwent biliary metal stenting. ERCP with self-expandable metal stent placement. Liver volume change after biliary stenting and its comparison according to the location (hilar vs distal common bile duct) and number (hilar bilateral vs hilar unilateral). There were 60 patients; 31 were treated for hilar bile duct cancer (13 for bilateral stent and 18 for unilateral stent) and 29 for distal bile duct cancer. Overall mean follow-up duration was 11.7 ± 4.9 weeks. Liver volume increased 17.4 ± 24.1%. The rate of liver growth was rapid during the early period from 4 to 8 weeks. Stenting in hilar bile duct cancer tended to increase liver volume more than distal biliary stents (22.5% vs 11.9%, P = .091). In hilar bile duct cancer, unilateral and bilateral stents showed similar liver volume increases (20.1% and 25.8%, respectively; P = .512). Single center, retrospective. Biliary stenting markedly increased liver volume in both hilar and distal bile duct cancer. Our data suggest that liver volume assessment could be a useful tool for evaluating stent efficacy. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  6. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  7. Cancer care coordinators in stage III colon cancer: a cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Tony; Collinson, Lucie; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; Foster, Rachel; Dennett, Elizabeth; Sarfati, Diana

    2015-08-05

    There is momentum internationally to improve coordination of complex care pathways. Robust evaluations of such interventions are scarce. This paper evaluates the cost-utility of cancer care coordinators for stage III colon cancer patients, who generally require surgery followed by chemotherapy. We compared a hospital-based nurse cancer care coordinator (CCC) with 'business-as-usual' (no dedicated coordination service) in stage III colon cancer patients in New Zealand. A discrete event microsimulation model was constructed to estimate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs from a health system perspective. We used New Zealand data on colon cancer incidence, survival, and mortality as baseline input parameters for the model. We specified intervention input parameters using available literature and expert estimates. For example, that a CCC would improve the coverage of chemotherapy by 33% (ranging from 9 to 65%), reduce the time to surgery by 20% (3 to 48%), reduce the time to chemotherapy by 20% (3 to 48%), and reduce patient anxiety (reduction in disability weight of 33%, ranging from 0 to 55%). Much of the direct cost of a nurse CCC was balanced by savings in business-as-usual care coordination. Much of the health gain was through increased coverage of chemotherapy with a CCC (especially older patients), and reduced time to chemotherapy. Compared to 'business-as-usual', the cost per QALY of the CCC programme was $NZ 18,900 (≈ $US 15,600; 95% UI: $NZ 13,400 to 24,600). By age, the CCC intervention was more cost-effective for colon cancer patients costs, meaning the cost-effectiveness was roughly comparable between ethnic groups. Such a nurse-led CCC intervention in New Zealand has acceptable cost-effectiveness for stage III colon cancer, meaning it probably merits funding. Each CCC programme will differ in its likely health gains and costs, making generalisation from this evaluation to other CCC interventions difficult. However, this evaluation suggests

  8. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Europe and Central Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  9. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Asia and the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  10. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Africa and the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  11. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Latin America and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  12. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Despite the presence of interplay effect, the

  13. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  14. Breast cancer management: is volume related to quality? Clinical Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M; Bell, J; Campbell, S; Basnett, I; Pollock, A; Taylor, I

    1997-01-01

    A method of carrying out region-wide audit for breast cancer was developed by collaboration between the cancer registry, providers and purchasers as part of work to fulfill the 'Calman-Hine' recommendations. In order to test the audit method, a retrospective audit in North Thames East compared practice in 1992 against current guidelines. The analysis compared care in specialist and non-specialist centres. A stratified random sample comprising 28% of all breast cancer patients diagnosed in 1992 was selected from the population-based Thames Cancer Registry. The data for 309 patients with stage I-III tumours were analysed by hospital type using local guidelines. No difference between specialist (high volume) and non-specialist centres was detected for factors important in survival. Pathological staging was good with over 70% reporting tumour size and grade. A small number of patients were undertreated; after conservative surgery, 10% (19) of women did not receive radiotherapy, and 15% (8) of node-positive premenopausal women did not receive chemotherapy or ovarian ablation. In contrast, a significant trend with hospital volume was found for several quality of life factors. These included access to a specialist breast surgeon and specialist breast nurses, availability of fine-needle aspiration (FNA), which ranged from 84% in high-volume to 42% in low-volume centres, and quality of surgery (axillary clearance rates ranged from 51% to 8% and sampling of less than three nodes from 3% to 25% for high- and very low-volume centres respectively). Confidential feedback of results to surgeons was welcomed and initiated change. The summary information gave purchasers information relevant to the evaluation of cancer services. While the audit applied present standards to past practice, it provided the impetus for prospective audit of current practice (now being implemented in North Thames).

  15. Microsatellite instability is associated with reduced disease specific survival in stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, H M; Ryan, E; Balasubramanian, I; Kennelly, R; Geraghty, R; Sclafani, F; Fennelly, D; McDermott, R; Ryan, E J; O'Donoghue, D; Hyland, J M P; Martin, S T; O'Connell, P R; Gibbons, D; Winter, Des; Sheahan, K

    2016-11-01

    Up to 15% of colorectal cancers exhibit microsatellite instability (MSI), where errors in replication go unchecked due to defects in the mismatch repair system. This study aimed to determine survival in a large single-centre series of 1250 consecutive colorectal cancers subjected to universal MSI testing. Clinical and pathological features of patients with colorectal cancer identified on prospectively maintained colorectal and pathology databases at St. Vincent's University Hospital from 2004 to May 2012 were examined. Mismatch repair (MMR) status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier curves, the log-rank test and Cox regression were used to associate survival with clinical and pathological characteristics. Of the 1250 colorectal cancers in the study period, 11% exhibited MSI (n = 138). Patients with MSI tumours had significantly lower rates of lymph node and distant metastases (MSI N+ rate: 24.8% compared with MSS N+ rate: 46.2%, p colon cancer. However, patients with Stage III MSI colon cancers had a worse DSS than those with MSS tumours. Stage III MSI tumours exhibited higher rates of lymphovascular invasion and perineural invasion than Stage I/II MSI tumours. MSI is associated with a reduced risk of nodal and distant metastases, with an improved DSS in Stage I/II colon cancer. However, when MSI tumours progress to Stage III these patients had worse outcomes and pathological features. New strategies for this cohort of patients may be required to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Connective tissue-activating peptide III: a novel blood biomarker for early lung cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John; Sadar, Marianne D; Sin, Don D; Kuzyk, Michael; Xing, Li; Kondra, Jennifer; McWilliams, Annette; Man, S F Paul; Lam, Stephen

    2009-06-10

    There are no reliable blood biomarkers to detect early lung cancer. We used a novel strategy that allows discovery of differentially present proteins against a complex and variable background. Mass spectrometry analyses of paired pulmonary venous-radial arterial blood from 16 lung cancer patients were applied to identify plasma proteins potentially derived from the tumor microenvironment. Two differentially expressed proteins were confirmed in 64 paired venous-arterial blood samples using an immunoassay. Twenty-eight pre- and postsurgical resection peripheral blood samples and two independent, blinded sets of plasma from 149 participants in a lung cancer screening study (49 lung cancers and 100 controls) and 266 participants from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Lung Health Study (45 lung cancer and 221 matched controls) determined the accuracy of the two protein markers to detect subclinical lung cancer. Connective tissue-activating peptide III (CTAP III)/ neutrophil activating protein-2 (NAP-2) and haptoglobin were identified to be significantly higher in venous than in arterial blood. CTAP III/NAP-2 levels decreased after tumor resection (P = .01). In two independent population cohorts, CTAP III/NAP-2 was significantly associated with lung cancer and improved the accuracy of a lung cancer risk prediction model that included age, smoking, lung function (FEV(1)), and an interaction term between FEV(1) and CTAP III/NAP-2 (area under the curve, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91) compared to CAPIII/NAP-2 alone. We identified CTAP III/NAP-2 as a novel biomarker to detect preclinical lung cancer. The study underscores the importance of applying blood biomarkers as part of a multimodal lung cancer risk prediction model instead of as stand-alone tests.

  17. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P.; Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the corresponding posterior mediastinum. In

  18. Intensity of adjuvant chemotherapy regimens and grade III-V toxicities among elderly stage III colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erning, F N; Razenberg, L G E M; Lemmens, V E P P; Creemers, G J; Pruijt, J F M; Maas, H A A M; Janssen-Heijnen, M L G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide insight in the use, intensity and toxicity of therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) and capecitabine monotherapy (CapMono) among elderly stage III colon cancer patients treated in everyday clinical practice. Data from the Netherlands Cancer Registry were used. All stage III colon cancer patients aged ≥70 years diagnosed in the southeastern part between 2005 and 2012 and treated with CAPOX or CapMono were included. Differences in completion of all planned cycles, cumulative dosages and toxicity between both regimens were evaluated. One hundred ninety-three patients received CAPOX and 164 patients received CapMono; 33% (n = 63) of the patients receiving CAPOX completed all planned cycles of both agents, whereas 55% (n = 90) of the patients receiving CapMono completed all planned cycles (P characteristics, CapMono was associated with a lower odds of developing grade III-V toxicity than CAPOX (odds ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.33-0.89). For patients treated with CAPOX, the most common toxicities were gastrointestinal (29%), haematological (14%), neurological (11%) and other toxicity (13%). For patients treated with CapMono, dermatological (17%), gastrointestinal (13%) and other toxicity (11%) were the most common. CAPOX is associated with significantly more grade III-V toxicities than CapMono, which had a pronounced impact on the cumulative dosage received and completion of all planned cycles. In this light, CapMono seems preferable over CAPOX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    expression of ion transporters and channels is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, it is timely to consider this especially for epithelia. Epithelial cells are highly proliferative and epithelial cancers, carcinomas, account for about 90% of all cancers. In this review we will focus on ion...... such as cancer, transepithelial and cell volume regulatory ion transport are dys-regulated. Furthermore, epithelial architecture and coordinated ion transport function are lost, cell survival/death balance is altered, and new interactions with the stroma arise, all contributing to drug resistance. Since altered...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed....

  20. Proceedings of the symposium to review Volume III of the Annual Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, F.; Norland, D.

    1979-01-01

    This report is a transcript of the proceedings of a two-day Symposium, held in the Fall of 1979 at the University of Maryland in order to independently review the 1978 Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Report to Congress (ARC), Volume III. Participants included energy forecasting experts from the academic community and the private sector; other Federal, State, and local government energy experts; and Office of Applied Analysis, EIA, staff members. The Symposium and its transcript are a critique of the underlying 1978 ARC assumptions, methodologies, and energy system projections. Discussions cover the short-, mid-, and long-term periods, national and international forecasts, source and consuming sectors and projected economic impacts. 27 figures, 22 tables.

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction volume: a novel method for volume measurement in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Timothy A; Carnell, Jonathan; Turk, Thomas T; Gupta, Gopal N

    2014-06-01

    The role of volumetric estimation is becoming increasingly important in the staging, management, and prognostication of benign and cancerous conditions of the kidney. We evaluated the use of three-dimensional reconstruction volume (3DV) in determining renal parenchymal volumes (RPV) and renal tumor volumes (RTV). We compared 3DV with the currently available methods of volume assessment and determined its interuser reliability. RPV and RTV were assessed in 28 patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer. Patients with a preoperative creatinine level of kidney pre- and postsurgery overestimated 3D reconstruction volumes by 15% to 102% and 12% to 101%, respectively. In addition, volumes obtained from 3DV displayed high interuser reliability regardless of experience. 3DV provides a highly reliable way of assessing kidney volumes. Given that 3DV takes into account visible anatomy, the differences observed using previously published methods can be attributed to the failure of geometry to accurately approximate kidney or tumor shape. 3DV provides a more accurate, reproducible, and clinically useful tool for urologists looking to improve patient care using analysis related to volume.

  2. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume III. Manpower and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    This volume addresses ways to bridge the gap between existing tribal skill levels and the skill levels required for higher-paying jobs in energy resource development projects. It addresses opportunities for technical, skilled, and semiskilled employment as well as professional positions, because it is important to have tribal participation at all levels of an operation. Section II, ''Energy-Related Employment Opportunities,'' covers three areas: (1) identification of energy-resource occupations; (2) description of these occupations; and (3) identification of skill requirements by type of occupation. Section III, ''Description of Training Programs,'' also covers three areas: (a) concept of a training-program model; (b) description of various training methods; and (c) an assessment of the cost of training, utilizing different programs. Section IV concentrates on development of a training program for target occupations, skills, and populations. Again this section covers three areas: (i) overview of the development of a skills training program; (ii) identification of target occupations, skills, and populations; and (iii) energy careers for younger tribal members.

  3. Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Tongue Cancer

  4. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  5. Is the Distance Worth It? Patients With Rectal Cancer Traveling to High-Volume Centers Experience Improved Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaomin; Becerra, Adan Z; Justiniano, Carla F; Boodry, Courtney I; Aquina, Christopher T; Swanger, Alex A; Temple, Larissa K; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-12-01

    It is unclear whether traveling long distances to high-volume centers would compensate for travel burden among patients undergoing rectal cancer resection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether operative volume outweighs the advantages of being treated locally by comparing the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer treated at local, low-volume centers versus far, high-volume centers. This was a population-based study. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with rectal cancer. Patients with stage II or III rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between 2006 and 2012 were included. The outcomes of interest were margins, lymph node yield, receipt of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, adjuvant chemotherapy, readmission within 30 days, 30-day and 90-day mortality, and 5-year overall survival. A total of 18,605 patients met inclusion criteria; 2067 patients were in the long-distance/high-volume group and 1362 in the short-distance/low-volume group. The median travel distance was 62.6 miles for the long-distance/high-volume group and 2.3 miles for the short-distance/low-volume group. Patients who were younger, white, privately insured, and stage III were more likely to have traveled to a high-volume center. When controlled for patient factors, stage, and hospital factors, patients in the short-distance/low-volume group had lower odds of a lymph node yield ≥12 (OR = 0.51) and neoadjuvant chemoradiation (OR = 0.67) and higher 30-day (OR = 3.38) and 90-day mortality (OR = 2.07) compared with those in the long-distance/high-volume group. The short-distance/low-volume group had a 34% high risk of overall mortality at 5 years compared with the long-distance/high-volume group. We lacked data regarding patient and physician decision making and surgeon-specific factors. Our results indicate that when controlled for patient, tumor, and hospital factors, patients who traveled a long distance to a high-volume center had improved lymph node yield

  6. Factors Affecting Adjuvant Therapy in Stage III Pancreatic Cancer—Analysis of the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Krishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adjuvant therapy after curative resection is associated with survival benefit in stage III pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the factors affecting the outcome of adjuvant therapy in stage III pancreatic cancer and compared overall survival with different modalities of adjuvant treatment. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with stage III pancreatic cancer listed in the National Cancer Database (NCDB who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. Patients were stratified based on adjuvant therapy they received. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: We analyzed a cohort included 1731 patients who were recipients of adjuvant therapy for stage III pancreatic cancer within the limits of our database. Patients who received adjuvant chemoradiation had the longest postdiagnosis survival time, followed by patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, and finally patients who received no adjuvant therapy. On multivariate analysis, advancing age and patients with Medicaid had worse survival, whereas Spanish origin and lower Charlson comorbidity score had better survival. Conclusions: Our study is the largest trial using the NCDB addressing the effects of adjuvant therapy specifically in stage III pancreatic cancer. Within the limits of our study, survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was more apparent with longer duration from date of diagnosis.

  7. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  8. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  9. Influence of conformal radiotherapy technique on survival after chemoradiotherapy for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, David J; Koshy, Matthew; Liptay, Michael J; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-07-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy is a core treatment modality for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although radiotherapy (RT) technologies have advanced dramatically, to the authors' knowledge relatively little is known regarding the importance of irradiation technique on outcome, particularly given the competing risk of distant metastasis. The National Cancer Data Base was used to determine predictors of overall survival (OS) in patients with AJCC stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy, focusing on the importance of conformal RT (CRT). Patients with stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy between 2003 and 2005 in the National Cancer Data Base were included. RT technique was defined as conventional, 3-dimensional-conformal, or intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), the latter 2 combined as CRT. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed for univariable and multivariable analyses of OS. The median, 3-year, and 5-year survival outcomes for the 13,292 patients were 12.9 months, 19%, and 11%, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year survival probabilities of patients receiving CRT versus no CRT were 22% versus 19% and 14% versus 11%, respectively (P < .0001). On multivariable analysis, CRT was found to be significantly associated with improved OS (hazards ratio, 0.89). This effect was confirmed on sensitivity analyses, including restricting the cohort to minimum 6-month survivors, young patients with stage IIIA disease, and propensity score-matching. Institutional academic status and patient volume were not found to be associated with OS. CRT was found to be independently associated with a survival advantage. These results reflect the importance of optimal locoregional therapy in patients with stage III NSCLC and provide motivation for further study of advanced RT technologies in patients with NSCLC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  10. Phase III study by the Norwegian lung cancer study group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Bjørn H; Bremnes, Roy M; Fløtten, Oystein

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare pemetrexed/carboplatin with a standard regimen as first-line therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer NSCLC. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC and performance status of 0 to 2 were randomly assigned to receive pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) plus carboplatin......, and fatigue reported on the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and the lung cancer-specific module LC13 during the first 20 weeks. Secondary end points were overall survival and toxicity. Results Four hundred thirty-six eligible patients were enrolled...

  11. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Diehn, Felix E.; Boughey, Judy C.; Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mutter, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted

  12. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Lindsay C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Diehn, Felix E. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Boughey, Judy C. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert W., E-mail: mutter.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  13. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. T4 category revision enhances the accuracy and significance of stage III breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Uwe; Singer, Gad; Langer, Igor; Schötzau, Andreas; Herberich, Linda; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Wight, Edward

    2006-06-15

    Because of the considerable heterogeneity in breast carcinoma with noninflammatory skin involvement (T4b/Stage IIIB), a revision was proposed of the TNM staging system that would classify these tumors exclusively based on their tumor size and lymph node status. In the current study, the authors evaluated how implementation of this proposal will affect Stage III noninflammatory breast cancer. Two hundred seven patients who were classified with noninflammatory Stage III breast cancer were treated consecutively between 1990 and 1999 at the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland. To assess the extent of T4b/Stage IIIB tumors independent of the clinicopathologic feature of skin involvement, the reclassification was undertaken. Of 68 patients who had nonmetastatic T4b breast cancer, 37 patients (54.4%) had a tumor extent in accordance with Stage I/II and had improved disease-specific survival (DSS) compared with patients who had Stage III breast cancer (P = .008). Excluding those patients from Stage III led to a 17.9% reduction of the number of patients in this group (n = 170 patients). The 10-year DSS declined from 48.5% to 42.9%. Considerable numbers of patients who are classified with noninflammatory Stage IIIB breast cancer show only a limited disease extent. Through a revision of the T4 category, these low-risk patients were excluded from the highest nonmetastatic TNM stage, and overstaging could be avoided. This procedure decreased the degree of heterogeneity of the entire Stage III group and may result in a more precise assessment of this disease entity. Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.

  15. Quantification of Tumor Volume Changes During Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Jana; Ford, Eric; Redmond, Kristin; Zhou, Jessica; Wong, John; Song, Danny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for lung cancer is limited by normal tissue toxicity. We evaluated sequential computed tomography (CT) scans to assess the possibility of adaptively reducing treatment volumes by quantifying the tumor volume reduction occurring during a course of radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients underwent RT for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer with conventional fractionation; 15 received concurrent chemotherapy. Two repeat CT scans were performed at a nominal dose of 30 Gy and 50 Gy. Respiration-correlated four-dimensional CT scans were used for evaluation of respiratory effects in 17 patients. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on simulation and all individual phases of the repeat CT scans. Parenchymal tumor was evaluated unless the nodal volume was larger or was the primary. Subsequent image sets were spatially co-registered with the simulation data for evaluation. Results: The median GTV reduction was 24.7% (range, -0.3% to 61.7%; p 100 cm 3 vs. 3 , and hilar and/or mediastinal involvement vs. purely parenchymal or pleural lesions. A tendency toward a greater volume reduction with increasing dose was seen, although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated significant alterations in the GTV seen on repeat CT scans during RT. These observations raise the possibility of using an adaptive approach toward RT of non-small-cell lung cancer to minimize the dose to normal structures and more safely increase the dose directed at the target tissues.

  16. Elevated levels of CXC chemokine connective tissue activating peptide (CTAP)-III in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gina; Gardner, Brian K; Elashoff, David A; Purcell, Colleen M; Sandha, Harpavan S; Mao, Jenny T; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Lee, Jay M; Dubinett, Steven M

    2011-05-15

    Despite advances in treatments, lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States for the past several decades. Recent findings from the National Lung Screening Trial reveal that low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scan screening of high-risk individuals reduces lung cancer mortality. This suggests that early detection is of key importance to improving patient outcome. However, of those screened with CT scans, 25% had positive scans that require further follow-up studies which often involve more radiation exposure and invasive tests to reduce false positive results. The purpose of this study was to identify candidate plasma biomarkers to aid in diagnosis of lung cancer in at-risk individuals. We found increased expression of the CXC chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III from plasma specimens of lung cancer patients compared to at-risk control subjects. Identification of the peptide was confirmed by the addition of an anti-NAP-2 antibody that recognizes CTAP-III and NAP-2. We also quantified and verified the increased levels of plasma CTAP-III with ELISA in patients with lung cancer (mean ± SD, 1859 ± 1219 ng/mL) compared to controls (698 ± 434 ng/mL; Pcancer patients. Further studies are required to determine if this chemokine could be utilized in a blood-based biomarker panel for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

  17. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Jensen, Alexandra D; Sterzing, Florian; Munter, Marc W; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  18. Patterns of Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients with Stage II/III Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    High-level evidence supports adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer. We examined the influence of socio demographic factors on patterns of adjuvant radiotherapy for resected Stage II/III rectal cancer. Methods. Patients undergoing surgical resection for stage II/III rectal cancer were identified in SEER registry. Results. A total of 21,683 patients were identified. Majority of patients were male (58.8%), white (83%), and with stage III (54.9%) and received radiotherapy (66%). On univariate analysis, male gender, stage III, younger age, year of diagnosis, and higher socioeconomic status (SES) were associated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered in 84.4% of patients <50; however, only 32.8% of those are >80 years. Logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in the use of radiotherapy in younger patients who are 50 (OR, 10.3), with stage III (OR, 1.21), males (OR, 1.18), and with higher SES. Conclusions. There is a failure to conform to standard adjuvant radiotherapy in one-third of patients, and this is associated with older age, stage II, area-level of socioeconomic deprivation, and female sex.

  19. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (III/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Hernández, C; Vich Pérez, P; Brusint, B; Cuadrado Rouco, C; Díaz García, N; Robles Díaz, L

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease with implications in all aspects of patientś life, therefore, family doctors must know this pathology in depth, in order to optimize the health care provided to these patients with the best available resources. This series of five articles on breast cancer is based on a review of the scientific literature of the last ten years. This third article will review the clinical context and the staging and prognostic factors of the disease. This summary report aims to provide a global, current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Resectable stage III lung cancer: CT, surgical, and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, I.R.; Muller, N.L.; Miller, R.R.; Evans, K.G.; Nelems, B.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with stage IIIa lung cancer have improved survival following surgery. The authors reviewed the CT, surgical, and pathologic findings in 26 patients with completely resected stage IIIa lung cancer. These include examples of the different subsets of stage IIIa disease. CT correctly predicted chest-wall invasion in only two of ten patients, pericardial involvement in one of three, and tumor extension to within 2 cm of the carina in one of three patients. It detected mediastinal nodal disease in eight of 11 patients. CT is of limited value in assessing chest-wall or pericardial extension; however, such extension does not preclude complete resection. Ipsilateral nodal involvement also doses not preclude surgery

  1. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  2. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    . Data on patients with stage III colonic cancer operated between January 1, 2005 and August 31, 2012 were retrieved. Perioperative variables, surgical modality, and time to adjuvant therapy (8 weeks) were evaluated and Cox regression was performed to identify factors influencing survival...

  3. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yen Huang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group, and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group. The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107. Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  4. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  5. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  6. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  7. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  8. POPULATION III STAR FORMATION IN LARGE COSMOLOGICAL VOLUMES. I. HALO TEMPORAL AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Brian D.; O' Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Turk, Matthew J. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Hahn, Oliver, E-mail: crosbyb1@msu.edu [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-08-20

    We present a semi-analytic, computationally inexpensive model to identify halos capable of forming a Population III star in cosmological simulations across a wide range of times and environments. This allows for a much more complete and representative set of Population III star forming halos to be constructed, which will lead to Population III star formation simulations that more accurately reflect the diversity of Population III stars, both in time and halo mass. This model shows that Population III and chemically enriched stars coexist beyond the formation of the first generation of stars in a cosmological simulation until at least z {approx} 10, and likely beyond, though Population III stars form at rates that are 4-6 orders of magnitude lower than chemically enriched stars by z = 10. A catalog of more than 40,000 candidate Population III forming halos were identified, with formation times temporally ranging from z = 30 to z = 10, and ranging in mass from 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} to 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. At early times, the environment that Population III stars form in is very similar to that of halos hosting chemically enriched star formation. At later times Population III stars are found to form in low-density regions that are not yet chemically polluted due to a lack of previous star formation in the area. Population III star forming halos become increasingly spatially isolated from one another at later times, and are generally closer to halos hosting chemically enriched star formation than to another halo hosting Population III star formation by z {approx} 10.

  9. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  10. Acupuncture in Reducing Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Participants With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-30

    Anatomic Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage III Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Anatomic Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Grade 1 Peripheral Motor Neuropathy, CTCAE; Grade 1 Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy, CTCAE; Grade 2 Peripheral Motor Neuropathy, CTCAE; Grade 2 Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy, CTCAE; Prognostic Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage III Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIIA Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIIB Breast Cancer AJCC v8; Prognostic Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v8

  11. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  12. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non–small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4–85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1–91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  13. Variation of gross tumor volume and clinical target volume definition for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Li Minghui; Chen Dongdu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the variation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) definition for lung cancer between different doctors. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients with PET-CT simulation were selected from January 2008 to December 2009.GTV and CTV of these patients were defined by four professors or associate professors of radiotherapy independently. Results: The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were 1.66 and 1.65, respectively. The mean coefficients of variation for GTV and CTV were 0.20 and 0.17, respectively. System errors of CTV definition in three dimension were less than 5 mm, which was the largest in inferior and superior (0.48 cm, 0.37 cm, 0.32 cm; F=0.40, 0.60, 0.15, P=0.755, 0.618, 0.928). Conclusions: The variation of GTV and CTV definition for lung cancer between different doctors exist. The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were less than 1.7. The variation was in hilar and mediastinum lymphanode regions. System error of CTV definition was the largest (<5 mm) in cranio-caudal direction. (authors)

  14. A Phase III Trial Comparing Two Dose-dense, Dose-intensified Approaches (ETC and PM(Cb)) for Neoadjuvant Treatment of Patients With High-risk Early Breast Cancer (GeparOcto)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; HER2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  15. New approach to lung cancer screening with helical volume CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midorikawa, S.; Hashimoto, N.; Katakura, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the relationship between reducing radiation dose to the patient and maintaining the clinical quality of the chest image in lung cancer screening by helical-volume CT (HVCT). The authors evaluated the changing relationship between radiation dose and clinical quality after changing the HVCY scanning conditions (such as stroke of patient transport and section thickness) as well as adding copper filters of various thickness and using high-voltage x-ray examination to complement CT examinations. The authors were able to reduce radiation dose by changing the HVCT scanning conditions (eg, stroke of 20 mm/sec, with a section thickness of 10 mm)

  16. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV 0 ) and the set of CBCTs ({CTV 1 –CTV 25 }). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV 0 with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV 1 –CTV 25 was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1–16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm 3 ) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm 3 ) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm 3 ) (p 0 , 5–10 mm along the interfaces of CTV 0 with the bladder and rectum, and 10–14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV 0 at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and clinical trials.

  17. Adjuvant chemotherapy and risk of gastrointestinal, hematologic, and cardiac toxicities in elderly patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chung-Yuan; Chan, Wenyaw; Delclos, George P; Du, Xianglin L

    2012-06-01

    Randomized trials have established the effectiveness of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III resectable colon cancer but the toxicity has not been well established outside the trial setting. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of various toxicity-related endpoints among the elderly patients. Patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 1991 to 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Chemotherapy use within 3 months after tumor resection was identified from submitted claims. We reported the 3-month cumulative incidence rate (CIR) for gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities. The risk of ischemic heart disease in relation to chemotherapy use and length was assessed using Cox regression models, stratified by age and comorbidity subgroups. Of the 12,099 patients, 63.9% (n=7740) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Common gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities among chemotherapy group include volume depletion disorder (CIR=9.1%), agranulocytosis (CIR=3.4%), diarrhea (CIR=2.4%), nausea and vomiting (CIR=2.3%). Chemotherapy use was significantly associated with the onset of these toxicities [hazard ratio (HR)=2.76; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=2.42-3.15]. The risk of ischemic heart disease was slightly associated with chemotherapy use (HR=1.08, 95% CI=0.96-1.22), but significant only among patients aged colon cancer. On account of the effects of these side effects on treatment discontinuation, rehospitalization, and overall health status, some close monitoring and preventive measures may be emphasized to maximize the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  18. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer in the oldest old: results beyond clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anasooya; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Rothenberger, David A; Kwaan, Mary; Weinberg, Armin D; Parsons, Helen M; Gupta, Pankaj; Al-Refaie, Waddah B

    2013-01-15

    Randomized trials demonstrating the benefits of chemotherapy in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III colon cancer underrepresent persons aged ≥ 75 years. The generalizability of these studies to a growing elderly population remains unknown. Using the California Cancer Registry for 1994 through 2008, the authors conducted a population-based study of postcolectomy patients aged 50 years to 94 years with stage III (N1M0) colon adenocarcinoma. A 2-sided chi-square test and Cochran-Armitage test for trend were used to compare patient and tumor characteristics associated with receipt of chemotherapy across age groups. Multivariate regression was used to assess the association between older age and receipt of chemotherapy. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to evaluate the association between chemotherapy and mortality, with propensity score adjustment. Approximately 44% (12,382 patients) of the study cohort was aged ≥ 75 years. Persons aged ≥ 75 years were found to be less likely to have received adjuvant chemotherapy than those aged colon cancer in the elderly. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  20. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Hayashi, Yasushi [Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m{sup 2}) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  1. A proteomics panel for predicting optimal primary cytoreduction in stage III/IV ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Signe; Høgdall, Estrid; Engelholm, Svend A

    2009-01-01

    for CA-125. In addition, serum was analyzed for 7 biomarkers using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These biomarkers were combined into a single-valued ovarian-cancer-risk index (OvaRI). CA-125 and OvaRI were evaluated as predictors of cytoreduction in 75......The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate CA-125 and a 7-marker panel as predictors of incomplete primary cytoreduction in patients with stage III/IV ovarian cancer (OC). From September 2004 to January 2008, serum from 201 patients referred to surgery for a pelvic tumor was analyzed...... stage III/IV patients using receiver operating characteristic curves. Complete primary cytoreduction (no macroscopic residual disease) was achieved in 31% (23/75) of the patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.66 for CA-125 and 0.75 for OvaRI. The sensitivity...

  2. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m 2 ) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  3. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, Brian; Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin; Stoddard, Greg; Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K.; Poppe, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  4. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Stoddard, Greg [Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  5. Collagen Type III Metabolism Evaluation in Patients with Malignant Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Mazurek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation affects the metabolism of key proteins of extracellular matrix including type III collagen, an important component of human skin. The aim of the work is an analysis of the impact of radical and palliative radiotherapy on collagen type III synthesis in patients with head and neck cancer. The test group consisted of 56 males with histopathologically confirmed head and neck cancer, for whom radiotherapy was applied as a form of radical or palliative treatment. The level of procollagen III aminoterminal propeptide (PIIINP, which is a marker of collagen type III synthesis, was determined in blood serum before radiotherapy, immediately following radiotherapy, and 3 months after it was finished. As a result of radical radiotherapy a statistically significant decrease of PIIINP levels in serum (p<0.0001 was observed, both immediately after the radiotherapy and 3 months after the end of the treatment. Also the palliative radiotherapy caused a significant decrease of PIIINP right after the treatment (p=0.0052, as well as during the examination performed 3 months later (p=0.0004. The achieved results suggest that PIIINP can be used as a marker helpful in assessing radiation damage to connective tissue.

  6. Clinicopathological analysis of 91 cases of uterine cervical cancer (including 38 cases of CIN III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Naoko; Kamiya, Norio; Goto, Setsuko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2000-01-01

    A total of 91 cases of uterine cervical cancer, consisting of 38 cases of carcinoma in situ (CIN III) and 53 cases of stage I-IV cervical cancer, were retrospectively and clinicopathologically analyzed. The standard treatment given to these patients consisted of hysterectomy or conization for CIN III; observation of cases of mild to moderate dysplasia; radical hysterectomy plus pelvic lymph node dissection for stage I and II cervical cancer; and radiotherapy for stage III and IV cervical cancer. Postoperative irradiation consisted of irradiation of the whole pelvis with 40-50 Gy. The patients who were not treated surgically underwent 40 Gy external irradiation of the whole pelvis, followed by an additional 20 Gy with shielding and internal irradiation with an RALS. When lymph node metastasis was present, the nodes were irradiated with 40-50 Gy. The mean age of the 38 patients with CIN III was 45.2 years old, and they were para 0-4. In 24 (63.2%) of them the cancer was detected by cytodiagnosis as part of screening. Radical hysterectomy, simple hysterectomy, and conization were performed in 25 patients, 7 patients, and 6 patients, respectively. No recurrences have been detected, and the survival rate is 100%. The mean age of the 53 patients with cervical cancer stage I-IV was 62.4 years old, and they were para 0-10. There were 25 patients with stage I disease, 15 patients with stage II disease, 6 patients with stage III, and 7 patients with stage IV, and their 5-year survival rate was 82.4%, 68.8%, 66.7%, and 42.9%, respectively. Radioenteritis and radiocystitis occurred as adverse radiation effects. Pathologic factors influencing lymph node metastasis were examined by a multivariate analysis based on the data from 25 patients with stage I and II who underwent hysterectomy. The results of the analysis indicated the importance of screening and the choice of appropriate surgical method/technique, as well as the need for further investigation to determine the effective

  7. Feasibility planning study for a behavior database. Volume III Appendix B, Compendium of survey questions on drinking and driving and occupant restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    The general objective of the project was to determine the feasibility of and the general requirements for a centralized database on driver behavior and attitudes related to drunk driving and occupant restraints. Volume III is a compendium of question...

  8. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Azria, D.; Gerard, J.P.; Hennequin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  9. Cytotoxic property of surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes on a human breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajendran Senthil; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Dinesh, Mohanakrishnan; Paul, Christo Preethy; Srinag, Suresh; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher

    2011-07-01

    The cancer chemotherapeutic potential of surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes, cis-[Co(bpy)(2)(C(14)H(29)NH(2))Cl](ClO(4))(2)·3 H(2)O (1) and cis-[Co(phen)(2)(C(14)H(29)NH(2))Cl](ClO(4))(2)·3 H(2)O (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) on MCF-7 breast cancer cell was determined adopting MTT assay and specific staining techniques. The complexes affected the viability of the cells significantly and the cells succumbed to apoptosis as seen in the changes in the nuclear morphology and cytoplasmic features. Since the complex 2 appeared to be more potent, further assays were carried out on the complex 2. Single-cell electrophoresis indicated DNA damage. The translocation of phosphatidyl serine and loss of mitochondrial potential was revealed by annexin V-Cy3 staining and JC-1 staining respectively. Western blot analysis revealed up-regulation of pro-apoptotic p53 and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Taken together, the surfactant-cobalt(III) complex 2 would be a potential candidate for further investigation for application as a chemotherapeutic for cancers in general and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in particular. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Proceedings of the Malaysian Science and Technology Congress 2000: Symposium B,Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This proceedings is a collection of lectures presented at this symposium. This volume covers the following areas - biodiversity, cleaner production, green science, environment, renewable resources, social sciences, waste management and basic sciences

  11. Outcome for stage II and III rectal and colon cancer equally good after treatment improvement over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Joern, Fischer; Hellmich, Gunter; Gunter, Hellmich; Jackisch, Thomas; Thomas, Jackisch; Puffer, Erik; Erik, Puffer; Zimmer, Jörg; Jörg, Zimmer; Bleyl, Dorothea; Dorothea, Bleyl; Kittner, Thomas; Thomas, Kittner; Witzigmann, Helmut; Helmut, Witzigmann; Stelzner, Sigmar; Sigmar, Stelzner

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the outcome for stage II and III rectal cancer patients compared to stage II and III colonic cancer patients with regard to 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), overall survival, and local and combined recurrence rates over time. This prospective cohort study identified 3,355 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum and treated in our colorectal unit between 1981 and 2011, for investigation. The study was restricted to International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stages II and III. Postoperative mortality and histological incomplete resection were excluded, which left 995 patients with colonic cancer and 726 patients with rectal cancer for further analysis. Five-year CSS rates improved for colonic cancer from 65.0% for patients treated between 1981 and 1986 to 88.1% for patients treated between 2007 and 2011. For rectal cancer patients, the respective 5-year CSS rates improved from 53.4% in the first observation period to 89.8% in the second one. The local recurrence rate for rectal cancer dropped from 34.2% in the years 1981-1986 to 2.1% in the years 2007-2011. In the last decade of observation, prognosis for rectal cancer was equal to that for colon cancer (CSS 88.6 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.409). Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer has continued to improve over the last three decades. After major changes in treatment strategy including introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant (radio)chemotherapy, prognosis for stage II and III rectal cancer is at least as good as for stage II and III colonic cancer.

  12. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  13. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project's scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary

  14. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume; Cancers du rectum: volumes cible de la radiotherapie, bases rationnelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Jean-Minjoz, 3, boulevard Fleming, 25030 Besancon (France); Crehange, G. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Pr-Marion, 21079 Dijon cedex (France); Azria, D. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Val-d' Aurelle, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Gerard, J.P. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue Valombrose, 06189 Nice (France); Hennequin, C. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  15. Radiation therapy alone in stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix - a 17-year experience in Southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Paulo R.F.; Braga-Filho, Aroldo; Barletta, Antonio; Ilha, Ligia A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: External irradiation followed by intracavitary therapy (EBIC) has been considered the standard treatment for stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix. For different reasons, some patients are not suited for intracavitary therapy (ICT), and the treatment may be given entirely by external beam irradiation alone (EBRTA). The purpose of our study is to discuss treatment results and complications for patients undergoing EBIC or EBRTA. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study was carried out on 202 eligible patients with stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix admitted for radiotherapy from 1980-1997. Ninety-three patients were able to receive EBIC (50 Gy, 8 MV RX whole pelvis followed by one session of 38-45 Gy ICT to point A). The remaining received EBRTA (50-70 Gy for 5-9 or more weeks). Median follow-up procedure was 18.5 months (range: 4-182) for all patients and 26 months (range 4-147) for the patients at risk. Results: The most frequent reason for precluding ICT was large residual tumor volume (32.1%). Ten-year overall survival rates, relapse free survival, and pelvic failure rate for the EBIC and EBRTA patients were, respectively, 22.5% x 15.6% (p = 0.0087), 23.5% x 14.8% (p = 0.005), and 51.6% x 68.8% (p = 0.005). However, when the same comparisons were performed with EBIC patients x EBRTA patients receiving a high dose schedule (60 Gy/6-8 wk to 70 Gy/7-9 wk), the results of the EBIC group remained higher, but the differences became insignificant: respectively, 22.5% x 18.9% (p = 0.17), 23.5% x 15.3% (p = 0.052), and 51.6% x 60.0% (p = 0.10). The distribution of complications was similar in both groups. Conclusions: We found that EBIC was the best treatment modality in our patients with stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix, whereas for patients who were not candidates for ICT, EBRTA with a high dose schedule appears to be an efficient and safe alternative

  16. Cardiotoxin III Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Oral Cancer Cells through MAPK and MMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxin III (CTXIII, isolated from the snake venom of Formosan cobra Naja naja atra, has previously been found to induce apoptosis in many types of cancer. Early metastasis is typical for the progression of oral cancer. To modulate the cell migration behavior of oral cancer is one of the oral cancer therapies. In this study, the possible modulating effect of CTXIII on oral cancer migration is addressed. In the example of oral squamous carcinoma Ca9-22 cells, the cell viability was decreased by CTXIII treatment in a dose-responsive manner. In wound-healing assay, the cell migration of Ca9-22 cells was attenuated by CTXIII in a dose- and time-responsive manner. After CTXIII treatment, the MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions were downregulated, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38-MAPK was increased independent of ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, CTXIII has antiproliferative and -migrating effects on oral cancer cells involving the p38-MAPK and MMP-2/-9 pathways.

  17. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume III. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Forty-five papers from Vol. III of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Two papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  18. Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients With Pathologic Stage III Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Samir; Portelance, Lorraine; Gilbert, Lucy; Tan, Leonard; Stanimir, Gerald; Duclos, Marie; Souhami, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess prognostic factors and patterns of recurrence in patients with pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2003, 107 patients with pathologic International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage III endometrial adenocarcinoma confined to the pelvis were treated at our institution. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) was delivered to 68 patients (64%). The influence of multiple patient- and treatment-related factors on pelvic and distant control and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up for patients at risk was 41 months. Five-year actuarial OS was significantly improved in patients treated with adjuvant RT (68%) compared with those with resection alone (50%; p = 0.029). Age, histology, grade, uterine serosal invasion, adnexal involvement, number of extrauterine sites, and treatment with adjuvant RT predicted for improved survival in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that grade, uterine serosal invasion, and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of survival. Five-year actuarial pelvic control was improved significantly with the delivery of adjuvant RT (74% vs. 49%; p = 0.011). Depth of myometrial invasion and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of pelvic control in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Multiple prognostic factors predicting for the outcome of pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer patients were identified in this analysis. In particular, delivery of adjuvant RT seems to be a significant independent predictor for improved survival and pelvic control, suggesting that pelvic RT should be routinely considered in the management of these patients

  19. Gold(III) bis(thiosemicarbazonate) compounds in breast cancer cells: Cytotoxicity and thioredoxin reductase targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fanjul, Vanessa; López-Torres, Elena; Mendiola, M Antonia; Pizarro, Ana María

    2018-03-25

    Gold(III) compounds have received increasing attention in cancer research. Three gold complexes of general formula [Au III L]Cl, where L is benzil bis(thiosemicarbazonate), compound 1, benzil bis(4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazonate), compound 2, or benzil bis(4-cyclohexyl-3-thiosemicarbazonate), compound 3, have been synthesized and fully characterized, including the X-ray crystal structure of compound 3, confirming square-planar geometry around the gold(III) centre. Compound 1 showed moderate cytotoxicity and accumulation in MCF7 breast cancer cells but did not inhibit thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity and did not induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Compound 2, the least cytotoxic, was found to be capable of modestly inhibiting TrxR activity and produced low levels of ROS in the MCF7 cell line. The most cytotoxic compound, 3, had the highest cellular accumulation and its distribution pattern showed a clear preference for the cytosol and mitochondria of MCF7 cells. It readily hampered intracellular TrxR activity leading to a dramatic alteration of the cellular redox state and to the induction of cell death. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Petroleum industry in Latin America: volume III Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsch, A.E.; Tissot, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    As the previous volume in this series, this concluding volume was divided into separately paged sections, one for each of Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico and Peru, each section being complete in itself. For each of the countries dealt with, there was a brief historical introduction, followed by a detailed analysis of its energy sector, a description of the physical and market characteristics, the transportation and infrastructure systems, the legal and regulatory issues pertaining to the petroleum industry, especially as regards investment and environmental requirements, and an analysis of the prevailing political climate. figs., tabs., refs

  1. The influence of hospital volume on long-term oncological outcome after rectal cancer surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Frederik H. W.; Hagemans, Jan A. W.; Burger, Jacobus W. A.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Borstlap, Wernard A. A.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Aalbers, A.; Acherman, Y.; Algie, G. D.; Alting von Geusau, B.; Amelung, F.; Aukema, T. S.; Bakker, I. S.; Bartels, S. A.; Basha, S.; Bastiaansen, A. J. N. M.; Belgers, E.; Bemelman, W. A.; Bleeker, W.; Blok, J.; Bosker, R. J. I.; Bosmans, J. W.; Boute, M. C.; Bouvy, N. D.; Bouwman, H.; Brandt-Kerkhof, A.; Brinkman, D. J.; Bruin, S.; Bruns, E. R. J.; Burbach, J. P. M.; Clermonts, S.; Coene, P. P. L. O.; Compaan, C.; Consten, E. C. J.; Darbyshire, T.; de Mik, S. M. L.; de Graaf, E. J. R.; de Groot, I.; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, R. J. L.; de Wilt, J. H. W.; van der Wolde, J.; den Boer, F. C.; Dekker, J. W. T.; Demirkiran, A.; van Duijvendijk, P.; Marres, C. C.; Musters, G. D.; van Rossem, C. C.; Schreuder, A. M.; Swank, H. A.

    2017-01-01

    The association between hospital volume and outcome in rectal cancer surgery is still subject of debate. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of hospital volume on outcomes of rectal cancer surgery in the Netherlands in 2011. In this collaborative research with a cross-sectional study

  2. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  3. National Childcare Consumer Study: 1975. Volume III: American Consumer Attitudes and Opinions on Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodes, Thomas W.

    This report represents the third of a series of analyses of child care usages based on 4609 personal interviews conducted in 1975 from a national probability sample of households with children under 14 years of age. The study was sponsored by the office of Child Development of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. This volume is…

  4. Combined cycle solar central receiver hybrid power system study. Volume III. Appendices. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-11-01

    A design study for a 100 MW gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle solar/fossil-fuel hybrid power plant is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (a) preconceptual design data; (b) market potential analysis methodology; (c) parametric analysis methodology; (d) EPGS systems description; (e) commercial-scale solar hybrid power system assessment; and (f) conceptual design data lists. (WHK)

  5. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume III: appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    This volume contains time estimate summaries to the second level of detail for scheduled or unscheduled maintenance of the first wall/blanket, some selected subsystem components and maintenance equipment. Elaboration of selected maintenance equipment functions and performance as well as conceptual designs is also included

  6. Optimization of radiation therapy, III: a method of assessing complication probabilities from dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.; Wolbarst, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    To predict the likelihood of success of a therapeutic strategy, one must be able to assess the effects of the treatment upon both diseased and healthy tissues. This paper proposes a method for determining the probability that a healthy organ that receives a non-uniform distribution of X-irradiation, heat, chemotherapy, or other agent will escape complications. Starting with any given dose distribution, a dose-cumulative-volume histogram for the organ is generated. This is then reduced by an interpolation scheme (involving the volume-weighting of complication probabilities) to a slightly different histogram that corresponds to the same overall likelihood of complications, but which contains one less step. The procedure is repeated, one step at a time, until there remains a final, single-step histogram, for which the complication probability can be determined. The formalism makes use of a complication response function C(D, V) which, for the given treatment schedule, represents the probability of complications arising when the fraction V of the organ receives dose D and the rest of the organ gets none. Although the data required to generate this function are sparse at present, it should be possible to obtain the necessary information from in vivo and clinical studies. Volume effects are taken explicitly into account in two ways: the precise shape of the patient's histogram is employed in the calculation, and the complication response function is a function of the volume

  7. Analysis and forecast of electrical distribution system materials. Final report. Volume III. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, C G

    1976-08-23

    These appendixes are referenced in Volume II of this report. They contain the detailed electrical distribution equipment requirements and input material requirements forecasts. Forecasts are given for three electric energy usage scenarios. Also included are data on worldwide reserves and demand for 30 raw materials required for the manufacture of electrical distribution equipment.

  8. Beach Profile Analysis System (BPAS). Volume III. BPAS User’s Guide: Analysis Module SURVY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    extrapolated using the two seawardmost points. Before computing volume changes, common bonds are established relative to the landward and seawsrd extent...Cyber 176 or equivalent computer. Such features include the 10- character, 60-bit word size, the FORTRAN- callable sort routine (interfacing with the NOS

  9. Variation in use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage III breast cancer : Results of the Dutch national breast cancer audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, Pauline E.R.; van Bommel, A.C.M.; Siesling, S.; Wouters, M. W.J.M.; Vrancken Peeters, M.T.F.D.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is important in the optimal treatment of patients with locally advanced (stage III) breast cancer (BC). The objective of this study was to examine the clinical practice of NAC for stage III BC patients in all Dutch hospitals participating in BC care.

  10. Institutional clinical trial accrual volume and survival of patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrick, Evan J; Zhang, Qiang; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Fortin, André; Silverman, Craig L; Raben, Adam; Kim, Harold E; Horwitz, Eric M; Read, Nancy E; Harris, Jonathan; Wu, Qian; Le, Quynh-Thu; Gillison, Maura L

    2015-01-10

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receive treatment at centers with expertise, but whether provider experience affects survival is unknown. The effect of institutional experience on overall survival (OS) in patients with stage III or IV HNC was investigated within a randomized trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 0129), which compared cisplatin concurrent with standard versus accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. As a surrogate for experience, institutions were classified as historically low- (HLACs) or high-accruing centers (HHACs) based on accrual to 21 RTOG HNC trials (1997 to 2002). The effect of accrual volume on OS was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. Median RTOG accrual (1997 to 2002) at HLACs was four versus 65 patients at HHACs. Analysis included 471 patients in RTOG 0129 (2002 to 2005) with known human papillomavirus and smoking status. Patients at HLACs versus HHACs had better performance status (0: 62% v 52%; P = .04) and lower T stage (T4: 26.5% v 35.3%; P = .002) but were otherwise similar. Radiotherapy protocol deviations were higher at HLACs versus HHACs (18% v 6%; P accounting for radiotherapy protocol deviations. Institutional experience substantially influences survival in locally advanced HNC. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Chemohormonal Therapy in Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Survival Analysis of the Randomized Phase III E3805 CHAARTED Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakopoulos, Christos E; Chen, Yu-Hui; Carducci, Michael A; Liu, Glenn; Jarrard, David F; Hahn, Noah M; Shevrin, Daniel H; Dreicer, Robert; Hussain, Maha; Eisenberger, Mario; Kohli, Manish; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Picus, Joel; Cooney, Matthew M; Garcia, Jorge A; DiPaola, Robert S; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2018-04-10

    Purpose Docetaxel added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly increases the longevity of some patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Herein, we present the outcomes of the CHAARTED (Chemohormonal Therapy Versus Androgen Ablation Randomized Trial for Extensive Disease in Prostate Cancer) trial with more mature follow-up and focus on tumor volume. Patients and Methods In this phase III study, 790 patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer were equally randomly assigned to receive either ADT in combination with docetaxel 75 mg/m 2 for up to six cycles or ADT alone. The primary end point of the study was overall survival (OS). Additional analyses of the prospectively defined low- and high-volume disease subgroups were performed. High-volume disease was defined as presence of visceral metastases and/or ≥ four bone metastases with at least one outside of the vertebral column and pelvis. Results At a median follow-up of 53.7 months, the median OS was 57.6 months for the chemohormonal therapy arm versus 47.2 months for ADT alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.89; P = .0018). For patients with high-volume disease (n = 513), the median OS was 51.2 months with chemohormonal therapy versus 34.4 months with ADT alone (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.79; P OS benefit was observed (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.55; P = .86). Conclusion The clinical benefit from chemohormonal therapy in prolonging OS was confirmed for patients with high-volume disease; however, for patients with low-volume disease, no OS benefit was discerned.

  12. Operations Events Census Report: Volume III, 1975-1980. Sanitized Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    2 0971 WILKINSON, WILLIAM 2 0746 122 Personnel Dose Information_ 1977 ID ORG. NAME CODE CODE WILLIAMS, ALONZO 2 0961 WILLIAMS, DAVE S. 2 0971...0903 GONZALEZ, DAVE 2 0874 GOOD, JACKIE C. 2 0837 GOOD, JAMES H. 2 0845 GORDON, DONALD C. 2 0680 GORDON, JAMES A. 2 0879 GORE, ARWIND K. 2 0679 GORMAN...0687 ZERGA, DONALD L. 2 0918 ZERGA, SUSAN J. 2 0918 ZIELINSKI , KENNETH 2 0679 ZIKA, ANDREW P., III 2 0837 ZIMMERMAN, DOUGLAS E. 2 0918 ZYGAN, ROBERT

  13. Algorithm for Surface of Translation Attached Radiators (A-STAR). Volume III. Computer Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    MULTR t SPORT ONFRBP K8 BPP ALP TEt M;M: III ::CSoSPIII 111448C CAP-WIRE. 440 78 (KeQ 1l) REAMI) IY(I)oIllLCWI 44 ML ZE O(LCZ.LECCTO 14 CLL ZER0(LC 24...PI6O SPTZ" 160) 4 ON11 K11 T61 EpKUI fAu 5,495 NM f.M PTvBAN0 IDA 藉 NP49 FuRNA 311 48 FORMS ~I NMDE PTADN NBAND NPPIP4181 N1111 13 46 3’.8o WRITE(6

  14. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume III. Area II: graphic data, Section III-IX Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume contains all of the graphic data for Area II, which include map lines 1660 to 3400 and 5360 to 5780 and tie lines 6100, 6120, and 6160. Due to the large map scale of the data presented (1:62,500), this area was further subdivided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets. It should be noted that TL6100 resides in both Areas II and III. The graphic data for TL6100 are presented in Volume IV - Area III - Graphic Data of this report

  15. Economic evaluation of the annual cycle energy system (ACES). Final report. Volume III, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume consists of seven appendices related to ACES, the first three of which are concerned with computer programs. The appendices are entitled: (A) ACESIM: Residential Program Listing; (B) Typical Inputs and Outputs of ACESIM; (C) CACESS: Commercial Building Program Listing; (D) Typical Weather-Year Selection Requirements; (E) Building Characteristics; (F) List of Major Variables Used in the Computer Programs; and (G) Bibliography. 79 references.

  16. Genetic correlations between brain volumes and the WAIS-III dimensions of verbal comprehension, working memory, perceptual organization, and processing speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthuma, Daniëlle; Baaré, Wim F C; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Kahn, René S; Boomsma, Dorret I; De Geus, Eco J C

    2003-04-01

    We recently showed that the correlation of gray and white matter volume with full scale IQ and the Working Memory dimension are completely mediated by common genetic factors (Posthuma et al., 2002). Here we examine whether the other WAIS III dimensions (Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed) are also related to gray and white matter volume, and whether any of the dimensions are related to cerebellar volume. Two overlapping samples provided 135 subjects from 60 extended twin families for whom both MRI scans and WAIS III data were available. All three brain volumes are related to Working Memory capacity (r = 0.27). This phenotypic correlation is completely due to a common underlying genetic factor. Processing Speed was genetically related to white matter volume (r(g) = 0.39). Perceptual Organization was both genetically (r(g) = 0.39) and environmentally (r(e) = -0.71) related to cerebellar volume. Verbal Comprehension was not related to any of the three brain volumes. It is concluded that brain volumes are genetically related to intelligence which suggests that genes that influence brain volume may also be important for intelligence. It is also noted however, that the direction of causation (i.e., do genes influence brain volume which in turn influences intelligence, or alternatively, do genes influence intelligence which in turn influences brain volume), or the presence or absence of pleiotropy has not been resolved yet.

  17. A cohort study of metformin exposure and survival in patients with stage I-III colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    BENNETT, KATHLEEN

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background: Preclinical evidence suggests a beneficial effect of metformin in colorectal cancer. This study aimed to investigate associations between metformin exposure and colorectal cancer–specific survival using population-level data. Methods: Adult patients with stage I–III colorectal cancer diagnosed from 2001 to 2006 were identified from the National Cancer Registry Ireland. Use of metformin and other antidiabetic medications was determined from a linked national prescr...

  18. Prognostic impact of interhospital variation in adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with Stage II/III colorectal cancer: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Kawai, K; Tanaka, T; Hata, K; Sugihara, K; Nozawa, H

    2018-05-12

    Clinical guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for high-risk patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer. However, chemotherapeutic administration rates differ significantly between hospitals. We assessed the prognostic benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with Stage IIb/c colorectal cancer, and the prognostic impact of interhospital variations in the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III colorectal cancer. We conducted a multicentre, retrospective study of 17 757 patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer treated between 1997 and 2008 in 23 hospitals in Japan. Hospitals were classified as high-rate (rate > 42.8%) or low-rate (rate ≤ 42.8%), chemotherapy prescribing clinics. The 5-year overall survival (OS) of patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly higher than for those not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (85.7% vs 79.2%, P colorectal cancer (both P colorectal cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy, with patients who were treated in hospitals with high adjuvant chemotherapy rates demonstrating better prognoses. Colorectal Disease © 2018 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Cost-utility analysis of chemotherapy regimens in elderly patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairson, David R; Parikh, Rohan C; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2014-10-01

    Chemotherapy prolongs survival for stage III colon cancer patients but community-level evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of treatment for elderly patients is limited. Comparisons were between patients receiving no chemotherapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and FOLFOX (5-FU + oxaliplatin). A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the Surveillance Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Patients (≥65 years) with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III colon cancer at diagnosis in 2004-2009 were identified. The 3-way propensity score matched sample included 3,534 patients. Effectiveness was measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Medicare costs (2010 US dollars) were estimated from diagnosis until death or end of study. FOLFOX patients experienced 6.06 median life-years and 4.73 QALYs. Patients on 5-FU had 5.75 median life-years and 4.50 median QALYs, compared to 3.42 and 2.51, respectively, for the no chemotherapy patients. Average total healthcare costs ranged from US$85,422 for no chemotherapy to US$168,628 for FOLFOX. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) for 5-FU versus no chemotherapy were US$17,131 per life-year gained and US$20,058 per QALY gained. ICERs for FOLFOX versus 5-FU were US$139,646 per life-year gained and US$188,218 per QALY gained. Results appear to be sensitive to age, suggesting that FOLFOX performs better for patients 65-69 and 80+ years old while 5-FU appears most effective and cost effective for the age groups 70-74 and 75-79 years. FOLFOX appears more effective and cost effective than other strategies for colon cancer treatment of older patients. Results were sensitive to age, with ICERs exhibiting a U-shaped pattern.

  20. Genetic correlations between brain volumes and the WAIS-III dimensions of verbal comprehension, working memory, perceptual organization, and processing speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posthuma, Daniëlle; Baare, Wim F.C.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.

    2003-01-01

    We recently showed that the correlation of gray and white matter volume with full scale IQ and the Working Memory dimension are completely mediated by common genetic factors (Posthuma et al., 2002). Here we examine whether the other WAIS III dimensions (Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization......, Processing Speed) are also related to gray and white matter volume, and whether any of the dimensions are related to cerebellar volume. Two overlapping samples provided 135 subjects from 60 extended twin families for whom both MRI scans and WAIS III data were available. All three brain volumes are related...... to Working Memory capacity (r = 0.27). This phenotypic correlation is completely due to a common underlying genetic factor. Processing Speed was genetically related to white matter volume (r(g) = 0.39). Perceptual Organization was both genetically (r(g) = 0.39) and environmentally (r(e) = -0.71) related...

  1. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and its relation to survival among patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, A C R K; van Erning, F N; van Gestel, Y R B M; Creemers, G J M; Punt, C J A; van Oijen, M G H; Lemmens, V E P P

    2015-11-01

    Currently available data suggest that delaying the start of adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer patients has a detrimental effect on survival. We analysed which factors impact on the timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and evaluated the influence on overall survival (OS). Stage III colon cancer patients who underwent resection and received adjuvant chemotherapy between 2008 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy was subdivided into: ⩽ 4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-16 weeks post-surgery. Multivariable regressions were performed to assess the influence of several factors on the probability of starting treatment within 8 weeks post-surgery and to evaluate the association of timing of adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-year OS. 6620 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, 14% commenced after 8 weeks. Factors associated with starting treatment after 8 weeks were older age (Odds ratio (OR) 65-74 versus colon cancer patients within 8 weeks post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  3. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trip, Anouk K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Poppema, Boelo J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Siemerink, Ester [Department of Internal Medicine, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Beukema, Jannet C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Plukker, John T.M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sandick, Johanna W. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospers, Geke A.P., E-mail: g.a.p.hospers@umcg.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates.

  4. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk K.; Poppema, Boelo J.; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Siemerink, Ester; Beukema, Jannet C.; Verheij, Marcel; Plukker, John T.M.; Richel, Dick J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Sandick, Johanna W. van; Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Hospers, Geke A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates

  5. Differences in Funding Sources of Phase III Oncology Clinical Trials by Treatment Modality and Cancer Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Vikram; Yu, James B; Aneja, Sanjay; Wilson, Lynn D; Lloyd, Shane

    2017-06-01

    Given the limited resources available to conduct clinical trials, it is important to understand how trial sponsorship differs among different therapeutic modalities and cancer types and to consider the ramifications of these differences. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for a cross-sectional register of active, phase III, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying treatment-related endpoints such as survival and recurrence for the 24 most prevalent malignancies. We classified the RCTs into 7 categories of therapeutic modality: (1) chemotherapy/other cancer-directed drugs, (2) targeted therapy, (3) surgery, (4) radiation therapy (RT), (5) RT with other modalities, (6) multimodality therapy without RT, and (7) other. RCTs were categorized as being funded by one or more of the following groups: (1) government, (2) hospital/university, (3) industry, and (4) other. χ analysis was performed to detect differences in funding source distribution between modalities and cancer types. The percentage of multimodality trials (5%) and radiation RCTs (4%) funded by industry was less than that for chemotherapy (32%, Pfunding than any of the other modalities (Pfunded by industry if they also studied targeted therapy (Pfunded by industry than trials studying multimodality therapy or radiation. The impact of industry funding versus institutional or governmental sources of funding for cancer research is unclear and requires further study.

  6. Alpha2,3-sialyltransferase III knockdown sensitized ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yiting; Lin, Haiyingjie; Liu, Yan; Tan, Yi; Lin, Jie; Gao, Fenze; Lin, Shaoqiang

    2017-01-22

    Emerging evidence indicates that β-galactoside-α2,3-sialyltransferase III (ST3Gal3) involves in development, inflammation, neoplastic transformation, and metastasis. However, the role of ST3Gal3 in regulating cancer chemoresistance remains elusive. Herein, we investigated the functional effects of ST3Gal3 in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. We found that the levels of ST3Gal3 mRNA differed significantly among ovarian cancer cell lines. HO8910PM cells that have high invasive and metastatic capacity express elevated ST3Gal3 mRNA and are resistant to cisplatin, comparing to SKOV3 cells that have a lower level of ST3Gal3 expression and are more chemosensitive to cisplatin. We found that the expression of ST3Gal3 has reverse correlation with the dosage of cisplatin used in both SKOV3 and HO8910PM cells, and high dose of cisplatin could down-regulate ST3Gal3 expression. We then examined the functional effects of ST3Gal3 knockdown in cancer cell lines using FACS analysis. The number of apoptotic cells was much higher in cells if ST3Gal3 expression was knocked down by siRNA and/or by treating cells with higher dosage of cisplatin in comparison to control cells. Interestingly, in HO8910PM cells with ST3Gal3 knockdown, the levels of caspase 8 and caspase 3 proteins increased, which was more obvious in cells treated with both ST3Gal3 knockdown and cisplatin, suggesting that ST3Gal3 knockdown synergistically enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, these results uncover an alternative mechanism of cisplatin-resistance through ST3Gal3 and open a window for effective prevention of chemoresistance and relapse of ovarian cancer by targeting ST3Gal3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Maternal vitamin C deficiency does not reduce hippocampal volume and beta-tubulin III intensity in prenatal Guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Schjoldager, Janne Gram; Paidi, Maya Devi

    2016-01-01

    Marginal vitamin C (vitC) deficiency affects 5% to 10% of adults including subpopulations such as pregnant women and newborns. Animal studies link vitC deficiency to deleterious effects on the developing brain, but exactly how the brain adapts to vitC deficiency and the mechanisms behind...... the observed deficits remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that vitC deficiency in utero may lead to a decreased neuronal maturation and increased cellular death giving rise to alterations of the hippocampal morphology in a guinea pig model. Brains from prenatal guinea pig pups (n = 9-10 in each group......) subjected to either a sufficient (918 mg vitC/kg feed) or deficient (100 mg vitC/kg feed) maternal dietary regimen were assessed with regards to hippocampal volume and beta-tubulin isotype III staining intensity at 2 gestational time points (45 and 56). We found a distinct differential regional growth...

  8. NWTS conceptual reference repository description (CRRD). Volume III. Criteria, bases, special studies, and codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This volume documents the criteria, design bases, and special studies and provides the backup for the design presented in Volume II. The criteria presented here were developed by ONWI as a draft version for consideration in this conceptual report. Since these criteria were developed subsequent to preparation of the reports used as a basis for the CRRD, not all of the criteria could be fully considered in preparation of the CRRD. However, they were used as guidelines wherever possible. The criteria for terminal storage of waste are still in development. The chapter on the design bases identifies the important design considerations and provides the justification for their selection. The design bases were developed not so much to give exact values for parameters as to identify the parameters that are significant to the design. They also serve as a common basis for coordinating analysis and design studies unitl the next design phase is completed. Some of the design bases presented here were taken directly from the Stearns-Roger NWTS-R1 Conceptual Design Report. The special studies document technical aspects of the design that are of particular importance or that furnish additional information pertaining to the design

  9. Radiotherapy alone for elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kanehara, Masasi; Doi, Mihoko; Furonaka, Osamu; Miyazu, Yuka; Hada, Yosihiro

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated solely with radiotherapy during the period 1986 to 1995. Our study was designed to assess the influence of age on survival and malnutrition in patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) and patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). Radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival period of 11.5 months in the younger group and 6.3 months in the elderly group (p=0.0043). With the Cox multivariate model, good performance status, age less than 75 years, and good response were significant favorable independent predictors. Furthermore, the elderly group patients more frequently died of respiratory infections and had lower prognostic nutritional indexes than the younger group patients before and after radiotherapy. These findings suggested elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated with radiotherapy alone had a poor prognosis and that malnutrition caused by radiotherapy was a factor contributing to the risk of death from respiratory infection in such patients. (author)

  10. Cost-utility analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdkiattikorn, Panattharin; Chaikledkaew, Usa; Lausoontornsiri, Wirote; Chindavijak, Somjin; Khuhaprema, Thirawud; Tantai, Narisa; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2015-01-01

    In Thailand, there has been no economic evaluation study of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer patients after resection. This study aims to evaluate the cost-utility of all chemotherapy regimens currently used in Thailand compared with the adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV) plus capecitabine as the first-line therapy for metastatic disease in patients with stage III colon cancer after resection. A cost-utility analysis was performed to estimate the relevant lifetime costs and health outcomes of chemotherapy regimens based on a societal perspective using a Markov model. The results suggested that the adjuvant 5-FU/LV plus capecitabine as the first-line therapy for metastatic disease would be the most cost-effective chemotherapy. The adjuvant FOLFOX and FOLFIRI as the first-line treatment for metastatic disease would be cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 299,365 Thai baht per QALY gained based on a societal perspective if both prices of FOLFOX and FOLFIRI were decreased by 40%.

  11. Treatment Variation of Sequential versus Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, I; Damhuis, R A; Ten Berge, M G; Rosskamp, M; van Eycken, L; de Ruysscher, D; Belderbos, J S A

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the standard treatment regimen in non-surgical locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) is recommended in patients who are unfit to receive CCRT or when the treatment volume is considered too large. In this study, we investigated the proportion of CCRT/SCRT in the Netherlands and Belgium. Furthermore, patient and disease characteristics associated with SCRT were assessed. An observational study was carried out with data from three independent national registries: the Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Dutch Lung Cancer Audit-Radiotherapy (DLCA-R). Differences in patient and disease characteristics between CCRT and SCRT were tested with unpaired t-tests (for continuous variables) and with chi-square tests (for categorical variables). A prognostic model was constructed to determine patient and disease parameters predictive for the choice of SCRT. This study included 350 patients from the BCR, 780 patients from the NCR and 428 patients from the DLCA-R. More than half of the stage III NSCLC patients in the Netherlands (55%) and in Belgium more than a third (35%) were treated with CCRT. In both the Dutch and Belgian population, higher age and more advanced N-stage were significantly associated with SCRT. Performance score, pulmonary function, comorbidities and tumour volume were not associated with SCRT. In this observational population-based study, a large treatment variation in non-surgical stage III NSCLC patients was observed between and within the Netherlands and Belgium. Higher age and N-stage were significantly associated with the choice for SCRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An excursion through elementary mathematics, volume iii discrete mathematics and polynomial algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Caminha Muniz Neto, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, in-depth overview of elementary mathematics as explored in Mathematical Olympiads around the world. It expands on topics usually encountered in high school and could even be used as preparation for a first-semester undergraduate course. This third and last volume covers Counting, Generating Functions, Graph Theory, Number Theory, Complex Numbers, Polynomials, and much more. As part of a collection, the book differs from other publications in this field by not being a mere selection of questions or a set of tips and tricks that applies to specific problems. It starts from the most basic theoretical principles, without being either too general or too axiomatic. Examples and problems are discussed only if they are helpful as applications of the theory. Propositions are proved in detail and subsequently applied to Olympic problems or to other problems at the Olympic level. The book also explores some of the hardest problems presented at National and International Mathematics Ol...

  13. Guide for the evaluation of physical protection equipment. Book 1: Volumes I--III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, W.

    1977-06-01

    A guide for evaluating the performance of commercially available physical protection equipment has been prepared in partial fulfillment of Task 2 of MITRE contract AT(49-24)-0376 for use by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Separate evaluation procedures are provided for each generic type of equipment contained in the companion document, Catalog of Physical Protection Equipment. Among the equipment parameters evaluated, as appropriate, are sensitivity, area/volume of coverage, false/nuisance alarm rate, resistance to countermeasures, environmental requirements, installation parameters and maintenance. Four evaluation techniques are employed (inspections, analyses, demonstrations and tests); standard test equipment (both commercially available as well as developmental) to be used in the evaluation are listed

  14. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume III. Collector subsystem. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    The Honeywell collector subsystem features a low-profile, multifaceted heliostat designed to provide high reflectivity and accurate angular and spatial positioning of the redirected solar energy under all conditions of wind load and mirror attitude within the design operational envelope. The heliostats are arranged in a circular field around a cavity receiver on a tower halfway south of the field center. A calibration array mounted on the receiver tower provides capability to measure individual heliostat beam location and energy periodically. This information and weather data from the collector field are transmitted to a computerized control subsystem that addresses the individual heliostat to correct pointing errors and determine when the mirrors need cleaning. This volume contains a detailed subsystem design description, a presentation of the design process, and the results of the SRE heliostat test program.

  15. Radiotherapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Masao; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1999-01-01

    Surgery has been regarded as the standard treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer in the early stage, while radiotherapy has become an effective alternative for medically inoperable patients and those who refuse surgery. We reviewed the records of 31 patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy between 1980 and 1997. There were 15 patients in stage I and 16 in stage II. The variables analyzed for influence on cause-specific survival and loco-regional control were: age, performance status, clinical stage, tumor size, tumor site, radiation field, radiation dose, and combination with chemotherapy. The overall and cause-specific 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-years survival rates were 71% and 77%; 63% and 73%; 34% and 48%; and 17% and 32%, respectively. Five-year survival rate for patients with peripheral tumor in the lung was 72%, with 70% loco-regional control, while the 5-year survival rate of patients whose tumor originated in the central region was 20%, with 25% loco-regional control. These differences had marginal significance on univariate analysis (P=0.07), but only tumor site (central vs peripheral) showed marginal significant influence on cause-specific survival (P=0.08) and loco-regional control (P=0.07) on multivariate analysis. There were no fatal complications, including radiation-induced myelopathy. The present series showed satisfactory results with definitive radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer, with results similar to those in recent reports of radiotherapy. The only significant variable was that patients with peripheral tumors had a better prognosis than patients with central tumors. (author)

  16. Cancer Incidence in Five Continents: Inclusion criteria, highlights from Volume X and the global status of cancer registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, F; Ferlay, J; Laversanne, M; Brewster, D H; Gombe Mbalawa, C; Kohler, B; Piñeros, M; Steliarova-Foucher, E; Swaminathan, R; Antoni, S; Soerjomataram, I; Forman, D

    2015-11-01

    Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5), a longstanding collaboration between the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the International Association of Cancer Registries, serves as a unique source of cancer incidence data from high-quality population-based cancer registries around the world. The recent publication of Volume X comprises cancer incidence data from 290 registries covering 424 populations in 68 countries for the registration period 2003-2007. In this article, we assess the status of population-based cancer registries worldwide, describe the techniques used in CI5 to evaluate their quality and highlight the notable variation in the incidence rates of selected cancers contained within Volume X of CI5. We also discuss the Global Initiative for Cancer Registry Development as an international partnership that aims to reduce the disparities in availability of cancer incidence data for cancer control action, particularly in economically transitioning countries, already experiencing a rapid rise in the number of cancer patients annually. © 2015 UICC.

  17. Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 3 contains chapters 13 through 19: site issues and plans; geoengineering and repository design issues and plans; waste package and site geochemistry issues and plans; performance-assessment issues and plans; site characterization program; quality assurance; and identification of alternate sites

  18. Experimental fusion power reactor conceptual design study. Final report. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1976-12-01

    This document is the final report which describes the work carried out by General Atomic Company for the Electric Power Research Institute on a conceptual design study of a fusion experimental power reactor (EPR) and an overall EPR facility. The primary objective of the two-year program was to develop a conceptual design of an EPR that operates at ignition and produces continuous net power. A conceptual design was developed for a Doublet configuration based on indications that a noncircular tokamak offers the best potential of achieving a sufficiently high effective fuel containment to provide a viable reactor concept at reasonable cost. Other objectives included the development of a planning cost estimate and schedule for the plant and the identification of critical R and D programs required to support the physics development and engineering and construction of the EPR. This volume contains the following appendices: (1) tradeoff code analysis, (2) residual mode transport, (3) blanket/first wall design evaluations, (4) shielding design evaluation, (5) toroidal coil design evaluation, (6) E-coil design evaluation, (7) F-coil design evaluation, (8) plasma recycle system design evaluation, (9) primary coolant purification design evaluation, (10) power supply system design evaluation, (11) number of coolant loops, (12) power conversion system design evaluation, and (13) maintenance methods evaluation

  19. Radiotherapy volume delineation using 18F-FDG-PET/CT modifies gross node volume in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Jimenez, E; Mateos, P; Aymar, N; Roncero, R; Ortiz, I; Gimenez, M; Pardo, J; Salinas, J; Sabater, S

    2018-05-02

    Evidence supporting the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the segmentation process of oesophageal cancer for radiotherapy planning is limited. Our aim was to compare the volumes and tumour lengths defined by fused PET/CT vs. CT simulation. Twenty-nine patients were analyzed. All patients underwent a single PET/CT simulation scan. Two separate GTVs were defined: one based on CT data alone and another based on fused PET/CT data. Volume sizes for both data sets were compared and the spatial overlap was assessed by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The gross tumour volume (GTVtumour) and maximum tumour diameter were greater by PET/CT, and length of primary tumour was greater by CT, but differences were not statistically significant. However, the gross node volume (GTVnode) was significantly greater by PET/CT. The DSC analysis showed excellent agreement for GTVtumour, 0.72, but was very low for GTVnode, 0.25. Our study shows that the volume definition by PET/CT and CT data differs. CT simulation, without taking into account PET/CT information, might leave cancer-involved nodes out of the radiotherapy-delineated volumes.

  20. Estimating the adjuvant chemotherapy effect in elderly stage II and III colon cancer patients in an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Yeol; Cha, In-Ho; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Nam Kyu; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Roh, Jae Kyung; Shin, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has been known as a standard treatment for patients with resected colon cancer. However, in elderly colon cancer patients, the characteristics of patients are heterogeneous with regard to life expectancy and comorbidities. Thus, with regard to the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer, it is difficult to extrapolate data of clinical trials from the younger into the older general population. Data for 382 elderly colon cancer patients were analyzed: 217 in Stage II and 165 in Stage III. The efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy was evaluated in elderly colon cancer patients after a match by the propensity score method. For matched patients with Stage II colon cancer, there was no significant efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in the risk of death during all follow-up periods (P-value, 0.06-0.37). Though there was a tendency that the adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the death rate during the follow-up periods, it was not statistically significant. In the case of Stage III, the adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly effective in matched patients for 5-year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.90) and overall survival (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.94). Adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients with Stage II colon cancer is not effective, whereas elderly patients with Stage III with adjuvant chemotherapy appear to have a better survival rate in the general population. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Impact of flavonoids on matrix metalloproteinase secretion and invadopodia formation in highly invasive A431-III cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo-Chuen Lin

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major cause of mortality in cancer patients. Invadopodia are considered to be crucial structures that allow cancer cells to penetrate across the extracellular matrix (ECM by using matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Previously, we isolated a highly invasive A431-III subline from parental A431 cells by Boyden chamber assay. The A431-III cells possess higher invasive and migratory abilities, elevated levels of MMP-9 and an enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT phenotype. In this study, we discovered that A431-III cells had an increased potential to form invadopodia and an improved capacity to degrade ECM compared with the original A431 cells. We also observed enhanced phosphorylation levels of cortactin and Src in A431-III cells; these phosphorylated proteins have been reported to be the main regulators of invadopodia formation. Flavonoids, almost ubiquitously distributed in food plants and plant food products, have been documented to exhibit anti-tumor properties. Therefore, it was of much interest to explore the effects of flavonoid antioxidants on the metastatic activity of A431-III cells. Exposure of A431-III cells to two potent dietary flavonoids, namely luteolin (Lu and quercetin (Qu, caused inhibition of invadopodia formation and decrement in ECM degradation. We conclude that Lu and Qu attenuate the phosphorylation of cortactin and Src in A431-III cells. As a consequence, there ensues a disruption of invadopodia generation and the suppression of MMP secretion. These changes, in concert, bring about a reduction in metastasis.

  2. High procedure volume is strongly associated with improved survival after lung cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Riaz, Sharma P; Coupland, Victoria H

    2013-01-01

    Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect....

  3. Novel concepts for the compression of large volumes of carbon dioxide-phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Allison, Timothy C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Evans, Neal D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Moreland, Brian [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hernandez, Augusto J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Day, Meera [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Ridens, Brandon L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-30

    and tested in a closed loop compressor facility using CO2 . Both test programs successfully demonstrated good performance and mechanical behavior. In Phase III, a pilot compression plant consisting of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor with cooled diaphragm technology has been designed, constructed, and tested. Comparative testing of adiabatic and cooled tests at equivalent inlet conditions shows that the cooled diaphragms reduce power consumption by 3-8% when the compressor is operated as a back-to-back unit and by up to 9% when operated as a straight-though compressor with no intercooler. The power savings, heat exchanger effectiveness, and temperature drops for the cooled diaphragm were all slightly higher than predicted values but showed the same trends.

  4. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm 3 , and patients with a tumor volume 3 had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm 3 at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume 3 had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = 3 larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm 3 larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer of the head and neck undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy and correlated with the treatment outcomes better than the T or N stage.

  5. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  6. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  7. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  8. Effective cancer vaccine platform based on attenuated salmonella and a type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Hegazy, Wael A H; Guo, Linjie; Gao, Xiuhua; Courtney, Amy N; Kurbanov, Suhrab; Liu, Daofeng; Tian, Gengwen; Manuel, Edwin R; Diamond, Don J; Hensel, Michael; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines explored for cancer therapy have been based generally on injectable vector systems used to control foreign infectious pathogens, to which the immune system evolved to respond naturally. However, these vectors may not be effective at presenting tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to the immune system in a manner that is sufficient to engender antitumor responses. We addressed this issue with a novel orally administered Salmonella-based vector that exploits a type III secretion system to deliver selected TAA in the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells in situ. A systematic comparison of candidate genes from the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) locus was conducted in the vaccine design, using model antigens and a codon-optimized form of the human TAA survivin (coSVN), an oncoprotein that is overexpressed in most human cancers. In a screen of 20 SPI2 promoter:effector combinations, a PsifB::sseJ combination exhibited maximal potency for antigen translocation into the APC cytosol, presentation to CD8 T cells, and murine immunogenicity. In the CT26 mouse model of colon carcinoma, therapeutic vaccination with a lead PsifB::sseJ-coSVN construct (p8032) produced CXCR3-dependent infiltration of tumors by CD8 T cells, reversed the CD8:Treg ratio at the tumor site, and triggered potent antitumor activity. Vaccine immunogenicity and antitumor potency were enhanced by coadministration of the natural killer T-cell ligand 7DW8-5, which heightened the production of IL12 and IFNγ. Furthermore, combined treatment with p8032 and 7DW8-5 resulted in complete tumor regression in A20 lymphoma-bearing mice, where protective memory was demonstrated. Taken together, our results demonstrate how antigen delivery using an oral Salmonella vector can provide an effective platform for the development of cancer vaccines. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification

  10. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. A.; Choi, I. B.; Kang, K. M.; Jang, J. Y.; Song, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kuak, M. S.; Shinn, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    This study was tried to evaluate the potential benefits of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Between April 1992 and March 1994, 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Historical control group consisted of 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone. Total radiation dose ranged from 5580 cGy to 7000 cGy with median of 5940 cGy. Complete response rate was higher in chemoradiation therapy (CRT) group than radiation therapy (RT) group. In subgroup analyses for patients with good performance status, CRT group showed significantly higher overall survival rate compared with RT group. The prognostic factors affecting survival rate were performance status and pathologic subtype in CRT group. In RT alone group, performance status and stage (IIIa vs IIIb) were identified as a prognostic factors. The incidence of RTOG/EORTC grade 3-4 pulmonary toxicity ahd no significant differences in between CRT group and RT group (16% vs. 6%). The incidence of WHO grade 3-4 pulmonary fibrosis also had no significant differences in both group (38% vs. 25%). In analyses for relationship of field size and pulmonary toxicity, the patients who treated with field size beyond 200 cm 2 had significantly higher rates of pulmonary toxicities. The CRT group showed significantly higher local control rate than RT group. There were no significant differences of survival rate in status showed higher overall survival rate in CRT group than RT group. In spite of higher incidence of acute toxicities with concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the survival gain in subgroup of patients with good performance status were encouraging. CRT group showed higher rate of early death within 1 year, higher 2 year survival rate compared with RT group. Therefore, to evaluate the accurate effect on survival of concurrent chemoradiation therapy, systematic follow-up for long term

  11. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W; Kelsey, Chris R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  12. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Kristin; Chino, Junzo P.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Ready, Neal; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  13. Genetic correlations between brain volumes and the WAIS-III dimensions of verbal comprehension, working memory, perceptual organization, and processing speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma, D.; Baare, W.F.C.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.; Kahn, R.S.; Boomsma, D.I.; de Geus, E.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    We recently showed that the correlation of gray and white matter volume with full scale IQ and the Working Memory dimension are completely mediated by common genetic factors (Posthuma et al., 2002). Here we examine whether the other WAIS III dimensions (Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization,

  14. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume IV. Area III: graphic data. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume contains all the graphic data for Area III, which includes lines 3420 to 5320 and tie lines 6080, 6100, and 6140. Due to the large map scale of the data presented (1:62,500), this area was further subdivided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets

  15. Institutional Clinical Trial Accrual Volume and Survival of Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrick, Evan J.; Zhang, Qiang; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Fortin, André; Silverman, Craig L.; Raben, Adam; Kim, Harold E.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Read, Nancy E.; Harris, Jonathan; Wu, Qian; Le, Quynh-Thu; Gillison, Maura L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receive treatment at centers with expertise, but whether provider experience affects survival is unknown. Patients and Methods The effect of institutional experience on overall survival (OS) in patients with stage III or IV HNC was investigated within a randomized trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 0129), which compared cisplatin concurrent with standard versus accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. As a surrogate for experience, institutions were classified as historically low- (HLACs) or high-accruing centers (HHACs) based on accrual to 21 RTOG HNC trials (1997 to 2002). The effect of accrual volume on OS was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. Results Median RTOG accrual (1997 to 2002) at HLACs was four versus 65 patients at HHACs. Analysis included 471 patients in RTOG 0129 (2002 to 2005) with known human papillomavirus and smoking status. Patients at HLACs versus HHACs had better performance status (0: 62% v 52%; P = .04) and lower T stage (T4: 26.5% v 35.3%; P = .002) but were otherwise similar. Radiotherapy protocol deviations were higher at HLACs versus HHACs (18% v 6%; P < .001). When compared with HHACs, patients at HLACs had worse OS (5 years: 51.0% v 69.1%; P = .002). Treatment at HLACs was associated with increased death risk of 91% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.65) after adjustment for prognostic factors and 72% (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.40) after radiotherapy compliance adjustment. Conclusion OS is worse for patients with HNC treated at HLACs versus HHACs to cooperative group trials after accounting for radiotherapy protocol deviations. Institutional experience substantially influences survival in locally advanced HNC. PMID:25488965

  16. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  17. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  18. [Definition of nodal volumes in breast cancer treatment and segmentation guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirova, Y M; Castro Pena, P; Dendale, R; Campana, F; Bollet, M A; Fournier-Bidoz, N; Fourquet, A

    2009-06-01

    To assist in the determination of breast and nodal volumes in the setting of radiotherapy for breast cancer and establish segmentation guidelines. Materials and methods. Contrast metarial enhanced CT examinations were obtained in the treatment position in 25 patients to clearly define the target volumes. The clinical target volume (CTV) including the breast, internal mammary nodes, supraclavicular and subclavicular regions and axxilary region were segmented along with the brachial plexus and interpectoral nodes. The following critical organs were also segmented: heart, lungs, contralateral breast, thyroid, esophagus and humeral head. A correlation between clinical and imaging findings and meeting between radiation oncologists and breast specialists resulted in a better definition of irradiation volumes for breast and nodes with establishement of segmentation guidelines and creation of an anatomical atlas. A practical approach, based on anatomical criteria, is proposed to assist in the segmentation of breast and node volumes in the setting of breast cancer treatment along with a definition of irradiation volumes.

  19. Reduction in cardiac volume during chemoradiotherapy for patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J., E-mail: l.j.lutkenhaus@amc.uva.nl; Kamphuis, Martijn; Wieringen, Niek van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Bel, Arjan

    2013-11-15

    We investigated the change in cardiac volume over the course of chemoradiotherapy in 26 patients treated for esophageal cancer, using cone beam CT imaging. The cardiac volume reduced significantly, with a median reduction of 8%. A significant relationship with planned cardiac dose was not found.

  20. Reduction in cardiac volume during chemoradiotherapy for patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Kamphuis, Martijn; Wieringen, Niek van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Bel, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the change in cardiac volume over the course of chemoradiotherapy in 26 patients treated for esophageal cancer, using cone beam CT imaging. The cardiac volume reduced significantly, with a median reduction of 8%. A significant relationship with planned cardiac dose was not found

  1. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; de Mey, Johan; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were

  2. Comparison of satellite imagery from LISS-III/Resourcesat-1 and TM/Landsat 5 to estimate stand-level timber volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Fernando Berra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After Landsat 5 activities were discontinued, sensors on board ResourceSat-1 satellite have been pointed as an option for Landsat series. The aim of this study is to estimate timber volume from a slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm. stand using images from both LISS-III/ResourceSat-1 and TM/Landsat 5 sensors, cross comparing their performances. Reflectance values from the four spectral bands considered equivalent for both sensors were compared regarding sensitivity to changes in timber volume. Trends were similar, with direct relationship in the near-infrared bands and inverse relationships in the visible and mid-infrared bands. Significant differences were only found in the equivalent band of green. Multiple linear regressions were used to select spectral bands that would better explain variations in timber volume. The best fit equations for each sensor were inverted to generate maps of timber volume, estimates which were compared at pixel and stand level. None of the scales showed significant differences between estimates generated from the two sensors. We concluded that LISS-III and TM have generally very similar performance for monitoring timber volume, and LISS-III could therefore be potentially used as a complement or substitute to Landsat series.

  3. Assessing brain volume changes in older women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy: a brain magnetic resonance imaging pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihong T; Sethi, Sean K; Jin, Taihao; Patel, Sunita K; Ye, Ningrong; Sun, Can-Lan; Rockne, Russell C; Haacke, E Mark; Root, James C; Saykin, Andrew J; Ahles, Tim A; Holodny, Andrei I; Prakash, Neal; Mortimer, Joanne; Waisman, James; Yuan, Yuan; Somlo, George; Li, Daneng; Yang, Richard; Tan, Heidi; Katheria, Vani; Morrison, Rachel; Hurria, Arti

    2018-05-02

    Cognitive decline is among the most feared treatment-related outcomes of older adults with cancer. The majority of older patients with breast cancer self-report cognitive problems during and after chemotherapy. Prior neuroimaging research has been performed mostly in younger patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate longitudinal changes in brain volumes and cognition in older women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Women aged ≥ 60 years with stage I-III breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy and age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. All participants underwent neuropsychological testing with the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox for Cognition and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to chemotherapy, and again around one month after the last infusion of chemotherapy. Brain volumes were measured using Neuroreader™ software. Longitudinal changes in brain volumes and neuropsychological scores were analyzed utilizing linear mixed models. A total of 16 patients with breast cancer (mean age 67.0, SD 5.39 years) and 14 age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls (mean age 67.8, SD 5.24 years) were included: 7 patients received docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) and 9 received chemotherapy regimens other than TC (non-TC). There were no significant differences in segmented brain volumes between the healthy control group and the chemotherapy group pre-chemotherapy (p > 0.05). Exploratory hypothesis generating analyses focusing on the effect of the chemotherapy regimen demonstrated that the TC group had greater volume reduction in the temporal lobe (change = - 0.26) compared to the non-TC group (change = 0.04, p for interaction = 0.02) and healthy controls (change = 0.08, p for interaction = 0.004). Similarly, the TC group had a decrease in oral reading recognition scores (change = - 6.94) compared to the non-TC group (change = - 1.21, p for

  4. Platinum(II)-gadolinium(III) complexes as potential single-molecular theranostic agents for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenzhu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Li, Tuanjie; Aime, Silvio; Sadler, Peter J; Guo, Zijian

    2014-11-24

    Theranostic agents are emerging multifunctional molecules capable of simultaneous therapy and diagnosis of diseases. We found that platinum(II)-gadolinium(III) complexes with the formula [{Pt(NH3)2Cl}2GdL](NO3)2 possess such properties. The Gd center is stable in solution and the cytoplasm, whereas the Pt centers undergo ligand substitution in cancer cells. The Pt units interact with DNA and significantly promote the cellular uptake of Gd complexes. The cytotoxicity of the Pt-Gd complexes is comparable to that of cisplatin at high concentrations (≥0.1 mM), and their proton relaxivity is higher than that of the commercial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent Gd-DTPA. T1-weighted MRI on B6 mice demonstrated that these complexes can reveal the accumulation of platinum drugs in vivo. Their cytotoxicity and imaging capabilities make the Pt-Gd complexes promising theranostic agents for cancer treatment. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adult Disease, Akashi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author).

  6. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi

    1994-01-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author)

  7. Long-term outcomes after proton therapy, with concurrent chemotherapy, for stage II–III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Ly, Ngoc Bui; Komaki, Ritsuko; Levy, Lawrence B.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mehran, Reza J.; Lu, Charles; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We report long-term disease control, survival, and toxicity for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer prospectively treated with concurrent proton therapy and chemotherapy on a nonrandomized case-only observational study. Methods: All patients received passive-scatter proton therapy, planned with 4D-CT–based simulation; all received proton therapy concurrent with weekly chemotherapy. Endpoints were local and distant control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The 134 patients (21 stage II, 113 stage III; median age 69 years) had a median gross tumor volume (GTV) of 70 cm 3 (range, 5–753 cm 3 ); 77 patients (57%) received 74 Gy(RBE), and 57 (42%) received 60–72 Gy(RBE) (range, 60–74.1 Gy(RBE)). At a median follow-up time of 4.7 years, median OS times were 40.4 months (stage II) and 30.4 months (stage III). Five-year DFS rates were 17.3% (stage II) and 18.0% (stage III). OS, DFS, and local and distant control rates at 5 years did not differ by disease stage. Age and GTV were related to OS and DFS. Toxicity was tolerable, with 1 grade 4 esophagitis and 16 grade 3 events (2 pneumonitis, 6 esophagitis, 8 dermatitis). Conclusion: This report of outcomes after proton therapy for 134 patients indicated that this regimen produced excellent OS with tolerable toxicity

  8. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to peptide vaccination predicts survival in stage III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Junichiro; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Sukegawa, Yasushi; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Hida, Jin-Ichi; Hazama, Shoichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2018-02-23

    We previously reported a phase I clinical trial of a peptide vaccine ring finger protein 43 (RNF43) and 34-kDa translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOMM34) combined with uracil-tegafur (UFT)/LV for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), and demonstrated the safety and immunological responsiveness of this combination therapy. In this study, we evaluated vaccination-induced immune responses to clarify the survival benefit of the combination therapy as adjuvant treatment. We enrolled 44 patients initially in an HLA-masked fashion. After the disclosure of HLA, 28 patients were in the HLA-A*2402-matched and 16 were in the unmatched group. In the HLA-matched group, 14 patients had positive CTL responses specific for the RNF43 and/or TOMM34 peptides after 2 cycles of treatment and 9 had negative responses; in the HLA-unmatched group, 10 CTL responses were positive and 2 negative. In the HLA-matched group, 3-year relapse-free survival (RFS) was significantly better in the positive CTL subgroup than in the negative-response subgroup. Patients with negative vaccination-induced CTL responses showed a significant trend towards shorter RFS than those with positive responses. Moreover, in the HLA-unmatched group, the positive CTL response subgroup showed an equally good 3-year RFS as in the HLA-matched group. In conclusion, vaccination-induced CTL response to peptide vaccination could predict survival in the adjuvant setting for stage III CRC. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  10. Methodology to Forecast Volume and Cost of Cancer Drugs in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehoda M. Martei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, frequent outages of the stock of cancer drugs undermine cancer care delivery and are potentially fatal for patients with cancer. The aim of this study is to describe a methodologic approach to forecast chemotherapy volume and estimate cost that can be readily updated and applied in most LMICs. Methods: Prerequisite data for forecasting are population-based incidence data and cost estimates per unit of drug to be ordered. We used the supplementary guidelines from the WHO list of essential medicines for cancer to predict treatment plans and ordering patterns. We used de-identified aggregate data from the Botswana National Cancer Registry to estimate incident cases. The WHO Management Sciences for Health International Price Indicator was used to estimate unit costs per drug. Results: Chemotherapy volume required for incident cancer cases was estimated as the product of the standardized dose required to complete a full treatment regimen per patient, with a given cancer diagnosis and stage, multiplied by the total number of incident cancer cases with the respective diagnosis. The estimated chemotherapy costs to treat the 10 most common cancers in the public health care sector of Botswana is approximately 2.3 million US dollars. An estimated 66% of the budget is allocated to costs of rituximab and trastuzumab alone, which are used by approximately 10% of the cancer population. Conclusion: This method provides a reproducible approach to forecast chemotherapy volume and cost in LMICs. The chemotherapy volume and cost outputs of this methodology provide key stakeholders with valuable information that can guide budget estimation, resource allocation, and drug-price negotiations for cancer treatment. Ultimately, this will minimize drug shortages or outages and reduce potential loss of lives that result from an erratic drug supply.

  11. [Diagnostic values of type III Procollagen N-terminal peptide and combination assay of type III procollagen N-terminal peptide with CEA and CA 19-9 in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, S; Harada, A; Futatsuki, K

    1984-07-01

    It is known that interstitial collagens are initially synthesized as precursors (procollagen), which possess extra peptide segments at both ends of the molecules. The authors attempted to detect the aminoterminal peptide of type III procollagen (type III-N-peptide) and also to measure the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) together in sera of patients with gastric cancer. The results showed that: (1) mean serum levels and positive ratios of the type III-N-peptide increased as the clinical stage of the patients with gastric cancer advanced; (2) serum levels of the type III-N-peptide were not correlated either with those of CEA or CA 19-9; (3) positive ratios of type III-N-peptide, CEA and CA 19-9 were 51.7%, 44.8% and 48.3%, respectively: (4) positive ratio in combination of the type III-N-peptide with CEA was 69.3% and that in combination of the type III-N-peptide with CEA and CA 19-9 was 72.4%. These results suggest that type III-N-peptide is available for diagnosis of gastric cancer and, that the combination assay of type III-N-peptide with CEA and CA 19-9 is more effective than a single assay for diagnosis.

  12. Phase III trial of high and low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for early oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Teshima, Teruki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Fuchihata, Hajime; Furukawa, Souhei

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Oral tongue carcinomas are highly curable with radiotherapy. In the past, patients with tongue carcinoma have usually been treated with low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation. This Phase III study was designed to compare the treatment results obtained with LDR with those obtained with high dose rate (HDR) interstitial radiotherapy for tongue carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The criteria for patient selection for the Phase III study were: (a) presence of a T1T2N0 tumor that could be treated with single-plane implantation, (b) localization of tumor at the lateral tongue border, (c) tumor thickness of 10 mm or less, (d) performance status between O and 3, and (e) absence of any severe concurrent disease. From April 1992 through December 1993, 15 patients in the LDR group (70 Gy/4 to 9 days) and 14 patients in the HDR group (60 Gy/10 fractions/6 days) were accrued. The time interval between two fractions of the HDR brachytherapy was more than 6 h. Results: Local recurrence occurred in two patients treated with LDR brachytherapy but in none of the patients treated with HDR. One- and 2-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were both 86%, compared with 100% in the HDR group (p = 0.157). There were four patients with nodal metastasis in the LDR group and three in the HDR group. Local recurrence occurred in two of the four patients with nodal metastases in the LDR group. One- and 2-year nodal control rates for patients in the LDR group are were 85%, compared with 79% in the HDR group. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to traditional LDR brachytherapy for early tongue cancer and eliminate the radiation exposure for medical staffs

  13. Interobserver and Intraobserver Reproducibility with Volume Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) in Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard Hansen, Martin; Fallentin, Eva; Axelsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional (2D) fixed ROIs) placed in the tumor periphery, (II) 2-dimensional regions of interest (2D-ROI) along the tumor border in the tumor center, and (III) 3-dimensional volumes of interest (3D-VOI) containing the entire tumor volume. Arterial flow, blood volume and permeability (k(trans)) were recorded...

  14. Short Course Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy in Treating Patients With Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-17

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Sarcoma

  15. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  16. Optimal scheme of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: phase III prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2002-01-01

    To determine the optimal scheme of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer by comparing survival, patterns of failure, toxicities in early and late radiotherapy groups using a phase III randomized prospective clinical trial. From January 1996 to March 1999, 307 patients with curatively resected AJCC stage II and III rectal cancer were assigned randomly to an 'early (151 patients, arm I)' or a 'late (156 patients, arm II)' and were administered combined chemotherapy (5-FU 375 mg/m 2 /day, leucovorin 20 mg/m 2 , IV bolus daily, for 3 days with RT, 5 days without RT, 8 cycles with 4 weeks interval) and radiation therapy (whole pelvis with 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks). Patients of arm I received radiation therapy from day 1 of the first cycle of chemotherapy and those of arm II from day 57 with a third cycle of chemotherapy. The median follow-up period of living patients was 40 months. Of the 307 patients enrolled, fifty patients did not receive scheduled radiation therapy or chemotherapy. The overall survival rate and disease free survival rate at 5 years were 78.3% and 68.7% in arm I, and 78.4% and 67.5% in arm II. The local recurrence rate was 6.6% and 6.4% (ρ = 0.46) in arms I and II, respectively, no significant difference was observed between the distant metastasis rates of the two arms (23.8% and 29.5%, ρ = 0.16). During radiation therapy, grade 3 diarrhea or more, by the NCI common toxicity criteria, was observed in 63.0% and 58.2% of the respective arms (ρ = N.S.), but most were controlled with supportive care. Hematologic toxicity (leukopenia) greater than RTOG grade 2 was found in only 1.3% and 2.6% of patients in each respective arm. There was no significant difference in survival, patterns of failure or toxicities between the early and late radiation therapy arms. Postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation was found to be a relatively safe treatment but higher compliance is needed

  17. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  18. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  19. Phase I-II Study of Fluorouracil in Combination With Phenylbutyrate in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose–Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45–50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy for tumor; α/β = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV (± 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 (±30) cm 3 , and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 (±14) cm 3 . The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 (±13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 (±20) Gy, 76 (±16) Gy, 70 (±9) Gy, and 60 (±9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19–87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable

  1. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  2. Prognostic implication of serum hepatocyte growth factor in stage II/III breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyori; Youk, Jeonghwan; Yang, Yaewon; Kim, Tae-Yong; Min, Ahrum; Ham, Hye-Seon; Cho, Seongcheol; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Keam, Bhumsuk; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Han Suk; Han, Wonshik; Park, In Ae; Kim, Tae-You; Noh, Dong-Young; Im, Seock-Ah

    2016-03-01

    In stage II/III breast cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is a standard treatment. Although several biomarkers are used to predict prognosis in breast cancer, there is no reliable predictive biomarker for NAC success. Recently, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and cMet signaling pathway demonstrated to be involved in breast cancer tumor progression, and its potential as a biomarker is under active investigation. In this study, we assessed the potential of serum HGF as a prognostic biomarker for NAC efficacy. Venous blood samples were drawn from patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer and treated with NAC in Seoul National University Hospital from August 2004 to November 2009. Serum HGF level was determined using an ELISA system. We reviewed the medical records of the patients and investigated the association of HGF level with patients' clinicopathologic characteristics. A total of 121 female patients (median age = 45 years old) were included. Median level of HGF was 934 pg/ml (lower quartile: 772, upper quartile: 1145 pg/ml). Patients with higher HGF level than median value were significantly more likely to have clinically detectable regional node metastasis (p = 0.017, Fisher's exact test). Patients with complete and partial response according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th Edition criteria tended to have higher HGF level (p = 0.105 by t test). Patients with an HGF level higher than the upper quartile value had longer relapse-free survival than the other patients (106 vs. 85 months, p = 0.008). High serum HGF levels in breast cancer patients are associated with clinically detectable regional node metastasis and, paradoxically, with longer relapse-free survival in stage II/III breast cancer.

  3. Roles of chemoradio therapy for stage III or IV advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Takuya; Iwai, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Minamino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yukawa, Hisaya; Inoue, Toshiya; Yamashita, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of chemoradio therapy (CRT), which was performed on 31 patients with advanced head and neck cancers of stage III or IV at Kansai Medical University between September 1999 and December 2000, was examined. The CRT consisted of continuous infusion of 5FU (500 mg/m 2 ) for 120 hours, prior to drip infusion of CDDP (50 mg/m 2 ) for 2 hours and conventional radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, 5 days/w). The 31 patients with these cancers were divided into two groups; a non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group underwent CRT (60-70 Gy of total radiation dose and two courses of chemotherapy) without surgery. The patients in the operative group received surgical treatment followed by CRT (40 Gy of total radiation dose and one course of chemotherapy). The results of CRT indicated 87.1% of the response rate (RR), and 29.0% of the complete response rate (CR) in the group. The CR rate was lower than in other reports. However, the combination of CRT and the subsequent operation indicated a disease-free survival rate of 61.3% and reduction of the recurrence rate to 17.4%. Eight of 9 patients of CR after CRT without surgery revealed NED. On the other hand, the results indicated that all 10 patients of PR after CRT showed tumor residue, 9 of 10 patients of PR showed NED after additional surgery. Therefore, it is likely that the patients of CR do not need the additional surgery, however, the patients of PR are strongly recommended the surgery to improve the local control rate as well as survival rate. Although adverse reactions of CRT on patients included mucositis, leucopenia, thrombopenia and dermatitis, the symptoms ranged within grade 3. (author)

  4. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  5. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing; Xia Tingyi; Yuan Zhiyong; Liu Hui; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe; Zhang Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  6. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 3: Papers by Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, R.L. [ed.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process-and how-would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. This volume contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  7. Target volume determination in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer-facts and questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, L.; Bujko, K.

    2003-01-01

    Although the precise target volume definition in conformal radiotherapy is required by ICRU Report 50 and 62, this task in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often controversial and strict accordance with ICRU requirements is hard to achieve. The Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) definition depends mainly on the imaging method used. We discuss the use of new imaging modalities, like PET, in GTV definition. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) definition remains a separate, and still unresolved problem, especially in the part concerning the Elective Nodal Irradiation (ENI). Nowadays, there is no unified attitude among radiation oncologists regarding the necessity and extent of ENI. The common use of combined treatment modalities and the tendency to dose escalation, both increasing the potential toxicity, result in the more frequent use of involved-fields techniques. Problems relating to margins during Planning Target Volume (PTV) of lung cancer irradiation are also discussed. Another issue is the Interclinician variability in target volumes definition, especially when there is data indicating that the GTV, as defined by 3 D-treatment planning in NSCLC radiotherapy, may be highly prognostic for survival. We postulate that special attention should be paid to detailed precision of target volume determination in departmental and trial protocols. Careful analysis of patterns of failures from ongoing protocols will enable us to formulate the guidelines for target volume definition in radiotherapy for lung cancer. (author)

  8. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.oberije@maastro.nl [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, KU Leuven (Belgium); Houben, Ruud [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deasy, Joseph O. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  9. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Sasai, Keisuke; Veld, Aart A. van't; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D_2 − D_9_8, where D_2 and D_9_8 are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to 98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects have limited impact on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and

  10. High volume improves outcomes: The argument for centralization of rectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquina, Christopher T; Probst, Christian P; Becerra, Adan Z; Iannuzzi, James C; Kelly, Kristin N; Hensley, Bradley J; Rickles, Aaron S; Noyes, Katia; Fleming, Fergal J; Monson, John R T

    2016-03-01

    Centralization of care to "centers of excellence" in Europe has led to improved oncologic outcomes; however, little is known regarding the impact of nonmandated regionalization of rectal cancer care in the United States. The Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) was queried for elective abdominoperineal and low anterior resections for rectal cancer from 2000 to 2011 in New York with the use of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Surgeon volume and hospital volume were grouped into quartiles, and high-volume surgeons (≥ 10 resections/year) and hospitals (≥ 25 resections/year) were defined as the top quartile of annual caseload of rectal cancer resection and compared with the bottom 3 quartiles during analyses. Bivariate and multilevel regression analyses were performed to assess factors associated with restorative procedures, 30-day mortality, and temporal trends in these endpoints. Among 7,798 rectal cancer resections, the overall rate of no-restorative proctectomy and 30-day mortality decreased by 7.7% and 1.2%, respectively, from 2000 to 2011. In addition, there was a linear increase in the proportion of cases performed by both high-volume surgeons and high-volume hospitals and a decrease in the number of surgeons and hospitals performing rectal cancer surgery. High-volume surgeons at high-volume hospitals were associated independently with both less nonrestorative proctectomies (odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.89) and mortality (odds ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.21-0.87) rates. No patterns of significant improvement within the volume strata of the surgeon and hospitals were observed over time. This study suggests that the current trend toward regionalization of rectal cancer care to high-volume surgeons and high-volume centers has led to improved outcomes. These findings have implications regarding the policy of health care delivery in the United States, supporting referral to high-volume

  11. Genetic correlations between brain volumes and the WAIS-III dimensions of verbal comprehension, working memory, perceptual organization, and processing speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posthuma, Daniëlle; Baare, Wim F.C.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.

    2003-01-01

    We recently showed that the correlation of gray and white matter volume with full scale IQ and the Working Memory dimension are completely mediated by common genetic factors (Posthuma et al., 2002). Here we examine whether the other WAIS III dimensions (Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization...... to Working Memory capacity (r = 0.27). This phenotypic correlation is completely due to a common underlying genetic factor. Processing Speed was genetically related to white matter volume (r(g) = 0.39). Perceptual Organization was both genetically (r(g) = 0.39) and environmentally (r(e) = -0.71) related...

  12. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    : The correlation between the relative bladder volume (RBV, defined as repeat scan volume/planning scan volume) and the margins required to account for internal motion was first studied using a series of 20 bladder cancer patients with weekly repeat CT scanning during treatment. Both conformal RT (CRT) and IGRT......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS...... these patients were given fluid intake restrictions on alternating weeks during treatment. RESULTS: IGRT gave the strongest correlation between the RBV and margin size (R(2)=0.75; p10mm were required in only 1% of the situations when the RBV1, whereas isotropic margins >10...

  13. Second cancers after conservative surgery and radiation for stages I-II breast cancer: identifying a subset of women at increased risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, Barbara; Hanlon, Alexandra; Freedman, Gary; Nicolaou, Nicos; Anderson, Penny

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk and patterns of second malignancy in a group of women treated with conservative surgery and radiation in a relatively contemporary manner for early-stage invasive breast cancer, and to identify a subgroup of these women at increased risk for a second cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1978 to 1994, 1,253 women with unilateral Stage I-II breast cancer underwent wide excision, axillary dissection, and radiation. The median follow-up was 8.9 years, with 446 patients followed for ≥10 years. The median age was 55 years. Sixty-eight percent had T1 tumors and 74% were axillary-node negative. Radiation was directed to the breast only in 78%. Adjuvant therapy consisted of chemotherapy in 19%, tamoxifen in 19%, and both in 8%. Factors analyzed for their association with the cumulative incidence of all second malignancies, contralateral breast cancer, and non-breast cancer malignancy were: age, menopausal status, race, family history, obesity, smoking, tumor size, location, histology, pathologic nodal status, region(s) treated with radiation, and the use and type of adjuvant therapy. Results: One hundred seventy-six women developed a second malignancy (87 contralateral breast cancers at a median interval of 5.8 years, and 98 non-breast cancer malignancies at a median interval of 7.2 years). Nine women had both a contralateral breast cancer and non-breast cancer second malignancy. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences of a second malignancy were 5% and 16% for all cancers, 3% and 7% for contralateral breast cancer, 3% and 8%, for all second non-breast cancer malignancies, and 1% and 5%, respectively, for second non-breast cancer malignancies, excluding skin cancers. Patient age was a significant factor for contralateral breast cancer and non-breast cancer second malignancy. Young age was associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer, while older age was associated with an increased the risk of a second non-breast cancer

  14. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Conceptual design and evaluation of commercial plant. Volume III. Economic analyses (Deliverable Nos. 15 and 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of Task I of Phase I in the form of a Conceptual Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant report. The report is presented in four volumes as follows: I - Executive Summary, II - Commercial Plant Design, III - Economic Analyses, IV - Demonstration Plant Recommendations. Volume III presents the economic analyses for the commercial plant and the supporting data. General cost and financing factors used in the analyses are tabulated. Three financing modes are considered. The product gas cost calculation procedure is identified and appendices present computer inputs and sample computer outputs for the MLGW, Utility, and Industry Base Cases. The results of the base case cost analyses for plant fenceline gas costs are as follows: Municipal Utility, (e.g. MLGW), $3.76/MM Btu; Investor Owned Utility, (25% equity), $4.48/MM Btu; and Investor Case, (100% equity), $5.21/MM Btu. The results of 47 IFG product cost sensitivity cases involving a dozen sensitivity variables are presented. Plant half size, coal cost, plant investment, and return on equity (industrial) are the most important sensitivity variables. Volume III also presents a summary discussion of the socioeconomic impact of the plant and a discussion of possible commercial incentives for development of IFG plants.

  15. Dynamic volume perfusion CT in patients with lung cancer: Baseline perfusion characteristics of different histological subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jingyun; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Fink, Christian; Sudarski, Sonja; Apfaltrer, Paul; Pilz, Lothar R.; Liu, Bo; Haberland, Ulrike; Klotz, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) tumor baseline characteristics of three different subtypes of lung cancer in untreated patients. Materials and methods: 173 consecutive patients (131 men, 42 women; mean age 61 ± 10 years) with newly diagnosed lung cancer underwent dVPCT prior to biopsy. Tumor permeability, blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) were quantitatively assessed as well as tumor diameter and volume. Tumor subtypes were histologically determined and compared concerning their dVPCT results. dVPCT results were correlated to tumor diameter and volume. Results: Histology revealed adenocarcinoma in 88, squamous cell carcinoma in 54 and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in 31 patients. Tumor permeability was significantly differing between adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and SCLC (all p < 0.05). Tumor BF and BV were higher in adenocarcinomathan in SCLC (p = 0.001 and p = 0.0002 respectively). BV was also higher in squamous cell carcinoma compared to SCLC (p = 0.01). MTT was not differing between tumor subtypes. Regarding all tumors, tumor diameter did not correlate with any of the dVPCT parameters, whereas tumor volume was negatively associated with permeability, BF and BV (r = −0.22, −0.24, −0.24, all p < 0.05). In squamous cell carcinoma, tumor diameter und volume correlated with BV (r = 0.53 and r = −0.40, all p < 0.05). In SCLC, tumor diameter und volume correlated with MTT (r = 0.46 and r = 0.39, all p < 0.05). In adenocarcinoma, no association between morphological and functional tumor characteristics was observed. Conclusions: dVPCT parameters are only partially related to tumor diameter and volume and are significantly differing between lung cancer subtypes

  16. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  17. Prognostic significance of the PC10 index for patients with stage II and III oesophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Irie, Toshiyuki; Nozawa, Kumiko; Nakajima, Kotaro [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takahashi, Atsushi [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Pathology; Watanabe, Teruo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Pathology; Tanaka, Naomi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1999-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody PC10 is used for immunohistochemical staining of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The percentage of PC10-positive cancer cells is defined as the PC10 index. We evaluated the relationship between the PC10 index in pretreatment endoscopic biopsies and the prognoses of 47 patients with Stage II-III oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy. The patients with a PC10 index >40% had significantly poorer prognoses than the other patients (p=0.0007). Proportional hazards model analysis indicated that only the PC10 index was a prognostic factor (p=0.0009). The patient group of complete responders showed significantly lower PC10 indices compared to patients with a partial response or no change (p=0.049). The PC10 index can be a good predictive indicator of the prognosis in patients with Stage II-III oesophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  18. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% ± 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p 80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of ≥60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  19. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  20. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deuk Hee; Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm 3 which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Is a reassessment necessary in modern times?

    OpenAIRE

    Billiet, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Background: The role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pathologically involved mediastinal lymph nodes (N2) remains unclear. Despite a reduction of local recurrence (LR), its effect on overall survival (OS) remains unproven. Therefore we conducted a review of the current literature. Methods: To investigate the benefit and safety of modern PORT, we identified published phase III trials for PORT. We inves...

  2. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillet, T.; MOrere, J.F.; Piperno-Neuman, S.; Boaziz, C.; Breau, J.L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and whether the response to induction chemotherapy can predict the response to subsequent chemoradiotherapy and survival. In conclusion, there is a statistically significant relationship not only between the response to ICT and the response to CCrt, but also between the response to ICT and the local outcome and survival. (authors)

  3. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  4. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score as a predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Marlies S; Kuppen, Peter J K; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Tezcan, Haluk; Putter, Hein; Clark-Langone, Kim; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; Shak, Steve; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-11-01

    The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay is a validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III colon cancer patients. We conducted a prospectively designed study to validate this assay for prediction of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients from the Dutch Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) trial. RNA was extracted from fixed paraffin-embedded primary rectal tumor tissue from stage II and III patients randomized to TME surgery alone, without (neo)adjuvant treatment. Recurrence Score was assessed by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction using previously validated colon cancer genes and algorithm. Data were analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for stage and resection margin status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Recurrence Score predicted risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 2.21, P = .01), risk of distant recurrence (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.17, P = .03), and rectal cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.34, P = .007). The effect of Recurrence Score was most prominent in stage II patients and attenuated with more advanced stage (P(interaction) ≤ .007 for each endpoint). In stage II, five-year cumulative incidence of recurrence ranged from 11.1% in the predefined low Recurrence Score group (48.5% of patients) to 43.3% in the high Recurrence Score group (23.1% of patients). The 12-gene Recurrence Score is a predictor of recurrence risk and cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery alone, suggesting a similar underlying biology in colon and rectal cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Prostate cancer volume associates with preoperative plasma levels of testosterone that independently predicts high grade tumours which show low densities (quotient testosterone/tumour volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Porcaro

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The investigation shows that TT relates to volume and grade of PCa; moreover, the density of TT relative to TV inversely associates with rate of increase of cancer that depends on the grade of the tumour.

  6. Analysis of influence factors on the volume of pelvic bowel irradiated for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yuxiang; Cai Yong; Zhu Xianggao; Han Shukui; Xu Bo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate influence of prone/ supine position, gender, operation, bladder distension on bowel irradiated for patients with rectal cancer during pelvic radiotherapy. Methods: 36 patients with rectal cancer were investigated. Treatment plans were created with three dimensional treatment planning system. The dose and volume of bowel irradiated were analyzed according to dose-volume histograms (DVH) for every patient. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy. Results: The extent of bladder distension significantly influenced the mean doses and the V 45 high dose volumes of bowel irradiated. The treatment position and gender significantly influenced the V 15 low dose volume of bowel irradiated, the operation significantly influenced the mean doses of bowel. Either prone and supine position, or preoperative and postoperative, the doses of bowel irradiated for good bladder distension were lower and the volumes were smaller than that for bad bladder distension. The V 45 high dose volume of bowel irradiated for bad and good bladder distension at prone position were 15.3% and 7.4% (P=0.023), respectively, and at postoperative 14.1% and 7.2% (P=0.014), respectively. Conclusions: The doses and volumes of pelvic bowel irradiated were significantly influenced by the extent of bladder distension, and partly influenced by the prone/supine position, gender and operation. (authors)

  7. Prognostic and predictive value of liver volume on colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prognostic and predictive value of liver volume in colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases. Sixteen patients received whole liver radiotherapy (WLRT) between January 1997 and June 2013. A total dose of 21 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions. The median survival time after WLRT was 9 weeks. In univariate analysis, performance status, serum albumin and total bilirubin level, liver volume and extrahepatic metastases were associated with survival. The mean liver volume was significantly different between subgroups with and without pain relief (3,097 and 4,739 mL, respectively; p = 0.002). A larger liver volume is a poor prognostic factor for survival and also a negative predictive factor for response to WLRT. If patients who are referred for WLRT have large liver volume, they should be informed of the poor prognosis and should be closely observed during and after WLRT.

  8. Prognostic and predictive value of liver volume on colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To determine the prognostic and predictive value of liver volume in colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases. Sixteen patients received whole liver radiotherapy (WLRT) between January 1997 and June 2013. A total dose of 21 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions. The median survival time after WLRT was 9 weeks. In univariate analysis, performance status, serum albumin and total bilirubin level, liver volume and extrahepatic metastases were associated with survival. The mean liver volume was significantly different between subgroups with and without pain relief (3,097 and 4,739 mL, respectively; p = 0.002). A larger liver volume is a poor prognostic factor for survival and also a negative predictive factor for response to WLRT. If patients who are referred for WLRT have large liver volume, they should be informed of the poor prognosis and should be closely observed during and after WLRT.

  9. Bladder volume variations of cervical cancer patient in radiation therapy using ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The bladder volume change was measured using ultrasonography for helping decrease the side effects and other organ variations in the location of radiation therapy for cervical cancer patients. An experiment was performed targeting patients who were treated with radiation therapy at PNUH within the period from September to December 2015. To maintain the bladder volume, each patient was instructed to drink 500 cc water before and after CT simulation, 60 minutes before the dry run. Also, the bladder volume was measured in each patient CT scan, and a 3D conformal therapy plan was designed. The bladder volumes measured before and after the CT simulation, dry run, and radiation treatment planning were compared and analyzed. The average volume and average error of the bladder that were obtained from the measurement based on the CT scan images had the lowest standard deviation in the CT simulation. This means that the values that were obtained before and after the CT simulation were statistically relevant and correlative. Moreover, the bladder volume measured via ultrasonography was larger size, the average volume in the CT scan. But the values that were obtained Dry run and after the CT simulation were not statistically relevant. Drinking a certain amount of water helps a patient maintain his/her bladder volume for a dry run. Even then, it is difficult to maintain the bladder volume for the dry run. Also, whether or not the patients followed the directions for the dry run correctly is important.

  10. Public Reporting of Hospital-Level Cancer Surgical Volumes in California: An Opportunity to Inform Decision Making and Improve Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christina A; Asch, Steven M; Baker, Laurence; Bilimoria, Karl; Dudley, R Adams; Fong, Niya; Holliday-Hanson, Merry L; Hopkins, David S P; Imholz, Elizabeth M; Malin, Jennifer; Moy, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Maryann; Parker, Joseph P; Saigal, Christopher S; Spurlock, Bruce; Teleki, Stephanie; Zingmond, David; Lang, Lance

    2016-10-01

    Most patients, providers, and payers make decisions about cancer hospitals without any objective data regarding quality or outcomes. We developed two online resources allowing users to search and compare timely data regarding hospital cancer surgery volumes. Hospital cancer surgery volumes for all California hospitals were calculated using ICD-9 coded hospital discharge summary data. Cancer surgeries included (bladder, brain, breast, colon, esophagus, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, rectum, and stomach) were selected on the basis of a rigorous literature review to confirm sufficient evidence of a positive association between volume and mortality. The literature could not identify threshold numbers of surgeries associated with better or worse outcomes. A multidisciplinary working group oversaw the project and ensured sound methodology. In California in 2014, about 60% of surgeries were performed at top-quintile-volume hospitals, but the per-hospital median numbers of surgeries for esophageal, pancreatic, stomach, liver, or bladder cancer surgeries were four or fewer. At least 670 patients received cancer surgery at hospitals that performed only one or two surgeries for a particular cancer type; 72% of those patients lived within 50 miles of a top-quintile-volume hospital. There is clear potential for more readily available information about hospital volumes to help patient, providers, and payers choose cancer surgery hospitals. Our successful public reporting of hospital volumes in California represents an important first step toward making publicly available even more provider-specific data regarding cancer care quality, costs, and outcomes, so those data can inform decision-making and encourage quality improvement.

  11. The efficacy of multimodality treatment for breast cancer depending on the surgery volume in menopausal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomar'ov, Yi.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of conservative treatment in menopausal patients were studied. Irrespective of the volume of surgery, in patients with stage 1 and 2 breast cancer aged over 55, the tumor size (<5 cm), location of the tumor do not influence considerably survival values

  12. Phase III trial of high- vs. low-dose-rate interstitial radiotherapy for early mobile tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Shigetoshi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Early mobile tongue cancer can be controlled with interstitial radiotherapy (ISRT). We carried out a Phase III trial to compare the treatment results of low-dose-rate (Ld) ISRT and high-dose-rate (HDR) ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 1992 through October 1996, 59 patients with cancer of the early mobile tongue were registered in this Phase III study. Eight patients were excluded from the evaluation because of violations of the requirements for this study. Of 51 eligible patients, 26 patients were treated with LDR-ISRT (70 Gy/4-9 days) and 25 patients with HDR-ISRT (60 Gy/10 fractions/1 week). For the hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT, the time interval between 2 fractions was more than 6 h. Results: Five-year local control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 84% and 87% respectively. Nodal metastasis occurred in 6 patients in each group. Five-year nodal control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 77% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer has the same local control compared with continuous LDR-ISRT. Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT is an alternative treatment for continuous LDR-ISRT

  13. Identification of novel peptide ligands for the cancer-specific receptor mutation EFGRvIII using a mixture-based synthetic combinatorial library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denholt, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    We report here, the design and synthesis of a positional scanning synthetic combinatorial library for the identification of novel peptide ligands targeted against the cancer-specific epidermal growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor mutation variant III (EGFRvIII). This receptor is expressed in se...

  14. T3 glottic cancer: an analysis of dose time-volume factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood, A.R.; Beale, F.A.; Cummings, B.J.; Hawkins, N.V.; Keane, T.J.; Rider, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This report analyzes dose-time-volume factors in 112 patients with T3N0M0 glottic cancer who were treated with radical radiotherapy with surgery for salvage between 1963 and 1977. 55% of the patients are alive and well 5 years following treatment; 26% died of glottic cancer and 19% died of intercurrent disease. In the 1965 to 1969 time period, 31% died of tumor as compared to 16% in the 1975 to 1977 time period. Overall local control by radiotherapy was 51%; 2/3 of the failures were surgically salvaged. 44% were locally controlled by radiotherapy in the 1965 to 1969 time period and 57% in the 1975 to 1977 time period. Analysis of dose-time-volume factors reveals that the optimal dose is greater than 1700 ret and a minimal volume of 6 x 8 cm should be used. A dose-cure curve for T3 glottic cancer is constructed and compared with the dose complication curve for the larynx and the dose-cure curve for T1N0M0 glottic cancer. A comparison of cure rates between 112 patients treated with radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage versus 28 patients treated with combined pre-operative irradiation and surgery reveals no difference in the proportion of patients who died of glottic cancer or in the number of patients alive at 5 years following treatment

  15. Reproducibility of mean nuclear volume and correlation with mean nuclear area in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baak, J P; Ladekarl, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1994-01-01

    reproducible and strongly correlated with nuclear vv assessed in the TOTAL. In invasive breast cancer assessments in the whole tumor section can be used if delineation of the measurement area cannot be done easily. In small areas with a limited number of nuclei (eg, microinvasive parts) MNA can be easier......Previous studies have shown that quantitative, histopathologic features obtained from a carefully selected area in the tumor section ("selective" approach) have a strong prognostic value in breast cancer. On the other hand, it was found that mean nuclear volume estimation in the whole area...... as to their intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility in 22 invasive breast cancer cases. The mean nuclear volume (nuclear vv) was assessed both in the most atypical area (AREA) (selected on morphologic criteria) and in the whole tumor section (TOTAL). Furthermore, the correlation with mean nuclear (profile) area...

  16. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [de

  17. Prognostic Factors for Hormone Sensitive Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Impact of Disease Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhanafy, Alshimaa Mahmoud; Zanaty, Fouad; Ibrahem, Reda; Omar, Suzan

    2018-04-27

    Background and Aim: The optimal management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has been controversial in recent years with introduction of upfront chemohormonal treatment based on results of several Western studies. This changing landscape has renewed interest in the concept “disease volume”, the focus of the present study is the Egyptian patients. Methods: Patients with hormone sensitive metastatic prostate cancer presenting at Menoufia University Hospital, Egypt, during the period from June 2013 to May 2016, were enrolled. All received hormonal treatment. Radiologic images were evaluated and patients were stratified according to their disease volume into high or low, other clinical and pathological data that could affect survival also being collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 128 patients were included, with a median age of 70 years (53.9% ≥70). About 46% had co-morbidities, 62% having high volume disease. During the median follow up period of 28 months about half of the patients progressed and one third received chemotherapy. On univariate analysis, disease volume, performance status (PS), prostate specific antigen level (PSA) and presence of pain at presentation were identified as factors influencing overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed the independent predictor factors for survival to be PS, PSA and disease volume. The median overall survival with 27 months was high volume versus 49 with low volume disease (hazard ratio 2.1; 95% CI 1.2 - 4.4; P=0.02). Median progression free survival was 19 months in the high volume, as compared with 48 months in the low volume disease patients (hazard ratio, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.42 – 7.4; P=0.009). Conclusions: Disease volume is a reliable predictor of survival which should be incorporated with other important factors as; patient performance status and comorbidities in treatment decision-making. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. Geographic variation and sociodemographic disparity in the use of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Janki M; Lairson, David R; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the geographic variation and sociodemographic disparities in the use of oxaliplatin chemotherapy, which has not been widely studied in the past. Our results suggest that chemotherapy use varies across geographic regions. Patterns of use that relate specifically to oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy can inform providers and researchers how newer regimens are being used as standard chemotherapy in a real-world setting. According to the National Cancer Comprehensive Network (NCCN), oxaliplatin with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (5-FU/LV) is the recommended adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with resected stage III colon cancer. Age and race are considered strong predictors of chemotherapy receipt, whereas geographic disparity has received minimal attention. The purpose of this study was to examine geographic variation and sociodemographic disparity in the use of chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer, focusing specifically on oxaliplatin. A retrospective cohort of 4106 Medicare patients was identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)/Medicare linked database. Descriptive statistics show how oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy was used in various geographic regions among different age and racial groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between receipt of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy and geographic region while adjusting for other sociodemographic and tumor characteristics. Only 49% of the patients with stage III disease received adjuvant chemotherapy within 3 to 6 months of colon cancer-specific surgery. Patients aged 66 to 70 years were 78% more likely to receive chemotherapy than were those aged 80 years and older (Pcancer care to all patients according to their preferences and needs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Going the Extra Mile: Improved Survival for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Traveling to High-volume Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidsky, Michael E; Sun, Zhifei; Nussbaum, Daniel P; Adam, Mohamed A; Speicher, Paul J; Blazer, Dan G

    2017-08-01

    This study compares outcomes following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for patients treated at local, low-volume centers and those traveling to high-volume centers. Although outcomes for PD are superior at high-volume institutions, not all patients live in proximity to major medical centers. Theoretical advantages for undergoing surgery locally exist. The 1998 to 2012 National Cancer Data Base was queried for T1-3N0-1M0 pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients who underwent PD. Travel distances to treatment centers were calculated. Overlaying the upper and lower quartiles of travel distance with institutional volume established short travel/low-volume (ST/LV) and long travel/high-volume (LT/HV) cohorts. Overall survival was evaluated. Of 7086 patients, 773 ST/LV patients traveled ≤6.3 (median 3.2) miles to centers performing ≤3.3 PDs yearly, and 758 LT/HV patients traveled ≥45 (median 97.3) miles to centers performing ≥16 PDs yearly. LT/HV patients had higher stage disease (P travel to a high-volume center remained associated with reduced long-term mortality (hazard ratio 0.75, P travel burden, patients treated at high-volume centers had improved perioperative outcomes, short-term mortality, and overall survival. These data support ongoing efforts to centralize care for patients undergoing PD.

  20. Defining the target volume for post-operative radiotherapy after D2 dissection in gastric cancer by CT-based vessel-guided delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hong In; Chang, Jee Suk; Lim, Joon Seok; Noh, Sung Hoon; Hyung, Woo Jin; An, Ji Yeong; Lee, Yong Chan; Rha, Sun Young; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Koom, Woong Sub

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the recurrent nodal gross tumor volume (rnGTV) based on CT-guided vascular structure to refine the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in postoperative radiotherapy for advanced gastric cancer following radical gastrectomy with D2 dissection. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed follow-up images from 91 patients with their first regional recurrence after D2 dissection in stage III gastric cancer with N3 disease. We defined rnGTV as recurrent nodes shown in follow-up CT images, in which one diagnostic radiologist with specialty of gastrointestinal tract investigated. We drew rnGTVs at the equivalent location based on the same vessels of reference comparing CT images to recurrence CT images. Results: We propose vessel-based locations of rnGTVs on CT images with axial and coronal views. We show different patterns of regional recurrence according to the location of primary gastric cancer using CT and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images. Frequently recurred sites, overlapped by more than five rnGTVs, are depicted in a DRR image. Conclusions: This study suggests vessel-based delineations of rnGTVs on CT images depending on nodal recurrence sites from follow-up images after D2 lymphadenectomy. Our results could help reduce the inter-observer variation of CTV delineation after D2 dissection in gastric cancer

  1. Comparison of outcomes in patients with stage III versus limited stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, Praveena; Metcalfe, Su K; Metcalfe, Justin; Chen, Yuhchyau; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Standard therapy for metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes palliative systemic chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recent studies of patients with limited metastases treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have shown encouraging survival. We hypothesized that patients treated with SBRT for limited metastases have comparable outcomes with those treated with curative-intent radiation for Stage III NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of NSCLC patients treated with curative-intent radiotherapy at the University of Rochester from 2000-2008. We identified 3 groups of patients with NSCLC: stage III, stage IV, and recurrent stage IV (initial stage I-II). All stage IV NSCLC patients treated with SBRT had ≤ 8 lesions. Of 146 patients, 88% had KPS ≥ 80%, 30% had > 5% weight loss, and 95% were smokers. The 5-year OS from date of NSCLC diagnosis for stage III, initial stage IV and recurrent stage IV was 7%, 14%, and 27% respectively. The 5-year OS from date of metastatic diagnosis was significantly (p < 0.00001) superior among those with limited metastases (≤ 8 lesions) versus stage III patients who developed extensive metastases not amenable to SBRT (14% vs. 0%). Stage IV NSCLC is a heterogeneous patient population, with a selected cohort apparently faring better than Stage III patients. Though patients with limited metastases are favorably selected by virtue of more indolent disease and/or less bulky disease burden, perhaps staging these patients differently is appropriate for prognostic and treatment characterization. Aggressive local therapy may be indicated in these patients, though prospective clinical studies are needed

  2. Tumor cavitation in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy: incidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phernambucq, Erik C J; Hartemink, Koen J; Smit, Egbert F; Paul, Marinus A; Postmus, Pieter E; Comans, Emile F I; Senan, Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Commonly reported complications after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) include febrile neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and pneumonitis. We studied the incidence of tumor cavitation and/or "tumor abscess" after CCRT in a single-institutional cohort. Between 2003 and 2010, 87 patients with stage III NSCLC underwent cisplatin-based CCRT and all subsequent follow-up at the VU University Medical Center. Diagnostic and radiotherapy planning computed tomography scans were reviewed for tumor cavitation, which was defined as a nonbronchial air-containing cavity located within the primary tumor. Pulmonary toxicities scored as Common Toxicity Criteria v3.0 of grade III or more, occurring within 90 days after end of radiotherapy, were analyzed. In the entire cohort, tumor cavitation was observed on computed tomography scans of 16 patients (18%). The histology in cavitated tumors was squamous cell (n = 14), large cell (n = 1), or adenocarcinoma (n = 1). Twenty patients (23%) experienced pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more, other than radiation pneumonitis. Eight patients with a tumor cavitation (seven squamous cell carcinoma) developed severe pulmonary complications; tumor abscess (n = 5), fatal hemorrhage (n = 2), and fatal embolism (n = 1). Two patients with a tumor abscess required open-window thoracostomy post-CCRT. The median overall survival for patients with or without tumor cavitation were 9.9 and 16.3 months, respectively (p = 0.09). With CCRT, acute pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more developed in 50% of patients with stage III NSCLC, who also had radiological features of tumor cavitation. The optimal treatment of patients with this presentation is unclear given the high risk of a tumor abscess.

  3. Organ preservation in stage II and III head and neck cancer utilizing alternate week concomitant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, David B.; Vokes, Everett; Mittal, Bharat B.; Stenson, Kerstin; Kies, M.; Pelzer, H.; Nautiyal, Jaishanker; Kozloff, Mark; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Haraf, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase II trial was conducted to determine the efficacy and rate of organ preservation of alternate week concomitant chemoradiotherapy in stage II and III head and neck cancer. Methods: Forty-nine patients (10 stage II and 39 stage III) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region have been entered into a prospective phase II trial. Pretreatment evaluation included history and physical examination, computed tomography of the neck, bone scan, chest x-ray, panendoscopy and biopsy confirmation of malignancy. Therapy is given in 2 week cycles consisting of 5 days of concomitant chemoradiotherapy followed by a nine day break during which no treatment is given. Each cycle of treatment consists of 1.0 gm hydroxyurea P.O. every 12 hours for 6 days (11 doses per cycle) and 800mg/m 2 /d continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil along with concomitant radiation therapy (RT) administered in 1.8-2.0 Gy daily fractions for five days. This alternate week (week on/week off) schedule is continued for a total of 7 cycles resulting in an overall treatment time of 13 weeks and a total RT dose of 70 Gy. Extent of initial surgery included biopsy only (59.2%), minimal laser debulking (12.2%), and resection with or without neck dissection (28.6%). Results: The majority of patients are male (71.4%), with a median age of 61.3 years. Primary sites included oral cavity (16.3%), oropharynx (12.2%), larynx (57.1%), hypopharynx (8.1%), and nasopharynx (4.1%). T stage included T3 (32 patients, 65.3%), T2 (16 patients, 32.7%), and T1 (1 patient). N stage included N1 (17 patients, 34.7%), and N0 (32 patients, 65.3%). With a median follow-up of 27 months, the overall response rate is 100% (91.7 complete response, and 8.3% partial response). The 5 year actuarial local control, disease free survival, and overall survival is 90.1%, 88.3%, and 65.0%, respectively. One patient has failed with distant disease alone. Four patients had isolated local failures and (3(4)) were

  4. Phase III Study of Cabozantinib in Previously Treated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: COMET-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew; De Bono, Johann; Sternberg, Cora; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Oudard, Stéphane; De Giorgi, Ugo; Krainer, Michael; Bergman, Andries; Hoelzer, Wolfgang; De Wit, Ronald; Bögemann, Martin; Saad, Fred; Cruciani, Giorgio; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine; Feyerabend, Susan; Miller, Kurt; Houédé, Nadine; Hussain, Syed; Lam, Elaine; Polikoff, Jonathan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Mainwaring, Paul; Ramies, David; Hessel, Colin; Weitzman, Aaron; Fizazi, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of kinases, including MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, and has shown activity in men with previously treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This blinded phase III trial compared cabozantinib with prednisone in patients with mCRPC. Men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel and abiraterone and/or enzalutamide were randomly assigned at a two-to-one ratio to cabozantinib 60 mg once per day or prednisone 5 mg twice per day. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Bone scan response (BSR) at week 12 as assessed by independent review committee was the secondary end point; radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and effects on circulating tumor cells (CTCs), bone biomarkers, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs) were exploratory assessments. A total of 1,028 patients were randomly assigned to cabozantinib (n = 682) or prednisone (n = 346). Median OS was 11.0 months with cabozantinib and 9.8 months with prednisone (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.06; stratified log-rank P = .213). BSR at week 12 favored cabozantinib (42% v 3%; stratified Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel P < .001). rPFS was improved in the cabozantinib group (median, 5.6 v 2.8 months; hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.57; stratified log-rank P < .001). Cabozantinib was associated with improvements in CTC conversion, bone biomarkers, and post-random assignment incidence of SSEs but not PSA outcomes. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events and discontinuations because of adverse events were higher with cabozantinib than with prednisone (71% v 56% and 33% v 12%, respectively). Cabozantinib did not significantly improve OS compared with prednisone in heavily treated patients with mCRPC and progressive disease after docetaxel and abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. Cabozantinib had some activity in improving BSR, rPFS, SSEs, CTC conversions, and bone biomarkers but not PSA outcomes. © 2016 by

  5. Sunitinib versus sorafenib in advanced hepatocellular cancer: results of a randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lin, Deng-Yn; Park, Joong-Won; Kudo, Masatoshi; Qin, Shukui; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Song, Xiangqun; Xu, Jianming; Poggi, Guido; Omata, Masao; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Lanzalone, Silvana; Yang, Liqiang; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Raymond, Eric

    2013-11-10

    Open-label, phase III trial evaluating whether sunitinib was superior or equivalent to sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer. Patients were stratified and randomly assigned to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg once per day or sorafenib 400 mg twice per day. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Early trial termination occurred for futility and safety reasons. A total of 1,074 patients were randomly assigned to the study (sunitinib arm, n = 530; sorafenib arm, n = 544). For sunitinib and sorafenib, respectively, median OS was 7.9 versus 10.2 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; one-sided P = .9990; two-sided P = .0014); median progression-free survival (PFS; 3.6 v 3.0 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8785; two-sided P = .2286) and time to progression (TTP; 4.1 v 3.8 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8312; two-sided P = .3082) were comparable. Median OS was similar among Asian (7.7 v 8.8 months; HR, 1.21; one-sided P = .9829) and hepatitis B-infected patients (7.6 v 8.0 months; HR, 1.10; one-sided P = .8286), but was shorter with sunitinib in hepatitis C-infected patients (9.2 v 17.6 months; HR, 1.52; one-sided P = .9835). Sunitinib was associated with more frequent and severe adverse events (AEs) than sorafenib. Common grade 3/4 AEs were thrombocytopenia (29.7%) and neutropenia (25.7%) for sunitinib; hand-foot syndrome (21.2%) for sorafenib. Discontinuations owing to AEs were similar (sunitinib, 13.3%; sorafenib, 12.7%). OS with sunitinib was not superior or equivalent but was significantly inferior to sorafenib. OS was comparable in Asian and hepatitis B-infected patients. OS was superior in hepatitis C-infected patients who received sorafenib. Sunitinib-treated patients reported more frequent and severe toxicity.

  6. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume III.- Extremadura; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles Volumen III.- Extremadura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C; Millam, R; Schmid, T; Roquero, C; Magister, M

    1998-12-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Extremadura. (Author) 50 refs.

  7. The value of level III clearance in patients with axillary and sentinel node positive breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, Mary F

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of level III axillary clearance is contentious, with great variance worldwide in the extent and levels of clearance performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine rates of level III positivity in patients undergoing level I-III axillary clearance, and identify which patients are at highest risk of involved level III nodes. METHODS: From a database of 2850 patients derived from symptomatic and population-based screening service, 1179 patients who underwent level I-III clearance between the years 1999-2007 were identified. The pathology, surgical details, and prior sentinel nodes biopsies of patients were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven hundred seventy nine patients had level I-III axillary clearance. Of the patients, 63% (n = 747) were node positive. Of patients with node positive disease, 23% (n = 168) were level II positive and 19% (n = 141) were level III positive. Two hundred fifty patients had positive sentinel node biopsies prior to axillary clearance. Of these, 12% (n = 30) and 9% (n = 22) were level II and level III positive, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of level III involvement in patients with node positive disease were tumor size (P < 0.001, OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.2-1.5), invasive lobular disease (P < 0.001, OR = 3.6; 95% CI: 1.9-6.95), extranodal extension (P < 0.001, OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.18-0.4), and lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.04, OR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-1). Lobular invasive disease (P = 0.049, OR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1-16.8), extranodal spread (P = 0.003, OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.06-0.57), and having more than one positive sentinel node (P = 0.009, OR = 4.9; 95% CI: 1.5-16.1) were predictive of level III involvement in patients with sentinel node positive disease. CONCLUSION: Level III clearance has a selective but definite role to play in patients who have node positive breast carcinoma. Pathological characteristics of the primary tumor are of particular use in identifying those who are at various risk of level III nodal

  8. Profile of differentially expressed genes mediated by the type III epidermal growth factor receptor mutation expressed in a small-cell lung cancer cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.W.; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a correlation between expression of the EGF receptor type III mutation (EGFRvIII) and a more malignant phenotype of various cancers including: non-small-cell lung cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, prostate cancer and breast cancer. Thus, a detailed molecular genetic...... understanding of how the EGFRvIII contributes to the malignant phenotype is of major importance for future therapy. The GeneChip Hu6800Set developed by Affymetrix was used to identify changes in gene expression caused by the expression of EGFRvIII. The cell line selected for the study was an EGF receptor...... negative small-cell-lung cancer cell line, GLC3, stably transfected with the EGFRvIII gene in a Tet-On system. By comparison of mRNA levels in EGFRvIII-GLC3 with those of Tet-On-GLC3, it was found that the levels of mRNAs encoding several transcription factors (ATF-3, JunD, and c-Myb), cell adhesion...

  9. Frequency of breast cancer with hereditary risk features in Spain: Analysis from GEICAM "El Álamo III" retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Pollán, Marina; Escudero, María José; Ruiz, Amparo; Martín, Miguel; Santaballa, Ana; Martínez Del Prado, Purificación; Batista, Norberto; Andrés, Raquel; Antón, Antonio; Llombart, Antonio; Fernandez Aramburu, Antonio; Adrover, Encarnación; González, Sonia; Seguí, Miguel Angel; Calvo, Lourdes; Lizón, José; Rodríguez Lescure, Álvaro; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Llort, Gemma; Jara, Carlos; Carrasco, Eva; López-Tarruella, Sara

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of breast cancer (BC) patients with hereditary risk features in a wide retrospective cohort of patients in Spain. a retrospective analysis was conducted from 10,638 BC patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2001 in the GEICAM registry "El Álamo III", dividing them into four groups according to modified ESMO and SEOM hereditary cancer risk criteria: Sporadic breast cancer group (R0); Individual risk group (IR); Familial risk group (FR); Individual and familial risk group (IFR) with both individual and familial risk criteria. 7,641 patients were evaluable. Of them, 2,252 patients (29.5%) had at least one hereditary risk criteria, being subclassified in: FR 1.105 (14.5%), IR 970 (12.7%), IFR 177 (2.3%). There was a higher frequency of newly diagnosed metastatic patients in the IR group (5.1% vs 3.2%, p = 0.02). In contrast, in RO were lower proportion of big tumors (> T2) (43.8% vs 47.4%, p = 0.023), nodal involvement (43.4% vs 48.1%, p = 0.004) and lower histological grades (20.9% G3 for the R0 vs 29.8%) when compared to patients with any risk criteria. Almost three out of ten BC patients have at least one hereditary risk cancer feature that would warrant further genetic counseling. Patients with hereditary cancer risk seems to be diagnosed with worse prognosis factors.

  10. Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in stage I-II synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollamudi, Smitha V; Gelman, Rebecca S; Peiro, Gloria; Schneider, Lindsey; Connolly, James L; Schnitt, Stuart; Silver, Barbara; Harris, Jay R

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether patients with early-stage SBBC can be safely and effectively treated with bilateral BCT. MATERIALS and METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of 26 patients with clinical Stage I-II SBBC treated between 1968-1989 with bilateral BCT. SBBC was defined as tumors diagnosed no more than one month apart, with both sides demonstrating invasive cancer. Maximum (max) clinical stage was based on the more advanced breast tumor. Median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 32-85 years); menopausal status was 6 pre-, 16 post-, 3 peri-, and 1 unknown at diagnosis. Median follow-up for surviving pts is 95 months (range, 68-157). Outcome was compared to 1325 pts with unilateral Stage I or II breast cancer, within the same age range, treated during the same time period. There were no significant differences in median age, median total dose, tumor size, estrogen receptor (ER) status, pathologic nodal status, and use of systemic therapy between the study population and the comparison group. Local recurrence (LR) was evaluated as true recurrence (TR, i.e., in the original tumor bed), marginal miss (MM, at the edge of the boost field), or elsewhere (E). Median total dose to the primary was 6100 cGy (range, 5000-7000). Pathology was available for review in 19 cases. Cytology (nuclear and cytoplasmic features) was similar in (7(19)) evaluable cases, and architecture (growth pattern, ie, papillary, solid) was similar in (5(19)) cases. The presence of either cytologic or architectural similarity was noted in(9(19)) cases. 7 of 19 pts who had axillary lymph node evaluation on at least one side had pathological confirmation of lymph node metastasis. Stage was the same in both breasts in 13 cases (10 Stage I, 3 Stage II); ER status data was complete in 11 pts, and the same in both primaries in 9 cases. Cosmetic results and complications after BCT were scored. Statistical significance was evaluated by use of the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: The 5-yr actuarial

  11. Preliminary study of the internal margin of the gross tumor volume in thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiancheng; Pan, Jianji; Wang, Linhua; Zhao, Yunhui; Liu, Di; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, He Ping; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To measure the displacement of the tumor of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of thoracic esophageal cancer in the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration for determining the internal margin of the GTV (IGTV). Methods. - Twenty-two patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who were unable to undergo surgery were identified in our hospital. The patients received radiotherapy. By using 16-slice spiral computed tomography (CT), we acquired the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration. The displacement and volume changes in tumor target volume were measured, and the changes were analyzed to determine if these were associated with the tidal volume and the location and length of the target volume V. In the end, we analyzed the displacement of tumor target volume and calculated the internal margin of the GTV by empirical formula. Results. - The average tidal volume was 463.6 ml. The average GTV at end-inspiration was 33.3 ml and at end-expiration was 33.35 ml. Three was not any significant between two groups (T -0.034, P > 0.05). The IGTV (X-axis direction) was 3.09 mm for the right sector and 4.08 mm for the left border; the IGTV (Z-axis direction) was 3.96 mm for the anterior border and 2.83 mm for the posterior border; and the IGTV (Y-axis direction) was 7.31 mm for the upper boundary (head direction) and 10.16 mm for the lower boundary (feet direction). The motion of the GTV showed no significant correlation with the tidal volume of patients and the length of the tumor, but in relation to the tumor location, the displacement of the lower thoracic and the middle thoracic target volumes occurred in the direction of the anterior and right, which were not significantly different (T = 0.859, 0.229, P > 0.05) The significant differences were observed for the other directions (P < 0.05). Conclusions. - Because of respiratory and organ movements, the displacement of the tumor target volume was different in all directions. Therefore, we recommend that

  12. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Waxweiller, Timothy; Koo, Phillip; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Rusthoven, Chad; Gaspar, Laurie; Kavanagh, Brian; Miften, Moyed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assess each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional avoidance

  13. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Waxweiller, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Koo, Phillip [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Rusthoven, Chad; Gaspar, Laurie; Kavanagh, Brian; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assess each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional

  14. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  15. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME III: LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: NASHUA CORPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume discusses Nashua Corporation's Omaha facility, a label and label stock manufacturing facility that no longer uses solvent-based adhesives. Information obtained includes issues related to the technical, economic, and environmental barriers and opportunities associated ...

  16. Self-assembled Targeting of Cancer Cells by Iron(III)-doped, Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, K.K. Pohaku; Sandoval, S.; Cortes-Mateos, M. J.; Alfaro, J.G.; Kummel, A. C.; Trogler, W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Iron(III)-doped silica nanoshells are shown to possess an in vitro cell-receptor mediated targeting functionality for endocytosis. Compared to plain silica nanoparticles, iron enriched ones are shown to be target-specific, a property that makes them potentially better vehicles for applications, such as drug delivery and tumor imaging, by making them more selective and thereby reducing the nanoparticle dose. Iron(III) in the nanoshells can interact with endogenous transferrin, a serum protein ...

  17. Avelumab (anti-PD-L1) in platinum-resistant/refractory ovarian cancer: JAVELIN Ovarian 200 Phase III study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Dychter, Samuel S; Devgan, Geeta; Monk, Bradley J

    2018-03-27

    Avelumab is a human anti-PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor with clinical activity in multiple solid tumors. Here, we describe the rationale and design for JAVELIN Ovarian 200 (NCT02580058), the first randomized Phase III trial to evaluate the role of checkpoint inhibition in women with ovarian cancer. This three-arm trial is comparing avelumab administered alone or in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin alone in patients with platinum-resistant/refractory recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer. Eligible patients are not preselected based on PD-L1 expression and may have received up to three prior lines of chemotherapy for platinum-sensitive disease, but none for resistant disease. Overall survival and progression-free survival are primary end points, and secondary end points include biomarker evaluations and pharmacokinetics.

  18. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of mitochondrial membrane complexes (MMCs) I, III, IV and V in malignant and benign periampullary epithelium: a potential target for drug therapy of periampullary cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloysius, Mark M; Zaitoun, Abed M; Bates, Timothy E; Ilyas, Mohammad; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Rowlands, Brian J; Lobo, Dileep N

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane complexes (MMCs) are key mediators of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and inhibiting them could lead to cell death. No published data are available on the relative abundance of MMCs in different periampullary cancers. Therefore, we studied the expression profile of MMCs I, III, IV and V in periampullary cancers, reactive pancreatitis, normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis. This was a retrospective study on tissue microarrays constructed from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 126 consecutive patients (cancer = 104, chronic pancreatitis = 22) undergoing pancreatic resections between June 2001 and June 2006. 78 specimens of chronic pancreatitis tissue were obtained adjacent to areas of cancer. Normal pancreatic tissue was obtained from the resection specimens in a total of 30 patients. Metastatic tumours in 61 regional lymph nodes from 61 patients were also studied. MMCs I, III, IV and V were highly expressed (p < 0.05) in all primary periampullary cancers compared with metastatic lymph nodes and adjacent benign pancreas. MMCs III, IV and V were highly expressed in all cancers regardless of type compared with chronic pancreatitis (p < 0.05). Higher expression of MMCs I and V was associated with better survival and may, in part, relate to lower expression of these MMCs in poorly differentiated tumours compared with well and moderately differentiated tumours. Differential expression of MMCs III, IV and V in primary periampullary cancers compared with adjacent benign periampullary tissue and chronic pancreatitis is a novel finding, which may render them attractive anticancer targets

  20. Use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer in Puerto Rico: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Ríos-Motta, Ruth; Veintidós-Feliú, Alejandro; Hunter-Mellado, Robert; Torres-Cintrón, Carlos R.; Suárez-Ramos, Tonatiuh; Magno, Priscilla

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study aims to examine factors associated with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and the use of oxaliplatin after curative resection in stage III colon cancer patients and assesses the effect of their use in three-year survival. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted using Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry-Health Insurance Linkage Database. The study cohort consisted of stage III colon cancer patients with a curative surgery in the period 2008–2012. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between adjuvant chemotherapy and oxaliplatin use and overall survival and risk of death, respectively. Results Overall, 75% of the study population received adjuvant chemotherapy during the study period. Factors statistically associated with receiving adjuvant chemotherapy within four months after resection included being married (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.64; 95% CI 1.18–2.28; p = 0.003), and being enrolled in Medicare (AOR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.03–2.75; p = 0.039) or Medicaid and Medicare dual eligible (AOR 1.66; 95% CI: 1.06–2.60; p = 0.028). However, patients aged ≥70 years were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (AOR 0.22; 95%CI 0.14–0.36; p<0.001). Discussion We observed a significant reduction in mortality in adjuvant chemotherapy treated patients. Similarly, patients <70 years treated with oxaliplatin had significantly lower risk of death than those who did not, although for patients ≥70 years no statistical significance was achieved. Future studies should assess effective interventions to reduce barriers to access guideline-based recommended colon cancer treatment. PMID:29584752

  1. Could semiquantitative FDG analysis add information to the prognosis in patients with stage II/III breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy); Ghiotto, Cristina; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Medical Oncology 2 Unit, Padua (Italy); Saibene, Tania; Michieletto, Silvia; Fernando, Bozza [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Breast Unit, Padua (Italy); Orvieto, Enrico [University Hospital of Padua, Department of Pathology, Padua (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We investigated whether maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and whole-body (WB) SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could improve prognostic stratification in patients with stage II/III breast cancer (BC). We prospectively enrolled 99 consecutive women (median age 50 years, range 27 - 77 years) with pathologically proven stage II/III BC who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were measured in all malignant lesions. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to test for relationships among WB SUVmax, WB MTV, WB TLG, and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), after adjustment for age, and histopathological and immunohistochemical features (oestrogen/progesterone and HER2 expression, proliferation index and grade). The median values of WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were 16.2 (range 1.5 - 33.1), 14 cm{sup 3} (range 0.03 - 708.6 cm{sup 3}) and 62.5 (0.06 - 3869.4), respectively. All WB semiquantitative values were higher in patients with higher TNM stage, although not significantly (all p > 0.05). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 30 months, with a range of 13 - 45 months. Both PFS and OS of patients with low WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were longer than that of patients with high WB values for progression, although not statistically significant. However, stratifying the patients in accordance with the stage of disease, both PFS and OS were significantly lower in patients with high WB TLG and stage III than in patients with stage II (p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, WB MTV and WB TLG were independent prognostic factors for PFS (hazard ratio 1.004, 95 % confidence interval 1.002 - 1.006, p < 0.001, and hazard ratio 1.001, 95 % confidence interval 1.000 - 1.001, p = 0.011, respectively). The addition of WB TLG to clinical data may provide a more detailed

  2. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume III. Estuaries and coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupka, R.C.; Sharma, R.K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 32 power plants, located on estuaries and coastal waters has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV

  3. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume III: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This volume contains information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the six options described in Volume 1, Section 2: Option 1 -- Total removal clean closure; No subsequent use; Option 2 -- Risk-based clean closure; LLW fill; Option 3 -- Risk-based clean closure; CERCLA fill; Option 4 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; LLW fill; Option 5 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; CERCLA fill; and Option 6 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; Clean fill. This volume is divided into two portions. The first portion contains the cost and planning schedule estimates while the second portion contains life-cycle costs and yearly cash flow information for each option

  4. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume III. Estuaries and coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupka, Richard C.; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 32 power plants, located on estuaries and coastal waters has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV.

  5. Radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: volume definition and patient selection. Annecy 1998 international Association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) Workshop recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Loubeyre, P.; Van houtte, P.; Scalliet, P.

    1998-01-01

    Chemo-radiation is the standard treatment of unresectable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, with a mean dose of 60-66 Gy, excluding escalation dose schemes. The standard treated volume includes primary tumor, ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes, supraclavicular and contralateral nodes as well, regardless of the node status. This work tries to answer the question of the optimal volume to be treated. Drainage routes analysis is in favor of large volumes, while toxicity analysis favors small volumes. Combined modality treatment may increase the observed toxicity. The optimal volume definition is difficult, and requires available conformal therapy tools. Patients selection is another important issue. A volume definition is then attempted, based on the IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Annecy workshop experience, highlighting the inter-observers discrepancies, and suggests basic recommendations to harmonize volume definition. (author)

  6. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tatsuya [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Takegawa, Hideki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Anneyuko I. [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Korevaar, Erik W., E-mail: e.w.korevaar@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D{sub 2} − D{sub 98}, where D{sub 2} and D{sub 98} are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to <98% (clinical threshold) in 3 of 10 patients for robust 5-mm evaluations. However, the TC remained >98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range

  7. The current status of emergency operations at a high-volume cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Koji; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawai, Ryosuke; Kawakami, Jiro; Asano, Tomonari; Iwata, Yoshinori; Kurahashi, Shintaro; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the pathogenic causes, clinical conditions, surgical procedures, in-hospital mortality, and operative death associated with emergency operations at a high-volume cancer center. Although many reports have described the contents, operative procedures, and prognosis of elective surgeries in high-volume cancer centers, emergency operations have not been studied in sufficient detail. We retrospectively enrolled 28 consecutive patients who underwent emergency surgery. Cases involving operative complications were excluded. The following surgical procedures were performed during emergency operations: closure in 3 cases (10.7%), diversion in 22 cases (78.6%), ileus treatment in 2 cases (7.1%), and hemostasis in 1 case (3.6%). Closure alone was performed only once for peritonitis. Diversion was performed in 17 cases (77.3%) of peritonitis, 4 cases (18.2%) of stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and 1 case (4.5%) of bleeding. There was a significant overall difference (P = 0.001). The frequency of emergency operations was very low at a high-volume cancer center. However, the recent shift in treatment approaches toward nonoperative techniques may enhance the status of emergency surgical procedures. The results presented in this study will help prepare for emergency situations and resolve them as quickly and efficiently as possible.

  8. Randomized Phase III and Extension Studies of Naldemedine in Patients With Opioid-Induced Constipation and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Harada, Toshiyuki; Murata, Toru; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Yokota, Takaaki; Arai, Masatsugu; Tada, Yukio; Narabayashi, Masaru; Boku, Narikazu

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a frequent and debilitating adverse effect (AE) of opioids-common analgesics for cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist, naldemedine (S-297995), for OIC, specifically in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods This phase III trial consisted of a 2-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (COMPOSE-4) and an open-label, 12-week extension study (COMPOSE-5). In COMPOSE-4, eligible adults with OIC and cancer were randomly assigned on a 1:1 basis to receive once-daily oral naldemedine 0.2 mg or placebo. The primary end point was the proportion of spontaneous bowel movement (SBM) responders (≥ 3 SBMs/week and an increase of ≥ 1 SBM/week from baseline). The primary end point of COMPOSE-5 was safety. Results In COMPOSE-4, 193 eligible patients were randomly assigned to naldemedine (n = 97) or placebo (n = 96). The proportion of SBM responders in COMPOSE-4 was significantly greater with naldemedine than with placebo (71.1% [69 of 97 patients] v 34.4% [33 of 96 patients]; P opioid withdrawal and had no notable impact on opioid-mediated analgesia. Conclusion Once-daily oral naldemedine 0.2 mg effectively treated OIC and was generally well tolerated in patients with OIC and cancer.

  9. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  10. Association between partial-volume corrected SUVmax and Oncotype DX recurrence score in early-stage, ER-positive/HER2-negative invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Ha, Seunggyun; An, Hyun Joon; Lee, Jae Sung; Han, Wonshik; Im, Seock-Ah; Ryu, Han Suk; Kim, Won Hwa; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Oncotype DX, a 21-gene expression assay, provides a recurrence score (RS) which predicts prognosis and the benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early-stage, estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-negative) invasive breast cancer. However, Oncotype DX tests are expensive and not readily available in all institutions. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether metabolic parameters on (18)F-FDG PET/CT are associated with the Oncotype DX RS and whether (18)F-FDG PET/CT can be used to predict the Oncotype DX RS. The study group comprised 38 women with stage I/II, ER-positive/HER2-negative invasive breast cancer who underwent pretreatment (18)F-FDG PET/CT and Oncotype DX testing. On PET/CT, maximum (SUVmax) and average standardized uptake values, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis were measured. Partial volume-corrected SUVmax (PVC-SUVmax) determined using the recovery coefficient method was also evaluated. Oncotype DX RS (0 - 100) was categorized as low (negative breast cancer.

  11. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Dose-volume analysis for quality assurance of interstitial brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Jaffray, David A.; Wong, John W.; Kini, Vijay R.; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer has increased significantly over the past several years. Unfortunately, few techniques have been developed to compare dosimetric quality and target volume coverage concurrently. We present a new method of implant evaluation that incorporates computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D) dose-volume analysis with traditional measures of brachytherapy quality. Analyses performed in this fashion will be needed to ultimately assist in determining the efficacy of breast implants. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, brachytherapy has been used as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy in selected protocol patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Eight patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy who had surgical clips outlining the lumpectomy cavity and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning after implant placement were selected for this study. For each patient, the postimplant CT dataset was transferred to a 3D treatment planning system. The lumpectomy cavity, target volume (lumpectomy cavity plus a 1-cm margin), and entire breast were outlined on each axial slice. Once all volumes were entered, the programmed HDR brachytherapy source positions and dwell times were imported into the 3D planning system. Using the tools provided by the 3D planning system, the implant dataset was then registered to the visible implant template in the CT dataset. The distribution of the implant dose was analyzed with respect to defined volumes via dose-volume histograms (DVH). Isodose surfaces, the dose homogeneity index, and dosimetric coverage of the defined volumes were calculated and contrasted. All patients received 32 Gy to the entire implanted volume in 8 fractions of 4 Gy over 4 days. Results: Three-plane implants were used for 7 patients and a two-plane implant for 1 patient. The median number of needles per implant was 16.5 (range

  15. Prostate specific cancer volume: a significant prognostic factor in prostate cancer patients at intermediate risk of failing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, S.P.; Pollack, A.; Zagars, G.K.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Although the pretreatment serum prostate specific antigen level (PSAL) is the single most significant predictor of local and biochemical control in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, it is relatively insensitive for patients with a PSAL in the intermediate range (4-20 ng/ml). PSA density (PSAD) has been shown to be slightly more predictive of outcome than PSAL for this intermediate risk group; however, this improvement is small and of little use clinically. PSA cancer volume (PSACV) is an estimate of cancer volume based on PSA that was recently described by D'Amico and Propert (IJROBP 32:232, 1995) as providing significant and independent prognostic information in addition to PSAL. We report here a detailed comparison between this new prognostic factor, PSAL, and PSAD. Methods and Materials: The records of 356 patients treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy for regionally localized (T1-4, Nx, M0) adenocarcinoma of the prostate were reviewed. Each patient had a PSAL, biopsy Gleason score, and pretreatment prostate volume by transrectal ultrasonography. The median PSAL was 9.3 ng/ml and 66% had Gleason scores in the 2-6 range. The median radiation dose was 66.0 Gy and the median follow-up for those living was 27 months. PSACV is a calculated parameter that takes into account PSAL (total PSA), ultrasonographic prostate volume (estimate of PSA from benign epithelium), and Gleason grade (estimate of PSA per tumor volume). The median PSACV was 1.43 cc. Biochemical failure was defined as increases in two consecutive follow-up PSA levels, one increase by a factor > 1.5, or an absolute increase of > 1 ng/ml. Local failure was defined as a cancer-positive prostate biopsy, usually undertaken because of evidence of biochemical failure. Results: The distributions of PSACV and PSAL were similar and, when normalized by log-transformation, were highly correlated (p 4 cc, as compared to those with a PSACV ≤ 0.5 cc, was over 30%. Conclusion

  16. TS gene polymorphisms are not good markers of response to 5-FU therapy in stage III colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariña-Sarasqueta, A; Gosens, M J E M; Moerland, E; van Lijnschoten, I; Lemmens, V E P P; Slooter, G D; Rutten, H J T; van den Brule, Adriaan J C

    2011-08-01

    Although the predictive and prognostic value of thymidylate synthase (TS) expression and gene polymorphism in colon cancer has been widely studied, the results are inconclusive probably because of methodological differences. With this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of TS gene polymorphisms genotyping in therapy response in stage III colon carcinoma patients treated with 5-FU adjuvant chemotherapy. 251 patients diagnosed with stage III colon carcinoma treated with surgery followed by 5-FU based adjuvant therapy were selected. The variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5'untranslated region of the TS gene were genotyped. There was a positive association between tumor T stage and the VNTR genotypes (p = 0.05). In both univariate and multivariate survival analysis no effects of the studied polymorphisms on survival were found. However, there was an association between both polymorphisms and age. Among patients younger than 60 years, the patients homozygous for 2R seemed to have a better overall survival, whereas among the patients older than 67 this longer survival was seen by the carriers of other genotypes. We conclude that the TS VNTR and SNP do not predict response to 5-FU therapy in patients with stage III colon carcinoma. However, age appears to modify the effects of TS polymorphisms on survival.

  17. Twenty-seven years of phase III trials for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer: disappointing results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Oze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine-based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care.

  18. The Uses of Mass Communications: Current Perspectives on Gratifications Research. Sage Annual Reviews of Communication Research Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumler, Jay G., Ed.; Katz, Elihu, Ed.

    The essays in this volume examine the use of the mass media and explore the findings of the gratifications approach to mass communication research. Part one summaries the achievements in this area of mass media research and proposes an agenda for discussion of the future direction of this research in terms of a set of theoretical, methodological,…

  19. International conference on high-energy physics. Volume 1. Sessions I to III. [Geneva, June 27-July 4, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Volume 1 of the conference proceedings contains sessions on neutrino physics and weak interactions, e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics, and theory. Five of the papers have already been cited in ERA, and can be found by reference to the entry CONF-790642-- in the Report Number Index. The remaining 30 will be processed as they are received on the Atomindex tape. (RWR)

  20. Emerging Therapies for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera S. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC includes radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery in certain individualized cases. In unresectable NSCLC, chemoradiation has been the standard of care for the past three decades. Local and distant failure remains high in this group of patients, so dose escalation has been studied in both single institution and national clinical trials. Though initial studies showed a benefit to dose escalation, phase III studies examining dose escalation using standard fractionation or hyperfractionation have failed to show a benefit. Over the last 17 years, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has shown a high degree of safety and local control for stage I lung cancers and other localized malignancies. More recently, phase I/II studies using SBRT for dose escalation after conventional chemoradiation in locally advanced NSCLC have been promising with good apparent safety. Immunotherapy also offers opportunities to address distant disease and preclinical data suggest immunotherapy in tandem with SBRT may be a rational way to induce an “abscopal effect” although there are little clinical data as yet. By building on the proven concept of conventional chemoradiation for patients with locally advanced NSCLC with a subsequent radiation dose intensification to residual disease with SBRT concurrent with immunotherapy, we hope address the issues of metastatic and local failures. This “quadmodality” approach is still in its infancy but appears to be a safe and rational approach to the improving the outcome of NSCLC therapy.

  1. Comparison of doses according to change of bladder volume in treatment of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In the case of radiation therapy for prostate cancer, a balloon infused with a certain amount of air through the anus is used to reduce rectal dose. Because of the reason, radiation therapy for prostate cancer has acquired CBCT for daily image induction. In order to maintain the anatomical structure most similar to the first CT taken before treatment, it is pretreated, but it can not be said to be perfectly consistent. In two actual treatment regimens, the volume of the bladder was measured as 45.82 cc and 63.43 cc, and the equivalent diameter was 4.4 cm and 4.9 cm. As a result of this study, the mean volume of the bladder was estimated to be 56.2 cc, 105.6 cc by 20 CBCT. The mean dose of CBCT was 1.74% and the mean Bladder mean dose was 96.67%. In case B, PTV mean dose was 4.31%, Bladder mean Dose was estimated to be 97.35%. The changes in the volume of the bladder resulted in changes in the dose of PTV and bladder. The correlation coefficient of bladder dose according to the change of bladder volume showed linearity of mean dose R2= -0.94. The correlation coefficient of the PTV dose according to the volume change of the bladder showed linearity of mean dose R2= 0.04. It was found that the dose change of PTV was larger than that of bladder according to the change of bladder volume.

  2. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  3. Impact of tumour volume on prediction of progression-free survival in sinonasal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennersdorf, Florian; Mauz, Paul-Stefan; Adam, Patrick; Welz, Stefan; Sievert, Anne; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyse potential prognostic factors, with emphasis on tumour volume, in determining progression free survival (PFS) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses. Retrospective analysis of 106 patients with primary sinonasal malignancies treated and followed-up between March 2006 and October 2012. Possible predictive parameters for PFS were entered into univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis included age, sex, baseline tumour volume (based on MR imaging), histology type, TNM stage and prognostic groups according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis concerning the predictive value of tumour volume for recurrence was also conducted. The main histological subgroup consisted of epithelial tumours (77%). The majority of the patients (68%) showed advanced tumour burden (AJCC stage III–IV). Lymph node involvement was present in 18 cases. The mean tumour volume was 26.6 ± 21.2 cm 3 . The median PFS for all patients was 24.9 months (range: 2.5–84.5 months). The ROC curve analysis for the tumour volume showed 58.1% sensitivity and 75.4% specificity for predicting recurrence. Tumour volume, AJCC staging, T- and N- stage were significant predictors in the univariate analysis. Positive lymph node status and tumour volume remained significant and independent predictors in the multivariate analysis. Radiological tumour volume proofed to be a statistically reliable predictor of PFS. In the multivariate analysis, T-, N- and overall AJCC staging did not show significant prognostic value

  4. Comparison between CT volume measurement and histopathological assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerri, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pomerri@unipd.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Department of Medicine, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Pucciarelli, Salvatore, E-mail: puc@unipd.it [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Gennaro, Gisella, E-mail: gisella.gennaro@pd.infn.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Maretto, Isacco, E-mail: isac77@gmail.com [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Nitti, Donato, E-mail: donato.nitti@unipd.it [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Muzzio, Pier Carlo, E-mail: pcmuzzio@unipd.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare volume measurements on computed tomography (CT) images with histopathological assessments of chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced tumor regression in locally advanced rectal cancer (RC). Methods: In 25 patients (13 males, 12 females; median age, 63 years; age range, 44–79 years) with locally advanced RC treated with preoperative CRT and surgery, two radiologists measured tumor volume on CT images before and after CRT. CT-based tumor volumetry and the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECISTs) were compared with T and N downstaging after CRT, and with the tumor regression grade (TRG). Results: Tumor volumes were significantly smaller on CT images after CRT. The tumors regressed in 52% (13/25), 36% (9/25) and 40% (10/25) of patients, based on T downstaging, TRG and mRECIST findings, respectively. In terms of T downstaging, the pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes of responders and non-responders to the treatment differed statistically, while their tumor volume reduction rates and volume reductions according to the 65% mRECIST threshold did not. In terms of N downstaging and TRG, the differences between the responders’ and the non-responders’ pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes, tumor volume reduction rates, and mRECIST thresholds were never statistically significant. Conclusion: Measuring tumor size on CT images is of limited value in predicting the histopathological response to preoperative CRT in RC patients, so it may be unwise to select surgical treatment strategies based on CT volumetry.

  5. Role of choline PET/CT in guiding target volume delineation for irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.M.; Kurth, J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Gocke, C.; Kuhnt, T.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Krause, B.J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Choline PET/CT has shown limitations for the detection of primary prostate cancer and nodal metastatic disease, mainly due to limited sensitivity and specificity. Conversely in the restaging of prostate cancer recurrence, choline PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the detection of local regional and nodal recurrence with an impact on therapy management. This review highlights current literature on choline PET/CT for radiation treatment planning in primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Due to limited sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between benign and malignant prostatic tissues in primary prostate cancer, there is little enthusiasm for target volume delineation based on choline PET/CT. Irradiation planning for the treatment of single lymph node metastases on the basis of choline PET/CT is controversial due to its limited lesion-based sensitivity in primary nodal staging. In high-risk prostate cancer, choline PET/CT might diagnose lymph node metastases, which potentially can be included in the conventional irradiation field. Prior to radiation treatment of recurrent prostate cancer, choline PET/CT may prove useful for patient stratification by excluding distant disease which would require systemic therapy. In patients with local recurrence, choline PET/CT can be used to delineate local sites of recurrence within the prostatic resection bed allowing a boost to PET-positive sites. In patients with lymph node metastases outside the prostatic fossa and regional metastatic lymph nodes, choline PET/CT might influence radiation treatment planning by enabling extension of the target volume to lymphatic drainage sites with or without a boost to PET-positive lymph nodes. Further clinical randomized trials are required to assess treatment outcomes following choline-based biological radiation treatment planning in comparison with conventional radiation treatment planning. (orig.)

  6. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules.......In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  7. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  8. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schneeweiss, Andreas [University of Heidelberg, Nationales Centrum fuer Tumorerkrankungen (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Sohn, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynecology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Es wurden Akut- und Langzeittoxizitaet sowie Ueberlebensdaten der konsolidierenden intensitaetsmodulierten Ganzabdomenbestrahlung (&apos

  9. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Pollack, Alan; Levy, Larry; Starkschall, George; Lei Dong; Rosen, Isaac; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p 3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  10. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  11. Florence Richardson Wyckoff (1905-1997), Fifty Years of Grassroots Social ActivismVolume III: Watsonville Years 1960-1985

    OpenAIRE

    Wyckoff, Florence Richardson; Jarrell, Randall

    1990-01-01

    Florence Wyckoff's three-volume oral history documents her remarkable, lifelong work as a social activist, during which she has become nationally recognized as an advocate of migrant families and children. From the depression years through the 1970s, she pursued grassroots, democratic, community-building efforts in the service of improving public health standards and providing health care, education, and housing for migrant families. Major legislative milestones in her career of advocacy were...

  12. Clinicopathologic Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy versus Conventional Chemoradiotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting for Resectable Stages II and III Low Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess for differences in clinical, radiologic, and pathologic outcomes between patients with stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma treated neoadjuvantly with conventional external beam radiotherapy (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (EBT. Methods. Patients undergoing neoadjuvant EBT received 4 consecutive daily 6.5 Gy fractions without chemotherapy, while those undergoing 3DRT or IMRT received 28 daily 1.8 Gy fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Data was collected prospectively for 7 EBT patients and retrospectively for 25 historical 3DRT/IMRT controls. Results. Time to surgery was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P<0.001. There was a trend towards higher rate of pathologic CR for EBT (P=0.06. Rates of margin and lymph node positivity at resection were similar for all groups. Acute toxicity was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P=0.025. Overall and progression-free survival were noninferior for EBT. On MRI, EBT achieved similar complete response rate and reduction in tumor volume as 3DRT and IMRT. Histopathologic comparison showed that EBT resulted in more localized treatment effects and fewer serosal adhesions. Conclusions. EBT offers several practical benefits over conventional radiotherapy techniques and appears to be at least as effective against low rectal cancer as measured by short-term outcomes.

  13. Phase I/II study of azacitidine and capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in refractory CIMP-high metastatic colorectal cancer: evaluation of circulating methylated vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michael J; Morris, Van; Moinova, Helen; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ensor, Joe; Lee, Michael S; Eng, Cathy; Kee, Bryan; Fogelman, David; Shroff, Rachna T; LaFramboise, Thomas; Mazard, Thibault; Feng, Tian; Hamilton, Stanley; Broom, Bradley; Lutterbaugh, James; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Markowitz, Sanford D; Kopetz, Scott

    2016-10-11

    Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands (CIMP) has been strongly implicated in chemotherapy resistance and is implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs) termed CIMP-high. This phase I/II study in CRC (phase II portion restricted to CIMP-high CRC), treated fluoropyrimidine/oxaliplatin refractory patients with azacitidine (75 mg/m2/day subcutaneously D1-5) and CAPOX (capecitibine and oxaliplatin) every three weeks. Twenty-six patients (pts) were enrolled in this study: 15 pts (12 treated at MTD) in phase I and 11 pts in phase II. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. A total of 14 pts were CIMP-high. No responses were seen. CIMP-high status did not correlate with efficacy endpoints [stable disease (SD) or progression-free survival (PFS)] or baseline vimentin methylation level. Changes in vimentin methylation over time did not correlate with efficacy outcomes. Baseline methylated vimentin correlated with tumor volume (PCIMP-high pts, but no objective responses. Serum methylated vimentin may be associated with benefit from a regimen including a hypomethylation agent, although this study is not able to separate a potential prognostic or predictive role for the biomarker.

  14. Variation of clinical target volume definition in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Sweet, John W.; Hauck, Walter W.; Hudes, Richard S.; Lee, Tony; Dicker, Adam P.; Waterman, Frank M.; Anne, Pramila R.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Galvin, James M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) planning relies on the interpretation of computed tomography (CT) axial images for defining the clinical target volume (CTV). This study investigates the variation among multiple observers to define the CTV used in 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seven observers independently delineated the CTVs (prostate ± seminal vesicles [SV]) from the CT simulation data of 10 prostate cancer patients undergoing 3D-CRT. Six patients underwent CT simulation without the use of contrast material and serve as a control group. The other 4 had urethral and bladder opacification with contrast medium. To determine interobserver variation, we evaluated the derived volume, the maximum dimensions, and the isocenter for each examination of CTV. We assessed the reliability in the CTVs among the observers by correlating the variation for each class of measurements. This was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), with 1.00 defining absolute correlation. Results: For the prostate volumes, the ICC was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.96). This changed to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.75-0.99) with the use of contrast material. Similarly, the maximal prostatic dimensions were reliable and improved. There was poor agreement in defining the SV. For this structure, the ICC never exceeded 0.28. The reliability of the isocenter was excellent, with the ICC exceeding 0.83 and 0.90 for the prostate ± SV, respectively. Conclusions: In 3D-CRT for prostate cancer, there was excellent agreement among multiple observers to define the prostate target volume but poor agreement to define the SV. The use of urethral and bladder contrast improved the reliability of localizing the prostate. For all CTVs, the isocenter was very reliable and should be used to compare the variation in 3D dosimetry among multiple observers

  15. Associations between cigarette smoking status and colon cancer prognosis among participants in North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Shi, Qian; Newcomb, Polly A; Nelson, Garth D; Sargent, Daniel J; Alberts, Steven R; Limburg, Paul J

    2013-06-01

    By using data from North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147, a randomized adjuvant trial of patients with stage III colon cancer, we assessed the relationship between smoking and cancer outcomes, disease-free survival (DFS), and time to recurrence (TTR), accounting for heterogeneity by patient and tumor characteristics. PATIENTS AND METHODS Before random assignment to infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or FOLFOX plus cetuximab, 1,968 participants completed a questionnaire on smoking history and other risk factors. Cox models assessed the association between smoking history and the primary trial outcome of DFS (ie, time to recurrence or death), as well as TTR, adjusting for other clinical and patient factors. The median follow-up was 3.5 years among patients who did not experience events. Compared with never-smokers, ever smokers experienced significantly shorter DFS (3-year DFS proportion: 70% v 74%; hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.42). This association persisted after multivariate adjustment (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.49). There was significant interaction in this association by BRAF mutation status (P = .03): smoking was associated with shorter DFS in patients with BRAF wild-type (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.66) but not BRAF mutated (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.29) colon cancer. Smoking was more strongly associated with poorer DFS in those with KRAS mutated versus KRAS wild-type colon cancer (HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.12 to 2.00] v HR, 1.09 [95% CI, 0.85 to 1.39]), although interaction by KRAS mutation status was not statistically significant (P = .07). Associations were comparable in analyses of TTR. Overall, smoking was significantly associated with shorter DFS and TTR in patients with colon cancer. These adverse relationships were most evident in patients with BRAF wild-type or KRAS mutated colon cancer.

  16. Prostate-specific antigen cancer volume: a significant prognostic factor in prostate cancer patients at intermediate risk of failing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, Scott P.; Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Although the pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen level (PSAL) is the single-most significant predictor of local and biochemical control in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, it is relatively insensitive for patients with a PSAL in the intermediate range (4-20 ng/ml). PSA density (PSAD) has been shown to be slightly more predictive of outcome than PSAL for this intermediate risk group; however, this improvement is small and of little use clinically. PSA cancer volume (PSACV), an estimate of cancer volume based on PSA, has recently been described and has been purported to be more significant t than PSAL in predicting early biochemical failure after radiotherapy. We report a detailed comparison between this new prognostic factor, PSAL, and PSAD. Methods and Materials: The records of 356 patients treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy for regionally localized (T1-4,Nx,M0) adenocarcinoma of the prostate were reviewed. Each patient had a PSAL, biopsy Gleason score, and pretreatment prostate volume by transrectal ultrasonography. The median PSAL was 9.3 ng/ml and 66% had Gleason scores in the 2-6 range. The median radiation dose was 66.0 Gy and the median follow-up for those living was 27 months. PSACV was calculated using a formula which takes into account PSAL, pretreatment prostate ultrasound volume, and Gleason score. The median PSACV was 1.43 cc. Biochemical failure was defined as increases in two consecutive follow-up PSA levels, one increase by a factor > 1.5, or an absolute increase of > 1 ng/ml. Local failure was defined as a cancer-positive prostate biopsy, obtained for evidence of tumor progression. Results: The distributions of PSACV and PSAL were similar and, when normalized by log transformation, were highly correlated (p < 0.0001, linear regression). There was a statistically significant relationship between PSACV and several potential prognostic factors including PSAL, PSAD, stage, Gleason score, and

  17. The EORTC module for quality of life in patients with thyroid cancer: phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susanne; Jordan, Susan; Locati, Laura D; Pinto, Monica; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Araújo, Cláudia; Hammerlid, Eva; Vidhubala, E; Husson, Olga; Kiyota, Naomi; Brannan, Christine; Salem, Dina; Gamper, Eva M; Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Ioannidis, Georgios; Andry, Guy; Inhestern, Johanna; Grégoire, Vincent; Licitra, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to pilot-test a questionnaire measuring health-related quality of life (QoL) in thyroid cancer patients to be used with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. A provisional questionnaire with 47 items was administered to patients treated for thyroid cancer within the last 2 years. Patients were interviewed about time and help needed to complete the questionnaire, and whether they found the items understandable, confusing or annoying. Items were kept in the questionnaire if they fulfilled pre-defined criteria: relevant to the patients, easy to understand, not confusing, few missing values, neither floor nor ceiling effects, and high variance. A total of 182 thyroid cancer patients in 15 countries participated ( n  = 115 with papillary, n  = 31 with follicular, n  = 22 with medullary, n  = 6 with anaplastic, and n  = 8 with other types of thyroid cancer). Sixty-six percent of the patients needed 15 min or less to complete the questionnaire. Of the 47 items, 31 fulfilled the predefined criteria and were kept unchanged, 14 were removed, and 2 were changed. Shoulder dysfunction was mentioned by 5 patients as missing and an item covering this issue was added. To conclude, the EORTC quality of life module for thyroid cancer (EORTC QLQ-THY34) is ready for the final validation phase IV. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. Secondary Breast Cancer Risk by Radiation Volume in Women With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Jessica L. [Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Connors, Joseph M. [Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Savage, Kerry J. [Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Campbell, Belinda A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Zheng, Yvonne Y.; Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Cancer Surveillance and Outcomes, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Pickles, Tom, E-mail: TPickles@bccancer.bc.ca [Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the risk of secondary breast cancer (SBC) is reduced in women with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated with smaller field radiation therapy (SFRT) versus mantle field radiation therapy (MRT). Methods and Materials: We used the BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) Lymphoid Cancer Database to identify female patients treated for HL between January 1961 and December 2009. Radiation therapy volumes were categorized as MRT or SFRT, which included involved field, involved site, or involved nodal radiation therapy. SBC risk estimates were compared using competing risk analysis and Fine and Gray multivariable model: MRT ± chemotherapy, SFRT ± chemotherapy, or chemotherapy-only. Results: Of 734 eligible patients, 75% of the living patients have been followed up for more than 10 years, SBC has developed in 54, and 15 have died of breast cancer. The 20-year estimated risks (competing risk cumulative incidence) for SBC differed significantly: MRT 7.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4%-11.5%), SFRT 3.1% (95% CI 1.0%-7.7%), and chemotherapy-only 2.2% (95% CI 1.0%-4.8%) (P=.01). Using a Fine and Gray model to control for death and patients lost to follow-up, MRT was associated with a higher risk of SBC (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.9; 95% CI 1.4%-6.0%; P=.004) compared with chemotherapy-only and with SFRT (HR = 3.3; 95% CI 1.3%-8.4%; P=.01). SFRT was not associated with a greater risk of SBC compared with chemotherapy-only (HR = 0.87; 95% CI 0.28%-2.66%; P=.80). Conclusion: This study confirms that large-volume MRT is associated with a markedly increased risk of SBC; however, more modern small-volume RT is not associated with a greater risk of SBC than chemotherapy alone.

  19. Helical tomotherapy in patients with breast cancer and complex treatment volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendales, Ricardo; Schiappacasse, Luis; Schnitman, Franco; García, Graciela; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2011-04-01

    To describe early clinical results of tomotherapy treatment in patients with breast cancer and complex treatment volumes. Ten patients were treated with tomotherapy between January 2009 and March 2010. Treatment planning objectives were to cover at least 95% of the planning target volume with the 95% isodose; to have a minimum dose of 90% and a maximum dose of 105%. All treatments included daily CT/megavoltage image guidance. Acute toxicity was recorded weekly. Six patients were treated because constraints were not accomplished for heart, lung or contralateral breast in a previous three-dimensional conformal plan; two for preexisting cardiac or pulmonary disease, and two more for bilateral breast irradiation. Treatment volumes included the whole breast in the majority of patients, as well as the supraclavicular and the internal mammary chain nodes when indicated. Most patients were older than 50 years, and had an early breast cancer, with positive oestrogen receptors, negative HER2 expression and a poorly differentiated, infiltrating ductal carcinoma. The majority of patients had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy associated to breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant hormonotherapy. Median homogeneity index was 1.09; median coverage index was 0.81. Median V20Gy and V10Gy for ipsilateral lung was 20% and 37.1% respectively. Median V25 and V35 for heart was 15% and 4% respectively. Median dose for contralateral breast was 7 Gy. Skin acute toxicity was grade 1 in 41.7% and grade 2 in 58.3%. Tomotherapy is a technique capable of delivering a well tolerated treatment with high homogeneity and coverage indexes and high capabilities for sparing the organs at risk in patients with anatomically complex breast cancer, bilateral breast cancer, indication for internal mammary chain node irradiation, cardiac toxicity derived from chemotherapy, or preexisting cardiac or pulmonary disease. Further studies are required to evaluate local control and late toxicity.

  20. Target volume delineation variation in radiotherapy for early stage rectal cancer in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Haas-Kock, Danielle F.M. de; Beukema, Jannet C.; Neelis, Karen J.; Woutersen, Dankert; Ceha, Heleen; Rozema, Tom; Slot, Annerie; Vos-Westerman, Hanneke; Intven, Martijn; Spruit, Patty H.; Linden, Yvette van der; Geijsen, Debby; Verschueren, Karijn; Herk, Marcel B. van; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to measure and improve the quality of target volume delineation by means of national consensus on target volume definition in early-stage rectal cancer. Methods and materials: The CTV’s for eight patients were delineated by 11 radiation oncologists in 10 institutes according to local guidelines (phase 1). After observer variation analysis a workshop was organized to establish delineation guidelines and a digital atlas, with which the same observers re-delineated the dataset (phase 2). Variation in volume, most caudal and cranial slice and local surface distance variation were analyzed. Results: The average delineated CTV volume decreased from 620 to 460 cc (p < 0.001) in phase 2. Variation in the caudal CTV border was reduced significantly from 1.8 to 1.2 cm SD (p = 0.01), while it remained 0.7 cm SD for the cranial border. The local surface distance variation (cm SD) reduced from 1.02 to 0.74 for anterior, 0.63 to 0.54 for lateral, 0.33 to 0.25 for posterior and 1.22 to 0.46 for the sphincter region, respectively. Conclusions: The large variation in target volume delineation could significantly be reduced by use of consensus guidelines and a digital delineation atlas. Despite the significant reduction there is still a need for further improvement.

  1. Everolimus for Previously Treated Advanced Gastric Cancer: Results of the Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III GRANITE-1 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Bai, Yu-Xian; Bang, Yung-Jue; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Pan, Hong-Ming; Sahmoud, Tarek; Shen, Lin; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Chin, Keisho; Muro, Kei; Kim, Yeul Hong; Ferry, David; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Smith, Heind; Costantini, Chiara; Rizvi, Syed; Lebwohl, David; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus demonstrated promising efficacy in a phase II study of pretreated advanced gastric cancer. This international, double-blind, phase III study compared everolimus efficacy and safety with that of best supportive care (BSC) in previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of systemic chemotherapy were randomly assigned to everolimus 10 mg/d (assignment schedule: 2:1) or matching placebo, both given with BSC. Randomization was stratified by previous chemotherapy lines (one v two) and region (Asia v rest of the world [ROW]). Treatment continued until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and safety. Results Six hundred fifty-six patients (median age, 62.0 years; 73.6% male) were enrolled. Median OS was 5.4 months with everolimus and 4.3 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.08; P = .124). Median PFS was 1.7 months and 1.4 months in the everolimus and placebo arms, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78). Common grade 3/4 adverse events included anemia, decreased appetite, and fatigue. The safety profile was similar in patients enrolled in Asia versus ROW. Conclusion Compared with BSC, everolimus did not significantly improve overall survival for advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of previous systemic chemotherapy. The safety profile observed for everolimus was consistent with that observed for everolimus in other cancers. PMID:24043745

  2. Total reference air kerma can accurately predict isodose surface volumes in cervix cancer brachytherapy. A multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nkiwane, Karen S; Andersen, Else; Champoudry, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate that V60 Gy, V75 Gy, and V85 Gy isodose surface volumes can be accurately estimated from total reference air kerma (TRAK) in cervix cancer MRI-guided brachytherapy (BT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: 60 Gy, 75 Gy, and 85 Gy isodose surface volumes levels were obtained from treatm...

  3. Older cancer patients in cancer clinical trials are underrepresented. Systematic literature review of almost 5000 meta- and pooled analyses of phase III randomized trials of survival from breast, prostate and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Cita; Wilson, Andrew; Sitas, Freddy

    2017-12-01

    Older people represent increasing proportions of the population with cancer. To understand the representivity of cancer treatments in older people, we performed a systematic literature review using PRISMA guidelines of the age distribution of clinical trial participants for three leading cancer types, namely breast, prostate, and lung. We used PubMed to identify articles detailing meta or pooled-analyses of phase III, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of survival for breast, prostate and lung cancer, published ≤5 years from 2016. We compared the age distribution of participants to that of these cancers for "More developed regions". 4993 potential papers were identified, but only three papers on breast cancer, three on lung cancer, and none on prostate cancer presented the age distribution of their participants. Except for one paper of breast cancer, participants ≥70 years in all other papers were underrepresented. We recommend the age distribution of patients be clearly reported in all clinical trials, as per guidelines. Clinical trials ought to be more representative of the populations most affected by the disease for which treatments are being tested. This should lead to better knowledge of effectiveness of treatments and better translation of trial results to optimal care of older cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reduction of heart volume during neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haj Mohammad, Nadia; Kamphuis, Martijn; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M.; Bruin-Bon, H.A.C.M. Rianne de; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Bel, Arjan; Boekholdt, S. Mathijs; Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by surgery is considered curative intent treatment for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The aim was to establish hemodynamic aspects of changes in heart volume and to explore whether changes in heart volume resulted in clinically relevant changes in the dose distribution of radiotherapy. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in patients who were treated with nCRT consisting of carboplatin and paclitaxel concomitant with radiotherapy (41.4 Gy/1.8 Gy per fraction). Physical parameters, cardiac volume on CT and Cone beam CT, cardiac blood markers and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Results: In 23 patients a significant decrease of 55.3 ml in heart volume was detected (95% CI 36.7–73.8 ml, p < 0.001). There was a decrease in both systolic (mean decrease 18 mmHg, 95% CI 11–26 mmHg, p < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (mean decrease 8 mmHg, 95% CI 2–14 mmHg, p = 0.008) and an increase in heart rate with 6 beats/min (95% CI 1–11 beats/min, p = 0.021). Except for Troponin T, no change in other cardiac markers and echocardiography parameters were observed. The change in heart volume did not result in a clinically relevant change in radiation dose distribution. Conclusion: Heart volume was significantly reduced, but was not accompanied by overt cardiac dysfunction. All observed changes in hemodynamic parameters are consistent with volume depletion. Adaptation of the treatment plan during the course of radiotherapy is not advocated

  5. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Survival and human papillomavirus in oropharynx cancer in TAX 324: a subset analysis from an international phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Lorch, J H; Goloubeva, O; Tan, M; Schumaker, L M; Sarlis, N J; Haddad, R I; Cullen, K J

    2011-05-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and overall survival (OS) in oropharynx cancer (OPC) was retrospectively examined in TAX 324, a phase III trial of sequential therapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Accrual for TAX 324 was completed in 2003 and data updated through 2008. Pretherapy tumor biopsies were studied by PCR for human papillomavirus type 16 and linked to OS, progression-free survival (PFS) and demographics. Of 264 patients with OPC, 111 (42%) had evaluable biopsies; 56 (50%) were HPV+ and 55 (50%) were HPV-. HPV+ patients were significantly younger (54 versus 58 years, P = 0.02), had T1/T2 primary cancers (49% versus 20%, P = 0.001), and had a performance status of zero (77% versus 49%, P = 0.003). OS and PFS were better for HPV+ patients (OS, hazard ratio = 0.20, P < 0.0001). Local-regional failure was less in HPV+ patients (13% versus 42%, P = 0.0006); at 5 years, 82% of HPV+ patients were alive compared with 35% of HPV- patients (P < 0.0001). HPV+ OPC has a different biology compared with HPV- OPC; 5-year OS, PFS, and local-regional control are unprecedented. These results support the possibility of selectively reducing therapy and long-term morbidity in HPV+ OPC while preserving survival and approaching HPV- disease with more aggressive treatment.

  7. A lymph node ratio of 10% is predictive of survival in stage III colon cancer: a French regional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Charles; Mauvais, François; Cosse, Cyril; Rebibo, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Paul; Dromer, Didier; Aubert, Christine; Carton, Sophie; Dron, Bernard; Dadamessi, Innocenti; Maes, Bernard; Perrier, Guillaume; Manaouil, David; Fontaine, Jean-François; Gozy, Michel; Panis, Xavier; Foncelle, Pierre Henri; de Fresnoy, Hugues; Leroux, Fabien; Vaneslander, Pierre; Ghighi, Caroline; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node ratio (LNR) (positive lymph nodes/sampled lymph nodes) is predictive of survival in colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to validate the LNR as a prognostic factor and to determine the optimum LNR cutoff for distinguishing between "good prognosis" and "poor prognosis" colon cancer patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, patients with TNM stage III colon cancer operated on with at least of 3 years of follow-up and not lost to follow-up were included in this retrospective study. The two primary endpoints were 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) as a function of the LNR groups and the cutoff. One hundred seventy-eight patients were included. There was no correlation between the LNR group and 3-year OS (P=0.06) and a significant correlation between the LNR group and 3-year DFS (P=0.03). The optimal LNR cutoff of 10% was significantly correlated with 3-year OS (P=0.02) and DFS (P=0.02). The LNR was not an accurate prognostic factor when fewer than 12 lymph nodes were sampled. Clarification and simplification of the LNR classification are prerequisites for use of this system in randomized control trials. An LNR of 10% appears to be the optimal cutoff.

  8. Can we eliminate neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in favor of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy for select stage II/III rectal adenocarcinomas: Analysis of the National Cancer Data base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Richard J; Liu, Yuan; Patel, Kirtesh; Zhong, Jim; Steuer, Conor E; Kooby, David A; Russell, Maria C; Gillespie, Theresa W; Landry, Jerome C

    2017-03-01

    Stage II and III rectal cancers have been effectively treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) followed by definitive resection. Advancements in surgical technique and systemic therapy have prompted investigation of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy (NMAC) regimens with the elimination of radiation (RT). The objective of the current study was to investigate factors that predict for the use of NCRT versus NMAC and compare outcomes using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) for select stage II and III rectal cancers. In the NCDB, 21,707 patients from 2004 through 2012 with clinical T2N1 (cT2N1), cT3N0, or cT3N1 rectal cancers were identified who had received NCRT or NMAC followed by low anterior resection. Kaplan-Meier analyses, log-rank tests, and Cox-proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted along with propensity score matching analysis to reduce treatment selection bias. The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS) rate was 75% for patients who received NCRT versus 67.2% for those who received NMAC (P elimination of neoadjuvant RT for select patients with stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma was associated with worse OS and should not be recommended outside of a clinical trial. Cancer 2017;123:783-93. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  9. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in tangential field irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Fowble, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume based on empirically derived functions which accuracy depends on the actual measured volume in treatment position. A simple and accurate linear relationship with CLD and retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart is presented with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 45 consecutive (22 left and 23 right breast) patients referred for CT simulation of the cone down treatment. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head uniformly to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the CLD and analysis. Results: Table 1 shows the volume statistics of patients in this study. There is a large variation in the lung and heart volumes among patients. Due to differences in the shape of right and left lungs the percent irradiated volume (PIV) are different. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with 2nd and 3rd degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomial. The regression lines for the left and right

  10. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV; Gammagrafia osea: utilidad en la evaluacion y seguimiento de pacientes con cancer de mama en estadio clinico II, III, IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano P, R A

    1996-12-31

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Toxicity Profile With a Large Prostate Volume After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Nussen, Sandra; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prostate volume on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and at different intervals after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 204 patients was surveyed prospectively before (Time A), at the last day (Time B), 2 months after (Time C), and 16 months (median) after (Time D) radiotherapy, with a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). The group was divided into subgroups with a small (11-43 cm 3 ) and a large (44-151 cm 3 ) prostate volume. Results: Patients with large prostates presented with lower urinary bother scores (median 79 vs. 89; p = 0.01) before treatment. Urinary function/bother scores for patients with large prostates decreased significantly compared to patients with small prostates due to irritative/obstructive symptoms only at Time B (pain with urination more than once daily in 48% vs. 18%; p 3 vs. 47 cm 3 ; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with a large prostate volume have a great risk of irritative/obstructive symptoms (particularly dysuria) in the acute radiotherapy phase. These symptoms recover rapidly and do not influence long-term HRQOL

  12. Gold markers for tumor localization and target volume delineation in radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Christiansen, Hans; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Hermann, Robert Michael; Liersch, Thorsten; Ghadimi, Michael; Rothe, Hilka

    2009-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer, neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy is indicated. To improve target volume definition for radiotherapy planning, the potential of implanted gold markers in the tumor region was evaluated. In nine consecutive patients, two to three gold markers were implanted in the tumor region during rigid rectoscopy. Computed tomography scans were performed during treatment planning. All electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) recorded during treatment series were analyzed. All patients underwent complete tumor resection with meticulous histopathologic examination. The gold markers could easily be implanted into the mesorectal tissue at the caudal tumor border without any complications. They were helpful in identifying the inferior border of the planning target volume in order to spare normal tissue (in particular anal structures). No significant shift of the markers was found during the course of therapy. Marker matching of the EPIDs did not improve patient positioning in comparison to bone structure matching. The former position of at least one marker could be identified in all patients during histopathologic examination. The use of gold marker enables a more precise definition of the target volume for radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. This could eventually allow a better protection of anal structures of patients with a tumor localization = 5 cm cranial of the anal sphincter. The implantation of the gold markers improved communication between the surgeon, the radiooncologist and the pathologist resulting in intensified exchange of relevant informations. (orig.)

  13. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang; Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam; Kim, Dongwon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC R ), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10 8 colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC R , defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC R values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC R (P R . Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC R , which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer

  14. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Caria, Nicola; Schöder, Heiko; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Wolden, Suzanne; Wong, Richard J.; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p 0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation. Conclusion: PET and MRI are complementary and combined use is ideal. However, the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) particularly for primary tumors underscores the limitations of defining GTVs using imaging alone. PE is invaluable and must be incorporated.

  15. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Yongkan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontaek, E-mail: rokwt@hanmail.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam [Department of Urology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC{sub R}), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10{sup 8} colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC{sub R}, defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC{sub R} values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC{sub R} (P<.001). However, the radiation therapy fraction number did not significantly influence the PVC{sub R}. Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC{sub R}, which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  16. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian E Cooke

    Full Text Available Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment.

  17. Adherence to treatment guidelines and survival for older patients with stage II or III colon cancer in Texas from 2001 through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Ning; Ho, Vivian; Ding, Minming; He, Weiguo; Niu, Jiangong; Yang, Ming; Du, Xianglin L; Zorzi, Daria; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Giordano, Sharon H

    2018-02-15

    Treatment guidelines for colon cancer recommend colectomy with lymphadenectomy of at least 12 lymph nodes for patients with stage I to stage III disease as surgery adherence (SA) and adjuvant chemotherapy for individuals with stage III disease. Herein, the authors evaluated adherence to these guidelines among older patients in Texas with colon cancer and the associated survival outcomes. Using Texas Cancer Registry data linked with Medicare data, the authors included patients with AJCC stage II and III colon cancer who were aged ≥66 years and diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. SA and adjuvant chemotherapy adherence rates to treatment guidelines were estimated. The chi-square test, general linear regression, survival probability, and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with adherence and survival. The rate of SA increased from 47.2% to 84% among 6029 patients with stage II or stage III disease from 2001 to 2011, and the rate of adjuvant chemotherapy increased from 48.9% to 53.1% for patients with stage III disease during the same time period. SA was associated with marital status, tumor size, surgeon specialty, and year of diagnosis. Patient age, sex, marital status, Medicare state buy-in status, comorbidity status, and year of diagnosis were found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year survival probability for patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment was the highest at 87% for patients with stage II disease and was 73% for those with stage III disease. After adjusting for demographic and tumor characteristics, improved cancer cause-specific survival was associated with the receipt of stage-specific, guideline-concordant treatment for patients with stage II or stage III disease. The adherence to guideline-concordant treatment among older patients with colon cancer residing in Texas improved over time, and was associated with better survival outcomes. Future studies should be focused on identifying interventions to

  18. Urinary engrailed-2 (EN2) levels predict tumour volume in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandha, Hardev; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2012-01-01

    ELISA test and is not dependent on other parameters, even PSA, unlike all the other current biomarkers under evaluation. To date, no marker correlates with the amount of cancer present - the present study shows this positive correlation with EN2 in men undergoing prostatectomy. The potential utility...... in men who had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer. To date, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels have not reliably predicted prostate cancer volume. Reliable volume indicator biomarker(s) may aid management decisions, e.g. active treatment vs active surveillance. PATIENTS......: In all, 88 of the whole cohort of 125 men (70%) were positive for EN2 in their urine (>42.5 µg/L); 38/58 (65%) men where cancer volume data was available. There was no statistical relationship between urinary EN2 levels and serum PSA levels. PSA levels did not correlate with tumour stage, combined...

  19. Role of metformin in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage III colorectal cancer: randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fatatry, Basma Mahrous; Ibrahim, Osama Mohamed; Hussien, Fatma Zakaria; Mostafa, Tarek Mohamed

    2018-06-21

    Peripheral sensory neuropathy is the most prominently reported adverse effect of oxaliplatin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate metformin role in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. From November 2014 to May 2016, 40 patients with stage III colorectal cancer completed 12 cycles of FOLFOX-4 regimen. Twenty patients in the control arm received FOLFOX-4 regimen only, and 20 patients in the metformin arm, received the same regimen along with metformin 500 mg three times daily. The metformin efficacy was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE version 4.0), a12-item neurotoxicity questionnaire (Ntx-12) from the validated Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group and, the brief pain inventory short form "worst pain" item. In addition to neurotensin, malondialdehyde and interleukin-6 serum levels assessment. At the end of the 12th cycle, there were less patients with grade 2 and 3 neuropathy in metformin arm as compared to control arm. (60 versus 95%, P = 0.009) In addition, metformin arm showed significantly higher total scores of Ntx-12 questionnaire than control arm (24.0 versus 19.2, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the mean pain score in metformin arm was significantly lower than those of control arm, (6.7 versus 7.3, P = 0.005). Mean serum levels of malondialdehyde and neurotensin were significantly lower in metformin arm after the 6th and the 12th cycles. Metformin may be a promising drug in protecting colorectal cancer patients against oxaliplatin-induced chronic peripheral sensory neuropathy.

  20. Evaluation of Angiopoietin-2 as a biomarker in gastric cancer: results from the randomised phase III AVAGAST trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich T; Escalona-Espinosa, Laura; Consalvo, Nicola; Goede, Valentin; Schiffmann, Lars; Scherer, Stefan J; Hedge, Priti; Van Cutsem, Eric; Coutelle, Oliver; Büning, Hildegard

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the phase III AVAGAST trial, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy improved progression-free survival (PFS) but not overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced gastric cancer. We studied the role of Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), a key driver of tumour angiogenesis, metastasis and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment, as a biomarker. Methods: Previously untreated, advanced gastric cancer patients were randomly assigned to receive bevacizumab (n=387) or placebo (n=387) in combination with chemotherapy. Plasma collected at baseline and at progression was analysed by ELISA. The role of Ang-2 as a prognostic and a predictive biomarker of bevacizumab efficacy was studied using a Cox proportional hazards model. Logistic regression analysis was applied for correlations with metastasis. Results: Median baseline plasma Ang-2 levels were lower in Asian (2143 pg ml−1) vs non-Asian patients (3193 pg ml−1), P<0.0001. Baseline plasma Ang-2 was identified as an independent prognostic marker for OS but did not predict bevacizumab efficacy alone or in combination with baseline VEGF. Baseline plasma Ang-2 correlated with the frequency of liver metastasis (LM) at any time: Odds ratio per 1000 pg ml−1 increase: 1.19; 95% CI 1.10–1.29; P<0.0001 (non-Asians) and 1.37; 95% CI 1.13–1.64; P=0.0010 (Asians). Conclusions: Baseline plasma Ang-2 is a novel prognostic biomarker for OS in advanced gastric cancer strongly associated with LM. Differences in Ang-2 mediated vascular response may, in part, account for outcome differences between Asian and non-Asian patients; however, data have to be further validated. Ang-2 is a promising drug target in gastric cancer. PMID:27031850

  1. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  2. Phase I/II study on docetaxel, gemcitabine and prednisone in castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Trine Zeeberg; Bentzen, Lise Nørgaard; Hansen, Steinbjoern

    2010-01-01

    DGP, maximum of eight courses, until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously day 1, gemcitabine was given day 1 and 8 in doses increasing from 600 to 1,000 mg/m(2) every third week. Patients had castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRMPC......), adequate function of liver, kidney and bone marrow; ECOG performance status...

  3. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested

  4. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested.

  5. Inventory of Federal Energy-Related Environment and Safety Research for FY 1978. Volume III, interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C. E.; Barker, Janice F.

    1979-12-01

    This users' guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environmental and safety research projects for FY 1978. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports. The data contained in this data base are not exhaustive and represent research reported by the following agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of the Interior, Department of Transportation, Federal Energy Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  6. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Sanoff, Hanna K.; Stitzenberg, Karyn B.; Baron, John A.; Lund, Jennifer L.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age < 50) populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics...

  7. Survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III and IV bladder cancer: results of 170 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoumi Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Bayoumi,1 Tarek Heikal,2 Hossam Darweish2 1Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Medical Oncology, Damietta Cancer Institute, Ministry of Health, Damietta, Egypt Background: Radical cystectomy (RC with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancers. However, the locoregional recurrence rate is still significantly higher for locally advanced cases post-RC. The underuse of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in such cases after RC is related mainly to a lack of proven survival benefit. Here we are reporting our long-term Egyptian experience with bladder cancer patients treated with up-front RC with or without conformal PORT. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 170 locally advanced bladder cancer (T3–T4, N0/N1, M0 patients who had RC performed with or without PORT at Damietta Cancer Institute during the period of 1998–2006. The treatment outcomes and toxicity profile of PORT were evaluated and compared with those of a non-PORT group of patients. Results: Ninety-two patients received PORT; 78 did not. At median follow-up of 47 months (range, 17–77 months, 33% locoregional recurrences were seen in the PORT group versus 55% in the non-PORT group (P<0.001. The overall distant metastasis rate in the whole group was 39%, with no difference between the two groups. The 5-year disease-free survival for the whole group of patients was 53%±11%, which was significantly affected by additional PORT, and 65%±13% compared with 40%±9% for the non-PORT group (P=0.04. The pathological subtypes did not affect 5-year disease-free survival significantly (P=0.9. The 5-year overall survival was 44%±10%. Using multivariate analysis, PORT, stage, and extravesical extension (positive surgical margins were found to be important prognostic factors for locoregional control. Stage and lymph node status were important prognosticators for distant metastasis

  8. Radial displacement of clinical target volume in node negative head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Wan; Wu, Hong Gyun; Song, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Jung In

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the radial displacement of clinical target volume in the patients with node negative head and neck (H and N) cancer and to quantify the relative positional changes compared to that of normal healthy volunteers. Three node-negative H and N cancer patients and fi ve healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. For setup accuracy, neck thermoplastic masks and laser alignment were used in each of the acquired computed tomography (CT) images. Both groups had total three sequential CT images in every two weeks. The lymph node (LN) level of the neck was delineated based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guideline by one physician. We use the second cervical vertebra body as a reference point to match each CT image set. Each of the sequential CT images and delineated neck LN levels were fused with the primary image, then maximal radial displacement was measured at 1.5 cm intervals from skull base (SB) to caudal margin of LN level V, and the volume differences at each node level were quantified. The mean radial displacements were 2.26 (±1.03) mm in the control group and 3.05 (±1.97) in the H and N cancer patients. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the mean radial displacement (p = 0.03). In addition, the mean radial displacement increased with the distance from SB. As for the mean volume differences, there was no statistical significance between the two groups. This study suggests that a more generous radial margin should be applied to the lower part of the neck LN for better clinical target coverage and dose delivery.

  9. Effect of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFX RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy for Stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-nine patients treated in a randomized study were retrospectively analyzed. Group I patients were treated by HFX RT with 1.2 Gy twice daily with a total dose of 64.8 Gy in 27 treatment days, while Groups II and III patients were treated by the same HFX RT and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide (every week in Group II and every other week in Group III). Interfraction intervals of either 4.5-5 h or 5.5-6 h were used for each patient. Results: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) had a better prognosis than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h) (median survival: 22 vs. 7 months; 5-year survival rate: 27% vs. 0%, p = 0.00000). This phenomenon was observed in all treatment groups. Patients ≥ 60 years of age, with Stage IIIA disease, or with previous weight loss ≤ 5% were treated more often with the shorter intervals than those 5%, respectively, but in all of these subgroups of patients, the shorter intervals were associated with a better prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the interfraction interval was an independent prognostic factor, together with sex, age, performance status, and stage. The shorter intervals were associated with an increased incidence of acute high grade toxicity, but not with an increase in late toxicity. Conclusion: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) appeared to have a better survival than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h). Prospective randomized studies are warranted to further investigate the influence of interfraction interval in HFX RT

  10. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano P, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  11. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C.; Budach, W.; Dunst, J.; Feyer, P.; Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R.; Harms, W.; Piroth, M.D.; Souchon, R.; Wenz, F.; Haase, W.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data suggest that the current restrictive use of RNI should be

  12. A prospective phase II trial of EGCG in treatment of acute radiation-induced esophagitis for stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hanxi; Xie, Peng; Li, Xiaolin; Zhu, Wanqi; Sun, Xindong; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Xiaoting; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute radiation-induced esophagitis (ARIE) is one of main toxicities complicated by thoracic radiotherapy, influencing patients’ quality of life and radiotherapy proceeding seriously. It is difficult to be cured rapidly so far. Our phase I trial preliminarily showed that EGCG may be a promising strategy in the treatment of ARIE. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with stage III lung cancer from the Shandong Tumor Hospital & Institute in China from January 2013 to September 2014. All patients received concurrent or sequential chemo-radiotherapy, or radiotherapy only. EGCG was administrated once ARIE appeared. EGCG was given with the concentration of 440 μmol/L during radiotherapy and additionally two weeks after radiotherapy. RTOG score, dysphagia and pain related to esophagitis were recorded every week. Results: Thirty-seven patients with stage IIIA and IIIB lung cancer were enrolled in this trial. In comparison to the original, the RTOG score in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th week after EGCG prescription and the 1st, 2nd week after radiotherapy decreased significantly (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001, 0.102, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). The pain score of each week was significantly lower than the baseline (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.006, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: This trial confirmed that the oral administration of EGCG is an effective and safe method to deal with ARIE. A phase III randomized controlled trial is expected to further corroborate the consequence of EGCG in ARIE treatment

  13. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguang Shi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]. The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001 than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response.

  14. Is it possible to predict low-volume and insignificant prostate cancer by core needle biopsies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2013-01-01

    M: tumour ≤5% of total prostate volume and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤10 ng/mL. In all definitions, Gleason score (GS) was ≤6 and the tumour was organ confined. Biopsies alone performed poorly as a predictor of unifocal and unilateral cancer in the prostatectomy specimens with positive predictive......In an attempt to minimize overtreatment of localized prostate cancer (PCa) active surveillance (AS) and minor invasive procedures have received increased attention. We investigated the accuracy of pre-operative findings in defining insignificant disease and distinguishing between unilateral.......9% and 12.0%, respectively, for identifying InsigM, InsigW and InsigE in the prostate specimen. Conclusively, routine prostate biopsies cannot predict unifocal and unilateral PCa, and must be regarded insufficient to select patients for focal therapy. Although candidates for AS may be identified using...

  15. Evaluation of PET/MRI for Tumor Volume Delineation for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kyle; Mullins, Brandon T; Falchook, Aaron D; Lian, Jun; He, Kelei; Shen, Dinggang; Dance, Michael; Lin, Weili; Sills, Tiffany M; Das, Shiva K; Huang, Benjamin Y; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), combined positron emitted tomography and CT (PET/CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used in head and neck radiation planning. Hybrid PET/MRI has garnered attention for potential added value in cancer staging and treatment planning. Herein, we compare PET/MRI vs. planning CT for head and neck cancer gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. We prospectively enrolled patients with head and neck cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation to 60-70 Gy using IMRT. We performed pretreatment contrast-enhanced planning CT and gadolinium-enhanced PET/MRI. Primary and nodal volumes were delineated on planning CT (GTV-CT) prospectively before treatment and PET/MRI (GTV-PET/MRI) retrospectively after treatment. GTV-PET/MRI was compared to GTV-CT using separate rigid registrations for each tumor volume. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) metric evaluating spatial overlap and modified Hausdorff distance (mHD) evaluating mean orthogonal distance difference were calculated. Minimum dose to 95% of GTVs (D95) was compared. Eleven patients were evaluable (10 oropharynx, 1 larynx). Nine patients had evaluable primary tumor GTVs and seven patients had evaluable nodal GTVs. Mean primary GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 13.2 and 14.3 cc, with mean intersection 8.7 cc, DSC 0.63, and mHD 1.6 mm. D95 was 65.3 Gy for primary GTV-CT vs. 65.2 Gy for primary GTV-PET/MRI. Mean nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 19.0 and 23.0 cc, with mean intersection 14.4 cc, DSC 0.69, and mHD 2.3 mm. D95 was 62.3 Gy for both nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI. In this series of patients with head and neck (primarily oropharynx) cancer, PET/MRI and CT-GTVs had similar volumes (though there were individual cases with larger differences) with overall small discrepancies in spatial overlap, small mean orthogonal distance differences, and similar radiation doses.

  16. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in radiation treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Freedman, Gary; Fowble, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume. Retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer is presented with respect to CLD. Methods and Materials: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 108 consecutive cases (52 left and 56 right breast) referred for CT simulation. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the measurement of the CLD and analysis. Results: Using CT data the mean volume and standard deviation of left and right lungs were 1307.7 ± 297.7 cm 3 and 1529.6 ± 298.5 cm 3 , respectively. The magnitude of irradiated volume in left and right lung is nearly equal for the same CLD that produces different percent irradiated volumes (PIV). The left and right PIV lungs are 8.3 ± 4.7% and 6.6 ± 3.7%, respectively. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with second- and third-degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomials. The regression lines for the left and right breasts are very different based on

  17. Definition and delineation of the clinical target volume for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roels, Sarah; Duthoy, Wim; Haustermans, Karin; Penninckx, Freddy; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Optimization of radiation techniques to maximize local tumor control and to minimize small bowel toxicity in locally advanced rectal cancer requires proper definition and delineation guidelines for the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose of this investigation was to analyze reported data on the predominant locations and frequency of local recurrences and lymph node involvement in rectal cancer, to propose a definition of the CTV for rectal cancer and guidelines for its delineation. Methods and Materials: Seven reports were analyzed to assess the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences in rectal cancer. The distribution of lymphatic spread was analyzed in another 10 reports to record the relative frequency and location of metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer, according to the stage and level of the primary tumor. Results: The mesorectal, posterior, and inferior pelvic subsites are most at risk for local recurrences, whereas lymphatic tumor spread occurs mainly in three directions: upward into the inferior mesenteric nodes; lateral into the internal iliac lymph nodes; and, in a few cases, downward into the external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. The risk for recurrence or lymph node involvement is related to the stage and the level of the primary lesion. Conclusion: Based on a review of articles reporting on the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences and the distribution of lymphatic spread in rectal cancer, we defined guidelines for CTV delineation including the pelvic subsites and lymph node groups at risk for microscopic involvement. We propose to include the primary tumor, the mesorectal subsite, and the posterior pelvic subsite in the CTV in all patients. Moreover, the lateral lymph nodes are at high risk for microscopic involvement and should also be added in the CTV

  18. Neoadjuvant letrozole in postmenopausal estrogen and/or progesterone receptor positive breast cancer: A phase IIb/III trial to investigate optimal duration of preoperative endocrine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krainick-Strobel, Ute E; Lichtenegger, Werner; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Tulusan, Augustinus H; Jänicke, Fritz; Bastert, Gunther; Kiesel, Ludwig; Wackwitz, Birgit; Paepke, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, preoperative volume reduction of locally advanced breast cancers, resulting in higher rates of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), has become increasingly important also in postmenopausal women. Clinical interest has come to center on the third-generation nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors (AIs), including letrozole, for such neoadjuvant endocrine treatment. This usually lasts 3–4 months and has been extended to up to 12 months, but optimal treatment duration has not been fully established. This study was designed as a multicenter, open-label, single-arm, exploratory phase IIb/III clinical trial of letrozole 2.5 mg, one tablet daily, for 4–8 months. The primary objective was to investigate the effect of neoadjuvant treatment duration on tumor regression and BCS eligibility to identify optimal treatment duration. Tumor regression (by clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasound), shift towards BCS eligibility, and safety assessments were the main outcome measures. Standard parametric and nonparametric descriptive statistics were performed. Letrozole treatment was received by 32 of the enrolled 33 postmenopausal women (median (range): 67.0 (56–85) years) with unilateral, initially BCS-ineligible primary breast cancer (clinical stage ≥ T2, N0, M0). Letrozole treatment duration in the modified intent-to-treat (ITT; required 4 months' letrozole treatment) analysis population (29 patients) was 4 months in 14 patients and > 4 months in 15 patients. The respective per-protocol (PP) subgroup sizes were 14 and 11. The majority of partial or complete responses were observed at 4 months, though some beneficial responses occurred during prolonged letrozole treatment. Compared with baseline, median tumor size in the ITT population was reduced by 62.5% at Month 4 and by 70.0% at final study visit (Individual End). Similarly, in the PP population, respective reductions were 64.0% and 67.0%. Whereas initially all patients were mastectomy candidates

  19. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm 3 , 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm 3 this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm 3 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm 3 (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10 10 cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm 3 (∝1 cm in diameter with 10 9 cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  20. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offersen, Birgitte V.; Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Kirkove, Carine; Hol, Sandra; Aznar, Marianne C.; Biete Sola, Albert; Kirova, Youlia M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Remouchamps, Vincent; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Arenas, Meritxell; Gabrys, Dorota; Kopek, Neil; Krause, Mechthild; Lundstedt, Dan; Marinko, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. Material and methods: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Results: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5 mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency

  1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy by bronchial arterial infusion in patients with unresectable stage III squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Jiang, Sen; Ni, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy administered via bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) on unresectable stage III lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This was a single-arm retrospective study of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GP) administered via BAI to patients with unresectable lung SCC. Data regarding the post-treatment response rate, downstage rate, and surgery rate, as well as progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), quality of life, and post-BAI side effects were collected. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and May 2014. The response rate was 72.2%, and the downstage rate was 22.2%. Among the patients who were downstaged, 16 (44.4%) patients were because of their T stage, and 5 (13.9%) patients were downstaged due to to their N stage. The surgery rate was 52.8%, the 1-year survival rate was 75.4%, and the 2-year survival rate was 52.1%. The median PFS was 14.0 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.4], and the median OS was 25.0 months (95% CI: 19.1-30.9). The quality of life was significantly improved, and the chemotherapy was well tolerated. Compared with intravenous neoadjuvant chemotherapy, BAI chemotherapy significantly improved the surgery rate, prolonged PFS and OS, and improved the quality of life in patients with unresectable stage III lung SCC.

  2. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    targeting bone density, cardiovascular function, lean and fat mass, physical function and falls risk as primary study endpoints. In terms of advancement of prostate cancer care, we expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce fracture risk, improve physical and functional ability, quality of life and ultimately survival rate in this population. A Phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer; ACTRN12609000200280

  3. Validation of previously reported predictors for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy, a post hoc analysis from a Phase III randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertbutsayanukul, Chawalit; Kitpanit, Sarin; Prayongrat, Anussara; Kannarunimit, Danita; Netsawang, Buntipa; Chakkabat, Chakkapong

    2018-05-10

    This study aimed to validate previously reported dosimetric parameters, including thyroid volume, mean dose, and percentage thyroid volume, receiving at least 40, 45 and 50 Gy (V40, V45 and V50), absolute thyroid volume spared (VS) from 45, 50 and 60 Gy (VS45, VS50 and VS60), and clinical factors affecting the development of radiation-induced hypothyroidism (RHT). A post hoc analysis was performed in 178 euthyroid nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients from a Phase III study comparing sequential versus simultaneous-integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy. RHT was determined by increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with or without reduced free thyroxin, regardless of symptoms. The median follow-up time was 42.5 months. The 1-, 2- and 3-year freedom from RHT rates were 78.4%, 56.4% and 43.4%, respectively. The median latency period was 21 months. The thyroid gland received a median mean dose of 53.5 Gy. Female gender, smaller thyroid volume, higher pretreatment TSH level (≥1.55 μU/ml) and VS60 treatment planning.

  4. Impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Volkova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal carcinoma.Subjects and methods. Four hundred and fifty-three patients with pT1–3aN0M0 renal cell carcinoma and normally functioning secondkidney who had undergone radical nephrectomy (n = 226 (49.9 % or kidney resection (n = 227 (50.1 % were selected for the investigation. The patient groups who had undergone different-volume operations were matched for gender, age, body mass index (BMI, side of involvement, tumor sizes, and baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR (p > for all. The median baseline Charlson index and the rate of ASA classes III–IV operative risk were significantly higher in candidates for radical nephrectomy (p < 0.05 for all, the rate of diseases affecting kidney function, pT1a category, and G1 anaplasia were higher in the kidney resection group (p < 0.0001. The median follow-up was 50 (12–224 months.Results. Within 28 days postsurgery, the rate of acute renal dysfunction (ARD was 36.2 %. The independent risk factors of ARD were kidney resection (risk ratio (RR = 0.210; 95 % confidence interval (CI 0.115–0.288; р < 0.0001 and ischemia time (RR = 0.012; 95 % CI 0.004–0.021; p = 0.004. The degree of ARD after kidney resection was significantly lower than that following radical nephrectomy (p < 0.0001. In the late postoperative period, the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD Stage ≥ III was 38.4 %. Its independent risk factors were low baseline GFR (RR = 0.003; 95 % CI 0.002–0.005; p < 0.0001, radical nephrectomy (RR = 0.195; 95 % CI 0.093–0.298; p < 0.0001, and ARD (RR = 0.281; 95 % CI 0.187–0.376; p = 0.0001. Ten-year specific and cardiospecific survival rates in all the patients were 98.5 and 94.9 %, respectively, and unrelated to surgical volume. The independent predictors of poor cardiospecific survival were BMI, Charlson index, and ASA risk

  5. Impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Volkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal carcinoma.Subjects and methods. Four hundred and fifty-three patients with pT1–3aN0M0 renal cell carcinoma and normally functioning secondkidney who had undergone radical nephrectomy (n = 226 (49.9 % or kidney resection (n = 227 (50.1 % were selected for the investigation. The patient groups who had undergone different-volume operations were matched for gender, age, body mass index (BMI, side of involvement, tumor sizes, and baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR (p > for all. The median baseline Charlson index and the rate of ASA classes III–IV operative risk were significantly higher in candidates for radical nephrectomy (p < 0.05 for all, the rate of diseases affecting kidney function, pT1a category, and G1 anaplasia were higher in the kidney resection group (p < 0.0001. The median follow-up was 50 (12–224 months.Results. Within 28 days postsurgery, the rate of acute renal dysfunction (ARD was 36.2 %. The independent risk factors of ARD were kidney resection (risk ratio (RR = 0.210; 95 % confidence interval (CI 0.115–0.288; р < 0.0001 and ischemia time (RR = 0.012; 95 % CI 0.004–0.021; p = 0.004. The degree of ARD after kidney resection was significantly lower than that following radical nephrectomy (p < 0.0001. In the late postoperative period, the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD Stage ≥ III was 38.4 %. Its independent risk factors were low baseline GFR (RR = 0.003; 95 % CI 0.002–0.005; p < 0.0001, radical nephrectomy (RR = 0.195; 95 % CI 0.093–0.298; p < 0.0001, and ARD (RR = 0.281; 95 % CI 0.187–0.376; p = 0.0001. Ten-year specific and cardiospecific survival rates in all the patients were 98.5 and 94.9 %, respectively, and unrelated to surgical volume. The independent predictors of poor cardiospecific survival were BMI, Charlson index, and ASA risk

  6. Overexpression of the S100A2 protein as a prognostic marker for patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUDA, TAIKI; ISHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; MOGUSHI, KAORU; OKAZAKI, SATOSHI; ISHIGURO, MEGUMI; IIDA, SATORU; MIZUSHIMA, HIROSHI; TANAKA, HIROSHI; UETAKE, HIROYUKI; SUGIHARA, KENICHI

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify a novel prognostic biomarker related to recurrence in stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Stage II and III CRC tissue mRNA expression was profiled using an Affymetrix Gene Chip, and copy number profiles of 125 patients were generated using an Affymetrix 250K Sty array. Genes showing both upregulated expression and copy number gains in cases involving recurrence were extracted as candidate biomarkers. The protein expression of the candidate gene was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of tissue from 161 patients. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was also examined. We identified 9 candidate genes related to recurrence of stage II and III CRC, whose mRNA expression was significantly higher in CRC than in normal tissue. Of these proteins, the S100 calcium-binding protein A2 (S100A2) has been observed in several human cancers. S100A2 protein overexpression in CRC cells was associated with significantly worse overall survival and relapse-free survival, indicating that S100A2 is an independent risk factor for stage II and III CRC recurrence. S100A2 overexpression in cancer cells could be a biomarker of poor prognosis in stage II and III CRC recurrence and a target for treatment of this disease. PMID:26783118

  7. Cancer in the oropharynx: Cost calculation of different treatment modalities for controlled primaries, relapses and grade III/IV complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijdam, Wideke; Levendag, Peter; Noever, Inge; Groot, Carin Uyl-de; Agthoven, Michel van

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper presents a model for cost calculation using the different treatment modalities for oropharyngeal (OPh) cancers used in our hospital. We compared full hospital costs, the associated costs of localregional relapses (LRR) and/or treatment related grade III/IV complications. Materials and methods: Patients with OPh cancer are treated in the Erasmus MC preferably by an organ function preservation protocol. That is, by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy (BT) boost, and neck dissection in case of N+ disease (BT-group: 157 patients). If BT is not feasible, resection with postoperative EBRT (S-group [S=Surgery]: 110 patients) or EBRT-alone (EBRT-group: 77 patients) is being pursued. Actuarial localregional control (LRC), disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5-years were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The mean costs per treatment group for diagnosis, primary Tx per se, follow-up, (salvage of) locoregional relapse (LRR), distant metastasis (DM), and/or grade III/IV complications needing clinical admission, were computed. Results: For the BT-, S-, or EBRT treatment groups, LRC rates at 5-years were 85, 82, and 55%, for the DFS, 61, 48, and 43%, and for the OS 65, 52, and 40%, respectively. The mean costs of primary Tx in case of the BT-group is EURO 13,466; for the S-group EURO 24,219, and EURO 12,502 for the EBRT-group. The mean costs of S (the main salvage modality) for a LRR of the BT group or EBRT-group, were EURO 17,861 and EURO 15,887, respectively. The mean costs of clinical management of Grade III/IV complications were EURO 7184 (BT-group), EURO 16,675 (S-group) and EURO 6437 (EBRT-group). Conclusion: The clinical outcome illustrates excellent LRC rates at 5-years for BT (85%), as well as for S (82%). The relatively low 55% LRC rate at 5-years for EBRT probably reflects a negative selection of patients. It is of interest that the total mean costs of patients alive

  8. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Berle, Lisa; Graham, Roger; Chung, Maureen; Rothschild, Janice; Graves, Theresa; Cady, Blake; Ulin, Kenneth; Ruthazer, Robin; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192 Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  9. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival....

  10. Early tumor shrinkage served as a prognostic factor for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Men; Hu, Yan; Yang, Yonghua; Yang, Jiyuan; Cai, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death. About 80% of patients are diagnosed at stage III in the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is extremely important to understand the progression of this disease which has low survival times despite the advancing treatment modalities. We aimed to investigate the relationship between early tumor shrinkage (ETS) after initial concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT) and survival outcome in patients with stage III (NSCLC). A retrospective review of 103 patients with stage III NSCLC who had received C-CRT from January 2006 to October 2011 was performed. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of Cisplatin/Vp-16 and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 66 Gy (range 60-70 Gy). All patients received a computed tomography (CT) examination before treatment. Also subsequently, chest CT scans were performed with the same imaging parameters at approximately 5 weeks after the initiation of treatment. ETS is here stratified by a decrease in tumor size ≥30% and cancer-related death (P < .05) in stage IIINSCLC. ETS may be served as a useful prognostic factor to predict the outcome of stage III NSCLC patients treated with CCRT.

  11. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1) gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Top1) is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III C...

  12. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans

  13. Phase III trial of cetuximab with continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) versus FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Tormod; Glimelius, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    The NORDIC-VII multicenter phase III trial investigated the efficacy of cetuximab when added to bolus fluorouracil/folinic acid and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX), administered continuously or intermittently, in previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The influence of KRAS mutation...

  14. The expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 in predicting postoperative tumour progression in stages I-II colon cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Yao, Yunfeng; Xue, Weicheng; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Peng, Yifan; Gu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of chemokine receptors in stage I/II colon cancer is unclear. We assessed the prognostic value of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and CXCR4 in stage I/II colon cancer. 145 patients with stage I/II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery alone from 2000 to 2007 were investigated. Chemokine receptor expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The associations between CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological variables were analysed using the χ2 test, and the relationships between chemokine receptors and a 5-year disease-free survival were analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The high-expression rates of CXCR3 and CXCR4 were 17.9% (26/145) and 38.6% (56/145), respectively. There were no significant associations between the expressions of CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological factors including gender, age, tumour location, histological differentiation, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion and pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The 5-year disease-free survival was not significantly different between low-expression groups and high-expression groups of CXCR3 and CXCR4. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum CEA and a number of retrieved lymph nodes, rather than chemokine receptors, were independent prognosticators. CXCR3 and CXCR4 are not independent prognosticators for stage I/II colon cancer after curative surgery.

  15. Identification of a rhodium(iii) complex as a Wee1 inhibitor against TP53-mutated triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guan-Jun; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Ko, Chung-Nga; Wong, Suk-Yu; Vellaisamy, Kasipandi; Ye, Min; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2018-03-06

    The rhodium(iii) complex 1 was identified as a potent Wee1 inhibitor in vitro and in cellulo. It decreased Wee1 activity and unscheduled mitotic entry, and induced cell damage and death in TP53-mutated triple-negative breast cancer cells. 1 represents a promising scaffold for further development of more potent metal-based Wee1 antagonists.

  16. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies : Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.L.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; de Giorgi, U.; De Wit, R.; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.; European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group; Genito-Urinary Cancers Group, The

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  17. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies: Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; De Giorgi, U.; de Wit, R; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; van Poppel, H.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  18. Edrecolomab alone or in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer: a randomised study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Nagy, Attila; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Figer, Arie; Skovsgaard, Torben; Monson, John; Barone, Carlo; Fountzilas, George; Riess, Hanno; Moylan, Eugene; Jones, Delyth; Dethling, Juergen; Colman, Jessica; Coward, Lorna; Macgregor, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    Edrecolomab is a murine monoclonal antibody to the cell-surface glycoprotein 17-1A, which is expressed on epithelial tissues and on various carcinomas. Preliminary data suggested that it might be of use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with resected stage III colon cancer. We did a randomised

  19. Edrecolomab alone or in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer: a randomised study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C.J.A.; Nagy, A.; Douillard, J.Y.; Figer, A.; Skovsgaard, T.; Monson, J.; Barone, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Riess, H.; Moylan, E.; Jones, D.; Dethling, J.; Colman, J.; Coward, L.; MacGregor, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edrecolomab is a murine monoclonal antibody to the cell-surface glycoprotein 17-1A, which is expressed on epithelial tissues and on various carcinomas. Preliminary data suggested that it might be of use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with resected stage III colon cancer. We did a

  20. CDX2 prognostic value in stage II/III resected colon cancer is related to CMS classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, C; Taieb, J; Balogoun, R; Marisa, L; de Reyniès, A; Laurent-Puig, P

    2017-05-01

    Caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is involved in colon cancer (CC) oncogenesis and has been proposed as a prognostic biomarker in patients with stage II or III CC. We analyzed CDX2 expression in a series of 469 CC typed for the new international consensus molecular subtype (CMS) classification, and we confirmed results in a series of 90 CC. Here, we show that lack of CDX2 expression is only present in the mesenchymal subgroup (CMS4) and in MSI-immune tumors (CMS1) and not in CMS2 and CMS3 colon cancer. Although CDX2 expression was a globally independent prognostic factor, loss of CDX2 expression is not associated with a worse prognosis in the CMS1 group, but is highly prognostic in CMS4 patients for both relapse free and overall survival. Similarly, lack of CDX2 expression was a bad prognostic factor in MSS patients, but not in MSI. Our work suggests that combination of the consensual CMS classification and lack of CDX2 expression could be a useful marker to identify CMS4/CDX2-negative patients with a very poor prognosis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Magnitude of Myocutaneous Flaps and Factors Associated With Loss of Volume in Oral Cancer Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Yanamoto, Souichi; Ota, Yoshihide; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Myocutaneous flaps are often used to repair oral and maxillofacial defects after surgery for oral cancer; however, their volume decreases during the postoperative period. To facilitate treatment planning, the authors measured the extent of such postoperative flap volume loss and identified associated factors in patients who underwent oral reconstruction with myocutaneous flaps. The authors designed and performed a retrospective observational study of patients who underwent reconstructive procedures involving rectus abdominal myocutaneous (RAM) or pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flaps at Tokai University Hospital, Kobe University Hospital, or Nagasaki University Hospital from April 2009 through March 2013. Flap type and other clinical variables were examined as potential predictors of flap loss. The primary outcome was flap loss at 6 months postoperatively. Correlations between each potential predictor and the primary outcome were examined using multiple regression analysis. The subjects were 75 patients whose oral defects were reconstructed with RAM flaps (n = 57) or PMMC flaps (n = 18). RAM flaps exhibited a mean volume shrinkage of 22% at 6 months postoperatively, which was less than the 27.5% displayed by the PMMC flaps, but the difference was not important. Renal failure, previous surgery of the oral region, postoperative radiotherapy, and postoperative serum albumin level were found to be meaningful risk factors for postoperative flap volume loss. The results of this study suggest that larger flaps should be used in patients who possess these risk factors or are scheduled to undergo postoperative radiotherapy. Future studies should examine the utility of postoperative nutritional management for preventing flap volume loss. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of imaging-based gross tumor volume and pathological volume determined by whole-mount serial sections in primary cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zhang,1,* Jing Hu,1,* Jianping Li,1 Ning Wang,1 Weiwei Li,1 Yongchun Zhou,1 Junyue Liu,1 Lichun Wei,1 Mei Shi,1 Shengjun Wang,2 Jing Wang,2 Xia Li,3 Wanling Ma4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To investigate the accuracy of imaging-based gross tumor volume (GTV compared with pathological volume in cervical cancer.Methods: Ten patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–II cervical cancer were eligible for investigation and underwent surgery in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT scans were taken the day before surgery. The GTVs under MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT (GTV-MRI, GTV-PET, GTV-CT were calculated automatically by Eclipse treatment-planning systems. Specimens of excised uterine cervix and cervical cancer were consecutively sliced and divided into whole-mount serial sections. The tumor border of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was outlined under a microscope by an experienced pathologist. GTV through pathological image (GTV-path was calculated with Adobe Photoshop.Results: The GTVs (average ± standard deviation delineated and calculated under CT, MRI, PET, and histopathological sections were 19.41 ± 11.96 cm3, 12.66 ± 10.53 cm3, 11.07 ± 9.44 cm3, and 10.79 ± 8.71 cm3, respectively. The volume of GTV-CT or GTV-MR was bigger than GTV-path, and the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05. Spearman correlation analysis showed that GTV-CT, GTV-MRI, and GTV-PET were significantly correlated with GTV-path (P < 0.01. There was no significant difference in the lesion coverage factor among the three modalities.Conclusion: The present study showed that GTV defined under 40% of maximum standardized

  3. A Phase III placebo-controlled trial of oral pilocarpine in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Brian; Aslanidis, Julie; Kroll, Barbaranne; Lockwood, Gina; Waldron, John; Payne, David; Bayley, Andrew; Ringash, Jolie; Kim, John; Liu, F.-F.; Maxymiw, Walter; Sprague, Shelley; Cummings, Bernard J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the use of oral pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer would reduce the symptoms of post-RT xerostomia. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty patients were randomized in a double-blind method to receive either pilocarpine (5-mg tablets) or placebo three times daily starting on Day 1 of RT and continuing for 1 month after treatment. The eligibility criteria included a planned dose of >50 Gy as radical or postoperative RT for head-and-neck cancer, with at least 50% of both parotid glands included in the treatment fields. The primary outcome measure was the severity of xerostomia as assessed by a patient-completed linear analog scale 3 months after RT. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life during therapy (as assessed by the McMaster University Head-and-Neck Questionnaire) and severity of mucositis during RT (as assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scales). Results: No difference was observed between the pilocarpine-treated patients and the placebo group in the severity of xerostomia score as assessed by linear analog scale at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment (repeated measures analysis, p=0.92). No difference was apparent in the severity of mucositis during RT; 56.3% of patients receiving pilocarpine had Grade III/IV mucositis compared with 50.8% treated with placebo. No difference in quality of life was noted between the treatment groups during or after RT. The questionnaire score at 3 months after RT was 5.0 (SD 1.0). in the pilocarpine group and 4.9 (SD 0.9) in the placebo group. Conclusion: We were unable to detect a beneficial effect of pilocarpine on RT-induced xerostomia when administered during RT for head-and-neck cancer

  4. A phase I/II study of Docetaxel/TS-1 with radiation for esophageal cancer patients. Step 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Hirai, Toshihiro; Hirabayashi, Youko

    2006-01-01

    The therapy 5-fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) with radiation is thought to be the standard therapy for esophageal cancer patients by now. However, the therapy is associated with a comparatively high incidence of gastrointestinal disorders and requires hospitalization. We have proposed a new regimen of Docetaxel and TS-1 with radiation for maintaining of QOL and improving outcome. Step 1 of the clinical phase I/II study was conducted for 10 cases from May 2004 to March 2006. Treatment could be accomplished in all cases, and no treatment-related deaths or adverse events of grade 4 were observed in any case. As for hematotoxicity, one case had leucopenia of grade 3 and neutropenia of grade 2. As for non-hematotoxic adverse events, anorexia of grade 3 was recognized in one case of level 3. The response rate evaluated by RECIST was 66% (CR in 2 cases, PR in 4 cases,) and the rate based on the Guide Lines for the Clinical and Pathologic Studies on Carcinoma of Esophagus by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Cancer was 70% (CR in 3 cases, PR in 4 cases). We assumed that the recommended dosage of TXT was 30 mg/m 2 and that of TS-1 was 60 mg/m 2 with radiotherapy of 60 Gy. This combination therapy may be recommended because of fewer adverse events and a higher responsive rate than the standard therapies. We intend to continue this study to step 2 and 3, and to reveal the response rate and adverse events for more esophageal cancer patients. (author)

  5. Preliminary investigation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jindong; Lu Changxing; Wang Jiaming; Liu Jun; Li Hongxuan; Wang Changlu; Gao Lanting; Zhao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and treatment-related toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: SBRT was applied to 30 patients, including clinically staged T 1 , T 2 (≤5 cm) or T 3 (chest wall primary tumors only), N 0 , M 0 ,biopsy-confirmed NSCLC. All patients were precluded from lobotomy because of physical condition or comorbidity. No patients developed tumors of any T-stage in the proximal zone. SBRT was performed with the total dose of 50 Gy to 70 Gy in 10 - 11 fractions during 12 - 15 days. prescription line was set onthe edge of the PTV. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%. The number of patients who completed the 1-, and 2-year follow-up were 15, and 10, respectively. All 30 patients completed therapy as planned. The complete response (CR), partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 37%, 53% and 3%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 4-36 months), Kaplan-Meier local control at 2 years was 94%. The 2-year overall survival was 84% and the 2-year cancer specific survival was 90%. Seven patients(23%) developed Grade 2 pneumonitis, no grade > 2 acute or late lung toxicity was observed. No one developed chest wall pain. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver 50 Gy to 70 Gy of SBRT in 10 - 11 fractions for medically inoperable patients with stage I / II NSCLC. It was associated with low incidence of toxicities and provided sustained local tumor control.The preliminary investigation indicated the cancer specific survival probability of SBRT was high. It is necessary to perform similar investigation in a larger number of patients with long-term follow-up. (authors)

  6. Advanced ovarian cancer: phase III randomized study of sequential cisplatin-topotecan and carboplatin-paclitaxel vs carboplatin-paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, P; Vergote, I; Cervantes, A; Tu, D; Stuart, G; Zola, P; Poveda, A; Provencher, D; Katsaros, D; Ojeda, B; Ghatage, P; Grimshaw, R; Casado, A; Elit, L; Mendiola, C; Sugimoto, A; D'Hondt, V; Oza, A; Germa, J R; Roy, M; Brotto, L; Chen, D; Eisenhauer, E A

    2010-10-20

    Topotecan has single-agent activity in recurrent ovarian cancer. It was evaluated in a novel combination compared with standard frontline therapy. Women aged 75 years or younger with newly diagnosed stage IIB or greater ovarian cancer, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status of 1 or less, were stratified by type of primary surgery and residual disease, treatment center, and age; then randomly assigned to one of the two 21-day intravenous regimens. Patients in arm 1 (n = 409) were administered four cycles of cisplatin 50 mg/m(2) on day 1 and topotecan 0.75 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, then four cycles of paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) over 3 hours on day 1 followed by carboplatin (area under the curve = 5) on day 1. Patients in arm 2 (n = 410) were given paclitaxel plus carboplatin as in arm 1 for eight cycles. We compared progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival, and cancer antigen-125 normalization rates in the two treatment arms. A stratified log-rank test was used to assess the primary endpoint, PFS. All statistical tests were two-sided. A total of 819 patients were randomly assigned. At baseline, the median age of the patients was 57 years (range = 28-78); 81% had received debulking surgery, and of these, 55% had less than 1 cm residual disease; 66% of patients were stage III and 388 (47.4%) patients had measurable disease. After a median follow-up of 43 months, 650 patients had disease progression or died without documented progression and 406 had died. Patients in arm 1 had more hematological toxicity and hospitalizations than patients in arm 2; PFS was 14.6 months in arm 1 vs 16.2 months in arm 2 (hazard ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 0.94 to 1.28, P = .25). Among patients with elevated baseline cancer antigen-125, fewer in arm 1 than in arm 2 had levels return to normal by 3 months after random assignment (51.6% vs 63.3%, P = .007) Topotecan and cisplatin, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel, were more toxic than carboplatin and

  7. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, M.D. [Helios-Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Wuppertal (Germany); Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data

  8. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna, E-mail: anapaulafortuna@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Atencao Integrada a Saude da Mulher. Divisao de Radioterapia; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Divisao de Radioterapia

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm{sup 3} had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm{sup 3}. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm{sup 3} should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. Keywords: Rectal volume; Prostate cancer; Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a porphyrazine-Gd(III) MRI contrast agent and in vivo imaging of a breast cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Evan R; Ma, Zhidong; Waters, Emily A; Macrenaris, Keith W; Subramanian, Rohit; Barrett, Anthony G M; Meade, Thomas J; Hoffman, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrazines (Pz), or tetraazaporphyrins, are being studied for their potential use in detection and treatment of cancer. Here, an amphiphilic Cu-Pz-Gd(III) conjugate has been prepared via azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition or 'click' chemistry between an azide functionalized Pz and alkyne functionalized DOTA-Gd(III) analog for use as an MRI contrast agent. This agent, Cu-Pz-Gd(III), is synthesized in good yield and exhibits solution-phase ionic relaxivity (r1  = 11.5 mM(-1) s(-1)) that is approximately four times higher than that of a clinically used monomeric Gd(III) contrast agent, DOTA-Gd(III). Breast tumor cells (MDA-MB-231) associate with Cu-Pz-Gd(III) in vitro, where significant contrast enhancement (9.336 ± 0.335 contrast-to-noise ratio) is observed in phantom cell pellet MR images. This novel contrast agent was administered in vivo to an orthotopic breast tumor model in athymic nude mice and MR images were collected. The average T1 of tumor regions in mice treated with 50 mg kg(-1) Cu-Pz-Gd(III) decreased relative to saline-treated controls. Furthermore, the decrease in T1 was persistent relative to mice treated with the monomeric Gd(III) contrast agent. An ex vivo biodistribution study confirmed that Cu-Pz-Gd(III) accumulates in the tumors and is rapidly cleared, primarily through the kidneys. Differential accumulation and T1 enhancement by Cu-Pz-Gd(III) in the tumor's core relative to the periphery offer preliminary evidence that this agent would find application in the imaging of necrotic tissue. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Delineation of Internal Mammary Nodal Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jethwa, Krishan R.; Kahila, Mohamed M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hunt, Katie N. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Brown, Lindsay C.; Corbin, Kimberly S.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Boughey, Judy C. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert W., E-mail: mutter.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: The optimal clinical target volume for internal mammary (IM) node irradiation is uncertain in an era of increasingly conformal volume-based treatment planning for breast cancer. We mapped the location of gross internal mammary lymph node (IMN) metastases to identify areas at highest risk of harboring occult disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of IMN disease were identified from a breast cancer registry. The IMN location was transferred onto the corresponding anatomic position on representative axial computed tomography images of a patient in the treatment position and compared with consensus group guidelines of IMN target delineation. Results: The IMN location in 67 patients with 130 IMN metastases was mapped. The location was in the first 3 intercostal spaces in 102 of 130 nodal metastases (78%), whereas 18 of 130 IMNs (14%) were located caudal to the third intercostal space and 10 of 130 IMNs (8%) were located cranial to the first intercostal space. Of the 102 nodal metastases within the first 3 intercostal spaces, 54 (53%) were located within the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group consensus volume. Relative to the IM vessels, 19 nodal metastases (19%) were located medially with a mean distance of 2.2 mm (SD, 2.9 mm) whereas 29 (28%) were located laterally with a mean distance of 3.6 mm (SD, 2.5 mm). Ninety percent of lymph nodes within the first 3 intercostal spaces would have been encompassed within a 4-mm medial and lateral expansion on the IM vessels. Conclusions: In women with indications for elective IMN irradiation, a 4-mm medial and lateral expansion on the IM vessels may be appropriate. In women with known IMN involvement, cranial extension to the confluence of the IM vein with the brachiocephalic vein with or without caudal extension to the fourth or fifth interspace may be considered provided that normal tissue constraints are met.

  11. Clinical outcome of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer patients after definitive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Primarily combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used to treat unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the results are not satisfactory. In this study treatment results were retrospectively analyzed and the prognostic factors related to survival were identified. From March 1999 to January 2004, 102 patients with stage IIIA/IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Radiotherapy involved a daily dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy five times a week; 60 Gy was set as the total dose. Maximal chemotherapy was given to patients with normal kidney, liver, and bone marrow functions. The 5-year overall survival rate was 22.2%; the median survival was 18 months. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53 months. The complete or partial response rate was 85%. At the time of the last follow-up, 21 patients were alive and 81 patients had died, including 5 patients who had died due to radiation pneumonitis. There were significant differences in survival and in the fatal radiation pneumonitis rate between patients with superior lobe lesions and those with middle or inferior lobe lesions. Patients whose primary tumor is located in the superior lobe appear to have a better clinical outcome.

  12. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Hejduk, B.; Kolosza, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm 3 ) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm 3 (range 0.15-21.68 cm 3 ). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  13. Association Between Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbal Therapy and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Mao, Jun J; Sun, Lingyun; Yang, Lin; Li, Jie; Hao, Yingxu; Li, Huashan; Hou, Wei; Chu, Yuping; Bai, Yu; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jinwan; Shen, Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Jianping; Yang, Yufei

    2017-11-01

    Chinese cancer patients often use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) herbal medicine during or after active cancer treatments. However, little is known about how TCM herbal medicine impacts cancer outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate the association between TCM herbal therapy and survival outcomes in patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer. We conducted an eight-center prospective cohort study in China among patients who had undergone radical resection for stage II and III colorectal cancer. All patients received comprehensive conventional treatments according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, and follow-up visits were conducted over five years. We defined high exposure as a patient's use of TCM individualized herbs for more than one year, ascertained via clinical interviews. The primary outcome was disease-free survival (DFS), with overall survival (OS) as a secondary outcome. Between April 2007 and February 2009, we enrolled 312 patients into the cohort; 166 (53.2%) met the definition of high exposure to TCM herbs. Adjusting for covariates, high exposure to TCM was associated with both better DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.39 to 0.98) and OS (HR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.14 to 0.68). In subgroup exploratory analysis, the effects demonstrated that the differences in outcomes were statistically significant in patients who had received chemotherapy. Longer duration of TCM herbal use is associated with improved survival outcomes in stage II and III colorectal cancer patients in China. More research is needed to evaluate the effects and underlying mechanisms of herbal medicine on colorectal cancer outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Dose Volume Histogram analysis for rectum and urethral reaction of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinically relevant parameters for rectum and urethral reaction using DVH (dose volume histogram) in carbon ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer. In this year, we studied the urinary reaction mainly. 35 patients with prostate cancer were treated with carbon ion beams between June 1995 and December 1997. The applied dose was escalated from 54.0 GyE to 72.0 GyE in fixed 20 fractions. Clinical urinary reaction and rectum reaction were reviewed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system for acute reactions, RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system for late reactions. Taking the ROI (region of interest) for DVH of urethra, we used surrogate one that was derived from the observation of MR images. 35 patients were analyzed for acute urinary reaction and 34 for late urinary reaction in the study of this year. DVH analysis suggested difference among the grades for acute and late reactions. These analysis appears to be a useful tool for predicting the urinary reactions. (author)

  15. Clinical target volume delineation including elective nodal irradiation in preoperative and definitive radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caravatta Luciana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT is widely used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Currently, recommendation has been given for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV in adjuvant RT. Based on recently reviewed pathologic data, the aim of this study is to propose criteria for the CTV definition and delineation including elective nodal irradiation (ENI in the preoperative and definitive treatment of pancreatic cancer. Methods The anatomical structures of interest, as well as the abdominal vasculature were identified on intravenous contrast-enhanced CT scans of two different patients with pancreatic cancer of the head and the body. To delineate the lymph node area, a margin of 10 mm was added to the arteries. Results We proposed a set of guidelines for elective treatment of high-risk nodal areas and CTV delineation. Reference CT images were provided. Conclusions The proposed guidelines could be used for preoperative or definitive RT for carcinoma of the head and body of the pancreas. Further clinical investigations are needed to validate the defined CTVs.

  16. The benefit of microsatellite instability is attenuated by chemotherapy in stage II and stage III gastric cancer: Results from a large cohort with subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Shin, Hyun Beak; Jo, Ara; Choi, Hyeji; Seo, Sang Hyuk; Bang, Hui-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported that the prognosis of microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) gastric cancer is similar to that of MSI-low/microsatellite stable (MSI-L/MSS) gastric cancer. The reason for this seemed to be related to the effects of chemotherapy. To verify this hypothesis, we expanded the study population and reanalyzed the prognosis of MSI-H gastric cancer. Data from 1,276 patients with Stage II and III gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. The prognosis of MSI-H tumors in comparison with MSI-L/MSS tumors was analyzed, according to the administration of chemotherapy and other clinicopathologic features. A total of 361 (28.3%) patients did not receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 47 and MSI-L/MSS = 314), whereas 915 (71.7%) patients did receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 58 and MSI-L/MSS = 857). The hazard ratio of MSI-H versus MSI-L/MSS was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.94, p = 0.031) when chemotherapy was not received and 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.71, p = 0.466) when chemotherapy was received. In subgroup analyses, the prognosis of MSI-H was better in Stage III, women, with lymph node metastasis, and undifferentiated histology subgroups when chemotherapy was not received. However, in patients treated with chemotherapy, prognosis was worse for MSI-H tumors in Stage III, undifferentiated histology, and diffuse type subgroups of gastric cancer. In conclusion, MSI-H tumors were associated with a good prognosis in Stage II and III gastric cancer when patients were treated by surgery alone, and the benefits of MSI-H status were attenuated by chemotherapy. © 2015 UICC.

  17. The survival of patients with Stage III Colon Cancer is improved in HNPCC compared with sporadic cases. A Danish registry based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Line Merrild; Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Bülow, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) seem to have a better prognosis than those with sporadic colon cancer (CC)s. The aim was to compare survival after stage III CC in patients with HNPCC with those having sporadic CC. METHOD: 230 patients with hereditary cancer...... from The Danish HNPCC-Register and 3557 patients with sporadic CC from The Danish Colorectal Cancer Database, diagnosed during May 2001-December 2008 were included. HNPCC patients were classified according to Mismatch Repair mutation status and family pedigree. Sporadic cases had no known family...... history of cancer. Patient characteristics, geographic differences and survival data were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall survival (OS) was better in HNPCC patients compared to sporadic CC after stratification for sex and age (p=0.02; CI 1.04-1.7). The 5-year survival was 70% in HNPCC patients compared...

  18. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [de

  19. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing

  20. Primary observing pulmonary function variety following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of III phase non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Feng; Li Guang; Zhao Yuxia; Dang Jun; Yao Lei; Wu Chunli

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pulmonary function, DVH and radiation pneumonitis after three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment of III phase non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods: 71 patients (male 52, female 19, median age 63, KPS≥80) were evaluated by pulmonary function tests before radiotherapy and in M1 and M3 after radiotherapy respectively. After 3 months of follow-up time, it reviewed the appearance and grade of radiation pneumonitis. Then V 20 , V 30 and MLD were worked out from dose volume histogram. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy, and total dose was 66-70 Gy. FVC (L), FEV 1 (L) and C L CO were (2.58±0.65) L, (1.85±0.58) L and (15.15±4.65)ml/(min) before radio- therapy, with(2.96±0.76) L, (2.13±0.65) L and (14.71±3.92) ml/(min) in M1 after radiotherapy, with (2.65±0.61) L, (1.92±0.52) L and (13.15±3.71)ml/(min)in M3 after radiotherapy. The accidence of radiation pneumonitis was 30%, moderate and severe radiation pneumonitis was 7%. With V 20 , V 30 and MLD increasing, the grade of radiation pneumonitis was increasing. V 20 , V 30 and MLD were related to the change in C L CO value among before, M1 and M3 after radiotherapy, and the correlation coefficient was more than 0.2. Conclusions: There is a relationship in the pulmonary fiction, DVH and radiation pneumonitis surely. The change in C L CO value between before radiotherapy and M1 after radiotherapy could predict the radiation pneumonitis. V 20 , V 30 and MLD are not only correlated to radiation pneumonitis evidently but the change in FEV 1 and C L CO after radiotherapy. (authors)

  1. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having ≤10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  2. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  3. Radiation therapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer in patients aged 75 years and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masaya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Katano, Susumu

    1996-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1992, 32 patients aged 75 and older with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were given definitive radiation therapy. These patients did not undergo surgery because of old age, poor cardiac/pulmonary condition, or refusal to give consent. The mean age was 79 years, and 11 patients were over 80 years old. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 25 patients and adenocarcinoma in 7. The clinical T and N stage was T1N0 in 4 patients, T2N0 in 9, and T2N0 in 19. The total dose of radiation therapy given to each patient exceeded 60 Gy using 10-MV X-rays. The treatment was completed in all 32 patients without treatment-related complications. The 2- and 5-year overall actuarial survival rates were 40% and 16%, respectively. Eleven intercurrent deaths occurred, including 7 patients who died of heart disease. The 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 57% and 36%, respectively. None of the patients developed severe pneumonitis requiring hospitalization. All but three patients received radiation therapy on an inpatient basis. The mean duration of the hospital stay for initial treatment was 56 days, and mean ratio to total survival period (mean 739 days) was 8%. Although many elderly patients have concurrent medical complications such as heart disease and chronic pulmonary disease, the present study showed that elderly patients with clinical stage I-II NSCLC can expert a realistic probability of long-term survival with definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  4. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute⊕ Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruijt Hans FM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC. In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0 will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs and/or micrometastases (MMs at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+ and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+ are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS. Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265

  5. Self-Advocacy Serious Game in Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-05

    Ovarian Cancer Stage III; Ovarian Cancer Stage IV; Breast Cancer Stage IV; Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB; Cervical Cancer Stage IVA; Cervical Cancer Stage IVB; Endometrial Cancer Stage III; Endometrial Cancer Stage IV; Vulvar Cancer, Stage III; Vulvar Cancer, Stage IV; Vaginal Cancer Stage III; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVA; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVB

  6. Superior outcome of women with stage I/II cutaneous melanoma: Pooled analysis of four European organisation for research and treatment of cancer phase III trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Joosse (Arjen); S. Collette (Sandra); S. Suciu (Stefan); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar); F.J. Lejeune (Ferdy); U.R. Kleeberg (Ulrich); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); E.G.E. de Vries (Elisabeth)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Several studies observed a female advantage in the prognosis of cutaneous melanoma, for which behavioral factors or an underlying biologic mechanism might be responsible. Using complete and reliable follow-up data from four phase III trials of the European Organisation for

  7. Improved photodynamic action of nanoparticles loaded with indium (III) phthalocyanine on MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, Carlos Augusto Zanoni [Federal Institute of Espirito Santo (Brazil); Madeira, Klesia Pirola [Federal University of Espirito Santo, Biotechnology Program/RENORBIO, Health Sciences Center (Brazil); Rettori, Daniel [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Department of Exact Sciences and Earth (Brazil); Baratti, Mariana Ozello [University of Campinas, Department of Cellular Biology (Brazil); Rangel, Leticia Batista Azevedo [Federal University of Espirito Santo, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Brazil); Razzo, Daniel [University of Campinas, Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Brazil); Silva, Andre Romero da, E-mail: aromero@ifes.edu.br [Federal Institute of Espirito Santo (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Indium (III) phthalocyanine (InPc) was encapsulated into nanoparticles of PEGylated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG) to improve the photobiological activity of the photosensitizer. The efficacy of nanoparticles loaded with InPc and their cellular uptake was investigated with MCF-7 breast tumor cells, and compared with the free InPc. The influence of photosensitizer (PS) concentration (1.8-7.5 {mu}mol/L), incubation time (1-2 h), and laser power (10-100 mW) were studied on the photodynamic effect caused by the encapsulated and the free InPc. Nanoparticles with a size distribution ranging from 61 to 243 nm and with InPc entrapment efficiency of 72 {+-} 6 % were used in the experiments. Only the photodynamic effect of encapsulated InPc was dependent on PS concentration and laser power. The InPc-loaded nanoparticles were more efficient in reducing MCF-7 cell viability than the free PS. For a light dose of 7.5 J/cm{sup 2} and laser power of 100 mW, the effectiveness of encapsulated InPc to reduce the viability was 34 {+-} 3 % while for free InPc was 60 {+-} 7 %. Confocal microscopy showed that InPc-loaded nanoparticles, as well as free InPc, were found throughout the cytosol. However, the nanoparticle aggregates and the aggregates of free PS were found in the cell periphery and outside of the cell. The nanoparticles aggregates were generated due to the particles concentration used in the experiment because of the small loading of the InPc while the low solubility of InPc caused the formation of aggregates of free PS in the culture medium. The participation of singlet oxygen in the photocytotoxic effect of InPc-loaded nanoparticles was corroborated by electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, and the encapsulation of photosensitizers reduced the photobleaching of InPc.

  8. Development of a nomogram combining clinical staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT image features in non-small-cell lung cancer stage I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Visvikis, Dimitris; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Perdrisot, Remy; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine; Guillevin, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a nomogram by exploiting intratumour heterogeneity on CT and PET images from routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions to identify patients with the poorest prognosis. This retrospective study included 116 patients with NSCLC stage I, II or III and with staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Primary tumour volumes were delineated using the FLAB algorithm and 3D Slicer trademark on PET and CT images, respectively. PET and CT heterogeneities were quantified using texture analysis. The reproducibility of the CT features was assessed on a separate test-retest dataset. The stratification power of the PET/CT features was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The best standard metric (functional volume) was combined with the least redundant and most prognostic PET/CT heterogeneity features to build the nomogram. PET entropy and CT zone percentage had the highest complementary values with clinical stage and functional volume. The nomogram improved stratification amongst patients with stage II and III disease, allowing identification of patients with the poorest prognosis (clinical stage III, large tumour volume, high PET heterogeneity and low CT heterogeneity). Intratumour heterogeneity quantified using textural features on both CT and PET images from routine staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions can be used to create a nomogram with higher stratification power than staging alone. (orig.)

  9. A randomized phase III trial comparing concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in advanced head and neck cancers - mature results: Yoodhvir Singh Nagar, Lucknow Cancer Institute, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Kumar, S.; Datta, N.R.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate contribution of concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) over and above radiotherapy alone (RT) in previously untreated stage III/IV, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCH and N). Patients with cancers of oral cavity (OC), oropharynx (OP), supraglottis (SG) and hypopharynx (HP) were randomized into RT arm or CTRT arm. Radiotherapy was identical in both arms (70Gy/35 fractions/7 weeks). In CTRT arm concomitant cisplatin (35mg/m 2 ) was given weekly for seven cycles. Surgery was reserved for salvage purposes when required. From May 1996 to December 1998, 155 patients (RT=78, CTRT=77) were enrolled and 139 patients (RT1,CTRT=68) were assessable. Over 90% patients in both arms completed planned treatment. The complete response rate was 51% in RT arm and 71% in CTRT arm (p=0.017). The median disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in RT arm and CTRT arm were 3 months vs. 11 months (p=0.0009) and 9 months vs. 26 months (p=0.01) respectively. The 5-year DFS and OS in the two arms were 10% vs. 27% (p=0.000) and 16% vs. 29% (p=0.01) respectively. Acute grade III toxicity was comparable in both the arms (12% vs. 16%, p=0.74). Late grade I/II toxicity was higher in CTRT arm (70% vs. 51%, p=0.09). Serious late toxicities were not seen in both arms. On univariate analysis the favorable factors for immediate response were protocol (CTRT better), primary site (SG and OP better than OC and HP), T-stage (T1-T2 better), Nodes (N0 better than N+), Stage (III > IV), KPS (>80) and lesser overall treatment time (OTT). Multivariate analysis retained protocol, T stage, N stage and OTT as factors independently affecting the immediate response. Addition of concomitant weekly cisplatin (35mg/m 2 ) to radiotherapy improves the likelihood of local control, DFS and OS with acceptable acute and late toxicities and can be recommended as a standard form of treatment in advanced SCCH and N

  10. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  12. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  13. Evaluation of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator on 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV) treated with radiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Shuji; Imajo, Yoshinari; Hamada, Fumio; Miyaji, Chihiro

    1982-01-01

    The clinical effect of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator OK-432 and/or PSK was studied about 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV). In 91 cases in stage III, fifty percent survival period was found to be 11.5 months for 63 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 7.5 months for 28 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. In 81 cases in stage IV, fifty percent survival period was found to be 6.7 months for 45 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 3.3 months for 36 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. (author)

  14. The relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Akahane, Keiko; Shikama, Naoto; Takahashi, Osamu; Hama, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is no current consensus regarding the optimal bladder volumes in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Two hundred and forty-three patients underwent definitive radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer. The prescribed dose defined as 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 100 % of the prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the prostate with a 5-mm margin and 2 cm of the proximal seminal vesicle. The PTV was defined as the CTV with a 5-mm margin. Treatment plans were optimized to satisfy the dose constraints defined by in-house protocols for PTV and organs at risk (rectum wall, bladder wall, sigmoid colon and small intestine). If all dose constraints were satisfied, the plan was defined as an optimal plan (OP). Results: An OP was achieved with 203 patients (84%). Mean bladder volume (± 1 SD) was 266 ml (± 130 ml) among those with an OP and 214 ml (±130 ml) among those without an OP (p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis also showed that bladder volumes below 150 ml decreased the possibility of achieving an OP. However, the percentage of patients with an OP showed a plateau effect at bladder volumes above 150 ml. Conclusions. Bladder volume is a significant factor affecting OP rates. However, our results suggest that bladder volumes exceeding 150 ml may not help meet planning dose constraints

  15. Phase I/II trial of concurrent use of S-1 and radiation therapy for T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Meijin; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Okamoto, Makito; Niibe, Yuzuru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kotani, Shouko

    2010-01-01

    A Phase I/II study of S-1 combined radiation therapy was conducted in patients with Stage II (T2N0) glottic cancer. The purpose of the Phase I study was to identify the maximum tolerated dose, the recommended dose and the dose limiting toxicity. The objectives in the phase II study were to estimate the local control and the overall survival, and the incidence of adverse events. In Phase I, S-1 was administered orally in a split-course fashion as two doses of 40 mg/m 2 , for a total daily dose of 80 mg/m 2 . The course involved a 2-week rest after a 2-week administration (Level 1) and a 1-week rest after a 3-week administration (Level 2). Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily (total 60-Gy) standard fractionation. Seven patients were enrolled in the Phase I, and 19 in the Phase II study. Mucositis was the most common toxicity encountered. All 26 patients completed radiation therapy without delay. The overall response rate was 100% (26/26) with all patients showing a complete response. One patient developed a local recurrence 28 months after the treatment. The 3-year local control and overall survival rates were 94.7 and 85.4%, respectively (limited to 22 patients from Level 2). The use of S-1 at 80 mg/m 2 per day in a split-course with 1-week rest during the course of radiation therapy was safe and effective for Stage II glottic cancer. The treatment strategy employing orally available S-1 proved to be beneficial over the conventional injection of antitumor agents for maintaining the patients' quality of life. (author)

  16. A phase I/II clinical trial for the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi; Uno, Takashi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuroda, Yuki; Yoshio, Kotaro; Itami, Jun

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes about a study protocol of phase I/II multicenter prospective clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy (HBT) for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer patients. Patients with histologically confirmed FIGO stage IB2, IIA2, IIB, and IIIB uterine cervical carcinoma width of which is larger than 5 cm assessed by MRI will be entered to this clinical trial. Protocol therapy is 30-30.6 Gy in 15-17 fractions of whole pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly CDDP (40 mg/m(2)), followed by 24 Gy in 4 fractions of HBT and central shield EBRT up to 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Tumor width is assessed again within one week before the first HBT and if the tumor width is larger than 4 cm, patients proceed to the secondary registration. In phase I section, feasibility of this will be investigated. If less than 10 % out of 20 patients experienced greater than grade 3 acute non-hematologic adverse effects, the study proceeds to phase II part. In phase II part a total of 55 patients will be accrued and the efficacy of the HBT will be investigated comparing with historical control data. If the lower margin of 90 % confidence interval of the 2-year pelvic progression-free survival of the HBT trial is higher than 64 %, the HBT is considered to be more effective than conventional ICBT. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the HBT for locally advanced cervical cancer. This trial will clarify the indication, feasibility, and efficacy of this new technique. UMIN000019081 ; Registration date: 2015/9/30.

  17. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  18. Improved photodynamic action of nanoparticles loaded with indium (III) phthalocyanine on MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, Carlos Augusto Zanoni; Madeira, Klésia Pirola; Rettori, Daniel; Baratti, Mariana Ozello; Rangel, Letícia Batista Azevedo; Razzo, Daniel; Silva, André Romero da

    2013-01-01

    Indium (III) phthalocyanine (InPc) was encapsulated into nanoparticles of PEGylated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG) to improve the photobiological activity of the photosensitizer. The efficacy of nanoparticles loaded with InPc and their cellular uptake was investigated with MCF-7 breast tumor cells, and compared with the free InPc. The influence of photosensitizer (PS) concentration (1.8–7.5 μmol/L), incubation time (1–2 h), and laser power (10–100 mW) were studied on the photodynamic effect caused by the encapsulated and the free InPc. Nanoparticles with a size distribution ranging from 61 to 243 nm and with InPc entrapment efficiency of 72 ± 6 % were used in the experiments. Only the photodynamic effect of encapsulated InPc was dependent on PS concentration and laser power. The InPc-loaded nanoparticles were more efficient in reducing MCF-7 cell viability than the free PS. For a light dose of 7.5 J/cm 2 and laser power of 100 mW, the effectiveness of encapsulated InPc to reduce the viability was 34 ± 3 % while for free InPc was 60 ± 7 %. Confocal microscopy showed that InPc-loaded nanoparticles, as well as free InPc, were found throughout the cytosol. However, the nanoparticle aggregates and the aggregates of free PS were found in the cell periphery and outside of the cell. The nanoparticles aggregates were generated due to the particles concentration used in the experiment because of the small loading of the InPc while the low solubility of InPc caused the formation of aggregates of free PS in the culture medium. The participation of singlet oxygen in the photocytotoxic effect of InPc-loaded nanoparticles was corroborated by electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, and the encapsulation of photosensitizers reduced the photobleaching of InPc

  19. The complex relationship between lung tumor volume and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy: A prospective, observational prognostic factor study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 99.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, David L.; Fisher, Richard J.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Poulsen, Michael G.; Graham, Peter H.; Penniment, Michael G.; Vinod, Shalini K.; Krawitz, Hedley E.; Joseph, David J.; Wheeler, Greg C.; McClure, Bev E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that primary tumor volume is prognostic independent of T and N stages in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by definitive radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Multicenter prospective observational study. Patient eligibility: pathologically proven stage I–III non-small cell lung cancer planned for definitive radiotherapy (minimum 50 Gy in 20 fractions) using CT-based contouring. Volumes of the primary tumor and enlarged nodes were measured according to a standardized protocol. Survival was adjusted for the effect of T and N stage. Results: There were 509 eligible patients. Five-year survival rates for tumor volume grouped by quartiles were, for increasing tumor volume, 22%, 14%, 15% and 21%. Larger primary tumor volume was associated with shorter survival (HR = 1.060 (per doubling); 95% CI 1.01–1.12; P = 0.029). However, after adjusting for the effects of T and N stage, there was no evidence for an association (HR = 1.029, 95% CI, 0.96–1.10, P = 0.39). There was evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume was associated with an increased risk of dying, independently of T and N stage, in the first 18 months but not beyond. Conclusions: In patients treated by non-surgical means we were unable to show that lung tumor volume, overall, provides additional prognostic information beyond the T and N stage (TNM, 6th edition). There is evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume adversely affects outcome only within the first 18 months. Larger tumor size alone should not by itself exclude patients from curative (chemo)radiotherapy

  20. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained

  1. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; Mey, Johan de; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. Material and methods: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were compared on the base of geometric volume, dimensions and extensions. Judgement of invasion of lymph node (LN) regions was evaluated using the ATS/LCSG classification of LN. Clinical relevance of the variation was studied through 3D-dosimetry of standard conformal plans: volume of critical organs (heart, lungs, esophagus, spinal cord) irradiated at toxic doses, 95% isodose volumes of GTVs, normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) and tumor control probabilities (TCP) were compared for evaluation of observer variability. Results: Before evaluation of observer variability, critical review of planning CT scan led to up- (two cases) and downstaging (one case) of patients as compared to the respective diagnostic scans. The defined GTVs showed an inter-observer variation with a ratio up to more than 7 between maximum and minimum geometric content. The dimensions of the primary tumor had inter-observer ranges of 4.2 (transversal), 7.9 (cranio-caudal) and 5.4 (antero-posterior) cm. Extreme extensions of the GTVs (left, right, cranial, caudal, anterior and posterior) varied with ranges of 2.8-7.3 cm due to inter-observer variation. After common review, only 63% of involved lymph node regions were delineated by the clinicians (i.e. 37% are false negative). Twenty-two percent of drawn in lymph node regions were accepted to be false positive after review. In the conformal plans, inter-observer ranges of irradiated normal tissue volume were on average 12%, with a maximum of 66%. The probability (in the population of all conformal plans) of irradiating at least 95% of the GTV with at least 95% of the nominal treatment dose decreased from 96 to 88% when swapping the matched GTV

  2. Radiation-induced parotid gland changes in oral cancer patients. Correlation between parotid volume and saliva production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Keiko; Murakami, Ryuji; Tomitaka, Etsuji

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether saliva production reflects the parotid volume during the course of radiation therapy (RT) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Twenty patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas, who were treated with preoperative chemo-RT, underwent morphological assessment with CT or MRI and functional assessment with the Saxon test. For the Saxon test, saliva production was measured by weighing a gauze pad before and 2 min after chewing without swallowing; the low-normal value is 2 g. Saliva production and parotid volumes before and 2 weeks after RT were compared with the paired t-test, the Spearman rank correlation test and the Fisher exact test. After 30 Gy irradiation, mean saliva production was decreased from 4.2 to 1.0 g (P 3 (P<0.01); the post-RT: pre-RT parotid volume ratio ranged from 54% to 85% (mean 71%). Although the initial parotid volume was correlated with initial saliva production (r=0.47, P=0.04), no significant correlation was noted after RT (r=0.08, P=0.71), and there were considerable individual variations. The parotid volume ratio was inversely correlated with the saliva-reduction amount (r=-0.79, P<0.01). There was a correlation between decreased parotid gland volume and decreased saliva production in patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing RT. Parotid volume reduction may predict parotid gland function. (author)

  3. Randomized phase III trial of regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: analysis of the CORRECT Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Takayuki; Komatsu, Yoshito; Yamada, Yasuhide; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Tsuji, Akihito; Ura, Takashi; Grothey, Axel; Van Cutsem, Eric; Wagner, Andrea; Cihon, Frank; Hamada, Yoko; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    In the international, phase III, randomized, double-blind CORRECT trial, regorafenib significantly prolonged overall survival (OS) versus placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that had progressed on all standard therapies. This post hoc analysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations in the CORRECT trial. Patients were randomized 2 : 1 to regorafenib 160 mg once daily or placebo for weeks 1-3 of each 4-week cycle. The primary endpoint was OS. Outcomes were assessed using descriptive statistics. One hundred Japanese and 660 non-Japanese patients were randomized to regorafenib (n = 67 and n = 438) or placebo (n = 33 and n = 222). Regorafenib had a consistent OS benefit in the Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations, with hazard ratios of 0.81 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.43-1.51) and 0.77 (95 % CI 0.62-0.94), respectively. Regorafenib-associated hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, proteinuria, thrombocytopenia, and lipase elevations occurred more frequently in the Japanese subpopulation than in the non-Japanese subpopulation, but were generally manageable. Regorafenib appears to have comparable efficacy in Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations, with a manageable adverse-event profile, suggesting that this agent could potentially become a standard of care in patients with mCRC.

  4. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Tanai, Chiharu; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P 80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  5. Macrophage markers in serum and tumor have prognostic impact in American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I/II melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine O.; Schmidt, Henrik; Møller, Holger John

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages...... melanomas from 190 patients were available for immunohistochemical analyzes of CD163(+) and CD68(+) macrophage infiltration. They were estimated semiquantitatively in three different tumor compartments: tumor nests, tumor stroma, and at the invasive front of the tumor. RESULTS: Serum sCD163 treated......, HR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8; P = .003). Melanomas with dense CD163(+) macrophage infiltration in tumor stroma and CD68(+) macrophage infiltration at the invasive front were associated with poor overall survival (CD163, HR = 2.7; 95% CI, 0.8 to 9.3; P = .11; and CD68, HR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.8; P...

  6. Crystallographic and Modeling Studies of RNase III Suggest a Mechanism for Double-Stranded RNA Cleavage | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Ribonuclease III belongs to the family of Mg2+-dependent endonucleases that show specificity for double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). RNase III is conserved in all known bacteria and eukaryotes and has 1–2 copies of a 9-residue consensus sequence, known as the RNase III signature motif. The bacterial RNase III proteins are the simplest, consisting of two domains: an

  7. Prostate cancer volume adds significantly to prostate-specific antigen in the prediction of early biochemical failure after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Propert, Kathleen J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A new clinical pretreatment quantity that closely approximates the true prostate cancer volume is defined. Methods and Materials: The cancer-specific prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA density, prostate cancer volume (V Ca ), and the volume fraction of the gland involved with carcinoma (V Ca fx) were calculated for 227 prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy. 1. PSA density PSA/ultrasound prostate gland volume 2. Cancer-specific PSA = PSA - [PSA from benign epithelial tissue] 3. V Ca = Cancer-specific PSA/[PSA in serum per cm 3 of cancer] 4. V Ca fx = V Ca /ultrasound prostate gland volume A Cox multiple regression analysis was used to test whether any of these-clinical pretreatment parameters added significantly to PSA in predicting early postradiation PSA failure. Results: The prostate cancer volume (p = 0.039) and the volume fraction of the gland involved by carcinoma (p = 0.035) significantly added to the PSA in predicting postradiation PSA failure. Conversely, the PSA density and the cancer-specific PSA did not add significantly (p > 0.05) to PSA in predicting postradiation PSA failure. The 20-month actuarial PSA failure-free rates for patients with calculated tumor volumes of ≤0.5 cm 3 , 0.5-4.0 cm 3 , and >4.0 cm 3 were 92, 80, and 47%, respectively (p = 0.00004). Conclusion: The volume of prostate cancer (V Ca ) and the resulting volume fraction of cancer both added significantly to PSA in their ability to predict for early postradiation PSA failure. These new parameters may be used to select patients in prospective randomized trials that examine the efficacy of combining radiation and androgen ablative therapy in patients with clinically localized disease, who are at high risk for early postradiation PSA failure

  8. Does Core Length Taken per cc of Prostate Volume in Prostate Biopsy Affect the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliktas, Hasan; Sahin, Hayrettin; Cetinkaya, Mehmet; Dere, Yelda; Erdogan, Omer; Baldemir, Ercan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimal core length to be taken per cc of prostate volume for an effective prostate biopsy. A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 379 patients who underwent a first prostate biopsy with 12 to 16 cores under transrectal ultrasound guidance between September 2012 and April 2015. For each patient, the core length per cc of the prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were calculated, and these values were compared between the patients with and without prostate cancer. A total of 348 patients were included in the study. Cancer was determined in 26.4% of patients. The mean core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were determined to be 3.40 ± 0.15 mm/cc (0.26%; range, 0.08-0.63 cc) in patients with cancer and 2.75 ± 0.08 mm/cc (0.20%; range, 0.04-0.66 cc) in patients without cancer (P = .000 and P = .000), respectively. Core length taken per cc of prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc was found to be related to an increase in the rates of prostate cancer diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-4.78). The rate of cancer determination for core length taken per cc of prostate of  3.31 mm/cc, 41.1%. Core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume are important morphometric parameters in the determination of prostate cancer. The results of study suggest a core length per cc of the prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc as a cutoff value for quality assurance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multivariate analyses to assess the effects of surgeon and hospital volume on cancer survival rates: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Positive results between caseloads and outcomes have been validated in several procedures and cancer treatments. However, there is limited information available on the combined effects of surgeon and hospital caseloads. We used nationwide population-based data to explore the association between surgeon and hospital caseloads and survival rates for major cancers. METHODOLOGY: A total of 11,677 patients with incident cancer diagnosed in 2002 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Survival analysis, the Cox proportional hazards model, and propensity scores were used to assess the relationship between 5-year survival rates and different caseload combinations. RESULTS: Based on the Cox proportional hazard model, cancer patients treated by low-volume surgeons in low-volume hospitals had poorer survival rates, and hazard ratios ranged from 1.3 in head and neck cancer to 1.8 in lung cancer after adjusting for patients' demographic variables, co-morbidities, and treatment modality. When analyzed using the propensity scores, the adjusted 5-year survival rates were poorer for patients treated by low-volume surgeons in low-volume hospitals, compared to those treated by high-volume surgeons in high-volume hospitals (P<0.005. CONCLUSIONS: After adjusting for differences in the case mix, cancer patients treated by low-volume surgeons in low-volume hospitals had poorer 5-year survival rates. Payers may implement quality care improvement in low-volume surgeons.

  10. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  11. Tumor response parameters for head and neck cancer derived from tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The main goal of this paper is to reconstruct a distribution of cell survival fractions from tumor-volume variation for a heterogeneous group of head and neck cancer patients and compare this distribution to the data from predictive assays. Methods: To characterize the tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy treatment, the authors use a two-level tumor-volume model of cell population that separates the entire tumor cell population into two subpopulations of viable cells and lethally damaged cells. This parameterized radiobiological model is integrated with a least squares objective function and a simulated annealing optimization algorithm to describe time-dependent tumor-volume variation rates in individual patients. Several constraints have been used in the optimization problem because tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy is described by a sum of exponentials; therefore, the problem of accurately fitting a model to measured data is ill-posed. The model was applied to measured tumor-volume variation curves from a clinical study on tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy for 14 head and neck cancer patients in which an integrated CT/linear particle accelerator (LINAC) system was used for tumor-volume measurements. Results: The two-level cell population tumor-volume modeling is capable of describing tumor-volume variation throughout the entire treatment for 11 of the 14 patients. For three patients, the tumor-volume variation was described only during the initial part of treatment, a fact that may be related to the neglected hypoxia in the two-level approximation. The predicted probability density distribution for the survival fractions agrees with the data obtained using in vitro studies with predictive assays. The mean value 0.35 of survival fraction obtained in this study is larger than the value 0.32 from in vitro studies, which could be expected because of greater repair in vivo. The mean half-life obtained in this study for the head

  12. Comparing colon cancer outcomes: The impact of low hospital case volume and case-mix adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C; Lingsma, H F; van Leersum, N; Tollenaar, R A E M; Wouters, M W; Steyerberg, E W

    2015-08-01

    When comparing performance across hospitals it is essential to consider the noise caused by low hospital case volume and to perform adequate case-mix adjustment. We aimed to quantify the role of noise and case-mix adjustment on standardized postoperative mortality and anastomotic leakage (AL) rates. We studied 13,120 patients who underwent colon cancer resection in 85 Dutch hospitals. We addressed differences between hospitals in postoperative mortality and AL, using fixed (ignoring noise) and random effects (incorporating noise) logistic regression models with general and additional, disease specific, case-mix adjustment. Adding disease specific variables improved the performance of the case-mix adjustment models for postoperative mortality (c-statistic increased from 0.77 to 0.81). The overall variation in standardized mortality ratios was similar, but some individual hospitals changed considerably. For the standardized AL rates the performance of the adjustment models was poor (c-statistic 0.59 and 0.60) and overall variation was small. Most of the observed variation between hospitals was actually noise. Noise had a larger effect on hospital performance than extended case-mix adjustment, although some individual hospital outcome rates were affected by more detailed case-mix adjustment. To compare outcomes between hospitals it is crucial to consider noise due to low hospital case volume with a random effects model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Late dysphagia after IMRT for head and neck cancer and correlation with dose–volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, Hanna R.; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, Karin; Behrens, Marie; Grau, Cai

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience diminished quality of life due to radiation-induced dysphagia. The aim of this study was to investigate frequency, intensity and dose–volume dependency for late dysphagia in HNC patients treated with curative IMRT. Materials and methods: Candidates for the study were 294 patients treated with primary IMRT from 2006 to 2010; a total of 259 patients accepted to participate by answering the EORTC QLQ-C30 and H and N35 questionnaires. A total of 65 patients were further examined with modified barium swallow (MBS) and saliva collection. Data on patient, tumor and treatment characteristics were prospectively recorded in the DAHANCA database. Dose–volume histograms (DVH) of swallowing-related structures were retrospectively analyzed. Results: QoL data showed low degree of dysphagia (QoL subscales scores of 17 and below) compared to objective measures. The most frequent swallowing dysfunction was retention; penetration and aspiration was less common. In general, objective measurements and observer-assessed late dysphagia correlated with dose to pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM), whereas QoL endpoints correlated with DVH parameters in the glottis/supraglottic larynx. Both xerostomia and dysphagia has been reduced after introduction of IMRT. Conclusions: Radiation-induced dysphagia is still important, with a high degree of retention and penetration. Introduction of parotid-sparing IMRT has reduced the severity of dysphagia, primarily through a major reduction in xerostomia. Dose–response relationships were found for specific dysphagia endpoints

  14. Expression of class III beta tubulin in cervical cancer patients administered preoperative radiochemotherapy: correlation with response to treatment and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Martinelli, Enrica; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Distefano, Mariagrazia; Paglia, Amelia; Ferlini, Cristiano; Scambia, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    Alterations of the beta subunit of tubulin have been reported to be predictive of resistance to radiation and antitubulin agents in several solid tumors. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical role of beta III tubulin expression as prognostic factor for survival and as a predictive parameter of response to preoperative radiochemotherapy in a single institutional series of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients. The study included 98 LACC patients admitted to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University of Rome and Campobasso between January 1998 and January 2005. Immunohistochemistry was performed by using the polyclonal rabbit anti-beta III tubulin antibody (Covance, Princeton, NJ, USA). The value of 10% immunostained tumor cells was arbitrarily chosen as cut-off value to distinguish cases with high versus low beta III tubulin content. In the whole series, beta III tubulin immunoreaction was detectable in 66/98 cases (67.3%), and the percentage of positively stained cells ranged from 0 to 100% (median=10%). The percentages of cases with high beta III tubulin expression were shown not to be differently distributed according to clinico-pathological characteristics. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of cases with high beta III tubulin expression according to clinical and pathological response to treatment. During the follow-up period, recurrence and death of disease occurred in 15 and 13 cases, respectively. There was no difference in disease-free and overall survival in cases with high versus low beta III tubulin expression. The assessment of class III beta tubulin status seems of little usefulness in order to identify LACC patients with poor chance of response to concomitant radiochemotherapy and unfavorable prognosis.

  15. Proposed definition of the vaginal cuff and paracolpium clinical target volume in postoperative uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Murofushi, Keiko; Ariga, Takuro; Kato, Tomoyasu; Inaba, Koji; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshinori; Toita, Takafumi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an appropriate definition for vaginal cuff and paracolpium clinical target volume (CTV) for postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with uterine cervical cancer. A working subgroup was organized within the Radiation Therapy Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group to develop a definition for the postoperative vaginal cuff and paracolpium CTV in December 2013. The group consisted of 5 radiation oncologists who specialized in gynecologic oncology and a gynecologic oncologist. A comprehensive literature review that included anatomy, surgery, and imaging fields was performed and was followed by multiple discreet face-to-face discussions and e-mail messages before a final consensus was reached. Definitions for the landmark structures in all directions that demarcate the vaginal cuff and paracolpium CTV were decided by consensus agreement of the working group. A table was created that showed boundary structures of the vaginal cuff and paracolpium CTV in each direction. A definition of the postoperative cervical cancer vaginal cuff and paracolpium CTV was developed. It is expected that this definition guideline will serve as a template for future radiation therapy clinical trial protocols, especially protocols involving intensity modulated radiation therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight

  17. Role of volume-regulated and calcium-activated anion channels in cell volume homeostasis, cancer and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Sauter, Daniel Rafael Peter

    2015-01-01

    to be an essential component of both VRAC and VSOAC. Reduced VRAC and VSOAC activities are seen in drug resistant cancer cells. ANO1 is a calcium-activated chloride channel expressed on the plasma membrane of e.g. secretory epithelia. ANO1 is amplified and highly expressed in a large number of carcinomas. The gene...... functions as well as their role in cancer and drug resistance....

  18. Relationship Between State-Level Google Online Search Volume and Cancer Incidence in the United States: Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Charles A; Barz Leahy, Allison; Li, Yimei; Schapira, Marilyn M; Bailey, L Charles; Merchant, Raina M

    2018-01-08

    In the United States, cancer is common, with high morbidity and mortality; cancer incidence varies between states. Online searches reflect public awareness, which could be driven by the underlying regional cancer epidemiology. The objective of our study was to characterize the relationship between cancer incidence and online Google search volumes in the United States for 6 common cancers. A secondary objective was to evaluate the association of search activity with cancer-related public events and celebrity news coverage. We performed a population-based, retrospective study of state-level cancer incidence from 2004 through 2013 reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for breast, prostate, colon, lung, and uterine cancers and leukemia compared to Google Trends (GT) relative search volume (RSV), a metric designed by Google to allow interest in search topics to be compared between regions. Participants included persons in the United States who searched for cancer terms on Google. The primary measures were the correlation between annual state-level cancer incidence and RSV as determined by Spearman correlation and linear regression with RSV and year as independent variables and cancer incidence as the dependent variable. Temporal associations between search activity and events raising public awareness such as cancer awareness months and cancer-related celebrity news were described. At the state level, RSV was significantly correlated to incidence for breast (r=.18, P=.001), prostate (r=-.27, P<.001), lung (r=.33, P<.001), and uterine cancers (r=.39, P<.001) and leukemia (r=.13, P=.003) but not colon cancer (r=-.02, P=.66). After adjusting for time, state-level RSV was positively correlated to cancer incidence for all cancers: breast (P<.001, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.19), prostate (P=.38, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.22), lung (P<.001, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.46), colon (P<.001, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.17), and uterine cancers (P<.001, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.12) and leukemia (P<.001, 95

  19. Accelerated split-course (Type B) thoracic radiation therapy plus vinorelbine/carboplatin combination chemotherapy in Stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iaffaioli, R.V.; Tortoriello, A.; Facchini, G.; Maccauro, M.; Dimitri, P.; Ravo, V.; Muto, P.; Crovella, F.

    1996-01-01

    43 patients with stage III NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) entered a phase II study aimed at evaluating the toxicity and the activity of a combined modality programme including an accelerated split-course schedule (type B) of thoracic radiation therapy and a combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and carboplatin. An objective response was achieved in 18/42 evaluable patients (5 complete and 13 partial responses), for an overall response rate of 43% (95% confidence interval, 28-58%). Four complete responses had a duration which exceeded 16 months. Treatment was well tolerated; grade III myelotoxicity occurred in only 14% of patients and treatment was delayed in only 2 cases because of grade 3 oesophagitis. Both tolerability and efficacy data suggest that this regimen holds promise for the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  20. Gemcitabine Plus Docetaxel Versus Docetaxel in Patients With Predominantly Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Randomized, Phase III Study by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte L; Bjerre, Karsten D; Jakobsen, Erik H

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this phase III study was to compare the efficacy of gemcitabine plus docetaxel (GD) versus docetaxel in patients with advanced breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS Predominantly human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -negative patients were randomly assigned...

  1. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  2. Effect of Esophageal Cancer Surgeon Volume on Management and Mortality From Emergency Upper Gastrointestinal Conditions: Population-based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markar, Sheraz R; Mackenzie, Hugh; Askari, Alan; Faiz, Omar; Hanna, George B

    2017-11-01

    To study the influence of esophageal cancer surgeon volume upon mortality from upper gastrointestinal emergencies. Volume-outcome relationships led to the centralization of esophageal cancer surgery. Hospital Episode Statistics data were used to identify patients admitted to hospitals within England (1997-2012). The influence of esophageal high-volume (HV) cancer surgeon status (≥5 resections per year) upon 30-day and 90-day mortality from esophageal perforation (EP), paraesophageal hernia causing obstruction or gangrene (PEH) and perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) was analyzed, independent of HV esophageal cancer center status and patient and disease-specific confounding factors. A total of 3707, 12,411, and 57,164 patients with EP, PEH, and PPU, respectively, were included. The observed 90-day mortality was 36.5%, 11.5%, and 29.0% for EP, PEH, and PPU, respectively.Management by HV cancer surgeon was independently associated with significant reductions in 30-day and 90-day mortality from EP (odds ratio, OR 0.51, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.40-0.66), PEH (OR=0.70, 95% CI 0.53-0.91), and PPU (OR=0.85, 95% CI 0.7-0.95). Subset analysis of those patients receiving primary surgery as treatment showed no change in mortality when performed by HV cancer surgeons.However HV cancer surgeons performed surgery as primary treatment more commonly for EP (OR=2.38, 95% CI 1.87-3.04) and PEH (OR=2.12, 95% CI 1.79-2.51). Furthermore surgery was independently associated with reduced mortality for all 3 conditions. The complex elective workload of HV esophageal cancer surgeons appears to lower the threshold for surgical intervention in specific upper gastrointestinal emergencies such as EP and PEH, which in turn reduces mortality.

  3. DYPD genotyping to predict toxicity in patients with stage III colon cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in the PETACC-8 phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boige, Valérie; Vincent, Marc; Alexandre, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding resection of the primary tumour with few or absent symptoms in patients with synchronous unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). A potential benefit of resection of the primary tumour is to prevent complications of the primary tumour in later s...

  4. A critical evaluation of the planning target volume for 3-d conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Michalski, Jeff M.; Cheng, Abel; Low, Daniel A.; Zhu, Ron; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Perez, Carlos A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The goal was to determine an adequate planning target volume (PTV) margin for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) of prostate cancer. The uncertainty in the internal positions of the prostate and seminal vesicles and the uncertainty in the treatment set-ups for a single group of patients was measured. Methods: Weekly computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis (n=38) and daily electronic portal images (n=1225) were reviewed for six patients who received seven-field 3D CRT for prostate cancer. The weekly CT scans were registered in three dimensions to the original treatment planning CT scan using commercially available software. This registration permitted measurement of the motion in the center-of-volume (COV) of the prostate and seminal vesicles throughout the course of therapy. The daily portal images (PI) were registered to the corresponding simulation films to measure the set-up displacement for each of the seven fields. The field displacements were then entered into a matrix program which calculated the isocenter displacement by a least squares method. The uncertainty in the internal positions of the prostate and seminal vesicles (standard deviation of the motions) was added to the uncertainty in the set-up (standard deviation of the isocenter displacements) in quadrature to arrive at a total uncertainty. Positive directions were defined in the left, anterior, and superior directions. A discussion of an adequate PTV was based on these results. Results: The mean magnitude of motion for the COV of the prostate ± the standard deviation was 0 ± 1 mm in the left-right (LR) direction, 0.5 ± 2.8 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, and 0.5 ± 3.5 mm in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. The mean magnitude of motion for the COV of the seminal vesicles ± the standard deviation was -0.3 ± 1.5 mm in the LR, 0.6 ± 4.1 mm in the AP, and 0.7 ± 2.3 mm in the SI directions, respectively. For all patients the mean isocenter

  5. Predictive value of PET-CT for pathological response in stages II and III breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García-Esquinas, Marta A; Arrazola García, Juan; García-Sáenz, José A; Furió-Bacete, V; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel E; Ortega Candil, Aída; Cabrera Martín, María N; Carreras Delgado, José L

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively study the value of PET-CT with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response of locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients. A written informed consent and approval were obtained from the Ethics Committee. PET-CT accuracy in the prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC was studied in primary tumors and lymph node metastasis in 43 women (mean age: 50 years: range: 27-71 years) with histologically proven breast cancer between December 2009 and January 2011. PET-CT was performed at baseline and after NAC. SUV(max) percentage changes (ΔSUV(max)) were compared with pathology findings at surgery. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to discriminate between locoregional pCR and non-pCR. In patients not achieving pCR, it was investigated if ΔSUV(max) could accurately identify the residual cancer burden (RCB) classes: RCB-I (minimal residual disease (MRD)), RCB-II (moderate RD), and RCB-III (extensive RD). pCR was obtained in 11 patients (25.6%). Residual disease was found in 32 patients (74.4%): 16 (37.2%) RCB-I, 15 (35.6%) RCB-II and 2 (4.7%) RCB-III. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 90.9%, 90.6%, and 90.7%, respectively. Specificity was 94.1% in the identification of a subset of patients who had either pCR or MRD. Accuracy of ΔSUV(max) in the locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients after NAC is high for the identification of pCR cases. Its specificity is potentially sufficient to identify a subgroup of patients who could be managed with conservative surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, David V. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Division of Quantitative Sciences, Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E., E-mail: LECourt@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  7. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijts, Charlotte M; Santegoets, Saskia J; Eertwegh, Alfons J van den; Pijpers, Laura S; Haanen, John B; Gruijl, Tanja D de; Verheul, Henk M; Vliet, Hans J van der

    2011-01-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part). In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus induced Treg expansion in patients with metastatic renal cell

  8. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  9. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijts Charlotte M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. Methods/design This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part. In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. Discussion This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus

  10. A correlation study on position and volume variation of primary lung cancer during respiration by four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Li Jianbin; Tian Shiyu; Li Fengxiang; Fan Tingyong; Shao Qian; Xu Min; Lu Jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of position movement of primary tumor with interested organs and skin markers, and to investigate the correlation of volume variation of primary tumors and lungs during different respiration phases for patients with lung cancer at free breath condition scanned by four-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation. Methods: 16 patients with lung cancer were scanned at free breath condition by simulation 4DCT which connected to a respiration-monitoring system. A coordinate system was created based on image of T 5 phase,gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures of 10 phases were contoured. The three dimensional position variation of them were measured and their correlation were analyzed, and the same for the volume variation of GTV and lungs of 10 respiratory phases. Results: Movement range of lung cancer in different lobe differed extinct: 0.8 - 5.0 mm in upper lobe, 5.7 -5.9 mm in middle lobe and 10.2 - 13.7 mm in lower lobe, respectively. Movement range of lung cancer in three dimensional direction was different: z-axis 4.3 mm ± 4.3 mm > y-axis 2.2 mm ± 1.0 mm > x-axis 1.7 mm ± 1.5 mm (χ 2 =16.22, P =0.000), respectively. There was no statistical significant correlation for movement vector of GTV and interested structures (r =-0.50 - -0.01, P =0.058 - -0.961), nor for volume variation of tumor and lung (r =0.23, P =0.520). Conclusions: Based on 4DCT, statistically significant differences of GTV centroid movement are observed at different pulmonary lobes and in three dimensional directions. So individual 4DCT measurement is necessary for definition of internal target volume margin for lung cancer. (authors)

  11. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean ± standard deviation of 32 ± 9 vs. 23 ± 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 ± 3 vs. 21 ± 5 min (p = .003), 39 ± 12 vs. 30 ± 5 min (p = .055), and 29 ± 5 vs. 20 ± 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target volume.

  12. Safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil after mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection for stage iii lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Satoru; Souda, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Takahari, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yuji; Takii, Yasumasa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for stage III lower rectal cancer worldwide. However, in Japan, the standard treatment is TME with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection (LPLD) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. We examined the safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (modified FOLFOX6) after TME with LPLD. This retrospective study included 33 patients who received modified FOLFOX6 after TME with LPLD for stage III lower rectal cancer. The overall completion rate of 12 cycles of adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was 76%. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in eight patients (24%). Sensory neuropathy was observed in 32 patients (97%) with 4 (12%) having a grade 3 event. The disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 45% at 3 years. Adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was feasible in patients with stage III lower rectal cancer after TME with LPLD. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of minichromosome maintenance proteins (MCM-3, MCM-7) and metallothioneins (MT-I/II, MT-III) expression in relation to clinicopathological data in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobierzycki, Christopher; Pula, Bartosz; Skiba, Mateusz; Jablonska, Karolina; Latkowski, Krzysztof; Zabel, Maciej; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Spaczynski, Marek; Kedzia, Witold; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-12-01

    Despite great progress in the understanding of ovarian cancer biology, clinicopathological data (i.e. grade, stage, histological type and residual disease after surgery) seem to be the most important prognostic factors. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between expression of minichromosome maintenance proteins (MCM-3, MCM-7), metallothioneins (MT-I/II, MT-III), and Ki-67 in 103 ovarian cancer cases, mostly of the serous histological type. Statistical analysis revealed strong positive correlations in the expression of MCM-3 vs. Ki-67 (r=0.492), MCM-7 vs. Ki-67 (r=0.651), and MCM-3 vs. MCM-7 (r=0.515) (all pMCM-3 and Ki-67 with increasing grade of histological malignancy (p=0.0011, p=0.029, respectively). Regarding clinical progression, cytoplasmic MT-I/II expression was significantly higher in more advanced disease stages (III+IV vs. I+II; p=0.0247). Due to the correlations shown here, the determination of MCM proteins as proliferation markers of ovarian cancer, should be strongly considered.

  14. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna Poli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation ( p = 0.037. A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction ( p = 0.045. Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation.

  15. Molecular image-guided radiation treatment planing using biological target volume (BTV)for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamamura, Hiroyasu; Sasaki, Makoto; Bou, Sayuri; Satou, Yoshitaka; Minami, Hiroki; Saga, Yusuke; Aoyama, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Kawamura, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    As the biological mechanisms of cancer cell proliferation become clear at molecular level, 'precision therapy' is attracting a great attention, in which the irradiation dose and area are determined in consideration of these molecular mechanism. For this sophisticated radiotherapy, it is essential to evaluate the tumor morphology and proliferation/activation of cancer cells before radiation treatment planning. Generally, cancer cells start to proliferate when their activity levels increase, and subsequently primary tumor or metastatic tumor that can De recognized by CT scan or MRI start to develop. Thus, when proliferation of cancer cells occurs and tumor start to develop, a vast amount of energy is required for proliferation and cancer cells obtain a part of this energy from glucose in the body. Therefore, we can get the information on the status of metabolism and density of cancer cells by PET using F-18-FDG, which is structurally similar to glucose. It is a general belief that, when conducting evaluation using F18-FDG-PET, evaluation of proliferation of cancer cells before tumor formation might be possible at the cell level by evaluating and visualizing glucose metabolism in cancer cells that proliferate in a manner that they cannot be visualized morphologically by using CT scan or MRI. Therefore, when performing sophisticated precision radiotherapy, it is important to implement radiation treatment plan including information obtained from FDG-PET imaging. Many studies have reported usefulness of FDG-PET imaging for esophagus cancer so far, indicating the efficacy of using FDG-PET imaging for radiation treatment plan of esophagus cancer as well. However, few studies have described how to use FDG-PET imaging for radiation treatment plan for esophagus cancer. In this review, therefore, we will outline the usefulness of molecular image-guided radiation treatment plan, in which biological target volume (BTV) and the actual radiation treatment plan using FDG

  16. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy; Les volumes-cibles de la radiotherapie des adenocarcinomes gastriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Cancerologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P. [Hopital Clarac, Service de Radiotherapie et de Cancerologie, 97 - Fort de France (France)

    2001-10-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the

  17. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal; Ghosh, Sunita; Ko, Lawrence; Murray, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm). The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (± standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm 3 (SD, 29.71 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm 3 (SD, 21.64 cm 3 ). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm 3 (SD, 36.51 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm 3 (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm 3 (SD, 3.97 cm 3 ). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.

  18. MRI to delineate the gross tumor volume of nasopharyngeal cancers: which sequences and planes should be used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovtzer, Aron; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Tatro, Daniel; Feng, Felix Y; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be better than computed tomography for defining the extent of primary gross tumor volume (GTV) in advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. It is routinely applied for target delineation in planning radiotherapy. However, the specific MRI sequences/planes that should be used are unknown. Twelve patients with nasopharyngeal cancer underwent primary GTV evaluation with gadolinium-enhanced axial T1 weighted image (T1) and T2 weighted image (T2), coronal T1, and sagittal T1 sequences. Each sequence was registered with the planning computed tomography scans. Planning target volumes (PTVs) were derived by uniform expansions of the GTVs. The volumes encompassed by the various sequences/planes, and the volumes common to all sequences/planes, were compared quantitatively and anatomically to the volume delineated by the commonly used axial T1-based dataset. Addition of the axial T2 sequence increased the axial T1-based GTV by 12% on average (p = 0.004), and composite evaluations that included the coronal T1 and sagittal T1 planes increased the axial T1-based GTVs by 30% on average (p = 0.003). The axial T1-based PTVs were increased by 20% by the additional sequences (p = 0.04). Each sequence/plane added unique volume extensions. The GTVs common to all the T1 planes accounted for 38% of the total volumes of all the T1 planes. Anatomically, addition of the coronal and sagittal-based GTVs extended the axial T1-based GTV caudally and cranially, notably to the base of the skull. Adding MRI planes and sequences to the traditional axial T1 sequence yields significant quantitative and anatomically important extensions of the GTVs and PTVs. For accurate target delineation in nasopharyngeal cancer, we recommend that GTVs be outlined in all MRI sequences/planes and registered with the planning computed tomography scans.

  19. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allal, A.S. [Geneva Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Monney, M.; Rosset, A.; Ozsahin, M. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Radiographie; Guillemin, C. [Cantonal Radiotherapy Department Sion (Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Wirksamkeit der akzelerierten Bestrahlung in bezug auf die Bewaeltigung der Tumorzellrepopulation waehrend einer Radiotherapie ist vor kurzem nachgewiesen worden. Das Verhaeltnis zwischen therapeutischem Effekt und Toxizitaet duerfte fuer fuenfwoechige Schemen

  20. Imaging features of automated breast volume scanner: Correlation with molecular subtypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Feng-Yang, E-mail: fyzheng16@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Lu, Qing, E-mail: lu.qing@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Huang, Bei-Jian, E-mail: huang.beijian@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Xia, Han-Sheng, E-mail: zs12036@126.com [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yan, Li-Xia, E-mail: dndyanlixia@163.com [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, Xi, E-mail: wang.xi@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yuan, Wei, E-mail: yuan.wei@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, Wen-Ping, E-mail: wang.wenping@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • ABVS imaging features have a strong correlation with breast cancer molecular subtypes. • Retraction phenomenon on the coronal planes was the most important predictor for Luminal A and Triple Negative subtypes. • ABVS expand the scope of ultrasound in identifying breast cancer molecular subtypes. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the correlation between the imaging features obtained by an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods: We examined 303 malignant breast tumours by ABVS for specific imaging features and by immunohistochemical analysis to determine the molecular subtype. ABVS imaging features, including retraction phenomenon, shape, margins, echogenicity, post-acoustic features, echogenic halo, and calcifications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine the significant predictive factors of the molecular subtypes. Results: By univariate logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of the Luminal-A subtype (n = 128) were retraction phenomenon (odds ratio [OR] = 10.188), post-acoustic shadowing (OR = 5.112), and echogenic halo (OR = 3.263, P < 0.001). The predictive factors of the Human-epidermal-growth-factor-receptor-2-amplified subtype (n = 39) were calcifications (OR = 6.210), absence of retraction phenomenon (OR = 4.375), non-mass lesions (OR = 4.286, P < 0.001), absence of echogenic halo (OR = 3.851, P = 0.035), and post-acoustic enhancement (OR = 3.641, P = 0.008). The predictors for the Triple-Negative subtype (n =