WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer vaccine development

  1. Challenges for cancer vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabi, Z; Man, S

    2006-10-01

    The first generation of human cancer vaccines has been tested in phase III clinical trials, but only a few of these have demonstrated sufficient efficacy to be licensed for clinical use. This article reviews some of the mechanisms that could contribute to these limited clinical responses, and highlights the challenges faced for development of future vaccines. PMID:16979786

  2. Progress and controversies in developing cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speiser Daniel E

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapy has become a standard approach for cancer management, through the use of cytokines (eg: interleukin-2 and monoclonal antibodies. Cancer vaccines hold promise as another form of immunotherapy, and there has been substantial progress in identifying shared antigens recognized by T cells, in developing vaccine approaches that induce antigen-specific T cell responses in cancer patients, and in developing new technology for monitoring immune responses in various human tissue compartments. Dramatic clinical regressions of human solid tumors have occurred with some cancer vaccines, but the rate of those responses remains low. This article is part of a 2-part point:counterpoint series on peptide vaccines and adoptive therapy approaches for cancer. The current status of cancer vaccination, and associated challenges, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need to increase our knowledge of cancer immunobiology, as well as to improve monitoring of cellular immune function after vaccination. Progress in both areas will facilitate development of effective cancer vaccines, as well as of adoptive therapy. Effective cancer vaccines promise to be useful for treatment and prevention of cancer at low cost and with low morbidity.

  3. Approaches to improve development methods for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Chizuru; Aruga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are an immunotherapy that amplify or induce an active immune response against tumors. Notably, limitations in the methodology for existing anti-cancer drugs may subsist while applying them to cancer vaccine therapy. A retrospective analysis was performed using information obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed, and published articles. Our research evaluated the optimal methodologies for therapeutic cancer vaccines based on (1) patient populations, (2) immune monitoring, (3) tumor response evaluation, and (4) supplementary therapies. Failure to optimize these methodologies at an early phase may impact development at later stages; thus, we have proposed some points to be considered during the early phase. Moreover, we compared our proposal with the guidance for industry issued by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2011 entitled "Clinical Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines". Consequently, while our research was aligned with the guidance, we hope it provides further insights in order to predict the risks and benefits and facilitate decisions for a new technology. We identified the following points for consideration: (1) include in the selection criteria the immunological stage with a prognostic value, which is as important as the tumor stage; (2) select immunological assays such as phenotype analysis of lymphocytes, based on their features and standardize assay methods; (3) utilize optimal response criteria for immunotherapy in therapeutic cancer vaccine trials; and (4) consider supplementary therapies, including immune checkpoint inhibitors, for future therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:25746315

  4. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate. PMID:19835869

  5. Evolution of animal models in cancer vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei-Zen; Jones, Richard F; Juhasz, Csaba; Gibson, Heather; Veenstra, Jesse

    2015-12-16

    Advances in cancer vaccine development are facilitated by animal models reflecting key features of human cancer and its interface with host immunity. Several series of transplantable preneoplastic and neoplastic mouse mammary lesions have been used to delineate mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity. Mimicking immune tolerance to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) such as HER2/neu, transgenic mice developing spontaneous mammary tumors are strong model systems for pre-clinical vaccine testing. In these models, HER2 DNA vaccines are easily administered, well-tolerated, and induce both humoral and cellular immunity. Although engineered mouse strains have advanced cancer immunotherapy, basic shortcomings remain. For example, multiple mouse strains have to be tested to recapitulate genetic regulation of immune tolerance in humans. Outbred domestic felines more closely parallel humans in the natural development of HER2 positive breast cancer and their varying genetic background. Electrovaccination with heterologous HER2 DNA induces robust adaptive immune responses in cats. Importantly, homologous feline HER2 DNA with a single amino acid substitution elicits unique antibodies to feline mammary tumor cells, unlocking a new vaccine principle. As an alternative approach to targeted vaccination, non-surgical tumor ablation such as cryoablation induces anti-tumor immunity via in situ immunization, particularly when combined with toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist. As strategies for vaccination advance, non-invasive monitoring of host response becomes imperative. As an example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scanning following administration of tryptophan metabolism tracer [11C]-alpha-methyl-tryptophan (AMT) provides non-invasive imaging of both tumor growth and metabolic activities. Because AMT is a substrate of indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that produces the immune regulatory molecule kynurenine, AMT imaging can provide

  6. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current "value-for-money" oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies. PMID:22894953

  7. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhenlong; Li, Zhong; Jin, Huajun; Qian, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major leading death causes of diseases. Prevention and treatment of cancer is an important way to decrease the incidence of tumorigenesis and prolong patients' lives. Subversive achievements on cancer immunotherapy have recently been paid much attention after many failures in basic and clinical researches. Based on deep analysis of genomics and proteomics of tumor antigens, a variety of cancer vaccines targeting tumor antigens have been tested in preclinical and human clinical trials. Many therapeutic cancer vaccines alone or combination with other conventional treatments for cancer obtained spectacular efficacy, indicating the tremendously potential application in clinic. With the illustration of underlying mechanisms of cancer immune regulation, valid, controllable, and persistent cancer vaccines will play important roles in cancer treatment, survival extension and relapse and cancer prevention. This chapter mainly summarizes the recent progresses and developments on cancer vaccine research and clinical application, thus exploring the existing obstacles in cancer vaccine research and promoting the efficacy of cancer vaccine. PMID:27240458

  8. The pharmaceuticalization of sexual risk: vaccine development and the new politics of cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Laura; Epstein, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine development is a core component of pharmaceutical industry activity and a key site for studying pharmaceuticalization processes. In recent decades, two so-called cancer vaccines have entered the U.S. medical marketplace: a vaccine targeting hepatitis B virus (HBV) to prevent liver cancers and a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) to prevent cervical and other cancers. These viruses are two of six sexually transmissible infectious agents (STIs) that are causally linked to the development of cancers; collectively they reference an expanding approach to apprehending cancer that focuses attention simultaneously "inward" toward biomolecular processes and "outward" toward risk behaviors, sexual practices, and lifestyles. This paper juxtaposes the cases of HBV and HPV and their vaccine trajectories to analyze how vaccines, like pharmaceuticals more generally, are emblematic of contemporary pharmaceuticalization processes. We argue that individualized risk, in this case sexual risk, is produced and treated by scientific claims of links between STIs and cancers and through pharmaceutical company and biomedical practices. Simultaneous processes of sexualization and pharmaceuticalization mark these cases. Our comparison demonstrates that these processes are not uniform, and that the production of risks, subjects, and bodies depends not only on the specificities of vaccine development but also on the broader political and cultural frames within which sexuality is understood. PMID:24560236

  9. Tocotrienols are good adjuvants for developing cancer vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to process and present antigens to T-cells and also in stimulating immune responses. However, DC-based vaccines have only exhibited minimal effectiveness against established tumours in mice and humans. The use of appropriate adjuvant enhances the efficacy of DC based cancer vaccines in treating tumours. In this study we have used tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), a non-toxic natural compound, as an adjuvant to enhance the effectiveness of DC vaccines in treating mouse mammary cancers. In the mouse model, six-week-old female BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with DC and supplemented with oral TRF daily (DC+TRF) and DC pulsed with tumour lysate from 4T1 cells (DC+TL). Experimental mice were also injected with DC pulsed with tumour lysate and supplemented daily with oral TRF (DC+TL+TRF) while two groups of animal which were supplemented daily with carrier oil (control) and with TRF (TRF). After three times vaccination, mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in the mammary breast pad to induce tumour. Our study showed that TRF in combination with DC pulsed with tumour lysate (DC+TL+TRF) injected subcutaneously significantly inhibited the growth of 4T1 mammary tumour cells as compared to control group. Analysis of cytokines production from murine splenocytes showed significant increased productions of IFN-γ and IL-12 in experimental mice (DC+TL+TRF) compared to control, mice injected with DC without TRF, mice injected with DC pulsed with tumour lysate and mice supplemented with TRF alone. Higher numbers of cytotoxic T cells (CD8) and natural killer cells (NK) were observed in the peripheral blood of TRF adjuvanted DC pulsed tumour lysate mice. Our study show that TRF has the potential to be an adjuvant to augment DC based immunotherapy

  10. Tocotrienols are good adjuvants for developing cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Ammu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs have the potential for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to process and present antigens to T-cells and also in stimulating immune responses. However, DC-based vaccines have only exhibited minimal effectiveness against established tumours in mice and humans. The use of appropriate adjuvant enhances the efficacy of DC based cancer vaccines in treating tumours. Methods In this study we have used tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF, a non-toxic natural compound, as an adjuvant to enhance the effectiveness of DC vaccines in treating mouse mammary cancers. In the mouse model, six-week-old female BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with DC and supplemented with oral TRF daily (DC+TRF and DC pulsed with tumour lysate from 4T1 cells (DC+TL. Experimental mice were also injected with DC pulsed with tumour lysate and supplemented daily with oral TRF (DC+TL+TRF while two groups of animal which were supplemented daily with carrier oil (control and with TRF (TRF. After three times vaccination, mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in the mammary breast pad to induce tumour. Results Our study showed that TRF in combination with DC pulsed with tumour lysate (DC+TL+TRF injected subcutaneously significantly inhibited the growth of 4T1 mammary tumour cells as compared to control group. Analysis of cytokines production from murine splenocytes showed significant increased productions of IFN-γ and IL-12 in experimental mice (DC+TL+TRF compared to control, mice injected with DC without TRF, mice injected with DC pulsed with tumour lysate and mice supplemented with TRF alone. Higher numbers of cytotoxic T cells (CD8 and natural killer cells (NK were observed in the peripheral blood of TRF adjuvanted DC pulsed tumour lysate mice. Conclusion Our study show that TRF has the potential to be an adjuvant to augment DC based immunotherapy.

  11. Dissecting Cancer Vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer Couzin; 丁东

    2004-01-01

    @@ If there's one thing cancer vaccine developers would like to know, it's why only a handful of patients respond strongly to their inventions. Now at an immunology② meeting here, a team of scientists reported that a set of patients with metastatic melanoma③ may be revealing an answer to that mysterious question.

  12. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  13. Challenges to the development of antigen-specific breast cancer vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continued progress in the development of antigen-specific breast cancer vaccines depends on the identification of appropriate target antigens, the establishment of effective immunization strategies, and the ability to circumvent immune escape mechanisms. Methods such as T cell epitope cloning and serological expression cloning (SEREX) have led to the identification of a number target antigens expressed in breast cancer. Improved immunization strategies, such as using dendritic cells to present tumor-associated antigens to T lymphocytes, have been shown to induce antigen-specific T cell responses in vivo and, in some cases, objective clinical responses. An outcome of successful tumor immunity is the evolution of antigen-loss tumor variants. The development of a polyvalent breast cancer vaccine, directed against a panel of tumor-associated antigens, may counteract this form of immune escape

  14. Cancer Vaccines: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Shamayel; Bakshi, Nasir; Chaudri, Naeem; Akhter, Javed; Akhtar, Mohammed

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is a common and potentially deadly disease. Some of the cancers may be difficult to treat by conventional means such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, but may be controlled by the stimulation of the immune response of the body with the help of cancer vaccines. The use of vaccines for preventing infections by oncogenic viruses such as hepatitis B virus and human papilloma virus has been extremely successful in reducing the incidence of cancers resulting from these infections. The use of vaccines for treating cancers that are not due to viral infections and that are already established is currently the object of numerous clinical trials. Several types of cancer vaccines are being tried. These include antigen vaccines, tumor cell vaccines, dendritic vaccines, deoxyribonucleic acid vaccines, and viral vector vaccines. The development of these therapeutic vaccines is proving difficult with only 1 recent success. However, there is significant enthusiasm and optimism regarding the development of effective therapeutic vaccines stemming from the fact that our understanding regarding the cancer immunology is considerably enhanced in recent years. This expanded knowledge regarding the mechanisms that cancers use to escape the immune system is likely to open new avenues in modulating the immune response to cancer, thus enhancing the effectiveness of therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:27058246

  15. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, O; Svane, I M;

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  16. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  17. Cervical cancer vaccine: Exploring new opportunities and challenges for developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Ray Laskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide, and the burden of the disease is disproportionately high in the developing world (>80%. With the advent of two new vaccines, "Gardasil" developed by Merck & Co. New Jersey, USA and "Cervarix" developed by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK in Philadelphia, USA, the future holds newer promises for prevention and control of the disease. However, various regulatory and policy changes also may be required to be undertaken and the various new challenges need to be addressed.

  18. A prophylactic vaccine for breast cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Christine J.; Gusterson, Barry A.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are the Holy Grail for patients and clinicians alike. The possibility that we can be vaccinated against common cancers is very appealing and the socioeconomic consequences are significant. A recent paper from Vincent Tuohy's group, published in the journal Nature Medicine, suggests a new approach for the development of a prophylactic vaccine for breast cancer. Their strategy was to induce mammary gland failure in mice by immunisation with an antibody specific to a milk protein...

  19. HPV Prevalence in Colombian Women with Cervical Cancer: Implications for Vaccination in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Murillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccines have been considered potentially cost-effective for the reduction of cervical cancer burden in developing countries; their effectiveness in a public health setting continues to be researched. We conducted an HPV prevalence survey among Colombian women with invasive cancer. Paraffin-embedded biopsies were obtained from one high-risk and one low-middle-risk regions. GP5+/GP6+ L1 primers, RLB assays, and E7 type specific PCR were used for HPV-DNA detection. 217 cases were analyzed with 97.7% HPV detection rate. HPV-16/18 prevalence was 63.1%; HPV-18 had lower occurrence in the high-risk population (13.8% versus 9.6% allowing for the participation of less common HPV types; HPV-45 was present mainly in women under 50 and age-specific HPV type prevalence revealed significant differences. Multiple high-risk infections appeared in 16.6% of cases and represent a chance of replacement. Age-specific HPV prevalence and multiple high-risk infections might influence vaccine impact. Both factors highlight the role of HPVs other than 16/18, which should be considered in cost-effectiveness analyses for potential vaccine impact.

  20. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  1. Chikungunya vaccines in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwameis, Michael; Buchtele, Nina; Wadowski, Patricia Pia; Schoergenhofer, Christian; Jilma, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Chikungunya virus has become a global health threat, spreading to the industrial world of Europe and the Americas; no treatment or prophylactic vaccine is available. Since the late 1960s much effort has been put into the development of a vaccine, and several heterogeneous strategies have already been explored. Only two candidates have recently qualified to enter clinical phase II trials, a chikungunya virus-like particle-based vaccine and a recombinant live attenuated measles virus-vectored vaccine. This review focuses on the current status of vaccine development against chikungunya virus in humans and discusses the diversity of immunization strategies, results of recent human trials and promising vaccine candidates. PMID:26554522

  2. Clinical vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Seunghoon

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical e...

  3. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeli A. Brinkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  4. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  5. Development of InCVAX as a novel in situ autologous vaccine for metastatic cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Samuel Siu Kit; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    A novel method, an in situ autologous whole-cell cancer vaccine (inCVAX), is being developed by Immunophotonics, Inc., for the treatment of metastatic cancers. inCVAX combines phototherapy and immunotherapy to potentially induce a systemic anti-tumor immune response in the hosts. Immunophotonics and its academic partners have spent years conducting nonclinical research, developing CMC techniques and conducting clinical research. In 2015 the company initiated a late-stage (II/III) clinical trial in South America for advanced breast cancer patients. The process of developing the inCVAX approach from a laboratory setting into clinical trials requires significant efforts from a group of dedicated engineers, scientists, and physicians. The growth of the company and its business advances demonstrated the determination of a group of visionary investors, entrepreneurs, and business leaders. This talk will chronicle the milestones of the scientific achievement, medical progress, and business development of Immunophotonics.

  6. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-09-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  8. Development of a next generation Semliki Forest virus-based DNA vaccine against cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Wall, Stephanie; Ljungberg, Karl; Peng IP, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Nijman, Hans W.; Liljeström, Peter; Daemen, Toos

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among women worldwide. The disease develops as a result of infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) through persistent expression of early proteins E6 and E7 with transforming capacities in cervical epithelial cells. Our group pioneered

  9. Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines: From the Bench to the Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition that the development of cancer is associated with acquired immunodeficiency, mostly against cancer cells themselves, and understanding pathways inducing this immunosuppression, has led to a tremendous development of new immunological approaches, both vaccines and drugs, which overcome this inhibition. Both “passive” (e.g. strategies relying on the administration of specific T cells and “active” vaccines (e.g. peptide-directed or whole-cell vaccines have become attractive immunological approaches, inducing cell death by targeting tumor-associated antigens. Whereas peptide-targeted vaccines are usually directed against a single antigen, whole-cell vaccines (e.g. dendritic cell vaccines are aimed to induce robust responsiveness by targeting several tumor-related antigens simultaneously. The combination of vaccines with new immuno-stimulating agents which target “immunosuppressive checkpoints” (anti-CTLA-4, PD-1, etc. is likely to improve and maintain immune response induced by vaccination.

  10. Cancer immunotherapy: moving beyond current vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Yang, James C.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2004-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the field of tumor immunology in the past decade, but optimism about the clinical application of currently available cancer vaccine approaches is based more on surrogate endpoints than on clinical tumor regression. In our cancer vaccine trials of 440 patients, the objective response rate was low (2.6%), and comparable to the results obtained by others. We consider here results in cancer vaccine trials and highlight alternate strategies that mediate cancer regre...

  11. Cervical cancer: The preventive role of HPV vaccine (review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Behtash

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common gynecologic cancer. A steady 70% annual decline in mortality from cervical cancers has been observed since the mid 20th century after the introduction of widespread papanicolaou cytological screening. But also cervical cancer continues to be an important world health problem for women. Cervical cancer is one of the best- understood neoplasm given its well known viral cause of persistent infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HPV. To date, two manufacturers have developed HPV vaccines composed of noninfectious, recombinant HPV viral-like particles (VLPs. This article presents current advances and perspectives on HPV vaccines.The vaccine is administered by intramuscular injection, and the recommended schedule is a 3-dose series with the second and third doses administered 2 and 6 months after the first dose. The recommended age for vaccination of females is 11-12 years. Vaccine can be administered as young as age 9 years. Catch-up vaccination is recommended for females aged 13--26 years who have not been previously vaccinated. Vaccination is not a substitute for routine cervical cancer screening, and vaccinated females should have cervical cancer screening as recommended.

  12. Improvement of different vaccine delivery systems for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaiyan Shima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer vaccines are the promising tools in the hands of the clinical oncologist. Many tumor-associated antigens are excellent targets for immune therapy and vaccine design. Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and/or delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. Various vaccine delivery systems such as different routes of immunization and physical/chemical delivery methods have been used in cancer therapy with the goal to induce immunity against tumor-associated antigens. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs have demonstrated to be effective in animal models. New developments in vaccine delivery systems will improve the efficiency of clinical trials in the near future. Among them, nanoparticles (NPs such as dendrimers, polymeric NPs, metallic NPs, magnetic NPs and quantum dots have emerged as effective vaccine adjuvants for infectious diseases and cancer therapy. Furthermore, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP have been known as attractive carrier having applications in drug delivery, gene transfer and DNA vaccination. This review will focus on the utilization of different vaccine delivery systems for prevention or treatment of cancer. We will discuss their clinical applications and the future prospects for cancer vaccine development.

  13. Swine flu vaccination for patients with cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    In oncology, vaccination is accepted as an important preventive measure. As a tertiary prevention protocol, several vaccines are recommended for the oncology patients. The newest vaccine in medicine is swine flu vaccine which is developed for prevention of novel H1N1 influenza virus infection. In this paper, the author will briefly discuss on swine flu vaccination for oncology patients.

  14. Developments in rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D J; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2012-09-01

    The development of vaccines that prevent rabies has a long and distinguished history, with the earliest preceding modern understanding of viruses and the mechanisms of immune protection against disease. The correct application of inactivated tissue culture-derived vaccines is highly effective at preventing the development of rabies, and very few failures are recorded. Furthermore, oral and parenteral vaccination is possible for wildlife, companion animals and livestock, again using inactivated tissue culture-derived virus. However, rabies remains endemic in many regions of the world and causes thousands of human deaths annually. There also remain no means of prophylaxis for rabies once the virus enters the central nervous system (CNS). One reason for this is the poor immune response within the CNS to infection with rabies virus (RABV). New approaches to vaccination using modified rabies viruses that express components of the innate immune system are being applied to this problem. Preliminary reports suggest that direct inoculation of such viruses could trigger an effective anti-viral response and prevent a fatal outcome from RABV infection. PMID:22861358

  15. Preventive vaccines for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WHEELER COSETTE M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer is a possibility in the near future. Close to 20 genotypes of HPV, of the 75 that have been identified, infect the femine genital tract, but four subtypes (16, 18, 31 and 45 have been associated in close to 80% of cervical cancers. this article proposes that in order to design an effective prophylactic vaccine against HPV infection, an adequate immune response should be guaranteed through four goals; a activation of antigens present in the cell; b overcoming the host response and viral genetic variability in the T cell response; c generation of high levels of T and B memory cells; and d persistence of antigens.

  16. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarthigeyan, K

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context. PMID:22754202

  17. Impact of human papillomavirus vaccination on anal cancer incidence in French women.

    OpenAIRE

    Ribassin-Majed, Laureen; Lounes, Rachid; Clémençon, Stéphan

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 are found to be involved in 80% of anal cancers. Two vaccines against HPV infections are currently available, and vaccination policies aim to decrease mainly, incidence of cervical cancers. Moreover, an impact of HPV vaccination on the incidence of anal cancer can also be expected. Our aim was to assess the potential benefits of HPV vaccination on the occurrence of female anal cancer in France. We developed a dynamic model for the heterosexual transmission...

  18. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Ciliberto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost.

  19. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurisicchio, Luigi, E-mail: aurisicchio@takis-it.it [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); BIOGEM scarl, via Camporeale, 83031 Ariano Irpino (AV) (Italy); Ciliberto, Gennaro [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università degli studi di Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy)

    2011-09-22

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost.

  20. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost

  1. HIV Vaccine Development: Strategies for Preclinical and Clinical Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, Stuart Z.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses HIV vaccine discovery and candidate vaccine testing in the context of current realities of funding and clinical trial practice. Lacking perfect animal models for testing candidate HIV vaccines, clinical investigators have proposed a strategy of iterative exploratory clinical trials in the model of cancer chemotherapy development. Problems with the appropriateness of this model to HIV vaccine development are discussed. Also, the future feasibility of this strategy in the...

  2. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Mansour

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  3. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Genevieve M. [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada); Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Liwski, Robert S. [Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Room 206E, Dr. D. J. Mackenzie Building, Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, 5788 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Mansour, Marc [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada)

    2011-08-05

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  4. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments

  5. [Diarrhea and vaccines: current developments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, P

    2006-05-10

    Diarrhoea is a main concern for travellers, populations of developing countries and children. Causative pathogens are numerous. An efficient vaccine against cholera is available, also offering a 50% cross-protection against E. Coli enterotoxin (ETEC), however its efficacy is only 23% against all-causes traveller's diarrhoea. Rotavirus can be responsible for severe diarrhoea in infants but rarely causes traveller's diarrhoea. Two new vaccines being under development appear effective and well-tolerated but too expensive for developing countries which most need them. To date, the live oral Ty21a vaccine remains frequently prescribed in Switzerland, with limited indications and suboptimal efficacy. A new oral vaccine is under development. PMID:16767878

  6. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kaarthigeyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine′s efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context.

  7. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Sayers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bioinformatics scripts are developed and used to link vaccine adjuvants to different adjuvanted vaccines stored in the general VIOLIN vaccine database. Presently, 103 vaccine adjuvants have been curated in Vaxjo. Among these adjuvants, 98 have been used in 384 vaccines stored in VIOLIN against over 81 pathogens, cancers, or allergies. All these vaccine adjuvants are categorized and analyzed based on adjuvant types, pathogens used, and vaccine types. As a use case study of vaccine adjuvants in infectious disease vaccines, the adjuvants used in Brucella vaccines are specifically analyzed. A user-friendly web query and visualization interface is developed for interactive vaccine adjuvant search. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine adjuvants is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO in the Web Ontology Language (OWL format.

  8. Pancreatic cancer vaccine: a unique potential therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paola Cappello, Moitza Principe, Francesco Novelli Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, Center for Experimental Research and Medical Studies, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is a lethal disease and is one of the cancers that is most resistant to traditional therapies. Historically, neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy has provided any significant increase in the survival of patients with PDA. Despite intensive efforts, any attempts to improve the survival in the past 15 years have failed. This holds true even after the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their involvement in pathways that are considered to be important in PDA development and progression. Recently, however, FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin treatment has provided a limited survival advantage in patients with advanced PDA. Therefore, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the survival rate of patients with PDA. Results from the last 10 years of research in the field of PDA have helped to identify new immunological targets and develop new vaccines that are capable of stimulating an immune response. In addition, the information obtained about the role of the tumor microenvironment in suppressing the immune response and the possibility of targeting PDA microenvironment to limit immune suppression and enhance the response of effector T-cells has opened new avenues for treating this incurable disease. The time is ripe for developing new therapeutic approaches that are able to effectively counteract the progression and spreading of PDA. This review discusses the potential prospects in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer through vaccination and its combination therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, targeting of the tumor microenvironment, and inhibition of immunological

  9. Establishing the pig as a large animal model for vaccine development against human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon;

    2015-01-01

    20mer peptides spanning the entire porcine IDO and RhoC sequences formulated in CTL-inducing adjuvants: CAF09, CASAC, Montanide ISA 51 VG, or PBS. Taking advantage of recombinant swine MHC class I molecules (SLAs), the peptide-SLA complex stability was measured for 198 IDO- or RhoC-derived 9-11mer...... peptides predicted to bind to SLA-1*04:01, −1*07:02, −2*04:01, −2*05:02, and/or −3*04:01. This identified 89 stable (t½ ≥ 0.5 h) peptide-SLA complexes. By IFN-γ release in PBMC cultures we monitored the vaccine-induced peptide-specific CTL responses, and found responses to both IDO- and Rho...

  10. Vaccination with embryonic stem cells protects against lung cancer: is a broad-spectrum prophylactic vaccine against cancer possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Yaddanapudi

    Full Text Available The antigenic similarity between tumors and embryos has been appreciated for many years and reflects the expression of embryonic gene products by cancer cells and/or cancer-initiating stem cells. Taking advantage of this similarity, we have tested a prophylactic lung cancer vaccine composed of allogeneic murine embryonic stem cells (ESC. Naïve C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with ESC along with a source of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in order to provide immunostimulatory adjuvant activity. Vaccinated mice were protected against subsequent challenge with implantable Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC. ESC-induced anti-tumor immunity was not due to a non-specific "allo-response" as vaccination with allogeneic murine embryonic fibroblasts did not protect against tumor outgrowth. Vaccine efficacy was associated with robust tumor-reactive primary and memory CD8(+ T effector responses, Th1 cytokine response, higher intratumoral CD8(+ T effector/CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cell ratio, and reduced myeloid derived suppressor cells in the spleen. Prevention of tumorigenesis was found to require a CD8-mediated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response because in vivo depletion of CD8(+ T lymphocytes completely abrogated the protective effect of vaccination. Importantly, this vaccination strategy also suppressed the development of lung cancer induced by the combination of carcinogen administration and chronic pulmonary inflammation. Further refinement of this novel vaccine strategy and identification of shared ESC/tumor antigens may lead to immunotherapeutic options for lung cancer patients and, perhaps more importantly, could represent a first step toward the development of prophylactic cancer vaccines.

  11. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  12. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  13. Development of a schistosomiasis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Rojo, Juan U; Siddiqui, Sabrina Z; Gray, Sean A; Carter, Darrick; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2016-05-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) of public health importance. Despite decades of implementation of mass praziquantel therapy programs and other control measures, schistosomiasis has not been contained and continues to spread to new geographic areas. A schistosomiasis vaccine could play an important role as part of a multifaceted control approach. With regards to vaccine development, many biological bottlenecks still exist: the lack of reliable surrogates of protection in humans; immune interactions in co-infections with other diseases in endemic areas; the potential risk of IgE responses to antigens in endemic populations; and paucity of appropriate vaccine efficacy studies in nonhuman primate models. Research is also needed on the role of modern adjuvants targeting specific parts of the innate immune system to tailor a potent and protective immune response for lead schistosome vaccine candidates with the long-term aim to achieve curative worm reduction. This review summarizes the current status of schistosomiasis vaccine development. PMID:26651503

  14. Targeting the Heterogeneity of Cancer with Individualized Neoepitope Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türeci, Özlem; Vormehr, Mathias; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Huber, Christoph; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-04-15

    Somatic mutations binding to the patient's MHC and recognized by autologous T cells (neoepitopes) are ideal cancer vaccine targets. They combine a favorable safety profile due to a lack of expression in healthy tissues with a high likelihood of immunogenicity, as T cells recognizing neoepitopes are not shaped by central immune tolerance. Proteins mutated in cancer (neoantigens) shared by patients have been explored as vaccine targets for many years. Shared ("public") mutations, however, are rare, as the vast majority of cancer mutations in a given tumor are unique for the individual patient. Recently, the novel concept of truly individualized cancer vaccination emerged, which exploits the vast source of patient-specific "private" mutations. Concurrence of scientific advances and technological breakthroughs enables the rapid, cost-efficient, and comprehensive mapping of the "mutanome," which is the entirety of somatic mutations in an individual tumor, and the rational selection of neoepitopes. How to transform tumor mutanome data to actionable knowledge for tailoring individualized vaccines "on demand" has become a novel research field with paradigm-shifting potential. This review gives an overview with particular focus on the clinical development of such vaccines.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1885-96. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CCR FOCUS SECTION, "OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY". PMID:27084742

  15. The pig as a model for therapeutic human anti-cancer vaccine development, elucidating the T-cell reactivity against IDO and RhoC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon;

    here introduce pigs as a superior large animal model for human cancer vaccine development via the use of our unique technology for swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) production. IDO and RhoC, both known to be important in human cancer development and progression, were used as vaccine targets. Pigs were...... immunized with overlapping 20-mer peptides spanning the entire porcine IDO and RhoC sequences formulated in a panel of CTL-inducing adjuvants. 198 candidate IDO- and RhoC-derived 9-11mer peptides potentially binding to SLA- 1*04:01, -1*07:02, -2*04:01, -2*05:02 and/or -3*04:01 were identified in silico, and...... peptide-SLA complex stability measurements revealed 89 stable (t½ ≥ 0.5 hour) complexes. Vaccine-induced peptide-specific CTL responses were monitored using IFN-γ release as a read out. We found responses to IDO- and RhoC-derived peptides across all groups; surprisingly non-stably binding peptides also...

  16. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer. PMID:26933898

  17. Priorities for CMV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Philip R; Bialek, Stephanie R; Boppana, Suresh B; Griffiths, Paul D; Laughlin, Catherine A; Ljungman, Per; Mocarski, Edward S; Pass, Robert F; Read, Jennifer S; Schleiss, Mark R; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2013-12-17

    A multidisciplinary meeting addressed priorities related to development of vaccines against cytomegalovirus (CMV), the cause of congenital CMV (cCMV) disease and of serious disease in the immunocompromised. Participants discussed optimal uses of a CMV vaccine, aspects of clinical study design, and the value of additional research. A universal childhood CMV vaccine could potentially rapidly reduce cCMV disease, as infected children are sources of viral transmission to seronegative and seropositive mothers. A vaccine administered to adolescents or adult women could also reduce cCMV disease by making them immune prior to pregnancy. Clinical trials of CMV vaccines in women should evaluate protection against cCMV infection, an essential precursor of cCMV disease, which is a more practical and acceptable endpoint for assessing vaccine effects on maternal-fetal transmission. Clinical trials of vaccines to evaluate prevention of CMV disease in stem cell transplant recipients could use CMV viremia at a level triggering pre-emptive antiviral therapy as an endpoint, because widespread use of pre-emptive and prophylactic antivirals has rendered CMV-induced disease too rare to be a practical endpoint for clinical trials. In solid organ transplant patients, CMV-associated disease is sufficiently common for use as a primary endpoint. Additional research to advance CMV vaccine development should include identifying factors that predict fetal loss due to CMV, determining age-specific incidence and transmission rates, defining the mechanism and relative contributions of maternal reactivation and re-infection to cCMV disease, developing assays that can distinguish between reactivation and re-infection in seropositive vaccinees, further defining predictors of sequelae from cCMV infection, and identifying clinically relevant immune response parameters to CMV (including developing validated assays that could assess CMV antibody avidity) that could lead to the establishment of immune

  18. Get Vaccinated! and Get Tested! Developing Primary and Secondary Cervical Cancer Prevention Videos for a Haitian Kreyòl-Speaking Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frett, Brigitte; Aquino, Myra; Fatil, Marie; Seay, Julia; Trevil, Dinah; Fièvre, Michèle Jessica; Kobetz, Erin

    2016-05-01

    Although routine screening reduces cervical cancer rates between 60% and 90%, thousands of women worldwide are diagnosed with the disease on an annual basis because of inadequate screening. Haitian women in South Florida experience a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer, with disease rates 4 times higher than the average for women in Miami. An ongoing community-based participatory research initiative to assess and reduce this burden has revealed that a complex interplay of factors contributes to a lack of access to screening in this community, including socioeconomics, language barriers, and traditional understandings of health and disease. In an effort to address some of these barriers and encourage uptake of primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention strategies, 2 videos on cervical cancer prevention were created using a community-based participatory research framework. The video screenplays were created by a Haitian screenwriter using evidence-based medical information provided by academic researchers. The films feature Haitian actors speaking a Haitian Kreyòl dialogue with a storyline portraying friends and family discussing human papillomavirus disease and vaccination, Papanicolaou testing, and cervical cancer. Focus groups held with Haitian women in South Florida suggested that the films are engaging; feature relatable characters; and impact knowledge about human papillomavirus, cervical cancer development, and current prevention recommendations. PMID:27050619

  19. Chitin, Chitosan, and Glycated Chitosan Regulate Immune Responses: The Novel Adjuvants for Cancer Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaosong Li; Min Min; Nan Du; Ying Gu; Tomas Hode; Mark Naylor; Dianjun Chen; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of cancer immunotherapy, cancer vaccine has become a novel modality for cancer treatment, and the important role of adjuvant has been realized recently. Chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives have shown their advantages as adjuvants for cancer vaccine. In this paper, the adjuvant properties of chitin and chitosan were discussed, and some detailed information about glycated chitosan and chitosan nanoparticles was also presented to illustrate the trend for future development.

  20. Elucidating the T-cell reactivity against porcine IDO and RhoC to establish the pig as an animal model for vaccine development against human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon;

    superior to rodents as they are more closely related to humans in terms of immunology and physiology. Here, we introduce pigs as a supplementary large animal model for human cancer vaccine development via the use of our unique technology for swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) production. IDO and RhoC, two tumor...... antigens previously identified as important players in human cancer development and progression, were used as vaccine targets. Using peptide-MHC-I binding predictors we identified IDO-derived and RhoC-derived candidate peptides potentially binding to five different broadly distributed SLA molecules. We...... measured the peptide-SLA complex stability of these and found a total of 89 stable (t½ ≥ 0.5 hours) peptide-MHC complexes with SLA-1*04:01, -1*07:02, -2*04:01, -2*05:02 and/or -3*04:01. For a pilot study, 12 pigs were immunized with overlapping 20-mer peptides spanning the entire IDO and RhoC sequences...

  1. Recent update in HIV vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, So Youn

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous efforts to develop a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine, the quest for a safe and effective HIV vaccine seems to be remarkably long and winding. Disappointing results from previous clinical trials of VaxGen's AIDSVAXgp120 vaccine and MRKAd5 HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine emphasize that understanding the correlates of immune protection in HIV infection is the key to solve the puzzle. The modest vaccine efficacy from RV144 trial and the successive results ob...

  2. Therapeutic cancer vaccines: are we there yet?

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Acquavella, Nicholas; Yu, Zhiya; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2011-01-01

    Enthusiasm for therapeutic cancer vaccines has been rejuvenated with the recent completion of several large, randomized phase III clinical trials that in some cases have reported an improvement in progression free or overall survival. However, an honest appraisal of their efficacy reveals modest clinical benefit and a frequent requirement for patients with relatively indolent cancers and minimal or no measurable disease. Experience with adoptive cell transfer-based immunotherapies unequivocal...

  3. 人乳头瘤病毒疫苗预防宫颈癌的应用%Application of HPV Vaccines in Preventing Development of the Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏巧凡; 何莲芝

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer causes serious damage to women′s health. It is clear that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major pathogenic factor. HPV invades the organism by subtle injures. When E6 or E7 oncoprotein is continous expression in the epithelial tissue, high-risk HPV infections contribute to tumorigenicity. Detection of high-risk HPV infection and virus oncoprotein still cannot prevent cervical cancer effectively. Researchers begin to develop a vaccine against the HPV virus, and to prevent HPV infections from the sources, hoping to achieve the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Currently bivalent vaccine Cervarix against HPV 16/18 and quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil against HPV 16/18/11/16 have been approved for marketing. Prophylactic HPV vaccines have been used widely on a global scale and obtained significant effect. A new generation of prophylactic HPV vaccines have made a breakthrough in solving problems including cost, persistence and broad-spectrum immune. Cervical cancer is expected to become the first preventable cancer in the history of human anti-tumor. This review concentrates on the biological characteristics and pathogenic mechanism of HPV and the current application and situation of prophylactic HPV vaccines.%宫颈癌严重危害女性健康,现已明确人乳头瘤病毒(HPV)感染是其主要致病因素。HPV通过机体的细微损伤入侵,HPV E6和E7癌蛋白中的1种或2种持续表达是高危型HPV感染致瘤的关键所在,检测高危型HPV感染及病毒癌蛋白仍不能有效预防宫颈癌。研究者们正着手研制针对HPV的病毒疫苗,从源头预防HPV感染,以期实现宫颈癌的一级预防。目前已有针对HPV16/18型的二价疫苗Cervarix和针对HPV16/18/11/6型的四价疫苗Gardasil的认证上市,预防性HPV疫苗已在全球范围内推广使用并取得显著效果。新一代预防性HPV疫苗在解决疫苗的成本、持久性和广谱免疫问题上取得突破性进展,

  4. Current state in the development of candidate therapeutic HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Andrew; Jeang, Jessica; Cheng, Kevin; Cheng, Ting; Yang, Benjamin; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2016-08-01

    The identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological factor for HPV-associated malignancies creates the opportunity to control these cancers through vaccination. Currently, available preventive HPV vaccines have not yet demonstrated strong evidences for therapeutic effects against established HPV infections and lesions. Furthermore, HPV infections remain extremely common. Thus, there is urgent need for therapeutic vaccines to treat existing HPV infections and HPV-associated diseases. Therapeutic vaccines differ from preventive vaccines in that they are aimed at generating cell-mediated immunity rather than neutralizing antibodies. The HPV-encoded early proteins, especially oncoproteins E6 and E7, form ideal targets for therapeutic HPV vaccines since they are consistently expressed in HPV-associated malignancies and precancerous lesions, playing crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of HPV-associated disease. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we review strategies to enhance vaccine efficacy and the latest clinical trials on therapeutic HPV vaccines. PMID:26901118

  5. Use of human papillomavirus vaccine in HIV-infected men for the prevention of anal dysplasia and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There are two commercially available vaccines licensed worldwide for the prevention of cervical cancer and other human papillomavirus-associated cancers such as anal cancer. However, only two countries have implemented healthcare programs that include human papillomavirus vaccination for boys and men. Although most of the human papillomavirus-related cancers in the world are attributable to cervical cancer, in developed countries anal cancer accounts for a larger proportion of human papillomavirus-related cancers. Most cases of anal cancer occur in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. In this review, we discuss the burden of human papillomavirus-related cancers in men, the most plausible immune mechanism associated with the high efficacy of the human papillomavirus vaccine, and address key issues of vaccination for HIV-infected men. Finally, we review cost-effectiveness considerations for the use of the vaccine in boys and recent guidelines for vaccination in boys, with attention to HIV-infected men. PMID:24818632

  6. Developing Anti-tick Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are responsible for the transmission of viral, bacterial, and protozoal diseases of man and animals and also produce significant economic losses to cattle industry. The use of acaricides constitutes a major component of integrated tick control strategies. However, this is accompanied by the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and contamination of environment and milk and meat products with drug residues. These issues highlight the need for alternative approaches to control tick infestations and have triggered the search for tick protective antigens for vaccine development. Vaccination as a tick control method has been practiced since the introduction of TickGARD and Gavac that were developed using the midgut glycoprotein Bm86 as antigen. Gavac within integrated tick management systems has proven to reduce the number of acaricidal applications per year that are required to control some strains of R. microplus ticks in different geographical regions. Nevertheless, it has limited or no efficacy against other tick species. These issues have stimulated research for additional tick protective antigens with critical functions in the tick. This chapter presents methodologies for the design and test of molecules as antigens against ticks. Considerations about different methods for the tick control compared to the immunological methods, the desirable characteristics for an anti-tick vaccine and the obstacles encountered for developing this kind of vaccines are discussed. Detailed methodologies for the establishment of a biological model to test new molecules as immunogens against ticks and to perform challenge trials with this model are presented. General considerations in the efficacy calculation for any anti-tick vaccine are also discussed. PMID:27076303

  7. Cancer Vaccines in Ovarian Cancer: How Can We Improve?

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Martin Lluesma; Anita Wolfer; Alexandre Harari; Lana E. Kandalaft

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one important cause of gynecologic cancer-related death. Currently, the mainstay of ovarian cancer treatment consists of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy (introduced 30 years ago) but, as the disease is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, its prognosis remains very poor. Clearly, there is a critical need for new treatment options, and immunotherapy is one attractive alternative. Prophylactic vaccines for prevention of infectious dise...

  8. Recombinant Swinepox Virus for Veterinary Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong-Jie; Lin, Hui-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Poxvirus-vectors have been widely used in vaccine development for several important human and animal diseases; some of these vaccines have been licensed and used extensively. Swinepox virus (SPV) is well suited to develop recombinant vaccines because of its large packaging capacity for recombinant DNA, its host range specificity, and its ability to induce appropriate immune responses. PMID:26458836

  9. Cancer Genome Sequencing and Its Implications for Personalized Cancer Vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New DNA sequencing platforms have revolutionized human genome sequencing. The dramatic advances in genome sequencing technologies predict that the $1,000 genome will become a reality within the next few years. Applied to cancer, the availability of cancer genome sequences permits real-time decision-making with the potential to affect diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, and has opened the door towards personalized medicine. A promising strategy is the identification of mutated tumor antigens, and the design of personalized cancer vaccines. Supporting this notion are preliminary analyses of the epitope landscape in breast cancer suggesting that individual tumors express significant numbers of novel antigens to the immune system that can be specifically targeted through cancer vaccines

  10. Vaccine-associated sarcomas in cats: a unique cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiel, E A

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports a relationship between vaccination of cats for rabies and feline leukemia virus with the development of soft tissue sarcomas at the site of administration. These tumors are locally invasive and histologically aggressive. As with high-grade soft tissue sarcoma in humans, combination treatment with radiation therapy and surgery provides for optimum tumor control. Feline vaccine-associated sarcoma has become a difficult issue for the veterinary profession for legal, ethical, and clinical reasons. Although most research efforts have focused on therapeutic intervention, this tumor has great potential to provide an informative model for carcinogenesis and genetic susceptibility applicable to cancer in all species, including humans. PMID:11153990

  11. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Ashley J

    2016-06-01

    Despite recent progress in reducing deaths attributable to malaria, it continues to claim approximately 500,000 lives per year and is associated with approximately 200 million infections. New tools, including safe and effective vaccines, are needed to ensure that the gains of the last 15 years are leveraged toward achieving the ultimate goal of malaria parasite eradication. In 2015, the European Medicines Agency announced the adoption of a positive opinion for the malaria vaccine candidate most advanced in development, RTS,S/AS01, which provides modest protection against clinical malaria; in early 2016, WHO recommended large-scale pilot implementations of RTS,S in settings of moderate-to-high malaria transmission. In alignment with these advancements, the community goals and preferred product characteristics for next-generation vaccines have been updated to inform the development of vaccines that are highly efficacious in preventing clinical malaria, and those needed to accelerate parasite elimination. Next-generation vaccines, targeting all stages of the parasite lifecycle, are in early-stage development with the most advanced in Phase 2 trials. Importantly, progress is being made in the definition of feasible regulatory pathways to accelerate timelines, including for vaccines designed to interrupt transmission of parasites from humans to mosquitoes. The continued absence of financially lucrative, high-income markets to drive investment in malaria vaccine development points to continued heavy reliance on public and philanthropic funding. PMID:26993333

  12. Developing recombinant and synthetic vaccines for the treatment of melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    1999-01-01

    To develop new vaccines for the treatment of patients with cancer, target antigens presented on tumor cell surfaces have been cloned. Many of these antigens are non-mutated differentiation antigens and are expressed by virtually all melanomas, making them attractive components for a widely efficacious melanoma vaccine. These antigens are also expressed by melanocytes, however, and are likely to be subject to immune tolerance. A central challenge for tumor immunologists has thus been the break...

  13. Therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called "highrisk" human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  14. Heat shock proteins and cancer vaccines: developments in the past decade and chaperoning in the decade to come

    OpenAIRE

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Stevenson, Mary Ann; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular chaperone–peptide complexes extracted from tumors (heat shock protein [HSP] vaccines) have been intensively studied in the preceding two decades, proving to be safe and effective in treating a number of malignant diseases. They offer personalized therapy and target a cross-section of antigens expressed in patients' tumors. Future advances may rely on understanding the molecular underpinnings of this approach to immunotherapy. One property common to HSP vaccines is the ability to sti...

  15. Progress and challenges in the vaccine-based treatment of head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venuti Aldo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Head and neck (HN cancer represents one of the most challenging diseases because the mortality remains high despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment. Although vaccine-based approaches for the treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have achieved limited clinical success, advances in cancer immunology provide a strong foundation and powerful new tools to guide current attempts to develop effective cancer vaccines. This article reviews what has to be rather what has been done in the field for the development of future vaccines in HN tumours.

  16. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles.

  17. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas G; Schrager, Lew; Thole, Jelle

    2016-06-01

    TB is now the single pathogen that causes the greatest mortality in the world, at over 1.6 million deaths each year. The widely used the 90 year old BCG vaccine appears to have minimal impact on the worldwide incidence despite some efficacy in infants. Novel vaccine development has accelerated in the past 15 years, with 15 candidates entering human trials; two vaccines are now in large-scale efficacy studies. Modeling by three groups has consistently shown that mass vaccination that includes activity in the latently infected population, especially adolescents and young adults, will likely have the largest impact on new disease transmission. At present the field requires better validated animal models, better understanding of a correlate of immunity, new cost-effective approaches to Proof of Concept trials, and increased appreciation by the public health and scientific community for the size of the problem and the need for a vaccine. Such a vaccine is likely to also play a role in the era of increasing antibiotic resistance. Ongoing efforts and studies are working to implement these needs over the next 5 years, which will lead to an understanding that will increase the likelihood of a successful TB vaccine. PMID:26973073

  18. Postgenomics of Neisseria meningitidis for vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2007-10-01

    Meningococcal disease is a global problem. Multivalent (A, C, Y, W135) conjugate vaccines have been developed and licensed; however, an effective vaccine against serogroup B has not yet become available. Outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines have been used to disrupt serogroup B epidemics and outbreaks. Postgenomic technologies have been useful in aiding the discovery of new protein vaccine candidates. Moreover, proteomic technologies enable large-scale identification of membrane and surface-associated proteins, and provide suitable methods to characterize and standardize the antigen composition of OMV-based vaccines. PMID:17941821

  19. Injecting Hope--A Review of Breast Cancer Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Peoples, George E

    2016-05-01

    There is significant interest in investigating immunotherapeutic strategies to be used for the treatment of breast cancer patients. One form of immunotherapy under active investigation is the cancer vaccine. Vaccines are a form of active immune therapy designed to stimulate the immune system to recognize tumor cells as foreign. Vaccines include an antigen that serves as the target for the immune response, and an immunoadjuvant, which is a nonspecific stimulator of the immune response that promotes an environment conducive to immune stimulation. Vaccines are an appealing therapeutic strategy because they are specific and are associated with minimal toxicity. In addition, they stimulate the adaptive immune system, thereby producing a memory response allowing for sustained effect without repeated therapy. Currently, there are no US Food and Drug Administration-approved breast cancer vaccines; however, there are multiple vaccines and treatment strategies employing these vaccines that are being actively investigated in clinical trials. PMID:27188680

  20. Vaccines with dendritic cells in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that autologous D Cs pulsed with peptides specific for prostate specific Ag (PSA) or prostate-specific membrane Ag are capable of stimulating potent CT L in vitro. However there is evidence to believe that multiple tumour derived antigens would be more potent to elicit anti-tumour responses. Based on these observations a Phase I/II clinical trial in has been initiated. Autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC s) were transfected with mRNA from three prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, LNCaP and P C-3) and used for vaccination. Twenty patients have been enrolled and 19 have finished vaccination. Each patient received at least four weekly injections. Of them, 10 patients were vaccinated intranodally under ultrasonic guidance and 9 others received the vaccine intradermally. Safety and feasibility were evaluated. No evidence of toxicity and adverse events was observed. Immune response was measured as DTH and by vitro immunoassays including ELISPOT, T cell proliferation test and cytotoxicity test in pre- and post-vaccination peripheral blood samples. Twelve patients developed a specific immune response to tumour cells. Ten patients showed a significant decrease in log slope PSA. Patients with lower PSA tend to give a better response. The early clinical outcome was significantly related to immune responses (p<0.05). We conclude that the strategy of vaccinating with mRNA transfected D Cs functions to elicit cellular immune responses specific for antigens associated with prostate cancer cells and such responses may result in a clinical benefit for the patients

  1. Study Hints At HPV Vaccine's Cancer Prevention Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159696.html Study Hints at HPV Vaccine's Cancer Prevention Promise Fewer ... that can lead to cervical cancer, a new study shows. Canadian researchers found that young women who ...

  2. Cancer testis antigen vaccination affords long-term protection in a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati

    Full Text Available Sperm protein (Sp17 is an attractive target for ovarian cancer (OC vaccines because of its over-expression in primary as well as in metastatic lesions, at all stages of the disease. Our studies suggest that a Sp17-based vaccine can induce an enduring defense against OC development in C57BL/6 mice with ID8 cells, following prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. This is the first time that a mouse counterpart of a cancer testis antigen (Sp17 was shown to be expressed in an OC mouse model, and that vaccination against this antigen significantly controlled tumor growth. Our study shows that the CpG-adjuvated Sp17 vaccine overcomes the issue of immunologic tolerance, the major barrier to the development of effective immunotherapy for OC. Furthermore, this study provides a better understanding of OC biology by showing that Th-17 cells activation and contemporary immunosuppressive T-reg cells inhibition is required for vaccine efficacy. Taken together, these results indicate that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations can induce long-standing protection against OC and delay tumor growth, suggesting that this strategy may provide additional treatments of human OC and the prevention of disease onset in women with a family history of OC.

  3. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Portia M; Beaumier, Coreen M; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    A number of leishmaniasis vaccine candidates are at various stages of pre-clinical and clinical development. Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania and transmitted to humans by the bite of a sand fly. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, kala-azar) is a high mortality NTD found mostly in South Asia and East Africa, while cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a disfiguring NTD highly endemic in the Middle East, Central Asia, North Africa, and the Americas. Estimates attribute 50,000 annual deaths and 3.3 million disability-adjusted life years to leishmaniasis. There are only a few approved drug treatments, no prophylactic drug and no vaccine. Ideally, an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis will elicit long-lasting immunity and protect broadly against VL and CL. Vaccines such as Leish-F1, F2 and F3, developed at IDRI and designed based on selected Leishmania antigen epitopes, have been in clinical trials. Other groups, including the Sabin Vaccine Institute in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health are investigating recombinant Leishmania antigens in combination with selected sand fly salivary gland antigens in order to augment host immunity. To date, both VL and CL vaccines have been shown to be cost-effective in economic modeling studies. PMID:26973063

  4. Identification of a microRNA signature in dendritic cell vaccines for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrøm, Kim; Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg;

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to tumor antigens followed by treatment with T(h)1-polarizing differentiation signals have paved the way for the development of DC-based cancer vaccines. Critical parameters for assessment of the optimal functional state of DCs and prediction of the vaccine potency of...

  5. Cancer-germline antigen vaccines and epigenetic enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Burns, Jorge; Ditzel, Henrik Jorn

    2010-01-01

    can be achieved using epigenetic modifiers. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: We provide an overview of the potential of CG antigens as targets for cancer immunotherapy, including advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the current state of development of CG antigen vaccines, and the potential...... synergistic effect of combining CG antigen immunotherapeutic strategies with epigenetic modifiers. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: The reader will gain an overview of the past, present and future role of CG antigens in cancer immunotherapy. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Chemoimmunotherapy using epigenetic drugs and CG...

  6. Dendritic-Tumor Fusion Cell-Based Cancer Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Koido

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immunity. Therefore, various strategies have been developed to deliver tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) to DCs as cancer vaccines. The fusion of DCs and whole tumor cells to generate DC-tumor fusion cells (DC-tumor FCs) is an alternative strategy to treat cancer patients. The cell fusion method allows DCs to be exposed to the broad array of TAAs originally expressed by whol...

  7. Animal models of tuberculosis for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, U D; Katoch, V M

    2009-01-01

    Animal models for testing different vaccine candidates have been developed since a long time for studying tuberculosis. Mice, guinea pigs and rabbits are animals most frequently used. Each model has its own merits for studying human tuberculosis, and none completely mimics the human disease. Different animal models are being used depending upon the availability of the space, trained manpower as well as other resources. Efforts should continue to develop a vaccine which can replace/outperform the presently available vaccine BCG. PMID:19287053

  8. Development of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Recombinant Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Simionatto, Simone; Dellagostin, Odir

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Research using genome-based approach has the potential to elucidate the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines. Here, we describe the protocol for developing M. hyopneumoniae recombinant vaccines using reverse vaccinology approaches. PMID:27076288

  9. DNA vaccines: a review of developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R G; Robinson, H L

    1997-10-01

    undesirable agents;correct presentation of antigen;combinations of DNA-encoded antigens and/or cytokines may be administered;genetic stability;potential speed of making new vaccines with genetic identity;development of vaccines for agents that cannot be grown in culture;no need for a cold chain; andpossibility of modulation of the immune response. The perceived risks include: integration of the plasmid into the host genome;induction of anti-DNA antibodies and autoimmunity; andinduction of tolerance. The available information concerning safety is encouraging, with the risk of integration being considered to be orders of magnitude below the spontaneous mutation frequency in humans. DNA immunisation offers the possibility of extending the control of infectious diseases far beyond those that are currently controlled by conventional and recombinant vaccines, to include vaccines for parasites and cancer. However, it is currently too early to predict the future extent of use of DNA vaccines in human immunisation programmes because the initial clinical trials are still in progress. PMID:18020519

  10. The Prevention of Liver Cancer by HBV Vaccine Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Xiong

    2002-01-01

    Objective To recognize the HBV vaccine program for prevention of the hepatic cancer.Methods To discuss the relation between the HBV and hepatic cancer arising, and to discuss the immunology respond of the HBV vaccine (HBV surface antigen protein) in our patient group. Result Our data indicates that the predisposing of the HBV infection is required for the hepatic cancer arising and for the high expression of the AFP gene, and our data indicates that the HBV vaccine can induce highly immuno respond in about 78.8 % of the adult for achieving the HBV prevention status and the hepatic cancer prevention status.

  11. Dendritic cell vaccines in cancer immunotherapy: from biology to translational medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongmei Xu; Xuetao Cao

    2011-01-01

    According to the GLOBOCAN reports,there were about 12.7 million cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths in 2008,and the cancer burden continues to increase worldwide [1].At present,the common treatments for cancer include surgery,chemotherapy,radiotherapy,and immunotherapy.Immunotherapy aims to enhance or regulate the patient's own immune response to fight against tumors.It represents a novel and effective strategy in cancer treatments,but,generally,its efficacy needs to be improved [2].Cancer vaccination is an important and promising approach in cancer immunotherapy.For many years,prophylactic vaccines have exhibited profound accomplishment in preventing serious infectious diseases in humankind,including polio,small pox,and diphtheria.However,cancer vaccines are vastly different from the prophylactic vaccines in that they are aimed to eliminate preexisting tumors.Furthermore,the immune system is immunosuppressed in most cancer patients,so it is much more difficult to develop effective cancer vaccines.

  12. Development of Novel Vaccines against Enterovirus-71

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinn Tsin Isabel Yee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hand, foot and mouth disease is caused by a group of Enteroviruses such as Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71 and Coxsackievirus CV-A5, CV-A8, and CV-A16. Mild symptoms of EV-A71 infection in children range from high fever, vomiting, rashes and ulcers in mouth but can produce more severe symptoms such as brainstem and cerebellar encephalitis, leading up to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The lack of vaccines and antiviral drugs against EV-A71 highlights the urgency of developing preventive and treatment agents against EV-A71 to prevent further fatalities. Research groups have developed experimental inactivated vaccines, recombinant Viral Protein 1 (VP1 vaccine and virus-like particles (VLPs. The inactivated EV-A71 vaccine is considered the safest viral vaccine, as there will be no reversion to the infectious wild type strain. The recombinant VP1 vaccine is a cost-effective immunogen, while VLPs contain an arrangement of epitopes that can elicit neutralizing antibodies against the virus. As each type of vaccine has its advantages and disadvantages, increased studies are required in the development of such vaccines, whereby high efficacy, long-lasting immunity, minimal risk to those vaccinated, safe and easy production, low cost, dispensing the need for refrigeration and convenient delivery are the major goals in their design.

  13. Development of Novel Vaccines against Enterovirus-71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Pinn Tsin Isabel; Poh, Chit Laa

    2016-01-01

    The hand, foot and mouth disease is caused by a group of Enteroviruses such as Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and Coxsackievirus CV-A5, CV-A8, and CV-A16. Mild symptoms of EV-A71 infection in children range from high fever, vomiting, rashes and ulcers in mouth but can produce more severe symptoms such as brainstem and cerebellar encephalitis, leading up to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The lack of vaccines and antiviral drugs against EV-A71 highlights the urgency of developing preventive and treatment agents against EV-A71 to prevent further fatalities. Research groups have developed experimental inactivated vaccines, recombinant Viral Protein 1 (VP1) vaccine and virus-like particles (VLPs). The inactivated EV-A71 vaccine is considered the safest viral vaccine, as there will be no reversion to the infectious wild type strain. The recombinant VP1 vaccine is a cost-effective immunogen, while VLPs contain an arrangement of epitopes that can elicit neutralizing antibodies against the virus. As each type of vaccine has its advantages and disadvantages, increased studies are required in the development of such vaccines, whereby high efficacy, long-lasting immunity, minimal risk to those vaccinated, safe and easy production, low cost, dispensing the need for refrigeration and convenient delivery are the major goals in their design. PMID:26729152

  14. Recent progress in dengue vaccine development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianchun; Wei; Hui; Chen; Jing; An

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus(DENV) has four distinct serotypes. DENV infection can result in classic dengue fever and life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. In recent decades, DENV infection has become an important public health concern in epidemic-prone areas. Vaccination is the most effective measure to prevent and control viral infections. However, several challenges impede the development of effective DENV vaccines, such as the lack of suitable animal models and the antibody-dependent enhancement phenomenon. Although no licensed DENV vaccine is available, significant progress has been made. This review summarizes candidate DENV vaccines from recent investigations.

  15. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  16. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    OpenAIRE

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinating boys against HPV to reduce cancer rates across the sexes New melanoma vaccine contains natural product from marine sponges Impact of Hib conjugate vaccines in developing countries Electronic Health Records to keep track of immunization status Pregnant women urged to get whooping cough vaccination New nano-coating developed to preserve vaccines Alternative approach to creating a universal flu vaccine New modular vaccine design: MAPS technology

  17. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  18. Adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy: Development of an autologous cancer vaccination therapy (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Masami; Nasu,Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells (REIC)/Dickkopf (Dkk)-3 is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene and has been studied with respect to the application of cancer gene therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that the intratumoral injection of an adenovirus vector carrying the human REIC/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) suppresses tumor growth in mouse models of prostate, breast and testicular cancer and malignant mesothelioma. The mechanisms underlying these antitumor therapeutic effects have ...

  19. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Kamalakannan; Grode, Leander; Chang, Rosemary; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Laddy, Dominick; Hokey, David; Derrick, Steven; Morris, Sheldon; McCown, David; Kidd, Reginald; Gengenbacher, Martin; Eisele, Bernd; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Fulkerson, John; Brennan, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO) from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO) from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines. PMID:26343962

  20. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Eisele

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines.

  1. A cost-utility analysis of cervical cancer vaccination in preadolescent Canadian females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merid Maraki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the fact that approximately 70% of Canadian women undergo cervical cancer screening at least once every 3 years, approximately 1,300 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer and approximately 380 died from it in 2008. This study estimates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of vaccinating 12-year old Canadian females with an AS04-adjuvanted cervical cancer vaccine. The indirect effect of vaccination, via herd immunity, is also estimated. Methods A 12-health-state 1-year-cycle Markov model was developed to estimate lifetime HPV related events for a cohort of 12-year old females. Annual transition probabilities between health-states were derived from published literature and Canadian population statistics. The model was calibrated using Canadian cancer statistics. From a healthcare perspective, the cost-effectiveness of introducing a vaccine with efficacy against HPV-16/18 and evidence of cross-protection against other oncogenic HPV types was evaluated in a population undergoing current screening practices. The base-case analysis included 70% screening coverage, 75% vaccination coverage, $135/dose for vaccine, and 3% discount rate on future costs and health effects. Conservative herd immunity effects were taken into account by estimated HPV incidence using a mathematical model parameterized by reported age-stratified sexual mixing data. Sensitivity analyses were performed to address parameter uncertainties. Results Vaccinating 12-year old females (n = 100,000 was estimated to prevent between 390-633 undiscounted cervical cancer cases (reduction of 47%-77% and 168-275 undiscounted deaths (48%-78% over their lifetime, depending on whether or not herd immunity and cross-protection against other oncogenic HPV types were included. Vaccination was estimated to cost $18,672-$31,687 per QALY-gained, the lower range representing inclusion of cross-protective efficacy and herd immunity. The cost per QALY-gained was most

  2. The stem cell patent landscape as relevant to cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2011-10-01

    Cancer vaccine targeting cancer stem cells is proposed to serve as a potent immunotherapy. Thus, it would be useful to examine the main trends in stem cell patenting activity as a guide for those seeking to develop such cancer vaccines. We found that a substantial number of stem cell patents were granted up to the end of 2010, including ~2000 issued in the US. Many of these have been filed since 2001, including 7,551 applications in the US. Stem cell development, as evidenced by the numbers of PubMed articles, has matured steadily in recent years. However, the other metrics, such as the number of patent applications, the technology-science linkage and the number of patent assignees, have been stagnant. Moreover, the ownership of stem cell patents is still quiet fragmented across multiple organizations, and the number of stem cell patent assignees from the business sector has not increased significantly. Academic and nonprofit institutions not only account for a large share of stem cell patents but also apply for patents continually. Based on this analysis, the strength of stem cell resources seems to remain stagnant in recent years due to the ban on government funding of embryonic stem cell research. Furthermore, the patent prosecution or technical barriers in the field of stem cells would be another main reason that the number of US-issued stem cell patents for each application have been in gradual decline since 2000. Therefore, we consider stem cell technology to still be under development. PMID:21957493

  3. Cancer treatment: the combination of vaccination with other therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.H.; Sorensen, R.B.; Schrama, D.;

    2008-01-01

    approach to fight cancer, the combination with additional therapy could create a number of synergistic effects. Herein we discuss the possibilities and prospects of vaccination when combined with other treatments. In this regard, cell death upon drug exposure may be immunogenic or non-immunogenic depending...... their escape from cytotoxic therapies represent prime vaccination candidates. The characterization of a high number of tumor antigens allow the concurrent or serial immunological targeting of different proteins associated with such cancer traits. Moreover, while vaccination in itself is a promising new...... tumor cells and endothelial cells. The efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against cancer will over the next few years be studied in settings taking advantage of strategies in which vaccination is combined with other treatment modalities. These combinations should be based on current knowledge not only...

  4. Recombinant vaccines and the development of new vaccine strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccines were initially developed on an empirical basis, relying mostly on attenuation or inactivation of pathogens. Advances in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics, and proteomics have added new perspectives to the vaccinology field. The use of recombinant proteins allows the targeting of immune responses focused against few protective antigens. There are a variety of expression systems with different advantages, allowing the production of large quantities of proteins depending on the required characteristics. Live recombinant bacteria or viral vectors effectively stimulate the immune system as in natural infections and have intrinsic adjuvant properties. DNA vaccines, which consist of non-replicating plasmids, can induce strong long-term cellular immune responses. Prime-boost strategies combine different antigen delivery systems to broaden the immune response. In general, all of these strategies have shown advantages and disadvantages, and their use will depend on the knowledge of the mechanisms of infection of the target pathogen and of the immune response required for protection. In this review, we discuss some of the major breakthroughs that have been achieved using recombinant vaccine technologies, as well as new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, including potential shortcomings and risks

  5. Recombinant vaccines and the development of new vaccine strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, I.P.; Leite, L.C.C. [Centro de Biotecnologia, Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-07

    Vaccines were initially developed on an empirical basis, relying mostly on attenuation or inactivation of pathogens. Advances in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics, and proteomics have added new perspectives to the vaccinology field. The use of recombinant proteins allows the targeting of immune responses focused against few protective antigens. There are a variety of expression systems with different advantages, allowing the production of large quantities of proteins depending on the required characteristics. Live recombinant bacteria or viral vectors effectively stimulate the immune system as in natural infections and have intrinsic adjuvant properties. DNA vaccines, which consist of non-replicating plasmids, can induce strong long-term cellular immune responses. Prime-boost strategies combine different antigen delivery systems to broaden the immune response. In general, all of these strategies have shown advantages and disadvantages, and their use will depend on the knowledge of the mechanisms of infection of the target pathogen and of the immune response required for protection. In this review, we discuss some of the major breakthroughs that have been achieved using recombinant vaccine technologies, as well as new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, including potential shortcomings and risks.

  6. Evolution of the health economics of cervical cancer vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferko, Nicole; Postma, Maarten; Gallivan, Steve; Kruzikas, Denise; Drummond, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of modelling for cervical cancer vaccination. We provide an interpretation and summary of conclusions pertaining to the usefulness of different models, the predicted epidemiological impact of vaccination and the cost-effectiveness of adolescent, catch-up and sex-specif

  7. Vaccines in development against West Nile virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandler, Samantha; Tangy, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    West Nile encephalitis emerged in 1999 in the United States, then rapidly spread through the North American continent causing severe disease in human and horses. Since then, outbreaks appeared in Europe, and in 2012, the United States experienced a new severe outbreak reporting a total of 5,387 cases of West Nile virus (WNV) disease in humans, including 243 deaths. So far, no human vaccine is available to control new WNV outbreaks and to avoid worldwide spreading. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art of West Nile vaccine development and the potential of a novel safe and effective approach based on recombinant live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccine. MV vaccine is a live attenuated negative-stranded RNA virus proven as one of the safest, most stable and effective human vaccines. We previously described a vector derived from the Schwarz MV vaccine strain that stably expresses antigens from emerging arboviruses, such as dengue, West Nile or chikungunya viruses, and is strongly immunogenic in animal models, even in the presence of MV pre-existing immunity. A single administration of a recombinant MV vaccine expressing the secreted form of WNV envelope glycoprotein elicited protective immunity in mice and non-human primates as early as two weeks after immunization, indicating its potential as a human vaccine. PMID:24084235

  8. Vaccines in Development against West Nile Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Tangy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available West Nile encephalitis emerged in 1999 in the United States, then rapidly spread through the North American continent causing severe disease in human and horses. Since then, outbreaks appeared in Europe, and in 2012, the United States experienced a new severe outbreak reporting a total of 5,387 cases of West Nile virus (WNV disease in humans, including 243 deaths. So far, no human vaccine is available to control new WNV outbreaks and to avoid worldwide spreading. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art of West Nile vaccine development and the potential of a novel safe and effective approach based on recombinant live attenuated measles virus (MV vaccine. MV vaccine is a live attenuated negative-stranded RNA virus proven as one of the safest, most stable and effective human vaccines. We previously described a vector derived from the Schwarz MV vaccine strain that stably expresses antigens from emerging arboviruses, such as dengue, West Nile or chikungunya viruses, and is strongly immunogenic in animal models, even in the presence of MV pre-existing immunity. A single administration of a recombinant MV vaccine expressing the secreted form of WNV envelope glycoprotein elicited protective immunity in mice and non-human primates as early as two weeks after immunization, indicating its potential as a human vaccine.

  9. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for GBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Paul T

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus (GBS)) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in many countries. Intrapartum antibiotic strategies have reduced the incidence of early-onset neonatal GBS in a number of countries but have had no impact on late onset GBS infection (LOD). In low/middle income settings, the disease burden remains uncertain although in several countries of Southern Africa appears comparable to or higher than that of high-income countries. As disease may be rapidly fulminating cases can be missed before appropriate samples are obtained and this may lead to underestimation of the true burden. Given the rapid onset and progression within hours of birth as well as the deficiencies in IAP strategies and absence of a solution for preventing LOD, it is clear that administration of a suitable vaccine in pregnancy could provide a better solution in all settings; it should also be cost effective. The current leading vaccine candidates are CPS-protein conjugate vaccines but protein-based vaccines are also in development and one has recently commenced clinical trials. PMID:26988258

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor enhances the efficacy of a breast cancer vaccine: role of IDO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Gargi D; Tinder, Teresa L; Bradley, Judy M; Tu, Tony; Hattrup, Christine L; Pockaj, Barbara A; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2006-08-15

    We report that administration of celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, in combination with a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine significantly augments vaccine efficacy in reducing primary tumor burden, preventing metastasis, and increasing survival. This combination treatment was tested in MMTV-PyV MT mice that develop spontaneous mammary gland tumors with metastasis to the lungs and bone marrow. Improved vaccine potency was associated with an increase in tumor-specific CTLs. Enhanced CTL activity was attributed to a significant decrease in levels of tumor-associated IDO, a negative regulator of T cell activity. We present data suggesting that inhibiting COX-2 activity in vivo regulates IDO expression within the tumor microenvironment; this is further corroborated in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Thus, a novel mechanism of COX-2-induced immunosuppression via regulation of IDO has emerged that may have implications in designing future cancer vaccines. PMID:16888001

  11. Drones Could Deliver Vaccines in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159549.html Drones Could Deliver Vaccines in Developing Countries Machines might ... Right now, people often associate the use of drones with warfare. But in the future they could ...

  12. DNA vaccines, electroporation and their applications in cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Si-Hyeong; Danishmalik, Sayyed Nilofar; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2015-01-01

    Numerous animal studies and recent clinical studies have shown that electroporation-delivered DNA vaccines can elicit robust Ag-specific CTL responses and reduce disease severity. However, cancer antigens are generally poorly immunogenic, requiring special conditions for immune response induction. To date, many different approaches have been used to elicit Ag-specific CTL and anti-neoplastic responses to DNA vaccines against cancer. In vivo electroporation is one example, whereas others inclu...

  13. Nanovaccines: recent developments in vaccination

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarala D Nandedkar

    2009-12-01

    In the past 100 years, vaccination has contributed immensely to public health by preventing a number of infectious diseases. Attenuated, killed or part of the microorganism is employed to stimulate the immune system against it. Progress in biotechnology has provided protective immunity through DNA vaccines. In recent years, nanovaccine is a novel approach to the methodology of vaccination. Nanomaterials are delivered in the form of microspheres, nanobeads or micro-nanoprojections. Painless, effective and safe needle-free routes such as the intranasal or the oral route, or patches of microprojections to the skin are some of the approaches which are in the experimental stage at present but may have a great future ahead in nanovaccination.

  14. GENERAL AWARNANCE OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS VACCINE AGAINST CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAFILA NAVEED

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have conducted a survey program on the awarnance of HPV vaccine of cervical cancer in common people. Methods: For this survey we perform 2 steps. First we made a questionnaires in which we ask to female of different belongs to different education field either they are married or not. Secondly we gone in the different hospitals of Karachi and observe treatment, diagnosis, vaccination availability and frequency of cervical cancer. Results:From questionnaire we observed that only 1 % female are aware about cervical cancer and its vaccine i.e. HPV, even female belongs medical field are not aware about it. Form hospital survey we observed that frequency of cervical cancer is very less but in Shaukat Khanum hospital 90 cases reported out of 1803 cancer. The given treatment is radiology, chemotherapy and surgery.

  15. Vaccine development for tuberculosis: current progress

    OpenAIRE

    Orme, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Very substantial efforts have been made over the past decade or more to develop vaccines against tuberculosis. Historically, this began with a view to replace the current vaccine, BCG, but more recently most candidates are either new forms of this bacillus, or are designed to boost immunity in children given BCG as infants. Good progress is being made, but very few have as yet progressed into clinical trials. The leading candidate has advanced to Phase IIb efficacy testing, with disappointing...

  16. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity......During the last decade use of dendritic cells (DC) has moved from murine and in vitro studies to clinical trials as adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. Here they function as delivery vehicles for exogenous tumor antigens, promoting an efficient antigen presentation. The development of protocols...... and in selected patients to tumor regression. However, the majority of clinical trials are still in phase I, and interpretations are hampered by pronounced variation in study design related to technical aspects of DC preparation, treatment and schedule, monitoring of immune response, and clinically relevant...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of adding vaccination with the AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine to cervical cancer screening in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vokó Zoltán

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cervical cancer screening program implemented in Hungary to date has not been successful. Along with screening, vaccination is an effective intervention to prevent cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of adding vaccination with the human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine to the current cervical cancer screening program in Hungary. Methods We developed a cohort simulation state-transition Markov model to model the life course of 12-year-old girls. Eighty percent participation in the HPV vaccination program at 12 years of age was assumed. Transitional probabilities were estimated using data from the literature. Local data were used regarding screening participation rates, and the costs were estimated in US $. We applied the purchasing power parity exchange rate of 129 HUF/$ to the cost data. Only direct health care costs were considered. We used a 3.7% discount rate for both the cost and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. The time horizon was 88 years. Results Inclusion of HPV vaccination at age 12 in the cervical cancer prevention program was predicted to be cost-effective. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of adding HPV vaccination to the current national cancer screening program was estimated to be 27 588 $/QALY. The results were sensitive to the price of the vaccine, the discount rate, the screening participation rate and whether herd immunity was taken into account. Conclusions Our modeling analysis showed that the vaccination of 12-year-old adolescent girls against cervical cancer with the AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine would be a cost-effective strategy to prevent cervical cancer in Hungary.

  18. NGcGM3 ganglioside: a privileged target for cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Luis E; Gabri, Mariano R; Guthmann, Marcelo D; Gomez, Roberto E; Gold, Silvia; Fainboim, Leonardo; Gomez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F

    2010-01-01

    Active specific immunotherapy is a promising field in cancer research. N-glycolyl (NGc) gangliosides, and particularly NGcGM3, have received attention as a privileged target for cancer therapy. Many clinical trials have been performed with the anti-NGc-containing gangliosides anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody racotumomab (formerly known as 1E10) and the conjugated NGcGM3/VSSP vaccine for immunotherapy of melanoma, breast, and lung cancer. The present paper examines the role of NGc-gangliosides in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical and clinical data on these vaccine products. A brief discussion on the relevance of prioritization of cancer antigens in vaccine development is also included. PMID:21048926

  19. Development of Toxoplasma gondii vaccine: A global challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep

    2013-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by the protozoan parasite T. gondii. Humans and other warm-blooded animals are its hosts. The infection has a worldwide distribution; one-third of the world's population has been exposed to this parasite. There are three primary ways of transmission: ingesting uncooked meat containing tissue cysts, ingesting food and water contaminated with oocysts from infected cat feces and congenitally. Those particularly at risk of developing clinical illness include pregnant women, given that the parasite can pose a serious threat to the unborn child if the mother becomes infected while pregnant, and immunosuppressed individuals such as tissue transplant subjects, AIDS subjects, those with certain types of cancer and those undergoing certain forms of cancer therapy. Maternal infections early in pregnancy are less likely to be transmitted to the fetus than infections later in pregnancy, but early fetal infections are more likely to be severe than later infections. In the absence of an effective human vaccine, prevention of zoonotic transmission might be the best way to approach the problem of toxoplasmosis and must be done by limiting exposure to oocysts or tissue cysts. Vaccine development to prevent feline oocyst shedding is ongoing, mostly with live vaccines. The S48 strain Toxovax is a live vaccine originally developed for use in sheep, but when used in cats inhibits sexual development of T. gondii. This vaccine is used in sheep to reduce tissue cyst development. The T-263 strain of T. gondii is a live mutant strain designed to reduce or prevent oocyst shedding by cats by developing only partial infection in the feline intestinal tract. PMID:23111123

  20. Glycan changes: cancer metastasis and anti-cancer vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Min Li; Lujun Song; Xinyu Qin

    2010-12-01

    Complex carbohydrates, which are major components of the cell membrane, perform important functions in cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions, as well as in signal transduction. They comprise three kinds of biomolecules: glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Recent studies have also shown that glycan changes in malignant cells take a variety of forms and mediate key pathophysiological events during the various stages of tumour progression. Glycosylation changes are universal hallmarks of malignant transformation and tumour progression in human cancer, which take place on the whole cells or some specific molecules. Accordingly, those changes make them prominent candidates for cancer biomarkers in the meantime. This review mainly focuses on the correlation between glycosylation and the metastasis potential of tumour cells from comprehensive aspects to further address the vital roles of glycans in oncogenesising. Moreover, utilizing these glycosylation changes to ward off tumour metastasis by means of anti-adhesion approach or devising anti-cancer vaccine is one of promising targets of future study.

  1. Development of vaccines for Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ivo; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium vivax continues to cause significant morbidity outside Africa with more than 50% of malaria cases in many parts of South and South-east Asia, Pacific islands, Central and South America being attributed to P. vivax infections. The unique biology of P. vivax, including its ability to form latent hypnozoites that emerge months to years later to cause blood stage infections, early appearance of gametocytes before clinical symptoms are apparent and a shorter development cycle in the vector makes elimination of P. vivax using standard control tools difficult. The availability of an effective vaccine that provides protection and prevents transmission would be a valuable tool in efforts to eliminate P. vivax. Here, we review the latest developments related to P. vivax malaria vaccines and discuss the challenges as well as directions toward the goal of developing highly efficacious vaccines against P. vivax malaria. PMID:26428453

  2. Sub-acute toxicity study in female ICR mice following repetitive intramuscular injection of cervical cancer vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Seol-Hee; Kim, Du-Yeol; Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Hye-Yeong; Lee, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Jaesung; Jung, Jiwon; Kim, Min-Ju; Choi, Kyoung-Baek; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young-Bong; Kim, Sujeong; Oh, Seung Min

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The sub-acute toxic effects following repetitive intramuscular injection of two cervical cancer vaccines newly developed against human papillomaviruse (HPV)16/58/18 and HPV16 were investigated in female ICR (CrljOri: CD1) mice, and the no-observedadverse- effect-level (NOAEL) of the cervical cancer vaccines was estimated. Methods Female ICR mice (n=15 in each group) were exposed to a 1:1 mixture of two cervical cancer vaccines by repetitive intramuscular injection (once a week, 5 t...

  3. 9-Valent HPV vaccine for cancers, pre-cancers and genital warts related to HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Velicer, Christine; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of nearly all cervical cancer cases as well as a substantial proportion of anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, making it responsible for approximately 5% of the global cancer burden. The first-generation HPV vaccines that is, quadrivalent HPV type 6/11/16/18 vaccine and bivalent HPV type 16/18 vaccine were licensed in 2006 and 2007, respectively. A second-generation 9-valent HPV type 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine with broader cancer coverage was initiated even before the first vaccines were approved. By preventing HPV infection and disease due to HPV31/33/45/52/58, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to increase prevention of cervical cancer from 70 to 90%. In addition, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to prevent 85-95% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Overall, the 9vHPV vaccine addresses a significant unmet medical need, although further health economics and implementation research is needed. PMID:26366475

  4. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in combination with conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva; Svane, Inge Marie;

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with...... of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant...... phenotype can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma....

  5. Therapeutic cancer vaccines and combination immunotherapies involving vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen T; Urban J.; Kalinski P

    2014-01-01

    Trang Nguyen,1 Julie Urban,1 Pawel Kalinski1–5 1Department of Surgery, 2Department of Immunology, 3Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 4Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, 5University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Recent US Food and Drug Administration approvals of Provenge® (sipuleucel-T) as the first cell-based cancer therapeutic factor and ipilimumab (Yervoy®/anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4) as the first &...

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiansong; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    Following HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) continues to be the second most deadly infectious disease in humans. The global TB prevalence has become worse in recent years due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) strains, as well as co-infection with HIV. Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has nearly been used for a century in many countries, it does not protect adult pulmonary tuberculosis and even causes disseminated BCG disease in HIV-positive population. It is impossible to use BCG to eliminate the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection or to prevent TB onset and reactivation. Consequently, novel vaccines are urgently needed for TB prevention and immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the TB prevalence, interaction between M. tb and host immune system, as well as recent progress of TB vaccine research and development. PMID:27156616

  7. TAA Polyepitope DNA-Based Vaccines: A Potential Tool for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-based cancer vaccines represent an attractive strategy for inducing immunity to tumor associated antigens (TAAs in cancer patients. The demonstration that the delivery of a recombinant plasmid encoding epitopes can lead to epitope production, processing, and presentation to CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and the advantage of using a single DNA construct encoding multiple epitopes of one or more TAAs to elicit a broad spectrum of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes has encouraged the development of a variety of strategies aimed at increasing immunogenicity of TAA polyepitope DNA-based vaccines. The polyepitope DNA-based cancer vaccine approach can (a circumvent the variability of peptide presentation by tumor cells, (b allow the introduction in the plasmid construct of multiple immunogenic epitopes including heteroclitic epitope versions, and (c permit to enroll patients with different major histocompatibility complex (MHC haplotypes. This review will discuss the rationale for using the TAA polyepitope DNA-based vaccination strategy and recent results corroborating the usefulness of DNA encoding polyepitope vaccines as a potential tool for cancer therapy.

  8. Muc1 based breast cancer vaccines: role of post translational modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccine development is one of the most promising fields in cancer research. After autologous transplantation, due to low tumour burden, patients are more likely to respond immunologically to a cancer vaccine. MUC1 with its adhesive and anti adhesive functions, immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive activities, is therefore a good candidate for breast cancer vaccine. A structure-based insight into the immunogenicity of natural MUC1 glyco forms, of its sub-domains, motifs and post translational modification like glycosylation and myriostoylation may aid the design of tumour vaccines. Primary sequences of human MUC1 were retrieved from the SWISSPROT data bank. Protein pattern search: The primary sequence of Human MUC1 was searched at PROSITE (a dictionary of protein sites and patterns) database. Our study observes that post-translational modifications play an important role in presenting MUC1 as a candidate for breast cancer vaccine. It is found that the phosphorylation and glycosylation of important functional motifs of MUC1 may take part in the production of cytokines that may provide immunization. (author)

  9. Epidemiology of HPV 16 and cervical cancer in Finland and the potential impact of vaccination: mathematical modelling analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruanne V Barnabas

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Candidate human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines have demonstrated almost 90%-100% efficacy in preventing persistent, type-specific HPV infection over 18 mo in clinical trials. If these vaccines go on to demonstrate prevention of precancerous lesions in phase III clinical trials, they will be licensed for public use in the near future. How these vaccines will be used in countries with national cervical cancer screening programmes is an important question. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed a transmission model of HPV 16 infection and progression to cervical cancer and calibrated it to Finnish HPV 16 seroprevalence over time. The model was used to estimate the transmission probability of the virus, to look at the effect of changes in patterns of sexual behaviour and smoking on age-specific trends in cancer incidence, and to explore the impact of HPV 16 vaccination. We estimated a high per-partnership transmission probability of HPV 16, of 0.6. The modelling analyses showed that changes in sexual behaviour and smoking accounted, in part, for the increase seen in cervical cancer incidence in 35- to 39-y-old women from 1990 to 1999. At both low (10% in opportunistic immunisation and high (90% in a national immunisation programme coverage of the adolescent population, vaccinating women and men had little benefit over vaccinating women alone. We estimate that vaccinating 90% of young women before sexual debut has the potential to decrease HPV type-specific (e.g., type 16 cervical cancer incidence by 91%. If older women are more likely to have persistent infections and progress to cancer, then vaccination with a duration of protection of less than 15 y could result in an older susceptible cohort and no decrease in cancer incidence. While vaccination has the potential to significantly reduce type-specific cancer incidence, its combination with screening further improves cancer prevention. CONCLUSIONS: HPV vaccination has the potential to

  10. Optimised electroporation mediated DNA vaccination for treatment of prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, Sarfraz

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Immunological therapies enhance the ability of the immune system to recognise and destroy cancer cells via selective killing mechanisms. DNA vaccines have potential to activate the immune system against specific antigens, with accompanying potent immunological adjuvant effects from unmethylated CpG motifs as on prokaryotic DNA. We investigated an electroporation driven plasmid DNA vaccination strategy in animal models for treatment of prostate cancer. METHODS: Plasmid expressing human PSA gene (phPSA) was delivered in vivo by intra-muscular electroporation, to induce effective anti-tumour immune responses against prostate antigen expressing tumours. Groups of male C57 BL\\/6 mice received intra-muscular injections of phPSA plasmid. For phPSA delivery, quadriceps muscle was injected with 50 mug plasmid. After 80 seconds, square-wave pulses were administered in sequence using a custom designed pulse generator and acustom-designed applicator with 2 needles placed through the skin central to the muscle. To determine an optimum treatment regimen, three different vaccination schedules were investigated. In a separate experiment, the immune potential of the phPSA vaccine was further enhanced with co- administration of synthetic CpG rich oligonucleotides. One week after last vaccination, the mice were challenged subcutaneously with TRAMPC1\\/hPSA (prostate cancer cell line stably expressing human PSA) and tumour growth was monitored. Serum from animals was examined by ELISA for anti-hPSA antibodies and for IFNgamma. Histological assessment of the tumours was also carried out. In vivo and in vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed with splenocytes from treated mice. RESULTS: The phPSA vaccine therapy significantly delayed the appearance of tumours and resulted in prolonged survival of the animals. Four-dose vaccination regimen provided optimal immunological effects. Co - administration of the synthetic CpG with phPSA increased anti-tumour responses

  11. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, N.; Ellebaek, E.;

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with...

  12. Genetically modified dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 153-155. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cells * cancer vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  13. Fueling the engine and releasing the break:combinational therapy of cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer Kleponis; Richard Skelton; Lei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are increasingly drawing much attention in the therapeutic development for cancer treatment. However, many cancer patients do not respond to treatments with immune checkpoint inhibitors, partly because of the lack of tumor-inifltrating effector T cells. Cancer vaccines may prime patients for treatments with immune checkpoint inhibitors by inducing effector T-cell infiltration into the tumors and immune checkpoint signals. The combination of cancer vaccine and an immune checkpoint inhibitor may function synergistically to induce more effective antitumor immune responses, and clinical trials to test the combination are currently ongoing.

  14. The human papillomavirus vaccine: A powerful tool for the primary prevention of cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubia Muñoz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine is the most promissory public health tool for primary prevention of cervical cancer. Immunization of females before the acquisition of HPV infection has the greatest impact in preventing pre-neoplasic lesions and cervical cancer. Current HPV vaccines do not eliminate cervical cancer risk, therefore, screening should continue covering vaccinated as well as women that do not get the vaccine. The strategies that include combination of high-coverage vaccination of HPV-unexposed adolescents with screening using methods with higher sensitivity than cytology as HPV test may be more cost-effective than the strategies currently used. The cytology-based screening programs of Latin America countries including Colombia are very ineffective. The evidence in favor of the cost-effectiveness of other screening strategies such as HPV tests and visual inspection followed by immediate treatment for women with difficult access to health care services in developing countries warrants the immediate revision of the current strategies.

  15. Development of Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Using Live Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae still causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children and the elderly. Much effort has been dedicated to developing protein-based universal vaccines to conquer the current shortcomings of capsular vaccines and capsular conjugate vaccines, such as serotype replacement, limited coverage and high costs. A recombinant live vector vaccine delivering protective antigens is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this review, we discuss the researches using live recombinant vaccines, mainly live attenuated Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria, to deliver pneumococcal antigens. We also discuss both the limitations and the future of these vaccines.

  16. Promising Rabies Vaccine for Postexposure Prophylaxis in Developing Countries, a Purified Vero Cell Vaccine Produced in China▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chuanlin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Song, Qingkun; Tang, Kun

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, and antibody persistence of a Vero cell rabies vaccine manufactured in China, compared with those of Verorab. Adequate titers of antibody were observed for the two vaccines. ChengDa rabies vaccine could be a promising alternative vaccine for many developing countries which cannot afford expensive rabies vaccines.

  17. [Approaches and problems in vaccine development against leishmaniasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil; Bağirova, Melahat; Cakir Koç, Rabia; Oztel, Olga Nehir; Elçıçek, Serhat; Ateş, Sezen Canım; Karaca, Tuğçe Deniz

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major public health problem of the world and Turkey. Recently there has been increasing interest in vaccine studies among strategies for control of leishmaniasis. Recently the increase of interest in vaccine studies among leishmaniasis control strategies makes the subject more up to date. So the aim of this review is to present information about recent vaccine studies, problems and new strategies for vaccine development studies. There are 3 generations of vaccine against leishmaniasis. First-generation vaccines are killed or live attenuated parasites; second-generation vaccines are recombinant or native antigens and live genetically modified parasites (knock out and suicidal cassettes), third generation vaccines are DNA vaccines. Also vector salivary proteins, dendritic cells and non-pathogenic L. tarentolae have been used as vaccine candidates. However there is still no effective vaccine against leishmaniasis. Since polymer conjugates considerably increase immunogenicity, polymer based vaccine studies have gained importance in recent years. However, there has not been such a study for an antileishmanial vaccine yet. LPG, surface antigen of Leishmania promastigotes, and polymer conjugates may be promising in antileishmanial vaccine studies so we are carrying out a TUBITAK Project on this subject which has been given the number, 1085170SBAG-4007. PMID:20597059

  18. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination for prevention of cervical cancer in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Song-Nan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV infection has been shown to be a major risk factor for cervical cancer. Vaccines against HPV-16 and HPV-18 are highly effective in preventing type-specific HPV infections and related cervical lesions. There is, however, limited data available describing the health and economic impacts of HPV vaccination in Taiwan. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of prophylactic HPV vaccination for the prevention of cervical cancer in Taiwan. Methods We developed a Markov model to compare the health and economic outcomes of vaccinating preadolescent girls (at the age of 12 years for the prevention of cervical cancer with current practice, including cervical cytological screening. Data were synthesized from published papers or reports, and whenever possible, those specific to Taiwan were used. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for important uncertainties and different vaccination scenarios. Results Under the assumption that the HPV vaccine could provide lifelong protection, the massive vaccination among preadolescent girls in Taiwan would lead to reduction in 73.3% of the total incident cervical cancer cases and would result in a life expectancy gain of 4.9 days or 8.7 quality-adjusted life days at a cost of US$324 as compared to the current practice. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was US$23,939 per life year gained or US$13,674 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained given the discount rate of 3%. Sensitivity analyses showed that this ICER would remain below US$30,000 per QALY under most conditions, even when vaccine efficacy was suboptimal or when vaccine-induced immunity required booster shots every 13 years. Conclusions Although gains in life expectancy may be modest at the individual level, the results indicate that prophylactic HPV vaccination of preadolescent girls in Taiwan would result in substantial population benefits with a favorable cost

  19. Cancer therapy using a self-replicating RNA vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Han; Zaks, Tal Z.; Wang, Rong-fu; Irvine, Kari R.; Kammula, Udai S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    1999-01-01

    ‘Naked’ nucleic acid vaccines are potentially useful candidates for the treatment of patients with cancer1-3, but their clinical efficacy has yet to be demonstrated. We sought to enhance the immunogenicity of a nucleic acid vaccine by making it ‘self-replicating’. We accomplished this by using a gene encoding an RNA replicase polyprotein derived from the Semliki forest virus, in combination with a model antigen. A single intramuscular injection of a self-replicating RNA immunogen elicited ant...

  20. RhoC a new target for therapeutic vaccination against metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenandy, L.; Sorensen, R.B.; Straten, P.T.;

    2008-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are due to the development of metastases. Increased expression of RhoC is linked to enhanced metastatic potential in multiple cancers. Consequently, the RhoC protein is an attractive target for drug design. The clinical application of immunotherapy against cancer is rapidly...... moving forward in multiple areas, including the adoptive transfer of anti-tumor-reactive T cells and the use of "therapeutic" vaccines. The over-expression of RhoC in cancer and the fact that immune escape by down regulation or loss of expression of this protein would reduce the morbidity and mortality...... of cancer makes RhoC a very attractive target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we describe an HLA-A3 restricted epitope from RhoC, which is recognized by cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, RhoC-specific T cells show cytotoxic potential against HLA-matched cancer cells of different origin. Thus, Rho...

  1. Accelerating Next Generation Vaccine Development for Global Disease Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Koff, Wayne C.; Dennis R Burton; R.Johnson, Philip; Walker, Bruce D; King, Charles R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Ahmed, Rafi; Bhan, Maharaj Kishan; Plotkin, Stanley A.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are among the greatest successes in the history of public health. However, past strategies for vaccine development are unlikely to succeed in the future against major global diseases such as AIDS, TB, and malaria. For such diseases, the correlates of protection are poorly defined and the pathogens evade immune detection and/or exhibit extensive genetic variability. Recent advances have heralded in a new era of vaccine discovery. However, translation of these advances into vaccines re...

  2. Global Vaccine and Immunization Research Forum: Opportunities and challenges in vaccine discovery, development, and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew Q; Touchette, Nancy; Hall, B Fenton; Hwang, Angela; Hombach, Joachim

    2016-03-18

    The World Health Organization, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened the first Global Vaccine and Immunization Research Forum (GVIRF) in March 2014. This first GVIRF aimed to track recent progress of the Global Vaccine Action Plan research and development agenda, identify opportunities and challenges, promote partnerships in vaccine research, and facilitate the inclusion of all stakeholders in vaccine research and development. Leading scientists, vaccine developers, and public health officials from around the world discussed scientific and technical challenges in vaccine development, research to improve the impact of immunization, and regulatory issues. This report summarizes the discussions and conclusions from the forum participants. PMID:26626210

  3. Impact of BRICS' investment in vaccine development on the global vaccine market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddar, Miloud; Milstien, Julie; Schmitt, Sarah

    2014-06-01

    Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa--the countries known as BRICS--have made considerable progress in vaccine production, regulation and development over the past 20 years. In 1993, all five countries were producing vaccines but the processes used were outdated and non-standardized, there was little relevant research and there was negligible international recognition of the products. By 2014, all five countries had strong initiatives for the development of vaccine technology and had greatly improved their national regulatory capacity. South Africa was then the only BRICS country that was not completely producing vaccines. South Africa is now in the process of re-establishing its own vaccine production and passing beyond the stage of simply importing, formulating and filling vaccine bulks. Changes in the public sector's price per dose of selected vaccines, the global market share represented by products from specific manufacturers, and the attractiveness, for multinational companies, of partnership and investment opportunities in BRICS companies have all been analysed. The results indicate that the BRICS countries have had a major impact on vaccine price and availability, with much of that impact attributable to the output of Indian vaccine manufacturers. China is expected to have a greater impact soon, given the anticipated development of Chinese vaccine manufacturers in the near future. BRICS' accomplishments in the field of vaccine development are expected to reshape the global vaccine market and accelerate access to vaccines in the developing world. The challenge is to turn these expectations into strategic actions and practical outcomes. PMID:24940018

  4. WHO policy development processes for a new vaccine: case study of malaria vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Cheyne James; Cárdenas Vicky; Milstien Julie; Brooks Alan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) are crucial to inform developing country decisions to use, or not, a new intervention. This article analysed the WHO policy development process to predict its course for a malaria vaccine. Methods The decision-making processes for one malaria intervention and four vaccines were classified through (1) consultations with staff and expert advisors to WHO's Global Malaria Programme (GMP) and Immunization, Vaccines and Bi...

  5. [Rabies vaccines: Current status and prospects for development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubova, E S; Preobrazhenskaia, O V; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Yarygina, E I; Karpov, V L

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is an infectious disease among humans and animals that remains incurable, despite its longstanding research history. The only way to prevent the disease is prompt treatment, including vaccination as an obligatory component and administration of antirabies immunoglobulin as a supplement. Since the first antirabies vaccination performed in the 19th century, a large number of different rabies vaccines have been developed. Progress in molecular biology and biotechnology enabled the development of effective and safe technologies of vaccine production. Currently, new-generation vaccines are being developed based on recombinant rabies virus strains or on the production of an individual recombinant rabies antigen-glycoprotein (G protein), either as a component of nonpathogenic viruses, or in plants, or in the form of DNA vaccines. In this review, the main modern trends in the development of rabies vaccines have been discussed. PMID:26299857

  6. Chikungunya virus vaccines: Current strategies and prospects for developing plant-made vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-González, Jorge A; Angulo, Carlos; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2015-07-17

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging pathogen initially found in East Africa and currently spread into the Indian Ocean Islands, many regions of South East Asia, and in the Americas. No licensed vaccines against this eminent pathogen are available and thus intensive research in this field is a priority. This review presents the current scenario on the developments of Chikungunya virus vaccines and identifies the use of genetic engineered plants to develop attractive vaccines. The possible avenues to develop plant-made vaccines with distinct antigenic designs and expression modalities are identified and discussed considering current trends in the field. PMID:26073010

  7. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Sayers; Guerlain Ulysse; Zuoshuang Xiang; Yongqun He

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bi...

  8. Therapeutic vaccines in non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socola, Francisco; Scherfenberg, Naomi; Raez, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unfortunately carries a very poor prognosis. Patients usually do not become symptomatic, and therefore do not seek treatment, until the cancer is advanced and it is too late to employ curative treatment options. New therapeutic options are urgently needed for NSCLC, because even current targeted therapies cure very few patients. Active immunotherapy is an option that is gaining more attention. A delicate and complex interplay exists between the tumor and the immune system. Solid tumors utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection. However, if the immune system can be stimulated to recognize the tumor as foreign, tumor cells can be specifically eliminated with little systemic toxicity. A number of vaccines designed to boost immunity against NSCLC are currently undergoing investigation in phase III clinical trials. Belagenpumatucel-L, an allogeneic cell vaccine that decreases transforming growth factor (TGF-β) in the tumor microenvironment, releases the immune suppression caused by the tumor and it has shown efficacy in a wide array of patients with advanced NSCLC. Melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3), an antigen-based vaccine, has shown promising results in MAGE-A3+ NSCLC patients who have undergone complete surgical resection. L-BLP25 and TG4010 are both antigenic vaccines that target the Mucin-1 protein (MUC-1), a proto-oncogene that is commonly mutated in solid tumors. CIMAVax is a recombinant human epidermal growth factor (EGF) vaccine that induces anti-EGF antibody production and prevents EGF from binding to its receptor. These vaccines may significantly improve survival and quality of life for patients with an otherwise dismal NSCLC prognosis. This review is intended to give an overview of the current data and the most promising studies of active immunotherapy for NSCLC.

  9. Review: New Vaccine Against Tuberculosis: Current Developments and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a global health threat. BCG was developed as an attenuated live vaccine for tuberculosis control nearly a century ago. Despite being the most widely used vaccine in human history, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: its poor efficacy against adult pulmonary TB and its disconcerting safety in immunocompromised individuals. A safer and more effective TB vaccine is urgently needed. This review article discusses current strategies to develop the next generation of TB vaccines to replace BCG. While some progresses have been made in the past decade, significant challenges lie ahead.

  10. OBSERVATION ON VACCINATING Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine with Inhalation and Preventing Recurrence of Nasopharyngeal cancer after Radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To understand whether the Newcastle disease virus(NDV) vaccine can successfully vaccinate the rabbits and volunteers of cancer patients by inhalation and to observe the effects of NDV vaccine on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NRC) patients after radiotherapy. Methods: The live NDV vaccine was vaccinated through nasal cavities of rabbits, NPC patients and other cancer patients who were treated by surgery or chemotherapy with larynx spray. The blood specimens of vein from the tested rabbits and volunteers of patients with cancer were collected before and after vaccination. The anti-NDV-antibody in serum was detected by conventional blood coagulation inhibiting method. The white blood cell (WBC) amount in blood samples was counted. In addition, the NPC patients after radiotherapy were divided into both test group and control group with random match. The both were followed-up by multiple kinds of way in order to understand effects of NDV immunotherapy for NPC. Results: The anti-NDV-antibody level of the rabbits and the patients with NPC rose significantly after vaccination. The WBC amount of cancer patients treated by surgery or chemotherapy also rose significantly after vaccination. The recurrence rate (3.23%) of NRC patients in test group who received immunotherapy of NDV vaccine for 4 to 10 treatment courses within 3 years after end of radiotherapy were significantly lower than that (25.81%) of the control group (P<0.025). Conclusion: The NDV vaccine La Sota strain can vaccinate the rabbits and the cancer patients in success by inhalation. And it has remarkable effect to decrease 3 year recurrence rate of NRC patients after radiotherapy.

  11. Immunoinformatics of Placental Malaria Vaccine Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Leon Eyrich

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Plasmodium, which is transferred by female Anopheles mosquitos. WHO estimates that in 2012 there were 207 million cases of malaria, of which 627,000 were fatal. People living in malaria-endemic areas, gradually acquire...... immunity with multiple infections. Placental malaria (PM) is caused by P. falciparum sequestering in the placenta of pregnant women due to the presence of novel receptors in the placenta. An estimated 200,000 infants die a year as a result of PM. In 2004 the specific protein responsible for the...... and development in the field of placental malaria vaccine development....

  12. Status of vaccine research and development for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, A Louis; Wierzba, Thomas F; Walker, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common bacterial causes of diarrhea-associated morbidity and mortality, particularly among infants and young children in developing countries. Still, the true impact on child and traveler health is likely underestimated. There are currently no licensed vaccines for ETEC, but studies indicate high public health impact, cost-effectiveness, and feasibility of immune protection through vaccination. ETEC vaccine development remains a World Health Organization priority. Traditionally, ETEC vaccine development efforts have focused on inducing antitoxin and anticolonization antigen immunity, as studies indicate that antibodies against both antigen types can contribute to protection and thus have potential for vaccines. Leading cellular vaccine candidates are ETVAX (a mixture of four inactivated strains) and ACE527 (a mixture of three live attenuated strains), both of which have been found to be safe and immunogenic in Phase 1/2 trials. ETVAX is the furthest along in development with descending-age studies already underway in Bangladesh. Other ETEC vaccine candidates based on protein subunits, toxoids (both LT and ST), or novel, more broadly conserved ETEC antigens are also under development. Of these, a protein adhesin-based subunit approach is the most advanced. Impact and economic models suggest favorable vaccine cost-effectiveness, which may help expand market interest in ETEC vaccines. Combination vaccine formulations may help improve the economic case for development and use, and better point-of-care diagnostics will help to raise awareness of the true health burden of ETEC and highlight the potential public health benefit of ETEC vaccine introduction. Better diagnostics and vaccine demand forecasting will also improve vaccine development financing and support accelerated uptake once a licensed vaccine becomes available. PMID:26988259

  13. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  14. Guiding dengue vaccine development using knowledge gained from the success of the yellow fever vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huabin; Lee, Min; Jin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise approximately 70 closely related RNA viruses. These include several mosquito-borne pathogens, such as yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which can cause significant human diseases and thus are of great medical importance. Vaccines against both YFV and JEV have been used successfully in humans for decades; however, the development of a DENV vaccine has encountered considerable obstacles. Here, we review the protective immune responses elicited by the vaccine against YFV to provide some insights into the development of a protective DENV vaccine. PMID:26435066

  15. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines: characteristics, development, and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-12-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products. PMID:23955057

  16. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... Girls ages 11 and 12 should receive the HPV vaccine series: The vaccine is given in three shots ...

  17. Development of Novel Vaccines against Enterovirus-71

    OpenAIRE

    Pinn Tsin Isabel Yee; Chit Laa Poh

    2015-01-01

    The hand, foot and mouth disease is caused by a group of Enteroviruses such as Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and Coxsackievirus CV-A5, CV-A8, and CV-A16. Mild symptoms of EV-A71 infection in children range from high fever, vomiting, rashes and ulcers in mouth but can produce more severe symptoms such as brainstem and cerebellar encephalitis, leading up to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The lack of vaccines and antiviral drugs against EV-A71 highlights the urgency of developing preventive and tr...

  18. Consensus on the Development of Vaccines against Naturally Acquired Melioidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Funnell, Simon G.P.; Torres, Alfredo G.; Morici, Lisa A.; Brett, Paul J.; Dunachie, Susanna; Atkins, Timothy; Altmann, Daniel M.; Bancroft, Gregory; Peacock, Sharon J.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Several candidates for a vaccine against Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causal bacterium of melioidosis, have been developed, and a rational approach is now needed to select and advance candidates for testing in relevant nonhuman primate models and in human clinical trials. Development of such a vaccine was the topic of a meeting in the United Kingdom in March 2014 attended by international candidate vaccine developers, researchers, and government health officials. The focus of the meeting wa...

  19. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Bernd Eisele; Martin Gengenbacher; Reginald Kidd; David McCown; Sheldon Morris; Steven Derrick; David Hokey; Dominick Laddy; Rosemary Chang; Megan Fitzpatrick; Leander Grode; Kamalakannan Velmurugan; Stefan H. E. Kaufmann; John Fulkerson; Brennan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both ...

  20. Large animal models for vaccine development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Volker; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, Francois; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Wilson, Don; Walker, Stewart; Wheler, Colette; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    The development of human vaccines continues to rely on the use of animals for research. Regulatory authorities require novel vaccine candidates to undergo preclinical assessment in animal models before being permitted to enter the clinical phase in human subjects. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in reducing and replacing the number of animals used for preclinical vaccine research through the use of bioinformatics and computational biology to design new vaccine candidates. However, the ultimate goal of a new vaccine is to instruct the immune system to elicit an effective immune response against the pathogen of interest, and no alternatives to live animal use currently exist for evaluation of this response. Studies identifying the mechanisms of immune protection; determining the optimal route and formulation of vaccines; establishing the duration and onset of immunity, as well as the safety and efficacy of new vaccines, must be performed in a living system. Importantly, no single animal model provides all the information required for advancing a new vaccine through the preclinical stage, and research over the last two decades has highlighted that large animals more accurately predict vaccine outcome in humans than do other models. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of large animal models for human vaccine development and demonstrate that much of the success in bringing a new vaccine to market depends on choosing the most appropriate animal model for preclinical testing. PMID:25991698

  1. Impact of 2-, 4- and 9-valent HPV vaccines on morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Rebecca; Feldman, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most cervical cancers are associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), and vaccination with any of 3 available HPV vaccines is anticipated to greatly reduce the burden of cervical cancer. This review provides an overview of the burden of HPV, the efficacy and clinical effectiveness of the bivalent (HPV 16, 18), quadrivalent (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) and 9vHPV (HPV 6, 11, 16, 1831, 33, 45, 52, 58) vaccines in order to assess the anticipated impact on cervical cancer. All three vaccines show high efficacy in prevention of vaccine-specific HPV-type infection and associated high-grade cervical dysplasia in HPV-naïve women. Early clinical effectiveness data for the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccine demonstrate reduced rates of HPV 16 and 18 prevalence in vaccinated cohorts; data evaluating cervical dysplasia and cervical procedures as outcomes will shed further light on the clinical effectiveness of both vaccines. The bivalent vaccine has demonstrated cross-protection to non-vaccine HPV types, including the types in the 9vHPV vaccine. No clinical effectiveness data is yet available for the 9vHPV vaccine.  While HPV vaccination has great promise to reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, estimated benefits are largely theoretical at present. Large population-based clinical effectiveness studies will provide long-term immunogenicity and effectiveness, as well as assessment of cervical cancer as an endpoint, particularly as young vaccinated women enter the appropriate age range to initiate screening for cervical cancer. Strengthening screening and treatment programs will likely have the greatest impact in the short-term on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:26588179

  2. Cancer Vaccine:promise in the 21st Century%癌症疫苗:21世纪征服癌症的希望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾钢

    2001-01-01

    Cancer vaccine,the idea of utilizing the immune system to prevent and/or treat human cancers has been proposed for nearly a century.Only since the last decasde,the discovery of tumor-associated antigens has helped us to understand the molecular details of tumor-immune system interaction as well as provided new opportunities for cancer vaccine development.Cancer vaccine has seen remarked progress in both basic scientific research and clinical trials based on the discoveries of these studies.Inaddition,more and more efforts from industry are being made to the commercialization of these discoverise.Cancer vaccine,in combination with surgery,chemotherapy and rediation therapy may potentially provide effective treatment to most human cancers in the 21st century.

  3. Pilot study of a novel combination of two therapeutic vaccines in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Zaima Mazorra; Ramos, Tania Crombet

    2014-07-01

    Cancer vaccines contain tumor antigens in a pro-inflammatory context with the purpose to generate potent antitumor immune responses. However, tumor cells develop different immunosuppressive mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of an anticancer immune response. Therefore, therapeutic vaccine treatment alone is usually not sufficient to generate tumor regression or survival improvement, especially in the advanced disease scenario in which most clinical studies have been conducted. Combining cancer vaccines with different anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and other immunotherapeutic agents has had different levels of success. However, the combination of cancer vaccines with different mechanisms of action has not been explored in clinical trials. To address this issue, the current review summarizes the main clinical and immunological results obtained with two different therapeutic vaccines used in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients, inducing an immune response against epidermal growth factor (CIMAvax-EGF) and NGcGM3 ganglioside (racotumomab). We also discuss preliminary findings obtained in a trial of combination of these two vaccines and future challenges with these therapies. PMID:24777612

  4. A History of the Development of Brucella Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Daniel Avila-Calderón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis affecting animal and human health. In the last several decades, much research has been performed to develop safer Brucella vaccines to control the disease mainly in animals. Till now, no effective human vaccine is available. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the importance of methodologies used to develop Brucella vaccines in pursuing this challenge.

  5. A developing country perspective on vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis.

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    When the Expanded Programme on Immunization was established and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) was introduced for developing countries to use exclusively, national leaders of public health had no opportunity to make an informed choice between OPV and the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Today, as progress is made towards the goal of global eradication of poliomyelitis attributable to wild polioviruses, all developing countries where OPV is used face the risk of vaccine-associated paralyti...

  6. Status of research and development of vaccines for Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Dale, James B; Fraser, John D; Good, Michael F; Guilherme, Luiza; Moreland, Nicole J; Mulholland, E Kim; Schodel, Florian; Smeesters, Pierre R

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important global pathogen, causing considerable morbidity and mortality, especially in low and middle income countries where rheumatic heart disease and invasive infections are common. There is a number of promising vaccine candidates, most notably those based on the M protein, the key virulence factor for the bacterium. Vaccines against Streptococcus pyogenes are considered as impeded vaccines because of a number of crucial barriers to development. Considerable effort is needed by key players to bring current vaccine candidates through phase III clinical trials and there is a clear need to develop a roadmap for future development of current and new candidates. PMID:27032515

  7. Mapping HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Practice in the Pacific Region-Strengthening National and Regional Cervical Cancer Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, J; McKenzie, J; Buenconsejo-Lum, L E;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide background information for strengthening cervical cancer prevention in the Pacific by mapping current human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening practices, as well as intent and barriers to the introduction and maintenance of national HPV vaccination...... insufficient, with only two of 21 countries and territories having achieved coverage of cervical cancer screening above 40%. Ten of 21 countries and territories had included HPV vaccination in their immunization schedule, but only two countries reported coverage of HPV vaccination above 60% among the targeted...... population. Key barriers to the introduction and continuation of HPV vaccination were reported to be: (i) Lack of sustainable financing for HPV vaccine programs; (ii) Lack of visible government endorsement; (iii) Critical public perception of the value and safety of the HPV vaccine; and (iv) Lack of clear...

  8. Design of nanomaterial based systems for novel vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Kirberger, Michael; Liao, Wenzhen; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2016-05-26

    With lower cell toxicity and higher specificity, novel vaccines have been greatly developed and applied to emerging infectious and chronic diseases. However, due to problems associated with low immunogenicity and complicated processing steps, the development of novel vaccines has been limited. With the rapid development of bio-technologies and material sciences, nanomaterials are playing essential roles in novel vaccine design. Incorporation of nanomaterials is expected to improve delivery efficiency, to increase immunogenicity, and to reduce the administration dosage. The purpose of this review is to discuss the employment of nanomaterials, including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, virus-like particles, peptide amphiphiles micelles, peptide nanofibers and microneedle arrays, in vaccine design. Compared to traditional methods, vaccines made from nanomaterials display many appealing benefits, including precise stimulation of immune responses, effective targeting to certain tissue or cells, and desirable biocompatibility. Current research suggests that nanomaterials may improve our approach to the design and delivery of novel vaccines. PMID:26891972

  9. Considerations for developing an immunization strategy with enterovirus 71 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yin, Hongzhang; An, Zhijie; Feng, Zijian

    2015-02-25

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a common pathogen for hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which has significant morbidity and mortality, and for which children aged 6-59 months age are at highest risk. Due to lack of effective treatment options, control of EV71 epidemics has mainly focused on development of EV71 vaccines. Clinical trials have been completed on 3 EV71 vaccines, with trial results demonstrating good vaccine efficacy and safety. When EV71 vaccine is approved by China's national regulatory authority, an evidence-based strategy should be developed to optimize impact and safety. An immunization strategy for EV71 vaccine should consider several factors, including the target population age group, the number of doses for primary immunization, the need for a booster dose, concomitant administration of other vaccines, economic value, program capacity and logistics, and public acceptance. Once EV71 vaccines are in use, vaccine effectiveness and safety must be monitored in large populations, and the epidemiology of HFMD must be evaluated to assure a match between vaccination strategy and epidemiology. Evaluation in China is especially important because there are no other EV71 vaccines globally. PMID:25444807

  10. Candida vaccines development from point view of US patent application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2011-11-01

    Candidiasis is the fourth most common bloodstream infection in hospitalized patients in the United States. Moreover, the mortality rate from Candida infections remains high, even after treatment with antifungal therapy. Vaccination would be a promising strategy for prevention of invasive fungal infections. In order to examine the main trends in anticandidal vaccine patenting activity, we conducted an analysis for anticandidal vaccine patents. We find 190 issued patent and 940 patent application documents containing the keywords Candida and vaccine within claims in the USA. Candida vaccines development, as evidenced by the numbers of issued patents, has decreased since the year 2002. Furthermore, the number of patent applications in Candida vaccines may indicate the strength of engaged resources were also in the status of stagnation during 2005-2007 and even a decline in 2008. Academic and nonprofit research institutions not only account for a large share of Candida vaccines patents but also apply for patents continually. Based on this analysis, the strength of Candida vaccines resources seems to remain stagnant in recent years due to patent prosecution or technical barrier in the filed of Candida vaccines. Therefore, we consider that Candida vaccines technology to still be under development and the researchers are still looking for scientific breakthrough in the filed. PMID:22048114

  11. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stewart Massad

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding.

  12. Recombinant cancer vaccines and new vaccine targets. Interview by Jenaid Rees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlom, Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    Interview by Jenaid Rees, Commissioning Editor Jeffrey Schlom obtained his PhD from Rutgers University (NJ, USA). After obtaining his PhD, he worked at Columbia University (NY, USA) before moving in 1973 to the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (MD, USA). Since then he has served as the Chief of several sections, including his present position as the Chief of the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology in the Center for Cancer Research which he has held for the past 30 years. During this period, he has worked as an Adjunct Professor at George Washington University (Washington, DC, USA), served on the Editorial Board of several journals and holds membership in a number of committees. He holds over 30 patents and patent applications in the areas of vaccines, tumor antigens and monoclonal antibodies and has received honors and awards throughout his career. Jeffrey Schlom has been involved in translational research involving the immunotherapy of a range of carcinomas and predominantly works in the areas of tumor immunology, mechanisms of tumor cell-immune cell interactions and immune mechanisms. He has recently been working on the design and characterization of recombinant vaccines for cancer therapy. PMID:24098990

  13. Development of an AIDS vaccine using Sendai virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hiroshi; Matano, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    Development of an effective AIDS vaccine is crucial for the control of global human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) prevalence. We have developed a novel AIDS vaccine using a Sendai virus (SeV) vector and investigated its efficacy in a macaque AIDS model of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection. Its immunogenicity and protective efficacy have been shown, indicating that the SeV vector is a promising delivery tool for AIDS vaccines. Here, we describe the potential of SeV vector as a vaccine antigen delivery tool to induce effective immune responses against HIV-1 infection. PMID:26232346

  14. Dengue: Challenges for Policy Makers and Vaccine Developers

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Macary, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Because of the increasing incidence, geographic expansion and economic burden of dengue transmission, dengue poses major challenges to policy makers. A vaccine against dengue is urgently needed, but vaccine development has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model, poor understanding of correlates of successful human immunity, the fear of immune enhancement, and viral interference in tetravalent combinations. The most suitable target epitopes for vaccines, as well as the role o...

  15. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development. PMID:26514419

  16. Brachyury, a vaccine target, is overexpressed in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Duane H; Roselli, Mario; Ferroni, Patrizia; Costarelli, Leopoldo; Cavaliere, Francesco; Taffuri, Mariateresa; Palena, Claudia; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2016-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a high rate of tumor metastasis and a poor prognosis. The treatment option for these patients is currently chemotherapy, which results in very low response rates. Strategies that exploit the immune system for the treatment of cancer have now shown the ability to improve survival in several tumor types. Identifying potential targets for immune therapeutic interventions is an important step in developing novel treatments for TNBC. In this study, in silico analysis of publicly available datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of primary and metastatic tumor biopsies from TNBC patients were conducted to evaluate the expression of the transcription factor brachyury, which is a driver of tumor metastasis and resistance and a target for cancer vaccine approaches. Analysis of breast cancer datasets demonstrated a predominant expression of brachyury mRNA in TNBC and in basal vs luminal or HER2 molecular breast cancer subtypes. At the protein level, variable levels of brachyury expression were detected both in primary and metastatic TNBC lesions. A strong association was observed between nuclear brachyury protein expression and the stage of disease, with nuclear brachyury being more predominant in metastatic vs primary tumors. Survival analysis also demonstrated an association between high levels of brachyury in the primary tumor and poor prognosis. Two brachyury-targeting cancer vaccines are currently undergoing clinical evaluation; the data presented here provide rationale for using brachyury-targeting immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:27580659

  17. Efficacy and safety of human papillomavirus vaccine for primary prevention of cervical cancer: A review of evidence from phase III trials and national programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Basu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccines have been widely introduced in the national immunization programs in most of the medium and high income countries following endorsement from national and international advisory bodies. HPV vaccine is unique and its introduction is challenging in many ways - it is the first vaccine developed to prevent any cancer, the vaccine is gender specific, it targets adolescent females who are difficult to reach by any health intervention programs. It is not unusual for such a vaccine to face scepticism and reservations not only from lay public but also from professionals in spite of the clinical trial results convincingly and consistently proving their efficacy and safety. Over the last few years millions of doses of the HPV vaccine have been administered round the world and the efficacy and safety data have started coming from the real life programs. A comprehensive cervical cancer control program involving HPV vaccination of the adolescent girls and screening of the adult women has been proved to be the most cost-effective approach to reduce the burden of cervical cancer. The present article discusses the justification of HPV vaccination in the backdrop of natural history of cervical cancer, the mechanism of action of the vaccines, efficacy and safety data from phase III randomized controlled trials as well as from the national immunization programs of various countries.

  18. Hepatitis B vaccinations among Koreans: Results from 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak Min-Son; Park Eun-Cheol; Choi Kui; Juon Hee-Soon; Lee Sunmin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Liver cancer is one of most commonly diagnosed cancers among Koreans. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer. HBV infection can be prevented by effective screening and vaccination programs. The purpose of this study is to examine the status of HBV infection and the predictors associated with HBV vaccination. Methods The study population was derived from the 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS). The KNCSS is an annua...

  19. Targeting TLR2 for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso P. Basto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel and more effective immunization strategies against many animal diseases may profit from the current knowledge on the modulation of specific immunity through stimulation of innate immune receptors. Toll-like receptor (TLR2-targeting formulations, such as synthetic lipopeptides and antigens expressed in fusion with lipoproteins, have been shown to have built-in adjuvant properties and to be effective at inducing cellular and humoral immune mechanisms in different animal species. However, contradictory data has arisen concerning the profile of the immune response elicited. The benefits of targeting TLR2 for vaccine development are thus still debatable and more studies are needed to rationally explore its characteristics. Here, we resume the main features of TLR2 and TLR2-induced immune responses, focusing on what has been reported for veterinary animals.

  20. WHO policy development processes for a new vaccine: case study of malaria vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyne James

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO are crucial to inform developing country decisions to use, or not, a new intervention. This article analysed the WHO policy development process to predict its course for a malaria vaccine. Methods The decision-making processes for one malaria intervention and four vaccines were classified through (1 consultations with staff and expert advisors to WHO's Global Malaria Programme (GMP and Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals Department (IVB; (2 analysis of the procedures and recommendations of the major policy-making bodies of these groups; (3 interviews with staff of partnerships working toward new vaccine availability; and (4 review and analyses of evidence informing key policy decisions. Case description WHO policy formulation related to use of intermittent preventive treatment in infancy (IPTi and the following vaccine interventions: Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (Hib, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV, rotavirus vaccine (RV, and human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV, five interventions which had relatively recently been through systematic WHO policy development processes as currently constituted, was analysed. Required information was categorized in three areas defined by a recent WHO publication on development of guidelines: safety and efficacy in relevant populations, implications for costs and population health, and localization of data to specific epidemiological situations. Discussion and evaluation Data needs for a malaria vaccine include safety; the demonstration of efficacy in a range of epidemiological settings in the context of other malaria prevention interventions; and information on potential rebound in which disease increases subsequent to the intervention. In addition, a malaria vaccine would require attention to additional factors, such as costs and cost-effectiveness, supply and demand, impact of use on other interventions, and

  1. New insights on the development of fungal vaccines: from immunity to recent challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha P Medici

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections are emerging as a major problem in part due to high mortality associated with systemic infections, especially in the case of immunocompromised patients. With the development of new treatments for diseases such as cancer and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome pandemic, the number of immunosuppressed patients has increased and, as a consequence, also the number of invasive fungal infections has increased. Several studies have proposed new strategies for the development of effective fungal vaccines. In addition, better understanding of how the immune system works against fungal pathogens has improved the further development of these new vaccination strategies. As a result, some fungal vaccines have advanced through clinical trials. However, there are still many challenges that prevent the clinical development of fungal vaccines that can efficiently immunise subjects at risk of developing invasive fungal infections. In this review, we will discuss these new vaccination strategies and the challenges that they present. In the future with proper investments, fungal vaccines may soon become a reality.

  2. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  3. Tuberculosis vaccine development: Shifting focus amid increasing development challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, A J; Hokey, D A

    2015-01-01

    A new tuberculosis vaccine is needed to replace or enhance BCG, which induces variable protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis pulmonary infections in adults. Development of new TB vaccine candidates is severely hampered by the lack of a correlate of immunity, unproven animal models, and limited funding opportunities. One candidate, MVA85A, recently failed to meet its efficacy endpoint goals despite promising early-phase trial data. As a result, some in the field believe we should now shift our focus away from product development and toward a research-oriented approach. Here, we outline our suggestions for this research-oriented strategy including diversification of the candidate pipeline, expanding measurements of immunity, improving pre-clinical animal models, and investing in combination pre-clinical/experimental medicine studies. As with any evolution, this change in strategy comes at a cost but may also represent an opportunity for advancing the field. PMID:26125249

  4. American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Howard H; Chuang, Linus T; duPont, Nefertiti C; Eng, Cathy; Foxhall, Lewis E; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Blanke, Charles D

    2016-05-20

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the leading medical professional oncology society, is committed to lessening the burden of cancer and as such will promote underused interventions that have the potential to save millions of lives through cancer prevention. As the main providers of cancer care worldwide, our patients, their families, and our communities look to us for guidance regarding all things cancer related, including cancer prevention. Through this statement and accompanying recommendations, ASCO hopes to increase awareness of the tremendous global impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) -caused cancers, refocus the discussion of HPV vaccination on its likely ability to prevent millions of cancer deaths, and increase HPV vaccination uptake via greater involvement of oncology professionals in ensuring accurate public discourse about HPV vaccination and calling for the implementation of concrete strategies to address barriers to vaccine access and acceptance. PMID:27069078

  5. Scaling up cervical cancer screening in the midst of human papillomavirus vaccination advocacy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawattananon Yot

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening tests for cervical cancer are effective in reducing the disease burden. In Thailand, a Pap smear program has been implemented throughout the country for 40 years. In 2008 the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH unexpectedly decided to scale up the coverage of free cervical cancer screening services, to meet an ambitious target. This study analyzes the processes and factors that drove this policy innovation in the area of cervical cancer control in Thailand. Methods In-depth interviews with key policy actors and review of relevant documents were conducted in 2009. Data analysis was guided by a framework, developed on public policy models and existing literature on scaling-up health care interventions. Results Between 2006 and 2008 international organizations and the vaccine industry advocated the introduction of Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccine for the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, a local study suggested that the vaccine was considerably less cost-effective than cervical cancer screening in the Thai context. Then, from August to December 2008, the MoPH carried out a campaign to expand the coverage of its cervical cancer screening program, targeting one million women. The study reveals that several factors were influential in focusing the attention of policymakers on strengthening the screening services. These included the high burden of cervical cancer in Thailand, the launch of the HPV vaccine onto the global and domestic markets, the country’s political instability, and the dissemination of scientific evidence regarding the appropriateness of different options for cervical cancer prevention. Influenced by the country’s political crisis, the MoPH’s campaign was devised in a very short time. In the view of the responsible health officials, the campaign was not successful and indeed, did not achieve its ambitious target. Conclusion The Thai case study suggests that the political crisis was a

  6. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...

  7. Developments of Subunit and VLP Vaccines Against Influenza A Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma-ping Deng; Zhi-hong Hu; Hua-lin Wang; Fei Deng

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is a continuous and severe global threat to mankind.The continuously re-emerging disease gives rise to thousands of deaths and enormous economic losses each year,which emphasizes the urgency and necessity to develop high-quality influenza vaccines in a safer,more efficient and economic way.The influenza subunit and VLP vaccines,taking the advantage of recombinant DNA technologies and expression system platforms,can be produced in such an ideal way.This review summarized the recent advancements in the research and development of influenza subunit and VLP vaccines based on the recombinant expression of hemagglutinin antigen (HA),neuraminidase antigen (NA),Matrix 2 protein (M2) and nucleocapsid protein (NP).It would help to get insight into the current stage of influenza vaccines,and suggest the future design and development of novel influenza vaccines.

  8. Vaccine development for Tuberculosis: Past, Present and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Tiwari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available About one third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb, and new infections occur at a rate of about one per second. Additionally, more people in the developed world contact tuberculosis (TB because their immune systems are more likely to be compromised due to higher exposure to immunosuppressive drugs, substance abuse, or AIDS. The distribution of tuberculosis is not uniform across the globe, still the treatment is difficult and requires long courses of multiple antibiotics. However, antibiotic resistance is a growing problem in multidrugresistant (MDR tuberculosis. But mostly the prevention relies on screening programs and vaccination, usually with Bacillus Calmette- Guérin (BCG vaccine. BCG is the most commonly used vaccine worldwide, but not as a powerful vaccine. BCG also provides some protection against severe forms of pediatric TB, but has been shown to be unreliable against adult pulmonary TB which accounts for most of the disease burden worldwide. Currently, there is an urgent need for novel, more effective vaccine that can prevent all forms of TB including drug resistant strains for all age groups and among people with HIV. The first recombinant tuberculosis vaccine rBCG30, entered clinical trials in year 2004, but, still no effective vaccine is available in a market. Study showed that DNA TB vaccine given with conventional chemotherapy can accelerate the disappearance of bacteria as well as protect against re-infection in mice and it is quite effective against TB. A very promising TB vaccine, MVA85A, is currently in phase II trials and is based on a genetically modified vaccinia virus. Many other strategies are also being used to develop novel vaccines, including both subunit vaccines such as Hybrid-1, HyVac4 or M72, and recombinant adenoviruses such as Ad35. Some of these vaccines can be effectively administered without needles making them preferable for areas where HIV is very common and few of

  9. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Hald Andersen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with chemotherapy may lead to improved clinical efficacy by clearing suppressor cells, reboot of the immune system, by rendering tumor cells more susceptible to immune mediated killing, or by activation of cells of the immune system. In addition, a range of tumor antigens have been characterized to allow targeting of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant phenotype can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma.

  10. Advances in the development of next-generation anthrax vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Arthur M; Little, Stephen F

    2009-11-01

    Anthrax, a disease of herbivores, only rarely infects humans. However, the threat of using Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent, to intentionally produce disease has been the impetus for development of next-generation vaccines. Two licensed vaccines have been available for human use for several decades. These are composed of acellular culture supernatants containing the protective antigen (PA) component of the anthrax toxins. In this review we summarize the various approaches used to develop improved vaccines. These efforts have included the use of PA with newer adjuvants and delivery systems, including bacterial and viral vectors and DNA vaccines. Attempts to broaden the protection afforded by PA-based vaccines have focused on adding other B. anthracis components, including spore and capsule antigens. PMID:19837282

  11. Development of Fasciola Vaccine in an Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meemon, Krai; Sobhon, Prasert

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica are the parasites that cause the zoonotic parasitic disease called fasciolosis. Although several anthelmintic drugs have been used to treat these parasitic infections, recombinant protein vaccines have been developed to overcome the anthelmintic resistance that has recently been reported in many regions of the world. These vaccines have been shown to induce high levels of immune responses and high percentages of protection in experimental and large animals. Efficacies of these vaccines suggest they could be an alternative and sustainable strategy to prevent fasciolosis in animals as well as humans in the future. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a protocol to develop a recombinant protein-based vaccine against Fasciola infection in mice. Moreover, this method can also be used as a guideline when the vaccination is performed in larger animals. PMID:27076294

  12. Poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Utah Latinas overdue for recommended cancer screenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Brynn; Bodson, Julia; Warner, Echo L; Dyer, Jane; Kepka, Deanna

    2016-08-01

    Individuals overdue for recommended cancer screenings may not be receiving adequate cancer prevention education. Since Latinas have the highest incidence of cervical cancer among all racial/ethnic groups, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination education is especially important for this population. The correlates of HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge were assessed among Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings. N = 206 Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings were recruited by health educators from local community groups. Bivariate analyses and multivariable regression models were used to investigate factors associated with HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among participants as well as to assess correlates of HPV vaccine receipt for eligible children of participants. In multivariable regression analyses, years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05) and health insurance status (p = 0.03) were significantly related to HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures. Age (p vaccine-related knowledge measures (p vaccination outcomes for eligible daughters of participants. Cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.02) and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible sons of participants. Results indicate poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Latinas. Interventions to improve HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge in Utah's growing Latino population should target vulnerable individuals (e.g., not employed outside the home, less educated, less acculturated, poor, uninsured, overdue for cervical cancer screening) by using materials that are culturally sensitive, linguistically appropriate, and easily accessible. PMID:26860277

  13. Development of DNA vaccines for fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heppell, Joël; Lorenzen, Niels; Armstrong, Neil K.;

    1998-01-01

    Disease control is one of the major concerns in the aquaculture industry. However, there are no vaccines available for the prevention of many piscine infectious diseases, especially those of viral and parasitic origin. DNA-based vaccination could circumvent several problems associated with...... permanent tissue damage. To further investigate the ability of DNA-based vaccines to induce protective immunity in fish, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus G and N genes were cloned individually into an expression plasmid. Both G and N proteins produced in transfected fish cells appeared identical to...... protein, killing the transfected host cells and ablating further expression of G protein and luciferase. Finally, young rainbow trout injected with the G construct, alone or together with the N construct, were strongly protected against challenge with live virus. These results suggest that DNA vaccines...

  14. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Løve Aaes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns and promote maturation of dendritic cells, the cross-priming of cytotoxic T cells, and the production of IFN-γ in response to tumor antigen stimulation. Using both FADD-dependent and FADD-independent RIPK3 induction systems, we demonstrate the efficient vaccination potential of immunogenic necroptotic cells. Our study broadens the current concept of immunogenic cell death and opens doors for the development of new strategies in cancer therapy.

  15. Prevention of cervical, vaginal, and vulval cancers: role of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lina Diaz

    2010-01-01

    Maria Lina DiazSection of Ambulatory Gynecology Cleveland Clinic Florida Weston, Florida, USAAbstract: The relationship between the human papillomavirus (HPV) and malignancies of the uterine cervix, vagina, and vulva has been established. The development of a quadrivalent HPV recombinant prophylactic vaccine represents the first time in history that primary prevention of these cancers is offered to girls and women. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV subtypes in cervical cancers has been the most...

  16. Role of HPV Vaccine in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh JA; Yusuph H; Zailani ZB

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer which affects relatively young women of child bearing age is considered to be the second most common cancer in women and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developing countries, a reflection of global health inequity. There are more than 450,000 newly diagnosed cases annually with over a quarter of million deaths recorded out of which over 80 percent are from the developing countries especially Africa, South Asia, South and Central America, and the Caribbe...

  17. Status of vaccine research and development for Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sachin; Wierzba, Thomas; Walker, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    Shigella are gram-negative bacteria that cause severe diarrhea and dysentery. In 2013, Shigella infections caused an estimated 34,400 deaths in children less than five years old and, in 2010, an estimated 40,000 deaths in persons older than five years globally. New disease burden estimates from newly deployed molecular diagnostic assays with increased sensitivity suggest that Shigella-associated morbidity may be much greater than previous disease estimates from culture-based methods. Primary prevention of this disease should be based on universal provision of potable water and sanitation methods and improved personal and food hygiene. However, an efficacious and low-cost vaccine would complement and accelerate disease reduction while waiting for universal access to water, sanitation, and hygiene improvements. This review article provides a landscape of Shigella vaccine development efforts. No vaccine is yet available, but human and animal challenge-rechallenge trials with virulent Shigella as well as observational studies in Shigella-endemic areas have shown that the incidence of disease decreases following Shigella infection, pointing to biological feasibility of a vaccine. Immunity to Shigella appears to be strain-specific, so a vaccine that covers the most commonly detected strains (i.e., S. flexneri 2a, 3a, 6, and S. sonnei) or a vaccine using cross-species conserved antigens would likely be most effective. Vaccine development and testing may be accelerated by use of animal models, such as the guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis or murine pneumonia models. Because there is no correlate of protection, however, human studies will be necessary to evaluate vaccine efficacy prior to deployment. A diversity of Shigella vaccine constructs are under development, including live attenuated, formalin-killed whole-cell, glycoconjugate, subunit, and novel antigen vaccines (e.g., Type III secretion system and outer membrane proteins). PMID:26979135

  18. HPV vaccine acceptability among Kenyan women

    OpenAIRE

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Otieno, Walter Agingu; Brewer, Noel T.; Agot, Kawango; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    As human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines become available in less developed countries, understanding women’s attitudes towards HPV vaccines can help guide approaches to immunization programs. We assessed knowledge and interest in prophylactic HPV vaccines among Kenyan women seeking women’s health services (N=147). They knew little about cervical cancer or HPV vaccine. Most women (95%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 92%, 99%), however, were willing to have their daughters vaccinated with a vaccin...

  19. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ...-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines for Bladder Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Liver Cancer, Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Pancreatic..., gastric cancer, kidney cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, ovarian......

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence: insights and impact on vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, Giovanni; Provvedi, Roberta; Sali, Michela; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The existing TB vaccine, the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, is effective in protecting infants from severe forms of the disease, while its efficacy in protecting adults from pulmonary TB is poor. In the last two decades, a renewed interest in TB resulted in the development of several candidate vaccines that are now entering clinical trials. However, most of these vaccines are based on a common rationale and aim to induce a strong T-cell response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recent advancements in the understanding of M. tuberculosis virulence determinants and associated pathogenic strategies are opening a new and broader view of the complex interaction between this remarkable pathogen and the human host, providing insights at molecular level that could lead to a new rationale for the design of novel antitubercular vaccines. A vaccination strategy that simultaneously targets different steps in TB pathogenesis may result in improved protection and reduced TB transmission. PMID:26119086

  1. Novel adjuvants & delivery vehicles for vaccines development: a road ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Teena; Verma, Priyanka; Rao, D Nageswara

    2013-11-01

    The pure recombinant and synthetic antigens used in modern day vaccines are generally less immunogenic than older style live/attenuated and killed whole organism vaccines. One can improve the quality of vaccine production by incorporating immunomodulators or adjuvants with modified delivery vehicles viz. liposomes, immune stimulating complexes (ISCOMs), micro/nanospheres apart from alum, being used as gold standard. Adjuvants are used to augment the effect of a vaccine by stimulating the immune system to respond to the vaccine, more vigorously, and thus providing increased immunity to a particular disease. Adjuvants accomplish this task by mimicking specific sets of evolutionary conserved molecules which include lipopolysaccharides (LPS), components of bacterial cell wall, endocytosed nucleic acids such as dsRNA, ssDNA and unmethylated CpG dinucleotide containing DNA. This review provides information on various vaccine adjuvants and delivery vehicles being developed to date. From literature, it seems that the humoral immune responses have been observed for most adjuvants and delivery platforms while viral-vector, ISCOMs and Montanides have shown cytotoxic T-cell response in the clinical trials. MF59 and MPL® have elicited Th1 responses, and virus-like particles (VLPs), non-degradable nanoparticle and liposomes have also generated cellular immunity. Such vaccine components have also been evaluated for alternative routes of administration with clinical success reported for intranasal delivery of viral-vectors and proteosomes and oral delivery of VLP vaccines. PMID:24434331

  2. Cross-stage immunity for malaria vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahrendorf, Wiebke; Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-12-22

    A vaccine against malaria is urgently needed for control and eventual eradication. Different approaches are pursued to induce either sterile immunity directed against pre-erythrocytic parasites or to mimic naturally acquired immunity by controlling blood-stage parasite densities and disease severity. Pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage malaria vaccines are often seen as opposing tactics, but it is likely that they have to be combined into a multi-stage malaria vaccine to be optimally safe and effective. Since many antigenic targets are shared between liver- and blood-stage parasites, malaria vaccines have the potential to elicit cross-stage protection with immune mechanisms against both stages complementing and enhancing each other. Here we discuss evidence from pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage subunit and whole parasite vaccination approaches that show that protection against malaria is not necessarily stage-specific. Parasites arresting at late liver-stages especially, can induce powerful blood-stage immunity, and similarly exposure to blood-stage parasites can afford pre-erythrocytic immunity. The incorporation of a blood-stage component into a multi-stage malaria vaccine would hence not only combat breakthrough infections in the blood should the pre-erythrocytic component fail to induce sterile protection, but would also actively enhance the pre-erythrocytic potency of this vaccine. We therefore advocate that future studies should concentrate on the identification of cross-stage protective malaria antigens, which can empower multi-stage malaria vaccine development. PMID:26469724

  3. Recent advances in the development of vaccines for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Mohamed Jawed

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (Tb) continues to be a dreadful infection worldwide with nearly 1.5 million deaths in 2013. Furthermore multi/extensively drug-resistant Tb (MDR/XDR-Tb) worsens the condition. Recently approved anti-Tb drugs (bedaquiline and delamanid) have the potential to induce arrhythmia and are recommended in patients with MDR-Tb when other alternatives fail. The goal of elimination of Tb by 2050 will not be achieved without an effective new vaccine. The recent advancement in the development of Tb vaccines is the keen focus of this review. To date, Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) is the only licensed Tb vaccine in use, however its efficacy in pulmonary Tb is variable in adolescents and adults. There are nearly 15 vaccine candidates in various phases of clinical trials, includes five protein or adjuvant vaccines, four viral-vectored vaccines, three mycobacterial whole cell or extract vaccines, and one each of the recombinant live and the attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) vaccine. PMID:26288734

  4. Advances in the development of vaccines for dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Monika Simmons1, Nimfa Teneza-Mora1, Robert Putnak21Viral and Rickettsial Diseases Department, Naval Medical Research Center, 2Division of Viral Diseases, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, USAAbstract: Dengue fever is caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV serotypes 1–4, and is the most common arboviral infection of humans in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. There are currently no prophylaxis or treatment options in the form of vaccines or antivirals, leaving vector control the only method of prevention. A particular challenge with DENV is that a successful vaccine has to be effective against all four serotypes without predisposing for antibody-mediated enhanced disease. In this review, we discuss the current lead vaccine candidates in clinical trials, as well as some second-generation vaccine candidates undergoing preclinical evaluation. In addition, we discuss DENV epidemiology, clinical disease and strategies used for Flavivirus antivirals in the past, the development of new DENV therapeutics, and their potential usefulness for prophylaxis and treatment.Keywords: tetravalent dengue vaccine, live attenuated vaccine, purified inactivated vaccine, DNA vaccine, antibody-dependent enhancement, antivirals

  5. Challenges in the research and development of new human vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Barbosa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of vaccinology was born from the observations by the fathers of vaccination, Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur, that a permanent, positive change in the way our bodies respond to life-threatening infectious diseases can be obtained by specific challenge with the inactivated infectious agent performed in a controlled manner, avoiding the development of clinical disease upon exposure to the virulent pathogen. Many of the vaccines still in use today were developed on an empirical basis, essentially following the paradigm established by Pasteur, “isolate, inactivate, and inject” the disease-causing microorganism, and are capable of eliciting uniform, long-term immune memory responses that constitute the key to their proven efficacy. However, vaccines for pathogens considered as priority targets of public health concern are still lacking. The literature tends to focus more often on vaccine research problems associated with specific pathogens, but it is increasingly clear that there are common bottlenecks in vaccine research, which need to be solved in order to advance the development of the field as a whole. As part of a group of articles, the objective of the present report is to pinpoint these bottlenecks, exploring the literature for common problems and solutions in vaccine research applied to different situations. Our goal is to stimulate brainstorming among specialists of different fields related to vaccine research and development. Here, we briefly summarize the topics we intend to deal with in this discussion.

  6. Development of inactivated-local isolate vaccine for infectious bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darminto

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis (IB is an acute highly contagious viral respiratory disease of poultry caused by coronavirus. The disease causes high mortality in young chicks, reduce body weight gain in broilers and remarkable drop in egg production. IB can only be controlled by vaccination, but due to the antigenic variation among serotypes of IB viruses, the effective IB vaccine should be prepared from local isolates. The aim of this research is to develop inactivated IB vaccine derived from local IB isolates. Local isolates of IB viruses designated as I-37, I-269 and PTS-III were propagated respectively in specific pathogen free (SPF chicken eggs, the viruses then were inactivated by formaline at final concentration of 1:1,000. Subsequently, the inactivated viruses were mixed and emulsified in oil emulsion adjuvant with sorbitant mono-oleic as an emulsifier. The vaccine then was tested for its safety, potency and efficacy in broiler chickens. Birds inoculated twice with a two-week interval by inactivated vaccine did not show any adverse reaction, either systemic or local reaction. The inoculated birds developed antibody responses with high titre, while antibody of the control birds remain negative. In addition, efficacy test which was conducted in broilers demonstrated that birds vaccinated by live-commercial vaccine and boosted three weeks later by Balitvet inactivated vaccine showed high level of antibody production which provided high level of protection against challenged virus (76% against I-37, 92% against I-269 and 68% against PTS-III challenge viruses. From this study, it can be concluded that inactivated local IB vaccine is considered to be safe, potent and efficacious. The vaccine stimulates high titre of antibody responses, which provide high level of protection against challenged viruses.

  7. Cross-stage immunity for malaria vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Nahrendorf, Wiebke; Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Highlights • Antigens are shared between liver and blood-stage malaria parasites. • Cross-stage antigens can mediate protection which is life cycle stage transcending. • Multi-stage malaria vaccine development should identify cross-stage antigens.

  8. Host protective immunity and vaccine development studies in lymphatic filariasis

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, M. V. R.; Alli, R.; Harinath, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis caused mainly by infection fromWuchereria bancrofti andBrugia malayi remains as the major cause of clinical morbidity in tropical and subtropical countries. Development of vaccine against filarial infection can act as additional measure to the existing therapeutic and vector control methods in the control of this disease. The main hurdles in the development of anti-filarial vaccine are the strict primate specificity ofWuchereria bancrofti, the paucity of parasite material...

  9. Development of a vaccine for bacterial kidney disease in salmon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the executive summary and background review for the final report of ''Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon''. A description of the disease is provided, with microbiological characterization of the infective agent. A brief discussion of attempts to eradicate the disease is included. Recent progress in vaccine development and attempts to control the disease through pharmacological means are described, along with potential ways to break the cycle of infection. 80 refs

  10. Current status of vaccine development for tularemia preparedness

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Kee-Jong; Park, Pil-Gu; Seo, Sang-Hwan; Rhie, Gi-eun; Hwang, Kyuh-Jam

    2013-01-01

    Tularemia is a high-risk infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. Due to its high fatality at very low colony-forming units (less than 10), F. tularensis is considered as a powerful potential bioterrorism agent. Vaccine could be the most efficient way to prevent the citizen from infection of F. tularensis when the bioterrorism happens, but officially approved vaccine with both efficacy and safety is not developed yet. Research for the development of tularem...

  11. Promoting HIV vaccine research and development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Anational strategy for the HIV vaccine research and development (R&D) should be formulated as soon as possible so as to ensure a sound progress in this field, urges a report by the Academic Divisions of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CASAD), the top national advisory body in science and technology. Entitled "A Proposal on China's Strategy of the HIV Vaccine Research and Development,"the report has recently been submitted to the State Council, the country's cabinet.

  12. Hepatitis B vaccinations among Koreans: Results from 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwak Min-Son

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver cancer is one of most commonly diagnosed cancers among Koreans. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer. HBV infection can be prevented by effective screening and vaccination programs. The purpose of this study is to examine the status of HBV infection and the predictors associated with HBV vaccination. Methods The study population was derived from the 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS. The KNCSS is an annual cross-sectional survey that uses a nationally-representative random sampling to investigate cancer screening rates. A total of 1,786 Koreans over 40 years of age participated in this study. Results Of all the participants, 5.9% reported HBV positive (HBsAg+, HBsAb-, 41.8% were HBV negative but protected (HBsAg-, HBsAb+, and 52.3% were unprotected (HBsAg-, HBsAb-. Among unprotected individuals (n = 934, 23.1% reported to have received the vaccination. About half of those who had vaccinations completed the 3-shot vaccine series. In multiple analyses, education, having private cancer insurance, alcohol use, having regular check-up, and doing regular exercise were associated with completed HBV vaccination. Conclusion This study result suggests that we need a liver cancer education program to increase HBV awareness and to increase the liver cancer prevention message among low educated populations.

  13. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  14. FDA Approves Two HPV Vaccines: Cervarix for Girls, Gardasil for Boys | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The FDA has approved a second vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and cervical precancers, the vaccine’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), announced last week. The approval is based on data from a large clinical trial showing that the vaccine, Cervarix, prevented precancerous lesions in 93 percent of those who received the full vaccine sequence of three injections over 6 months. |

  15. Development of an anti-endotoxin vaccine for sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is an important initiator of sepsis, a clinical syndrome that is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. Vaccines directed against core LPS structures that are widely conserved among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) have been developed for the treatment and/or prevention of sepsis. Killed whole bacterial vaccines (E. coli O111:B4, J5 [Rc chemotype] mutant and S. minnesota, Re chemotype) protected mice against experimental sepsis. Human J5 immune antisera reduced the mortality from GNB sepsis in a large controlled clinical trial; however, subsequent clinical studies with antiendotoxin antibodies did not demonstrate protective efficacy in sepsis. Multiple clinical studies have since demonstrated a correlation between the level of circulating antibodies to LPS core and morbidity and mortality in different clinical settings. We therefore developed a subunit vaccine by combining detoxified J5 LPS (J5 dLPS) with the outer membrane protein (OMP) from group B N. meningitidis. This vaccine was highly efficacious in experimental models of sepsis and progressed to phase 1 clinical trial. While well-tolerated, this vaccine induced only 3-4-fold increases in anti-J5 dLPS antibody. Addition of the TLR9 agonist, oligodeoxynucleotide with a CpG motif, as adjuvant to the vaccine increased antibody levels in mice and the vaccine/CpG combination will progress to phase 1 human study. Additional vaccines in which the core glycolipid was either conjugated to carrier protein or incorporated into liposomes have been developed, but have not progressed to clinical trial. Should an antiendotoxin vaccine become available, a new immunization strategy directed towards distinct populations at risk will be required. PMID:20593272

  16. Exploration of graphene oxide as an intelligent platform for cancer vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hua; Wei, Wei; Gu, Zonglin; Ni, Dezhi; Luo, Nana; Yang, Zaixing; Zhao, Lin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhou, Ruhong; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2015-11-01

    We explored an intelligent vaccine system via facile approaches using both experimental and theoretical techniques based on the two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO). Without extra addition of bio/chemical stimulators, the microsized GO imparted various immune activation tactics to improve the antigen immunogenicity. A high antigen adsorption was acquired, and the mechanism was revealed to be a combination of electrostatic, hydrophobic, and π-π stacking interactions. The ``folding GO'' acted as a cytokine self-producer and antigen reservoir and showed a particular autophagy, which efficiently promoted the activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and subsequent antigen cross-presentation. Such a ``One but All'' modality thus induced a high level of anti-tumor responses in a programmable way and resulted in efficient tumor regression in vivo. This work may shed light on the potential use of a new dimensional nano-platform in the development of high-performance cancer vaccines.We explored an intelligent vaccine system via facile approaches using both experimental and theoretical techniques based on the two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO). Without extra addition of bio/chemical stimulators, the microsized GO imparted various immune activation tactics to improve the antigen immunogenicity. A high antigen adsorption was acquired, and the mechanism was revealed to be a combination of electrostatic, hydrophobic, and π-π stacking interactions. The ``folding GO'' acted as a cytokine self-producer and antigen reservoir and showed a particular autophagy, which efficiently promoted the activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and subsequent antigen cross-presentation. Such a ``One but All'' modality thus induced a high level of anti-tumor responses in a programmable way and resulted in efficient tumor regression in vivo. This work may shed light on the potential use of a new dimensional nano-platform in the development of high-performance cancer vaccines. Electronic

  17. Malaria Vaccine Candidate Diversity Offers Challenges and Opportunities for Effective Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal CHOWDHURY

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most deadly diseases caused by protozoan parasites of genus Plasmodium. It affects 300-500 million people annually, of which more than a million lives are lost; among them majority under 5 years of age. By conventional wisdom, the immune mechanisms responsible for protection against malaria will require a multiple of 10-15 antigen targets for proper protection against various stages of malarial infection. Such large number of targets cannot be delivered to humans, by this method. Moreover, each antigen is reported to be highly polymorphic in nature and the malaria-affected populations live in economically poor part of the world. Development of anti-malarial vaccines is therefore, a very tough challenge from technical, delivery and affordability points of view. Technical challenges include identification of epitopes / antigens against appropriate targets, construction of DNA vector(s that will express properly folded functional protein. Vaccine delivery challenges include developing an easy method to deliver multiple doses within a short period of time to infants and children of less than five years of age. Affordability challenges include development of cost-effective vaccines that can be stored at room temperature and be easily delivered. Although the complex life cycle of Plasmodium is challenging for anti-malarial vaccine development, it also offers a lot of antigen targets (opportunities to combat malaria. Information on anti-malarial vaccine candidates, DNA constructs and cost-effective delivery mechanism will be discussed.

  18. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. (West Virginia Univ. School of Medicine, Morgantown (USA))

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  19. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone

  20. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  1. Hepatitis E vaccine development: a 14 year odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Li, Shao-Wei; Zhang, Jun; Ng, Mun-Hon; Xia, Ning-Shao; Zhao, Qinjian

    2012-06-01

    The first prophylactic vaccine, Hecolin®, against hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection and the HEV associated disease was approved by China's State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) in December 2011. Key milestones during the 14-year HEV vaccine development are summarized in this commentary.  After years of innovative research the recombinant virus-like particle (VLP) based antigen with virion-like epitopes was successfully produced in E. coli production platform on a commercial scale. Safety and efficacy of this vaccine was demonstrated in a large scale phase III clinical trial. PMID:22699438

  2. Preventing cervical cancer and genital warts - How much protection is enough for HPV vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    HPV associated disease is a global health problem: 5.2% of all cancers are HPV associated with HPV 16 and 18 accounting for 70% of cases of cervical cancer. Genital warts caused by HPV 6 and 11 have a lifetime risk of acquisition of 10%. HPV vaccines are subunit vaccines consisting of virus like particles comprised of the L1 major capsid protein. Two vaccines have been licenced since 2006/2007 and are in the National Immunisation programmes in 62 countries. Both vaccines include HPV 16 and 18 VLPs and one also includes HPV 6 and 11. The vaccines are highly immunogenic and well tolerated. Genital HPV is a sexually transmitted infection with peak incidence occurring just after the onset of sexual activity and the routine cohort for immunisation in almost all countries are adolescent girls 9-15 years of age with or without catch up for older adolescents and young women. Population effectiveness is now being demonstrated for these vaccines in countries with high vaccine coverage. HPV vaccines are highly immunogenic and effective and the original 3 dose schedules have already been reduced, for those 14 years and under, to 2 for both licenced vaccines. There is preliminary evidence that 1 dose of vaccine is as effective as 2 or 3 in preventing persistent HPV infection in the cervix in young women and further reductions in dosage may be possible if supported by appropriate virological, immunological and modelling studies. PMID:27211079

  3. Systems biology applied to vaccine and immunotherapy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapies, including vaccines, represent a potent tool to prevent or contain disease with high morbidity or mortality such as infections and cancer. However, despite their widespread use, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying the induction of protective immune responses. Immunity is made of a multifaceted set of integrated responses involving a dynamic interaction of thousands of molecules; among those is a growing appreciation for the role the innate immunity (i.e. pathogen recognition receptors - PRRs plays in determining the nature and duration (immune memory of adaptive T and B cell immunity. The complex network of interactions between immune manipulation of the host (immunotherapy on one side and innate and adaptive responses on the other might be fully understood only employing the global level of investigation provided by systems biology. In this framework, the advancement of high-throughput technologies, together with the extensive identification of new genes, proteins and other biomolecules in the "omics" era, facilitate large-scale biological measurements. Moreover, recent development of new computational tools enables the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the interactions between all of the components of immunity over time. Here, we review recent progress in using systems biology to study and evaluate immunotherapy and vaccine strategies for infectious and neoplastic diseases. Multi-parametric data provide novel and often unsuspected mechanistic insights while enabling the identification of common immune signatures relevant to human investigation such as the prediction of immune responsiveness that could lead to the improvement of the design of future immunotherapy trials. Thus, the paradigm switch from "empirical" to "knowledge-based" conduct of medicine and immunotherapy in particular, leading to patient-tailored treatment.

  4. The potential impact of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination on oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Theresa; Eisele, David W; Fakhry, Carole

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is significantly increasing in the United States. Given that these epidemiologic trends are driven by human papillomavirus (HPV), the potential impact of prophylactic HPV vaccines on the prevention of OPC is of interest. The primary evidence supporting the approval of current prophylactic HPV vaccines is from large phase 3 clinical trials focused on the prevention of genital disease (cervical and anal cancer, as well as genital warts). These trials reported vaccine efficacy rates of 89% to 98% for the prevention of both premalignant lesions and persistent genital infections. However, these trials were designed before the etiologic relationship between HPV and OPC was established. There are differences in the epidemiology of oral and genital HPV infection, such as differences in age and sex distributions, which suggest that the vaccine efficacy observed in genital cancers may not be directly translatable to the cancers of the oropharynx. Evaluation of vaccine efficacy is challenging in the oropharynx because no premalignant lesion analogous to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in cervical cancer has yet been identified. To truly investigate the efficacy of these vaccines in the oropharynx, additional clinical trials with feasible endpoints are needed. Cancer 2016;122:2313-2323. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27152637

  5. [Progress in the development of vaccines against helminths].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Monika; Kołodziej-Sobocińska, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Helminth infections are an important health problem for both humans and animals worldwide. The most sought for prophylactic strategy is vaccination due to the increasing incidence of anthelminthic resistance with little progress towards the discovery of novel drugs. However, the development of efficient anti-parasitic vaccines was proven to be a far greater challenge than in the case of bacteria or viruses. This is partly a result of the complex immunological interactions occurring during helminth infections, which are not yet fully understood, especially regarding the immune mechanisms conveying protection. Another problem is progressing from the research phase of vaccine development to commercial production and marketing. The advances made so far in developing efficient vaccines against helminth vary among the different classes, with a wide spectrum of both native and recombinant vaccine candidates. This review aims at presenting the current status and most important achievements in the field of helminth vaccine development, as well as the main obstacles and difficulties standing in the way of progress and practical applications. PMID:19670530

  6. Challenges and future in vaccines, drug development, and immunomodulatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Heather M; Nau, Gerard J; Ross, Ted M; Evans, Thomas G; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The "Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy" session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials. PMID:25148426

  7. WT1 Peptide Cancer Vaccine for Patients with Hematopoietic Malignancies and Solid Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Oka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild-type Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is expressed at a high level in hematopoietic malignancies including acute leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as in various kinds of solid cancers. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, which could specifically lyse WT1-expressing tumor cells with HLA class I restriction, were generated in vitro. It was also demonstrated that mice immunized with the WT1 peptide rejected challenges by WT1-expressing cancer cells and survived with no signs of autoaggression to normal organs that physiologically expressed WT1. Furthermore, we and others detected IgM and IgG WT1 antibodies in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, indicating that the WT1 protein was highly immunogenic, and that immunoglobulin class-switch-inducing, WT1-specific, cellular immune responses were elicited in these patients. CD8+ WT1-specific CTLs were also detected in peripheral blood or tumor-draining lymph nodes of cancer patients. These results provided us with the rationale for elicitation of CTL responses targeting the WT1 product for cancer immunotherapy. On the basis of these findings, we performed a phase I clinical trial of a WT1 peptide cancer vaccine for the patients with malignant neoplasms. These results strongly suggested that the WT1 peptide cancer vaccine had efficacy in the clinical setting because clinical responses, including reduction of leukemic blast cells or regression of tumor masses, were observed after the WT1 vaccination in patients with hematopoietic malignancies or solid cancers. The power of a tumor-associated-antigen (TAA-derived cancer vaccine may be enhanced in combination with stronger adjuvants, helper peptide, molecular-target-based drugs, or some chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine, which has been revealed to suppress regulartory T-cell function. In contrast, reduction of WT1 peptide dose may be needed for the treatment of patients with hematological stem cell diseases

  8. Antigen dose escalation study of a VEGF-based therapeutic cancer vaccine in non human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Yanelys; Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Ayala, Marta; Pérez, Pedro Puente; Castro, Jorge; Sánchez, Javier; Alba, José Suárez; Ancízar, Julio; Cosme, Karelia; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2012-01-01

    CIGB-247 is a cancer therapeutic, based on recombinant modified human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as antigen, in combination with the oil free adjuvant VSSP (very small sized proteoliposomes of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane). Our previous experimental studies in mice with CIGB-247 have shown that the vaccine has both anti-tumoral and anti-metastatic activity, and produces both antibodies that block VEGF-VEGF receptor interaction, and a specific T-cell cytotoxic response against tumor cells. CIGB-247, with an antigen dose of 100 μg, has been characterized by an excellent safety profile in mice, rats, rabbits, and non human primates. In this article we extend the immunogenicity and safety studies of CIGB-247 in non human primates, scaling the antigen dose from 100 μg to 200 and 400 μg/vaccination. Our results indicate that such dose escalation did not affect animal behavior, clinical status, and blood parameters and biochemistry. Also, vaccination did not interfere with skin deep skin wound healing. Anti-VEGF IgG antibodies and specific T-cell mediated responses were documented at all three studied doses. Antigen dose apparently did not determine differences in maximum antibody titer during the 8 weekly immunization induction phase, or the subsequent increase in antibodies seen for monthly boosters delivered afterwards. Higher antigen doses had a positive influence in antibody titer maintenance, after cessation of immunizations. Boosters were important to achieve maximum antibody VEGF blocking activity, and specific T-cell responses in all individuals. Purified IgG from CIGB-247 immunized monkey sera was able to impair proliferation and formation of capillary-like structures in Matrigel, for HMEC cells in culture. Altogether, these results support the further clinical development of the CIGB-247 therapeutic cancer vaccine, and inform on the potential mechanisms involved in its effect. PMID:22075086

  9. Latest developments and future directions in dengue vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease which is currently an expanding global health problem. The disease is caused by four closely related viruses, the dengue virus. There are no specific dengue therapeutics and prevention is currently limited to vector control measures. Development of an effective tetravalent dengue vaccine would therefore represent a major advance in the control of the disease and is considered a high public health priority. While a licensed dengue vaccine is not yet available...

  10. Development of Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia Inactivated Vaccine( M1601 Strain)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Ping; He; Ying; Chu; Yuefeng; Gao; Pengcheng; Zhang; Xuan; Lu; Zhongxin

    2014-01-01

    Three batches of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia inactivated vaccine( M1601 strain) developed by the laboratory were studied from the aspects of safety,minimum immune dose,immunity duration and storage life. The results showed that the vaccine was safe to goats under different physiological conditions.Regardless of lambs or adult goats,the minimum immune dose was 3 m L,and the immunity duration and the storage life were 6 and 12 months,respectively.

  11. The search for animal models for Lassa fever vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prevalent arenavirus in West Africa and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Currently there is no licensed LF vaccine and research and devlopment is hampered by the high cost of nonhuman primate animal models and by bioc...

  12. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever and the current state of vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joo Eun; Hong, Kee-Jong; Choi, Woo Young; Lee, Won-Ja; Choi, Yeon Hwa; Jeong, Chung-Hyeon; Cho, Kwang-Il

    2014-12-01

    Current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa already reached the total number of 1,323 including 729 deaths by July 31st. the fatality is around 55% in the southeastern area of Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria. The number of patients with Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF) was continuously increasing even though the any effective therapeutics or vaccines has not been developed yet. The Ebola virus in Guinea showed 98% homology with Zaire Ebola Virus. Study of the pathogenesis of Ebola virus infection and assess of the various candidates of vaccine have been tried for a long time, especially in United States and some European countries. Even though the attenuated live vaccine and DNA vaccine containing Ebola viral genes were tested and showed efficacy in chimpanzees, those candidates still need clinical tests requiring much longer time than the preclinical development to be approved for the practical treatment. It can be expected to eradicate Ebola virus by a safe and efficient vaccine development similar to the case of smallpox virus which was extinguished from the world by the variola vaccine. PMID:25562048

  13. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26424605

  14. Role of nanotechnology in HIV/AIDS vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Chunying

    2016-08-01

    HIV/AIDS is one of the worst crises affecting global health and influencing economic development and social stability. Preventing and treating HIV infection is a crucial task. However, there is still no effective HIV vaccine for clinical application. Nanotechnology has the potential to solve the problems associated with traditional HIV vaccines. At present, various nano-architectures and nanomaterials can function as potential HIV vaccine carriers or adjuvants, including inorganic nanomaterials, liposomes, micelles and polymer nanomaterials. In this review, we summarize the current progress in the use of nanotechnology for the development of an HIV/AIDS vaccine and discuss its potential to greatly improve the solubility, permeability, stability and pharmacokinetics of HIV vaccines. Although nanotechnology holds great promise for applications in HIV/AIDS vaccines, there are still many inadequacies that result in a variety of risks and challenges. The potential hazards to the human body and environment associated with some nano-carriers, and their underlying mechanisms require in-depth study. Non-toxic or low-toxic nanomaterials with adjuvant activity have been identified. However, studying the confluence of factors that affect the adjuvant activity of nanomaterials may be more important for the optimization of the dosage and immunization strategy and investigations into the exact mechanism of action. Moreover, there are no uniform standards for investigations of nanomaterials as potential vaccine adjuvants. These limitations make it harder to analyze and deduce rules from the existing data. Developing vaccine nano-carriers or adjuvants with high benefit-cost ratios is important to ensure their broad usage. Despite some shortcomings, nanomaterials have great potential and application prospects in the fields of AIDS treatment and prevention. PMID:26952542

  15. Recent advances in the development of vaccines against ricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, Robert N; Mantis, Nicholas J; Pincus, Seth H; Vitetta, Ellen S; Smith, Leonard A; Roy, Chad J

    2016-05-01

    Several promising subunit vaccines against ricin toxin (RT) have been developed during the last decade and are now being tested for safety and immunogenicity in humans and for efficacy in nonhuman primates. The incentive to develop a preventive vaccine as a countermeasure against RT use as a bioweapon is based on the high toxicity of RT after aerosol exposure, its environmental stability, abundance, and ease of purification. RT is the second most lethal biological toxin and is considered a "universal toxin" because it can kill all eukaryotic cells through binding to ubiquitous cell surface galactosyl residues. RT has two subunits conjoined by a single disulfide linkage: RTB, which binds galactosyl residues and RTA which enzymatically inactivates ribosomes intracellularly by cleavage ribosomal RNA. Attenuation of toxicity by elimination of the active site or introduction of other structural mutations of RTA has generated two similar clinical subunit vaccine candidates which induce antibodies in both humans and nonhuman primates. In rhesus macaques, inhaled RT causes rapid lung necrosis and fibrosis followed by death. After parenteral vaccination with RTA vaccine, macaques can be protected against aerosol RT exposure, suggesting that circulating antibodies can protect lung mucosa. Vaccination induces RT-neutralizing antibodies, the most likely correlate of protection. Macaques responded to conformational determinants in an RTA vaccine formulation, indicating preservation of RTA structure during initial manufacture. Comparative mapping studies have also demonstrated that macaques and humans recognize the same epitopes, significant in the study of macaques as a model during development of vaccines which cannot be tested for efficacy in humans. PMID:26810367

  16. [BENEFITS AND RISKS AT IMPLEMENTATION OF PROPHILACTIC VACCINES FOR CERVICAL CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatkov, V; Kostova, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the benefits and risks of the implementation of prophylactic vaccines for cervical cancer. The classical understanding of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and its role for the cervical oncogenesis, as well as, the place of prophylactic HPV vaccines are discussed. Results concerning the effectiveness of vaccines 10 years after their introduction and data about their safety are presented. Reports of the use in practice of the new 9-valent HPV vaccine and the first results of its implementation are studied. PMID:27514142

  17. Progress, challenges, and opportunities in Francisella vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Karen L; Kurtz, Sherry L; De Pascalis, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Renewed interest in Francisella tularensis has resulted in substantial new information about its pathogenesis and immunology, along with development of useful animal models. While understanding of protective immunity against Francisella remains incomplete, data in both animals and humans suggest that inducing T cell-mediated immunity is crucial for successful vaccination with current candidates such as the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS), with specific antibodies and immune B cells playing supporting roles. Consistent with this idea, recent results indicate that measurements of T cell functions and relative gene expression by immune T cells predict vaccine-induced protection in animal models. Because field trials of new vaccines will be difficult to design, using such measurements to derive potential correlates of protection may be important to bridge between animal efficacy studies and people. PMID:27010448

  18. The search for animal models for Lassa fever vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prevalent arenavirus in West Africa and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Currently there is no licensed LF vaccine and research and devlopment is hampered by the high cost of nonhuman primate animal models and by biocontainment requirements (BSL-4). In addition, a successful LF vaccine has to induce a strong cell-mediated cross-protective immunity against different LASV lineages. All of these challenges will be addressed in this review in the context of available and novel animal models recently described for evaluation of LF vaccine candidates. PMID:23256740

  19. The search for animal models for Lassa fever vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prevalent arenavirus in West Africa and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Currently there is no licensed LF vaccine and research and devlopment is hampered by the high cost of nonhuman primate animal models and by biocontainment requirements (BSL-4). In addition, a successful LF vaccine has to induce a strong cell-mediated cross-protective immunity against different LASV lineages. All of these challenges will be addressed in this review in the context of available and novel animal models recently described for evaluation of LF vaccine candidates. PMID:23256740

  20. Status of research and development of vaccines for enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Zarifah; Cardosa, Mary Jane

    2016-06-01

    Although outbreaks of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD) in young children have long been recognized worldwide, the occurrence of rare and life-threatening neurological, respiratory, and cardiac complications has propelled this common condition into the spotlight as a major public health problem in the affected countries. Various enteroviruses cause HFMD, but the severe complications have been mostly associated with enterovirus 71 (EV71). Medical treatment is supportive and measures to interrupt transmission have been challenging to implement. Preventive vaccines could have an important clinical impact, especially among children younger than 3 years old who are most susceptible to the neurological complications. Several groups in the highly affected Asia-Pacific region are working towards vaccines against EV71 and some candidates have progressed to late-stage clinical trials with two vaccines recently reported to have been approved by the regulatory authorities in China. This report summarizes current issues and progress in the development of vaccines against EV71. PMID:26973065

  1. Development of CpG ODN Based Vaccine Adjuvant Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursel, Mayda; Gursel, Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    Development of effective vaccine mediated immune responses relies on the use of vaccine adjuvants capable of enhancing and directing the adaptive immune response to the antigen. When used as vaccine adjuvants, type I interferon inducing agents can elicit potent effector/memory T cell responses and humoral immunity. Distinct sequences of single stranded synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide motifs (CpG ODN) can generate type I interferon production via a TLR9-MyD88-IRF7-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we describe two different methods of preparing CpG ODN-based vaccine adjuvant formulations that can induce a robust IFNα response from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:27076306

  2. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. Asad Umar, ... know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  3. Advances and challenges in malaria vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ruobing; Smith, Joseph D.; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2010-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious diseases that threaten humankind. Human malaria is caused by five different species of Plasmodium parasites, each transmitted by the bite of female Anopheles mosquitoes. Plasmodia are eukaryotic protozoans with more than 5000 genes and a complex life cycle that takes place in the mosquito vector and the human host. The life cycle can be divided into pre-erythrocytic stages, erythrocytic stages and mosquito stages. Malaria vaccine research...

  4. Development of recombinant vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L A

    1998-11-01

    Synthetic genes encoding non-toxic, carboxyl-terminal regions (approximately 50 kDa) of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B (referred to as fragment C or HC) were constructed and cloned into the methylotropic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Genes specifying BoNTA(HC) and BoNTB(HC) were expressed as both intracellular and secreted products. Recombinants, expressed intracellularly, yielded products with the expected molecular weight as judged by SDS PAGE and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, while secreted products were larger due to glycosylation. Gene products were used to vaccinate mice and evaluated for their ability to elicit protective antibody titers in vivo. Mice given three intramuscular vaccinations with yeast supernatant containing glycosylated BoNTA(HC) were protected against an intraperitoneal challenge of 10(6) 50% mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of serotype A neurotoxin, a result not duplicated by its BoNTB(HC) counterpart. Vaccinating mice with cytoplasmically produced BoNTA(HC) and BoNTB(HC) protected animals from a challenge of 10(6) MLD50 of serotype A and B toxins, respectively. Because of the glycosylation encountered with secreted BoNT(HC), our efforts focused on the production and purification of products from intracellular expression. PMID:9792170

  5. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S; Munksgaard, Signe B; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of...

  6. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  7. Development of a Vaccine against Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Harry L T; Alteri, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common infection in humans after those involving the respiratory tract. This results not only in huge annual economic costs, but in decreased workforce productivity and high patient morbidity. Most infections are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Antibiotic treatment is generally effective for eradication of the infecting strain; however, documentation of increasing antibiotic resistance, allergic reaction to certain pharmaceuticals, alteration of normal gut flora, and failure to prevent recurrent infections represent significant barriers to treatment. As a result, approaches to prevent UTI such as vaccination represent a gap that must be addressed. Our laboratory has made progress toward development of a preventive vaccine against UPEC. The long-term research goal is to prevent UTIs in women with recurrent UTIs. Our objective has been to identify the optimal combination of protective antigens for inclusion in an effective UTI vaccine, optimal adjuvant, optimal dose, and optimal route of delivery. We hypothesized that a multi-subunit vaccine elicits antibody that protects against experimental challenge with UPEC strains. We have systematically identified four antigens that can individually protect experimentally infected mice from colonization of the bladder and/or kidneys by UPEC when administered intranasally with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. To advance the vaccine for utility in humans, we will group the individual antigens, all associated with iron acquisition (IreA, Hma, IutA, FyuA), into an effective combination to establish a multi-subunit vaccine. We demonstrated for all four vaccine antigens that antigen-specific serum IgG represents a strong correlate of protection in vaccinated mice. High antibody titers correlate with low colony forming units (CFUs) of UPEC following transurethral challenge of vaccinated mice. However, the contribution of cell-mediated immunity cannot be ruled out and

  8. Gradual reduction of testosterone using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccination delays castration resistance in a prostate cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Jesús A. Junco; Millar, Robert P.; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Calzada, Lesvia; Morán, Rolando; Rodríguez, Ayni; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Castro, Maria D.; Bringas, Ricardo; Arteaga, Niurka; Toudurí, Henio; Rabassa, Mauricio; Fernández, Yairis; Serradelo, Andrés; Hernández, Eduardo; Guillén, Gerardo E.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study aimed to design a novel prostate cancer vaccine, the authors of the present study demonstrated the advantage of combining the adjuvants Montanide ISA 51 with very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) to promote a significant humoral immune response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy animals. The present study compared the efficacy of this vaccine formulation versus the standard treatment currently available in terms of preventing the development of tumors in DD/S mice injected with Shionogi carcinoma (SC) 115 cells. The results demonstrated that 5 non-vaccinated control mice exhibited a fast tumor growth, and succumbed to the disease within 19–31 days. Mice immunized with the GnRH/Montanide ISA 51/VSSP vaccine exhibited a moderate decline in testosterone levels that was associated with a decrease in anti-GnRH antibody titers, which lead to a sustained tumor growth inhibition. In total, 2 mice in the immunized group exhibited complete remission of the tumor for the duration of the present study. In addition, castrated mice, which were used as a control for standard hormonal therapy, exhibited an accelerated decrease in tumor size. However, tumor relapse was observed between days 50 and 54, and between days 65 and 85, following the injection of SC 155 cells. Therefore, these mice were sacrificed at day 90. The present study concludes that the slow and moderate reduction of testosterone levels observed using the GnRH-based vaccine may delay the appearance of castration resistance in a Shionogi prostate cancer model. These findings suggest that this vaccine may be used to delay castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer.

  9. Synopsis of the 6th Walker's Cay Colloquium on Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 6th annual Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy Colloquium at Walker's Cay was held under the auspices of the Albert B. Sabin Vaccine Institute on March 10–13, 2004. The Colloquium consisted of a select group of 34 scientists representing academia, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. The main goal of this gathering was to promote in a peaceful and comfortable environment exchanges between basic and clinical science. The secondary benefit was to inspire novel bench to bedside ventures and at the same time provide feed back about promising and/or disappointing clinical results that could help re-frame some scientific question or guide the design of future trials. Several topics were covered that included tumor antigen discovery and validation, platforms for vaccine development, tolerance, immune suppression and tumor escape mechanisms, adoptive T cell therapy and dendritic cell-based therapies, clinical trials and assessment of response. Here we report salient points raised by speakers or by the audience during animated discussion that followed each individual presentation.

  10. Prevention and control of influenza and dengue through vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David P; Robertson, Corwin A; Gordon, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Influenza and dengue are viral illnesses of global public health importance, especially among children. Accordingly, these diseases have been the focus of efforts to improve their prevention and control. Influenza vaccination offers the best protection against clinical disease caused by strains contained within the specific year's formulation. It is not uncommon for there to be a mismatch between vaccine strains and circulating strains, particularly with regards to the B lineages. For more than a decade, two distinct lineages of influenza B (Yamagata and Victoria) have co-circulated in the US with varying frequencies, but trivalent influenza vaccines contain only one B-lineage strain and do not offer adequate protection against the alternate B-lineage. Quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIVs), containing two A strains (H1N1 and H3N2) and two B strains (one from each lineage) have been developed to help protect against the four strains predicted to be the most likely to be circulating. The QIV section of this article discusses epidemiology of pediatric influenza, importance of influenza B in children, potential benefits of QIV, and new quadrivalent vaccines. In contrast to influenza, a vaccine against dengue is not yet available in spite of many decades of research and development. A global increase in reports of dengue fever (DF) and its more severe presentations, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), suggest that US physicians will increasingly encounter patients with this disease. Similarities of the early signs and symptoms of influenza and dengue and the differences in disease management necessitates a better understanding of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, management, and prevention of DF by US physicians, including pediatricians. The article also provides a brief overview of dengue and discusses dengue vaccine development. PMID:23910031

  11. Dengue:epidemiology, prevention and pressing need for vaccine development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuldeep Kumar; Pankaj Kumar Singh; Juhi Tomar; Swati Baijal

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito born viral infection, and the complicated form of dengue is dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). In the recent decades incidence and distribution of dengue has increased dramatically. Dengue viruses belong to family flaviviridae with four serotypes and are transmitted mainly by mosquito Aedes aegypti. Today almost two-fifth of world's population (2.5 million) is at risk of dengue and no specific antiviral drug or vaccine is available against it. Uncontrolled population growth in Africa and South East Asia has increased number of susceptible hosts in urban and semi urban areas. About 40% of world population resides in the high risk area for dengue transmission. According to latest estimates by WHO, yearly 50 to 100 million infections occur globally, this includes around 500 000 DHF and 22 000 deaths, mostly among children. Only symptomatic treatment in the form of analgesic, antipyretics and body fluid management is provided to the patient. Prevention strategies mainly focus on two approaches, firstly on activities to control vector and secondly on activities to protect human from mosquito bite but there is always concerns regarding their sustainably and effectiveness. Theoretically development of an effective dengue vaccine is feasible and production of an effective and affordable vaccine could be a viable option to save humans from this dreadful disease. Conceptually vaccine production is possible, but it has to be tetravalent, providing immunity against all serotypes. Few candidate vaccines are in advance stage of their development; however international cooperation is needed to make these vaccines available on cheaper rates to the poor and vulnerable countries. Objective of this review is to discuss various aspects related to dengue, its epidemiology, available preventive methods, need for vaccine and challenges in its development.

  12. Cancer vaccines and immunotherapeutics: challenges for pricing, reimbursement and market access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Bengt; Wilking, Nils

    2012-09-01

    Public payment is key to market access for new therapeutics including cancer vaccines and cancer immunotherapeutics. However, the methodology for economic evaluation aimed at informing decisions about pricing and reimbursement is different for cancer vaccines, such as HPV for preventing the occurrence or incidence of cancer, and immunotherapeutics for treatment of patients with manifest cancer. Vaccination against HPV is a traditional public health intervention, where the role of economic evaluation is to inform decisions about optimal vaccination strategies. The decision is about funding for a vaccination program, aimed at vaccinating a defined population at risk, either at a national or regional level. The methodology of economic evaluation is based on statistical modeling of number of cases prevented over a long time period, and the costs and health outcome related to this, for different vaccination strategies For immunotherapeutics, the role of economic evaluation is to assist decisions about reimbursement and guidelines for treatment of patients with establish disease, very often at advanced stages with short life expectancy. The focus is on alternative treatment options, and the costs and outcomes associated with these. Alternatives may be best supportive care, immunotherapeutics or other treatments like surgery, radiotherapy and other anti-cancer drugs. From an economic perspective the type of therapy does not matter, only costs and outcome associated with the relevant alternatives. The main controversy about reimbursement of immunotherapeutics, as with other new cancer drugs, has been the cost of treatment, mainly determined by the price of the therapy, in relation to the expected benefits in terms of survival and quality of life. This paper reviews the evidence on cost-effectiveness, the reimbursement decisions made, and the impact on market access for new immunotherapeutics. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge(®)) and abiraterone (Zytiga(®)) for treatment of

  13. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Macchia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM- based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma.

  14. Gene-based vaccine development for improving animal production in developing countries. Possibilities and constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For vaccine production, recombinant antigens must be protective. Identifying protective antigens or candidate antigens is an essential precursor to vaccine development. Even when a protective antigen has been identified, cloning of its gene does not lead directly to vaccine development. The fimbrial protein of Dichelobacter nodosus, the agent of foot-rot in ruminants, was known to be protective. Recombinant vaccines against this infection are ineffective if expressed protein subunits are not assembled as mature fimbriae. Antigenic competition between different, but closely related, recombinant antigens limited the use of multivalent vaccines based on this technology. Recombinant antigens may need adjuvants to enhance response. DNA vaccines, potentiated with genes for different cytokines, may replace the need for aggressive adjuvants, and especially where cellular immunity is essential for protection. The expression of antigens from animal pathogens in plants and the demonstration of some immunity to a disease like rinderpest after ingestion of these, suggests an alternative approach to vaccination by injection. Research on disease pathogenesis and the identification of candidate antigens is specific to the disease agent. The definition of expression systems and the formulation of a vaccine for each disease must be followed by research to establish safety and efficacy. Where vaccines are based on unique gene sequences, the intellectual property is likely to be protected by patent. Organizations, licensed to produce recombinant vaccines, expect to recover their costs and to make a profit. The consequence is that genetically-derived vaccines are expensive. The capacity of vaccines to help animal owners of poorer countries depends not only on quality and cost but also on the veterinary infrastructure where they are used. Ensuring the existence of an effective animal health infrastructure in developing countries is as great a challenge for the developed world as

  15. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    Tumor antigens are the primary target of therapeutic cancer vaccines. We set out to define and compare the expression pattern of tumor antigen genes in esophagus carcinoma biopsies and in an allogeneic tumor lysate-based cancer vaccine, MelCancerVac. Cells used for vaccine production were treated...... the production of the vaccine. Quantitative PCR was used to assay 74 tumor antigen genes in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. 81% (13/16) of tumors expressed more than five cancer/testis (CT) antigens. A total of 96 genes were assayed in the tumor cell clone (DDM1.7) used to make...

  16. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a expressing human papillomavirus type 16 L1 as a potential live vaccine against cervical cancer and typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraillery, Dominique; Baud, David; Pang, Susana Yuk-Ying; Schiller, John; Bobst, Martine; Zosso, Nathalie; Ponci, Françoise; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise

    2007-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) can prevent HPV-induced genital neoplasias, the precursors of cervical cancer. However, most cervical cancers occur in developing countries, where the implementation of expensive vaccines requiring multiple injections will be difficult. A live Salmonella-based vaccine could be a lower-cost alternative. We previously demonstrated that high HPV type 16 (HPV16)-neutralizing titers are induced after a single oral immunization of mice with attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains expressing a codon-optimized version of HPV16 L1 (L1S). To allow the testing of this type of vaccine in women, we constructed a new L1-expressing plasmid, kanL1S, and tested kanL1S recombinants of three Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine strains shown to be safe in humans, i.e., Ty21a, the actual licensed typhoid vaccine, and two highly immunogenic typhoid vaccine candidates, Ty800 and CVD908-htrA. In an intranasal mouse model of Salmonella serovar Typhi infection, Ty21a kanL1S was unique in inducing HPV16-neutralizing antibodies in serum and genital secretions, while anti-Salmonella responses were similar to those against the parental Ty21a vaccine. Electron microscopy examination of Ty21a kanL1S lysates showed that L1 assembled in capsomers and capsomer aggregates but not well-ordered VLPs. Comparison to the neutralizing antibody response induced by purified HPV16 L1 VLP immunizations in mice suggests that Ty21a kanL1S may be an effective prophylactic HPV vaccine. Ty21a has been widely used against typhoid fever in humans with a remarkable safety record. These finds encourage clinical testing of Ty21a kanL1S as a combined typhoid fever/cervical cancer vaccine with the potential for worldwide application. PMID:17687110

  17. A case study using the United Republic of Tanzania: costing nationwide HPV vaccine delivery using the WHO Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Hutubessy, Raymond; Levin, Ann; Wang, Susan; Morgan, Winthrop; Ally, Mariam; John, Theopista; Broutet, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose, methods, data sources and assumptions behind the World Health Organization (WHO) Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing (C4P) tool that was developed to assist low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with planning and costing their nationwide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program are presented. Tanzania is presented as a case study where the WHO C4P tool was used to cost and plan the roll-out of HPV vaccines nationwide as part of the national comprehe...

  18. A case study using the United Republic of Tanzania: costing nationwide HPV vaccine delivery using the WHO Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Hutubessy Raymond; Levin Ann; Wang Susan; Morgan Winthrop; Ally Mariam; John Theopista; Broutet Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose, methods, data sources and assumptions behind the World Health Organization (WHO) Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing (C4P) tool that was developed to assist low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with planning and costing their nationwide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program are presented. Tanzania is presented as a case study where the WHO C4P tool was used to cost and plan the roll-out of HPV vaccines nationwide as part of the national...

  19. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  20. A prospective highlight on exosomal nanoshuttles and cancer immunotherapy and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Rafi

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: As complex systems, these vesicular micro-/nano-machines convey important cellular messages dependent upon the cells/tissue setting(s. In addition to their potential in diagnosis of cancers, they have been exploited for cancer immunotherapy/vaccination. However, such treatment strategies need to be carefully designed to attain desired clinical outcomes.

  1. Schistosomiasis vaccine development: progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergquist NR

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The undisputed, worldwide success of chemotherapy notwithstanding, schistosomiasis continues to defy control efforts in as much rapid reinfection demands repeated treatment, sometimes as often as once a year. There is thus a need for a complementary tool with effect for the longer term, notably a vaccine. International efforts in this direction have been ongoing for several decades but, until the recombinant DNA techniques were introduced, antigen production remained an unsurmountable bottleneck. Although animal experiments have been highly productive and are still much needed, they probably do not reflect the human situation adequately and real progress can not be expected until more is known about human immune responses to schistosome infection. It is well-known that irradiated cercariae consistently produce high levels of protection in experimental animals but, for various reasons, this proof of principle cannot be directly exploited. Research has instead been focussed on the identification and testing of specific schistosome antigens. This work has been quite successful and is already at the stage where clinical trials are called for. Preliminary results from coordinated in vitro laboratory and field epidemiological studies regarding the protective potential of several antigens support the initiation of such trials. A series of meetings, organized earlier this year in Cairo, Egypt, reviewed recent progress, selecteded suitable vaccine candidates and made firm recommendations for future action including pledging support for large-scale production according to good manufacturing practice (GMP and Phase I trials. Scientists at the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC have drawn up a detailed research plan. The major financial support will come from USAID, Cairo, which has established a scientific advisory group of Egyptian scientists and representatives from current and previous international donors such as WHO, NIAID, the

  2. The granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine against metastatic bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-tong Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The MB49 bladder cancer cell vaccine was effective against bladder cancer in the mice model in previous studies. However, part of the tumors regrew as the vaccine could not eliminate the cancer stem cells (CSCs. MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs were isolated by a combination of the limited dilution method and the serum free culture medium method. MCSCs possessed higher expression of CD133, CD44, OCT4, NANOG, and ABCG2, the ability of differentiation, higher proliferative abilities, lower susceptibility to chemotherapy, greater migration in vitro, and stronger tumorigenic abilities in vivo. Then streptavidin–mouse granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor (SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine was prepared. SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine extended the survival of the mice and inhibited the growth of tumor in protective, therapeutic, memorial and specific immune response experiments. The level of immunoglobulin G and the ratio of dendritic cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were highest in the experimental group when compared to those in other four control groups, as well as for the cytotoxicity assay. We demonstrated that SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine induces an antitumor immune response to metastatic bladder cancer.

  3. Recent advances in canine leptospirosis: focus on vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaasen HLBM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Henricus LBM (Eric Klaasen,1 Ben Adler2 1Global Companion Animals Research and Development, Merck Sharp and Dohme Animal Health, Boxmeer, the Netherlands; 2Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia Abstract: Leptospirosis is a global infection of humans and animals caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. Leptospirosis is a major zoonosis, with infection acquired from wild and domestic animals. It is also a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, and economic loss in production and companion animals. Leptospirosis in dogs is prevalent worldwide and as well as a cause of canine disease, it presents a zoonotic risk to human contacts. Canine leptospirosis does not differ greatly from the syndromes seen in other animal species, with hepatic, renal, and pulmonary involvement being the main manifestations. While the pathogenesis of disease is well documented at the whole animal level, the cellular and molecular basis remains obscure. Killed, whole-cell bacterin vaccines are licensed worldwide and have not changed greatly over the past several decades. Vaccine-induced immunity is restricted to serologically related serovars and is generally short-lived, necessitating annual revaccination. The appearance of new serovars as causes of canine leptospirosis requires constant epidemiological surveillance and tailoring of vaccines to cover emerging serovars. At the present time, there is no realistic prospect of alternative, non-bacterin vaccines in the foreseeable future. Keywords: canine leptospirosis, vaccines, diagnosis, epidemiology, pathogenesis

  4. Status of vaccine research and development for Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Mark S; Guerry, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide and is associated with a number of sequelae, including Guillain-Barre Syndrome, reactive arthritis, irritable bowel syndrome and growth stunting/malnutrition. Vaccine development against C. jejuni is complicated by its antigenic diversity, a lack of small animal models, and a poor understanding of the bacterium's pathogenesis. Vaccine approaches have been limited to recombinant proteins, none of which have advanced beyond Phase I testing. Genomic analyses have revealed the presence of a polysaccharide capsule on C. jejuni. Given the success of capsule-conjugate vaccines for other mucosal pathogens of global importance, efforts to evaluate this established approach for C. jejuni are also being pursued. A prototypical capsule-conjugate vaccine has demonstrated efficacy against diarrheal disease in non-human primates and is currently in Phase I testing. In addition to proof of concept studies, more data on the global prevalence of capsular types, and a better understanding of the acute and chronic consequences of C. jejuni are needed to inform investments for a globally relevant vaccine. PMID:26973064

  5. The Immune Space: A Concept and Template for Rationalizing Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Manrique, Amapola; Adams, Elizabeth; Barouch, Dan H.; Fast, Pat; Graham, Barney S.; Kim, Jerome H.; Kublin, James G.; McCluskey, Margaret; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Robinson, Harriet L.; Russell, Nina; Snow, William; Johnston, Margaret I.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical testing of candidate vaccines has led to the successful development of a number of lifesaving vaccines. The advent of new tools to manipulate antigens and new methods and vectors for vaccine delivery has led to a veritable explosion of potential vaccine designs. As a result, selection of candidate vaccines suitable for large-scale efficacy testing has become more challenging. This is especially true for diseases such as dengue, HIV, and tuberculosis where there is no validated anima...

  6. Future directions for the development of Chlamydomonas-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Besides serving as a valuable model in biological sciences, Chamydomonas reinhardtii has been used during the last decade in the biotechnology arena to establish models for the low cost production of vaccines. Antigens from various pathogens including Plasmodium falciparum, foot and mouth disease virus, Staphylococcus aureus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV) as well as some auto-antigens, have been produced in C. reinhardtii. Although some of them have been functionally characterized with promising results, this review identifies future directions for the advancement in the exploitation of this robust and safe vaccine production platform. The present analysis reflects that important immunological implications exist for this system and remain unexplored, including the possible adjuvant effects of algae biomolecules, the effect of bioencapsulation on immunogenicity and the possible development of whole-cell vaccines as an approach to trigger cytotoxic immune responses. Recently described molecular strategies that aim to optimize the expression of nuclear-encoded target antigens are also discussed. PMID:24053395

  7. HPV infection in cervical and other cancers in Saudi Arabia: implication for prevention and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi eAlsbeih

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available HPV is closely associated with cervical cancer that the incidence of this tumor is regarded as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in countries lacking epidemiological studies. HPV is also implicated in subsets of anogenital and oro-pharyngeal cancers. Although cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, its reported incidence is low in Saudi Arabia, ranking number 12 between all cancers in females and accounts only for 2.4% of all new cases, despite the lack of national screening programs. However, the limited available studies from Saudi Arabia indicate that HPV prevalence and genotypes’ distribution in invasive cervical cancer show similar pattern as in the world. Cytology screening (Pap Smear and HPV vaccinations are the two preventive measures against cervical cancer. The two available vaccines are effective against the two most common HPV genotypes (HPV-16 and 18. Since 92% of cervical tumors in the Kingdom are infected with HPV of which 78% are HPV-16 and 18 genotypes, vaccination is expected to protect against more than two-third of cervical cancers in Saudi Arabia. Nevertheless, due to its low incidence (2.1/100,000 women, a proper cost-effectiveness analysis is required to justify the implementation of a costly vaccine bearing in mind that HPV could potentially be associated with about 3% of all cancers. However, further studies are needed to ascertain the real prevalence of HPV at the population level at large, its association with various types of cancers and also the impact of local tradition and emerging behavioral trends that could affect HPV transmission and consequently the effectiveness of applying national vaccination program.

  8. Development of cancer immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To increase the curative rate of cancer patients, we developed ideal biological response modifier from medicinal plants: Ginsan, KC68IId-8, KC-8Ala, KG-30. Ginsan activated natural killer cell activity of spleen cells more than 5.4 times than lentinan, 1.4 times than picibanil. Radioprotective activity of Ginsan is stronger than WR2721, glucan, and selenium. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of A20 tumor cells was also augmented by transfection with B7.1 gene. The immunosuppression of gamma-irradiation was due to the reduction of Th1 sytokine gene expression through STAT pathway. These research will devote to develop new cancer immunotherapy and to reduce side effect of cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy

  9. Development of cancer immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Yeon Sook; Chung, H. Y.; Yi, S. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K.; Chung, I. S.; Park, J. Y

    1999-04-01

    To increase the curative rate of cancer patients, we developed ideal biological response modifier from medicinal plants: Ginsan, KC68IId-8, KC-8Ala, KG-30. Ginsan activated natural killer cell activity of spleen cells more than 5.4 times than lentinan, 1.4 times than picibanil. Radioprotective activity of Ginsan is stronger than WR2721, glucan, and selenium. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of A20 tumor cells was also augmented by transfection with B7.1 gene. The immunosuppression of gamma-irradiation was due to the reduction of Th1 sytokine gene expression through STAT pathway. These research will devote to develop new cancer immunotherapy and to reduce side effect of cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  10. The Feasibility of Gamma Irradiation for Developing Malaria Vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaria, a plasmodial disease, causes more than one million deaths per year and has a significant public health impact. Improved access to prompt treatment with effective antimalarial drugs need to be conducted for prevention of infection in high risk groups. However, the parasite as causal agent has exhibited a potential danger of wide-spread resistances. This warning has directed attention to the study of alternative methods of protection against the disease, among them is to do the immunization. A deeper understanding of the nature and regulation of protective immune mechanisms against this parasite will facilitate the development of much needed vaccines. Developing a malaria vaccine remains an enormous scientific, technical, and financial challenge. Currently a vaccine is not fully available. Among the practical applications of radiobiological techniques that may be of considerable interest for public health is the use of ionizing radiation in the preparation of vaccines. Convincing data were reported that sporozoites of Plasmodium berghei irradiated with X- or gamma-rays, provide an antigenic stimulus effective to induce a protective immune response in mice and rats against subsequent sporozoite infection. Irradiated parasites are better immunogens than killed ones and although non-infective they are still metabolically active, as shown by continued protein and nucleic acid synthesis. There is a substantial number of data from human studies demonstrating that sporozoites attenuated by radiation are potent inducer of protective immunity and that they are safe and do not give rise to the asexual erythrocytic infections that cause malaria. This vaccine is relatively inexpensive to produce, easy to store, and transportable without refrigeration. A long-term effort and commitment to providing resources must be maintained and increased to achieve the goal of a malaria vaccine candidate where ionizing radiation as a tool to prepare is seemingly feasible. (author)

  11. The Feasibility of Gamma Irradiation for Developing Malaria Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Syaifudin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, a plasmodial disease, causes more than one million deaths per year and has a significant public health impact. Improved access to prompt treatment with effective antimalarial drugs need to be conducted for prevention of infection in high risk groups. However, the parasite as causal agent has exhibited a potential danger of wide-spread resistances. This warning has directed attention to the study of alternative methods of protection against the disease, among them is to do the immunization. A deeper understanding of the nature and regulation of protective immune mechanisms against this parasite will facilitate the development of much needed vaccines. Developing a malaria vaccine remains an enormous scientific, technical, and financial challenge. Currently a vaccine is not fully available. Among the practical applications of radiobiological techniques that may be of considerable interest for public health is the use of ionizing radiation in the preparation of vaccines. Convincing data were reported that sporozoites of Plasmodium berghei irradiated with X- or gamma-rays, provide an antigenic stimulus effective to induce a protective immune response in mice and rats against subsequent sporozoite infection. Irradiated parasites are better immunogens than killed ones and although non-infective they are still metabolically active, as shown by continued protein and nucleic acid synthesis. There is a substantial number of data from human studies demonstrating that sporozoites attenuated by radiation are potent inducers of protective immunity and that they are safe and do not give rise to the asexual erythrocytic infections that cause malaria. This vaccine is relatively inexpensive to produce, easy to store, and transportable without refrigeration. A long-term effort and commitment to providing resources must be maintained and increased to achieve the goal of a malaria vaccine candidate where ionizing radiation as a tool to prepare is seemingly

  12. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India. PMID:25355525

  13. Live bacterial delivery systems for development of mucosal vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.E.R.; Dalen, P.J. van; Havenith, C.E.G.; Pouwels, P.H.; Seegers, J.F.M.L.; Tielen, F.D.; Zee, M.D. van der; Zegers, N.D.; Shaw, M.

    2000-01-01

    By expression of foreign antigens in attenuated strains derived from bacterial pathogens and in non-pathogenic commensal bacteria, recombinant vaccines are being developed that aim to stimulate mucosal immunity. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and molecular biology of these bacteria have allowed

  14. Biotechnology in the diagnosis of infectious diseases and vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular biological methods have become increasingly applicable to the diagnosis of infectious diseases and vaccine development. To become widely used the methods need to be easy, safe, sensitive, reproducible and eventually automated to facilitate the evaluation of large number of samples. The p...

  15. Economic evaluations of hepatitis B vaccination for developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.T. Tu; H.J. Woerdenbag; S. Kane; A. Riewpaiboon; M. van Hulst; M.J. Postma

    2009-01-01

    Economic evaluations, in particular cost-effectiveness, are important determinants for policy makers and stakeholders involved in decision-making for health interventions. Up until now, most evaluations of cost-effectiveness of hepatitis B vaccination have been performed in developed countries. Appr

  16. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan; Claesson, Mogens; Nielsen, Hans; Rosenberg, Jacob

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  17. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Nielsen, Hans J; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  18. Quantifying the decisional satisfaction to accept or reject the Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccine: a preference for cervical cancer prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M Harper

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Only a portion of the US population is willing to consider HPV vaccination to date. The primary aim of this study is to determine the decisional satisfaction associated with HPV vaccination. STUDY DESIGN: This is a prospective survey conducted at an urban college where women 18-26 years old completed a decisional satisfaction survey about their HPV vaccine experience. RESULTS: Regardless of the decision to accept or reject HPV vaccination, the decisional satisfaction was very high (mean 5-item score = 21.2 (SD 3.8. Women without HPV vaccination were decisionally neutral significantly more often than those already vaccinated; 22% were decisionally neutral for the option to accept HPV vaccination at that visit. Cervical cancer prevention was preferred significantly more often than genital wart prevention in all analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Targeting those who are decisionally neutral about HPV vaccination may result in a higher uptake of HPV vaccination.

  19. Freund's vaccine adjuvant promotes Her2/Neu breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammation has been linked to the etiology of many organ-specific cancers. Indirect evidence suggests a possible role for inflammation in breast cancer. We investigated whether the systemic inflammation induced by Freund's adjuvant (FA) promotes mammary carcinogenesis in a rat model in which cancer is induced by the neu oncogene. The effects of FA on hyperplastic mammary lesions and mammary carcinomas were determined in a neu-induced rat model. The inflammatory response to FA treatment was gauged by measuring acute phase serum haptoglobin. In addition, changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis following FA treatment were assessed. Rats receiving FA developed twice the number of mammary carcinomas as controls. Systemic inflammation following FA treatment is chronic, as shown by a doubling of the levels of the serum biomarker, haptoglobin, 15 days following initial treatment. We also show that this systemic inflammation is associated with the increased growth of hyperplastic mammary lesions. This increased growth results from a higher rate of cellular proliferation in the absence of changes in apoptosis. Our data suggests that systemic inflammation induced by Freund's adjuvant (FA) promotes mammary carcinogenesis. It will be important to determine whether adjuvants currently used in human vaccines also promote breast cancer

  20. Efficacy of DNA vaccines forming e7 recombinant retroviral virus-like particles for the treatment of human papillomavirus-induced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescaille, Geraldine; Pitoiset, Fabien; Macedo, Rodney; Baillou, Claude; Huret, Christophe; Klatzmann, David; Tartour, Eric; Lemoine, François M; Bellier, Bertrand

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in the development of anogenital tumors and also in the development of oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, where HPV-16, expressing the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is the most frequent serotype. Although vaccines encoding L1 and L2 capsid HPV proteins are efficient for the prevention of HPV infection, they are inadequate for treating established tumors. Hence, development of innovative vaccine therapies targeting E6/E7 is important for controlling HPV-induced cancers. We have engineered a nononcogenic mutated E7-specific plasmo-retroVLP vaccine (pVLP-E7), consisting of plasmid DNA, that is able to form recombinant retrovirus-based virus-like particles (VLPs) that display E7 antigen into murine leukemia virus Gag proteins pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G). pVLP-E7 vaccinations were studied for their ability to generate specific immune responses and for induction of protective immunity against tumor cell challenge in preventive and therapeutic models. The produced VLPs induce the maturation of human dendritic cells in vitro and mount specific E7 T cell responses. Intradermic vaccinations of mice with pVLP-E7 show their efficacy to generate antigen-specific T cell responses, to prevent and protect animals from early TC-1 tumor development compared with standard DNA or VLP immunizations. The vaccine efficacy was also evaluated for advanced tumors in mice vaccinated at various time after the injection of TC-1 cells. Data show that pVLP-E7 vaccination can cure mice with already established tumors only when combined with Toll-like receptor-7 (TLR7) and TLR9 agonists. Our findings provide evidence that pVLPs, combining the advantages of DNA and VLP vaccines, appear to be a promising strategy for the treatment of HPV-induced cancers. PMID:23521528

  1. Transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1 is an effective target for a breast cancer vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunping; Zhou, He; Mizutani, Masato; Mizutani, Noriko; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Xiang, Rong

    2003-07-01

    Protection against breast cancer was achieved with a DNA vaccine against murine transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1, which is overexpressed in aggressively proliferating D2F2 murine breast carcinoma. Growth of primary s.c. tumor and dissemination of pulmonary metastases was markedly suppressed by this oral DNA vaccine, carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium, encoding murine Fos-related antigen 1, fused with mutant polyubiquitin, and cotransformed with secretory murine IL-18. The life span of 60% of vaccinated mice was tripled in the absence of detectable tumor growth after lethal tumor cell challenge. Immunological mechanisms involved activation of T, natural killer, and dendritic cells, as indicated by up-regulation of their activation markers and costimulatory molecules. Markedly increased specific target cell lysis was mediated by both MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells isolated from splenocytes of vaccinated mice, including a significant release of proinflammatory cytokines IFN- and IL-2. Importantly, fluorescence analysis of fibroblast growth factor 2 and tumor cell-induced vessel growth in Matrigel plugs demonstrated marked suppression of angiogenesis only in vaccinated animals. Taken together, this multifunctional DNA vaccine proved effective in protecting against growth and metastases of breast cancer by combining the action of immune effector cells with suppression of tumor angiogenesis. vaccine | tumor | metastases | antiangiogenesis

  2. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M

    2014-11-12

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated "CpG motifs" trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer. PMID:24975812

  3. Therapeutic vaccines as a promising treatment modality against prostate cancer: rationale and recent advances

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, B Harpreet; Gulley, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy was deemed the medical breakthrough of 2013, in part because it can induce a rapid, durable, self-propagating and adaptable immune response. Specifically in prostate cancer, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive treatment strategy. To date, therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors are the two classes of immunotherapy that have demonstrated improvements in overall survival in patients with advanced tumors. The 2010 Food and Drug Administr...

  4. CpG Oligonucleotides as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekazu Shirota

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants improve host responsiveness to co-delivered vaccines through a variety of mechanisms. Agents that trigger cells expressing Toll-like receptors (TLR activate an innate immune response that enhances the induction of vaccine-specific immunity. When administered in combination with vaccines designed to prevent or slow tumor growth, TLR agonists have significantly improved the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Unfortunately, vaccines containing TLR agonists have rarely been able to eliminate large established tumors when administered systemically. To improve efficacy, attention has focused on delivering TLR agonists intra-tumorally with the intent of altering the tumor microenvironment. Agonists targeting TLRs 7/8 or 9 can reduce the frequency of Tregs while causing immunosuppressive MDSC in the tumor bed to differentiate into tumoricidal macrophages thereby enhancing tumor elimination. This work reviews pre-clinical and clinical studies concerning the utility of TLR 7/8/9 agonists as adjuvants for tumor vaccines.

  5. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and Acceptance of Vaccination among Medical Students in Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejuyigbe, Funmilayo F; Balogun, M R; Balogun, Balogun R; Sekoni, Adekemi O; Adegbola, Adebukola A

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the commonest viral sexually transmitted infection in the world and the leading cause of cervical cancer. Medical students as future healthcare providers will play a role in influencing patients' decision to receive HPV vaccination. This study was aimed at determining the knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV as well as the acceptance of HPV vaccination among medical students of the University of Lagos. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 280 medical students sampled using stratified sampling technique. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect relevant data. Most respondents were aware of cervical cancer (95.4%), HPV (85.4%) and HPV vaccination (69.3%) and the most common source of information was school teaching. Good knowledge of cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccination was demonstrated by 51.8%, 67.1% and 21.1% respectively; only 39.6% fully accepted HPV vaccination. Inadequate information and high costs were the obstacles identified to receiving vaccine and recommending it to others. Older age and higher levels of study were significantly associated with good knowledge of HPV. Good knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccination respectively were significantly associated with full acceptance of vaccination. There is need for more education on cervical cancer, HPV infection and HPV vaccination for the medical students via school teaching and other media, and inclusion of the HPV vaccine in the National Program on Immunization to improve access. PMID:26103704

  6. Knowledge of cervical cancer and acceptance of HPV vaccination among secondary school students in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashwan, Hesham; Lubis, Syarif Husin; Ni, Kiat Aun

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women in peninsular Malaysia and very prevalent worldwide. HPV vaccination and routine Pap smear testing are the best preventive measures. The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge level of secondary school students from Sarawak, East Malaysia regarding cervical cancer and its prevention. Multistage random sampling with various methods in each step was employed to select the sample of 76 students. Results showed that 61.8% had poor knowledge level of cervical cancer and its prevention. There were 60.5% of students who were aware of cervical cancer with Chinese and form four students showing significantly the highest awareness (pstudents was 22.3% and an association was found between knowledge of cervical cancer with race and HPV vaccination acceptance (pstudents had poor knowledge level of cervical cancer, its prevention and HPV vaccination acceptance. More efforts should be made to improve cervical cancer knowledge and awareness of the public especially secondary school students in Sarawak. This in turn will enhance the practice of prevention against cervical cancer among students. PMID:22126576

  7. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    OpenAIRE

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term effectiveness shown for Merck’s chickenpox vaccine Again—no link between vaccines and autism Experimental ovarian cancer vaccine successful in phase 1 Sinovac’s HFMD vaccine meets phase 3 study goal A vaccine for long-suffering cat allergy patients Vaccines are key to breaking infectious disease-malnutrition cycle Cancer vaccine failures due to the adjuvant IFA? Novartis’ typhoid vaccine make good progress

  8. 宫颈癌治疗性疫苗研究进展%Advances in the research of therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓玲; 刘金辉; 施桥发

    2010-01-01

    宫颈癌为妇女最常见的恶性肿瘤之一,其与人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus,HPV)感染密切相关.随着对HPV及其致病机理研究的深入和免疫学的发展,利用免疫学方法治疗HPV引发的疾病显示良好的前景.目前,有关HPV治疗性疫苗的研究已取得较大进展,这些疫苗包括病毒/细菌载体疫苗、肽疫苗、蛋白疫苗、DNA疫苗、细胞疫苗等.此文就HPV治疗性疫苗的研究进展做一综述.%Cervical cancer, one of the most common cancers in women, is closely associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.Along with development of immunology as well as study on HPV and its pathogenic mechanism, the treatment of HPV-related diseases by immunological methods has showed excellent prospect.Great advances in therapeutic vaccines-including viral and bacterial vector vaccines, peptide and protein vaccines, nucleic acid or DNA vaccines, and cell-based vaccines- against cervical cancer have been achieved in recent years.The progress in study on therapeutic vaccines against HPV is reviewed in this paper.

  9. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  10. Quality vaccines for all people: Report on the 16th annual general meeting of the Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network, 05-07th October 2015, Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Ting, Ching-Chia; Khomvilai, Sumana

    2016-06-30

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers Network (DCVMN) assembled high-profile leaders from global health organisations and vaccine manufactures for its 16th Annual General Meeting to work towards a common goal: providing quality vaccines for all people. Vaccines contribute to a healthy community and robust health system; the Ebola outbreak has raised awareness of the threat and damage one single infectious disease can make, and it is clear that the world was not prepared. However, more research to better understand emerging infectious agents might lead to suitable vaccines which help prevent future outbreaks. DCVMN members presented their progress in developing novel vaccines against Dengue, HPV, Chikungunya, Cholera, cell-based influenza and other vaccines, demonstrating the commitment towards eliminating and eradicating preventable diseases worldwide through global collaboration and technology transfer. The successful introduction of novel Sabin-IPV and Oral Cholera vaccine in China and Korea respectively in 2015 was highlighted. In order to achieve global immunisation, local authorities and community leaders play an important role in the decision-making in vaccine introduction and uptake, based on the ability of vaccines to protect vaccinated people and protect non-vaccinated in the community through herd immunity. Reducing the risk of vaccine shortages can also be achieved by increasing regulatory convergence at regional and international levels. Combatting preventable diseases remains challenging, and collective efforts for improving multi-centre clinical trials, creating regional vaccine security strategies, fostering developing vaccine markets and procurement, and building trust in vaccines were discussed. PMID:26947496

  11. Biological challenges to effective vaccines in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassly, Nicholas C; Kang, Gagandeep; Kampmann, Beate

    2015-06-19

    The reason for holding a meeting to discuss biological challenges to vaccines is simple: not all vaccines work equally well in all settings. This special issue reviews the performance of vaccines in challenging environments, summarizes current thinking on the reasons why vaccines underperform and considers what approaches are necessary to understand the heterogeneity in responses and to improve vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. PMID:25964451

  12. Biological challenges to effective vaccines in the developing world

    OpenAIRE

    Grassly, Nicholas C.; Kang, Gagandeep; Kampmann, Beate

    2015-01-01

    The reason for holding a meeting to discuss biological challenges to vaccines is simple: not all vaccines work equally well in all settings. This special issue reviews the performance of vaccines in challenging environments, summarizes current thinking on the reasons why vaccines underperform and considers what approaches are necessary to understand the heterogeneity in responses and to improve vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy.

  13. TB vaccine development: where are we and why is it so difficult?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkie, Morven E M; McShane, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The development of an effective TB vaccine remains paramount to achieving the goal of global eradication of TB by 2050. The only licensed vaccine, BCG, has variable efficacy and is poorly effective in high burden countries. The development of promising candidate vaccines to either ‘boost’ a BCG primed immune system or replace BCG altogether is a key area for innovative research. Here, we discuss some of the issues encountered in the development of potential candidate vaccines and the future c...

  14. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide1826 combined with radioresistant cancer cell vaccine confers significant antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X B; Xing, N; Zhang, Q; Yuan, S J; Chen, W; Qiao, T K

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a hot issue in cancer research over the years and tumor cell vaccine is one of the increasing number of studies. Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), synthetic oligonucleotides containing a cytosine-phosphate-guanine(CpG) motif, was shown to enhance immune responses to a wide variety of antigens. In this study, we generated the radioresistant Lewis lung cancer cell by repeated X-ray radiation and inactivated it as a whole tumor cell vaccine to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cell vaccine. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 and then inoculated with autologous Lewis lung cancer (LLC) to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The results showed that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 could significantly inhibit tumor growth, increased survival of the mice and with 20% of the mice surviving tumor free in vivo compared with the unimmunized mice bearing LLC tumor. A significant increase of apoptosis was also observed in the tumor prophylactically immunized with vaccine of inactivated radioresistant tumor cell plus CpG ODN1826. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and lower levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) concentration in serum. Furthermore, the results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was probably depended on the decreased level of programmed death ligand-1(PD-L1) which plays an important role in the negative regulation of immune response by the inhibition of tumor antigen-specific T cell activation. These findings clearly demonstrated that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 as an appropriate adjuvant could induce effective antitumor immunity in vivo. PMID:26458317

  15. A contribution to the development of anti-tick vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Nijhof, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases seriously affect animal and human health worldwide with the highest economic losses occurring in livestock production in the developing world. The control of ticks and the diseases they transmit depends mainly on chemical tick control using acaricides. The development of acaricide resistance, concerns about environmental pollution and pesticide residues in food products result in the need for alternative tick control methods such as anti-tick vaccines. Commercial...

  16. A case study using the United Republic of Tanzania: costing nationwide HPV vaccine delivery using the WHO Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutubessy Raymond

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose, methods, data sources and assumptions behind the World Health Organization (WHO Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing (C4P tool that was developed to assist low- and middle-income countries (LMICs with planning and costing their nationwide human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination program are presented. Tanzania is presented as a case study where the WHO C4P tool was used to cost and plan the roll-out of HPV vaccines nationwide as part of the national comprehensive cervical cancer prevention and control strategy. Methods The WHO C4P tool focuses on estimating the incremental costs to the health system of vaccinating adolescent girls through school-, health facility- and/or outreach-based strategies. No costs to the user (school girls, parents or caregivers are included. Both financial (or costs to the Ministry of Health and economic costs are estimated. The cost components for service delivery include training, vaccination (health personnel time and transport, stationery for tally sheets and vaccination cards, and so on, social mobilization/IEC (information, education and communication, supervision, and monitoring and evaluation (M&E. The costs of all the resources used for HPV vaccination are totaled and shown with and without the estimated cost of the vaccine. The total cost is also divided by the number of doses administered and number of fully immunized girls (FIGs to estimate the cost per dose and cost per FIG. Results Over five years (2011 to 2015, the cost of establishing an HPV vaccine program that delivers three doses of vaccine to girls at schools via phased national introduction (three regions in year 1, ten regions in year 2 and all 26 regions in years 3 to 5 in Tanzania is estimated to be US$9.2 million (excluding vaccine costs and US$31.5 million (with vaccine assuming a vaccine price of US$5 (GAVI 2011, formerly the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations. This is equivalent to a

  17. Development of an Aeromonas hydrophila recombinant extracellular protease vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Jiang, Ya-nan; Tang, Qian; Lin, Hui-xing; Lu, Cheng-ping; Yao, Huo-chun

    2012-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila (Ah) exists widely in the aquatic environment and infects a variety of animals. Extracellular protease (EPR) is an important protective antigen that induces a specific antibody response to resist Ah infection. In this study, two genes encoding extracellular protease epr2 and epr3 were linked within the expression vector pET32a to construct a recombinant pET-epr2-3 plasmid. The immunogenicity of the fusion protein epr2-3 was investigated as a subunit vaccine in ICR mice. The recombinant epr2-3 protein induced the production of high antibody titers. The survival rate against homogenous Ah J-1 challenge was significantly higher in the epr2-3 vaccinated group (≥80%) compared with the inactivated Ah vaccinated group and the challenge control group (P < 0.01), thus indicating that the recombinant epr2-3 protein provided significant protection against Ah infection. Therefore, the recombinant epr2-3 is a promising candidate for development as a vaccine against Ah infections. PMID:22874879

  18. Animal Models for Influenza Viruses: Implications for Universal Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Margine

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population. Depending on the virulence of the influenza virus strain, as well as the immunological status of the infected individual, the severity of the respiratory disease may range from sub-clinical or mild symptoms to severe pneumonia that can sometimes lead to death. Vaccines remain the primary public health measure in reducing the influenza burden. Though the first influenza vaccine preparation was licensed more than 60 years ago, current research efforts seek to develop novel vaccination strategies with improved immunogenicity, effectiveness, and breadth of protection. Animal models of influenza have been essential in facilitating studies aimed at understanding viral factors that affect pathogenesis and contribute to disease or transmission. Among others, mice, ferrets, pigs, and nonhuman primates have been used to study influenza virus infection in vivo, as well as to do pre-clinical testing of novel vaccine approaches. Here we discuss and compare the unique advantages and limitations of each model.

  19. Health Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination in Developing Countries: Progress and Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Umesh D; Johnson, Hope; Steele, A Duncan; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2016-05-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been licensed in >100 countries worldwide since 2006. As of October 2105, these vaccines have been implemented in the national immunization programs of 79 countries, including 36 low-income countries that are eligible for support for vaccine purchase from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Rotavirus vaccines were initially introduced in Australia and countries of the Americas and Europe after completion of successful clinical trials in these regions, and the impact of routine vaccination in reducing the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis in these regions has been well documented. Because of concerns around the performance of orally administered rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, vaccine implementation in these settings only began after additional clinical trials were completed and the World Health Organization issued a global recommendation for use of rotavirus vaccines in 2009. This supplementary issue ofClinical Infectious Diseasesincludes a collection of articles describing the impact and effectiveness of routine rotavirus vaccination in developing countries that were among the early adopters of rotavirus vaccine. The data highlight the benefits of vaccination and should provide valuable evidence to sustain vaccine use in these countries and encourage other countries to adopt routine rotavirus vaccination to reduce the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis. PMID:27059361

  20. Protein conjugate polysaccharide vaccines: Challenges in development and global implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Nair

    2012-01-01

    Replacement by nonvaccine serotypes;capsule switching;time duration of the antibody protective effect following vaccination;costs of the vaccines, programme costs, lack of knowledge of the disease burden, and targeting population groups for vaccination.

  1. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and Willingness to pay for Cervical Cancer Vaccination among Ethnically Diverse Medical Students in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Num, Kelly Sze Fang; Yong, Ng Jin

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of medical students and determine variation between different cultural groups. A secondary aim was to find out the willingness to pay for cervical cancer vaccination and the relationships between knowledge and attitudes towards Human Papillomavirus vaccination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a private medical university between June 2014 and November 2014 using a convenient sampling method. A total of 305 respondents were recruited and interviewed with standard questionnaires for assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practice towards human papilloma virus and their willingness to pay for HPV vaccination. Knowledge regarding human papilloma virus, human papilloma virus vaccination, cervical cancer screening and cervical cancer risk factors was good. Across the sample, a majority (90%) of the pupils demonstrated a high degree of knowledge about cervical cancer and its vaccination. There were no significant differences between ethnicity and the participants' overall knowledge of HPV infection, Pap smear and cervical cancer vaccination. Some 88% of participants answered that HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer, while 81.5% of medical students said they would recommend HPV vaccination to the public although fewer expressed an intention to receive vaccination for themselves. PMID:26320444

  2. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are several types of HPV. ...

  3. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Amrita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening.

  4. New approaches to the development of live attenuated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J

    2002-04-01

    In the United States, extensive reservoirs of the rabies virus exist in many diverse wild animal species, which continue to pose a serious risk of lethal infection of humans and cause an economic burden exceeding $1 billion annually. Previous experience with rabies control in foxes in Europe has clearly demonstrated that oral immunization with live vaccines is the only practical approach to eradicate rabies in free-ranging animals. However, unlike Europe where vulpine rabies was the only major reservoir, the Americas harbor a variety of species including raccoons, skunks, coyotes, and bats that serve as the primary reservoirs of rabies. Each of these animal reservoirs carries an antigenically distinct virus variant. The currently available modified-live rabies virus vaccines have either safety problems or do not induce sufficient protective immunity in particular wildlife species. Therefore, there is a need for the development of new live rabies virus vaccines that are very safe and highly effective in particular wildlife species. Based on previous observations indicating that the potency of a vaccine is significantly increased if the G protein of the vaccine strain is identical to that of the target virus, we have used a reverse genetics approach to engineer viruses that contain G proteins from virus strains associated with relevant wildlife species. Furthermore, because our recent data also indicate that the pathogenicity of a particular rabies virus strain is inversely proportional to its ability to induce apoptosis and that low-level apoptosis-inducing ability is associated with low anti-viral immune responses, we inserted genes encoding pro-apoptotic proteins to stimulate immunity or otherwise interfere with viral pathogenesis into these recombinant viruses to enhance their efficacy and safety. PMID:12031103

  5. Human-animal chimeras for vaccine development: an endangered species or opportunity for the developing world?

    OpenAIRE

    Daar Abdallah S; Singer Peter A; Bhan Anant

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent years, the field of vaccines for diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) which take a heavy toll in developing countries has faced major failures. This has led to a call for more basic science research, and development as well as evaluation of new vaccine candidates. Human-animal chimeras, developed with a 'humanized' immune system could be useful to study infectious diseases, including many neglected diseases. These would also serve as an important t...

  6. Progress of vaccine and drug development for Ebola preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Young; Hong, Kee-Jong; Hong, Joo Eun; Lee, Won-Ja

    2015-01-01

    Since the first case of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Guinea was reported in March 2014 by World Health Organization (WHO), the outbreak has continued through the year and the total number of 19,065 patients was reported as the confirmed or suspected in the EVD-affected countries. Among the cases, 7,388 patients were reported death by 19 December. Currently, available therapeutics to treat the infected patients or vaccines to prevent people from infection is not developed yet while viral diagnostic methods were already developed and firmly established in a lot of countries as a first step for the preparedness of Ebola outbreak. Some potential therapeutic materials including ZMapp were supplied and the treated people got over the EVD. Several candidates of vaccines also were investigated their efficacy in animal models by National Institute of Health (NIH) and Department of Defense, and they are processing of clinical tests in West Africa aiming to finish the development by the 2015. Vaccine and therapeutic development is essential to stop the EVD outbreak in West Africa, also to protect the world from the risk which can be generated by potential spread of Ebola virus. PMID:25648233

  7. Comparative Pathogenesis and Systems Biology for Biodefense Virus Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C. Bowick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing vaccines to biothreat agents presents a number of challenges for discovery, preclinical development, and licensure. The need for high containment to work with live agents limits the amount and types of research that can be done using complete pathogens, and small markets reduce potential returns for industry. However, a number of tools, from comparative pathogenesis of viral strains at the molecular level to novel computational approaches, are being used to understand the basis of viral attenuation and characterize protective immune responses. As the amount of basic molecular knowledge grows, we will be able to take advantage of these tools not only to rationally attenuate virus strains for candidate vaccines, but also to assess immunogenicity and safety in silico. This review discusses how a basic understanding of pathogenesis, allied with systems biology and machine learning methods, can impact biodefense vaccinology.

  8. Mucin-type O-glycosylation and its potential use in drug and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Mads Agervig; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    decade an increasing number of GalNAc-transferase isoforms have been cloned and their substrate-specificities partly characterized. These differences in substrate specificities have been exploited for in vitro site-directed O-glycosylation. In GlycoPEGylation, polyehylene glycol (PEG) is transferred to...... recombinant therapeutics to specific acceptor sites directed by GalNAc-transferases. GalNAc-transferases have also been used to control density of glycosylation in the development of glycopeptide-based cancer vaccines. The membrane-associated mucin-1 (MUC1) has long been considered a target for...

  9. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever and the Current State of Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Joo Eun; Hong, Kee-Jong; Choi, Woo Young; Lee, Won-Ja; Choi, Yeon Hwa; Jeong, Chung-Hyeon; Cho, Kwang-il

    2014-01-01

    Current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa already reached the total number of 1,323 including 729 deaths by July 31st. the fatality is around 55% in the southeastern area of Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria. The number of patients with Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF) was continuously increasing even though the any effective therapeutics or vaccines has not been developed yet. The Ebola virus in Guinea showed 98% homology with Zaire Ebola Virus. Study of the pathogenesis of Ebola vir...

  10. Transmission blocking malaria vaccines: Assays and candidates in clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerwein, R W; Bousema, T

    2015-12-22

    Stimulated by recent advances in malaria control and increased funding, the elimination of malaria is now considered to be an attainable goal for an increasing number of malaria-endemic regions. This has boosted the interest in transmission-reducing interventions including vaccines that target sexual, sporogenic, and/or mosquito-stage antigens to interrupt malaria transmission (SSM-VIMT). SSM-VIMT aim to prevent human malaria infection in vaccinated communities by inhibiting parasite development within the mosquito after a blood meal taken from a gametocyte carrier. Only a handful of target antigens are in clinical development and progress has been slow over the years. Major stumbling blocks include (i) the expression of appropriately folded target proteins and their downstream purification, (ii) insufficient induction of sustained functional blocking antibody titers by candidate vaccines in humans, and (iii) validation of a number of (bio)-assays as correlate for blocking activity in the field. Here we discuss clinical manufacturing and testing of current SSM-VIMT candidates and the latest bio-assay development for clinical evaluation. New testing strategies are discussed that may accelerate the evaluation and application of SSM-VIMT. PMID:26409813

  11. Gene-based vaccine development for improving animal production in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The cloning and expression of microbial genes in alternate hosts to enhance production of antigens for animal vaccines against all disease is theoretically achievable. It is essential, however, that antigens expressed in this way are known to be protective. Many years of costly research usually precedes the identification of such antigens or combinations of antigens. Thus, while conventional vaccines based on living, attenuated or inactivated microorganisms may be effective, the protective components contained in them i.e. the candidates for cloning, have yet to be found. The principal protective antigen in vaccines against foot rot of sheep and goats is fimbrial protein of Dichelobacter nodosus. Recombinant vaccines against this infection are ineffective if the protein subunits are not assembled and presented to the host in a manner morphologically indistinguishable from those of the natural fimbriae. Availability of recombinant antigen does not necessarily avoid the need for the use of adjuvants to potentiate response. Oil emulsion vaccines, while enhancing immune response, almost inevitably cause a marked reaction at the site of injection. Livestock owners in developing countries are as likely as those elsewhere to object to these reactions. The need to find an acceptable and effective formulation adds to the cost of recombinant vaccines and their application in countries with limited resources for disease control. Another costly feature of recombinant vaccines has been the patenting of processes involving gene technology and licencing agreements for production under the protection of these patents. In some systems antigenic competition between similar and disparate antigens limits the usefulness of even recombinant antigens that, administered individually, are highly potent. In the case of programs for the control and eventual eradication of footrot in sheep and goats in Nepal this problem was overcome by the prior identification of causal serotypes

  12. Intellectual property rights and challenges for development of affordable human papillomavirus, rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines: Patent landscaping and perspectives of developing country vaccine manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Amin, Tahir; Kim, Joyce; Furrer, Eliane; Matterson, Anna-Carin; Schwalbe, Nina; Nguyen, Aurélia

    2015-11-17

    The success of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance depends on the vaccine markets providing appropriate, affordable vaccines at sufficient and reliable quantities. Gavi's current supplier base for new and underutilized vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), rotavirus, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is very small. There is growing concern that following globalization of laws on intellectual property rights (IPRs) through trade agreements, IPRs are impeding new manufacturers from entering the market with competing vaccines. This article examines the extent to which IPRs, specifically patents, can create such obstacles, in particular for developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). Through building patent landscapes in Brazil, China, and India and interviews with manufacturers and experts in the field, we found intense patenting activity for the HPV and pneumococcal vaccines that could potentially delay the entry of new manufacturers. Increased transparency around patenting of vaccine technologies, stricter patentability criteria suited for local development needs and strengthening of IPRs management capabilities where relevant, may help reduce impediments to market entry for new manufacturers and ensure a competitive supplier base for quality vaccines at sustainably low prices. PMID:26368398

  13. Nontyphoidal salmonella disease: Current status of vaccine research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M; MacLennan, Calman A; Simon, Raphael; Martin, Laura B; Khan, M Imran

    2016-06-01

    Among more than 2500 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) serovars, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis account for approximately fifty percent of all human isolates of NTS reported globally. The global incidence of NTS gastroenteritis in 2010 was estimated to be 93 million cases, approximately 80 million of which were contracted via food-borne transmission. It is estimated that 155,000 deaths resulted from NTS in 2010. NTS also causes severe, extra-intestinal, invasive bacteremia, referred to as invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. iNTS disease usually presents as a febrile illness, frequently without gastrointestinal symptoms, in both adults and children. Symptoms of iNTS are similar to malaria, often including fever (>90%) and splenomegaly (>40%). The underlying reasons for the high rates of iNTS disease in Africa are still being elucidated. Evidence from animal and human studies supports the feasibility of developing a safe and effective vaccine against iNTS. Both antibodies and complement can kill Salmonella species in vitro. Proof-of-principle studies in animal models have demonstrated efficacy for live attenuated and subunit vaccines that target the O-antigens, flagellin proteins, and other outer membrane proteins of serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. More recently, a novel delivery strategy for NTS vaccines has been developed: the Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) technology which presents surface polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins in their native conformation. GMMA technology is self-adjuvanting, as it delivers multiple pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. GMMA may be particularly relevant for low- and middle-income countries as it has the potential for high immunologic potency at a low cost and involves a relatively simple production process without the need for complex conjugation. Several vaccines for the predominant NTS serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, are

  14. First-in-man application of a novel therapeutic cancer vaccine formulation with the capacity to induce multi-functional T cell responses in ovarian, breast and prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berinstein Neil L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DepoVaxTM is a novel non-emulsion depot-forming vaccine platform with the capacity to significantly enhance the immunogenicity of peptide cancer antigens. Naturally processed HLA-A2 restricted peptides presented by breast, ovarian and prostate cancer cells were used as antigens to create a therapeutic cancer vaccine, DPX-0907. Methods A phase I clinical study was designed to examine the safety and immune activating potential of DPX-0907 in advanced stage breast, ovarian and prostate cancer patients. A total of 23 late stage cancer patients were recruited and were divided into two dose/volume cohorts in a three immunization protocol. Results DPX-0907 was shown to be safe with injection site reactions being the most commonly reported adverse event. All breast cancer patients (3/3, most of ovarian (5/6 and one third of prostate (3/9 cancer patients exhibited detectable immune responses, resulting in a 61% immunological response rate. Immune responses were generally observed in patients with better disease control after their last prior treatment. Antigen-specific responses were detected in 73% of immune responders (44% of evaluable patients after the first vaccination. In 83% of immune responders (50% of evaluable patients, peptide-specific T cell responses were detected at ≥2 time points post vaccination with 64% of the responders (39% of evaluable patients showing evidence of immune persistence. Immune monitoring also demonstrated the generation of antigen-specific T cell memory with the ability to secrete multiple Type 1 cytokines. Conclusions The novel DepoVax formulation promotes multifunctional effector memory responses to peptide-based tumor associated antigens. The data supports the capacity of DPX-0907 to elicit Type-1 biased immune responses, warranting further clinical development of the vaccine. This study underscores the importance of applying vaccines in clinical settings in which patients are more likely to be

  15. Genetically modified vaccines augment the efficacy of cancer surgery and chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2009), s. 199-200. ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : genetically modified vaccines * cancer surgery and chemotherapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2009

  16. Depletion of Treg cells augments the therapeutic effect of cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2006), s. 202-204. ISSN 0015-5500 Grant ostatní: EU-FP6-Clinigene(XE) 018933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Treg cells * cancer vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2006

  17. 76 FR 68768 - Guidance for Industry: Clinical Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... subsequent BLA for marketing approval. In the Federal Register of September 18, 2009 (74 FR 47947), FDA...) for marketing approval. The guidance applies to therapeutic cancer vaccines that are intended for the... (Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR) part 312) to support a subsequent BLA for...

  18. Overview of developments in the last 10-15 years in recombinant vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    This introductory talk will describe the various types of recombinant DNA vaccines that have been developed for the poultry industry. The talk will not discuss the efficacy of specific recombinant DNA vaccines. Instead, I will focus on describing how various recombinant vaccines are made and some ad...

  19. MALVAC 2012 scientific forum: accelerating development of second-generation malaria vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Vannice Kirsten S; Brown Graham V; Akanmori Bartholomew D; Moorthy Vasee S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a malaria vaccines committee (MALVAC) scientific forum from 20 to 21 February 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland, to review the global malaria vaccine portfolio, to gain consensus on approaches to accelerate second-generation malaria vaccine development, and to discuss the need to update the vision and strategic goal of the Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap. This article summarizes the forum, which included reviews of leading Plasmodium falcipar...

  20. Development and Evidence for Efficacy of CMV Glycoprotein B Vaccine with MF59 Adjuvant

    OpenAIRE

    Pass, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    A vaccine comprised of recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV) envelope glycoprotein B (gB) with MF59 adjuvant developed in the 1990s recently was recently found to have efficacy for prevention of CMV infection in a phase 2 clinical trial in young mothers. This review briefly considers the rationale for gB as a vaccine antigen, the history of this CMV gB vaccine and the data supporting vaccine efficacy.

  1. Evaluation of microparticulate ovarian cancer vaccine via transdermal route of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawde, Suprita A; Chablani, Lipika; Akalkotkar, Archana; D'Souza, Martin J

    2016-08-10

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most commonly occurring malignancy in women, with the highest mortality rate among all the gynecological tumors. Microparticulate vaccine can serve as an immunotherapeutic approach with a promising antigenic delivery system without a need for conventional adjuvants. In this study, a microparticulate vaccine using whole cell lysate of a murine ovarian cancer cell line, ID8 was prepared by spray drying. Further, the effect of interleukins (ILs) such as IL-2 and IL-12 was evaluated in a separate study group by administering them with vaccine particles to enhance the immune response. The vaccine microparticles were administered to C57BL/6 female mice via transdermal alone and in combination with the oral route. The transdermal vaccine was delivered using a metallic microneedle device, AdminPen™. Orally administered microparticles also included an M-cell targeting ligand, Aleuria aurantia lectin, to enhance the targeted uptake from microfold cells (M-cells) in Peyer's patches of small intestine. In case of combination of routes, mice were given 5 transdermal doses and 5 oral doses administered alternatively, beginning with transdermal dose. At the end of vaccination, mice were challenged with live tumor cells. Vaccine alone resulted in around 1.5 times tumor suppression in case of transdermal and combination of routes at the end of 15th week when compared to controls. Inclusion of interleukins resulted in 3 times tumor suppression when administered with transdermal vaccine and around 9 times tumor suppression for the combination route of delivery in comparison to controls. These results were further potentiated by serum IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a titers. Moreover, CD8+ T-cell, CD4+ T-cell and NK (natural killer) cell populations in splenocytes were elevated in case of vaccinated mice. Thus, vaccine microparticles could trigger humoral as well as cellular immune response when administered transdermally and via combination of route of delivery

  2. Development of vaccines against Ornithodoros soft ticks: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Martín, Verónica; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Obolo-Mvoulouga, Prosper; Oleaga, Ana; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    Ticks are parasites of great medical and veterinary importance since they are vectors of numerous pathogens that affect humans, livestock and pets. Among the argasids, several species of the genus Ornithodoros transmit serious diseases such as tick-borne human relapsing fever (TBRF) and African Swine Fever (ASF). In particular, Ornithodoros erraticus is the main vector of these two diseases in the Mediterranean while O. moubata is the main vector in Africa. The presence of these Ornithodoros ticks in domestic and peridomestic environments may greatly hinder the eradication of TBRF and ASF from endemic areas. In addition, there is a constant threat of reintroduction and spreading of ASF into countries from where it has been eradicated (Spain and Portugal) or where it was never present (the Caucasus, Russia and Eastern Europe). In these countries, the presence of Ornithodoros vectors could have a tremendous impact on ASF transmission and long-term maintenance. Therefore, elimination of these ticks from at least synanthropic environments would contribute heavily to the prevention and control of the diseases they transmit. Tick control is a difficult task and although several methods for such control have been used, none of them has been fully effective against all ticks and the problems they cause. Nevertheless, immunological control using anti-tick vaccines offers an attractive alternative to the traditional use of acaricides. The aim of the present paper is to offer a brief overview of the current status in control measure development for Ornithodoros soft ticks, paying special attention to the development of vaccines against O. erraticus and O. moubata. Thus, our contribution includes an analysis of the chief attributes that the ideal antigens for an anti-tick vaccine should have, an exhaustive compilation and analysis of the scant anti-soft tick vaccine trials carried out to date using both concealed and salivary antigens and, finally, a brief description of the

  3. Cancer epidemiology in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is estimated that there were over 10 million new cancer cases in 2000, 5.4 million of them occurring in the developing countries (Parkin et al, 2001). The marked geographical variation in cancer occurrence results in differing therapeutic priorities: North America has more new cancer cases than South-Central Asia, but there are more deaths from cancer in South-Central Asia, reflecting a different pattern of cancer rather than differences in prognosis. Prediction of future trends is difficult, but the impact of population increase and ageing will be significant, with an expected 63% increase in the population of the less developed countries in 50 years. Four sites of cancer namely breast, cervix, colorectal and nasopharyngeal carcinoma are reviewed, looking at their present and possible future importance in the context of developing countries and their aetiology

  4. Development of a new vaccine for the prevention of Lassa fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Geisbert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent importation of Lassa fever into Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States by travelers on commercial airlines from Africa underscores the public health challenge of emerging viruses. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines for Lassa fever, and no experimental vaccine has completely protected nonhuman primates against a lethal challenge. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed a replication-competent vaccine against Lassa virus based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors expressing the Lassa viral glycoprotein. A single intramuscular vaccination of the Lassa vaccine elicited a protective immune response in nonhuman primates against a lethal Lassa virus challenge. Vaccine shedding was not detected in the monkeys, and none of the animals developed fever or other symptoms of illness associated with vaccination. The Lassa vaccine induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses in the four vaccinated and challenged monkeys. Despite a transient Lassa viremia in vaccinated animals 7 d after challenge, the vaccinated animals showed no evidence of clinical disease. In contrast, the two control animals developed severe symptoms including rashes, facial edema, and elevated liver enzymes, and ultimately succumbed to the Lassa infection. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the Lassa vaccine candidate based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus is safe and highly efficacious in a relevant animal model that faithfully reproduces human disease.

  5. Development of a New Vaccine for the Prevention of Lassa Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent importation of Lassa fever into Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States by travelers on commercial airlines from Africa underscores the public health challenge of emerging viruses. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines for Lassa fever, and no experimental vaccine has completely protected nonhuman primates against a lethal challenge. Methods and Findings We developed a replication-competent vaccine against Lassa virus based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors expressing the Lassa viral glycoprotein. A single intramuscular vaccination of the Lassa vaccine elicited a protective immune response in nonhuman primates against a lethal Lassa virus challenge. Vaccine shedding was not detected in the monkeys, and none of the animals developed fever or other symptoms of illness associated with vaccination. The Lassa vaccine induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses in the four vaccinated and challenged monkeys. Despite a transient Lassa viremia in vaccinated animals 7 d after challenge, the vaccinated animals showed no evidence of clinical disease. In contrast, the two control animals developed severe symptoms including rashes, facial edema, and elevated liver enzymes, and ultimately succumbed to the Lassa infection. Conclusion Our data suggest that the Lassa vaccine candidate based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus is safe and highly efficacious in a relevant animal model that faithfully reproduces human disease. PMID:15971954

  6. Human biomarkers: can they help us to develop a new tuberculosis vaccine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Helen A; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-06-01

    The most effective intervention for the control of infectious disease is vaccination. The BCG vaccine, the only licensed vaccine for the prevention of tuberculosis (TB) disease, is only partially effective and a new vaccine is urgently needed. Biomarkers can aid the development of new TB vaccines through discovery of immune mechanisms, early assessment of vaccine immunogenicity or vaccine take and identification of those at greatest risk of disease progression for recruitment into smaller, targeted efficacy trials. The ultimate goal, however, remains a biomarker of TB vaccine efficacy that can be used as a surrogate for a TB disease end point and there remains an urgent need for further research in this area. PMID:27203133

  7. The global roadmap for advancing development of vaccines against sexually transmitted infections: Update and next steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Deal, Carolyn D; Giersing, Birgitte; Rees, Helen; Bolan, Gail; Johnston, Christine; Timms, Peter; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Jerse, Ann E; Cameron, Caroline E; Moorthy, Vasee S; Kiarie, James; Broutet, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the World Health Organization, the US National Institutes of Health, and global technical partners published a comprehensive roadmap for development of new vaccines against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Since its publication, progress has been made in several roadmap activities: obtaining better epidemiologic data to establish the public health rationale for STI vaccines, modeling the theoretical impact of future vaccines, advancing basic science research, defining preferred product characteristics for first-generation vaccines, and encouraging investment in STI vaccine development. This article reviews these overarching roadmap activities, provides updates on research and development of individual vaccines against herpes simplex virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Treponema pallidum, and discusses important next steps to advance the global roadmap for STI vaccine development. PMID:27105564

  8. University contributions to the HPV vaccine and implications for access to vaccines in developing countries: addressing materials and know-how in university technology transfer policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crager, Sara E; Guillen, Ethan; Price, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with most of the disease burden concentrated in developing countries. Over 90 percent of cervical cancer deaths, almost all of which are caused by HPV, occur in low- and middle-income countries where access to goods and services for prevention and treatment pose major barriers to intervention. In resource-poor settings lacking the capacity for routine screening for cervical cancer, the HPV vaccines developed by Merck and GlaxoSmithKline are desperately needed to help prevent these unnecessary deaths. The initial development of currently available HPV vaccines took place at a number of universities and other publicly funded institutions, yet there is little low-cost access to the vaccine in developing countries where access would be most critical. This is the rule rather than the exception with most university-discovered medicines. Universities and other publicly-funded institutions can adopt a number of licensing methods to ensure that vaccines discovered on their campuses are available at low-cost in developing countries. Universities Allied for Essential Medicines has proposed that universities adopt Global Access Licensing policies to implement these changes by enabling generic or low-cost production of the end product in developing countries. Generic competition is a critical market force that has, for instance, driven down the price of HIV/AIDS treatments from more than $10,000 to less than $99 per patient per year today. While the central barrier to creation of small molecule generics is patent-protection, there are multiple additional barriers that need to be addressed in order to ensure the efficient production of cost-effective generic vaccines and other biologics. While certain biologics may require generic producers to perform additional clinical trials, vaccines are in a somewhat unique situation with respect to both safety and efficacy. With access to appropriate patents

  9. Genetically engineered dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2001), s. 475-478. ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cells * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.330, year: 2001

  10. Creating Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines: Notes from the Battlefield

    OpenAIRE

    Overwijk, Willem W.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2001-01-01

    With the identification of tumor antigens and a knowledge of how to vaccinate against them, the field of tumor immunology faces new challenges. In this article, the authors argue that successful immunotherapies of the future will activate anti-tumor T cells without inducing their anergy or apoptotic death.

  11. Malaria vaccine development in Europe-preparing for the future : Workshop report

    OpenAIRE

    Viebig, N. K.; D'Alessio, F.; Draper, S. J.; Sim, B. K. L.; Mordmuller, B.; Bowyer, P. W.; Luty, Adrian; Jungbluth, S.; Chitnis, C.E.; Hill, A. V. S.; Kremsner, P.; Craig, A. G.; Kocken, C. H. M.; Leroy, O

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of a safe and effective malaria vaccine will be an important tool for the control of malaria and the reduction in malaria deaths. With the launch of the 2030 Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap, the malaria community has updated the goals and priorities for the development of such a vaccine and is now paving the way for a second phase of malaria vaccine development. During a workshop in Brussels in November 2014, hosted by the European Vaccine Initiative, key players from the Eu...

  12. Effect of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status on Serological Response to Influenza Vaccine in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Manpreet K.; Fakih, Marwan; Muindi, Josephia; Tian, Lili; Mashtare, Terry; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiologic data suggest that there is an association between vitamin D deficiency and influenza infection. We conducted a prospective influenza vaccination study to determine the influence of vitamin D status on serological response to influenza vaccine in prostate cancer (CaP) patients. METHODS During the 2006–2007 influenza season, CaP patients treated at Roswell Park Cancer Institute were offered vaccination with the trivalent influenza vaccine (Fluzone®, 2006–2007) and sera collected for hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay titers before and 3 months after vaccination. Response to vaccination was defined as ≥1:40 titer ratio or a fourfold increase in titer at 3 months, against any of the three strains. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-D3) levels were measured using DiaSorin 125I radioimmunoassay kits. RESULTS Thirty-five patients with CaP participated in the study. Median baseline 25-D3 level was 44.88 ng/ml (range: 9.16–71.98 ng/ml) Serological response against any of the three strains was noted in 80%. There was a significant effect of baseline 25-D3 level when tested as a continuous variable in relation to serological response (P = 0.0446). All patients in the upper quartile of 25-D3 level responded by mounting a serological response (P = 0.0344). None of the other baseline variables (age, race, chemotherapy status, or white cell count) had an effect on serological response. CONCLUSIONS In this study in CaP patients, a replete vitamin D status was associated with more frequent serological response to influenza vaccine. PMID:20812224

  13. Vaccine production training to develop the workforce of foreign institutions supported by the BARDA influenza vaccine capacity building program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbet, E Bart; Dorward, James T; Day, Craig W; Rashid, Kamal A

    2013-03-15

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, vaccination will be the best method to limit virus spread. However, lack of vaccine biomanufacturing capacity means there will not be enough vaccine for the world's population. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) provides support to the World Health Organization to enhance global vaccine production capacity in developing countries. However, developing a trained workforce in some of those countries is necessary. Biomanufacturing is labor-intensive, requiring unique skills not found in traditional academic programs. Employees must understand the scientific basis of biotechnology, operate specialized equipment, and work in an environment regulated by good manufacturing practices (cGMP). Therefore, BARDA supported development of vaccine biomanufacturing training at Utah State University. The training consisted of a three-week industry-focused course for participants from institutions supported by the BARDA and WHO influenza vaccine production capacity building program. The curriculum was divided into six components: (1) biosafety, (2) cell culture and growth of cells in bioreactors, (3) virus assays and inactivation, (4) scale-up strategies, (5) downstream processing, and (6) egg- and cell-based vaccine production and cGMP. Lectures were combined with laboratory exercises to provide a balance of theory and hands-on training. The initial course included sixteen participants from seven countries including: Egypt, Romania, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. The participant's job responsibilities included: Production, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Research; and their education ranged from bachelors to doctoral level. Internal course evaluations utilized descriptive methods including surveys, observation of laboratory activities, and interviews with participants. Generally, participants had appropriate academic backgrounds, but

  14. Atopy and development of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Nystrup Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Roswall, Nina;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopy is the familial or personal propensity to develop IgE antibodies against environmental allergens. Atopy, theoretically, could both prevent and promote the development of cancer. However, evidence from epidemiologic studies has been inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the...

  15. Development of a new live rough vaccine against bovine brucellosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    virulence reduction. These results indicate that even at high doses, strain Δpgm is cleared from the animal in a short period of time. The antibody response against O-antigen was evaluated using Fluorescence Polarization Assay with FITC-coupled O-antigen as a tracer. Mice receiving S2308 developed antibodies to the O-antigen that reached its maximal value at 49 days p.i (152.71±27.65 mP). In contrast, Δpgm-vaccinated mice failed, as the saline control mice, to elicit antibodies against O-antigen at any tested time (92.33±3.66 mP and 92.20±7.10 mP at 49 p.i. respectively). These results indicate that the O-antigen present in Δpgm is incapable to elicit a detectable specific antibody response. It is well established that for intracellular pathogens like Brucellae, cellular immunity plays a central role in protection. To investigate the cellular immune response induced by Δpgm, we analyzed the proliferative splenocytes response of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice upon stimulation with heat-inactivated S2308 whole cells. At 8 weeks post inoculation, splenocytes recovered from mice vaccinated with Δpgm proliferated upon stimulation in a specific manner, in contrast to the non-vaccinated control group (60,142 ± 7,443 c.p.m. vs 20,855 ± 2,541 c.p.m., P7 CFU of Δpgm, saline or 105 CFU of B19. Eight weeks post-vaccination animals were challenged with 105 CFU of strain S2308. Protection was defined as the difference between the numbers of viable bacteria recovered from spleens of immunized mice compared to those receiving saline. Vaccine efficacy was expressed as log10 units of protection. Δpgm generated a significant protection 2 and 4 weeks post challenge, with 2.25 and 1.93 protection units, respectively. As expected B. abortus strain S19 induced also a significant protection at 4 weeks (1.78 protection units). These results, together with the ability of the mutant to generate a strong cellular Th1 response without eliciting specific O-antigen antibodies, emphasize

  16. Immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccines in prostate cancer: an update on current strategies and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Harpreet Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. While there are multiple ways to target the immune system, therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in late-stage clinical trials. The landmark Food and Drug Administration approval of sipuleucel-T for asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic prostate cancer set the stage for ongoing phase III trials with the cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM and the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab. A common feature of these immune-based therapies is the appearance of improved overall survival without short-term changes in disease progression. This class effect appears to be due to modulation of tumor growth rate kinetics, in which the activated immune system exerts constant immunologic pressure that slows net tumor growth. Emerging data suggest that the ideal population for clinical trials of cancer vaccines is patients with lower tumor volume and less aggressive disease. Combination strategies that combine immunotherapy with standard therapies have been shown to augment both immune response and clinical benefit.

  17. Immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccines in prostate cancer:an update on current strategies and clinical implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B Harpreet Singh; James L Gulley

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. While there are multiple ways to target the immune system, therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in late-stage clinical trials. The landmark Food and Drug Administration approval of sipuleucel-T for asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic prostate cancer set the stage for ongoing phase III trials with the cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM and the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab. A common feature of these immune-based therapies is the appearance of improved overall survival without short-term changes in disease progression. This class effect appears to be due to modulation of tumor growth rate kinetics, in which the activated immune system exerts constant immunologic pressure that slows net tumor growth. Emerging data suggest that the ideal population for clinical trials of cancer vaccines is patients with lower tumor volume and less aggressive disease. Combination strategies that combine immunotherapy with standard therapies have been shown to augment both immune response and clinical beneift.

  18. Calreticulin as cancer treatment adjuvant: combination with photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen eKorbelik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin is recognized as one of pivotal damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP molecules alerting the host of the presence of distressed cells. In this role, calreticulin becomes exposed on the surface of tumor cells treated by several types of cancer therapy including photodynamic therapy (PDT. The goal of the present study was to examine the potential of externally added calreticulin for augmenting antitumor effect mediated by PDT. Recombinant calreticulin was found to bind to mouse SCCVII tumor cells treated by PDT. Compared to the outcome with PDT alone, cure-rates of SCCVII tumors grown in immunocompetent C3H/HeN mice were elevated when calreticulin (0.4 mg/mouse was injected peritumorally immediately after PDT. Such therapeutic gain with PDT plus calreticulin combination was not obtained with SCCVII tumors growing in immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. In PDT vaccine protocol, where PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used for vaccination of SCCVII tumor-bearing mice, adding recombinant calreticulin to cells before their injection produced improved therapeutic effect. The expression of calreticulin gene was reduced in PDT-treated cells, while no changes were observed with the expression of this gene in tumor, liver, and spleen tissues in PDT vaccine-treated mice. These findings reveal that externally added recombinant calreticulin can boost antitumor responses elicited by PDT or PDT-generated vaccines, and can thus serve as an effective adjuvant for cancer treatment with PDT and probably other cancer cell stress-inducing modalities.

  19. Extracellular Vesicles: Role in Inflammatory Responses and Potential Uses in Vaccination in Cancer and Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, João Henrique; Soares, Rodrigo Pedro; Ribeiro, Kleber; Cronemberger Andrade, André; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cells and organisms release membrane structures containing proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which have a wide range of functions concerning intercellular communication and signaling events. Recently, the characterization and understanding of their biological role have become a main research area due to their potential role in vaccination, as biomarkers antigens, early diagnostic tools, and therapeutic applications. Here, we will overview the recent advances and studies of Evs shed by tumor cells, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, focusing on their inflammatory role and their potential use in vaccination and diagnostic of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26380326

  20. Vaccine development in Staphylococcus aureus: taking the biofilm phenotype into consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Harro, Janette M; Peters, Brian M.; O'May, Graeme A.; Archer, Nathan; Kerns, Patrick; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine development against pathogenic bacteria is an imperative initiative as bacteria are gaining resistance to current antimicrobial therapies and few novel antibiotics are being developed. Candidate antigens for vaccine development can be identified by a multitude of high-throughput technologies that were accelerated by access to complete genomes. While considerable success has been achieved in vaccine development against bacterial pathogens, many species with multiple virulence factors a...

  1. Human-animal chimeras for vaccine development: an endangered species or opportunity for the developing world?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the field of vaccines for diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV which take a heavy toll in developing countries has faced major failures. This has led to a call for more basic science research, and development as well as evaluation of new vaccine candidates. Human-animal chimeras, developed with a 'humanized' immune system could be useful to study infectious diseases, including many neglected diseases. These would also serve as an important tool for the efficient testing of new vaccine candidates to streamline promising candidates for further trials in humans. However, developing human-animal chimeras has proved to be controversial. Discussion Development of human-animal chimeras for vaccine development has been slowed down because of opposition by some philosophers, ethicists and policy makers in the west-they question the moral status of such animals, and also express discomfort about transgression of species barriers. Such opposition often uses a contemporary western world view as a reference point. Human-animal chimeras are often being created for diseases which cause significantly higher morbidity and mortality in the developing world as compared to the developed world. We argue in our commentary that given this high disease burden, we should look at socio-cultural perspectives on human-animal chimera like beings in the developing world. On examination, it's clear that such beings have been part of mythology and cultural descriptions in many countries in the developing world. Summary To ensure that important research on diseases afflicting millions like malaria, HIV, Hepatitis-C and dengue continues to progress, we recommend supporting human-animal chimera research for vaccine development in developing countries (especially China and India which have growing technical expertise in the area. The negative perceptions in some parts of the west about human-animal chimeras can be used as an

  2. Complete response of metastatic renal cancer with dendritic cell vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall'Oglio Marcos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma that presented involution following therapy with dendritic cells. CASE REPORT: Male, 51-year old patient underwent left radical nephrectomy in September 1999 due to renal cell carcinoma, evolved with recurrence of the neoplasia in January 2002, confirmed by resection of the lesion. A vaccine therapy based on dendritic cells was then performed during 5 months (4 applications. After this period, there was occurrence of new lesions, whose resection revealed areas of necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate. DISCUSSION: The outcome of renal cell carcinoma is influenced by prognostic factors that confer more aggressive tumor characteristics. However, in cases of recurrence, the systemic therapy with dendritic cells-based vaccine can be associated with a better outcome with regression of disease.

  3. Anti-Tumor Effects of Peptide Therapeutic and Peptide Vaccine Antibody Co-targeting HER-1 and HER-2 in Esophageal Cancer (EC) and HER-1 and IGF-1R in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC)

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Overholser; Kristen Henkins Ambegaokar; Eze, Siobhan M.; Eduardo Sanabria-Figueroa; Rita Nahta; Tanios Bekaii-Saab; Kaumaya, Pravin T. P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the promise of targeted therapies, there remains an urgent need for effective treatment for esophageal cancer (EC) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Current FDA-approved drugs have significant problems of toxicity, safety, selectivity, efficacy and development of resistance. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that rationally designed peptide vaccines/mimics are a viable therapeutic strategy for blocking aberrant molecular signaling pathways with high affinity, specificity, pot...

  4. Targeted Vaccination against Human α-Lactalbumin for Immunotherapy and Primary Immunoprevention of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tuohy, Vincent K; Ritika Jaini; Johnson, Justin M.; Matthew G. Loya; Dennis Wilk; Erinn Downs-Kelly; Suparna Mazumder

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed that safe and effective protection against the development of adult onset cancers may be achieved by vaccination against tissue-specific self-proteins that are “retired” from expression at immunogenic levels in normal tissues as we age, but are overexpressed in emerging tumors. α-Lactalbumin is an example of a “retired” self-protein because its expression in normal tissues is confined exclusively to the breast during late pregnancy and lactation, but is also expressed in the ...

  5. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73. ISSN 0015-5500 Grant ostatní: EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  6. Overview of Current Humman Papilloma Virus (HPV) Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Cumhur Artuk; Hanefi Cem Gul; Omer Coskun

    2013-01-01

    Persistent viral infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes causes virtually all cancer of the cervix. The same HPV genotypes (“types”) also cause cases of anal cancer. Cervical cancer is the third most frequent cancer in women worldwide after breast and colorectal cancers. It ranks fourth of women’s cancers according to the mortality ratio. Two vaccines have been developed against HPV infection; one is a quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil™) and the othe...

  7. Current developments in avian influenza vaccines, including safety of vaccinated birds as food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayne, D E; Suarez, D L

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, most vaccines against avian influenza were based on oil-emulsified inactivated low- or high-pathogenicity viruses. Now, recombinant fowl pox and avian paramyxovirus type 1 vaccines with avian influenza H5 gene inserts (+ or - N1 gene insert) are available and licensed. New technologies might overcome existing limitations to make available vaccines that can be grown in tissue culture systems for more rapid production; provide optimized protection, as a result of closer genetic relations to field viruses; allow mass administration by aerosol, in drinking-water or in ovo; and allow easier strategies for identifying infected birds within vaccinated populations (DIVA). The technologies include avian influenza viruses with partial gene deletions, avian influenza-Newcastle disease virus chimeras, vectored vaccines such as adenoviruses and Marek's disease virus, and subunit vaccines. These new methods should be licensed only after their purity, safety, efficacy and potency against avian influenza viruses have been demonstrated, and, for live vectored vaccines, restriction of viral transmission to unvaccinated birds. Use of vaccines in countries affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza will not only protect poultry but will provide additional safety for consumers. Experimental studies have shown that birds vaccinated against avian influenza have no virus in meat and minimal amounts in eggs after HPAI virus challenge, and that replication and shedding from their respiratory and alimentary tracts is greatly reduced. PMID:18411943

  8. Immunogenicity and some safety features of a VEGF-based cancer therapeutic vaccine in rats, rabbits and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Yanelys; Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Ayala, Marta; Velazco, Jorge Castro; Pérez, Pedro Puente; Alba, Jesús Suárez; Ancizar, Julio; Rodríguez, Meilyn; Cosme, Karelia; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2010-04-26

    We have developed a cancer vaccine candidate (hereafter denominated CIGB-247), based on recombinant modified human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as antigen, and the adjuvant VSSP (very small sized proteoliposomes of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane). In mice, previous work of our group had shown that vaccination with CIGB-247 extended tumor-take time, slowed tumor growth, and increased animal survival. Immunization elicited anti-human and murine VEGF-neutralizing antibodies, and spleen cells of vaccinated mice are cytotoxic in vitro to tumor cells that produce VEGF. We have now tested the immunogenicity of CIGB-247 in Wistar rats, New Zealand White rabbits and the non-human primate Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus. Using weekly, biweekly and biweekly plus montanide immunization schemes, all three species develop antigen-specific IgG antibodies that can block the interaction of VEGF and VEGF receptor 2 in an ELISA assay. Antibody titers decline after vaccination stops, but can be boosted with new immunizations. In monkeys, DTH and direct cell cytotoxicity experiments suggest that specific T-cell responses are elicited by vaccination. Immunization with CIGB-247 had no effect on normal behavior, hematology, blood biochemistry and histology of critical organs, in the tested animals. Skin deep wound healing was not affected in vaccinated rats and monkeys. PMID:20197134

  9. Recent advances in the development of vaccines for tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahsan, Mohamed Jawed

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (Tb) continues to be a dreadful infection worldwide with nearly 1.5 million deaths in 2013. Furthermore multi/extensively drug-resistant Tb (MDR/XDR-Tb) worsens the condition. Recently approved anti-Tb drugs (bedaquiline and delamanid) have the potential to induce arrhythmia and are recommended in patients with MDR-Tb when other alternatives fail. The goal of elimination of Tb by 2050 will not be achieved without an effective new vaccine. The recent advancement in the development...

  10. Progress of vaccine and drug development for Ebola preparedness

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Woo Young; Hong, Kee-Jong; Hong, Joo Eun; Lee, Won-Ja

    2015-01-01

    Since the first case of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Guinea was reported in March 2014 by World Health Organization (WHO), the outbreak has continued through the year and the total number of 19,065 patients was reported as the confirmed or suspected in the EVD-affected countries. Among the cases, 7,388 patients were reported death by 19 December. Currently, available therapeutics to treat the infected patients or vaccines to prevent people from infection is not developed yet while viral diagn...

  11. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline. PMID:26970137

  12. Integration of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Eduardo L; Tsu, Vivien; Herrero, Rolando; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hildesheim, Allan; Muñoz, Nubia; Murillo, Raul; Sánchez, Gloria Ines; Andrus, Jon Kim

    2008-08-19

    Despite substantial efforts to control cervical cancer by screening, most Latin American and Caribbean countries continue to experience incidence rates of this disease that are much higher than those of other Western countries. The implementation of universal human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for young adolescent women is the best prospect for changing this situation. Even though there are financial challenges to overcome to implement such a policy, there is broad political support in the region for adopting universal HPV vaccination. The costs of implementing this policy could be largely alleviated by changing cervical cancer control practices that rely on inefficient use of resources presently allocated to cytology screening. In view of the strong evidence base concerning cervical cancer prevention technologies in the region and the expected impact of vaccination on the performance of cytology, we propose a reformulation of cervical cancer screening policies to be based on HPV testing using validated methods followed by cytologic triage. This approach would serve as the central component of a system that plays the dual role of providing screening and surveillance as integrated and complementary activities sharing centralized resources and coordination. PMID:18945406

  13. The clinical development process for a novel preventive vaccine: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K; Mehta, S

    2016-01-01

    Each novel vaccine candidate needs to be evaluated for safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in humans before it is licensed for use. After initial safety evaluation in healthy adults, each vaccine candidate follows a unique development path. This article on clinical development gives an overview on the development path based on the expectations of various guidelines issued by the World Health Organization (WHO), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). The manuscript describes the objectives, study populations, study designs, study site, and outcome(s) of each phase (Phase I-III) of a clinical trial. Examples from the clinical development of a malaria vaccine candidate, a rotavirus vaccine, and two vaccines approved for human papillomavirus (HPV) have also been discussed. The article also tabulates relevant guidelines, which can be referred to while drafting the development path of a novel vaccine candidate. PMID:26732191

  14. Development of antifertility vaccine using sperm specific proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A H Bandivdekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm proteins are known to be associated with normal fertilization as auto- or iso-antibodies to these proteins may cause infertility. Therefore, sperm proteins have been considered to be the potential candidate for the development of antifertility vaccine. Some of the sperm proteins proved to be promising antigens for contraceptive vaccine includes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4, protein hyaluronidase (PH-20, and Eppin. Immunization with LDH-C4 reduced fertility in female baboons but not in female cynomolgus macaques. Active immunization with PH-20 resulted in 100 per cent inhibition of fertility in male guinea pigs but it induced autoimmune orchitis. Immunization with Eppin elicited high antibody titres in 78 per cent of immunized monkeys and induced infertility but the immunopathological effect of immunization was not examined. Human sperm antigen (80kDa HSA is a sperm specific, highly immunogenic and conserved sperm protein. Active immunization with 80kDa HSA induced immunological infertility in male and female rats. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of 80kDa HSA (Peptide NT and its peptides (Peptides 1, 2, 3 and 4 obtained by enzymatic digestion did not show homology with any of the known proteins in gene bank. Peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 were found to mimic immunobiological activity of native protein. Passive administration of antibodies to peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 induced infertility in male and female rats and peptide 1 was found to be most effective in suppressing fertility. Active immunization with keyhole limpet haemocynin (KLH conjugated synthetic peptide 1 impaired fertility in all the male rabbits and six of the seven male marmosets. The fertility was restored following decline in antibody titre. All these findings on 80kDA HAS suggest that the synthetic Peptide-1 of 80kDa HSA is the promising candidate for development of male contraceptive vaccine.

  15. Development of antifertility vaccine using sperm specific proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandivdekar, A H

    2014-11-01

    Sperm proteins are known to be associated with normal fertilization as auto- or iso-antibodies to these proteins may cause infertility. Therefore, sperm proteins have been considered to be the potential candidate for the development of antifertility vaccine. Some of the sperm proteins proved to be promising antigens for contraceptive vaccine includes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4), protein hyaluronidase (PH-20), and Eppin. Immunization with LDH-C4 reduced fertility in female baboons but not in female cynomolgus macaques. Active immunization with PH-20 resulted in 100 per cent inhibition of fertility in male guinea pigs but it induced autoimmune orchitis. Immunization with Eppin elicited high antibody titres in 78 per cent of immunized monkeys and induced infertility but the immunopathological effect of immunization was not examined. Human sperm antigen (80 kDa HSA) is a sperm specific, highly immunogenic and conserved sperm protein. Active immunization with 80 kDa HSA induced immunological infertility in male and female rats. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of 80 kDa HSA (Peptide NT) and its peptides (Peptides 1, 2, 3 and 4) obtained by enzymatic digestion did not show homology with any of the known proteins in gene bank. Peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 were found to mimic immunobiological activity of native protein. Passive administration of antibodies to peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 induced infertility in male and female rats and peptide 1 was found to be most effective in suppressing fertility. Active immunization with keyhole limpet haemocynin (KLH) conjugated synthetic peptide 1 impaired fertility in all the male rabbits and six of the seven male marmosets. The fertility was restored following decline in antibody titre. All these findings on 80 kDA HAS suggest that the synthetic Peptide-1 of 80 kDa HSA is the promising candidate for development of male contraceptive vaccine. PMID:25673547

  16. Induction of protective and therapeutic anti-pancreatic cancer immunity using a reconstructed MUC1 DNA vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Yefei; Jin Dayong; Wu Wenchuan; Lou Wenhui; Wang Danshong; Kuang Tiantao; Ni Xiaoling; Qin Xinyu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is a common, highly lethal disease with a rising incidence. MUC1 is a tumor-associated antigen that is over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Active immunotherapy that targets MUC1 could have great treatment value. Here we investigated the preventive and therapeutic effect of a MUC1 DNA vaccine on the pancreatic cancer. Methods MUC1-various tandem repeat units(VNTR) DNA vaccine was produced by cloning one repeat of VNTR and inserting the cloned gene...

  17. Development of stable influenza vaccine powder formulations : Challenges and possibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2008-01-01

    Influenza vaccination represents the cornerstone of influenza prevention. However, today all influenza vaccines are formulated as liquids that are unstable at ambient temperatures and have to be stored and distributed under refrigeration. In order to stabilize influenza vaccines, they can be brought

  18. Metronomic Cyclophosphamide and Methotrexate Chemotherapy Combined with 1E10 Anti-Idiotype Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Jorge L; Batista, Noyde; Santiesteban, Eduardo; Lima, Mayté; González, Joaquín; García, Robin; Zarza, Yohanka; López, María V; Rodríguez, Myriam; Loys, Jorge L; Montejo, Narciso; Aguirre, Frank; Macías, Amparo; Vázquez, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    The use of low doses of cytotoxic agents continuously for prolonged periods is an alternative for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who have developed resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The combination of metronomic chemotherapy with therapeutic vaccines might increase the efficacy of the treatment. Twenty one patients with metastatic breast cancer in progression and a Karnosky index ≥60%, were treated with metronomic chemotherapy (50 mg of cyclophospamide orally daily and 2.5 mg of methotrexate orally bi-daily), in combination with five bi-weekly subcutaneous injections of 1 mg of aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 anti-idiotype MAb (1E10-Alum), followed by reimmunizations every 28 days. Five patients achieved objective response, eight showed stable disease and eight had disease progression. Median time to progression was 9,8 months, while median overall survival time was 12,93 months. The median duration of the response (CR+PR+SD) was 18,43 months (12,20-24,10 months), being higher than 12 months in 76,9% of the patients. Overall toxicity was generally mild. Metronomic chemotherapy combined with 1E10-Alum vaccine immunotherapy might be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer due to its potential impact on survival and patient quality of live, low toxicity and advantages of the administration. PMID:22295231

  19. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  20. Morbidity and mortality of vulvar and vaginal cancers: Impact of 2-, 4-, and 9-valent HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Tommy R; Graybill, Whitney S; Pierce, Jennifer Young

    2016-06-01

    Vaginal and vulvar cancers do not account for a large proportion of gynecologic malignancies but their impact is significant. Both vaginal and vulvar lesions have precursors and display levels of dysplasia before progression to invasive disease. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a known causative agent of such dysplasia and can be detected now more readily than ever with adequate recognition techniques and provider awareness. Although HPV vaccination is still lagging compared to other recommended childhood vaccinations, the impact on lower genital tract neoplasia is promising. The bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines have been shown to be efficacious and the newest nonavalent vaccine should add even more of impact on coverage of cancer-causing HPV types. Although it is still early to show true clinical and population-based disease reduction due to low disease incidence and relatively short time of vaccine availability, the potential is noteworthy. PMID:26901390

  1. Development of a Theory-based, Sociocultural Instrument to Assess Black Maternal Intentions to Vaccinate Their Daughters Aged 9 to 12 Against HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham-Erves, Jennifer; Talbott, Laura L; O'Neal, Marcia R; Ivankova, Nataliya V; Wallston, Kenneth A

    2016-09-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine could assist in reducing the cervical cancer disparity existing between Black and White women. Understanding factors influencing Black maternal intentions to vaccinate their daughter is essential in improving vaccination uptake. However, existing instruments do not comprehensively assess factors (e.g., culture) influencing maternal intentions. This paper describes the development of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Survey for Black Mothers with Girls Aged 9 to 12 (HPVS-BM), the first instrument to measure knowledge, attitudes, subjective norms, and cultural beliefs relating to Black maternal intentions to vaccinate their daughters aged 9 to 12 years against HPV. The items and scales were refined using content review by experts, as well as cognitive interviews and pilot testing with target audience participants. The final version of the HPVS-BM was administered to 242 Black mothers with adolescent daughters. Internal reliability was determined using Cronbach's alpha. An a priori hypothetical model was developed to determine convergent and discriminant validity. All scales of the HPVS-BM had an acceptable internal reliability of 0.70 or higher. The intention scale of HPVS-BM was significantly correlated (p instrument could be used by healthcare researchers and professionals to develop programs to increase HPV vaccination among Black adolescent females aimed at reducing the racial disparities in cervical cancer. Further psychometric testing of this survey tool for understanding factors influencing maternal intentions is warranted. PMID:26081311

  2. Development of a Murine Mycobacterial Growth Inhibition Assay for Evaluating Vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L.; Lim, Jaehyun; Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven; Cadieux, Nathalie; Perera, Liyanage P.; Jacobs, William R.; Brennan, Michael; Morris, Sheldon L.

    2009-01-01

    The development and characterization of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has been impeded by the lack of reproducible and reliable in vitro assays for measuring vaccine activity. In this study, we developed a murine in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating TB vaccines that directly assesses the capacity of immune splenocytes to control the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within infected macrophages. Using this in vitro assay, protective immune responses induced by immu...

  3. Progress on the research and development of inactivated EV71 whole-virus vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zheng-Lun; Mao, Qun-Ying; Wang, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Feng-cai; Li, Jing-Xin; Xin YAO; Gao, Fan; Wu, Xing; Xu, Miao; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of diseases caused by EV71 infection has become a serious public health problem in the Western Pacific region. Due to a lack of effective treatment options, controlling EV71 epidemics has mainly focused on the research and development (R&D) of EV71 vaccines. Thus far, five organizations have completed pre-clinical studies focused on the development of inactivated EV71 whole-virus vaccines, including vaccine strain screening, process optimization, safety and immunogenicity evalu...

  4. Malaria vaccine research and development: the role of the WHO MALVAC committee

    OpenAIRE

    Targett, GA; Moorthy, VS; Brown, GV

    2013-01-01

    The WHO Malaria Vaccine Advisory Committee (MALVAC) provides advice to WHO on strategic priorities, activities and technical issues related to global efforts to develop vaccines against malaria. MALVAC convened a series of meetings to obtain expert, impartial consensus views on the priorities and best practice for vaccine-related research and development strategies. The technical areas covered during these consultations included: guidance on clinical trial design for candidate sporozoite and ...

  5. Current perspective in tuberculosis vaccine development for high TB endemic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Aliabbas A; Daginawala, Hatim F; Singh, Lokendra; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a global epidemic, despite of the availability of Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccine for more than six decades. In an effort to eradicate TB, vaccinologist around the world have made considerable efforts to develop improved vaccine candidates, based on the understanding of BCG failure in developing world and immune response thought to be protective against TB. The present review represents a current perspective on TB vaccination research, including additional research strategies needed for increasing the efficacy of BCG, and for the development of new effective vaccines for high TB endemic regions. PMID:27156631

  6. Development and introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines derived from Sabin strains in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    During the endgame of global polio eradication, the universal introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines is urgently required to reduce the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and polio outbreaks due to wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses. In particular, the development of inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) derived from the attenuated Sabin strains is considered to be a highly favorable option for the production of novel IPV that reduce the risk of facility-acquired transmission of poliovirus to the communities. In Japan, Sabin-derived IPVs (sIPVs) have been developed and introduced for routine immunization in November 2012. They are the first licensed sIPVs in the world. Consequently, trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine was used for polio control in Japan for more than half a century but has now been removed from the list of vaccines licensed for routine immunization. This paper reviews the development, introduction, characterization, and global status of IPV derived from attenuated Sabin strains. PMID:25448090

  7. Ten years of HPV vaccines: State of art and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioli, Roberto; Lopez, Salvatore; Aloisi, Alessia; Terranova, Corrado; De Cicco, Carlo; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Capriglione, Stella; Miranda, Andrea; Luvero, Daniela; Ricciardi, Roberto; Montera, Roberto; Plotti, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) represents one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and it has been related to cervical cancer. The HPV vaccines prevent infection with certain species of HPV associated with the development of cervical cancer or genital warts. We carried out a PubMed search up to 2015 evaluating all randomized studies published in literature. This review discusses the current status of HPVs vaccines on the global market, efficacy, safety profiles, controversies and future vaccine developments. Three HPVs vaccines are currently on the global market: bivalent, quadrivalent and ninevalent. Bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines can protect against almost 70% of cervical HPV-related cancerous and precancerous conditions and the ninevalent vaccine, instead, provides a protection against almost 90%. The use of vaccinations raised several controversies in the last years and, currently, is not possible to establish which type of vaccine is most effective, however all of them are safe. PMID:27066937

  8. Vector prime/protein boost vaccine that overcomes defects acquired during aging and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Y.; Akbulut, H.; Maynard, J.;

    2006-01-01

    following the Ad-sig-TAA/ecdCD40L vector, the levels of the TAA-specific CD8 T cells and Abs increase dramatically over that seen with vector alone, in young (2-mo-old) as well as old (18-mo-old) mice. The Abs induced against hMUC-1 react with human breast cancer. This vaccine also induces a 4-fold...

  9. Shikonin enhances efficacy of a gene-based cancer vaccine via induction of RANTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hui-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shikonin, a phytochemical purified from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been shown to confer diverse pharmacological activities, including accelerating granuloma formation, wound healing, anti-inflammation and others, and is explored for immune-modifier activities for vaccination in this study. Transdermal gene-based vaccine is an attractive approach for delivery of DNA transgenes encoding specific tumor antigens to host skin tissues. Skin dendritic cells (DCs, a potent antigen-presenting cell type, is known to play a critical role in transmitting and orchestrating tumor antigen-specific immunities against cancers. The present study hence employs these various components for experimentation. Method The mRNA and protein expression of RANTES were detected by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The regional expression of RANTES and tissue damage in test skin were evaluated via immunohistochemistry assay. Fluorescein isothiocyanate sensitization assay was performed to trace the trafficking of DCs from the skin vaccination site to draining lymph nodes. Adjuvantic effect of shikonin on gene gun-delivered human gp100 (hgp100 DNA cancer vaccine was studied in a human gp100-transfected B16 (B16/hgp100 tumor model. Results Among various phytochemicals tested, shikonin induced the highest level of expression of RANTES in normal skin tissues. In comparison, mouse RANTES cDNA gene transfection induced a higher level of mRANTES expression for a longer period, but caused more extensive skin damage. Topical application of shikonin onto the immunization site before gene gun-mediated vaccination augmented the population of skin DCs migrating into the draining lymph nodes. A hgp100 cDNA gene vaccination regimen with shikonin pretreatment as an adjuvant in a B16/hgp100 tumor model increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities in splenocytes and lymph node cells on target tumor cells. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that shikonin can

  10. Phase I clinical study of anti-apoptosis protein, survivin-derived peptide vaccine therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minamida Hidetoshi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family containing a single baculovirus IAP repeat domain. It is expressed during fetal development but becomes undetectable in terminally differentiated normal adult tissues. We previously reported that survivin and its splicing variant survivin-2B was expressed abundantly in various types of tumor tissues as well as tumor cell lines and was suitable as a target antigen for active-specific anti-cancer immunization. Subsequently, we identified an HLA-A24-restricted antigenic peptide, survivin-2B80-88 (AYACNTSTL recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. We, therefore, started a phase I clinical study assessing the efficacy of survivin-2B peptide vaccination in patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer expressing survivin. Vaccinations with survivin-2B peptide were given subcutaneously six times at 14-day intervals. Of 15 patients who finished receiving the vaccination schedule, three suffered slight toxicities, including anemia (grade 2, general malaise (grade 1, and fever (grade 1. No severe adverse events were observed in any patient. In 6 patients, tumor marker levels (CEA and CA19-9 decreased transiently during the period of vaccination. Slight reduction of the tumor volume was observed in one patient, which was considered a minor responder. No changes were noted in three patients while the remaining eleven patients experienced tumor progression. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of one patient using HLA-A24/peptide tetramers revealed an increase in peptide-specific CTL frequency from 0.09% to 0.35% of CD8+ T cells after 4 vaccinations. This phase I clinical study indicates that survivin-2B peptide-based vaccination is safe and should be further considered for potential immune and clinical efficacy in HLA-A24-expression patients with colorectal cancer.

  11. New approaches to the development of virus vaccines for veterinary use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, K; Barrett, T; Kai, C

    1998-12-01

    The marked progress in recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology during the past decade has led to the development of a variety of safe new vaccine vectors which are capable of efficiently expressing foreign immunogens. These have been based on a variety of virus types--poxviruses, herpesviruses and adenoviruses--and have led to the production of many new potential recombinant vaccines. Of these recombinant vaccines, the rabies vaccine, in which the rabies G protein is expressed in a vaccinia vector, has been widely used in the field to prevent the spread of rabies both in Europe and in the United States of America. A recombinant Newcastle disease virus vaccine, using fowlpox virus as the vector to express immunogenic proteins from the Newcastle disease virus, has been licensed as the first commercial recombinant vectored vaccine. Many other recombinant virus vaccines are still at the stage of laboratory or field testing. The most recent breakthrough in vaccinology has been the success with the use of naked DNA as a means of vaccination. This approach has shown great promise in mouse model systems and has now become the most active field in new vaccine development. Molecular redesigning of conventional ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses to obtain more stable attenuated vaccines was previously possible only for positive-strand RNA viruses, such as poliovirus. However, recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the rescuing of negative-strand viruses from DNA copies of their genomes. This has made it possible to engineer specific changes in the genomes of Rhabdoviridae and Paramyxoviridae, both of which include several viruses of veterinary importance. The authors describe the current progress in the development of vector vaccines, DNA vaccines and vaccines based on engineered positive- and negative-strand RNA virus genomes, with special emphasis on their application to diseases of veterinary importance. PMID:9850535

  12. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  13. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  14. High Throughput T Epitope Mapping and Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Li Pira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of antigenic peptide sequences from proteins of relevant pathogens recognized by T helper (Th and by cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL is crucial for vaccine development. In fact, mapping of T-cell epitopes provides useful information for the design of peptide-based vaccines and of peptide libraries to monitor specific cellular immunity in protected individuals, patients and vaccinees. Nevertheless, epitope mapping is a challenging task. In fact, large panels of overlapping peptides need to be tested with lymphocytes to identify the sequences that induce a T-cell response. Since numerous peptide panels from antigenic proteins are to be screened, lymphocytes available from human subjects are a limiting factor. To overcome this limitation, high throughput (HTP approaches based on miniaturization and automation of T-cell assays are needed. Here we consider the most recent applications of the HTP approach to T epitope mapping. The alternative or complementary use of in silico prediction and experimental epitope definition is discussed in the context of the recent literature. The currently used methods are described with special reference to the possibility of applying the HTP concept to make epitope mapping an easier procedure in terms of time, workload, reagents, cells and overall cost.

  15. Therapeutic regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and immune response to cancer vaccine in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Iclozan, Cristina; Antonia, Scott; Chiappori, Alberto; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major factors limiting the efficacy of immune therapy. In a clinical trial of patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) we tested the possibility that targeting MDSC can improve the induction of immune responses by a cancer vaccine. Forty-one patients with extensive stage SCLC were randomized into three arms: arm A - control, arm B - vaccination with dendritic cells transduced with wild-type p53, and arm C – vaccination ...

  16. Vaccine process technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsberg, Jessica O; Buckland, Barry

    2012-06-01

    The evolution of vaccines (e.g., live attenuated, recombinant) and vaccine production methods (e.g., in ovo, cell culture) are intimately tied to each other. As vaccine technology has advanced, the methods to produce the vaccine have advanced and new vaccine opportunities have been created. These technologies will continue to evolve as we strive for safer and more immunogenic vaccines and as our understanding of biology improves. The evolution of vaccine process technology has occurred in parallel to the remarkable growth in the development of therapeutic proteins as products; therefore, recent vaccine innovations can leverage the progress made in the broader biotechnology industry. Numerous important legacy vaccines are still in use today despite their traditional manufacturing processes, with further development focusing on improving stability (e.g., novel excipients) and updating formulation (e.g., combination vaccines) and delivery methods (e.g., skin patches). Modern vaccine development is currently exploiting a wide array of novel technologies to create safer and more efficacious vaccines including: viral vectors produced in animal cells, virus-like particles produced in yeast or insect cells, polysaccharide conjugation to carrier proteins, DNA plasmids produced in E. coli, and therapeutic cancer vaccines created by in vitro activation of patient leukocytes. Purification advances (e.g., membrane adsorption, precipitation) are increasing efficiency, while innovative analytical methods (e.g., microsphere-based multiplex assays, RNA microarrays) are improving process understanding. Novel adjuvants such as monophosphoryl lipid A, which acts on antigen presenting cell toll-like receptors, are expanding the previously conservative list of widely accepted vaccine adjuvants. As in other areas of biotechnology, process characterization by sophisticated analysis is critical not only to improve yields, but also to determine the final product quality. From a regulatory

  17. From the Bench to the Pharmacy: Protecting Innovation During Vaccine Development and Commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Adam C; Abu-Shaar, Muna; Brady, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Patentable inventions may be made during the development of a vaccine, and patents on such inventions can help to protect the vaccine from competition. This chapter introduces several patent law concepts, including patent eligible subject matter, written description, enablement, novelty, and nonobviousness, by following a hypothetical vaccine development timeline that begins with the discovery of a previously unknown virus and ends with the commercial launch of a vaccine against the virus. Regulatory exclusivity, freedom to operate, and lifecycle management considerations are also discussed. PMID:27076339

  18. Chronic Inflammation in Cancer Development

    OpenAIRE

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Molls, Michael; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory mediators exert pleiotropic effects in the development of cancer. On the one hand, inflammation favors carcinogenesis, malignant transformation, tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spread; on the other hand inflammation can stimulate immune effector mechanisms that might limit tumor growth. The link between cancer and inflammation depends on intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Both pathways result in the activation of transcription factors such as NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-...

  19. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26550522

  20. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola Anuoluwapo Akanbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9% of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3% are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5% know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1% are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7% had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3% of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9% have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5% are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma.

  1. From empiricism to rational design: a personal perspective of the evolution of vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino

    2014-07-01

    Vaccination, which is the most effective medical intervention that has ever been introduced, originated from the observation that individuals who survived a plague or smallpox would not get the disease twice. To mimic the protective effects of natural infection, Jenner - and later Pasteur - inoculated individuals with attenuated or killed disease-causing agents. This empirical approach inspired a century of vaccine development and the effective prophylaxis of many infectious diseases. From the 1980s, several waves of new technologies have enabled the development of novel vaccines that would not have been possible using the empirical approach. The technological revolution in the field of vaccination is now continuing, and it is delivering novel and safer vaccines. In this Timeline article, we provide our views on the transition from empiricism to rational vaccine design. PMID:24925139

  2. Pharmaceutical characterization of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine used for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, M J

    1993-06-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, developed in the 1920s as a treatment and prophylactic for tuberculosis, has proved to be a nonspecific stimulant of the immune system and is now the major form of clinical immunotherapy approved for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer in the United States. However, methods for the production and physical characterization of the vaccine have not been significantly developed since Calmette and Guérin first devised their process for attenuating the organism in 1908. When reconstituted with sterile water immediately before use, the vaccine consists of a suspension of cellular fragments and aggregates and a mixture of dead and living cells. The dose is determined by the number of colony-forming units that develop when the vaccine is allowed to grow in a nutrient medium. This measurement of dose and viability is misleading because each cellular aggregate may consist of several hundred individual cells, but only one need be living to give rise to a single visible colony. Viability should therefore be measured on the basis of residual ATP levels. In this report, the mode of action of BCG vaccine against bladder cancer is reviewed, and attention is drawn to some factors that may need to be controlled during manufacturing and subsequent quality assurance procedures. The morphology of the various parts of the complex pleomorphic life cycle of this Mycobacterium species has been investigated, and the vaccine has been physically evaluated to provide a characterization by contemporary methodologies, including measurement of ATP content and particle size distribution of the dispersed mycobacterial aggregates. PMID:8331524

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of a NeuGcGM3 based cancer vaccine: Results from a controlled study in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulens, Vladimir; de la Torre, Ana; Marinello, Patricia; Rodríguez, Ronald; Cardoso, Jorge; Díaz, René; O'Farrill, Miguel; Macias, Amparo; Viada, Carmen; Saurez, Giselle; Carr, Adriana; Crombet, Tania; Mazorra, Zaima; Perez, Rolando; Fernandez, Luis Enrique

    2010-09-14

    Increased levels of NeuGc-containing gangliosides have been described in human breast cancer. A controlled Phase II clinical trial was conducted in patients with metastatic breast cancer to evaluate immunogenicity, safety and to identify evidences of biological activity of a cancer vaccine composed by NeuGcGM3 in a proteoliposome of Neisseria meningitidis together with Montanide ISA 51 as adjuvant. After first line chemotherapy, 79 women were randomized 1:1 to receive the vaccine candidate or best supportive care. All patients achieved at least stable disease to the first line therapy for the metastatic condition. Treatment consisted on 5 vaccine doses every 2 weeks and then, monthly re-immunization to complete 15 doses. Vaccination with the NeuGcGM3 based vaccine was safe and the most frequent adverse events consisted on injection site reactions, fever, arthralgia and chills. The vaccine was immunogenic and a sustained increase of both IgG and IgM antibody titters against NGcGM3 was observed after the second vaccination month. Antibodies were able to recognize the NeuGcGM3(+) murine tumor cell line L1210 and the myeloma cell line P3X63. Humoral response was specific since vaccination did not result in Neu-Acetyl GM3 or GM2-antibody response. Hyperimmune sera from vaccinated patients were able to prevent the NeuGcGM3 mediated CD4 down-modulation on T lymphocytes. In the intent to treat analysis, there was a trend toward a survival advantage for the vaccine group and this effect was significant for women bearing non-visceral metastasis. Two phase III clinical studies with this vaccine candidate are ongoing. PMID:20855939

  4. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccine for T1D promising in the clinic HPV vaccines halved infections in US teenage girls Modified DC immunotherapy against melanoma New study looks at clinical severity of human H7N9 infections Prevnar vaccines are valuable for healthcare systems GAPVAC: New consortium in the fight of brain cancer Cytomegalovirus vaccine to enter phase 3 Malaria vaccination using chemically attenuated parasites

  5. Varicella zoster vaccines and their implications for development of HSV vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershon, Anne A., E-mail: aag1@columbia.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 620W. 168th Street, NY, NY 10032 (United States)

    2013-01-05

    Live attenuated vaccines to prevent varicella and zoster have been available in the US for the past 17 years, with a resultant dramatic decrease in varicella incidence and a predicted future decrease in the incidence of zoster. The pathogenesis and immune responses to varicella zoster virus (VZV) as well as the safety and effectiveness of VZV vaccines are reviewed. The lack of sterilizing immunity provided by VZV vaccines has not prevented them from being safe and effective. Virological and pathological information concerning parallels and differences between VZV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are highlighted. Although VZV and HSV are distinct pathogens, they appear to have similarities in target organs and immunity that provide an expectation of a high likelihood for the success of vaccination against HSV, and predicted to be similar to that of VZV.

  6. Varicella zoster vaccines and their implications for development of HSV vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Live attenuated vaccines to prevent varicella and zoster have been available in the US for the past 17 years, with a resultant dramatic decrease in varicella incidence and a predicted future decrease in the incidence of zoster. The pathogenesis and immune responses to varicella zoster virus (VZV) as well as the safety and effectiveness of VZV vaccines are reviewed. The lack of sterilizing immunity provided by VZV vaccines has not prevented them from being safe and effective. Virological and pathological information concerning parallels and differences between VZV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are highlighted. Although VZV and HSV are distinct pathogens, they appear to have similarities in target organs and immunity that provide an expectation of a high likelihood for the success of vaccination against HSV, and predicted to be similar to that of VZV.

  7. Development, theoretical framework, and evaluation of a parent and teacher-delivered intervention on adolescent vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Lisa M; Herbert, Natasha L; Painter, Julia E; Sales, Jessica M; Vogt, Tara M; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M

    2014-07-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended immunization schedule for adolescents includes three vaccines (tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis [Tdap]; human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccine; and meningococcal conjugate vaccine [MCV4]) and an annual influenza vaccination. Given the increasing number of recommended vaccines for adolescents and health and economic costs associated with nonvaccination, it is imperative that effective strategies for increasing vaccination rates among adolescents are developed. This article describes the development, theoretical framework, and initial first-year evaluation of an intervention designed to promote vaccine acceptance among a middle and high school-based sample of adolescents and their parents in eastern Georgia. Adolescents, parents, and teachers were active participants in the development of the intervention. The intervention, which consisted of a brochure for parents and a teacher-delivered curriculum for adolescents, was guided by constructs from the health belief model and theory of reasoned action. Evaluation results indicated that our intervention development methods were successful in creating a brochure that met cultural relevance and the literacy needs of parents. We also demonstrated an increase in student knowledge of and positive attitudes toward vaccines. To our knowledge, this study is the first to extensively engage middle and high school students, parents, and teachers in the design and implementation of key theory-based educational components of a school-based, teacher-delivered adolescent vaccination intervention. PMID:24440920

  8. The introduction of new vaccines into developing countries. IV: Global Access Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Richard T; Krattiger, Anatole; Clemens, John D; Curtiss, Roy

    2007-05-16

    This paper offers a framework for managing a comprehensive Global Access Strategy for new vaccines in developing countries. It is aimed at strengthening the ability of public-sector entities to reach their goals. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and The Rockefeller Foundation have been leaders in stimulating the creation of new organizations - public/private product development partnerships (PDPs) - that seek to accelerate vaccine development and distribution to meet the health needs of the world's poor. Case studies of two of these PDPs - the Salmonella Anti-pneumococcal Vaccine Program and the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative - examine development of such strategies. Relying on the application of innovation theory, the strategy leads to the identification of six Components of Innovation which cover all aspects of the vaccine innovation process. Appropriately modified, the proposed framework can be applied to the development and introduction of other products in developing countries including drugs, and nutritional and agricultural products. PMID:17363119

  9. Clinical trials for vaccine development in registry of Korea Food and Drug Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seog-Youn

    2013-01-01

    Based on the action plan "Ensuring a stable supply of National Immunization Program vaccines and sovereignty of biopharmaceutical products," Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) has made efforts to develop vaccines in the context of self reliance and to protect public health. Along with the recognized infrastructures for clinical trials, clinical trials for vaccines have also gradually been conducted at multinational sites as well as at local sites. KFDA will support to expand six to ele...

  10. Clinical Development of a Cytomegalovirus DNA Vaccine: From Product Concept to Pivotal Phase 3 Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Gerber; Alain P. Rolland; Chaplin, Jennifer A.; Mary K. Wloch; Smith, Larry R

    2013-01-01

    2013 marks a milestone year for plasmid DNA vaccine development as a first-in-class cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA vaccine enters pivotal phase 3 testing. This vaccine consists of two plasmids expressing CMV antigens glycoprotein B (gB) and phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) formulated with a CRL1005 poloxamer and benzalkonium chloride (BAK) delivery system designed to enhance plasmid expression. The vaccine’s planned initial indication under investigation is for prevention of CMV reactivation in CMV-seropo...

  11. Overview of Current Humman Papilloma Virus (HPV Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cumhur Artuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes causes virtually all cancer of the cervix. The same HPV genotypes (“types” also cause cases of anal cancer. Cervical cancer is the third most frequent cancer in women worldwide after breast and colorectal cancers. It ranks fourth of women’s cancers according to the mortality ratio. Two vaccines have been developed against HPV infection; one is a quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil™ and the other is a bivalent vaccine (Cervarix™. This topic will cover issues related to HPV infections, routine HPV immunization recommendations, vaccination in special patient populations, the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination, and vaccine safety. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 327-334

  12. Long-lasting Disease Stabilization in the Absence of Toxicity in Metastatic Lung Cancer Patients Vaccinated with an Epitope Derived from Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Trine Zeeberg; Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Ellebaek, Eva;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate targeting of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme using a synthetic peptide vaccine administered to patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In a clinical phase I study, we treated 15 HLA-A2-positive patients with stage III...... endpoints. RESULTS: No severe toxicity was observed. One patient developed a partial response (PR) after one year of vaccine treatment, whereas long-lasting stable disease (SD) ≥ 8.5 months was demonstrated in another six patients. The median overall survival (OS) was 25.9 months. Patients demonstrated...... long-term analyses of two clinical responding patients, the ratio of Kyn/Trp remained stable. CONCLUSIONS: The vaccine was well tolerated with no severe toxicity occurring. A median OS of 25.9 months was demonstrated and long-lasting PR+SD was seen in 47% of the patients....

  13. Current challenges in the development of vaccines for pneumonic plague

    OpenAIRE

    Smiley, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of Yersinia pestis bacilli causes pneumonic plague, a rapidly progressing and exceptionally virulent disease. Extensively antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains exist and we currently lack a safe and effective pneumonic plague vaccine. These facts raise concern that Y. pestis may be exploited as a bioweapon. Here, I review the history and status of plague vaccine research and advocate that pneumonic plague vaccines should strive to prime both humoral and cellular immunity.

  14. Development of a BCG challenge model for the testing of vaccine candidates against tuberculosis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Berg, Stefan; Chamberlain, Laura; McShane, Helen; Hewinson, R Glyn; Clifford, Derek; Vordermeier, Martin

    2014-09-29

    Vaccination is being considered as part of a sustainable strategy for the control of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the UK. The live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been used experimentally to vaccinate cattle against BTB. However, BCG confers partial protection against BTB and therefore, there is a need to develop improved vaccines. BTB vaccine efficacy experiments require the use of biosafety level 3 facilities which are expensive to maintain, generally oversubscribed and represent a bottle neck for the testing of vaccine candidates. One indicator of the induction of protective responses would be the ability of the host's immune response to control/kill mycobacteria. In this work we have evaluated an intranodal BCG challenge for the selection of vaccine candidates at biosafety level 2 which are capable of inducing mycobactericidal responses. To our knowledge, this is the first such report. Whilst BCG only confers partial protection, it is still the standard against which other vaccines are judged. Therefore we tested the BCG intranodal challenge in BCG (Danish strain) vaccinated cattle and showed that vaccinated cattle had lower BCG cfu counts than naïve cattle at 14 and 21 days after intranodal challenge with BCG (Tokyo strain). This model could help prioritize competing TB vaccine candidates and exploration of primary and secondary immune responses to mycobacteria. PMID:25138291

  15. 76 FR 49776 - The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox... workshop entitled ``The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines.'' The purpose of... evaluation of next-generation smallpox vaccines. The public workshop will include presentations on the...

  16. Development of a murine mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L; Lim, JaeHyun; Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven; Cadieux, Nathalie; Perera, Liyanage P; Jacobs, William R; Brennan, Michael; Morris, Sheldon L

    2009-07-01

    The development and characterization of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has been impeded by the lack of reproducible and reliable in vitro assays for measuring vaccine activity. In this study, we developed a murine in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating TB vaccines that directly assesses the capacity of immune splenocytes to control the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within infected macrophages. Using this in vitro assay, protective immune responses induced by immunization with five different types of TB vaccine preparations (Mycobacterium bovis BCG, an attenuated M. tuberculosis mutant strain, a DNA vaccine, a modified vaccinia virus strain Ankara [MVA] construct expressing four TB antigens, and a TB fusion protein formulated in adjuvant) can be detected. Importantly, the levels of vaccine-induced mycobacterial growth-inhibitory responses seen in vitro after 1 week of coculture correlated with the protective immune responses detected in vivo at 28 days postchallenge in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, similar patterns of cytokine expression were evoked at day 7 of the in vitro culture by immune splenocytes taken from animals immunized with the different TB vaccines. Among the consistently upregulated cytokines detected in the immune cocultures are gamma interferon, growth differentiation factor 15, interleukin-21 (IL-21), IL-27, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Overall, we have developed an in vitro functional assay that may be useful for screening and comparing new TB vaccine preparations, investigating vaccine-induced protective mechanisms, and assessing manufacturing issues, including product potency and stability. PMID:19458207

  17. Mechanisms of immunity in hydatid disease: implications for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbao; Ross, Allen G; McManus, Donald P

    2008-11-15

    The Echinococcus organisms, the cause of echinococcosis (hydatid disease), are parasitic helminths with life cycles involving a carnivorous definitive host (usually dog or fox) and an intermediate host (human, ungulate, or rodent). They are complex multicellular pathogens that, despite being under constant barrage by the immune system, are able to modulate antiparasite immune responses and persist and flourish in their mammalian hosts. Understanding how the immune system deals with these parasites is a major challenge. Recent application of modern molecular and immunological approaches has revealed insights on the nature of immune responses generated during the course of hydatid infection, although many aspects of the Echinococcus-host interplay remain unexplored. This review summarizes current understanding of the immunology of echinococcosis, indicates areas where information is lacking, and shows how knowledge of host protective immunity has been translated into the design and development of anti-Echinococcus vaccines for application in intermediate hosts. PMID:18981082

  18. Hepatitis Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B ...

  19. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, T.A.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Dorsman, S.; Tutuhatunewa, E.D.; Vrij, E.L. de; Nijman, H.W.; Daemen, T.; Wilschut, J.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infection with HPV 16 and 18, the major causative agents of cervical cancer, can be prevented through vaccination with a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine. Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides a

  20. HPV vaccination and allocative efficiency: regional analysis of the costs and benefits with the bivalent AS04-adjuvanted vaccine, from the perspective of public health, for the prevention of cervical cancer and its pre-cancerous lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonanni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: by means of the decisions on whether to introduce the HPV vaccination, Public Health has already established the importance of associating the vaccination strategy to the policy of secondary prevention. The screening + vaccination strategy is more effective than the two methods taken individually. In support of this combined strategy and in order to make available per each region concrete elements for their regional planning, an assessment has been made, which also takes into account the effect of cross-protection regarding high-risk strains not contained in both vaccines, bivalent and quadrivalent, and more frequently responsible for pre-cancerous lesions and cervical cancer (CCU. This analysis evaluates the costs and benefits of screening + vaccination strategy in a 12-year-old female cohort. Furthermore, the paper provides results that may be useful to assess the opportunity to extend the vaccination to a second cohort of 24-25-year-old women. The analysis is preceded by a brief summary of CCU epidemiology available data, public health policies that give precise guidelines for vaccination strategies and analytical tools suitable to support public policy makers to efficiently allocate resources. Methods: two different models were used for two regional analyses.The vaccines may have different sustained- and cross-protection levels against non-vaccine oncogenic HPV-types. In the first analysis, a prevalence-based model estimated the potential net difference in HPV-related lesions (abnormal pap smear, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, cervical cancer (CC and genital warts (GW and associated costs generated by the two vaccines. Vaccine efficacy rates were based on published data for each vaccine. Lifetime vaccine efficacy was assumed. Results are reported over one year after reaching a steady state. Incidence and treatment costs were obtained from Italian and European sources. We also performed a cost-effectiveness analysis

  1. Human papillomavirus infection, vaccination, and cervical cancer communication: the protection dilemma faced by women in southern Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Sadie P; Dorgan, Kelly A; Duvall, Kathryn L; Garrett, Linda H

    2011-11-30

    Human papillomavirus is the most frequently occurring sexually transmitted infection and has been recognized as the necessary cause of cervical cancer. Understanding the shift in public awareness caused by recent changes to cervical prevention is critical to addressing cervical cancer disparities in Appalachia. Since the human papillomavirus vaccine was approved for prevention, little data have been collected regarding human papillomavirus risk assessment and vaccine perceptions among Appalachian women. The purpose of the authors in this study was to investigate communication and cultural issues via a social scripting framework that could influence human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among southern Appalachian women; and explore participants' perceptions of human papillomavirus, cervical cancer, and the vaccine. A qualitative, descriptive design was employed to examine these issues in eight counties in northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia. Thirty-nine women aged 18-49 years participated in a single individual interview or focus group session from October 2007 through August 2008. Interview and focus group data were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Two major themes emerged from the data: the human papillomavirus vaccine protection dilemma and spheres of silence surrounding the human papillomavirus vaccine protection dilemma. Study findings suggested areas for future research and may assist healthcare professionals in approaching southern Appalachian women as they make decisions regarding cervical cancer prevention. PMID:22185292

  2. Personalized peptide vaccination for advanced biliary tract cancer: IL-6, nutritional status and pre-existing antigen-specific immunity as possible biomarkers for patient prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshitomi, Munehiro; Yutani, Shigeru; Matsueda, Satoko; IOJI, TETSUYA; Komatsu, Nobukazu; SHICHIJO, SHIGEKI; Yamada, Akira; ITOH, KYOGO; SASADA, TETSURO; Kinoshita, Hisafumi

    2011-01-01

    Considering that the prognosis of patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) remains very poor, with a median survival of less than 1 year, new therapeutic approaches need to be developed. In the present study, a phase II clinical trial of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) was conducted in advanced BTC patients to evaluate the feasibility of this treatment and to identify potential biomarkers. A maximum of 4 human leukocyte antigen-matched peptides, which were selected based on th...

  3. Tumor cells engineered to codisplay on their surface 4-1BBL and LIGHT costimulatory proteins as a novel vaccine approach for cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Rajesh Kumar; Yolcu, Esma S.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Shirwan, Haval

    2010-01-01

    Primary tumor cells genetically modified to express on their surface a collection of immunological ligands may have utility as therapeutic autologous cancer vaccines. However, genetic modification of primary tumor cells is not only cost, labor, and time intensive, but also has safety repercussions. As an alternative, we developed the ProtEx™ technology that involves generation of immunological ligands with core streptavidin (SA) and their display on biotinylated cells in a rapid and efficient...

  4. Efficacy of HPV-16 E7 Based Vaccine in a TC-1 Tumoric Animal Model of Cervical Cancer - page 483

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Fazeli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The human papillomavirus as an etiological agent of cervical cancer doesnot grow adequately in tissue culture systems. The tumor cell line TC-1 continuously expressesthe E6 and E7 oncogenic proteins of HPV, and is considered a suitable tool inlaboratory investigations and vaccine researches against cervical cancer.Materials and Methods: The TC-1 cell line was grown in RPMI 1650 supplemented with10% FBS, glutamine and antibiotics, and was used for tumor development in mice. Six toseven week-old tumor bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 groups consisting of 7mice per group. The first group received pcDNA-E7, the second group received pcDNA3,and the third group received phosphate buffered saline (PBS. The treated animals weremonitored for their tumor size progression and survival. At last, the tumoric tissues fromautopsied animals were fixed and examined with Mayer's hematoxylin and eosin (H&E.All experiments were done in accordance with guidelines of the Laboratory Animal EthicalCommission of Tarbiat Modares University. Data analysis was performed using the onewayANOVA followed by Tukey's test in both experimental and control groups. A p-value<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There were significant decreases in tumor growth; there were also improvementsin survival among mice in the treated groups (p<0.041. H&E stained sections fromuntreated mice were studied independently in a blinded fashion by two observers andshowed malignant neoplasms composed of severely pleomorphic tumor cells with nuclearenlargement, high nuclear-cytoplasmic (N/C ratios, and prominent nucleoli in solid andfascicular patterns of growth. High mitotic activity with extensive necrosis was also notedin both test and control groups.Conclusion: The TC-1 lung metastatic model can be used to test the efficacy of variousE7-based therapeutic cancer vaccine strategies for cervical cancer and the prevention ofHPV-related neoplasia.

  5. Development of Vaccines against Influenza A Virus (H5N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yhu-Chering Huang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Three influenza pandemics took place during the 20thcentury, including the 1918 pandemic, which killed an estimated50 million people. We are facing the threat of anotherpandemic, which may be caused by an A/H5N1 influenzavirus. These viruses have expanded their territory from Asiato the Middle East, Africa and Europe and have caused morethan 190 human deaths up to the present. Vaccines in responseto this pandemic threat are currently under development.Reverse-genetics-based inactivated whole-virion vaccines andadjuvanted split-virion vaccines are undergoing clinical trialsand are among possible candidates to be approved as H5N1vaccines for human beings. Problems, including low immunogenicityin the generally naive human population, a lack ofdata on these vaccines in relation to immunocompromisedpatients, young children and the elderly and the currently limitedglobal capacity to manufacture influenza vaccines, all need to be resolved. Several innovativeapproaches, such as the use of novel adjuvants, an antigen-sparing policy and the useof adenoviral-vector-based or DNA vaccines, are being used to develop more efficient vaccines.Every effort should be made to shorten the gap that remains and improve greatlyinfluenza pandemic vaccine access.

  6. Development of vaccines against influenza A virus (H5N1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Chen; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2007-01-01

    Three influenza pandemics took place during the 20th century, including the 1918 pandemic, which killed an estimated 50 million people. We are facing the threat of another pandemic, which may be caused by an A/H5N1 influenza virus. These viruses have expanded their territory from Asia to the Middle East, Africa and Europe and have caused more than 190 human deaths up to the present. Vaccines in response to this pandemic threat are currently under development. Reverse-genetics-based inactivated whole-virion vaccines and adjuvanted split-virion vaccines are undergoing clinical trials and are among possible candidates to be approved as H5N1 vaccines for human beings. Problems, including low immunogenicity in the generally naive human population, a lack of data on these vaccines in relation to immunocompromised Dr. Yhu-Chering Huang patients, young children and the elderly and the currently limited global capacity to manufacture influenza vaccines, all need to be resolved. Several innovative approaches, such as the use of novel adjuvants, an antigen-sparing policy and the use of adenoviral-vector-based or DNA vaccines, are being used to develop more efficient vaccines. Every effort should be made to shorten the gap that remains and improve greatly influenza pandemic vaccine access. PMID:17939259

  7. 108 Development of universal vaccines against flu: reality and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmarov, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Two surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase are the main antigens for obtaining traditional flu vaccines due to their high immunogenicity and ability to induce generation of neutralizing antibodies. High genetically instability of influenza virus provides antigenic diversity of these glycoproteins between strains. Subunit vaccines based on one of these surface antigens are characterized by narrow specificity. Modern vaccines should provide protection against several or all subtypes of influenza A viruses. In addition sporadic influenza outbreaks of newly emerged influenza A viruses may cause the next pandemic. Today there are no flu vaccines of a wide range of action, so-called “universal” vaccines. Several flu vaccines with a broad cross-protectivity are tested in different phases of clinical trials. In this report the analysis of the modern researches directed on creation of flu “universal” vaccines including data obtained by researchers of Gamaleya institute of epidemiology and microbiology is carried out. Genetic immunization technology is used for development of “universal” vaccine. Recombinant pseudoadenoviral particles coding of influenza virus conservative antigens were used as a vector for gene delivery. Polypeptide, containing hemagglutinin conservative epitopes, was used in addition to traditional influenza conservative antigens M1, M2 and NP. Animal experiments demonstrated that developed vaccines were very efficient against different influenza subtypes (80%–100% survivability).

  8. Next generation dengue vaccines: A review of the preclinical development pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannice, Kirsten S; Roehrig, John T; Hombach, Joachim

    2015-12-10

    Dengue represents a significant and growing public health problem across the globe, with approximately half of the world's population at risk. The increasing and expanding burden of dengue has highlighted the need for new tools to prevent dengue, including development of dengue vaccines. Recently, the first dengue vaccine candidate was evaluated in Phase 3 clinical trials, and other vaccine candidates are under clinical evaluation. There are also a number of candidates in preclinical development, based on diverse technologies, with promising results in animal models and likely to move into clinical trials and could eventually be next-generation dengue vaccines. This review provides an overview of the various technological approaches to dengue vaccine development with specific focus on candidates in preclinical development and with evaluation in non-human primates. PMID:26424602

  9. The role of "go no-go" decisions in TB vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, Jerald C; Hone, David

    2005-05-01

    "Go no-go" decisions play a critical role in the product development plan of any TB vaccine at several points. Go no-go decisions are designed to serve the fundamental maxim in vaccine development that killing a bad vaccine project as early as possible is the hallmark of a successful overall program; in development, unlike in basic research, costs and skilled manpower requirements rise exponentially as the program proceeds. The opportunity costs in resources, manpower and equipment utilized on bad vaccine projects are unavailable to other vaccine programs. The go no-go decision is a fundamental piece of the process that balances risk, time and resources. An example of a go no-go decision development program is presented. PMID:15878835

  10. Potential Target Antigens for a Universal Vaccine in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Vermeij

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, the primary cause of death from gynaecological malignancies, has only modestly improved over the last decades. Immunotherapeutic treatment using a cocktail of antigens has been proposed as a “universal” vaccine strategy. We determined the expression of tumor antigens in the context of MHC class I expression in 270 primary tumor samples using tissue microarray. Expression of tumor antigens p53, SP17, survivin, WT1, and NY-ESO-1 was observed in 120 (48.0%, 173 (68.9%, 208 (90.0%, 129 (56.3%, and 27 (11.0% of 270 tumor specimens, respectively. In 93.2% of EOC, at least one of the investigated tumor antigens was (overexpressed. Expression of MHC class I was observed in 78.1% of EOC. In 3 out 4 primary tumors, (overexpression of a tumor antigen combined with MHC class I was observed. These results indicate that a multiepitope vaccine, comprising these antigens, could serve as a universal therapeutic vaccine for the vast majority of ovarian cancer patients.

  11. Cancer Vaccines: State of the Art of the Computational Modeling Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pappalardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer vaccines are a real application of the extensive knowledge of immunology to the field of oncology. Tumors are dynamic complex systems in which several entities, events, and conditions interact among them resulting in growth, invasion, and metastases. The immune system includes many cells and molecules that cooperatively act to protect the host organism from foreign agents. Interactions between the immune system and the tumor mass include a huge number of biological factors. Testing of some cancer vaccine features, such as the best conditions for vaccine administration or the identification of candidate antigenic stimuli, can be very difficult or even impossible only through experiments with biological models simply because a high number of variables need to be considered at the same time. This is where computational models, and, to this extent, immunoinformatics, can prove handy as they have shown to be able to reproduce enough biological complexity to be of use in suggesting new experiments. Indeed, computational models can be used in addition to biological models. We now experience that biologists and medical doctors are progressively convinced that modeling can be of great help in understanding experimental results and planning new experiments. This will boost this research in the future.

  12. Vaccines Against Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Ouattara, Amed; Laurens, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    No licensed malaria vaccine currently exists; however, final phase 3 testing results of a leading candidate vaccine are forthcoming. Continued challenges to malaria vaccine developers include genetically diverse strains found in nature and establishment of a vaccine correlate of protection.

  13. Recent Developments in Livestock and Wildlife Brucellosis Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Live attenuated brucellosis vaccines have been available for protecting domestic livestock against B. melitensis or B. abortus for more than 60 years. Current vaccines are effective in preventing abortion and transmission of brucellosis, but poor at preventing infection or seroconversion. In addit...

  14. Development of adjuvanted influenza vaccines for pulmonary delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Harshad Padmanabh

    2014-01-01

    Tijdens jaarlijkse epidemiën en tijdens pandemiën kan het griep virus flink huishouden hetgeen grote effecten kan hebben op economie en maatschappij. Griep vaccins kunnen bescherming bieden tegen griep infecties. De huidige geïnactiveerde vaccins hebben echter een aantal tekortkomingen: ze zijn erg

  15. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrit, Jeffrey T; Fast, Patricia E; Gieber, Lisa; Kuipers, Hester; Dean, Hansi J; Koff, Wayne C

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the cause of one of the most lethal pandemics in human history, although in recent years access to highly effective anti-retroviral therapy has provided new hope worldwide. Transmission of HIV by sexual contact, childbirth and injection drug use has been reduced, but 2 million are newly infected each year, and much of the transmission is from people who do not know their status. In addition to known methods, a preventive vaccine is needed to end the pandemic. The extraordinary mutability and genetic diversity of HIV is an enormous challenge, but vaccines are being designed for broad coverage. Computer-aided design of mosaic immunogens, incorporating many epitopes from the entire genome or from conserved regions aim to induce CD8+ T cells to kill virus-infected cells or inhibit virus replication, while trimeric envelope proteins or synthetic mimics aim to induce broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies similar to those cloned from some infected patients. Induction of more potent and durable responses may require new adjuvants or replicating chimeric vectors chimeras that bear HIV genes. Passive or genetic delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide broad protection and/or lead to insights for vaccine designers. Proof-of-concept trials in non-human primates and in one human efficacy trial have provided scientific clues for a vaccine that could provide broad and durable protection against HIV. The use of vaccines to destroy HIV reservoirs as part of therapy or cure is now also being explored. PMID:26993335

  16. Development of a new trend conjugate vaccine for the prevention of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major cause of nosocomial pneumonia, septicemia and urinary tract infections, especially in newborns, blood cancer patients, and other immunocompromised candidates. The control of K. pneumoniae is a complicated issue due to its tight pathogenesis. Immuno-prophylactic preparations, especially those directed toward the bacterium O-antigen, showed to be the most successful way to prevent the infection incidence. However, all previously proposed preparations were either of limited spectrum or non-maternal, and hence not targeting the main Klebsiella patients. Moreover, all preparations were directed only to prevent the respiratory diseases due to that pathogen. This article addresses the development of a method originally used to purify the non-capsular bacterial- endotoxins, as a new and easy method for vaccine production against K. pneumoniae. The application of this method was preceded by a biotechnological control of capsular polysaccharide production in K. pneumoniae. The new produced natural conjugate between the bacterial O-antigen and its outer membrane proteins was evaluated by physicochemical and immunological methods to investigate its purity, integrity, safety and immunogenicity. It showed to be pure, stable, safe for use, and able to elicit a protective immunoglobulin titer against different Klebsiella infections. This immune-response proved to be transferable to the offspring of the vaccinated experimental rabbits via placenta.

  17. Agility in adversity: Vaccines on Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Anne S; Moise, Leonard; Olive, David; Einck, Leo; Martin, William

    2016-09-01

    Is the US ready for a biological attack using Ebola virus or Anthrax? Will vaccine developers be able to produce a Zika virus vaccine, before the epidemic spreads around the world? A recent report by The Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense argues that the US is not ready for these challenges, however, technologies and capabilities that could address these deficiencies are within reach. Vaccine technologies have advanced and readiness has improved in recent years, due to advances in sequencing technology and computational power making the 'vaccines on demand' concept a reality. Building a robust strategy to design effective biodefense vaccines from genome sequences harvested by real-time biosurveillance will benefit from technologies that are being brought to bear on the cancer cure 'moonshot'. When combined with flexible vaccine production platforms, vaccines on demand will relegate expensive and, in some cases, insufficiently effective vaccine stockpiles to the dust heap of history. PMID:27389971

  18. Bacterial superglue enables easy development of efficient virus-like particle based vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M; Matondo, Sungwa;

    2016-01-01

    responses as well as to efficiently break B cell self-tolerance. The spy-VLP-system may serve as a generic tool for the cost-effective development of effective VLP-vaccines against both infectious- and non-communicable diseases and could facilitate rapid and unbiased screening of vaccine candidate antigens....

  19. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure. PMID:23171359

  20. Status of research and development of pediatric vaccines for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    Pneumococcal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children, particularly in the developing world. Vaccines are a critical strategy for protecting children from pneumococcal disease and licensed pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) are having a significant impact on invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal pneumonia throughout the world. Currently available PCVs do not, however, cover all pneumococcal serotypes and are complicated and relatively expensive to manufacture. While new PCV development is focused on either higher valency or more inherent affordability for developing countries, new vaccines are needed that offer serotype-independent protection. Vaccines containing proteins that are common to all pneumococcal serotypes could provide broad protection to children worldwide. Protein subunit and whole cell vaccines have advanced into Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials but face considerable challenges before they can become licensed and widely distributed. PMID:27083428

  1. Vaccine research, development, and innovation in Brazil: a translational science perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Akira; Tanuri, Amilcar; Duarte, Alberto J S; Marques, Ernesto; de Almeida, Alexandre; Martins, Reinaldo; Silva-Junior, Jarbas B; Possas, Cristina

    2013-04-18

    This article examines the Brazilian innovation policy for vaccines and its impact on infectious diseases, with emphasis on advances in translational science. The results indicate significant progress, with a rapid increase over the past two decades in the number of vaccine research groups, indicating scientific excellence. Advances and gaps in technological development and in public-private partnership initiatives were also identified. We stress the crucial role of partnerships, technology transfer, and targeted policies that could accelerate Brazil's participation in global vaccine research and development. We propose that new strategies should be urgently conceived to strengthen the links between the scientific and technological policies, the National Health System, and the National Immunizations Program in Brazil to provide access to low-cost vaccines to address major public health challenges. We also discuss the lessons learned from the Brazilian experience in the implementation of governmental policies on vaccine innovation that could be applicable to other developing countries. PMID:23598493

  2. Intra-dermal administration of rabies vaccines in developing countries: at an affordable cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Prinja, Shankar; Rajput, Meena

    2011-07-01

    Rabies is a virtually 100% fatal acute viral encephalitis. Rabies occurs in more than 150 countries and territories. Globally there are 17.4 million animal bite cases and more than 55,000 deaths annually. India's 20,000 deaths accounts for 36% of global and 65% of the Asian (31,000) deaths. The Intradermal Rabies Vaccine (IDRV) was first started in Thailand in 1984. In 1992, World Health Organization approved it for use in developing countries which face a shortage of rabies vaccine due to paucity of funds. Vaccines like Purified Vero cell vaccine (PVRV), Purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) and Human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV) that can be injected by the intradermal route for Post Exposure Prophylaxis as approved by WHO. The regimen approved by the WHO/DCGI India is the Updated Thai Red Cross Regimen, which involves injection of 0.1 mL of reconstituted vaccine per ID site and on two such ID site per visit on Days 0, 3, 7 and 28 (2-2-2-0-2). All reconstituted vaccine unused at the end of 6-8 h must be discarded. The ID route is ideal in terms of economic benefits, safety and efficacy. This reduces the cost of vaccination by about 68%, which is clearly an attractive option for resource-starved countries like India. PMID:21734465

  3. Development of a Cost-Effective Educational Tool to Promote Acceptance of the HPV Vaccination by Hispanic Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggmann, Doerthe; Opper, Neisha; Felix, Juan; Groneberg, David A; Mishell, Daniel R; Jaque, Jenny M

    2016-06-01

    Although vaccination against the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) reduces the risk of related morbidities, the vaccine uptake remains low in adolescents. This has been attributed to limited parental knowledge and misconceptions. In this cross sectional study, we assessed the (1) clarity of educational material informing Hispanic mothers about HPV, cervical cancer and the HPV vaccine, (2) determined vaccination acceptability and (3) identified predictors of vaccine acceptance in an underserved health setting. 418 Hispanic mothers received the educational material and completed an anonymous survey. 91 % of participants understood most or all of the information provided. 77 % of participants reported vaccine acceptance for their children; this increased to 84 % when only those with children eligible to receive vaccination were included. Significant positive predictors of maternal acceptance of the HPV vaccine for their children were understanding most or all of the provided information, older age and acceptance of the HPV vaccine for themselves. Concerns about safety and general dislike of vaccines were negatively associated with HPV vaccine acceptance. Prior knowledge, level of education, previous relevant gynecologic history, general willingness to vaccinate and other general beliefs about vaccines were not significantly associated with HPV vaccine acceptance. The majority of participants reported understanding of the provided educational material. Vaccine acceptability was fairly high, but was even higher among those who understood the information. This study documents a cost-effective way to provide Hispanic mothers with easy-to-understand HPV-related information that could increase parental vaccine acceptability and future vaccine uptake among their children. PMID:26516016

  4. Intent to Participate in Future Cervical Cancer Screenings Is Lower when Satisfaction with the Decision to Be Vaccinated Is Neutral

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Natalie Marya; Harper, Diane Medved; Comes, Johanna Claire; Smith, Melissa Smith; Heutinck, Melinda Ann; Handley, Sandra Martin; Ahern, Debra Ann

    2014-01-01

    Background HPV vaccination programs have adversely affected participation in future cervical cancer screening. The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of decision satisfaction with accepting/rejecting the HPV vaccine, as well as traditional clinical factors, on the intent to participate in future screening. Methods and Findings From January 2011 through August 2012 women 18–26 years old presenting for health care in an urban college student health and wellness clinic in the US...

  5. Developing plant-based vaccines against neglected tropical diseases: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda

    2012-12-17

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) impair the lives of 1 billion people worldwide, and threaten the health of millions more. Although vaccine candidates have been proposed to prevent some NTDs, no vaccine is available at the market yet. Vaccines against NTDs should be low-cost and needle-free to reduce the logistic cost of their administration. Plant-based vaccines meet both requirements: plant systems allow antigen production at low cost, and also yield an optimal delivery vehicle that prevents or delays digestive hydrolysis of vaccine antigens. This review covers recent reports on the development of plant-based vaccines against NTDs. Efforts conducted by a number of research groups to develop vaccines as a mean to fight rabies, cysticercosis, dengue, and helminthiasis are emphasized. Future perspectives are identified, such as the need to develop vaccination models for more than ten pathologies through a plant-based biotechnological approach. Current limitations on the method are also noted, and molecular approaches that might allow us to address such limitations are discussed. PMID:23142588

  6. Intellectual Property in Vaccine Innovation: Impact of Recent Patent Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elizabeth Siew-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the issues on patentability of microorganisms and human genes under the US laws and analyzes their influence on vaccine innovation. The analysis will focus on three aspects, namely, the naturally existing state, unmodified isolated form (i.e., mere extraction from the natural environment), and human-modified/genetically engineered structure. The outcome of the assessment suggests that the impact of the recent US patent jurisprudence on vaccines may differ significantly depending on whether the preparation of a vaccine in question involves natural or man-made DNA material. PMID:27076340

  7. Hepatitis B vaccines: protective efficacy and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, M-L; Tiollais, P

    2010-08-01

    Worldwide, two billion people have at some time been infected by hepatitis B virus, 370 millions suffer from chronic infection and around one million die each year from HBV-related liver diseases of which liver cancer is the ultimate stage. Vaccination is the measure that is most effective in reducing the global incidence of hepatitis B and hepatitis B vaccines have now been available for over 20 years. The first hepatitis B vaccine was prepared from inactivated hepatitis B surface antigen particles purified from plasma of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Knowledge of the structure and genomic organization of hepatitis B virus has led to development of the first DNA recombinant vaccine. In preventing hepatocellular carcinoma development, hepatitis B virus vaccines are considered as the first available cancer vaccine. HBV vaccines have recently taken on a new role as therapeutic vaccines as an attempt to cure or to control hepatitis B virus infection in persistently infected individuals. PMID:20382485

  8. Current barriers, challenges and opportunities for the development of effective STI vaccines: point of view of vaccine producers, biotech companies and funding agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodet, Betty

    2014-03-20

    Several barriers limit the development of vaccines against sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). Critical scientific information is missing that makes the feasibility and the likelihood of success of vaccines against genital herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhea and trichomonas uncertain: the immunity induced by natural infection is absent or imperfect which seriously limits the capacity to define the types of immune responses that an effective vaccine must induce. Reliable animal models are lacking and a number of crucial clinical questions are still unanswered about the goal of these vaccines and definition of endpoints for clinical trials. In the absence of a clear recognition of the need for vaccines against these diseases, there is no motivation for public or private research and industry to invest in the development of vaccines against STIs. The STI burden should be evaluated not only in terms of mortality and morbidity, but also in terms of economic and psycho-social impact. A global public-private consortium could mobilize the joint efforts of all stakeholders involved in the research, development and implementation of STI vaccines of the public and private sectors; ensure that sufficient resources are applied to R&D of vaccines against these STIs; and provide the pull-push forces that are necessary to overcome the barriers to develop safe and effective vaccines against these diseases. PMID:23994377

  9. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Kvistborg, Pia; Zocca, Mai-Britt;

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac®, Dandrit Biotech, Copenhagen, Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and......-layed effect of DC vaccination after completion of the treatment. A prospective randomized phase-IIb or -III is needed to further evaluate the use of MelCancerVac® vaccine treatment in patients with progressive NSCLC....

  10. Phase I trial of thymidylate synthase poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) vaccine in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, Maria Grazia; Botta, Cirino; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Rossetti, Maria Grazia; Dreassi, Elena; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Fioravanti, Antonella; Martino, Elodia Claudia; Gandolfo, Claudia; Pagliuchi, Marco; Basile, Assunta; Carbone, Salvatore Francesco; Ricci, Veronica; Micheli, Lucia; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Pirtoli, Luigi; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2015-09-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) is a 27-mer peptide vaccine containing the amino acidic sequences of three epitopes with HLA-A2.1-binding motifs of TS, an enzyme overexpressed in cancer cells, which plays a crucial role in DNA repair and replication. Based on the results of preclinical studies, we designed a phase Ib trial (TSPP/VAC1) to investigate, in a dose escalation setting, the safety and the biological activity of TSPP vaccination alone (arm A) or in combination with GM-CSF and IL-2 (arm B) in cancer patients. Twenty-one pretreated metastatic cancer patients, with a good performance status (ECOG ≤ 1) and no severe organ failure or immunological disease, were enrolled in the study (12 in arm A, nine in arm B) between April 2011 and January 2012, with a median follow-up of 28 months. TSPP resulted safe, and its maximal tolerated dose was not achieved. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. The most common adverse events were grade 2 dermatological reactions to the vaccine injection, cough, rhinitis, fever, poly-arthralgia, gastro-enteric symptoms and, to a lesser extent, moderate hypertension and hypothyroidism. We detected a significant rise in auto-antibodies and TS-epitope-specific CTL precursors. Furthermore, TSPP showed antitumor activity in this group of pretreated patients; indeed, we recorded one partial response and seven disease stabilizations (SD) in arm A, and three SD in arm B. Taken together, our findings provide the framework for the evaluation of the TSPP anti-tumor activity in further disease-oriented clinical trials. PMID:26031574

  11. Antibody recognition of the dengue virus proteome and implications for development of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Stefan; Cisney, Emily D; Tikhonov, Alexander P; Schweitzer, Barry; Putnak, Robert J; Simmons, Monika; Ulrich, Robert G

    2011-04-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection caused by four distinct serotypes of dengue virus, each appearing cyclically in the tropics and subtropics along the equator. Although vaccines are currently under development, none are available to the general population. One of the main impediments to the successful advancement of these vaccines is the lack of well-defined immune correlates of protection. Here, we describe a protein microarray approach for measuring antibody responses to the complete viral proteome comprised of the structural (capsid, membrane, and envelope) and nonstructural (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5) components of all four dengue virus serotypes (1 to 4). We examined rhesus macaques vaccinated with tetravalent vaccines consisting of live-attenuated virus (LAV) or purified inactivated virus (PIV), followed by boosting with LAV and challenging with wild-type dengue virus. We detected temporal increases in antibodies against envelope proteins in response to either vaccine, while only the PIV/LAV vaccination strategy resulted in anticapsid antibodies. In contrast to results from vaccination, naïve macaques challenged with wild-type viruses of each serotype demonstrated a balanced response to nonstructural and structural components, including responses against the membrane protein. Our results demonstrate discriminating details concerning the nature of antibody responses to dengue virus at the proteomic level and suggest the usefulness of this information for vaccine development. PMID:21270280

  12. Human papillomavirus and HPV vaccines: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FT Cutts

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer, the most common cancer affecting women in developing countries, is caused by persistent infection with "high-risk" genotypes of human papillomaviruses (HPV. The most common oncogenic HPV genotypes are 16 and 18, causing approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. Types 6 and 11 do not contribute to the incidence of high-grade dysplasias (precancerous lesions or cervical cancer, but do cause laryngeal papillomas and most genital warts. HPV is highly transmissible, with peak incidence soon after the onset of sexual activity. A quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16 and 18 HPV vaccine has recently been licensed in several countries following the determination that it has an acceptable benefit/risk profile. In large phase III trials, the vaccine prevented 100% of moderate and severe precancerous cervical lesions associated with types 16 or 18 among women with no previous infection with these types. A bivalent (types 16 and 18 vaccine has also undergone extensive evaluation and been licensed in at least one country. Both vaccines are prepared from non-infectious, DNA-free virus-like particles produced by recombinant technology and combined with an adjuvant. With three doses administered, they induce high levels of serum antibodies in virtually all vaccinated individuals. In women who have no evidence of past or current infection with the HPV genotypes in the vaccine, both vaccines show > 90% protection against persistent HPV infection for up to 5 years after vaccination, which is the longest reported follow-up so far. Vaccinating at an age before females are exposed to HPV would have the greatest impact. Since HPV vaccines do not eliminate the risk of cervical cancer, cervical screening will still be required to minimize cancer incidence. Tiered pricing for HPV vaccines, innovative financing mechanisms and multidisciplinary partnerships will be essential in order for the vaccines to reach populations in greatest need.

  13. TSOL18 Vaccine Antigen of Taenia solium: Development of Monoclonal Antibodies and Field Testing of the Vaccine in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assana, E.

    2010-01-01

    necropsy at the end of the trial (110 vaccinated; 102 controls. Viable T. solium cysticerci were identified in 20 control pigs (prevalence 19.6%, including 14 animals that had estimated total body burdens of > 1000 cysticerci. No cysticerci were found in any of the vaccinated animals indicating that the vaccine provided a very high level of protection (P< 0.0001 against naturally acquired infection with T. solium in pigs. Combined application of TSOL18 vaccination and a single oxfendazole treatment in pigs is a simple and relatively sustainable procedure that has the potential to control T. solium transmission in endemic areas and, indirectly, reduce the number of new cases of neurocysticercosis in humans. In chapter 6, the similarity of the antibody responses of pigs and mice to TSOL18 antigen is highlighted. Four IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb were produced against the conformational epitopes of TSOL18. It was shown that pig antisera inhibit the binding of these MoAbs in a competition ELISA, indicating that pig and mouse antibodies against TSOL18 vaccine react with the same conformational epitopes. For this reason, monoclonal antibodies raised in mice immunized with TSOL18 could be a valuable source of antibodies for further characterisation of the host-protective epitopes of the vaccine. A monoclonal antibody-based inhibitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (mi-ELISA was developed. Serum samples of TSOL18-vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs were used. In all the vaccinated and protected pigs screened at necropsy, anti-TSOL18 antibodies inhibited the binding of a monoclonal antibody (Mab25D12C1 specific to the conformational epitopes of TSOL18 antigen, suggesting an immune response that correlates with protection. This result was in agreement with the results obtained in an indirect ELISA, which showed that all the vaccinated and protected pigs had developed antibodies to the TSOL18 vaccine. In chapter 7 the efficacy of the TSOL18 vaccine is compared with that of

  14. Carbohydrate vaccines: developing sweet solutions to sticky situations?

    OpenAIRE

    Astronomo, Rena D.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    The realm of carbohydrate vaccines has expanded far beyond the capsular polysaccharides of bacterial pathogens to include a diverse collection of targets representing nearly every biological kingdom. Recent technological advances in glycobiology and glycochemistry are paving the way for a new era in carbohydrate vaccine design enabling greater efficiency in the identification, synthesis and evaluation of unique glycan epitopes found on a plethora of pathogens and malignant cells. This article...

  15. Rationalizing the development of live attenuated virus vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lauring, Adam S.; Jones, Jeremy O.; Andino, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Since the first demonstration of the protective effects of vaccinia inoculation, vaccination has been one of the medicine’s greatest successes. The design of vaccines against viral disease has evolved considerably over the last 50 years. Classically attenuated viruses, those created by passaging a virus in cultured cells, have proven to be an effective means for preventing many viral diseases, including smallpox, polio, measles, mumps, and yellow fever. However, empiric attenuation is not a r...

  16. Animal Models for Influenza Viruses: Implications for Universal Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Margine; Florian Krammer

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population. Depending on the virulence of the influenza virus strain, as well as the immunological status of the infected individual, the severity of the respiratory disease may range from sub-clinical or mild symptoms to severe pneumonia that can sometimes lead to death. Vaccines remain the primary public health measure in reducing the influenza burden. Though the first influenza vaccine preparation wa...

  17. Human and bovine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine research and development

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Gilles; Deplanche, Martine; Schelcher, François

    2008-01-01

    Human (HRSV) and bovine (BRSV) respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV) are two closely related viruses, which are the most important causative agents of respiratory tract infections of young children and calves, respectively. BRSV vaccines have been available for nearly 2 decades. They probably have reduced the prevalence of RSV infection but their efficacy needs improvement. In contrast, despite decades of research, there is no currently licensed vaccine for the prevention of HRSV disease. Devel...

  18. Development of a mucosal vaccine against Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shafique, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Het verkoudheidsvirus ‘Respiratoir Synctieel virus’ (RSV) kan ernstige luchtweginfecties veroorzaken. Vaccinatie van pasgeboren kinderen en ouderen met verminderde afweer zou de kans op infectie en complicaties kunnen verkleinen. UMCG-promovendus Muhammad Shafique stelde vast dat een neusspray geschikt is voor toediening van een nieuw type vaccin tegen RSV. Het nieuwe vaccin bestaat uit virosomen, een virusmantel zonder het genetisch materiaal van het virus. Aan de virosomen zijn stoffen geze...

  19. Development of adjuvanted influenza vaccines for pulmonary delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Harshad Padmanabh

    2014-01-01

    Tijdens jaarlijkse epidemiën en tijdens pandemiën kan het griep virus flink huishouden hetgeen grote effecten kan hebben op economie en maatschappij. Griep vaccins kunnen bescherming bieden tegen griep infecties. De huidige geïnactiveerde vaccins hebben echter een aantal tekortkomingen: ze zijn erg instabiel en moeten derhalve koel bewaard en getransporteerd worden, ze moeten door middel van tijdrovende injecties worden toegediend, en ze zijn niet in staat om in de bovenste luchtwegen goede i...

  20. [The importance of HPV vaccination in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnal, Borek; Chlíbek, Roman; Sláma, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The important goal of immunization programs in many countries is the reduction of the incidence of cervical cancer using either the quadrivalent (Silgard/Gardasil) or the bivalent (Cervarix) HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine. Nevertheless, HPV infection is associated with the development of cancers of anus, vagina, vulva and penis, and cancers of the head and neck and genital warts, too. Large trials for both vaccines find efficacy against HPV-related infection and different HPV associated diseases.Infection with HPV and diseases caused by HPV are common in boys and men, too. Approximately 5.2 % of all cancers are HPV associated and the burden of HPV associated disease in men is now comparable to that in women in economically developed countries. Randomized control trials demonstrate robust antibody responses and high efficacy also in men. Several countries recommend gender-neutral vaccination.Detailed cost effective modeling has preceded these decisions showing that when the burden of disease in men is included in the models then, depending upon vaccine price, coverage of a vaccinated population, and other factors male vaccination can become cost effective. Vaccine price had a decisive impact on results. However, increasing coverage in girls is substantially more effective and cost-effective than expanding vaccination coverage to boys and should be considered a priority. Since 2012, vaccination of girls at the age of 13-14 years has been covered from the health insurance in the Czech Republic. PMID:27481200

  1. Development of a new live rough vaccine against bovine brucellosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucella abortus S19 is the most commonly used attenuated live vaccine to prevent bovine brucellosis. In spite of its advantages, S19 has several drawbacks: it is abortive for pregnant cattle, is virulent for humans, and re-vaccination is not advised due to the persistence of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies that hamper the immunoscreening procedures. For these reasons, there is a continuous search for new bovine vaccine candidates. We have previously characterized the phenotype of the phosphoglucomutase (pgm) gene disruption in Brucella abortus S2308, as well as the possible role for the smooth LPS in virulence and intracellular multiplication. Here we evaluate the vaccine properties of an unmarked deletion mutant of pgm. Western blot analysis of purified lipopolysaccharide and whole-cell extract from Δpgm indicate that it synthesizes O-antigen but is incapable of assembling a complete LPS. In consequence Δpgm has a rough phenotype. Experimental infections of mice indicate that Δpgm is avirulent. Vaccination with Δpgm induces protection levels comparable to those induced by S19, and generates a splenocyte proliferative response and cytokines profile typical of a Th-1 response. The ability of the mutant to generate a strong cellular Th-1 response without eliciting specific O-antigen antibodies highlights the potential use of this mutant as a new live vaccine for cattle. (author)

  2. Vaccinations in paediatric rheumatology: an update on current developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Noortje; Heijstek, Marloes W; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2015-07-01

    In 2011, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) published recommendations regarding the vaccination of children with rheumatic diseases. These recommendations were based on a systematic literature review published in that same year. Since then, the evidence body on this topic has grown substantially. This review provides an update of the systematic literature study of 2011, summarizing all the available evidence on the safety and immunogenicity of vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases. The current search yielded 21 articles, in addition to the 27 articles described in the 2011 review. In general, vaccines are immunogenic and safe in this patient population. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on the immunogenicity of vaccines was not detrimental for glucocorticosteroids and methotrexate. Biologicals could accelerate a waning of antibody levels over time, although most patients were initially protected adequately. Overall, persistence of immunological memory may be reduced in children with rheumatic diseases, which shows the need for (booster) vaccination. This update of the 2011 systematic literature review strengthens the evidence base for the EULAR recommendations, and it must be concluded that vaccinations in patients with rheumatic diseases should be advocated. PMID:26025339

  3. The dichotomy of pathogens and allergens in vaccination approaches

    OpenAIRE

    FionaJ.Baird

    2014-01-01

    Traditional prophylactic vaccination to prevent illness is the primary objective of many research activities worldwide. The golden age of vaccination began with an approach called variolation in ancient China and the evolution of vaccines still continues today with modern developments such as the production of Gardasil™ against HPV and cervical cancer. The historical aspect of how different forms of vaccination have changed the face of medicine and communities is important as it dictates our ...

  4. The dichotomy of pathogens and allergens in vaccination approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Baird, Fiona J.; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional prophylactic vaccination to prevent illness is the primary objective of many research activities worldwide. The golden age of vaccination began with an approach called variolation in ancient China and the evolution of vaccines still continues today with modern developments such as the production of GardasilTM against HPV and cervical cancer. The historical aspect of how different forms of vaccination have changed the face of medicine and communities is important as it dictates our...

  5. VaxCelerate II: rapid development of a self-assembling vaccine for Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Pierre; Moise, Leonard; Luza, Cybelle; Chantaralawan, Kanawat; Lezeau, Lynchy; Yuan, Jianping; Field, Mary; Richer, Daniel; Boyle, Christine; Martin, William D; Fishman, Jordan B; Berg, Eric A; Baker, David; Zeigler, Brandon; Mais, Dale E; Taylor, William; Coleman, Russell; Warren, H Shaw; Gelfand, Jeffrey A; De Groot, Anne S; Brauns, Timothy; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective vaccines against emerging infectious diseases (EID) can take as much or more than a decade to progress from pathogen isolation/identification to clinical approval. As a result, conventional approaches fail to produce field-ready vaccines before the EID has spread extensively. Lassa is a prototypical emerging infectious disease endemic to West Africa for which no successful vaccine is available. We established the VaxCelerate Consortium to address the need for more rapid vaccine development by creating a platform capable of generating and pre-clinically testing a new vaccine against specific pathogen targets in less than 120 d A self-assembling vaccine is at the core of the approach. It consists of a fusion protein composed of the immunostimulatory Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 70 (MtbHSP70) and the biotin binding protein, avidin. Mixing the resulting protein (MAV) with biotinylated pathogen-specific immunogenic peptides yields a self-assembled vaccine (SAV). To meet the time constraint imposed on this project, we used a distributed R&D model involving experts in the fields of protein engineering and production, bioinformatics, peptide synthesis/design and GMP/GLP manufacturing and testing standards. SAV immunogenicity was first tested using H1N1 influenza specific peptides and the entire VaxCelerate process was then tested in a mock live-fire exercise targeting Lassa fever virus. We demonstrated that the Lassa fever vaccine induced significantly increased class II peptide specific interferon-γ CD4(+) T cell responses in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice compared to peptide or MAV alone controls. We thereby demonstrated that our SAV in combination with a distributed development model may facilitate accelerated regulatory review by using an identical design for each vaccine and by applying safety and efficacy assessment tools that are more relevant to human vaccine responses than current animal models. PMID:25483693

  6. Adjuvant therapeutic vaccination in patients with non-small cell lung cancer made lymphopenic and reconstituted with autologous PBMC: first clinical experience and evidence of an immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schendel Dolores J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the considerable toxicity and modest benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, there is clearly a need for new treatment modalities in the adjuvant setting. Active specific immunotherapy may represent such an option. However, clinical responses have been rare so far. Manipulating the host by inducing lymphopenia before vaccination resulted in a magnification of the immune response in the preclinical setting. To evaluate feasibility and safety of an irradiated, autologous tumor cell vaccine given following induction of lymphopenia by chemotherapy and reinfusion of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, we are currently conducting a pilot-phase I clinical trial in patients with NSCLC following surgical resection. This paper reports on the first clinical experience and evidence of an immune response in patients suffering from NSCLC. Methods NSCLC patients stages I-IIIA are recruited. Vaccines are generated from their resected lung specimens. Patients undergo leukapheresis to harvest their PBMC prior to or following the surgical procedure. Furthermore, patients receive preparative chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 and fludarabine 20 mg/m2 on 3 consecutive days for induction of lymphopenia followed by reconstitution with their autologous PBMC. Vaccines are administered intradermally on day 1 following reconstitution and every two weeks for a total of up to five vaccinations. Granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF is given continuously (at a rate of 50 μg/24 h at the site of vaccination via minipump for six consecutive days after each vaccination. Results To date, vaccines were successfully manufactured for 4 of 4 patients. The most common toxicities were local injection-site reactions and mild constitutional symptoms. Immune responses to chemotherapy, reconstitution and vaccination are measured by vaccine site and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH skin

  7. Modified tumour antigen-encoding mRNA facilitates the analysis of naturally occurring and vaccine-induced CD4 and CD8 T cells in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights, Ashley J; Nuber, Natko; Thomson, Christopher W; de la Rosa, Olga; Jäger, Elke; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; van den Broek, Maries; Pascolo, Steve; Knuth, Alexander; Zippelius, Alfred

    2009-03-01

    The development of effective anti-cancer vaccines requires precise assessment of vaccine-induced immunity. This is often hampered by low ex vivo frequencies of antigen-specific T cells and limited defined epitopes. This study investigates the applicability of modified, in vitro-transcribed mRNA encoding a therapeutically relevant tumour antigen to analyse T cell responses in cancer patients. In this study transfection of antigen presenting cells, by mRNA encoding the tumour antigen NY-ESO-1, was optimised and applied to address spontaneous and vaccine-induced T cell responses in cancer patients. Memory CD8+ T cells from lung cancer patients having detectable humoral immune responses directed towards NY-ESO-1 could be efficiently detected in peripheral blood. Specific T cells utilised a range of different T cell receptors, indicating a polyclonal response. Specific killing of a panel of NY-ESO-1 expressing tumour cell lines indicates recognition restricted to several HLA allelic variants, including a novel HLA-B49 epitope. Using a modified mRNA construct targeting the translated antigen to the secretory pathway, detection of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells in patients could be enhanced, which allowed the in-depth characterisation of established T cell clones. Moreover, broad CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses covering multiple epitopes were detected following mRNA stimulation of patients treated with a recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox NY-ESO-1 vaccine. This approach allows for a precise monitoring of responses to tumour antigens in a setting that addresses the breadth and magnitude of antigen-specific T cell responses, and that is not limited to a particular combination of known epitopes and HLA-restrictions. PMID:18663444

  8. Economic issues in vaccination against highly pathogenic avian influenza in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, A; Rushton, J; Riviere-Cinnamond, A; Brandenburg, B; Hinrichs, J; Loth, L

    2007-01-01

    We consider the use of vaccination against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in three contexts: as part of a stamping-out programme, as a government-led action for disease prevention and as private insurance by farmers. Poultry systems in developing countries cover all four of the poultry sectors defined by FAO and the OIE, each with particular economic aspects that might motivate farmers to take part in vaccination programmes or to initiate and finance them. Outbreaks in flocks of different types have different potential impacts in terms of disease spread and economic effects, which influence the potential benefits of vaccination as a means to prevent or control outbreaks. We use data from three countries to illustrate the costs of vaccination and discuss measures of cost-effectiveness and ways to improve it. We also consider the question of funding sources and their impact on the sustainability of vaccination programmes. PMID:18411936

  9. Challenges and opportunities in developing and marketing vaccines for OIE List A and emerging animal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, C G; Salt, J; Balaski, C

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary pharmaceutical products generated 14.5 billion U.S. Dollars (USD) in worldwide sales in 2000, with biological products contributing 16.2 percent or 2.3 billion USD. The leading biological products were foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines, with 284 million USD in sales, representing 26.4 percent of the entire livestock biological business. Despite the potential opportunities for the biologicals industry, non-vaccination policies and undefined control and eradication strategies have deterred the private sector from significant investments in the research and development of vaccines against List A diseases. The primary research focus remains vaccines for infectious diseases that have an impact on current domestic herd health management systems. Changing the vaccine paradigm, investing in new technologies, and creating the future by integrating into key alliances with producers and regulatory authorities will be paramount in protecting our poultry and livestock industries against highly infectious diseases and potential acts of bioterrorism. PMID:14677694

  10. 宫颈癌治疗性疫苗的临床研究现状%Advances in the clinical research of therapeutic vaccines for cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立娜; 周志祥; 盛望; 曾毅

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major etiological factor in cervical cancer, and it provides a promising target for the eradication of HPV-related malignancies. Although preventive HPV vaccines have been approved, the much-needed therapeutic vaccines targeted to HPV for cervical cancer require further development. Currently, a number of therapeutic vaccines have been developed and many have shown promise in both preclinical and clinical trials. This review discusses the therapeutic vaccines including live vector-based, peptide or protein-based, DNA-based and DC-based vaccines with emphasis on current progress of the clinical trials.%人乳头瘤状病毒(human papillomavirus,HPV)是宫颈癌的主要致病因子,也是研制宫颈癌防治性疫苗的理想靶点.虽然现在针对HPV感染的宫颈癌预防性疫苗已成功上市,但是对于急需的治疗型疫苗的研发还在进行中.目前有多种类型的治疗性疫苗已用于临床前期及临床试验,并显示出很好的治疗效果.本文从活载体疫苗、多肽/蛋白疫苗、DNA疫苗和DC疫苗几个方面综述了目前国内外宫颈癌治疗性疫苗的研究现状及进展,特别是进入临床阶段的疫苗,从而为治疗性疫苗的研究提供参考.

  11. Development of a new tuberculosis vaccine: is there value in the mucosal approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Gil Reynolds; Reljic, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    TB is a global health problem, killing 1.5 million people every year. The only currently available vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, is effective against severe childhood forms, but it demonstrates a variable efficacy against the pulmonary form of TB in adults. Many of these adult TB cases result from the reactivation of an initially controlled, latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Effective prophylactic vaccination remains the key long-term strategy for combating TB. Continued belief in reaching this goal requires unrelenting innovation in the formulation and delivery of candidate vaccines. It is also based on the assumption, that the failure of recent human vaccine trials could have been due to a suboptimal vaccine design and delivery, and therefore should not erode the key principle that a TB vaccine is an attainable target. This report gives a brief overview of the mucosal immune system in the context of M. tuberculosis infection, and focuses on the most recent advances in the field of mucosal TB vaccine development, with a specific emphasis on subunit TB vaccines. PMID:25341121

  12. 2015 Guidance on cancer immunotherapy development in early‐phase clinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    ,; Arato, Teruyo; Daimon, Takashi; Heike, Yuji; Ishii, Ken; Itho, Kyogo; KAGEYAMA, SHINICHI; Kawakami, Yutaka; Nakayama, Eiichi; Ozawa, Keiya; Sato, Noriyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Tani, Kenzaburo; Tamada, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing rapidly with a variety of technological approaches. They consist of “cancer vaccines”, which are based on the idea of vaccination, “effector cell therapy”, classified as passive immunotherapy, and “inhibition of immunosuppression”, which intends to break immunological tolerance to autoantigens or immunosuppressive environments characterizing antitumor immune responses. Recent reports showing clinical evidence of efficacy of immune check...

  13. Vaxvec: The first web-based recombinant vaccine vector database and its data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shunzhou; Martin, Carly; Patil, Rasika; Zhu, Felix; Zhao, Bin; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-11-27

    A recombinant vector vaccine uses an attenuated virus, bacterium, or parasite as the carrier to express a heterologous antigen(s). Many recombinant vaccine vectors and related vaccines have been developed and extensively investigated. To compare and better understand recombinant vectors and vaccines, we have generated Vaxvec (http://www.violinet.org/vaxvec), the first web-based database that stores various recombinant vaccine vectors and those experimentally verified vaccines that use these vectors. Vaxvec has now included 59 vaccine vectors that have been used in 196 recombinant vector vaccines against 66 pathogens and cancers. These vectors are classified to 41 viral vectors, 15 bacterial vectors, 1 parasitic vector, and 1 fungal vector. The most commonly used viral vaccine vectors are double-stranded DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, adenoviruses, and poxviruses. For example, Vaxvec includes 63 poxvirus-based recombinant vaccines for over 20 pathogens and cancers. Vaxvec collects 30 recombinant vector influenza vaccines that use 17 recombinant vectors and were experimentally tested in 7 animal models. In addition, over 60 protective antigens used in recombinant vector vaccines are annotated and analyzed. User-friendly web-interfaces are available for querying various data in Vaxvec. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine vectors, vaccines, and related information is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). Vaxvec is a timely and vital source of vaccine vector database and facilitates efficient vaccine vector research and development. PMID:26403370

  14. HIV-1/AIDS vaccine development: are we in the darkness before the dawn?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Chao; XU Jian-qing

    2008-01-01

    @@ The pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been devastating for the last two decades in a number of developing countries and constituting a grand challenge to the public health.WHO/UNAIDS estimates that approximately 33.2million people were living with HIV-1 infection by the end of 2007 and almost 2.5 million new infections occurred in 2007. An unprecedented scientifc challenge for the AIDS vaccine community is how to develop an effective HIV vaccine that can block HIV transmission and consequently stop the continuing spread of HIV-1.The recent failure of Merck Phase Ⅱ B trial alerted the HIV vaccine community that new vaccine strategies need to be more exclusively explored. In this review, we outline the basics of HIV vaccine and retrospect the history of the road to HIV vaccine in last two decades,and highlight the challenges we are currently facing and new strategies to develop HIV vaccines in this field.The Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai

  15. Advances in human papilloma virus vaccines: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Tomar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women and third leading cause of cancer death. Approximately 500,000 women worldwide develop new cases of cervical cancer annually, with 80% of these new cases occurring in developing countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV infection is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines, gardasil and cervarix, can prevent infection by certain HPV types, but not all. At present, research efforts are being devoted to developing broader spectrum preventative vaccines, as well as therapeutic vaccines. To confer additional therapeutic activities, chimeric vaccines have been developed. Multivalent vaccine technologies employ strategies for addressing a broader spectrum of HPV types or for combining HPV with other pathogens. Edible vaccines are also disclosed. For needleless immunization, jet gun, gene gun and microneedles have been developed. Biodegradable and mucoadhesive polymer-based vaccine formulations have been developed to deliver vaccines through the mucosa and enhance immunogenicity. Various viral vectors of recombinant HPV DNA vaccine are disclosed. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 37-43

  16. Induction of protective and therapeutic anti-pancreatic cancer immunity using a reconstructed MUC1 DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is a common, highly lethal disease with a rising incidence. MUC1 is a tumor-associated antigen that is over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Active immunotherapy that targets MUC1 could have great treatment value. Here we investigated the preventive and therapeutic effect of a MUC1 DNA vaccine on the pancreatic cancer. MUC1-various tandem repeat units(VNTR) DNA vaccine was produced by cloning one repeat of VNTR and inserting the cloned gene into the pcDNA3.1. In the preventive group, female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the vaccine, pcDNA3.1 or PBS; and challenged with panc02-MUC1 or panc02 cell. In the therapeutic group the mice were challenged with panc02-MUC1 or panc02 cell, and then immunized with the vaccine, pcDNA3.1 or PBS. The tumor size and the survival time of the animals were compared between these groups. The DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-VNTR could raise cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity specific for MUC1. In the preventive experiment, the mice survival time was significantly longer in the vaccine group than in the control groups (P < 0.05). In the therapeutic experiment, the DNA vaccine prolonged the survival time of the panc02-MUC1-bearing mice (P < 0.05). In both the preventive and therapeutic experiments, the tumor size was significantly less in the vaccine group than in the control groups (P < 0.05). This pcDNA3.1-VNTR vaccine, however, could not prevent the mice attacked by panc02 cells and had no therapeutic effect on the mice attacked by panc02 cells. The MUC1 DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-VNTR could induce a significant MUC1-specific CTL response; and had both prophylactic and therapeutic effect on panc02-MUC1 tumors. This vaccine might be used as a new adjuvant strategy against pancreatic cancer

  17. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host

  18. Comparative study on three locally developed live orf virus vaccines for sheep in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahdel M. Housawi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of orf virus infection in Saudi Arabia (SA has been researched since 1990. The results obtained during this period indicate that the disease is widespread, has great economic impact and that no vaccine has been used against it. The present study compares the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of three locally developed live orf virus vaccines. Two of them differ in their passage history in Vero cell culture and the third was used as a virulent virus in glycerine buffer. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no similar comparative study has been conducted in the Middle East utilising three types of vaccines prepared from the same virus strain. Selection of the candidate seed orf virus and performance of the quality control tests were as laid out by the OIE for veterinary vaccine production. The vaccine seed virus was a field orf virus isolated from a previous orf outbreak in Saudi Arabia. A simple novel formula was developed to calculate the rate of reduction in the healing time (RHT % in the challenged sheep. This allowed direct comparison of the efficacy of the three types of vaccines employed in the present study. The efficacy of each vaccine was tested on a cohort of local Noemi sheep.

  19. Preventive vaccination against cervical cancer: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology Guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Seong, Seok Ju; Song, Yong Jung; Shin, Jin Woo; Lee, Keun Ho; Lim, Myong Cheol; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Ju, Woong; Hong, Jin Hwa; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Jae-Weon; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2016-01-01

    After human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine guidelines published by Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology (KSGO) in 2011, new studies have been published, leading to additional data regarding efficacy, safety, number of vaccination rounds, and ideal age of vaccine administration. We searched and reviewed the literatures focused on the efficacy of 2-dose schedule vaccination, the efficacy of 3-dose schedule vaccination in middle-aged women, the ideal age of 3-dose schedule vaccination, the safet...

  20. A phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccination in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: prolongation of prostate-specific antigen doubling time

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Masanori; MORIYA, FUKUKO; SUEKANE, SHIGETAKA; Ohnishi, Rei; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer vaccine is one of the attractive treatment modalities for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, because of delayed immune responses, its clinical benefits, besides for overall survival (OS), are not well captured by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Several surrogate markers for evaluation of cancer vaccine, including prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT), are curren...

  1. A New Decade of Vaccines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-09-01

    The call for a new decade of vaccines was made in December 2010. The aims are to secure the further discovery, development and delivery of vaccination. The first challenge is the acquisition of funds for the research and development of 20 new vaccines1. The Gates Foundation has pledged $10 billion for this venture. The other major players are WHO, UNICEF and the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The top priorities are TB, AIDS and Malaria. It is hoped that a Malaria vaccine will available in 3 years. The ambitious target of saving the lives of over 7 million children has been set. The programme must also address the need for vaccines in insulin dependent diabetes, cancers and degenerative diseases2.

  2. Recent advances in the development of vaccines for Ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohimain, Elijah Ige

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus is one of the most dangerous microorganisms in the world causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non-human primates. Ebola virus (EBOV) is a zoonotic infection, which emerges and re-emerges in human populations. The 2014 outbreak was caused by the Zaire strain, which has a kill rate of up to 90%, though 40% was recorded in the current outbreak. The 2014 outbreak is larger than all 20 outbreaks that have occurred since 1976, when the virus was first discovered. It is the first time that the virus was sustained in urban centers and spread beyond Africa into Europe and USA. Thus far, over 22,000 cases have been reported with about 50% mortality in one year. There are currently no approved therapeutics and preventive vaccines against Ebola virus disease (EVD). Responding to the devastating effe1cts of the 2014 outbreak and the potential risk of global spread, has spurred research for the development of therapeutics and vaccines. This review is therefore aimed at presenting the progress of vaccine development. Results showed that conventional inactivated vaccines produced from EBOV by heat, formalin or gamma irradiation appear to be ineffective. However, novel vaccines production techniques have emerged leading to the production of candidate vaccines that have been demonstrated to be effective in preclinical trials using small animal and non-human primates (NHP) models. Some of the promising vaccines have undergone phase 1 clinical trials, which demonstrated their safety and immunogenicity. Many of the candidate vaccines are vector based such as Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Rabies Virus (RABV), Adenovirus (Ad), Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). Other platforms include virus like particle (VLP), DNA and subunit vaccines. PMID:26596227

  3. The role of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in the prevention of anal cancer in individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso, Luis F.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing in the general population and especially in high-risk groups. A total of 90% of anal cancers are caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of the anal canal. Similar to cervical cancer, anal cancer progresses through a predictable series of premalignant stages before resulting in invasive cancer; this process begins with persistent HPV infection. The HPV vaccine represents a promising strategy to combat the increasing incidence of anal cancer.

  4. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  5. Animal models for development of therapeutic HPV16 vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2002), s. 207-212. ISSN 1019-6439 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : human papilloma viruses * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.931, year: 2002

  6. Development of an Inactivated Iridovirus Vaccine Against Turbot Viral Reddish Body Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Tingjun; HU Xiuzhong; WANG Liyan; GENG Xiaofen; JIANG Guojian; YANG Xiuxia; YU Miaomiao

    2012-01-01

    Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV) was propagated in turbot fin cells (TF cells) and inactivated as the TRBIV vaccine with its protection efficiency evaluated in this study.TF cells were cultured in 10% bovine calf serum (BCS)-containing MEM medium (pH7.0) at 22 ℃,in which TRBIV propagated to a titer as high as 105.6 TCID50 mL-1.The TRBIV was inactivated with 0.1% formalin and formulated with 0.5% aluminum hydroxide.The inactivated vaccine caused neither cytopathogenic effect (CPE) on TF cells nor pathogenic effect on turbots.After being administered with the vaccine twice via muscle injection,the turbot developed high-tittered TRBIV neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner.The vaccine protected the turbot from dying with an immunoprotection rate of 83.3% as was determined via subcutaneous vaccination in the laboratory and 90.5% via bath vaccination in turbot farms,respectively.The inactivated vaccine was very immunogenic,efficiently preventing turbot from death.It holds the potential of being applied in aquaculture.

  7. Development of two salmonella-based oral vaccines against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi Jalilian, F; Yusoff, K; Suhaimi, S; Amini, R; Sekawi, Z; Jahanshiri, F

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and other respiratory infections in infants and the elderly worldwide. We have developed two new oral vaccines using Salmonella typhi TY21a to carry and express the immunogenic epitopes of RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins on its surface, separately. To evaluate the efficacy of the designed vaccines, BALB/c mice were orally immunized and then infected with RSV. Immune response analyses showed that cellmediated, mucosal and humoral immunity in the vaccinated mice were significantly enhanced compared to the control group. Both vaccines generated a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response which is crucial for efficiency of vaccines against RSV. Furthermore, histopathological examination proved that these vaccines were safe as they did not cause any Th2-associated adverse effects in the lungs of RSV-infected mice. The findings of this research suggest that Salmonella-F and Salmonella-G vaccine candidates may have strong potential to prevent RSV infection. PMID:25864737

  8. Approach to the Discovery, Development, and Evaluation of a Novel Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Luke R; Eiden, Joseph; Hao, Li; Jones, Tom; Perez, John; McNeil, Lisa K; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a research and development pathway to identify and demonstrate the efficacy of a Neisseria meningitidis non-capsular vaccine, the recently licensed N. meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) vaccine, Trumenba(®). While other approaches have been followed in the identification of a MnB vaccine (Pizza et al. Science 287:1816-1820, 2000), the methods described here reflect the distinctive approach and experiences in discovering and developing Trumenba(®). In contrast to the development and licensure of polysaccharide-conjugate vaccines against meningococcal serotypes A, C, W, and Y, the development of a vaccine to produce broadly protective antibodies against meningococcal serogroup B has proved difficult, due to the antigenic mimicry of the serogroup B polysaccharide capsule, which is composed of polysialic acid structures similar to those expressed on human neuronal cells. Early development efforts for these vaccines failed because the MnB polysaccharide structures resemble autoantigens and thus were poorly immunogenic. The development of an MnB vaccine has therefore focused on non-polysaccharide approaches. It was critical to identify MnB cell surface-exposed antigens capable of inducing a protective response against diverse, circulating strains of invasive MnB to ensure global coverage. Once candidate antigens were identified, it was important to characterize antigenic variation and expression levels, and subsequently to assure that antigens were expressed broadly among diverse clinical isolates. Prior to the initiation of clinical trials in humans, candidate vaccine antigens were tested in functional immunogenicity assays and yielded responses that were correlated with protection from meningococcal disease. These functional immunogenicity assays (serum bactericidal assays using human complement, hSBAs) measure the titer of complement-dependent bactericidal antibodies in serum from immunized test animals using diverse clinical MnB isolates as

  9. Study on biological characters of SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Zhang; Peng-Fen Gao; Pei-Wu Yu; Yun Rao; Li-Xin Zhou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect the biological characters of the SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines.METHODS: The suspending living SGC7901 gastric cancer cells and dendritic cells were induced to be fusioned by polyethylene glycol. Pure fusion cells were obtained by selective culture with the HAT/HT culture systems.The fusion cells were counted at different time points of culture and their growth curves were drawn to reflect their proliferative activities. The fusion cells were also cultured in culture medium to investigate whether they could grow into cell clones. MTT method was used to test the stimulating abilities of the fusion cells on T lymphocytes' proliferations. Moreover, the fusion cells were planted into nude mice to observe whether they could grow into new planted tumors in this kind of immunodeficiency animals.RESULTS: The fusion cells had weaker proliferative activity and clone abilities than their parental cells. When they were cultured, the counts of cells did not increase remarkably, nor could they grow into cell clones in culture medium. The fusion cells could not grow into new planted tumors after planted into nude mice. The stimulating abilities of the fusion cells on T lymphocytes' proliferations were remarkably increased than their parental dendritic cells.CONCLUSION: The SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines have much weaker proliferative abilities than their parental cells, but they keep strong abilities to irritate the T lymphocytes and have no abilities to grow into new planted tumors in immunodeficiency animals. These are the biological basis for their antitumor biotherapies.

  10. Development of an Aotus nancymaae Model for Shigella Vaccine Immunogenicity and Efficacy Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Michael; Kaminski, Robert W.; Lugo-Roman, Luis A.; Galvez Carrillo, Hugo; Tilley, Drake Hamilton; Baldeviano, Christian; Simons, Mark P.; Reynolds, Nathanael D.; Ranallo, Ryan T.; Suvarnapunya, Akamol E.; Venkatesan, Malabi M.; Oaks, Edwin V.

    2014-01-01

    Several animal models exist to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of candidate Shigella vaccines. The two most widely used nonprimate models for vaccine development include a murine pulmonary challenge model and a guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis model. Nonhuman primate models exhibit clinical features and gross and microscopic colonic lesions that mimic those induced in human shigellosis. Challenge models for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Campylobacter spp. have...

  11. RTS,S malaria vaccine development: progress and considerations for postapproval introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Asante, Kwaku Poku

    2016-01-01

    Kwaku Poku Asante, George Adjei, Yeetey Enuameh, Seth Owusu-Agyei Kintampo Health Research Centre, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana Abstract: Though the burden of malaria has decreased in the last decade in some sub-Saharan African countries, it is still high in others, and there is no malaria vaccine in use. The development of malaria vaccines in combination with current control programs could be effective in reducing the malaria burden. In this paper, we review and discuss the progress ...

  12. Development of a minimal saponin vaccine adjuvant based on QS-21

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Chea, Eric K.; George, Constantine; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Gardner, Jeffrey R.; LIVINGSTON, PHILIP O.; Ragupathi, Govind; Lewis, Jason S.; Tan, Derek S.; Gin, David Y.

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are materials added to vaccines to enhance the immunological response to an antigen. QS-21 is a natural product adjuvant under investigation in numerous vaccine clinical trials, but its use is constrained by scarcity, toxicity, instability, and an enigmatic molecular mechanism of action. Herein, we describe the development of a minimal QS-21 analogue that decouples adjuvant activity from toxicity and provides a powerful platform for mechanistic investigations. We found that the enti...

  13. Adenovirus as a carrier for the development of influenza virus-free avian influenza vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, De-chu C.; Zhang, Jianfeng; Toro, Haroldo; Shi, Zhongkai; van Kampen, Kent R.

    2009-01-01

    A long-sought goal during the battle against avian influenza is to develop a new generation of vaccines capable of mass immunizing humans as well as poultry (the major source of avian influenza for human infections) in a timely manner. Although administration of the currently licensed influenza vaccine is effective in eliciting protective immunity against seasonal influenza, this approach is associated with a number of insurmountable problems for preventing an avian influenza pandemic. Many o...

  14. Need of cost-effective vaccines in developing countries: What plant biotechnology can offer?

    OpenAIRE

    Waheed, Mohammad Tahir; Sameeullah, Muhammad; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Syed, Tahira; Ilahi, Manzoor; Gottschamel, Johanna; Lössl, Andreas Günter

    2016-01-01

    To treat current infectious diseases, different therapies are used that include drugs or vaccines or both. Currently, the world is facing an increasing problem of drug resistance from many pathogenic microorganisms. In majority of cases, when vaccines are used, formulations consist of live attenuated microorganisms. This poses an additional risk of infection in immunocompromised patients and people suffering from malnutrition in developing countries. Therefore, there is need to improve drug t...

  15. Cost-effectiveness of introducing a rotavirus vaccine in developing countries: The case of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutierrez Juan-Pablo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developing countries rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhoea and diarrhoeal deaths in children under 5. Vaccination could greatly alleviate that burden, but in Mexico as in most low- and middle-income countries the decision to add rotavirus vaccine to the national immunisation program will depend heavily on its cost-effectiveness and affordability. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of including the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Mexico's national immunisation program. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was developed from the perspective of the health system, modelling the vaccination of a hypothetical birth cohort of 2 million children monitored from birth through 60 months of age. It compares the cost and disease burden of rotavirus in an unvaccinated cohort of children with one vaccinated as recommended at 2, 4, and 6 months. Results Including the pentavalent vaccine in the national immunisation program could prevent 71,464 medical visits (59%, 5,040 hospital admissions (66%, and 612 deaths from rotavirus gastroenteritis (70%. At US$10 per dose and a cost of administration of US$13.70 per 3-dose regimen, vaccination would cost US$122,058 per death prevented, US$4,383 per discounted life-year saved, at a total net cost of US$74.7 million dollars to the health care system. Key variables influencing the results were, in order of importance, case fatality, vaccine price, vaccine efficacy, serotype prevalence, and annual loss of efficacy. The results are also very sensitive to the discount rate assumed when calculated per life-year saved. Conclusion At prices below US $15 per dose, the cost per life-year saved is estimated to be lower than one GNP per capita and hence highly cost effective by the WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health criteria. The cost-effectiveness estimates are highly dependent upon the mortality in the absence of the vaccine, which suggests that the vaccine

  16. Intent to participate in future cervical cancer screenings is lower when satisfaction with the decision to be vaccinated is neutral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Marya Alexander

    Full Text Available HPV vaccination programs have adversely affected participation in future cervical cancer screening. The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of decision satisfaction with accepting/rejecting the HPV vaccine, as well as traditional clinical factors, on the intent to participate in future screening.From January 2011 through August 2012 women 18-26 years old presenting for health care in an urban college student health and wellness clinic in the US Midwest were asked to complete a descriptive and medical history survey including a six element decisional satisfaction survey scored on 5-point Likert scales, where the intent to participate in future cervical cancer screening was measured. Of the 568 women who completed the decisional satisfaction survey, 17% of those <21 years and 7% ≥ 21 years indicated no intent to participate in future cervical cancer screenings. Among women of current screening age, the univariate risk factors of race/ethnicity, contraceptive use, number of lifetime sexual partners, and receipt of HPV vaccine were not predictors of intent for future cervical cancer screening. Instead, only a history of a prior Pap test was a significant positive predictor and only a decisional satisfaction of 'neutral' (Likert score = 3 for any of the four decisional satisfaction elements was a significant negative predictor. For the decisional satisfaction element "best for me personally", there was a 78% decreased likelihood of intending to participate in future screening if the satisfaction was neutral rather than firm (aOR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.05-0.91 and a 26 fold increased likelihood if she had had a prior Pap test (aOR = 26, 95% CI: 5-133.HPV vaccination implementation programs must help women be the owner of their decision around HPV vaccination and understand the importance of future participation in cervical cancer screening.

  17. Towards a Preventive Strategy for Toxoplasmosis: Current Trends, Challenges, and Future Perspectives for Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereig, Ragab M; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    With its facultative ability to induce various types of infection in its hosts, Toxoplasma gondii remains a fascinating and enigmatic pathogen. As a parasite, despite its primitive unicellular structure, it possesses a highly sophisticated arsenal of invasive and defensive tools. Toxoplasmosis has gained widespread significance as a zoonotic disease capable of inducing severe illnesses in humans and drastic economic losses in the veterinary field. Although around a third of the world's population is infected with Toxoplasma gondii, immunocompromised people, pregnant women, and neonates are more vulnerable to the most severe forms of the disease. Hence, development of a preventive strategy is urgently needed to combat T. gondii infection in both humans and animals. Successful triggering of host immune responses and development of specific immune responses against the different strains and antigens of T. gondii has encouraged researchers to focus on vaccination as a feasible preventive control strategy against toxoplasmosis. In the last few years, vaccine development against T. gondii infections has seen great advances and achievements being made at the research level and, to a lesser extent, in veterinary applications. Currently, only one live attenuated vaccine is available for reducing abortions and fetal losses in pregnant ewes. Otherwise, researchers have investigated numerous classes of vaccine, including live attenuated, recombinant subunit, and vectored. In this chapter we discuss the most commonly investigated vaccines against toxoplasmosis, recombinant DNA and protein vaccines, with special focus on their methodologies and mechanisms of action. PMID:27076296

  18. Development of a stable liquid formulation of live attenuated influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jessica A; Estrada, Marcus; Flood, E Alexander; Mahmood, Kutub; Dhere, Rajeev; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-07-12

    Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing influenza. However, the cost of producing annual seasonal influenza vaccines puts them out of reach for most developing countries. While live attenuated influenza vaccines are among the most efficacious and can be manufactured at low cost, they may require lyophilization to be stable enough for developing-country use, which adds a significant cost burden. The development of a liquid live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine that is stable for around a year-the duration of an annual influenza season-would significantly improve not only the production output but also the use and accessibility of influenza vaccines in low-resource settings. In this study, potential stabilizing excipients were screened and optimized using the least stable influenza vaccine strain presently known, H1N1 (A/California/07/2009), as a model. The stability-conferring properties of the lead formulations were also tested with a Type B strain of influenza virus (B/Brisbane/60/2008). Stability was also evaluated with higher titers of influenza virus and exposure to agitation and freeze-thaw stresses to further confirm the stability of the lead formulations. Through this process, we identified a liquid formulation consisting of sucrose phosphate glutamate buffer with 1% arginine and 0.5% recombinant human serum albumin that provided storage stability of one year at 2-8°C for the influenza A and B strains tested. PMID:27155495

  19. Evaluation of dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic cancer cells or expressing tumour mRNA as potential cancer vaccines against leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukemia is a clonal disorder characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of haematopoietic cells, and represents the most common form of cancer in children. Advances in therapy for childhood leukemia have relied increasingly on the use of high-dose chemotherapy often combined with stem-cell transplantation. Despite a high success rate and intensification of therapy, children still suffer from relapse and progressive disease resistant to further therapy. Thus, novel forms of therapy are required. This study focuses on dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of childhood leukemia and evaluates the in vitro efficacy of different strategies for antigen loading of professional antigen-presenting cells. We have compared DCs either loaded with apoptotic leukemia cells or transfected with mRNA from the same leukemia cell line, Jurkat E6, for their capacity to induce specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. Monocyte-derived DCs from healthy donors were loaded with tumor antigen, matured and co-cultured with autologous T cells. After one week, T-cell responses against antigen-loaded DCs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay. DCs loaded with apoptotic Jurkat E6 cells or transfected with Jurkat E6-cell mRNA were both able to elicit specific T-cell responses in vitro. IFNγ-secreting T cells were observed in both the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. The results indicate that loading of DCs with apoptotic leukemia cells or transfection with tumour mRNA represent promising strategies for development of cancer vaccines for treatment of childhood leukemia

  20. Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal cells. Some types of leukocytes patrol the circulatory system , seeking foreign invaders and diseased, damaged, or dead ... and that are relatively easy for the immune system to recognize as ... viruses ( hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus ), stimulate the ...

  1. [The historical development of immunization in Germany. From compulsory smallpox vaccination to a National Action Plan on Immunization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S; Schöneberg, I; Krause, G

    2012-11-01

    In the German Reich, smallpox vaccinations were organized by the state. A mandatory vaccination throughout the empire was introduced in 1874, which was continued in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the German Democratic Republic (GDR) until 1982/1983. From 1935, health departments were responsible for vaccinations. In the GDR, immunization was tightly organized: The state made great efforts to achieve high vaccination rates. Responsibilities were clearly defined at all levels and for all ages. While vaccination was initially mandatory only at the regional level, the legally mandated immunization schedule later contained compulsory vaccinations, e.g., against measles. In the beginning there were mandatory vaccinations in the FRG at the Länder level. Since 1961, the Federal Epidemics Act has impeded obligatory vaccinations. Instead, voluntary vaccinations based on recommendations were stressed. Since the 1980s, vaccinations have been shifted from the public health service sector to office-based physicians. Today, public health authorities offer mainly supplementary vaccinations. In 2007, protective immunizations were introduced as compulsory benefits of the statutory health insurance (SHI). Recently, the German federal states developed a National Vaccination Plan to support immunization strategies. PMID:23114451

  2. Developing a vaccine to prevent otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Nadeem; Ren, Dabin; Kaur, Ravinder; Basha, Saleem; Zagursky, Robert; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a predominant organism of the upper respiratory nasopharyngeal microbiota. Its disease spectrum includes otitis media, sinusitis, non-bacteremic pneumonia and invasive infections. Protein-based vaccines to prevent NTHi infections are needed to alleviate these infections in children and vulnerable populations such as the elderly and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One NTHi protein is included in a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and has been shown to provide efficacy. Our lab has been interested in understanding the immunogenicity of NTHi vaccine candidates P6, protein D and OMP26 for preventing acute otitis media in young children. We expect that continued investigation and progress in the development of an efficacious protein based vaccine against NTHi infections is achievable in the near future. PMID:26894630

  3. Peptide Vaccines for Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Nakagami

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines are commonly used as a preventive medicine for infectious diseases worldwide; however, the trial for an amyloid beta vaccine against Alzheimer’s disease will open a new concept in vaccination. In case of therapeutic vaccines for cancer, their targets are usually specific antigens in cancer cells, allowing activated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs to attach and remove the antigen-presenting cancer cells. In our therapeutic vaccines against hypertension, the target is angiotensin II (Ang II and induced anti-Ang II antibodies could efficiently ameliorate high blood pressure. Similarly, we developed the therapeutic vaccine against DPP4 for diabetes mellitus. However, because Ang II or DPP4 is an endogenous hormone, we must avoid autoimmune disease induced by these vaccines. Therefore, our system was used to design a therapeutic vaccine that elicits anti-Ang II or DPP4 antibodies without CTL activation against Ang II or DPP4. In this review, we will describe our concept of therapeutic vaccines for hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  4. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  5. Applying mathematical tools to accelerate vaccine development: modeling Shigella immune dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney L Davis

    Full Text Available We establish a mathematical framework for studying immune interactions with Shigella, a bacteria that kills over one million people worldwide every year. The long-term goal of this novel approach is to inform Shigella vaccine design by elucidating which immune components and bacterial targets are crucial for establishing Shigella immunity. Our delay differential equation model focuses on antibody and B cell responses directed against antigens like lipopolysaccharide in Shigella's outer membrane. We find that antibody-based vaccines targeting only surface antigens cannot elicit sufficient immunity for protection. Additional boosting prior to infection would require a four-orders-of-magnitude increase in antibodies to sufficiently prevent epithelial invasion. However, boosting anti-LPS B memory can confer protection, which suggests these cells may correlate with immunity. We see that IgA antibodies are slightly more effective per molecule than IgG, but more total IgA is required due to spatial functionality. An extension of the model reveals that targeting both LPS and epithelial entry proteins is a promising avenue to advance vaccine development. This paper underscores the importance of multifaceted immune targeting in creating an effective Shigella vaccine. It introduces mathematical models to the Shigella vaccine development effort and lays a foundation for joint theoretical/experimental/clinical approaches to Shigella vaccine design.

  6. Reverse genetics of rabies virus: new strategies to attenuate virus virulence for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shimao; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunhua; Luo, Farui; Guo, Caiping

    2015-08-01

    Rabies is an ancient neurological disease that is almost invariably fatal once the clinical symptoms develop. Currently, prompt wound cleansing after exposing to a potentially rabid animal and vaccination using rabies vaccine combined with administration of rabies immune globulin are the only effective methods for post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies. Reverse genetic technique is a novel approach to investigate the function of a specific gene by analyzing the phenotypic effects through directly manipulating the gene sequences. It has revolutionized and provided a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of RNA viruses and has been widely used in rabies virus research. The attenuation of rabies virus virulence is the prerequisite for rabies vaccine development. Given the current challenge that sufficient and affordable high-quality vaccines are limited and lacking for global rabies prevention and control, highly cell-adapted, stable, and attenuated rabies viruses with broad cross-reactivity against different viral variants are ideal candidates for consideration to meet the need for human rabies control in the future. A number of approaches have been pursued to reduce the virulence of the virus and improve the safety of rabies vaccines. The application of reverse genetic technique has greatly advanced the engineering of rabies virus and paves the avenue for utilizing rabies virus for vaccine against rabies, viral vectors for exogenous antigen expression, and gene therapy in the future. PMID:25994916

  7. Utility, limitations, and future of non-human primates for dengue research and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariol, Carlos A; White, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is considered the most important emerging, human arboviruses, with worldwide distribution in the tropics. Unfortunately, there are no licensed dengue vaccines available or specific anti-viral drugs. The development of a dengue vaccine faces unique challenges. The four serotypes co-circulate in endemic areas, and pre-existing immunity to one serotype does not protect against infection with other serotypes, and actually may enhance severity of disease. One foremost constraint to test the efficacy of a dengue vaccine is the lack of an animal model that adequately recapitulates the clinical manifestations of a dengue infection in humans. In spite of this limitation, non-human primates (NHP) are considered the best available animal model to evaluate dengue vaccine candidates due to their genetic relatedness to humans and their ability to develop a viremia upon infection and a robust immune response similar to that in humans. Therefore, most dengue vaccines candidates are tested in primates before going into clinical trials. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of published studies on dengue vaccine evaluations using the NHP model, and discuss critical parameters affecting the usefulness of the model. In the light of recent clinical data, we assess the ability of the NHP model to predict immunological parameters of vaccine performances in humans and discuss parameters that should be further examined as potential correlates of protection. Finally, we propose some guidelines toward a more standardized use of the model to maximize its usefulness and to better compare the performance of vaccine candidates from different research groups. PMID:25309540

  8. Recent developments for Staphylococcus aureus vaccines: clinical and basic science challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, R A

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaccines have made dramatic impacts upon morbidity and mortality caused by a number of common pathogens, but a vaccine to prevent Staphylococcus aureus infections has proven to be illusive. With successful bacterial vaccines, the organisms are all part of the transient flora, whereas, S. aureus is part of the normal human flora. This means that S. aureus has had a prolonged time to adapt to the host milieu and its defences. The failure of several staphylococcal antigens to protect humans from infection in vaccine clinical trials using active or passive immunisation has stimulated a re-examination of the fundamental assumptions about staphylococcal immunity in humans vs. animals, especially rodents. This has spurred an active debate about the appropriate models for vaccine development and an examination of our current understanding of the protective immunity in humans. A major factor in the development of previous bacterial vaccines was a biomarker that predicted human protection, e.g., antibodies to tetanus toxoid or to pneumococcal polysaccharide. While antibodies against a number of staphylococcal antigens have proven to be an excellent biomarker for protection in rodents, these have not been translated to human infections. Thus, while much work remains, there is a growing consensus that T-cell immunity plays an important role in protecting humans. Moreover, the presence of anti-staphylococcal toxin antibodies correlates with reduced disease severity in humans. The most important recent advances concerning potential biomarkers, and the role of pre-existing immune status of vaccines in vaccine-associated mortality are considered in this review. PMID:26629971

  9. Development and evaluation of the TD97 measles virus vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Morita, M.; Katoh, M.; Kidokoro, M.; Saika, S.; Yoshizawa, S.; Hashizume, S.; Horiuchi, K.; Okabe, N.; Shinozaki, T. (Chiba Serum Institute (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    The TD97 strain vaccine virus was prepared from the Tanabe strain measles virus by low-temperature passages in primary cell cultures and ultraviolet (UV) mutagenesis. The TD97 strain exhibited the following characteristics: highly temperature sensitive, neither multiplying nor forming any plaques at 40 degrees C in Vero cells; genetically stable, maintaining high temperature sensitivity after ten successive passages in CE cells at 30 degrees C or 35 degrees C; and M proteins of this virus about 1 KD slower in mobility in SDS-PAGE than that of the Tanabe strain. The TD97 strain was further confirmed to be attenuated by an inoculation test into primate brain. In field trials, 752 healthy children were inoculated with a live virus vaccine prepared with this strain, and the following results were obtained: the seroconversion rate was 97% (517/533), and the average HI antibody titer was 2(5.2). An antibody-increasing effect was also observed in children who were initially seropositive. In children who seroconverted, the rates of fever were 15.7% (55/351) for 37.5 degrees C or higher and 4.0% (14/351) for 39 degrees C or higher. The rash rate was 7.7% (27/351), and the incidence of local reaction was 5.4% (19/351). The TD97 strain is thus considered to be suitable in use for an attenuated measles vaccine.

  10. Advanced Development of the rF1V and rBV A/B Vaccines: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kate Hart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of vaccines for microorganisms and bacterial toxins with the potential to be used as biowarfare and bioterrorism agents is an important component of the US biodefense program. DVC is developing two vaccines, one against inhalational exposure to botulinum neurotoxins A1 and B1 and a second for Yersinia pestis, with the ultimate goal of licensure by the FDA under the Animal Rule. Progress has been made in all technical areas, including manufacturing, nonclinical, and clinical development and testing of the vaccines, and in assay development. The current status of development of these vaccines, and remaining challenges are described in this chapter.

  11. Adverse events associated with vaccine prepared Ngcgm3 / Vssp / montanide Isa 51 In patients with breast cancer Metastatic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the best-studied antigenic systems, which have their expression increased in the membrane of tumor cells, are the gangliosides. Several clinical trials with therapeutic vaccines containing N-glycolylated gangliosides have been made in Cuba by the Center Molecular Immunology. One of these studies, it is the trial: 'Specific active immunotherapy with the vaccine preparation NGcGM3 / VSSP / Montanide ISA 51 in the treatment of patients with breast cancer metastatic. Phase II'. In order to assess the major events events related to this product, were reviewed the medical records of total patients in the clinical trial performed in the service Oncology Hospital Universitario 'Celestino Hernandez Robau' Villa Clara. (Author)

  12. Characterization of S3Pvac Anti-Cysticercosis Vaccine Components: Implications for the Development of an Anti-Cestodiasis Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassy, Dunia; Bobes, Raúl J.; Rosas, Gabriela; Anaya, Victor H.; Brehm, Klaus; Hernández, Beatriz; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Pedraza, Saúl; Morales, Julio; Villalobos, Nelly; de Aluja, Aline S.; Laclette, Juan P.; Nunes, Caris M.; Biondi, Germano F.; Fragoso, Gladis; Hernández, Marisela; Sciutto, Edda

    2010-01-01

    Background Cysticercosis and hydatidosis seriously affect human health and are responsible for considerable economic loss in animal husbandry in non-developed and developed countries. S3Pvac and EG95 are the only field trial-tested vaccine candidates against cysticercosis and hydatidosis, respectively. S3Pvac is composed of three peptides (KETc1, GK1 and KETc12), originally identified in a Taenia crassiceps cDNA library. S3Pvac synthetically and recombinantly expressed is effective against experimentally and naturally acquired cysticercosis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the homologous sequences of two of the S3Pvac peptides, GK1 and KETc1, were identified and further characterized in Taenia crassiceps WFU, Taenia solium, Taenia saginata, Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis. Comparisons of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences coding for KETc1 and GK1 revealed significant homologies in these species. The predicted secondary structure of GK1 is almost identical between the species, while some differences were observed in the C terminal region of KETc1 according to 3D modeling. A KETc1 variant with a deletion of three C-terminal amino acids protected to the same extent against experimental murine cysticercosis as the entire peptide. On the contrary, immunization with the truncated GK1 failed to induce protection. Immunolocalization studies revealed the non stage-specificity of the two S3Pvac epitopes and their persistence in the larval tegument of all species and in Taenia adult tapeworms. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that GK1 and KETc1 may be considered candidates to be included in the formulation of a multivalent and multistage vaccine against these cestodiases because of their enhancing effects on other available vaccine candidates. PMID:20585656

  13. Developing cancer warning statements for alcoholic beverages

    OpenAIRE

    Pettigrew, Simone; Jongenelis, Michelle; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Slevin, Terry; Pratt, Iain S; Glance, David; Liang, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence of the increased cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption, but this is not well understood by the general public. This study investigated the acceptability among drinkers of cancer warning statements for alcoholic beverages. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with Australian drinkers to develop a series of cancer-related warning statements for alcohol products. Eleven cancer warning statements and one general health warning statement were subse...

  14. Preclinical Safety Pharmacology Study of a Novel Protein-Based Cancer Vaccine CHP-NY-ESO-1

    OpenAIRE

    Harada, Naozumi; Hoshiai, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Yoshiyasu; Sakaguchi, Yasue; Kuno, Takayoshi; Hishida, Tadashi; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    CHP-NY-ESO-1 is a novel therapeutic cancer vaccine consisting of a recombinantprotein of cancer antigen NY-ESO-1 and a polysaccharide-based delivery system,cholesteryl pullulan. A pilot clinical study of CHP-NY-ESO-1 in cancer patients waspreviously conducted, and the adverse events related to this drug were observed to belimited to skin reactions at injection sites. To further establish the safety ofCHP-NY-ESO-1, we studied the effects of its subcutaneous injection on vital functionssuch as ...

  15. Preventive vaccines for cervical cancer Vacunas para prevenir el cáncer cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COSETTE M WHEELER

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer is a possibility in the near future. Close to 20 genotypes of HPV, of the 75 that have been identified, infect the femine genital tract, but four subtypes (16, 18, 31 and 45 have been associated in close to 80% of cervical cancers. this article proposes that in order to design an effective prophylactic vaccine against HPV infection, an adequate immune response should be guaranteed through four goals; a activation of antigens present in the cell; b overcoming the host response and viral genetic variability in the T cell response; c generation of high levels of T and B memory cells; and d persistence of antigens.El potencial uso de vacunas de virus del papiloma humano (VPH en la prevención y tratamiento del cáncer cervical posiblemente será implementado durante los próximos años. Cerca de los 20 genotipos de VPH de los 75 que se encuentran identificados infectan el tracto genital femenino, pero son cuatro subtipos: 16, 18, 31 y 45 los que se han asociado en cerca de 80% a cáncer cervical. En este ensayo se plantea que para poder diseñar una vacuna profiláctica contra la infección de VPH, efectiva, se debe garantizar una adecuada respuesta inmune a través de cuatro metas: a activación de antígenos presentes en la célula; b superar la respuesta del huésped y la variabilidad genética viral en la respuesta de células T; c generación de altos niveles de células T y B de memoria, y d persistencia de antígenos.

  16. Building collaborative networks for HIV/AIDS vaccine development: the AVIP experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrantelli, Flavia; Buttò, Stefano; Cafaro, Aurelio; Wahren, Britta; Ensoli, Barbara

    2006-11-01

    The need for an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine is imperative to halt a pandemic that involves more than 40 million individuals worldwide as of 2005 and is causing enormous socio-economic losses, especially in developing countries (DC). The overall failure of more than two decades of HIV vaccine research justifies the demands for a concerted effort for the rapid development of new and efficacious vaccines against HIV/AIDS. In this context, building international collaborative networks is a must for speeding up scientific research and optimizing the use of funding in a synergistic fashion, as resources for HIV/AIDS are limited and do not involve most of the biggest Pharmas that are more interested in drug discovery. The AIDS Vaccine Integrated Project (AVIP) consortium is an example of synergistic partnership of international European Union and DC experts with a common research goal. AVIP is a European Commission-funded (FP-6), consortium-based, 5-year program directed to the fast development of new HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates to be tested in phase I clinical trials in Europe for future advancement to phase II/III testing in DC. To ensure their rapid development, AVIP novel combined vaccines include both regulatory and structural HIV antigens, which have already been tested, as single components, in phase I clinical trials. In particular, such combination vaccines may be superior to earlier vaccine candidates, the vast majority of which are based only on either structural or regulatory HIV products. In fact, the generation of immune responses to both types of viral antigens expressed either early (regulatory products) or late (structural products) during the viral life cycle can maximize immune targeting of both primary or chronic viral infection. Further, the rational design of combined vaccines allows exploitation of immunomodulatory functions of HIV regulatory proteins, which can improve immunity against structural vaccine components. The building of the AVIP

  17. [Development of vaccines for HIV-1. Relevance of subtype-specific cellular immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ana María; Turk, Gabriela; Pascutti, María Fernanda; Falivene, Juliana; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    It has been almost 30 years since the detection of the first HIV-1 cases and yet an effective and safe vaccine has not been developed. Although, advances in antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have produced a major impact on the pandemic, and even though HIV/aids remains a major concern for developing countries, where access to therapy is limited. The last report from UNAIDS notified 33 million people living with HIV/aids, worldwide, while in Argentina it is estimated that 120,000 persons have been infected. One of the challenges to address and ultimately overcome when developing a vaccine is the high variability of HIV-1. The M group, responsible for the pandemic, is divided into 10 subtypes and several sub-subtypes, in addition to the 48 circulating recombinant forms (CRF) and over one hundred unique recombinant forms (URF). The HIV epidemic in Argentina is as complex as in the rest of the world, characterized by the high prevalence of infections caused by subtype B and BF variants. Despite the wide range of publications focused on the immune response against HIV as well as to vaccine development, how to overcome variability on vaccine antigen selection is still unclear. Studies performed in our laboratory showed the impact of the immunogenicity of BF recombinant variants, both in humans and in animal models. These results are of great concern in vaccine development for our region. PMID:21163746

  18. Targeting mucosal immunity in the battle to develop a mastitis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Mini; Mullarky, Isis K

    2011-12-01

    The mucosal immune system encounters antigens that enhance and suppress immune function, and serves as a selective barrier against invading pathogens. The mammary gland not only encounters antigens but also produces a nutrient evolved to protect and enhance mucosal development in the neonate. Efforts to manipulate antibody concentrations in milk to prevent mastitis, an infection of the mammary gland, have been hampered both by complexity and variation in target pathogens and limited knowledge of cellular immunity in the gland. Successful vaccination strategies must overcome the natural processes that regulate types and concentrations of milk antibodies for neonatal development, and enhance cellular immunity. Furthermore, the need to overcome dampening of immunity caused by non-pathogenic encounters to successfully prevent establishment of infection is an additional obstacle in vaccine development at mucosal sites. A significant mastitis pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, not only resides as a normal flora on a multitude of species, but also causes clinical disease with limited treatment options. Using the bovine model of S. aureus mastitis, researchers can decipher the role of antigen selection and presentation by mammary dendritic cells, enhance development of central and effector memory function, and subsequently target specific memory cells to the mammary gland for successful vaccine development. This brief review provides an overview of adaptive immunity, previous vaccine efforts, current immunological findings relevant to enhancing immune memory, and research technologies that show promise in directing future vaccine efforts to enhance mammary gland immunity and prevent mastitis. PMID:21968537

  19. Proteomics-driven Antigen Discovery for Development of Vaccines Against Gonorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Baarda, Benjamin I; Gafken, Philip R; Soge, Olusegun O; Holmes, King K; Jerse, Ann E; Unemo, Magnus; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2016-07-01

    Expanding efforts to develop preventive gonorrhea vaccines is critical because of the dire possibility of untreatable gonococcal infections. Reverse vaccinology, which includes genome and proteome mining, has proven very successful in the discovery of vaccine candidates against many pathogenic bacteria. However, progress with this approach for a gonorrhea vaccine remains in its infancy. Accordingly, we applied a comprehensive proteomic platform-isobaric tagging for absolute quantification coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry-to identify potential gonococcal vaccine antigens. Our previous analyses focused on cell envelopes and naturally released membrane vesicles derived from four different Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains. Here, we extended these studies to identify cell envelope proteins of N. gonorrhoeae that are ubiquitously expressed and specifically induced by physiologically relevant environmental stimuli: oxygen availability, iron deprivation, and the presence of human serum. Together, these studies enabled the identification of numerous potential gonorrhea vaccine targets. Initial characterization of five novel vaccine candidate antigens that were ubiquitously expressed under these different growth conditions demonstrated that homologs of BamA (NGO1801), LptD (NGO1715), and TamA (NGO1956), and two uncharacterized proteins, NGO2054 and NGO2139, were surface exposed, secreted via naturally released membrane vesicles, and elicited bactericidal antibodies that cross-reacted with a panel of temporally and geographically diverse isolates. In addition, analysis of polymorphisms at the nucleotide and amino acid levels showed that these vaccine candidates are highly conserved among N. gonorrhoeae strains. Finally, depletion of BamA caused a loss of N. gonorrhoeae viability, suggesting it may be an essential target. Together, our data strongly support the use of proteomics-driven discovery of potential vaccine targets as a sound

  20. HIV/AIDS vaccine development: are we walking out from the dark?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Yan-min; WANG You-chun; XU Jian-qing

    2010-01-01

    @@ The need for AIDS vaccine has been emphasized by the increase of HIV-1 prevalence in sexual transmission which bridges the spreading of HIV-1 from high-risk population to other populations. After more than two-decade intensive effort on the AIDS vaccine development, it remains elusive whether and how an effective vaccine will be achieved. Recent data released from a phase Ⅲ trial in Thailand showed a partial protection might be accomplishable by(R)the "prime-boost"combination of two vaccines: ALVAC(R) HIV vaccine (the prime), and AIDSVAX(R) B/E vaccine (the boost).1 This unprecedented large clinical trial observed that the prime-boost combination lowered the rate of HIV infection by 31.2% compared to placebo based on the modified intent-to-treat population (n=51 vs. n=74,respectively; P=0.04). However, debating on the efficacy interpretation of this trial arose among field scientists.Furthermore, how to improve the efficacy will become the most important question to be tackled. Here we reviewed the recent publications and summarized the major progress achieved.