WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer update lessons

  1. Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

    2003-02-24

    The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

  2. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  3. Lung cancer screening: Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers

  4. Lung cancer screening: Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyea Young [Dept. of Radiology, Center for Lung Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers.

  5. [Breast cancer update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armuss, A

    2014-06-01

    Breast Cancer, with a life-time prevalence of about 10-12%, is the most common cancer in women. In 2013, the actress Angelina Jolie, by announcing she had a double mastectomy, increased the awareness of a family history of breast and ovarian cancer and the treatment available to reduce the inherited risks. In Germany, each year about 25 out of 100,000 women (age-standardized according to European Standard) die of the disease. The number of newly diagnosed cases is about 72,000 per year. In comparison, many other countries record higher levels. Investing in the development of new therapies has therefore been key for many years. Prevention programs, such as the mammography screening are publicly touted, in both cases with the aim to reduce breast cancer mortality. To accurately assess the risk in underwriting, it is important to know about the risk factors for the development of breast cancer, as well as the latest advances in prevention, therapy and their prognostic classification. The following article provides an overview. PMID:25000626

  6. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Estrogen-alone hormone therapy does not increase the risk ...

  7. [Dying with cancer: Hollywood lessons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Fernanda; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2013-12-01

    The study attempts to understand how dying from cancer is portrayed by five movies produced in Hollywood between 1993 and 2006. Based on the cultural studies and their post-structuralism version and supported by the notions of discourse and subjectivity, as proposed by philosopher Michel Foucault, we suggest one of the possible readings of the movie picture corpus. We assess how the movie picture discourse acts as a cultural pedagogy that produces ways of seeing dying with cancer: immortalizing the healthy body image, silencing death, taking care of the dead body and, finally, accepting death. Our proposal is intended to stimulate reflections that may contribute to care and education in nursing. PMID:25080714

  8. Updates on esophageal and gastric cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy Gallo; Charles Cha

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancers are both common and deadly. Patients present most often after disease progression and survival is therefore poor. Due to demographic variability and recent changes in disease incidence, much emphasis has been placed on studying risk factors for both esophageal and gastric cancers.However, with increasing understanding of these diseases, low survival rates persist and continued intensive studies are necessary to optimize treatment plans. This review article discusses updates in the evolving epidemiology, clinical presentation, risk factors,and diagnostic and treatment modalities of esophageal and gastric cancers.

  9. Update on inflammatory breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lerebours, Florence; Bieche, Ivan; Lidereau, Rosette

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is both the least frequent and the most severe form of epithelial breast cancer. The diagnosis is based on clinical inflammatory signs and is reinforced by pathological findings. Significant progress has been made in the management of IBC in the past 20 years. Yet survival among IBC patients is still only one-half that among patients with non-IBC. Identification of the molecular determinants of IBC would probably lead to more specific treatments and to improve...

  10. Update: immunological strategies for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Charles G; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2010-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in US men. Along with initial therapy using surgery, radiotherapy, or cryotherapy, hormonal therapy is the mainstay of treatment. For men with advanced (metastatic) disease, docetaxel-based chemotherapy is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and provides a significant survival advantage. This relative paucity of treatment options drives an ongoing quest for additional treatment modalities; among these is immunotherapy. The concept that prostate cancer is a malignancy that can be targeted by the immune system may seem counterintuitive; certainly kidney cancer and melanoma are more traditionally thought of as immune responsive cancers. However, prostate cancer arises in a relatively unique organ and may express a number of proteins (antigens) against which an immune response can be generated. More importantly, several of these agents have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit in randomized controlled clinical trials, and one agent in particular (Sipuleucel-T, Dendreon Corporation, Seattle, WA) could be FDA-approved in 2010. This update summarizes recent clinical developments in the field of prostate cancer immunotherapy, with a focus on dendritic cell vaccines, virus-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, and cell-based vaccines. In addition, the notion of agents that target immune checkpoints is introduced. Enthusiasm for prostate cancer immunotherapy is founded upon its potential to mediate targeted, specific, tumor cell destruction without significant systemic toxicity; however, this has yet to be fully realized in the clinical arena. PMID:20425628

  11. Updating Teaching Lessons on the Soviet Union: Entering the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Lois

    1990-01-01

    Explains how social studies teachers can help students understand perestroika, glasnost, and other current events in the Soviet Union. Describes strategies that teach how to analyze periodical and newspaper articles dealing with the Soviet Union. Lists resource materials for updating information on the USSR. Outlines a sample lesson on the 1989…

  12. Novel therapies in genitourinary cancer: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenhong

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, new treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC has been a spotlight in the field of cancer therapeutics. With several emerging agents branded as 'targeted therapy' now available, both medical oncologists and urologists are progressively more hopeful for better outcomes. The new remedies may provide patients with improved survival and at the same time less toxicity when compared to traditional cytotoxic agents. This article will center on current and emerging treatment strategies for advanced RCC and other GU malignancies with updates from 2008 annual ASCO meeting.

  13. Timing matters: Lessons From The CA Literature On Updating

    OpenAIRE

    Radax, Wolfgang; Rengs, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    In the present article we emphasize the importance of modeling time in the context of agent-based models. To this end, we present a (selective) survey of the Cellular Automata-literature on updating and draw parallels to the issue of agent activation in agent-based models. By means of two simple models, Schelling's segregation model and Epstein's demographic prisoner's dilemma we investigate the influence of choosing different regimes of agent activation. Our experiments indicate that timing ...

  14. Sustainable Outreach: Lessons Learned from Space Update and Discovery Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, P. H.; Sumners, C.; Law, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    A sustainable program lives on past its initial funding cycle, and develops a network of users that ensures continued life, either by fees, advertising revenue, or by making the program more successful in later sponsored grants. Teachers like free things, so having a sponsor for products such as lithographs or CD-Roms is key to wide distribution. In 1994 we developed “Space Update®”, under the NASA “Public Use of the Internet” program. It has new editions annually, with over 40,000 distributed so far (many purchased but most free at teacher and student workshops). In 1996 we created a special edition “Space Weather®”, which includes the space weather module from Space Update plus other resources. Initially developed with funding from the IMAGE mission, it is now sponsored by Cluster and MMS. A new edition is published annually and distributed in the “Sun-Earth Day” packet; total distribution now exceeds 180,000. “Earth Update” was created in 1999 under cooperative agreement “Museums Teaching Planet Earth”. It now has a total distribution of over 20,000. Both Earth Update and Space Update were developed to be museum kiosk software, and more than 15 museums have them on display. Over 4,000 users are active in our e-Teacher network and 577 in our museum educator network. Although these can certainly be considered successful because of their longevity and user base, we have had a far more dramatic sustainable program arise in the last six years… the “Discovery Dome®”. Invented at HMNS and developed under NASA Cooperative Agreement “Immersive Earth”, this dome was the first digital portable planetarium that also showed fulldome movies with an interactive interface (first shown to the public at the Dec 2003 AGU meeting). The Discovery Dome network (tinyurl.com/DiscDome) has spun those initial 6 NASA-funded domes into over 90 installations in 22 states and 23 countries. Creating high quality content is quite expensive and so needs

  15. Colorectal Cancer in African Americans: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Renee; White, Pascale; Nieto, Jose; Vieira, Dorice; Francois, Fritz; Hamilton, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This review is an update to the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) Committee on Minority Affairs and Cultural Diversity's paper on colorectal cancer (CRC) in African Americans published in 2005. Over the past 10 years, the incidence and mortality rates of CRC in the United States has steadily declined. However, reductions have been strikingly much slower among African Americans who continue to have the highest rate of mortality and lowest survival when compared with all other racial groups. The reasons for the health disparities are multifactorial and encompass physician and patient barriers. Patient factors that contribute to disparities include poor knowledge of benefits of CRC screening, limited access to health care, insurance status along with fear and anxiety. Physician factors include lack of knowledge of screening guidelines along with disparate recommendations for screening. Earlier screening has been recommended as an effective strategy to decrease observed disparities; currently the ACG and American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopists recommend CRC screening in African Americans to begin at age 45. Despite the decline in CRC deaths in all racial and ethnic groups, there still exists a significant burden of CRC in African Americans, thus other strategies including educational outreach for health care providers and patients and the utilization of patient navigation systems emphasizing the importance of screening are necessary. These strategies have been piloted in both local communities and Statewide resulting in notable significant decreases in observed disparities. PMID:27467183

  16. Comprehensive update on cancer scenario of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Md Akram Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh, at 142 million people, is the ninth most populous country in the world. There are 13 to 15 lakh cancer patients in Bangladesh, with about two lakh patients newly diagnosed with cancer each year. As an overview, lung cancer and mouth-oropharynx cancer rank as the top two prevalent cancers in males. Other types of cancers are esophagus cancer and stomach cancer. In women, cancer cervix uteri and breast cancer are most prevalent. Other cancer types, which affect women, are mouth and ...

  17. HER2 testing in gastric cancer: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahao-Machado, Lucas Faria; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression is increasingly recognized as a frequent molecular abnormality in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer. With the recent introduction of HER2 molecular targeted therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer, determination of HER2 status is crucial in order to select patients who may benefit from this treatment. This paper provides an update on our knowledge of HER2 in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, including the prognostic...

  18. Diet & Cancer: An Update for Biology Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Clifford J.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on dietary substances which act against cancer-causing agents. Indicates that adapting a lifestyle which combines reduced fat intake with increased fiber-containing foods will reduce the risk of some common cancers. Provides teaching strategies and activities to help students analyze their lifestyles for a reduction in cancer risk. (RT)

  19. HER2 testing in gastric cancer: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahao-Machado, Lucas Faria; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam

    2016-05-21

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression is increasingly recognized as a frequent molecular abnormality in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer. With the recent introduction of HER2 molecular targeted therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer, determination of HER2 status is crucial in order to select patients who may benefit from this treatment. This paper provides an update on our knowledge of HER2 in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, including the prognostic relevance of HER2, the key differences between HER2 protein expression interpretation in breast and gastric cancer, the detection methods and the immunohistochemistry scoring system. PMID:27217694

  20. Updates in Tumor Profiling in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kimberly; Safran, Howard P

    2015-10-01

    In the last decade there has been a focus on biomarkers that play a critical role in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms which drive tumor initiation, maintenance and progression of cancers. Characterization of genomes by next-generation sequencing (NGS) has permitted significant advances in gastrointestinal cancer care. These discoveries have fueled the development of novel therapeutics and have laid the groundwork for the development of new treatment strategies. Work in colorectal cancer (CRC) has been in the forefront of these advances. With the continued development of NGS technology and the positive clinical experience in CRC, genome work has begun in esophagogastric, pancreatic, and hepatocellular carcinomas as well. PMID:26422541

  1. Risk stratification strategies for cancer-associated thrombosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorana, Alok A; McCrae, Keith R

    2014-05-01

    Rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE) vary substantially between cancer patients. Multiple clinical risk factors including primary site of cancer and systemic therapy, and biomarkers including leukocyte and platelet counts and tissue factor are associated with increased risk of VTE. However, risk cannot be reliably predicted based on single risk factors or biomarkers. New American Society of Clinical Guidelines recommend that patients with cancer be assessed for VTE risk at the time of chemotherapy initiation and periodically thereafter. This narrative review provides an update on risk stratification approaches including a validated Risk Score. Potential applications of risk assessment including targeted thromboprophylaxis are outlined. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. PMID:24862143

  2. [Cancer incidence in the military: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peragallo, Mario Stefano; Urbano, Francesco; Sarnicola, Giuseppe; Lista, Florigio; Vecchione, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    An abnormally elevated rate of Hodgkin's lymphoma was reported in 2001 among Italian soldiers in Bosnia and Kosovo since 1995: a surveillance system was therefore set up for the military community. Preliminary results for a longer period (1996-2007) have shown incidence rates lower than expected for all malignancies. No significant difference was registered between observed and expected cases of Hodkin's lymphoma: the excess of reported cases for this malignancy in 2001-2002 was probably due to a peak occurred in 2000 among the whole military; it is therefore unrelated to deployment in the Balkans, and probably represents a chance event. Moreover, a significant excess of thyroid cancer was reported among the whole military.The estimated number of incident cases, including those missed by the surveillance system, was not significantly higher than expected for all cancers; conversely, the estimated incidence rate of thyroid cancer was significantly increased; this excess, however, is probably due to a selection bias.These data concerning cancer surveillance in the Italian military are consistent with lacking evidence of an increased cancer incidence among troops of other countries deployed in the areas of Iraq, Bosnia, and Kosovo, where armour penetrating depleted uranium shells have been used. However, a comprehensive assessment of cancer morbidity in the military requires a revision of the privacy regulations, in order to link individual records of military personnel and data bases of the National Health Service. PMID:22166781

  3. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  4. Aquatic invasive species: Lessons from cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Ray, Andrew; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Gross, Jackson A.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic invasive species are disrupting ecosystems with increasing frequency. Successful control of these invasions has been rare: Biologists and managers have few tools for fighting aquatic invaders. In contrast, the medical community has long worked to develop tools for preventing and fighting cancer. Its successes are marked by a coordinated research approach with multiple steps: prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment options and rehabilitation. The authors discuss how these steps can be applied to aquatic invasive species, such as the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus), in the Northern Rocky Mountain region of the United States, to expedite tool development and implementation along with achievement of biodiversity conservation goals.

  5. Nutrition and Gastric Cancer Risk: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from epidemiologic, experimental, and animal studies indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. High intake of fresh fruit and vegetable, lycopene and lycopene-containing food products, and potentially vitamin C and selenium may reduce the risk for gastric can...

  6. Update in the management of penile cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge R. Caso

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The management of penile cancer has evolved as less invasive techniques are applied in the treatment of the primary tumor and inguinal lymph nodes. Materials and Methods: Herein we review the literature focusing on advances in the preservation of the phallus as well as less morbid procedures to evaluate and treat the groins. Results: Promising imaging modalities for staging are discussed. New techniques are described and tables provided for penile preservation. We also review the contemporary morbidity of modified surgical forms for evaluation of the inguinal nodes. Conclusions: Advances in surgical technique have made phallic preservation possible in a greater number of primary penile cancers. The groins can be evaluated for metastasis with greater accuracy through new radiologic means as well as with less morbid modified surgical techniques.

  7. Radiation exposure and breast cancer: lessons from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Hudon, Tyler W; Nadkarni, Prakash M; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2013-04-01

    The lessons learned from the Chernobyl disaster have become increasingly important after the second anniversary of the Fukushima, Japan nuclear accident. Historically, data from the Chernobyl reactor accident 27 years ago demonstrated a strong correlation with thyroid cancer, but data on the radiation effects of Chernobyl on breast cancer incidence have remained inconclusive. We reviewed the published literature on the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on breast cancer incidence, using Medline and Scopus from the time of the accident to December of 2010. Our findings indicate limited data and statistical flaws. Other confounding factors, such as discrepancies in data collection, make interpretation of the results from the published literature difficult. Re-analyzing the data reveals that the incidence of breast cancer in Chernobyl-disaster-exposed women could be higher than previously thought. We have learned little of the consequences of radiation exposure at Chernobyl except for its effects on thyroid cancer incidence. Marking the 27th year after the Chernobyl event, this report sheds light on a specific, crucial and understudied aspect of the results of radiation from a gruesome nuclear power plant disaster. PMID:23691737

  8. Breast and gastrointestinal cancer updates from ASCO 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheenah Dawood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the updates presented at the ASCO 2015 symposium in breast and gastrointestinal malignancies. Some were practice changing while others gave us an exciting glimpse into what′s to come in the very near future. Immunotherapy was the buzz word this year with data presented on every tumor site. Data on the efficacy of anti PD-1 agents in colorectal, hepatocellular and gastric cancer were presented. In breast cancer we saw data on a new and exciting therapeutic target in the form of androgen receptor among triple receptor negative breast tumors presented. Positive results of the PALOMA 3 trial were presented that has given women with hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer another therapeutic option. Furthermore data on strategies to further improve anti her2 therapy, optimizing of chemotherapy in the early and advanced stage and various strategies to improve endocrine therapy among patients with breast cancer were presented.

  9. Robotic Esophagectomy for Cancer: Early Results and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Wei, Benjamin; Hawn, Mary T; Minnich, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy with intrathoracic dissection and anastomosis is increasingly performed. Our objectives are to report our operative technique, early results and lessons learned. This is a retrospective review of 85 consecutive patients who were scheduled for minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (laparoscopic or robotic abdominal and robotic chest) for esophageal cancer. Between 4/2011 and 3/2015, 85 (74 men, median age: 63) patients underwent robotic Ivor Lewis esophageal resection. In all, 64 patients (75%) had preoperative chemoradiotherapy, 99% had esophageal cancer, and 99% had an R0 resection. There were no abdominal or thoracic conversions for bleeding. There was 1 abdominal conversion for the inability to completely staple the gastric conduit. The mean operative time was 6 hours, median blood loss was 35ml (no intraoperative transfusions), median number of resected lymph nodes was 22, and median length of stay was 8 days. Conduit complications (anastomotic leak or conduit ischemia) occurred in 6 patients. The 30 and 90-day mortality were 3/85 (3.5%) and 9/85 (10.6%), respectively. Initial poor results led to protocol changes via root cause analysis: longer rehabilitation before surgery, liver biopsy in patients with history of suspected cirrhosis, and refinements to conduit preparation and anastomotic technique. Robotic Ivor Lewis esophagectomy for cancer provides an R0 resection with excellent lymph node resection. Our preferred port placement and operative techniques are described. Disappointingly high thoracic conduit problems and 30 and 90-day mortality led to lessons learned and implementation of change which are shared. PMID:27568155

  10. Lung cancer staging: a physiological update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poullis, Michael; McShane, James; Shaw, Mathew; Woolley, Steven; Shackcloth, Michael; Page, Richard; Mediratta, Neeraj

    2012-06-01

    The tumour-node metastasis (TNM) classification system is anatomically based. We investigated whether the addition of simple physiological variables, age and body mass index (BMI), would affect survival curves, i.e. a composite anatomical and physiological staging system. We retrospectively analysed a prospectively validated thoracic surgery database (n = 1981). Cox multivariate analysis was performed to determine possible significant factors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed with combined anatomical and physiological factors. Cox multivariate analysis revealed age (P survival. Receiver operating curve analysis determined cut-off levels for age of 67 and BMI of 27.6. A composite anatomical and physiological survival curve based on TNM for BMI > 27.6 and age survival curves, for stage I (P Neural network analysis confirmed the importance of BMI and age above cancer stage with regard to long-term survival. Combining age 27.6 and TNM anatomical classification results in very different estimated survival curves from the usual TNM system. Patients from stages I, II and III may have survival equivalent to a stage higher or lower depending on their age and BMI. PMID:22419795

  11. Spinal analgesia for advanced cancer patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2012-05-01

    In the nineties, spinal analgesia has been described as an useful means to control pain in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this review was to update this information with a systematic analysis of studies performed in the last 10 years. 27 papers pertinent with the topic selected for review were collected according to selection criteria. Few studies added further information on spinal analgesia in last decade. Despite a lack of a clinical evidence, spinal analgesia with a combination of opioids, principally morphine, and local anesthetics may allow to achieve analgesia in patients who had been intensively treated unsuccessfully with different trials of opioids. Some adjuvant drugs such as clonidine, ketamine, betamethasone, meperidine, and ziconotide may be promising agents, but several problems have to be solved before they can be used in the daily practice. In complex pain situations, spinal analgesia should not be negated to cancer patients, and oncologists should address this group of patients to other specialists. PMID:21684173

  12. Leuprorelin Acetate in Prostate Cancer: a European Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persad R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an update on leuprorelin acetate, the world's most widely prescribed depot luteinising hormone-releasing hormone analogue. Leuprorelin acetate has been in clinical use in the palliative treatment of prostate cancer for more than 20 years, but advances continue to be made in terms of convenience and flexibility of administration, and in the incorporation of leuprorelin acetate into novel treatment regimens. The drug is administered in the form of a depot injection containing leuprorelin acetate microspheres, and is at least as effective in suppressing testosterone secretion as orchiectomy. In patients with prostate cancer, serum testosterone levels are reduced to castrate levels (= 50 ng/dl within 2-3 weeks of the first one-month depot injection of 3.75 mg or three-month depot injection of 11.25 mg. Both the one-month and three-month formulations are effective in delaying tumour progression and alleviating symptoms of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. Tolerability is generally good, with side-effects reflecting effective testosterone suppression. Recent studies have investigated the place of leuprorelin acetate as part of continuous or intermittent maximal androgen blockade (MAB and in neoadjuvant therapy (ie, to reduce the size of the prostate and downsize the tumour before radiotherapy. Additional formulations and presentations are in development, including a six-month injection, with the aim of adding to the clinical flexibility and patient acceptability of this important palliative treatment for prostate cancer.

  13. An Update on Immunohistochemistry in Translational Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonggao Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC takes advantage of the specific binding between antigen and antibody to measure the presence and abundance of antigen while simultaneously providing morphologic context on a tissue section. Since the revolutionary application of heat-induced epitope retrieval methods on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, which started in early 1990s, IHC has been routinely used in diagnostic pathology. This approach has also enabled mining of the rich archives of pathologic specimens for exploration in translational cancer research. Newer IHC biomarkers are being continuously found as aids in differential diagnosis, prediction of outcome or response to molecular-targeted therapies. These are prime examples for translational cancer research. The last decade has witnessed some significant improvements in the use of this technology. This review provides an overview on the current status of IHC as applied in translational cancer research, commenting on the underlying principles in specimen preparation, reagent choice, staining procedure, and results evaluation so that both beginners and seasoned users could appreciate the key factors and benefit from this update.

  14. Phytocannabinoids for Cancer Therapeutics: Recent Updates and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, K R; Goyal, S N; Sharma, C; Patil, C R; Ojha, S

    2015-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids (pCBs) are lipid-soluble phytochemicals present in the plant, Cannabis sativa L. and non-cannabis plants which have a long history in recreation and traditional medicine. The plant and the constituents isolated were central in the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the most new target for drug discovery. The ECS includes two G-protein-coupled receptors; the cannabinoid receptors-1 and -2 (CB1 and CB2) for marijuana's psychoactive principle Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), their endogenous small lipid ligands; namely anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), also known as endocannabinoids and the enzymes for endocannabinoid biosynthesis and degradation such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The ECS has been suggested as a pro-homeostatic and pleiotropic signaling system activated in a time- and tissue-specific way during pathological conditions including cancer. Targeting the CB1 receptors becomes a concern because of adverse psychotropic reactions. Hence, targeting the CB2 receptors or the endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes by pCBs obtained from plants lacking psychotropic adverse reactions has garnered interest in drug discovery. These pCBs derived from plants appear safe and effective with a wider access and availability. In the recent years, several pCBs derived other than non-cannabinoid plants have been reported to bind to and functionally interact with cannabinoid receptors and appear promising candidate for drug development including cancer therapeutics. Several of them also targets the endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes that control endocannabinoid levels. In this article, we summarize and critically discuss the updates and future prospects of the pCBs as novel and promising candidates for cancer therapeutics. PMID:26179998

  15. American Cancer Society guideline for the early detection of prostate cancer: update 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrew M D; Wender, Richard C; Etzioni, Ruth B; Thompson, Ian M; D'Amico, Anthony V; Volk, Robert J; Brooks, Durado D; Dash, Chiranjeev; Guessous, Idris; Andrews, Kimberly; DeSantis, Carol; Smith, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the American Cancer Society (ACS) Prostate Cancer Advisory Committee began the process of a complete update of recommendations for early prostate cancer detection. A series of systematic evidence reviews was conducted focusing on evidence related to the early detection of prostate cancer, test performance, harms of therapy for localized prostate cancer, and shared and informed decision making in prostate cancer screening. The results of the systematic reviews were evaluated by the ACS Prostate Cancer Advisory Committee, and deliberations about the evidence occurred at committee meetings and during conference calls. On the basis of the evidence and a consensus process, the Prostate Cancer Advisory Committee developed the guideline, and a writing committee drafted a guideline document that was circulated to the entire committee for review and revision. The document was then circulated to peer reviewers for feedback, and finally to the ACS Mission Outcomes Committee and the ACS Board of Directors for approval. The ACS recommends that asymptomatic men who have at least a 10-year life expectancy have an opportunity to make an informed decision with their health care provider about screening for prostate cancer after they receive information about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits associated with prostate cancer screening. Prostate cancer screening should not occur without an informed decision-making process. Men at average risk should receive this information beginning at age 50 years. Men in higher risk groups should receive this information before age 50 years. Men should either receive this information directly from their health care providers or be referred to reliable and culturally appropriate sources. Patient decision aids are helpful in preparing men to make a decision whether to be tested. PMID:20200110

  16. Clinical trials update of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Breast Cancer Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present clinical trial update consists of a review of two of eight current studies (the 10981-22023 AMAROS trial and the 10994 p53 trial) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Breast Cancer Group, as well as a preview of the MIND-ACT trial. The AMAROS trial is designed to prove equivalent local/regional control for patients with proven axillary lymph node metastasis by sentinel node biopsy if treated with axillary radiotherapy instead of axillary lymph node dissection, with reduced morbidity. The p53 trial started to assess the potential predictive value of p53 using a functional assay in yeast in patients with locally advanced/inflammatory or large operable breast cancer prospectively randomised to a taxane regimen versus a nontaxane regimen

  17. Using lessons from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to inform the development of lung cancer screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Katrina; Kim, Jane J; Halm, Ethan A; Ballard, Rachel M; Schnall, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Multiple advisory groups now recommend that high-risk smokers be screened for lung cancer by low-dose computed tomography. Given that the development of lung cancer screening programs will face many of the same issues that have challenged other cancer screening programs, the National Cancer Institute-funded Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium was used to identify lessons learned from the implementation of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening that should inform the introduction of lung cancer screening. These lessons include the importance of developing systems for identifying and recruiting eligible individuals in primary care, ensuring that screening centers are qualified and performance is monitored, creating clear communication standards for reporting screening results to referring physicians and patients, ensuring follow-up is available for individuals with abnormal test results, avoiding overscreening, remembering primary prevention, and leveraging advances in cancer genetics and immunology. Overall, this experience emphasizes that effective cancer screening is a multistep activity that requires robust strategies to initiate, report, follow up, and track each step as well as a dynamic and ongoing oversight process to revise current screening practices as new evidence regarding screening is created, new screening technologies are developed, new biological markers are identified, and new approaches to health care delivery are disseminated. Cancer 2016;122:1338-1342. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26929386

  18. The Relationship Between Usage Rate of Information and Communication Technology by Faculty Members of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, and Motivation Rate, Updating of Lesson Content and Attractiveness of Classroom in Academic Year of 2008-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Shila Soleymani; Seyyed Yaghub Mosavi; Mehri Parirokh

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aimed to study the relationship between usage rate of information and communication technology by faculty members of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and motivation rate, updating of lesson content and attractiveness of classroom in academic year of 2008-2009 and to study the ability to use information and communication technology in the classroom effectively , its effects on motivation of teachers and learners and updating of lesson content and to investigate possible difficu...

  19. Contagious cancer: lessons from the devil and the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Katherine

    2012-04-01

    Cancer is generally defined as uncontrollable growth of cells caused by genetic aberrations and/or environmental factors. Yet contagious cancers also occur. The recent emergence of a contagious cancer in Tasmanian devils has reignited interest in transmissible cancers. Two naturally occurring transmissible cancers are known: devil facial tumour disease and canine transmissible venereal tumour. Both cancers evolved once and have then been transmitted from one individual to another as clonal cell lines. The dog cancer is ancient; having evolved more than 6,000 years ago, while the devil disease was first seen in 1996. In this review I will compare and contrast the two diseases focusing on the life histories of the clonal cell lines, their evolutionary trajectories and the mechanisms by which they have achieved immune tolerance. A greater understanding of these contagious cancers will provide unique insights into the role of the immune system in shaping tumour evolution and may uncover novel approaches for treating human cancer. PMID:22383221

  20. Sunlight and Skin Cancer: Lessons from the Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight induces skin cancer development. Skin cancer is the most common form of human neoplasia. Estimates suggest that in excess of 1.5 million new cases of skin cancer (www.cancer.org/statistics) will be diagnosed in the United States this year Fortunately, because of their highly visible location, skin cancers are more rapidly diagnosed and more easily treated than other types of cancer. Be that as it may, approximately 10,000 Americans a year die from sk...

  1. An epidemiologic review of marijuana and cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yu-Hui Jenny; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Tashkin, Donald P.; Feng, Bingjian; Straif, Kurt; Hashibe, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use is legal in two states and additional states are considering legalization. Approximately 18 million Americans are current marijuana users. There is currently no consensus on whether marijuana use is associated with cancer risk. Our objective is to review the epidemiologic studies on this possible association. We identified 34 epidemiologic studies on upper aerodigestive tract cancers (n=11), lung cancer (n=6), testicular cancer (n=3), childhood cancers (n=6), all cancers (n=1), ...

  2. Interventions to decrease skin cancer risk in outdoor workers: update to a 2007 systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Horsham, Caitlin; Auster, Josephine; Sendall, Marguerite C; Stoneham, Melissa; Youl, Philippa; Crane, Phil; Tenkate, Thomas; Janda, Monika; Kimlin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Outdoor workers are at high risk of harmful ultraviolet radiation exposure and are identified as an at risk group for the development of skin cancer. This systematic evidence based review provides an update to a previous review published in 2007 about interventions for the prevention of skin cancer in outdoor workers. Results This review includes interventions published between 2007-2012 and presents findings about sun protection behaviours and/or objective measures of skin cancer ...

  3. Mild Cognitive Impairment: an update in Parkinson's Disease and lessons learned from Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jennifer G.; Aggarwal, Neelum T.; Schroeder, Cynthia D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cognitive dysfunction is an important focus of research in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the concept of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as a prodrome to AD has been recognized for many years, the construct of MCI in PD is a relative newcomer with recent development of diagnostic criteria, biomarker research programs, and treatment trials. Controversies and challenges, however, regarding PD-MCI's definition, application, heterogeneity, and different trajectories have arisen. This review will highlight current research advances and challenges in PD-MCI. Furthermore, lessons from the AD field, which has witnessed an evolution in MCI/AD definitions, relevant advances in biomarker research, and development of disease-modifying and targeted therapeutic trials will be discussed. PMID:26517759

  4. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most...

  5. Educating Cancer Prevention Researchers in Emerging Biobehavioral Models: Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Davila, Marivel; Kamrudin, Samira A.; Li, Dennis H.; Noor, Syed W.; Oluyomi, Abiodun O; Chang, Shine; Cameron, Carrie

    2011-01-01

    To increase the adoption of transdisciplinary research methods among future cancer prevention investigators, faculty members from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a graduate-level course in biobehavioral methods in cancer prevention research. Two instructors paired by topic and area of expertise offered an hour-long lecture-based seminar every week for 15 weeks during the spring semester of 2010. Students and presenters both evaluated the overall course content and ...

  6. Inhibition of histone deacetylases in cancer therapy: lessons from leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccacci, Elena; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a key component of the epigenetic machinery regulating gene expression, and behave as oncogenes in several cancer types, spurring the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) as anticancer drugs. This review discusses new results regarding the role of HDACs in cancer and the effect of HDACi on tumour cells, focusing on haematological malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukaemia. Histone deacetylases may have opposite roles at different stages of tumour progression and in different tumour cell sub-populations (cancer stem cells), highlighting the importance of investigating these aspects for further improving the clinical use of HDACi in treating cancer. PMID:26908329

  7. Global Breast Cancer: The Lessons to Bring Home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women globally. This paper discusses the current progress in breast cancer in Western countries and focuses on important differences of this disease in low- and middle-income countries (LMCs). It introduces several arguments for applying caution before globalizing some of the US-adopted practices in the screening and management of the disease. Finally, it suggests that studies of breast cancer in LMCs might offer important insights for a more effective management of the problem both in developing as well as developed countries.high-energy Japanese immigrants female higher proliferative

  8. An epidemiologic review of marijuana and cancer: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hui Jenny; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Tashkin, Donald P; Feng, Bingjian; Straif, Kurt; Hashibe, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use is legal in two states and additional states are considering legalization. Approximately 18 million Americans are current marijuana users. There is currently no consensus on whether marijuana use is associated with cancer risk. Our objective is to review the epidemiologic studies on this possible association. We identified 34 epidemiologic studies on upper aerodigestive tract cancers (n = 11), lung cancer (n = 6), testicular cancer (n = 3), childhood cancers (n = 6), all cancers (n = 1), anal cancer (n = 1), penile cancer (n = 1), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), malignant primary gliomas (n = 1), bladder cancer (n = 1), and Kaposi sarcoma (n = 1). Studies on head and neck cancer reported increased and decreased risks, possibly because there is no association, or because risks differ by human papillomavirus status or geographic differences. The lung cancer studies largely appear not to support an association with marijuana use, possibly because of the smaller amounts of marijuana regularly smoked compared with tobacco. Three testicular cancer case-control studies reported increased risks with marijuana use [summary ORs, 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-2.23 for higher frequency and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.08-2.09) for ≥10 years]. For other cancer sites, there is still insufficient data to make any conclusions. Considering that marijuana use may change due to legalization, well-designed studies on marijuana use and cancer are warranted. PMID:25587109

  9. Director's Update - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) has recently begun the proteomic interrogation of genomically-characterized tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  10. Bicalutamide monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter

    The current evidence is considered to support 150 mg of the nonsteroidal antiandrogen bicalutamide for early stage prostate cancer.......The current evidence is considered to support 150 mg of the nonsteroidal antiandrogen bicalutamide for early stage prostate cancer....

  11. Update on clinical trials: genetic targets in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bora; Cream, Leah V; Harvey, Harold A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women in United States. From data of American Cancer Society from 2007 reported total of 178,480 women diagnosed with breast cancer. The death rate from breast cancer has decreased in North America over time, but still accounts for second highest cancer death, following lung cancer. Breast cancer is staged based on tumor size, nodal involvement, and distant metastasis like any other solid tumors. However clinical staging is not the only important factor in management of breast cancer. Various molecular features divides breast cancer into many subgroups - that act differently, and respond differently from therapy. Thus the focus of breast cancer treatment has evolved focusing on specific targets. The most important biologic markers in subtyping of breast cancer so far are hormone receptor positivity and HER2/neu protein expression. Five molecular subtypes using intrinsic gene set include Basal mRNA, HER2 + mRNA, Luminal AmRNA, Luminal B mRNA, and Normal-like mRNA. In addition, better understanding of genetic target of breast cancer has given us arsenal of personalized, and more effective treatment approach.This review will focus on examples that highlight several mechanism of tumorigenesis, giving us not just understanding of gene pathways and the molecular biology, that could lead us to therapeutic target. Several important molecular targets have been investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, others are yet to be explored. We will also describe genetic mechanisms discovery related to overcoming resistance to current targeted therapies in breast cancer, including hormone receptor expression and HER 2- neu amplification. We will also review other exciting developments in understanding of breast cancer, the tumor microenvironment and cancer stem cells, and targeting agents in that area. PMID:23288634

  12. HIV– positive anal cancer: an update for the clinician

    OpenAIRE

    Savita V. Dandapani; Eaton, Michael; Thomas, Charles R.; Pagnini, Paul G

    2010-01-01

    Anal cancer used to be a rare cancer traditionally associated with elderly women. There are approximately 5260 cases per year in the U.S. (1). The onslaught of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) virus has led to a change in anal cancer demographics. Anal cancer is on the rise in the U.S and the number of anal cases documented has quadrupled in the past 20 yrs correlating with the rise of the HIV epidemic. The incidence of anal cancer is 40 to 80 fold higher in the HIV positive (HIV+) popu...

  13. Clinical use of cancer biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer: updated guidelines from the European Group on Tumor Markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sölétormos, G.; Duffy, M.J.; Othman Abu Hassan, S.; Verheijen, RHM; Tholander, B.; Bast jr., R.C.; Gaarenstroom, K.N.; Sturgeon, C.M.; Bonfrer, J.M.G.; Petersen, P.H.; Troonen, H.; Carlo Torre, G.; Kanty Kulpa, J.; Tuxen, M.K.; Molina, R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present an update of the European Group on Tumor Markers guidelines for serum markers in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Systematic literature survey from 2008 to 2013. The articles were evaluated by level of evidence and strength of recommendation. RESULTS: Because of its low sens

  14. Update in non small- cell lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, RA; Snoeckx, A.; Spinhoven, M; Beeck, B Op de; Corthouts, B; Parizel, PM

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made with the introduction of the TNM-7 staging system for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Constituting the first major revision in 12 years, the seventh edition of NSCLC TNM (TNM-7) is based on the recommendations from the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project of 2007. This new TNM iteration includes a subset analysis on SCLC and carcinoid tumors.A thorough understanding of its principles by the radiologis...

  15. Natural products as potential cancer therapy enhancers: A preclinical update

    OpenAIRE

    Agbarya, Abed; Ruimi, Nili; Epelbaum, Ron; Ben-Arye, Eran; Mahajna, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that arises as a consequence of alterations in many physiological processes. Recently, hallmarks of cancer were suggested that include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis, along with two emerging hallmarks including reprogramming energy metabolism and escaping immune destruction. Treating multifactorial diseases, s...

  16. TNM staging update for lung cancer: Why is this important?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cancer staging characterises the extent of disease facilitating selection of the most appropriate management and therapy and providing prediction of prognosis. As understanding of lung cancer evolves the opportunities arises to adjust disease staging. The adoption of the 7th edition tumour, node, metastasis staging system should result in improved treatment selection and more accurate prognostic information for the individual patient.

  17. Educating cancer prevention researchers in emerging biobehavioral models: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Davila, Marivel; Kamrudin, Samira A; Li, Dennis H; Noor, Syed W; Oluyomi, Abiodun O; Chang, Shine; Cameron, Carrie

    2011-12-01

    To increase the adoption of transdisciplinary research methods among future cancer prevention investigators, faculty members from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a graduate-level course in biobehavioral methods in cancer prevention research. Two instructors paired by topic and area of expertise offered an hour-long lecture-based seminar every week for 15 weeks during the spring semester of 2010. Students and presenters both evaluated the overall course content and delivery method, as well as each session. A total of 11 students and 22 presenters participated in the course. In each class session, one presenter was from a behavioral science background,and the other was from a biological sciences background. Both presenters and students expressed overall satisfaction with the content and format of the course. The presentation of topics from a transdisciplinary perspective and interaction with presenters from both biological and behavioral sciences are valuable and can help junior researchers prepare to meet the emerging challenges in cancer prevention research. PMID:21720937

  18. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. PMID:26324357

  19. Updates from the 2014 San antonio breast cancer symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheenah Dawood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The san antonio breast cancer syposium (SABCS 2014 was an exciting one this year. Data from the SOFT trial was presented that had potential implications on the treatment of pre menapausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. In a phase II trial fulvestrant was found to significantly improve progression free and overall survival compared to anastrazole in the first line treatment of women with hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer. We saw a number of intersting abstracts looking at trying to refine the role of platinums and exploring the role of blocking PD-1 among women with triple receptor negative breast cancer. We also saw the results of a number of trials trying to refine standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Here we will review some fon the most interesting abstracts presented this year at SABCS 2014.

  20. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer (Updated)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy and radiation before surgery survived, on average, nearly twice as long as patients treated with surgery alone, according to results of a randomized clinical trial published May 31, 2012, in NEJM.

  1. Sustainability in a state comprehensive cancer control coalition: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Renee A; Chapman, Kathryn; Graf, Gavin; Stanfield, Bret; Waterbor, John W

    2014-03-01

    The Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC) has developed an integrated and coordinated approach to reducing cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and to improving the quality of life for cancer survivors, their families, and their caregivers. The ACCCC is currently in a maintenance phase and a formal plan for sustainability of the coalition was needed to keep the members engaged and productive. A training session in coalition sustainability conducted in 2013 identified the following elements as essential to success: (1) increased marketing of the coalition by simplifying its mission; (2) improved networking including flexibility in coalition meeting location and attendance; (3) increased membership satisfaction through transformational leadership; (4) revision of the working structure of committees and improved accountability; and (5) enhancement of partner satisfaction with coalition activities designed to recruit and retain new partners. A self-administered membership satisfaction survey was given to assess coalition mission, meeting logistics, organization, capacity building, and coalition goals. Results indicated that the subcategories of communication, mission, and meeting logistics were rated satisfied to very satisfied on a five-point scale. Although the ACCCC had clearly written goals, improvement could be made in leadership participation and new member orientation could be improved. Most members rated their parent organization as highly involved with the ACCCC and many offered suggestions on capacity building. Results of the sustainability training have clarified the ACCCC's plans to ensure coalition viability and improve strategies to inform stakeholders of the benefits of participation in the coalition. PMID:24132542

  2. MicroRNAs in cancer: lessons from melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Eyal; Nemlich, Yael; Markel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a high-grade, poorly differentiated malignant tumor of pigment-producing cells (melanocytes), accounting for more than 70% of the skin cancer related deaths. Although new lines of targeted therapy and immunotherapy were introduced lately, durable responses are not common as it is hard to target the elusive metastatic phenotype. microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA molecules that function as specific epigenetic regulators of the transcriptome. miRNAs are involved in a broad spectrum of physiological and pathological processes, including cancer-related functions such as proliferation, cell cycle, migration, invasion, immune evasion and drug resistance. These functions are mostly regulated in melanoma through four molecular deregulated pathways, including the RAS/MAPK pathway, the MITF pathway, the p16INK4A-CDK4-RB pathway and the PI3K-AKT pathway. miRNAs provide a strong platform for delineation of cancer mechanisms. Here we review the diverse roles of miRNAs in melanoma cell biology. Studying miRNA-mediated regulation of aggressive and tumor related features is expected to provide novel mechanistic insights that may pave the way for new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tools as well as new molecular targets for future therapy. PMID:24479804

  3. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A.; Zaver M Bhujwalla

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The incre...

  4. Systemic treatment for hereditary cancers: a 2012 update

    OpenAIRE

    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Byrski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    The history of specific therapy for hereditary tumors dates back to mid 1980s and involves a number of reports demonstrating regression of familial colon polyps upon administration of sulindac. Virtually no clinical studies on other hereditary cancer types were available until the year 2009, when Byrski et al. presented the data on unprecedented sensitivity of BRCA1-associated breast malignancies to cisplatin. This breakthrough has revived interest to the treatment of cancer in germ-line muta...

  5. Cancer stem cells: the lessons from pre-cancerous stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Jian-Xin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract How a cancer is initiated and established remains elusive despite all the advances in decades of cancer research. Recently the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been revived, challenging the long-standing model of ‘clonal evolution’ for cancer development and implicating the dawning of a potential cure for cancer [1]. The recent identification of pre-cancerous stem cells (pCSCs) in cancer, an early stage of CSC development, however, implicates that the clonal evolution is not con...

  6. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Chiu Liu; Zan Shen; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Marie CM Lin

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971,scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of antiangiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has Received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy.

  7. Update on epidemiology classification, and management of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitham Gheriani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer represents approximately 0.5–1% of all human malignancy1. In the UK the incidence of thyroid cancer is 2-3 per 100,000 populations 2. In geographical areas of low iodine intake and in areas exposed to nuclear disasters the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher. Benign thyroid conditions are much more common. In the UK approximately 8 % of the population have nodular thyroid disease2. Nodular thyroid disease increases with age and is also more common in females and in geographical areas of low iodine intake. Primary thyroid malignancy can be broadly divided into 2 groups. The first group, which generally have much better prognosis, are the well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma, which includes papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma and Hürthle cell tumours. The second group includes the poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma like medullary thyroid carcinoma and the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Other rare tumours such as sarcomas, lymphomas and the extremely rare primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid should be included in the second group. Secondary or metastatic thyroid cancer can be from breast, lung, colon and kidney malignancies.

  8. An update in breast cancer screening and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Sanjay; Tapia, Grace; Goltsman, David; Beith, Jane

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the main controversies in a number of key areas of breast cancer management. Relevant studies that have contributed to guide the treatment of this heterogeneous disease in the field of breast screening, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted. Mammography and ultrasound are the main methods of breast screening. MRI and tomosynthesis are emerging as new screening tools for a selected group of breast cancer patients. From a surgical perspective, oncoplastic techniques and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are improving cosmetic results in breast-conserving surgery. For high-risk patients, controversies still remain regarding prophylactic mastectomies. Finally, the appropriate management of the axilla continues evolving with the increasing role of radiotherapy as an alternative treatment to axillary dissection. PMID:26689336

  9. Update in palliative management of hormone refractory cancer of prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pratipal; Srivastava, Aneesh

    2007-01-01

    Hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is an incurable disease and as in the pressure sensitive adhesive era the median survival of patients is increasing, these men increasingly develop symptomatic problems as a result of advanced local and or metastatic disease during their progression to death. Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to improve survival in this group of patients with use of chemotherapy which reinforces the need of better options in palliative care. We discus th...

  10. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized an...

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  12. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  13. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging. PMID:26315381

  14. Aspirin Use and Lung Cancer Risk: A Possible Relationship? Evidence from an Updated Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-yan Jiang; Tian-bao Huang; Lei Xu; Jing Yu; Yan Wu; Jiang Geng; Xu-dong Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Growing evidence has emerged and controversial results reported on possible relationship between aspirin use and lung cancer risk. We, therefore, conducted this updated and comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate this issue, with focus on dose-risk and duration-risk relationships. Methods We searched electronic databases including PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane library to identify eligible studies. Relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for cohor...

  15. Update on capecitabine alone and in combination regimens in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, N; Maiello, E; De Vita, F; Cinieri, S; Santini, D; Russo, A; Tommasi, S; Azzariti, A; Numico, G; Pisconti, S; Petriella, D; Lorusso, V; Millaku, A; Colucci, G

    2010-11-01

    Capecitabine is an orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate which has been developed as a prodrug of 5-FU with the goal to improve its tolerability and intratumoral drug concentration. The review aims to provide an evidence-based update of clinical trials investigating the clinical efficacy, adverse-event profile, dosage and administration of this drug, alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and/or new target-oriented drugs, in the management of colorectal cancer patients. PMID:21129610

  16. Thorotrast induced liver cancer: update of German thorotrast study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaick, G. van; Wesch, H. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy

    1999-02-01

    The German Thorotrast study was started in 1968. It comprises 2,326 Thorotrast patients and 1,890 contemporary matched controls group. 899 Thorotrast patients and 662 patients of the control group have been examined clinically and biophysically every two years. The evaluation of the causes of death demonstrates a statistically significant excess rate of malignant liver tumors, liver cirrhoses, myeloid leukaemias and bone marrow failures. The annual dose after an injection of two ampoules (24 ml) is about 25 cGy for the liver, 70 cGy for the spleen and 9 cGy for the bone marrow. Animal experiments demonstrated that non-radiation effects can be neglected. Correlation exists between the calculated dose to the liver and the frequency of liver cancer. The cumulative risk estimate for liver cancer of about 600 per 10{sup 4} person Gy comes close to the values which were calculated based on the epidemiological results of the Japanese bomb survivors when a quality factor of 20 for alpha radiation and a low dose rate reduction factor of 2 were applied. Dose and frequency of liver cirrhosis are also correlated. Liver cirrhosis is often combined with liver cancer but is not a prerequisite for tumor induction. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Deutsche Thorotraststudie begann 1968. Sie umfasst 2326 Thorotrastpatienten und 1890 nach Alter und Geschlecht angepasste Kontrollpatienten. Die zu Beginn der Studie noch lebenden Thorotrastpatienten (n=899) und Patienten der Kontrollgruppe (n=622) wurden soweit moeglich in zweijaehrigen Abstaenden ambulant klinisch und biophysikalisch untersucht. Die Recherche der Todesursachen der verstorbenen Patienten ergab eine statistisch signifikante Exzessrate bei primaeren malignen Lebertumoren, Leberzirrhosen, myeloischen Leukaemien und Knochenmarksinsuffizienz. Die jaehrliche Dosis nach Injektion von zwei Ampullen (24 ml) betraegt etwa 25 cGy fuer die Leber, 70 cGy fuer die Milz und 9 cGy fuer das rote Knochenmark. Tierexperimente belegten, dass

  17. CYP17 inhibitors for prostate cancer treatment--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, V M; Salvador, J A R; Vasaitis, T S; Njar, V C O

    2008-01-01

    It is almost 70 years since the discovery by Huggins et al. that androgens are essential for prostate cancer (PC) growth and progression, and there has been about 30 years experience using ketoconazole for PC therapy. Since then we have come a long way in learning about the disease and developing new strategies to approach it, among which is cytochrome 17alpha-hydroxylase-C(17,20)-lyase (CYP17) inhibition. This review focuses on the efforts to find prospective CYP17 inhibitors, both steroidal and nonsteroidal, in the absence of a 3D structure of the enzyme. It covers almost 4 decades of literature with highlights on the most significant achievements in this area, providing insight into PC pathophysiology, management and treatment options. PMID:18473796

  18. Update on the Management of Pancreatic Cancer in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin Yin; Sissoko, Moussa; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is more common in older adults, who are underrepresented in clinical trials and frequently under treated. Chronological age alone should not deter clinicians from offering treatment to geriatric patients, as they are a heterogeneous population. Geriatric assessment, frailty assessment tools, and toxicity risk scores help clinicians select appropriate patients for therapy. For resectable disease, surgery can be safe but should be done at a high-volume center. Adjuvant therapy is important; though there remains controversy on the role of radiation, chemotherapy is well studied and efficacious. In locally advanced unresectable disease, chemoradiation or chemotherapy alone is an option. Neoadjuvant therapy improves the chances of resectability in borderline resectable disease. Chemotherapy extends survival in metastatic disease, but treatment goals and risk-benefit ratios have to be clarified. Adequate symptom management and supportive care are important. There are now many new treatment strategies and novel therapies for this disease. PMID:27492426

  19. Follow up after IMRT in oral cavity cancer: update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Except for early stages (T1/2 N0), the prognosis for patients with oral cavity cancer (OCC) is known to be worse than for those with pharyngeal carcinoma. While definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-chemotherapy affords loco-regional control rates (LRC) of approximately 80% in advanced pharyngeal cancer, corresponding rates are reported to be much lower for OCC. The aim of this work was to evaluate loco-regional disease control and overall survival (OAS) in a relatively large OCC patient cohort treated in the IMRT era. Between October 2002 and June 2011, 160 OCC patients were treated with curative intention IMRT at our department. 122 patients (76%) were referred with primary disease and 38 patients (24%) with a recurrent OCC at least 3 months after surgery alone. Definitive IMRT was performed in 44/160 patients (28%), whilst 116 patients underwent previous surgery. Simultaneous systemic therapy was administered in 72%. Patients with postoperative IMRT (+/−systemic therapy) with R0-1 status (n = 99) reached significantly higher LRC/OAS rates than patients following IMRT for macroscopic disease (n = 61), with 84%/80% versus 38%/33% at 3 years, respectively (p < 0.0001). This was found in patients treated for initial, as well as recurrent, disease. Less than 2% persisting grade 3/4 late effects were observed. IMRT for R0-1 situations translated into a highly significant superior LRC and OAS compared to the IMRT cohort treated for macroscopic disease. Treatment was well tolerated

  20. Biomarker Validation for Aging: Lessons from mtDNA Heteroplasmy Analyses in Early Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Barker

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The anticipated biological and clinical utility of biomarkers has attracted significant interest recently. Aging and early cancer detection represent areas active in the search for predictive and prognostic biomarkers. While applications differ, overlapping biological features, analytical technologies and specific biomarker analytes bear comparison. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA as a biomarker in both biological models has been evaluated. However, it remains unclear whether mtDNA changes in aging and cancer represent biological relationships that are causal, incidental, or a combination of both. This article focuses on evaluation of mtDNA-based biomarkers, emerging strategies for quantitating mtDNA admixtures, and how current understanding of mtDNA in aging and cancer evolves with introduction of new technologies. Whether for cancer or aging, lessons from mtDNA based biomarker evaluations are several. Biological systems are inherently dynamic and heterogeneous. Detection limits for mtDNA sequencing technologies differ among methods for low-level DNA sequence admixtures in healthy and diseased states. Performance metrics of analytical mtDNA technology should be validated prior to application in heterogeneous biologically-based systems. Critical in evaluating biomarker performance is the ability to distinguish measurement system variance from inherent biological variance, because it is within the latter that background healthy variability as well as high-value, disease-specific information reside.

  1. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of differential thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the years 1990, with the general tendency to develop minimally invasive operations, an endoscopic approach has been applied to neck surgery for both para thyroidectomy and thyroidectomy. The most widely spread minimally invasive technique for thyroidectomy is minimally invasive video assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT), described and developed for the first time at our institution in 1998. Ideal candidates for MIVAT are patients with a thyroid volume lower than 25 ml with nodules smaller than 35 mm. Consequently, MIVAT will present restricted indications, being suitable only for the treatment of about 10-15% of the whole standard surgical case load. Thus, together with small follicular lesions, low risk papillary carcinoma will result the main indication for MIVAT, being this small cancer usually harboured in normal glands of young females. On the other hand, in case of locally invasive carcinomas and/or lymph node metastasis the procedure must be immediately converted to the conventional technique. MIVAT also is not indicated for the treatment of medullary and anaplastic carcinomas. Recent prospective randomized studies clearly demonstrate that MIVAT allows achieving same clearance at the thyroid bed level and same outcome as conventional technique, when dealing with low risk papillary carcinoma. At the same time, patients can benefit from the main advantages of this minimally invasive technique: lower postoperative pain, faster postoperative recovery and excellent cosmetic outcome.

  2. An update of cancer mortality among chrysotile asbestos miners in Balangero, northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piolatto, G; Negri, E; La Vecchia, C; Pira, E; Decarli, A; Peto, J

    1990-01-01

    The mortality experience of a cohort of chrysotile miners employed since 1946 in Balangero, northern Italy was updated to the end of 1987 giving a total of 427 deaths out of 27,010 man-years at risk. A substantial excess mortality for all causes (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) = 149) was found, mainly because of high rates for some alcohol related deaths (hepatic cirrhosis, accidents). For mortality from cancer, however, the number of observed deaths (82) was close to that expected (76.2). The SMR was raised for oral cancer (SMR 231 based on six deaths), cancer of the larynx (SMR 267 based on eight deaths), and pleura (SMR 667 based on two deaths), although the excess only reached statistical significance for cancer of the larynx. Rates were not increased for lung, stomach, or any other type of cancer. No consistent association was seen with duration or cumulative dust exposure (fibre-years) for oral cancer, but the greatest risks for laryngeal and pleural cancer were in the highest category of duration and degree of exposure to fibres. Although part of the excess mortality from laryngeal cancer is probably attributable to high alcohol consumption in this group of workers, the data suggest that exposure to chrysotile asbestos (or to the fibre balangeroite that accounts for 0.2-0.5% of total mass in the mine) is associated with some, however moderate, excess risk of laryngeal cancer and pleural mesothelioma. The absence of excess mortality from lung cancer in this cohort is difficult to interpret. Images PMID:2176805

  3. Hereditary melanoma: Update on syndromes and management: Emerging melanoma cancer complexes and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soura, Efthymia; Eliades, Philip J; Shannon, Kristen; Stratigos, Alexander J; Tsao, Hensin

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in cancer genomics have enabled the discovery of many cancer-predisposing genes that are being used to classify new familial melanoma/cancer syndromes. In addition to CDKN2A and CDK4, germline variants in TERT, MITF, and BAP1 have been added to the list of genes harboring melanoma-predisposing mutations. These newer entities may have escaped earlier description in part because of more advanced technologies now being used and in part because of their mixed cancer phenotype as opposed to a melanoma-focused syndrome. Dermatologists should be aware of (and be able to recognize) the clinical signs in high-risk patients in different contexts. Personal and family histories of cancer should always be sought in patients with multiple nevi or a positive history for melanoma, and should be updated annually. Various features that are unique to specific disorders, such as the appearance of melanocytic BAP1-mutated atypical intradermal tumors in cases of BAP1 melanoma syndrome, should also be recognized early. These patients should be offered regular screenings with the use of dermoscopy and total body photography, as needed. More importantly, referral to other specialists may be needed if a risk for internal malignancy is suspected. It is important to have in mind that these patients tend to develop multiple melanomas, along with various internal organ malignancies, often at younger ages; a multidisciplinary approach to their cancer screening and treatment is ideal. PMID:26892651

  4. Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer-a Defined Future Using Lessons From Other Cancers: A White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Barbara J; Chari, Suresh T; Maitra, Anirban; Srivastava, Sudhir; Cleeter, Deborah F; Go, Vay Liang W; Rothschild, Laura J; Goldberg, Ann E

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of effective early detection programs has significantly improved treatment, prognosis, and life expectancy in breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Early-detection methods need to be developed for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), where progress during the past decades has remained slow. Addressing this need, the forum "Early Detection: Lessons Learned from Other Cancers" was held in November 2015 and presented by the Kenner Family Research Fund in partnership with the American Pancreatic Association. Leading experts from breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers described the development of early detection methods in their respective fields. Emerging opportunities for scientific advancement were subsequently identified that hold the greatest promise for the future of early detection in PDAC, including a 4-part strategic map of necessary actionable items. Knowledge from other fields must be applied to achieve large-scale change within the arena of PDAC. A major breakthrough in early detection of PDAC will occur only through a definitive interdisciplinary collaborative effort involving a critical mass of committed academic research institutions, government agencies, industry leaders, and philanthropies. PMID:27518362

  5. Aspirin use and lung cancer risk: a possible relationship? Evidence from an updated meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-yan Jiang

    Full Text Available Growing evidence has emerged and controversial results reported on possible relationship between aspirin use and lung cancer risk. We, therefore, conducted this updated and comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate this issue, with focus on dose-risk and duration-risk relationships.We searched electronic databases including PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane library to identify eligible studies. Relative risk (RR and its 95% confidence interval (CI were used for cohort studies, while odds ratio (OR were employed for case-control studies. The random effects and fixed effects models were used for analyses.18 studies were identified including 19835 lung cancer cases, which were eligible for inclusion in the present meta-analysis. Pooled data from case-control studies showed a significant inverse association between regular aspirin use and lung cancer risk. But for cohort studies, insignificant association was detected with little evidence of heterogeneity (RR: 1.05, 95%CI: 0.95 - 1.16; I2: 10.3%, p value: 0.351. In case-control studies, standard aspirin use (>325mg was related to lower lung cancer incidence, compared with low-dose aspirin use (75-100mg. A similar trend was observed in cohort studies. Besides, when analysis was restricted to long time regular aspirin use (>5 years, insignificant results were reported in both cohort and case-control studies. Finally, regular aspirin use might result in higher reduction of non-small cell lung cancer incidence among men.Our findings do not support the protective effect of regular aspirin use on lung cancer risk. Long time aspirin use, sex, dose and type of lung cancer might alter the effect of aspirin use on lung cancer risk. More well-designed studies are needed to further clarify these associations.

  6. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of hexavalent chromium based on updated mortality for Painesville chromate production workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Deborah M; Suh, Mina; Mittal, Liz; Hirsch, Shawn; Valdes Salgado, Raydel; Bartlett, Chris; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Rohr, Annette; Crump, Kenny

    2016-01-01

    The exposure-response for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-induced lung cancer among workers of the Painesville Ohio chromate production facility has been used internationally for quantitative risk assessment of environmental and occupational exposures to airborne Cr(VI). We updated the mortality of 714 Painesville workers (including 198 short-term workers) through December 2011, reconstructed exposures, and conducted exposure-response modeling using Poisson and Cox regressions to provide quantitative lung cancer risk estimates. The average length of follow-up was 34.4 years with 24,535 person-years at risk. Lung cancer was significantly increased for the cohort (standardized mortality ratio (SMR)=186; 95% confidence interval (CI) 145–228), for those hired before 1959, those with >30-year tenure, and those with cumulative exposure >1.41 mg/m3-years or highest monthly exposures >0.26 mg/m3. Of the models assessed, the linear Cox model with unlagged cumulative exposure provided the best fit and was preferred. Smoking and age at hire were also significant predictors of lung cancer mortality. Adjusting for these variables, the occupational unit risk was 0.00166 (95% CI 0.000713–0.00349), and the environmental unit risk was 0.00832 (95% CI 0.00359–0.0174), which are 20% and 15% lower, respectively, than values developed in a previous study of this cohort. PMID:26669850

  7. Coffee Consumption and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: An Update Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Heng-Quan; Wang, Jun-Zhou; Sun, Chang-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective: The results of epidemiologic studies on the relationship between the coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer risk were inconsistent. Thus, we performed an update meta-analysis of cohort studies to quantitatively summarize the association between coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer risk. Methods: We searched CBM (China Biology Medicine disc) and MEDLINE for studies of coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer risk up to June 2015. A total of 20 cohort studies were identified in this meta-analysis, and we analyzed these studies using random effects model. The dose-response analysis was conducted too. Results: The overall relative risk (RR) for highest coffee consumption versus lowest coffee consumption was 0.75 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.63-0.86). Statistic significant heterogeneity was found among these studies (I2 =37.8%, P for heterogeneity =0.045). The pooled RR for increment of 1 cup/day of coffee consumption was 0.99 (95%CI, 0.96-1.03) for the nine studies, without statistically significant. Conclusions: High coffee consumption is associated with a reduced pancreatic cancer risk. However, the result should be accepted with caution, due to the potential confounder and bias could not be excluded. Further well designed studies are needed to confirm the finding. PMID:27022386

  8. Solar ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and skin cancer surveillance in organ transplant recipients (OTRs): an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, the annual numbers of performed solid organ transplants have continuously increased world-wide. Solid organ transplant recipients (OTR) have a greater risk to develop malignancies, with skin cancer representing the most common neoplasia. Additionally, OTRs in general develop a more aggressive form of malignancies. In consequence, dermatologic surveillance is of high importance for OTRs and these patients represent an increasing and significant challenge to clinicians including dermatologists. In OTRs, patient and organ survival have increased considerably and continuously over the past two decades as a result of better immunosuppressive regimens and better posttransplant care. Great progress has been made in our understanding that individual immunosuppressive regiments differ in their effect on skin cancer risk in OTRs, and that effects of individual immunosuppressive regiments on skin cancer risk depend on various other factors including viral infections. Since sunlight is the major source of vitamin D for most humans, OTRs, who have to protect themselves consequently against solar or artificial UV radiation, are at high risk of developing vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is not only associated with increased risk for metabolic bone disease, but with other severe health problems including various types of malignancies. As a consequence, screening for and treatment of vitamin D deficiency is warranted in OTRs. In this review, we give an update on our present understanding of skin cancer surveillance in OTRs. PMID:25207370

  9. Implementing a One-on-One Peer Support Program for Cancer Survivors Using a Motivational Interviewing Approach: Results and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Allicock, Marlyn; Carr, Carol; Johnson, La-Shell; Smith, Rosie; Lawrence, Mary; Kaye, Leanne; Gellin, Mindy; Manning, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Peer Connect matches cancer survivors and caregivers (guides) with those currently experiencing cancer-related issues seeking support (partners). Motivational interviewing (MI)-based communication skills are taught to provide patient-centered support. There is little guidance about MI-based applications with cancer survivors who may have multiple coping needs. This paper addresses the results and lessons learned from implementing Peer Connect. Thirteen cancer survivors and two caregivers rece...

  10. The NCS 45 cask family: an updated design replaces an old design. Lessons learned during design, testing and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NCS 45 cask family is intended to replace the cask types R52, TN6/1 and TN6/3. These packagings - country of origin France - were in operation worldwide since mid 1970. In the late nineties prolongations of the certificates of package approval became more and more difficult and time consuming. Finally only special arrangements for restricted contents were issued by the competent French authority which caused considerable problems when validations in other countries were applied for. To guarantee the availability of such a cask in the future for its customers NCS decided to replace the old casks by an updated design, the NCS 45 cask family

  11. American society of clinical oncology update on the role of bisphosphonates and bone health issues in women with breast cancer Part II. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vysotskaya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available American society of clinical oncology update on the roleof bisphosphonates and bone health issues in women with breast cancer Part II. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer

  12. Revision of the AESJ Standard for Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). Updating requirements based on the lessons learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP Accidents (3). Fragility evaluation and outline of the updated points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned from Great East Japan earthquake and other new findings had been accumulated on the fragility evaluation of buildings and components. And also new analysis and evaluation method had been proposed with the advancement of recent analysis and evaluation technology. These were reflected in revision of the AESJ Standard for Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). Scope of the fragility evaluation were extended to all equipment on the site, severe accident management equipment including portable equipment and earthquake concomitant incident (such as tsunami) countermeasure equipment. This article described outlines of updating points of the fragility evaluation of the AESJ Standard for Seismic PRA; (1) requirements for seismic induced other risk evaluations such as fire, inundation and tsunami, (2) simulation technology based on recent findings such as three dimensional responses of buildings / structures and its effect on equipment, (3) requirements of the fragility evaluation for various failure mode of several equipment such as severe accident management equipment, fine failure mode of buildings / structures, failures of equipment related with earthquake concomitant incidents (embankment and seawall) and spent fuel pool, and (4) requirements for the fragility evaluation of aftershocks and soil deformation due to fault displacement. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care intervention to manage cancer-related symptoms: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jennifer; Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan; Marsh, J Wallis; Dew, Mary Amanda; Spring, Michael; Grady, Jonathan; Likumahuwa, Sonja; Dunlavy, Andrea; Youssef, Michael; Antoni, Michael; Butterfield, Lisa H; Schulz, Richard; Day, Richard; Helgeson, Vicki; Kim, Kevin H; Gamblin, T Clark

    2012-01-01

    Background Collaborative care interventions to treat depression have begun to be tested in settings outside of primary care. However, few studies have expanded the collaborative care model to other settings and targeted comorbid physical symptoms of depression. Purpose The aims of this report were to: (1) describe the design and methods of a trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention designed to manage cancer-related symptoms and improve overall quality of life in patients diagnosed with hepatobiliary carcinoma; and (2) share the lessons learned during the design, implementation, and evaluation of the trial. Methods The trial was a phase III randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention to reduce depression, pain, and fatigue in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The intervention was compared to an enhanced usual care arm. The primary outcomes included the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Fatigue, and the FACT-Hepatobiliary. Sociodemographic and disease-specific characteristics were recorded from the medical record; Natural Killer cells and cytokines that are associated with these symptoms and with disease progression were assayed from serum. Results and Discussion The issues addressed include: (1) development of collaborative care in the context of oncology (e.g., timing of the intervention, tailoring of the intervention, ethical issues regarding randomization of patients, and changes in medical treatment over the course of the study); (2) use of a website by chronically ill populations (e.g., design and access to the website, development of the website and intervention, ethical issues associated with website development, website usage, and unanticipated costs associated with website development); (3) evaluation of the efficacy of intervention (e.g., patient preferences, proxy raters

  14. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: genetic testing for cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-15

    As the leading organization representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reaffirms its commitment to integrating cancer risk assessment and management, including molecular analysis of cancer predisposition genes, into the practice of oncology and preventive medicine. The primary goal of this effort is to foster expanded access to, and continued advances in, medical care provided to patients and families affected by hereditary cancer syndromes. The 1996 ASCO Statement on Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility set forth specific recommendations relating to clinical practice, research needs, educational opportunities, requirement for informed consent, indications for genetic testing, regulation of laboratories, and protection from discrimination, as well as access to and reimbursement for cancer genetics services. In updating this Statement, ASCO endorses the following principles: Indications for Genetic Testing: ASCO recommends that genetic testing be offered when 1) the individual has personal or family history features suggestive of a genetic cancer susceptibility condition, 2) the test can be adequately interpreted, and 3) the results will aid in diagnosis or influence the medical or surgical management of the patient or family members at hereditary risk of cancer. ASCO recommends that genetic testing only be done in the setting of pre- and post-test counseling, which should include discussion of possible risks and benefits of cancer early detection and prevention modalities. Special Issues in Testing Children for Cancer Susceptibility: ASCO recommends that the decision to offer testing to potentially affected children should take into account the availability of evidence-based risk-reduction strategies and the probability of developing a malignancy during childhood. Where risk-reduction strategies are available or cancer predominantly develops in childhood, ASCO believes that

  15. Cancerous 'floater': a lesson learned about tissue identity testing, endometrial cancer and microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Veerle; Buza, Natalia; Ngo, Nhu T; Much, Melissa A; Asis, Maria C; Schwartz, Peter E; Hui, Pei

    2013-09-01

    A 46-year-old woman presented with endometrial cells on a pap smear and underwent endometrial curettage. The specimen revealed secretory endometrium and a possible endometrial polyp. In addition, a single 4 mm fragment of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma was found. Tissue identity DNA genotyping was performed and the adenocarcinoma tissue fragment showed a drastically different allelic pattern from that of the background endometrium. To confirm tissue contamination, genotyping of three other tumor specimens-probable sources for a contaminant-was performed but failed to identify a match. Without confirmation of contamination, a second endometrial curettage was obtained from the patient, in which similar adenocarcinoma tissue was once again found. Further workup demonstrated that the patient had a microsatellite unstable (MSI) endometrial adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry and molecular testing. The patient subsequently underwent staging surgery, which revealed an early-stage, well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma. This case study illustrates an uncommon, yet important caveat of tissue identity testing by DNA genotyping, where MSI instability can significantly alter the allelic pattern of DNA polymorphisms in the tumor genome, leading to erroneous conclusion regarding the tissue identity. Awareness of this phenomenon is crucial for a molecular pathologist to avoid interpretation errors of tissue identity testing in a cancer diagnostic workup. PMID:23558568

  16. Cancer Patient and Survivor Research from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium: A Preview of Three Large Randomized Trials and Initial Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARCUS, ALFRED C.; DIEFENBACH, MICHAEL A.; STANTON, ANNETTE L.; MILLER-HALEGOUA, SUZANNE N.; FLEISHER, LINDA; RAICH, PETER C.; MORRA, MARION E.; PEROCCHIA, ROSEMARIE SLEVIN; TRAN, ZUNG VU; BRIGHT, MARY ANNE

    2014-01-01

    Three large randomized trials are described from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium (CISRC). Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 is also testing a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the two-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1 = 208, Project 2 = 340, Project 3 = 792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52% and 67% for Projects 1–3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most or some) was 90%, 85% and 83% for Projects 1–3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the CISRC interventions, perceived utility and benefit was high, and more than 90% would recommend them to other cancer patients. Five initial lessons learned are presented that may help inform future cancer communications research. PMID:23448232

  17. TP53 Variations in Human Cancers: New Lessons from the IARC TP53 Database and Genomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaoun, Liacine; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Ardin, Maude; Hollstein, Monica; Byrnes, Graham; Zavadil, Jiri; Olivier, Magali

    2016-09-01

    TP53 gene mutations are one of the most frequent somatic events in cancer. The IARC TP53 Database (http://p53.iarc.fr) is a popular resource that compiles occurrence and phenotype data on TP53 germline and somatic variations linked to human cancer. The deluge of data coming from cancer genomic studies generates new data on TP53 variations and attracts a growing number of database users for the interpretation of TP53 variants. Here, we present the current contents and functionalities of the IARC TP53 Database and perform a systematic analysis of TP53 somatic mutation data extracted from this database and from genomic data repositories. This analysis showed that IARC has more TP53 somatic mutation data than genomic repositories (29,000 vs. 4,000). However, the more complete screening achieved by genomic studies highlighted some overlooked facts about TP53 mutations, such as the presence of a significant number of mutations occurring outside the DNA-binding domain in specific cancer types. We also provide an update on TP53 inherited variants including the ones that should be considered as neutral frequent variations. We thus provide an update of current knowledge on TP53 variations in human cancer as well as inform users on the efficient use of the IARC TP53 Database. PMID:27328919

  18. 2001 updated standard options and recommendations for radiotherapy in non metastatic breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Context. - The 'Standards, Options an Recommendations' (SOR) project, started in 1993, is a collaboration between the Federation of french cancer centers (FNCLCC), the 20 french cancer centers, and specialists from french public universities, general hospitals and private clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and the outcome of cancer patients. The methodology is based on a literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. Objectives. -To develop clinical practice guidelines for non metastatic breast cancer patients according to the definitions of the Standards, Options and Recommendations project. Methods. -Data were identified by searching Medline, web sites, and using the personal reference lists of members of the expert groups. Once the guidelines were defined, the document was submitted for review to 148 independent reviewers. Results. - This article presents the chapter radiotherapy resulting from the 2001 update of the version first published in 1996. The modified 2001 version of the standards, options and recommendations takes into account new information published. The main recommendations are (1) Breast irradiation after conservative surgery significatively decrease the risk of local recurrence (level of evidence A) and the decrease in the risk of local recidivation after chest wall irradiation is greater as the number of risk factors for local recurrence increases (level of evidence A). (2) After conservative surgery, a whole breast irradiation should be performed at a minimum dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions (standard, level of evidence A). (3) A boost in the tumour bed should be performed in women under 50 years, even if the surgical margins are free (standard, level of evidence B). (4) Internal mammary chain irradiation is indicated for internal or central tumours in the absence of axillary

  19. An informatics model for tissue banks – Lessons learned from the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamed Jonathan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in molecular biology and growing requirements from biomarker validation studies have generated a need for tissue banks to provide quality-controlled tissue samples with standardized clinical annotation. The NCI Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR is a distributed tissue bank that comprises four academic centers and provides thousands of clinically annotated prostate cancer specimens to researchers. Here we describe the CPCTR information management system architecture, common data element (CDE development, query interfaces, data curation, and quality control. Methods Data managers review the medical records to collect and continuously update information for the 145 clinical, pathological and inventorial CDEs that the Resource maintains for each case. An Access-based data entry tool provides de-identification and a standard communication mechanism between each group and a central CPCTR database. Standardized automated quality control audits have been implemented. Centrally, an Oracle database has web interfaces allowing multiple user-types, including the general public, to mine de-identified information from all of the sites with three levels of specificity and granularity as well as to request tissues through a formal letter of intent. Results Since July 2003, CPCTR has offered over 6,000 cases (38,000 blocks of highly characterized prostate cancer biospecimens, including several tissue microarrays (TMA. The Resource developed a website with interfaces for the general public as well as researchers and internal members. These user groups have utilized the web-tools for public query of summary data on the cases that were available, to prepare requests, and to receive tissues. As of December 2005, the Resource received over 130 tissue requests, of which 45 have been reviewed, approved and filled. Additionally, the Resource implemented the TMA Data Exchange Specification in its TMA program and created a

  20. Report on the recently-updated study of cancer mortality in the A-bomb survivors: insights for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima has recently released an updated study of cancer mortality in the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort of survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. (The LSS is believed to contain about one-half of the total number of survivors who were within 2.5 km of the hypocentre.) The update has considerably more statistical power than previous studies because of five more years of follow-up(1986-1990 inclusive) and because of adding 10.536 survivors for whom DS86 dose estimates recently became available. Together these add about 550.000 person-years of follow-up compared to the previous report, which covered mortality to the end of 1985. Moreover, about 25% of the excess solid cancer deaths have occurred in these last five years of follow-up. Since the LSS is the most important source of information about the risk of induced cancer in humans following acute radiation exposures, this paper first summarizes this important new information. This is a keystone of radiation risk assessment and therefore of our radiation protection history; one cannot make sense of the current controversy concerning linearity without understanding what this data says and doesn't say. This communication then moves into a discussion of what implications there may be from this updated information, in the context of current debates about whether the linear-no threshold model is an appropriate one for radiation protection use. (DM)

  1. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography in the management of lung cancer: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punit Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication presents an update on the current role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT in the various clinical decision-making steps in lung carcinoma. The modality has been reported to be useful in characterizing solitary pulmonary nodules, improving lung cancer staging, especially for the detection of nodal and metastatic site involvement, guiding therapy, monitoring treatment response, and predicting outcome in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Its role has been more extensively evaluated in NSCLC than small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Limitations in FDG PET-CT are encountered in cases of tumor histotypes characterized by low glucose uptake (mucinous forms, bronchioalveolar carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, in the assessment of brain metastases (high physiologic 18F-FDG uptake in the brain and in cases presenting with associated inflammation. The future potentials of newer PET tracers beyond FDG are enumerated. An evolving area is PET-guided assessment of targeted therapy (e.g., EGFR and EGFR tyrosine kinase overexpression in tumors which have significant potential for drug development.

  2. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  3. Efficacy and safety of fentanyl buccal for cancer pain management by administration through a soluble film: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than half of patients receiving prescription medicine for cancer pain have been reported to experience inadequate pain relief or breakthrough pain. Buccal administration can deliver lipophilic opioids rapidly to the systemic circulation through the buccal mucosa, limiting gastrointestinal motility and first-pass metabolism. This review updates the safety and efficacy of fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF) in patients with cancer pain. Literature was identified through searches of Medline (PubMed). Search terms included combinations of the following: cancer pain, fentanyl, fentanyl buccal soluble film, pharmacology, kinetics, safety, efficacy and toxicity. FBSF is an oral transmucosal form of fentanyl citrate developed as a treatment of breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant patients with cancer. Studies have shown that it is well tolerated in the oral cavity, with adequate bioavailability and safety in cancer patients. Further studies are warranted to evaluate, in comparison with other short-acting opioids, its efficacy in the management of breakthrough cancer pain, its addictive potential and its economic impact in cancer patients

  4. Measuring quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer: Update of the EORTC QLQ-H&N Module, Phase III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singer, Susanne; Araújo, Cláudia; Arraras, Juan Ignacio;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to pilot test an updated version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Head and Neck Module (EORTC QLQ-H&N60). METHODS: Patients with head and neck cancer were asked to complete a list of 60 head...

  5. Updates and Controversies in the Rapidly Evolving Field of Lung Cancer Screening, Early Detection, and Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Hasmeena Kathuria; Yaron Gesthalter; Avrum Spira; Brody, Jerome S.; Katrina Steiling

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Cigarette smoking is a well-recognized risk factor for lung cancer, and a sustained elevation of lung cancer risk persists even after smoking cessation. Despite identifiable risk factors, there has been minimal improvement in mortality for patients with lung cancer primarily stemming from diagnosis at a late stage when there are few effective therapeutic options. Early detection of lung cancer and effective sc...

  6. Immunotherapy for prostate cancer: lessons from responses to tumor-associated antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westdorp, H.; Skold, A.; Snijer, B.A.; Franik, S.; Mulder, S.F.; Major, P.P.; Foley, R.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer in men and the second most common cause of cancer-related death in men. In recent years, novel therapeutic options for PCa have been developed and studied extensively in clinical trials. Sipuleucel-T is the first cell-based immunotherapeutic vaccine fo

  7. Sanitary surveillance in France in relation with the Chernobylsk accident. Updated situation on thyroid cancers and epidemiological studies during 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in children has been reported since 1990 in areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine which have been highly contaminated during the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A similar increase is now observed in young adults in the same areas. In France, thyroid cancer is characterized by low occurrence and good prognosis. However, the incidence of thyroid cancer has been increasing for more than 20 years, and in 1986, the Chernobyl cloud of radioactive dust crossed the French territory. Thus, the National institute for public health surveillance (I.n.V.S.) carried out several studies to evaluate whether the incidence increase in thyroid cancer is related to radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident. Since 2000, the I.n.V.S. is in charge of a national multidisciplinary approach involving a wide range of public health actors, including the French network of cancer registries (Francim). Since 2003, the I.n.V.S. has been working on improving the surveillance system according to the actions described in the national cancer plan 2003-2007. The I.n.V.S. has increased its financial contribution to cancer registries including the national registry of solid tumors in children, which was created in 2000. The Institute is also working on the implementation of a multi source system for the national cancer surveillance in link with cancer registries. For the twentieth anniversary of the Chernobyl accident, the I.n.V.S. is publishing updated results from the latest research conducted in close collaboration with the partners. These results do not support the initial hypothesis of a potential 'Chernobyl effect' in France. The increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer is also reported in most of developed countries. Practices in cancer diagnosis and the increased rate of total thyroidectomy for benign lesion may lead pathologists to unexpectedly discover small thyroid tumors. This fact is likely to explain most of the incidence increase. The wide

  8. Updates and Controversies in the Rapidly Evolving Field of Lung Cancer Screening, Early Detection, and Chemoprevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmeena Kathuria

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Cigarette smoking is a well-recognized risk factor for lung cancer, and a sustained elevation of lung cancer risk persists even after smoking cessation. Despite identifiable risk factors, there has been minimal improvement in mortality for patients with lung cancer primarily stemming from diagnosis at a late stage when there are few effective therapeutic options. Early detection of lung cancer and effective screening of high-risk individuals may help improve lung cancer mortality. While low dose computerized tomography (LDCT screening of high risk smokers has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality, the high rates of false positives and potential for over-diagnosis have raised questions on how to best implement lung cancer screening. The rapidly evolving field of lung cancer screening and early-detection biomarkers may ultimately improve the ability to diagnose lung cancer in its early stages, identify smokers at highest-risk for this disease, and target chemoprevention strategies. This review aims to provide an overview of the opportunities and challenges related to lung cancer screening, the field of biomarker development for early lung cancer detection, and the future of lung cancer chemoprevention.

  9. Planning Lessons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda Jensen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Jensen's "Lesson Planning"article serves aS a guide fOr novice teachers who need to create formalized lesson plans.The article covers why,when,and how teachers plan lessons,as well aS basic lesson plan principles and a lesson plan template.

  10. Gender, power, and feminisms in breast cancer advocacy: Lessons from the United States and Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Sulik, Gayle; Zierkiewicz, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    The United States breast cancer movement helped to transform breast cancer’s social and medical landscape domestically and, in some ways, internationally. However, differences in gender identities, power relations, and the role of feminism(s) cross‐culturally also shaped breast cancer advocacy itself. After giving a brief introduction to the socio‐historical context of the U.S. and Polish breast cancer movements, this article illuminates some of the linkages and divergences bet...

  11. Recruiting Chinese- and Korean-Americans in Cancer Survivorship Research: Challenges and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Won; Paek, Min-So

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes Asian-American recruitment experiences using data from the cancer survivorship study involving Chinese- and Korean-American breast cancer survivors specifically. The article discusses challenges to the successful recruitment of Asian-American populations for cancer survivorship research and provides recommendations for future recruitment efforts. The study investigated the role of family communication in coping and quality of life for survivors from Chinese- and Korean-American groups diagnosed with breast cancer. Participants were primarily recruited through cancer registries and community outreach. A total of 157 breast cancer survivors (86 Chinese-Americans and 71 Korean-Americans) completed the final survey, yielding a final response rate of 62.8 % of the accessible samples. Chinese-Americans were more likely to agree to participate but less frequently completed the survey, and Korean-Americans were more likely to refuse to participate. Common reasons for refusal were "too busy or too painful to recall," followed by "not interested," "too old," "distrust of the research," or "health issue." Participants were more likely to be young and Korean-American compared to non-participants. Cultural and linguistic barriers, distrust, and lack of awareness about cancer research should be considered to recruit more Asian-American cancer survivors. Community participatory research is required to ensure participation by sufficient numbers of ethnic minorities in cancer survivorship research. PMID:25619194

  12. Lung cancer and its association with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease:update on nexus of epigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Mullapudi, Nandita; Yao, Hongwei; Spivack, Simon D.; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW:Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The current research is focused on identifying the common and disparate events involved in epigenetic modifications that concurrently occur during the pathogenesis of COPD and lung cancer. The purpose of this review is to describe the current knowledge and understanding of epigenetic modifications in pathogenesis of COPD and lung cancer.RECENT FINDINGS:Th...

  13. Curcumin: Updated Molecular Mechanisms and Intervention Targets in Human Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a yellow pigment derived from Curcuma longa Linn, has attracted great interest in the research of cancer during the past decades. Extensive studies documented that curcumin attenuates cancer cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Curcumin has been demonstrated to interact with multiple molecules and signal pathways, which makes it a potential adjuvant anti-cancer agent to chemotherapy. Previous investigations focus on the mechanisms of action for curcumin, which is shown to manipulate transcription factors and induce apoptosis in various kinds of human cancer. Apart from transcription factors and apoptosis, emerging studies shed light on latent targets of curcumin against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, microRNAs (miRNA, autophagy and cancer stem cell. The present review predominantly discusses significance of EGFR, miRNA, autophagy and cancer stem cell in lung cancer therapy. Curcumin as a natural phytochemicals could communicate with these novel targets and show synergism to chemotherapy. Additionally, curcumin is well tolerated in humans. Therefore, EGFR-, miRNA-, autophagy- and cancer stem cell-based therapy in the presence of curcumin might be promising mechanisms and targets in the therapeutic strategy of lung cancer.

  14. Is it time for a new paradigm for systemic cancer treatment? Lessons from a century of cancer chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eCrawford

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available U.S. SEER data for age-adjusted mortality rates for all cancers combined for all races show only a modest overall 13% decline over the past 35 years. Moreover, the greatest contributor to cancer mortality is treatment resistant metastatic disease. The accepted therapeutic paradigm for the past half century for the treatment of advanced cancers has involved the use of systemic chemotherapy drugs cytotoxic for cycling cells (both normal and malignant during DNA synthesis and/or mitosis. The failure of this therapeutic modality to achieve high level, consistent rates of disease free survival for some of the most common cancers, including tumors of the lung, colon breast, brain, melanoma and others is the focus of this paper. A retrospective assessment of critical milestones in cancer chemotherapy indicates that most successful therapeutic regimens use cytotoxic cell cycle inhibitors in combined, maximum tolerated, dose dense acute treatment regimens originally developed to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and some lymphomas. Early clinical successes in this area led to their wholesale application to the treatment of solid tumor malignancies that, unfortunately, has not produced consistent, long-term high cure rates for many common cancers. Important differences in therapeutic sensitivity of leukemias/lymphomas versus solid tumors can be explained by key biological differences that define the treatment resistant solid tumor phenotype. A review of these clinical outcome data in the context of recent developments in our understanding of drug resistance mechanisms characteristic of solid tumors suggests the need for a new paradigm for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant cancers. In contrast to reductionist approaches, the systemic approach targets both micro-environmental and systemic factors that drive and sustain tumor progression. These systemic factors include dysregulated inflammatory and oxidation pathways shown to be directly implicated in

  15. GSTM1 null genotype and gastric cancer risk in the Chinese population: an updated meta-analysis and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang XL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Xi-Liang Zhang, Yong-Hui Cui Department of Gastroenterology, The First People’s Hospital of Shangqiu City, Shangqiu, Henan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Although a number of studies have been conducted on the association between the GSTM1 null genotype and gastric cancer in People’s Republic of China, this association remains elusive and controversial. To clarify the effects of the GSTM1 null genotype on the risk of gastric cancer, an updated meta-analysis was performed in the Chinese population. Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM up to November 5, 2014. A total of 25 studies including 3,491 cases and 5,921 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, a significant association (odds ratio [OR] =1.47, 95% CI: 1.28–1.69 was found between the null GSTM1 and gastric cancer risk when all studies in Chinese population were pooled into the meta-analysis. In subgroup analyses stratified by quality score, geographic area, and source of controls, the same results were observed. Additionally, a significant association was found both in smokers and non-smokers. This meta-analysis showed that the null GSTM1 may be a potential biomarker for gastric cancer risk in Chinese, and further studies with gene–gene and gene–environment interactions are required for definite conclusions. Keywords: meta-analysis, GSTM1, polymorphism, gastric cancer

  16. Studies Comparing Screen-Film Mammography and Full-Field Digital Mammography in Breast Cancer Screening: Updated Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) has several potential benefits as compared with screen-film mammography (SFM) in mammography screening. Digital technology also opens for implementation of advanced applications, including computer-aided detection (CAD) and tomosynthesis. Phantom studies and experimental clinical studies have shown that FFDM is equal or slightly superior to SFM for detection and characterization of mammographic abnormalities. Despite obvious advantages, the conversion to digital mammography has been slower than anticipated, and not only due to higher costs. Until very recently, some countries did not even permit the use of digital mammography in breast cancer screening. The reason for this reluctant attitude was concern about lower spatial resolution and about using soft-copy reading. Furthermore, there was a lack of data supporting improved diagnostic accuracy using FFDM in a screening setting, since two pioneer trials both showed nonsignificantly lower cancer detection rate at FFDM. The 10 studies comparing FFDM and SFM in mammography screening published so far have shown divergent and rather conflicting results. Nevertheless, there is a rapid conversion to digital mammography in breast cancer screening in many western countries. The aim of this article is to give an updated review of these studies, discuss the conflicting findings, and draw some conclusions from the results

  17. Lessons we have learned from our children: cancer risks from diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The A-bomb survivors represent the best source of data for risk estimates of radiation-induced cancer. It is clear that children are ten times more sensitive than adults to the induction of cancer. The introduction of helical CT has transformed diagnostic radiology, especially in pediatric patients. The undoubted benefits carry the price tag of much higher doses, and in children, even higher effective doses. The A-bomb data have ''matured'' and we now have cancer risk estimates for a dose range which coincides with the organ doses from pediatric CT. Individuals exposed 50 years ago to doses comparable to those associated with helical CT today, show a small but statistically significant excess incidence of cancer. There are no assumptions, and no extrapolations involved. An abdominal helical CT scan in a young girl results in a risk of fatal cancer later in life that amounts to about one in a thousand. The risk to the individual is small, and readily balanced by the medical benefits. The public health problem is, however, significant when the small individual risk is multiplied by the 2.7 million of such procedures performed annually. Every effort is needed to minimize doses by an appropriate choice of peak kilovoltage (kVp) and milliampere-seconds (mAs), and at the same time to urge a more selective use of pediatric CT. (orig.)

  18. Eribulin for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer: an update on its safety and efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty MK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mark K Doherty, Patrick G Morris Department of Medical Oncology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: Breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death internationally. Treatment approaches for metastatic breast cancer have evolved in recent years; however chemotherapy remains a core component for the majority of patients. Agents such as anthracyclines and taxanes have been extensively studied and form standard treatment. Eribulin mesylate is a novel synthetic microtubule-directed chemotherapy, based on a naturally-occurring compound. Through phase I studies, eribulin was found to be tolerable and activity was seen in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Phase II studies in metastatic breast cancer further demonstrated its efficacy, with responses and survival which compare favorably with other studied chemotherapy agents. The phase III EMBRACE study showed superior survival for patients treated with eribulin compared with those who received a physician’s choice control. This led to its approval for use in many countries in this setting. Its toxicity profile is well established and manageable for the most part, with the commonest reported toxicities being alopecia, fatigue, neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy. A second reported phase III study comparing eribulin to capecitabine failed to show an improvement in survival in pretreated patients. This article reviews the clinical pharmacology and mechanism of action of eribulin, and summarizes the results of the major preclinical and clinical studies of eribulin in metastatic breast cancer. Keywords: eribulin, breast cancer, metastatic breast cancer, review, new treatments, chemotherapy

  19. Role of multiparametric MRI in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Giovanni; Indino, Elena Lucia; Salvo, Vincenzo; Colarieti, Anna; Fierro, Davide; Scialpi, Michele; Panebianco, Valeria

    2016-05-24

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy of the male gender. The role of magnetic resonance imaging has evolved very rapidly over the years to be currently recognized as a fundamental tool in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of prostate cancer. PMID:26350047

  20. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI......Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and....../CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with (18)F or (11)C), (11)C-acetate, and (18)F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies....

  1. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and...... molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI....../CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with (18)F or (11)C), (11)C-acetate, and (18)F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies....

  2. How chromosome mis-segregation leads to cancer: lessons from BubR1 mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-10-31

    Alteration in chromosome numbers and structures instigate and foster massive genetic instability. As Boveri has seen a hundred years ago (Boveri, 1914; 2008), aneuploidy is hallmark of many cancers. However, whether aneuploidy is the cause or the result of cancer is still at debate. The molecular mechanism behind aneuploidy includes the chromo-some mis-segregation in mitosis by the compromise of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is an elaborate network of proteins, which monitor that all chromosomes are bipolarly attached with the spindles. Therefore, the weakening of the SAC is the major reason for chromosome number instability, while complete compromise of SAC results in detrimental death, exemplified in natural abortion in embryonic stage. Here, I will review on the recent progress on the understanding of chromosome mis-segregation and cancer, based on the comparison of different mouse models of BubR1, the core component of SAC. PMID:25256220

  3. Updates from the Intestinal Front Line: Autophagic Weapons against Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Simone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestine lies at the interface between the organism and its environment and responds to infection/inflammation in a multi-leveled manner, potentially leading to chronic inflammatory pathologies and cancer formation. Indeed, the immune response at the intestinal epithelium has been found to be involved in the origin and development of colorectal cancer, which is the third most commonly diagnosed neoplastic disease. Among the mechanisms induced upon inflammation, autophagy appears as a defensive strategy for the clearance of invading microbes and intracellular waste components. Autophagy has also been found to play an important role in colorectal cancer, where it seems to have a pro-survival or pro-death function depending on the stage of the neoplastic process. In this paper we discuss the dual role of autophagy in colorectal cancer and review evidence showing that modulation of autophagy affects the immune response and cancer biology. The study of key players involved in autophagy might contribute to the design of new approaches for colorectal cancer, consisting in combined therapies capable of modifying cancer-specific metabolism rather than simply evoking a generic apoptotic and/or autophagic response, thus enhancing the efficacy of currently used drugs and treatments.

  4. Update on raloxifene: role in reducing the risk of invasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel VG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Victor G Vogel Cancer Institute, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA, USA Abstract: Risk factors allow us to define women who are at increased lifetime risk for breast cancer, and the most important factor is age. Benign breast disease increases risk, and the most important histologies are atypical lobular or ductal hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ. Family history of breast cancer among first-degree relatives (mother, sisters, daughters also increases risk. Quantitative measures of risk give accurate predictions of breast cancer incidence for groups of women but not for individual subjects. Multiple published, randomized controlled trials, which employed selective estrogen receptor (ER modulators (SERMs, have demonstrated consistent reductions of 35% or greater in the risk of ER-positive invasive and noninvasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Professional organizations in the US now recommend the use of SERMs to reduce the risk of breast cancer in high-risk, postmenopausal women. Raloxifene and tamoxifen reduce the risk of ER-positive invasive breast cancer with equal efficacy, but raloxifene is associated with a lower risk of thromboembolic disease, benign uterine conditions, and cataracts than tamoxifen in postmenopausal women. No evidence exists establishing whether a reduction in breast cancer risk from either agent translates into reduced breast cancer mortality. Overall quality of life is similar with raloxifene or tamoxifen, but the incidence of dyspareunia, weight gain, and musculoskeletal complaints is higher with raloxifene use, whereas vasomotor symptoms, bladder incontinence, gynecologic symptoms, and leg cramps were higher with tamoxifen use. Keywords: selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs, raloxifene, risk reduction, chemoprevention

  5. Evaluation of a community-academic partnership: lessons from Latinos in a network for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, J Hope; Fernandez, Maria E; Mullen, Patricia D

    2015-05-01

    Established in 2002, Latinos in a Network for Cancer Control is a community-academic network supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute. The network includes >130 individuals from 65 community and academic organizations committed to reducing cancer-related health disparities. Using an empirically derived systems model--the Bergen Model of Collaborative Functioning--as the analytic frame, we interviewed 19 partners to identify challenges and successful processes. Findings indicated that sustained partner interaction created "meaningful relationships" that were routinely called on for collaboration. The leadership was regarded positively on vision, charisma, and capacity. Limitations included overreliance on a single leader. Suggestions supported more delegation of decision making, consistent communication, and more equitable resource distribution. The study highlighted new insights into dynamics of collaboration: Greater inclusiveness of inputs (partners, finances, mission) and loosely defined roles and structure produced strong connections but less network-wide productivity (output). Still, this profile enabled the creation of more tightly defined and highly productive subgroups, with clear goals and roles but less inclusive of inputs than the larger network. Important network outputs included practice-based research publications, cancer control intervention materials, and training to enhance the use of evidence-based interventions, as well as continued and diversified funding. PMID:25395057

  6. In vitro three-dimensional (3D) models in cancer research: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimlin, Lauren C; Casagrande, Giovanna; Virador, Victoria M

    2013-03-01

    Tissues are three-dimensional (3D) entities as is the tumor that arises within them. Though disaggregated cancerous tissues have produced numerous cell lines for basic and applied research, it is generally agreed that these lines are poor models of in vivo phenomena. In this review we focus on in vitro 3D models used in cancer research, particularly their contribution to molecular studies of the early stages of metastasis, angiogenesis, the tumor microenvironment, and cancer stem cells. We present a summary of the various formats used in the field of tissue bioengineering as they apply to mechanistic modeling of cancer stages or processes. In addition we list studies that model specific types of malignancies, highlight drastic differences in results between 3D in vitro models and classical monolayer culturing techniques, and establish the need for standardization of 3D models for meaningful preclinical and therapeutic testing. PMID:22162252

  7. [Medical castration in the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, S-J; Rouprêt, M; Davin, J-L; Soulié, M

    2009-04-01

    Indications for hormonotherapy in prostate cancer are in deep mutation and are constantly evolving. Used initially (1941) in metastatic stages, hormone therapy is used nowadays in locally advanced prostate cancer and aggressive localized disease. Its prescription in association with radiotherapy or surgery has provided a benefit regarding survival free progression. The place of hormone therapy in localized prostate cancer is not well defined and the debate is still ongoing, especially in case of biochemical recurrence after irradiation or radical prostatectomy and even in neoadjuvant cases. Additional and further studies are ongoing and are strongly needed to establish new guidelines. Nevertheless, hormone therapy is not restricted any more to palliative cases and is part of the current therapeutic arsenal of the urologist for high risk localized and/or locally advanced prostate cancers. PMID:19465332

  8. Stress and breast cancer: a systematic update on the current knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Grønbaek, Morten

    2006-01-01

    A vast body of research has been carried out to examine the relationship between psychological stress and the risk of breast cancer. Previous reviews on this issue have mainly focused on stressful life events and have included both prospective and retrospective studies. The results from these rev......A vast body of research has been carried out to examine the relationship between psychological stress and the risk of breast cancer. Previous reviews on this issue have mainly focused on stressful life events and have included both prospective and retrospective studies. The results from...... these reviews have revealed conflicting data. We evaluate whether stressful life events, work-related stress, or perceived global stress are differentially associated with breast cancer incidence and breast cancer relapse in prospective studies. Systematic and explicit methods were used to identify, select...

  9. An update on the pathobiological relevance of nuclear receptors for cancers of the head and neck

    OpenAIRE

    Stauber, Roland H; Wünsch, Desiree; Knauer, Shirley K.; Fetz, Verena

    2010-01-01

    Cancers of the head and neck are among the most common neoplasms worldwide, characterized by local tumor aggressiveness, high rate of early recurrence, development of metastasis and second primary tumors. Although disease management of head and neck cancer has improved significantly, overall survival-rates remained largely unchanged over the last decades. Thus, in addition to modern chemo-radiation treatment strategies combined with sophisticated surgery, there is s...

  10. Thyroid Cancer Rates and 131I Doses from Nevada Atmospheric Nuclear Bomb Tests: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Ethel S.; Huang, Lan; Bouville, Andre; Berg, Christine D.; Ron, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to radioactive iodine (131I) from atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in Nevada in the 1950s may have increased thyroid cancer risks. To investigate the long-term effects of this exposure, we analyzed data on thyroid cancer incidence (18,545 cases) from eight Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries for the period 1973-2004. Excess relative risks (ERR) per Gray (Gy) for exposure received before age 15 were estimated by relating age-, birth year-, sex-, and ...

  11. ASWAGANDHA (WITHANIA SOMNIFERA) – AYURVEDIC BEQUEST FOR THE PATIENTS OF CANCER: AN UPDATE ON CURRENT RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Rao Paramkusha Madupu; Khemani Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) is a popularly known medicinal plant said in Ayurveda. It has been used to promote vigor and strength. The current ongoing researches are approving the plant can be useful in malignacies at various levels and with different mechanisms. An effort has been made in this paper to review such results focused at cancer therapy and management. Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) is also known as Indian ginseng proves to be a beacon for blinded minds of cancer sufferers.

  12. Male breast cancer: An update in diagnosis, treatment and molecular profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Onami, Susan; Ozaki, Melanie; Mortimer, Joanne E; Pal, Sumanta Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of female breast cancer, resulting in a decline in incidence and a global improvement in clinical outcome. The statistics for male breast cancer (MBC) stand in sharp contrast – over the past several decades, there has been a steady rise in the incidence of this disease, and clinical outcome has improved at a much slower pace. In the current review, the clinicopathologic features of MBC are described in detail. An emphasis is p...

  13. Breast Cancer Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Update Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Guo Tian; Jia-Ning Liang; Zhuo-Yun Wang; Dian Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Background. The incidence of breast cancer in RA patients remains controversial. Thus we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the impact of RA on breast cancer. Methods. Published literature was available from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library. Pooled standardized incidence rate (SIR) was computed by random-effect model analysis. Results. We identified 16 separate studies in the present study, in which the number of patients ranged from 458 to 84,475. We did not find the increased canc...

  14. Improving Outcomes from Breast Cancer in a Low-Income Country: Lessons from Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have yet to benefit from recent advances in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment now experienced in high-income countries. Their unique socio cultural and health system circumstances warrant a different approach to breast cancer management than that applied to women in high-income countries. Here, we present experience from the last five years working in rural Bangladesh. Case and consecutive series data, focus group and individual interviews, and clinical care experience provide the basis for this paper. These data illustrate a complex web of socio cultural, economic, and health system conditions which affect women's choices to seek and accept care and successful treatment. We conclude that health system, human rights, and governance issues underlie high mortality from this relatively rare disease in Bangladesh

  15. Embracing an integromic approach to tissue biomarker research in cancer: Perspectives and lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gerald; Bankhead, Peter; Dunne, Philip D.; O'Reilly, Paul G; James, Jacqueline A.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Hamilton, Peter; McArt, Darragh G.

    2016-01-01

    Modern approaches to biomedical research and diagnostics targeted towards precision medicine are generating ‘big data’ across a range of high-throughput experimental and analytical platforms. Integrative analysis of this rich clinical, pathological, molecular and imaging data represents one of the greatest bottlenecks in biomarker discovery research in cancer and other diseases. Following on from the publication of our successful framework for multimodal data amalgamation and integrative anal...

  16. Lessons from development: A role for asymmetric stem cell division in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Anne E.; Shung, Chia-Yi; Saylor, Katherine W.; Müllendorf, Karin A.; Weiss, Joseph B.; Wong, Melissa H.

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric stem cell division has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for physiologic control of stem cell numbers. Reinvigoration of the cancer stem cell theory suggests that tumorigenesis may be regulated by maintaining the balance between asymmetric and symmetric cell division. Therefore, mutations affecting this balance could result in aberrant expansion of stem cells. Although a number of molecules have been implicated in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division, here, we highligh...

  17. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in ovarian cancer clinical trials-lost opportunities and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, M; Mercieca-Bebber, R L; King, M T

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased recognition of the value of including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) as important end points in phase III clinical trials, there has been a lack of pre-specified PRO hypotheses and shortcomings with the analyses and interpretation of PROs in many ovarian cancer trials. This paper discusses and provides examples of the so-called lost opportunities in ovarian cancer trials. These include: (i) no clear pre-specified PRO hypotheses; (ii) PRO end points not included; (iii) insensitive PRO end point selection; (iv) collection of poor-quality PRO data not suitable for analysis; (v) differences in PROs between treatment arms ignored; and (vi) poor reporting quality. We can learn from the past and with relatively little additional effort, improve the collection and interpretation of PRO data in future ovarian cancer trials. The importance of doing so is underpinned by recent initiatives to improve the standard and usefulness of PRO data in clinical trials. These include the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for PROs to support labelling claims, the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO MCBS), the International Society for Quality-of-Life Research PRO reporting guidance and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Clinical Trials (CONSORT)-PRO-extension statement which includes a checklist of recommended items to include in PRO sections of trial protocols. Promoting the importance of hypothesis-driven PROs in ovarian cancer clinical trials will lead to improvements in the design of these trials and the interpretation of their results. PMID:27141076

  18. Myeloperoxidase polymorphism, menopausal status, and breast cancer risk: an update meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qin

    Full Text Available Myeloperoxidase (MPO is a metabolic/oxidative lysosomal enzyme secreted by reactive neutrophils at the sites of inflamed organs and tissues during phagocytosis. MPO has been either directly or indirectly linked to neoplasia, which is a well-established risk factor for many types of cancer. A large number of studies have reported the role of MPO G-463A polymorphism regarding breast-cancer risk. However, the published findings are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to determine more precise estimations for the relationship. Eligible studies were identified by searching several electronic databases for relevant reports published before June 2012. According to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria, a total of five eligible studies were included in the pooled analyses. When the five eligible studies concerning MPO G-463A polymorphism were pooled into this meta-analysis, there was no evidence found for a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. We also categorized by ethnicity (Caucasian or Asian for subgroup analysis; according to this subgroup analysis, we found no significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. However, in the stratified analysis for the premenopausal group, women carrying the AA genotype were found to have a significantly reduced risk (OR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.34-0.94, p = 0.027. Under the recessive model, there was a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk (OR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.34-0.93, p = 0.025. We conclude that MPO-G463A polymorphism might not be a good predictor of breast-cancer risk, though menopausal status modified women's risk of developing breast cancer.

  19. Breast Cancer Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Update Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of breast cancer in RA patients remains controversial. Thus we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the impact of RA on breast cancer. Methods. Published literature was available from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library. Pooled standardized incidence rate (SIR was computed by random-effect model analysis. Results. We identified 16 separate studies in the present study, in which the number of patients ranged from 458 to 84,475. We did not find the increased cancer risk in RA patients (SIR=0.86, 95% CI=0.72–1.02. However, subgroup analysis showed that breast cancer risk in RA patients was positively different in Caucasians (SIR=0.82, 95% CI=0.73–0.93 and non-Caucasians (SIR=1.21, 95% CI=1.19–1.23, respectively. In subgroup analysis by style, a reduced incidence was found in hospital-based case subjects (SIR=0.82, 95% CI=0.69–0.97. Similarly, subgroup analysis for adjusted factors indicated that in A3 (age and sex and A4 (age, sex, and race/ethnicity the risk was decreased (SIR=0.87, 95% CI=0.76–0.99; SIR=0.63, 95% CI=0.59–0.67. Conclusions. The meta-analysis revealed no increased breast cancer risk in RA patients. However, in the subgroup analysis, the risk of breast cancer is increased in non-Caucasians patients with RA while it decreased in Caucasian population, hospital-based case subjects, and A3 group. Such relationship may provide preference for risk of breast cancer in different population.

  20. Immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccines in prostate cancer: an update on current strategies and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Harpreet Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. While there are multiple ways to target the immune system, therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in late-stage clinical trials. The landmark Food and Drug Administration approval of sipuleucel-T for asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic prostate cancer set the stage for ongoing phase III trials with the cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM and the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab. A common feature of these immune-based therapies is the appearance of improved overall survival without short-term changes in disease progression. This class effect appears to be due to modulation of tumor growth rate kinetics, in which the activated immune system exerts constant immunologic pressure that slows net tumor growth. Emerging data suggest that the ideal population for clinical trials of cancer vaccines is patients with lower tumor volume and less aggressive disease. Combination strategies that combine immunotherapy with standard therapies have been shown to augment both immune response and clinical benefit.

  1. Immunotherapy and therapeutic vaccines in prostate cancer:an update on current strategies and clinical implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B Harpreet Singh; James L Gulley

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. While there are multiple ways to target the immune system, therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in late-stage clinical trials. The landmark Food and Drug Administration approval of sipuleucel-T for asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic prostate cancer set the stage for ongoing phase III trials with the cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM and the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab. A common feature of these immune-based therapies is the appearance of improved overall survival without short-term changes in disease progression. This class effect appears to be due to modulation of tumor growth rate kinetics, in which the activated immune system exerts constant immunologic pressure that slows net tumor growth. Emerging data suggest that the ideal population for clinical trials of cancer vaccines is patients with lower tumor volume and less aggressive disease. Combination strategies that combine immunotherapy with standard therapies have been shown to augment both immune response and clinical beneift.

  2. Hematoporphyrin-mediated photodynamic therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer: clinical update 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1996-04-01

    From 1983 to 1996 Phase II and III clinical studies at Henry Ford Hospital demonstrated complete or partial responses in 55 of 56 patients treated with hematoporphyrin-derivative or PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy (HPD-PDT) for a variety of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease: (1) superficial 'condemned mucosa' or 'field cancerization' of the oral cavity and larynx (7 cases); (2) Stage III/IV head and neck cancer (25 cases); (3) mucocutaneous AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma of the upper aerodigestive tract and non AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the lower extremity (15 cases); (4) recurrent laryngotracheal papillomatosis (3 cases); (5) severe dysplasia/adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (4 cases); (6) partial or completely obstructing terminal esophageal cancer (9 cases). At the time of this report, HPD-PDT produced complete responses in 24 patients (follow up 6 months to 9 years) with 'field cancerization' (CIS, T1N0M0) of the oral cavity and larynx (6 cases), adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (3 cases), mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (12 cases), obstructing esophageal carcinoma (1 case), and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx (1 case), and radiation therapy or solar-induced basal cell/squamous cell carcinomas (2 cases). PDT treatment protocols, results, complications, and application as adjunct or primary oncologic therapy for head and neck cancer are reviewed in this article.

  3. Association of COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xue

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is one of the most important enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism and its functional genetic polymorphisms may be associated with breast cancer (BC risk. Many epidemiological studies have been conducted to explore the association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to derive a more precise estimation of this relationship, a large meta-analysis was performed in this study. Methods Systematic searches of the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were performed. Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to estimate the strength of the association. Results A total of 56 studies including 34,358 breast cancer cases and 45,429 controls were included. Overall, no significant associations between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk were found for LL versus HH, HL versus HH, LL versus HL, recessive model LL versus HL+HH, and dominant model LL+HL versus HH. In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, source of controls, and menopausal status, there was still no significant association detected in any of the genetic models. Conclusion Our meta-analysis results suggest that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism may not contribute to breast cancer susceptibility. Virtual slides The virtual slides(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs4806123577708417

  4. Implementing a one-on-one peer support program for cancer survivors using a motivational interviewing approach: results and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allicock, Marlyn; Carr, Carol; Johnson, La-Shell; Smith, Rosie; Lawrence, Mary; Kaye, Leanne; Gellin, Mindy; Manning, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Peer Connect matches cancer survivors and caregivers (guides) with those currently experiencing cancer-related issues seeking support (partners). Motivational interviewing (MI)-based communication skills are taught to provide patient-centered support. There is little guidance about MI-based applications with cancer survivors who may have multiple coping needs. This paper addresses the results and lessons learned from implementing Peer Connect. Thirteen cancer survivors and two caregivers received a 2-day MI, DVD-based training along with six supplemental sessions. Nineteen partners were matched with guides and received telephone support. Evaluation included guide skill assessment (Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code) and 6-month follow-up surveys with guides and partners. Guides demonstrated MI proficiency and perceived their training as effective. Guides provided on average of five calls to each partner. Conversation topics included cancer fears, family support needs, coping and care issues, and cancer-related decisions. Partners reported that guides provided a listening ear, were supportive, and nonjudgmental. Limited time availability of some guides was a challenge. MI can provide support for cancer survivors and caregivers without specific behavioral concerns (e.g., weight and smoking). An MI support model was both feasible and effective and can provide additional support outside of the medical system. PMID:24078346

  5. Early Breast Cancer Precursor Lesions: Lessons Learned from Molecular and Clinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Sinn, Hans-Peter; Elsawaf, Zeinab; Helmchen, Birgit; Aulmann, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), and lobular neoplasia (LN) form a group of early precursor lesions that are part of the low-grade pathway in breast cancer development. This concept implies that the neoplastic disease process begins at a stage much earlier than in situ carcinoma. We have performed a review of the published literature for the upgrade risk to ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma in open biopsy after a diagnosis of ADH, FEA, or LN in cor...

  6. Follow-up for cervical cancer: a Program in Evidence-Based Care systematic review and clinical practice guideline update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, L.; Kennedy, E.B.; Fyles, A.; Metser, U.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2009, the Program in Evidence-based Care (pebc) of Cancer Care Ontario published a guideline on the follow-up of cervical cancer. In 2014, the pebc undertook an update of the systematic review and clinical practice guideline for women in this target population. Methods The literature from 2007 to August 2014 was searched using medline and embase [extended to 2000 for studies of human papillomavirus (hpv) dna testing]. Outcomes of interest were measures of survival, diagnostic accuracy, and quality of life. A working group evaluated the need for changes to the earlier guidelines and incorporated comments and feedback from internal and external reviewers. Results One systematic review and six individual studies were included. The working group concluded that the new evidence did not warrant changes to the 2009 recommendations, although hpv dna testing was added as a potentially more sensitive method of detecting recurrence in patients treated with radiotherapy. Comments from internal and external reviewers were incorporated. Recommendations Summary Follow-up care after primary treatment should be conducted and coordinated by a physician experienced in the surveillance of cancer patients. A reasonable follow-up strategy involves visits every 3–4 months within the first 2 years, and every 6–12 months during years 3–5. Visits should include a patient history and complete physical examination, with elicitation of relevant symptoms. Vaginal vault cytology examination should not be performed more frequently than annually. Combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography, other imaging, and biomarker evaluation are not advocated; hpv dna testing could be useful as a method of detection of recurrence after radiotherapy. General recommendations for follow-up after 5 years are also provided. PMID:27122975

  7. Advantages and Disadvantages of Bone Protective Agents in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nine out of ten metastatic prostate cancer (PCa patients will develop osseous metastases. Of these, every second will suffer from skeletal-related events (SRE. SRE are associated with an increased risk for death, which is markedly increased in the presence of pathological fracture. Moreover, health insurance costs nearly double in the presence of SRE. Zoledronic acid and denosumab are both approved drugs for the prevention or delay of SRE in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC patients with osseous metastases. However, long-term treatment with one of these two drugs is associated with the development of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ. Routine inspections of the oral cavity before and during treatment are mandatory in these patients. Regarding imaging techniques, bone scintigraphy seems to be a promising tool to detect early stage MRONJ. Zoledronic acid does not reduce the incidence of SRE in hormone-sensitive PCa. First data shows 3-monthly application of zoledronic acid to be equi-effective to monthly application.

  8. Thyroid cancer rates and 131I doses from Nevada atmospheric nuclear bomb tests: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ethel S; Huang, Lan; Bouville, Andre; Berg, Christine D; Ron, Elaine

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radioactive iodine ((131)I) from atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in Nevada in the 1950s may have increased thyroid cancer risks. To investigate the long-term effects of this exposure, we analyzed data on thyroid cancer incidence (18,545 cases) from eight Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries for the period 1973-2004. Excess relative risks (ERR) per gray (Gy) for exposure received before age 15 were estimated by relating age-, birth year-, sex- and county-specific thyroid cancer rates to estimates of cumulative dose to the thyroid that take age into account. The estimated ERR per Gy for dose received before 1 year of age was 1.8 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5-3.2]. There was no evidence that this estimate declined with follow-up time or that risk increased with dose received at ages 1-15. These results confirm earlier findings based on less extensive data for the period 1973-1994. The lack of a dose response for those exposed at ages 1-15 is inconsistent with studies of children exposed to external radiation or (131)I from the Chernobyl accident, and results need to be interpreted in light of limitations and biases inherent in ecological studies, including the error in doses and case ascertainment resulting from migration. Nevertheless, the study adds support for an increased risk of thyroid cancer due to fallout, although the data are inadequate to quantify it. PMID:20426666

  9. Benefit risk assessment and update on the use of docetaxel in the management of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alken S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scheryll Alken, Catherine M KellyDepartment of Medical Oncology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: The objective of this paper is to review the data supporting the use of docetaxel in the treatment of breast cancer, focusing on pharmacokinetics, efficacy in adjuvant and metastatic trials alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and the toxicity of docetaxel in comparison to paclitaxel. Docetaxel is a semisynthetic product derived from the European yew tree Taxus baccata L. It promotes the assembly of microtubules, stabilizes them, and thereby prevents their depolymerization. Docetaxel has been incorporated into neo-adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, both with and without anthracyclines. The inclusion of taxanes such as docetaxel in polychemotherapy regimens in early breast cancer is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality. As a single agent, docetaxel is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the combination of docetaxel and capecitabine was associated with an improvement in overall survival; however, toxicity was higher. The toxicity profile of docetaxel has been well documented and is predictable; the most frequent adverse effects are neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Taxane-specific adverse effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are also expected but are manageable with appropriate dosing and scheduling.Keywords: taxanes, docetaxel, clinical trial, adverse effects, peripheral neuropathy, neutropenia

  10. Early detection of lung cancer using low-dose CT: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from malignancy. Due to a lack of early symptoms patients usually undergo therapy at advanced tumor stages when prognosis is poor. Feasibility studies of low-dose spiral CT screening of heavy smokers have shown that many small, resectable lung cancers can be diagnosed at early stages using simple diagnostic algorithms based on size and attenuation of detected pulmonary nodules with a small proportion of invasive procedures for benign lesions. Preliminary results of repeat screening confirms small size and favourable stage distribution of detected cancers, using even simpler diagnostic algorithms: additional diagnostic procedures are only required in new or growing nodules whereas follow-up with low-dose CT is sufficient in nodules that appear unchanged to exclude slow growth. However, mortality reduction by lung cancer screening with low-dose CT has yet to be demonstrated. Several randomised controlled trials are under way to assess possible mortality reduction by comparison of mortalities in a screening group and a control group. It is hoped that through international cooperation data from these trials can be pooled to allow for statistically significant conclusions as early as possible. (orig.)

  11. TIMP-1 as a tumor marker in breast cancer - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Mouridsen, Henning;

    2008-01-01

    association between TIMP-1 and prognosis in breast cancer and new studies within this area have focused on the possibility of using blood samples or paraffin embedded tissue instead of tumor tissue extracts for measurements of TIMP-1. Interestingly, recent studies have investigated the association between...

  12. Benefit risk assessment and update on the use of docetaxel in the management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to review the data supporting the use of docetaxel in the treatment of breast cancer, focusing on pharmacokinetics, efficacy in adjuvant and metastatic trials alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and the toxicity of docetaxel in comparison to paclitaxel. Docetaxel is a semisynthetic product derived from the European yew tree Taxus baccata L. It promotes the assembly of microtubules, stabilizes them, and thereby prevents their depolymerization. Docetaxel has been incorporated into neo-adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, both with and without anthracyclines. The inclusion of taxanes such as docetaxel in polychemotherapy regimens in early breast cancer is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality. As a single agent, docetaxel is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the combination of docetaxel and capecitabine was associated with an improvement in overall survival; however, toxicity was higher. The toxicity profile of docetaxel has been well documented and is predictable; the most frequent adverse effects are neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Taxane-specific adverse effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are also expected but are manageable with appropriate dosing and scheduling

  13. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R.S. van der; Vogelaar, I.P.; Carneiro, F.; Guilford, P.; Huntsman, D.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Caldas, C.; Schreiber, K.E.; Hardwick, R.H.; Ausems, M.G.; Bardram, L.; Benusiglio, P.R.; Bisseling, T.M.; Blair, V.; Bleiker, E.; Boussioutas, A.; Cats, A.; Coit, D.; DeGregorio, L.; Figueiredo, J.; Ford, J.M.; Heijkoop, E.; Hermens, R.; Humar, B.; Kaurah, P.; Keller, G.; Lai, J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; O'Donovan, M.; Oliveira, C.; Pinheiro, H.; Ragunath, K.; Rasenberg, E.; Richardson, S.; Roviello, F.; Schackert, H.; Seruca, R.; Taylor, A.; Huurne, A. Ter; Tischkowitz, M.; Joe, S.T.; Dijck, B. van; Grieken, N.C. van; Hillegersberg, R. van; Sandick, J.W. van; Vehof, R.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Fitzgerald, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, inc

  14. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer : updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Carneiro, Fatima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E. Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R.; Bisseling, Tanya M.; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M.; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Pinheiro, Hugo; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A.; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W.; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J. Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, inc

  15. Fever and neutropenia hospital discharges in children with cancer: A 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Emily L; Croop, James; Carroll, Aaron E

    2016-02-01

    Fever and neutropenia (FN) is a common precipitant for hospitalization among children with cancer, but hospital utilization trends are not well described. This study describes national trends for hospital discharges for FN among children with cancer for the year 2012, compared with the authors' previous analysis from 2009. Data were analyzed from the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), an all-payer US hospital database, for 2012. Pediatric patients with cancer who had a discharge for FN were identified using age ≤19 years, urgent or emergent admit type, nontransferred, and a combination of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes for fever and neutropenia. The authors evaluated factors associated with a "short length of stay" (SLOS). Sampling weights were used to permit national inferences. In 2012, children with cancer accounted for 1.8% of pediatric hospital discharges (n = 120,675), with 12.2% (n = 13,456) of cancer-related discharges meeting FN criteria. Two fifths of FN discharges had a SLOS, which accounted for $91 million (2015 US$) in hospital charges. The majority had no serious infections; most common infections were viral infection (9.6%) or upper respiratory infection (9.6%). Factors significantly associated with SLOS included having a diagnosis of ear infection (odds ratio [OR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-2.03), soft tissue sarcoma (OR = 1.47, CI: 1.10-1.95), and Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.51, CI: 1.09-2.10), as compared with not having those diagnoses. SLOS admissions continue to be rarely associated with serious infections, but contribute substantially to the burden of hospitalization for pediatric FN. Implementation of risk stratification schemas to identify patients who meet low-risk criteria may decrease financial burden. PMID:26900730

  16. Update on HER-2 as a target for cancer therapy: The ERBB2 promoter and its exploitation for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overexpression of the ERBB2 proto-oncogene is associated with amplification of the gene in breast cancer but increased activity of the promoter also plays a significant role. Members of two transcription factor families (AP-2 and Ets) show increased binding to the promoter in over-expressing cells. Consequently, strategies have been devised to target promoter activity, either through the DNA binding sites for these factors, or through another promoter sequence, a polypurine-polypyrimidine repeat structure. The promoter has also been exploited for its tumour-specific activity to direct the accumulation of cytotoxic compounds selectively within cancer cells. Our current understanding of the ERBB2 promoter is reviewed and the status of these therapeutic avenues is discussed

  17. Retaining Low-Income Minority Cancer Patients in a Depression Treatment Intervention Trial: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Anjanette A; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Williams, Sha-Lai L; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-08-01

    Previously published work finds significant benefit from medical and behavioral health team care among safety-net patients with major depression. This qualitative study assessed clinical social worker, psychiatrist and patient navigator strategies to increase depression treatment among low-income minority cancer patients participating in the ADAPt-C clinical depression trial. Patient care retention strategies were elicited through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with nine behavioral health providers. Using grounded theory, concepts from the literature and dropout barriers identified by patients, guided interview prompts. Retention strategies clustered around five dropout barriers: (1) informational, (2) instrumental, (3) provider-patient therapeutic alliance, (4) clinic setting, and (5) depression treatment. All strategies emphasized the importance of communication between providers and patients. Findings suggest that strong therapeutic alliance and telephone facilitates collaborative team provider communication and depression treatment retention among patients in safety-net oncology care systems. PMID:25544505

  18. Transforming growth factor-β and breast cancer: Lessons learned from genetically altered mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-βs are plausible candidate tumor suppressors in the breast. They also have oncogenic activities under certain circumstances, however. Genetically altered mouse models provide powerful tools to analyze the complexities of TGF-βaction in the context of the whole animal. Overexpression of TGF-β can suppress tumorigenesis in the mammary gland, raising the possibility that use of pharmacologic agents to enhance TGF-β function locally might be an effective method for the chemoprevention of breast cancer. Conversely, loss of TGF-β response increases spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis in the mammary gland. This confirms that endogenous TGF-βs have tumor suppressor activity in the mammary gland, and suggests that the loss of TGF-β receptors seen in some human breast hyperplasias may play a causal role in tumor development

  19. Recent updates of precision therapy for gastric cancer: Towards optimal tailored management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2016-01-01

    Signaling pathways of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer progression are being avidly studied to seek optimal treatment of gastric cancer. Among them, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK2/STAT3) pathways have been widely investigated. Their aberrant expression or mutation has been significantly associated with advanced stage or poor prognosis of gastric cancer. Recently, aberrations of immune checkpoints including programmed cell death-1/programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) have been suggested as an important step in the formation of a microenvironment favorable for gastric cancer. Accomplishments in basic research have led to the development of novel agents targeting these signaling pathways. However, phase III studies of selective anti-HGF/c-MET antibodies and mTOR inhibitor failed to show significant benefits in terms of overall survival and progression-free survival. Few agents directly targeting STAT3 have been developed. However, this target is still critical issue in terms of chemoresistance, and SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 might be a significant link to effectively inhibit STAT3 activity. Inhibition of PD-1/PD-L1 showed durable efficacy in phase I studies, and phase III evaluation is warranted. Therapeutic strategy to concurrently inhibit multiple tyrosine kinases is a reasonable option, however, lapatinib needs to be further evaluated to identify good responders. Regorafenib has shown promising effectiveness in prolonging progression-free survival in a phase II study. In this topic highlight, we review the biologic roles and outcomes of clinical studies targeting these signaling pathways. PMID:27217696

  20. A clinical-molecular update on azanucleoside-based therapy for the treatment of hematologic cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Diesch, Jeannine; Zwick, Anabel; Garz, Anne-Kathrin; Palau, Anna; Buschbeck, Marcus; Götze, Katharina S.

    2016-01-01

    The azanucleosides azacitidine and decitabine are currently used for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in patients not only eligible for intensive chemotherapy but are also being explored in other hematologic and solid cancers. Based on their capacity to interfere with the DNA methylation machinery, these drugs are also referred to as hypomethylating agents (HMAs). As DNA methylation contributes to epigenetic regulation, azanucleosides are furth...

  1. Recent updates of precision therapy for gastric cancer: Towards optimal tailored management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2016-05-21

    Signaling pathways of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer progression are being avidly studied to seek optimal treatment of gastric cancer. Among them, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK2/STAT3) pathways have been widely investigated. Their aberrant expression or mutation has been significantly associated with advanced stage or poor prognosis of gastric cancer. Recently, aberrations of immune checkpoints including programmed cell death-1/programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) have been suggested as an important step in the formation of a microenvironment favorable for gastric cancer. Accomplishments in basic research have led to the development of novel agents targeting these signaling pathways. However, phase III studies of selective anti-HGF/c-MET antibodies and mTOR inhibitor failed to show significant benefits in terms of overall survival and progression-free survival. Few agents directly targeting STAT3 have been developed. However, this target is still critical issue in terms of chemoresistance, and SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 might be a significant link to effectively inhibit STAT3 activity. Inhibition of PD-1/PD-L1 showed durable efficacy in phase I studies, and phase III evaluation is warranted. Therapeutic strategy to concurrently inhibit multiple tyrosine kinases is a reasonable option, however, lapatinib needs to be further evaluated to identify good responders. Regorafenib has shown promising effectiveness in prolonging progression-free survival in a phase II study. In this topic highlight, we review the biologic roles and outcomes of clinical studies targeting these signaling pathways. PMID:27217696

  2. Update on options for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Vishnu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Vishnu, Winston W TanDivision of Hematology Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men in US and European countries. Despite having a favorable prognosis, the incidence of incurable metastatic disease and mortality in the US is about 28,000 per year. Although hormone-based androgen deprivation therapies typically result in rapid responses, nearly all patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant disease state. With readily available prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing, most of these patients are asymptomatic and manifest progression simply as a rising PSA. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, the median survival is about 1–2 years, with improvements in survival seen mostly with docetaxel-based regimens. The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments in the treatment of advanced CRPC.Recent findings: Since the two landmark trials (TAX-327 and Southwest Oncology Group 99–16 in CRPC, several newer cytotoxic drugs (epothilones, satraplatin, targeted agents (abiraterone, MDV3100 and vaccines have been tested in phase II and III setting with promising results.Conclusions: The role of newer agents in the treatment of CRPC still needs to be validated by phase III trials, which are currently ongoing. Whilst the novel biomarkers, ‘circulating tumor cells’, have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation.Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, novel therapies, mechanisms of resistance, circulating tumor cells

  3. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer in the era of aromatase inhibitors: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Mokbel, Ramia; Karat, Isabella; Mokbel, Kefah

    2006-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that optimal adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women should include a third generation aromatase inhibitor (AI). On current evidence, adjuvant anstrozole or letrozole should be used upfront in such patients especially in those with high risk disease (node positive and/or tumours > 2 cm). The sequential approach of tamoxifen for 2–3 years followed by exemestane or anastrozole for 2–3 years is a reasonable alternative...

  4. The management of BCG failure in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Zlotta, Alexandre R.; Fleshner, Neil E.; Jewett, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Up to 40% of patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) will fail intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy. There is unfortunately no current gold standard for salvage intravesical therapy after appropriate BCG treatment. Indeed, outcomes are at best suboptimal. The vast majority of low-grade NMIBC are prone to recur but very rarely progress. Failure after intravesical BCG in these patients is usually superficial and low-grade. At the other end of the spectrum, failur...

  5. Surgical Management of Early Endometrial Cancer: An Update and Proposal of a Therapeutic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Falcone, Francesca; Balbi, Giancarlo; Di Martino, Luca; Grauso, Flavio; Salzillo, Maria Elena; Messalli, Enrico Michelino

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years technical improvements have produced a dramatic shift from traditional open surgery towards a minimally invasive approach for the management of early endometrial cancer. Advancement in minimally invasive surgical approaches has allowed extensive staging procedures to be performed with significantly reduced patient morbidity. Debate is ongoing regarding the choice of a minimally invasive approach that has the most effective benefit for the patients, the surgeon, and the h...

  6. "Pride and Prejudice". [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Jane Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that classics are those pieces of literature that continue to be popular long after they were written; classics tend to have universal themes; and Austen's writing has been updated and dramatized and, most likely, will…

  7. Tribulations of a prostate cancer trial - lessons learned from TOAD, a cancer council Victoria and Transtasman Radiation Oncology Group Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From 2004-2009 a total of 226 out of a target of 750 prostate cancer patients have been randomised into the Timing of Androgen Deprivation trial between immediate and delayed androgen deprivation. A screening log was kept by participating centres for the first 928 patients, which documented the reasons for non-entry into the trial; 42.7% of screened patients were ineligible and a further 33.0% were not entered for other reasons. Fewer than 10% of patients cited not wanting to be part of a clinical trial as a reason for non-entry. Strategies to improve recruitment included broadening the eligibility criteria, encouraging international collaboration, the use and support of research nurses in the private health care environment, and the use of phone follow-up. Recruitment will be completed at the number originally intended to inform the interim analysis designed to test the validity of the statistical assumptions, and a combined survival analysis with the Canadian study is planned.

  8. Early Breast Cancer Precursor Lesions: Lessons Learned from Molecular and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Hans-Peter; Elsawaf, Zeinab; Helmchen, Birgit; Aulmann, Sebastian

    2010-08-01

    Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), and lobular neoplasia (LN) form a group of early precursor lesions that are part of the low-grade pathway in breast cancer development. This concept implies that the neoplastic disease process begins at a stage much earlier than in situ carcinoma. We have performed a review of the published literature for the upgrade risk to ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma in open biopsy after a diagnosis of ADH, FEA, or LN in core needle biopsy. This has revealed the highest upgrade risk for ADH (28.2% after open biopsy), followed by LN (14.9%), and FEA (10.2%). With LN, the pleomorphic subtype is believed to confer a higher risk than classical LN. With all types of precursor lesions, careful attention must be paid to the clinicopathological correlation for the guidance of the clinical management. Follow-up biopsies are generally indicated in ADH, and if there is any radiological-pathological discrepancy, also in LN or FEA. PMID:22590441

  9. Nuclear insertions of mitochondrial origin: Database updating and usefulness in cancer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Amanda; Barbena, Elena; Mateiu, Ligia; del Mar González, María; Mairal, Quim; Lima, Manuela; Montiel, Rafael; Aluja, Maria Pilar; Santos, Cristina

    2011-11-01

    Nuclear insertions of mitochondrial origin (NUMTs) can be useful tools in evolution and population studies. However, due to their similarity to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), NUMTs may also be a source of contamination in mtDNA studies. The main goal of this work is to present a database of NUMTs, based on the latest version of the human genome-GRCh37 draft. A total of 755 insertions were identified. There are 33 paralogous sequences with over 80% sequence similarity and of a greater length than 500bp. The non-identical positions between paralogous sequences are listed for the first time. As an application example, the described database is used to evaluate the impact of NUMT contamination in cancer studies. The evaluation reveals that 220 positions from 256 with zero hits in the current mtDNA phylogeny could in fact be traced to one or more nuclear insertions of mtDNA. This is due to they are located in non-identical positions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA). After in silico primer validation of each revised cancer study, risk of co-amplification between mtDNA and nDNA was detected in some cases, whereas in others no risk of amplification was identified. This approach to cancer studies clearly proves the potential of our NUMT database as a valuable new tool to validate mtDNA mutations described in different contexts. Moreover, due to the amount of information provided for each nuclear insertion, this database should play an important role in designing evolutionary, phylogenetic and epidemiological studies. PMID:21907832

  10. Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: An Update on Neoadjuvant Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis despite the high rates of response to chemotherapy. This scenario highlights the need to develop novel therapies and/or treatment strategies to reduce the mortality associated with TNBC. The neoadjuvant setting provides a model for rapid assessment of treatment efficacy with smaller patient accruals and over shorter periods of time compared to the traditional adjuvant setting. In addition, a clear surrogate endpoint of improved survival, known as pathologic complete response, already exists in this setting. Here, we review current data from completed and ongoing neoadjuvant clinical trials for TNBC

  11. Lessons from T cell responses to virus induced tumours for cancer eradication in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melief, C J; Kast, W M

    1992-01-01

    Immunotherapy of virus induced tumours by adoptive transfer of virus specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) is now feasible in experimental murine systems. These CTL recognize viral peptide sequences of defined length presented in the groove of MHC class I molecules. Effective eradication of large tumour masses requires coadministration of IL-2. In essence, T cell immunity against virus induced tumours does not differ from anti-viral T cell immunity in general. Tumour escape strategies are numerous but, in various instances, can be counteracted by defined measures. Initiation of CTL responses against poorly immunogenic non-virus induced tumours (the majority of human cancer) requires novel strategies to overcome T cell inertia. Rather than waiting to see whether tumour specific CTL (against unknown antigens) can be cultured from TIL, we propose an alternative strategy in which CTL are raised against target molecules of choice, including differentiation antigens of restricted tissue distribution (autoantigens) or mutated/overexpressed oncogene products. The various steps proposed include: (a) identification of target molecules of choice; (b) identification in these target molecules of MHC allele specific peptide motifs involved in peptide binding to MHC molecules; (c) evaluation of actual binding of such peptides to specific MHC class I molecules; (d) in vitro CTL response induction by such peptides, presented either by highly efficient antigen presenting cells (such as processing defective cells, which carry empty MHC class I molecules) loaded with a single peptide or by dendritic cells, both cell types being capable of primary CTL response induction in vitro and (e) adoptive transfer of tumour specific CTL generated in vivo or, more conveniently, vaccination with immunodominant peptides. The latter possibility seems to be feasible because peptide vaccination with a single immunodominant viral peptide can install CTL memory and confer protection against lethal virus

  12. Adjudin disrupts spermatogenesis by targeting drug transporters: Lesson from the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaojing; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Jenardhanan, Pranitha; Mruk, Dolores D; Mathur, Premendu P; Xia, Weiliang; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-04-01

    For non-hormonal male contraceptives that exert their effects in the testis locally instead of via the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, such as adjudin that disrupts germ cell adhesion, a major hurdle in their development is to improve their bioavailability so that they can be efficiently delivered to the seminiferous epithelium by transporting across the blood-testis barrier (BTB). If this can be done, it would widen the gap between their efficacy and general toxicity. However, Sertoli cells that constitute the BTB, peritubular myoid cells in the tunica propria, germ cells at different stages of their development, as well as endothelial cells that constitute the microvessels in the interstitium are all equipped with multiple drug transporters, most notably efflux drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) that can actively prevent drugs (e.g., adjudin) from entering the seminiferous epithelium to exert their effects. Recent studies have shown that BCRP is highly expressed by endothelial cells of the microvessels in the interstitium in the testis and also peritubular myoid cells in tunica propria even though it is absent from Sertoli cells at the site of the BTB. Furthermore, BCRP is also expressed spatiotemporally by Sertoli cells and step 19 spermatids in the rat testis and stage-specifically, limiting to stage VII‒VIII of the epithelial cycle, and restricted to the apical ectoplasmic specialization [apical ES, a testis-specific F-actin-rich adherens junction (AJ)]. Interestingly, adjudin was recently shown to be capable of downregulating BCRP expression at the apical ES. In this Opinion article, we critically discuss the latest findings on BCRP; in particular, we provide some findings utilizing molecular modeling to define the interacting domains of BCRP with adjudin. Based on this information, it is hoped that the next generation of adjudin analogs to be

  13. Application of Autofluorescence Endoscopy for Colorectal Cancer Screening: Rationale and an Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Aihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the result of basic researches, several intravital fluorophores have been determined so far in human colorectal tissue. Autofluorescence endoscopy (AFE can detect slight alterations in their distribution and concentration during the colorectal carcinogenesis process and, thus facilitate noninvasive screening colonoscopies without the need for fluorescent substances or staining reagents to be administered. While detecting faint autofluorescence intensity by conventional fiberoptic endoscopy remains challenging, the latest AFE system with high-resolution videoendoscope capabilities enables such detection by using a false-color display algorithm. To this end, the diagnostic benefits of AFE have been reported in several multicenter randomized controlled studies of colorectal cancer (CRC screening and differential diagnosis. CRC screening using the latest AFE technology could, therefore, lead to future reductions in CRC mortality.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27–91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3–135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia ≥Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  16. Polymorphism in IGFBP3 gene is associated with prostate cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Yunkai; Nian, Xuewu; Liu, Xuesen; Hu, Hailong; Zhang, Changwen; Xie, Linguo; Han, Ruifa; Wu, Changli; Xu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) is the major protein that binds with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and is considered to be involved in the development and progression of various cancers. We aimed to examine the association between prostate cancer (PCa) and the IGFBP3 gene-202A/C polymorphism. Methods A comprehensive search within PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library was conducted to identify all case–control studies up to October 30, 2015, for a meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the fixed or random effects model. Results Eighteen studies including 10,538 cases and 10,078 controls were identified. Overall, the CC genotype of IGFBP3-202A/C polymorphism was associated with increased risk of PCa in homozygote comparison (CC vs AA − OR =1.16, 95% CI: 1.08–1.25) and in recessive model (CC vs AA+AC − OR =1.11, 95% CI: 1.04–1.17). In dominant model, the CC/AC genotypes also implicated an increased risk of PCa (CC+AC vs AA − OR =1.11, 95% CI: 1.05–1.19). The C allele of IGFBP3-202A/C polymorphism was the risk allele for PCa relative to the A allele (OR =1.09, 95% CI: 1.05–1.14). Further stratification analysis revealed that the association between –202A/C polymorphism and PCa risk among Caucasians, but not in other ethnicities, was statistically significant (recessive model, OR =1.10, 95% CI: 1.02–1.19). In addition, the IGFBP3-202A/C polymorphism was associated with PCa risk in both population-based and hospital-based studies in homozygote comparison, recessive model, and allele model. Conclusion Our meta-analysis indicates that the IGFBP3-202A/C polymorphism is associated with the risk of PCa, particularly in Caucasians, with the C allele being the risk allele for PCa. PMID:27462171

  17. A clinical-molecular update on azanucleoside-based therapy for the treatment of hematologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesch, Jeannine; Zwick, Anabel; Garz, Anne-Kathrin; Palau, Anna; Buschbeck, Marcus; Götze, Katharina S

    2016-01-01

    The azanucleosides azacitidine and decitabine are currently used for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in patients not only eligible for intensive chemotherapy but are also being explored in other hematologic and solid cancers. Based on their capacity to interfere with the DNA methylation machinery, these drugs are also referred to as hypomethylating agents (HMAs). As DNA methylation contributes to epigenetic regulation, azanucleosides are further considered to be among the first true "epigenetic drugs" that have reached clinical application. However, intriguing new evidence suggests that DNA hypomethylation is not the only mechanism of action for these drugs. This review summarizes the experience from more than 10 years of clinical practice with azanucleosides and discusses their molecular actions, including several not related to DNA methylation. A particular focus is placed on possible causes of primary and acquired resistances to azanucleoside treatment. We highlight current limitations for the success and durability of azanucleoside-based therapy and illustrate that a better understanding of the molecular determinants of drug response holds great potential to overcome resistance. PMID:27330573

  18. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer in the era of aromatase inhibitors: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokbel, Ramia; Karat, Isabella; Mokbel, Kefah

    2006-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that optimal adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women should include a third generation aromatase inhibitor (AI). On current evidence, adjuvant anstrozole or letrozole should be used upfront in such patients especially in those with high risk disease (node positive and/or tumours > 2 cm). The sequential approach of tamoxifen for 2-3 years followed by exemestane or anastrozole for 2-3 years is a reasonable alternative to 5 years of AI monotherapy in patients with low risk disease (node negative and tumour smaller than 2 cm) especially if the tumour is positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors.Node-positive patients completing 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen should be offered letrozole for up 48 months. Further research is required to establish the long-term cardiovascular safety of AIs especially that of letrozole and exmestane, the optimal AI to use, duration of AI therapy and whether monotherapy with an AI for 5 years is superior to sequencing an AI after 2-3 years of tamoxifen. The bone mineral density (BMD) should be measured at baseline and monitored during therapy in women being treated with AIs. Anti-osteoporosis agents should such as bisphosphonates should be considered in patients at high risk of bone fractures. PMID:16981992

  19. Second primary cancer following Hodgkin's disease: Updated results of an Italian multicentric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of second primary cancer (SPC) was evaluated in 947 patients treated for Hodgkin's disease (HD) during the period January 1969 to December 1979. The median follow-up of this series was 10.5 years (range, 9 to 19). Treatment categories included radiotherapy (RT) alone (115 patients, 12%), chemotherapy (CHT) alone (161 patients, 17%), combined RT plus CHT (381 patients, 40%), and salvage treatment for resistant or relapsing HD (290 patients, 30.6%). Fifty-six SPCs were observed, occurring between 1 and 17 years from initial treatment. Among these, secondary acute nonlymphoid leukemia (s-ANLL) was the most frequent SPC (23 cases). Secondary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (s-NHL) occurred in 5 patients, whereas a secondary solid tumor (s-ST) was observed in 28 patients. The calculated actuarial risk (+/- SE) of developing SPC was 5.0% (+/- 0.9%) and 23.1% (+/- 5.8%) at 10 and 19 years, respectively. Concerning treatment modalities and s-ANLL risk, no cases were observed in the radiotherapy group, whereas CHT plus RT and salvage groups showed the highest actuarial risk. This was, in fact, at 10 and 19 years, 3.1% (+/- 0.9%) and 8.1% (+/- 4.0%) in the former group, and 1.8% (+/- 1.0%) and 16% (+/- 9.0%) in the latter. A statistically significant difference was observed when the CHT plus RT group was compared with CHT and RT groups (P = .04). Concerning the relationships with chemotherapeutic regimens, 12 s-ANLL cases occurred in the mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP) plus RT group, and only one case in the group receiving doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) plus RT. A statistically significant difference of s-ANLL actuarial risk was found comparing patients receiving MOPP plus RT to all other treatment groups (P = .04)

  20. The value of TOP2A gene copy number variation as a biomarker in breast cancer: Update of DBCG trial 89D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K.V.; Ejlertsen, B.; Moller, S.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous analyses of TOP2A and HER2 in the Danish Breast Cancer Coopererative Group (DBCG) trial 89D suggested that TOP2A amplifications and possible also deletions are predictive markers for the effect of adjuvant epirubicin in patients with primary breast cancer. We present an updated...... and extended statistical analysis, requested for IVD-labeling of TOP2A testing. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the DBCG trial 89D 980 Danish patients were randomly assigned to nine cycles of intravenous CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil) or CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and...... patients with primary breast cancer, favoring treatment with epirubicin in patients with TOP2A amplifications, and perhaps deletions. Additional studies are needed to clarify the exact importance of TOP2A deletions on outcome, but deletions have proven to be associated with a very poor prognosis...

  1. Lesson on Demand. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sue

    This lesson plan helps students understand the role consumer demand plays in the market system, i.e., how interactions in the marketplace help determine pricing. Students will participate in an activity that demonstrates the concepts of demand, demand schedule, demand curve, and the law of demand. The lesson plan provides student objectives;…

  2. Establishing and Sustaining a Prospective Screening Program for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema at the Massachusetts General Hospital: Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Brunelle, Cheryl; Skolny, Melissa; Ferguson, Chantal; Swaroop, Meyha; O’Toole, Jean; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within ...

  3. DNA methylation-based biomarkers for early detection of non-small cell lung cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Laird-Offringa Ite A; Alonzo Todd A; Anglim Paul P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the United States. This disease is clinically divided into two sub-types, small cell lung cancer, (10–15% of lung cancer cases), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 85–90% of cases). Early detection of NSCLC, which is the more common and less aggressive of the two sub-types, has the highest potential for saving lives. As yet, no routine screening method that enables early detection exists, and this is a key factor in the high mortalit...

  4. Spotlight on Confucius: Chinese Classics and Cultural Values. Updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkin, Linda, Ed.

    This updated set of lesson plans focuses on Confucius and Confucian thought, especially Confucian ethics. The lesson plans are divided into the following chapters: (1) "How do the Analects embody the ethical framework of Confucian thought?"; (2) "How does Confucianism affect behavior, attitudes and beliefs?"; (3) "How did other belief systems…

  5. Impact of tertiary Gleason pattern 5 on prostate cancer aggressiveness: Lessons from a contemporary single institution radical prostatectomy series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary B. Koloff

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results emphasize the importance of TP5 and suggest that criteria for tertiary pattern reporting in prostate cancer should be standardized. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of tertiary patterns in prognostic models.

  6. Cancer mortality among radiological technologists in Japan. Updated analysis of follow-up data from 1969 to 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Shinji; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Aoyama, Takashi; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    1999-04-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted for 12,195 male radiological technologists who received the occupational exposure to low dose radiation over a long term. A total of 1,097 deaths including 435 from cancer were ascertained by Koseki and death certificates from 1969 to 1993. Cancer mortality among the study population was basically compared with that of whole Japanese men. The significant low SMRs were obtained for all cancers, stomach and lung cancer partly due to Healthy Worker Effect, unlike the results of the early reports with some inappropriateness in the methods. Apparent high risks of lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers were observed, although none of site-specific cancers revealed the statistically significant increase. For these cancers, the SMRs among old sub-cohort were somewhat higher than those of young sub-cohort, whereas similar SMRs for solid cancer were obtained between the two sub cohorts. The SMR for leukemia reached statistically significant level of 1.75 (95%Cl: 1.07-2.71) when using whole professional and technical workers as a standard population. The study results might suggest that the chronic exposure to low-dose radiation enhanced the risk of lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers. (author)

  7. Glutathione S-transferase P1, gene-gene interaction, and lung cancer susceptibility in the Chinese population: An updated meta-analysis and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ming Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study: To assess the impact of glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism on the risk of lung cancer in the Chinese population, an updated meta-analysis and review was performed. Materials and Methods: Relevant studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biology Medicine published through January 22, 2015. The odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to estimate the strength of the associations. Results: A total of 13 case-control studies, including 2026 lung cancer cases and 2451 controls, were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, significantly increased lung cancer risk was associated with the variant genotypes of GSTP1 polymorphism in the Chinese population (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.01-1.84. In subgroup analyses stratified by geographic area and source of controls, the significant results were found in population-based studies (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.13-2.31; GG vs. AG: OR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03-2.16; GG vs. AA + AG: OR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.12-2.26. A gene-gene interaction analysis showed that there was an interaction for individuals with combination of GSTM1 (or GSTT1 null genotype and GSTP1 (AG + GG mutant genotype for lung cancer risk in Chinese. Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism may increase the risk of lung cancer in the Chinese population.

  8. Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The examples of lessons learned comprise an outline of the problems encountered at the nuclear facilities involved. The situations are typical of the difficulties that can arise when planning or implementing a decommissioning project for a small facility. Although the information is not intended to be exhaustive, the reader is encouraged to evaluate the applicability of the lessons learned to a specific decommissioning project. The general categories of problem and the relevant section in which they are discussed are shown. One should also note that in almost all cases the lack/inadequacy of construction or operational records contributed to the seriousness of the reported occurrences.

  9. Telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for low rectal cancer: Report of the first case in Hong Kong and China with an updated literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simon Siu-Man Ng; Janet Fung-Yee Lee; Raymond Ying-Chang Yiu; Jimmy Chak-Man Li; Sophie Sok-Fei Hon

    2007-01-01

    Telerobotic surgery is the most advanced development in the field of minimally invasive surgery. The da Vinci surgical system, which is currently the most widely used telerobotic device, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States of America for clinical use in all abdominal operations in July 2000. The first da Vinci surgical system in China was installed in November 2005 at our institution. We herein report the first telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection using the 3-arm da Vinci surgical system for low rectal cancer in Hong Kong and China, which was performed in August 2006. The operative time and blood loss were 240 min and 200 mL, respectively. There was no complication, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day five. An updated review of published literature on telerobotic-assisted colorectal surgery is included in this report, with special emphasis on its advantages and limitations.

  10. Establishing and Sustaining a Prospective Screening Program for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema at the Massachusetts General Hospital: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Brunelle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within the infrastructure of our institution. It is our hope that by sharing our history other centers can learn from our mistakes and successes to better design their own prospective screening program to best serve their patient population.

  11. About Updating

    OpenAIRE

    Smets, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Survey of several forms of updating, with a practical illustrative example. We study several updating (conditioning) schemes that emerge naturally from a common scenarion to provide some insights into their meaning. Updating is a subtle operation and there is no single method, no single 'good' rule. The choice of the appropriate rule must always be given due consideration. Planchet (1989) presents a mathematical survey of many rules. We focus on the practical meaning of these rules. After sum...

  12. Lessons learned from a negative biopsy: Impact of positron emission tomography/CT on targeted biopsy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce two cases in which positron emission tomography (PET)/CT delineated viable malignant tissue from nonmalignant areas and guided us to successful biopsies when conventional CT failed to do so. According to our experience, PET/CT appears to be helpful in deciding the adequate site for biopsy in patients with lung cancer, owing to its capability to delineate malignant from nonmalignant areas, and also to reflect the areas with the most aggressive behaviors, especially in the era of the personalized cancer therapy

  13. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this ... a combination of drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated ...

  14. A Qualitative Study about Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas Living in a Rural Area of California: Lessons for Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Perez, Miguel; Torres, Victor; Krenz, Vickie

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major health concern for Latinas, who are also less likely to undergo a Pap smear exam than the general population. This study identifies alterable determinants of Pap smear screening for Latino women living in a rural area of California. It involved the design and pilot testing of a culturally appropriate instrument and the…

  15. Social Studies Program: [Grade] 3. Updated Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    This updated New York social studies curriculum guide for third grade has 10 key concepts that include change, citizenship, culture, empathy, environment, identity, interdependence, nation-state, scarcity, and technology. These concepts are taught in 23 lessons through social, political, economic, geographic, and historic perspectives. Each lesson…

  16. Lessons learned from the application of whole-genome analysis to the treatment of patients with advanced cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Janessa; Jones, Steven; Aparicio, Samuel; Chia, Stephen; Ch'ng, Carolyn; Deyell, Rebecca; Eirew, Peter; Fok, Alexandra; Gelmon, Karen; Ho, Cheryl; Huntsman, David; Jones, Martin; Kasaian, Katayoon; Karsan, Aly; Leelakumari, Sreeja; Li, Yvonne; Lim, Howard; Ma, Yussanne; Mar, Colin; Martin, Monty; Moore, Richard; Mungall, Andrew; Mungall, Karen; Pleasance, Erin; Rassekh, S. Rod; Renouf, Daniel; Shen, Yaoqing; Schein, Jacqueline; Schrader, Kasmintan; Sun, Sophie; Tinker, Anna; Zhao, Eric; Yip, Stephen; Marra, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the success of targeted agents in specific populations it is expected that some degree of molecular biomarker testing will become standard of care for many, if not all, cancers. To facilitate this, cancer centers worldwide are experimenting with targeted “panel” sequencing of selected mutations. Recent advances in genomic technology enable the generation of genome-scale data sets for individual patients. Recognizing the risk, inherent in panel sequencing, of failing to detect meaningful somatic alterations, we sought to establish processes to integrate data from whole-genome analysis (WGA) into routine cancer care. Between June 2012 and August 2014, 100 adult patients with incurable cancers consented to participate in the Personalized OncoGenomics (POG) study. Fresh tumor and blood samples were obtained and used for whole-genome and RNA sequencing. Computational approaches were used to identify candidate driver mutations, genes, and pathways. Diagnostic and drug information were then sought based on these candidate “drivers.” Reports were generated and discussed weekly in a multidisciplinary team setting. Other multidisciplinary working groups were assembled to establish guidelines on the interpretation, communication, and integration of individual genomic findings into patient care. Of 78 patients for whom WGA was possible, results were considered actionable in 55 cases. In 23 of these 55 cases, the patients received treatments motivated by WGA. Our experience indicates that a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and scientists can implement a paradigm in which WGA is integrated into the care of late stage cancer patients to inform systemic therapy decisions. PMID:27148575

  17. Association of COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Qin Xue; Peng Qiliu; Qin Aiping; Chen Zhiping; Lin Liwen; Deng Yan; Xie Li; Xu Juanjuan; Li Haiwei; Li Taijie; Li Shan; Zhao Jinmin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is one of the most important enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism and its functional genetic polymorphisms may be associated with breast cancer (BC) risk. Many epidemiological studies have been conducted to explore the association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to derive a more precise estimation of this relationship, a large meta-analysis was performe...

  18. Association between NFKB1 −94ins/del ATTG Promoter Polymorphism and Cancer Susceptibility: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-κB is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous malignancies, and the functional polymorphism −94ins/del ATTG (rs28362491 in the human NFKB1 gene is associated with cancer risk. Previous studies on the association between the −94ins/del ATTG polymorphism and cancer risk reported conflicting results. To clarify this relationship, we performed a meta-analysis of 21 case-control studies involving 6127 cases and 9238 controls. We used pooled odds ratios (ORs with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs to assess the association. We found that the NFKB1 promoter −94ins/del ATTG polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk in four genetic models (ins/ins versus del/del, OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.11–1.93; dominant model, OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.03–1.53; recessive model, OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.05–1.51; ins allele versus del allele, OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.05–1.35. Stratified analyses revealed a significant association between the polymorphism and ovarian, oral, and prostate cancers. Similar results were determined in an Asian population and not in a Caucasian population. Thus, our results suggested that the polymorphism can contribute to cancer risk. Moreover, the polymorphism can exert race- and cancer-specific effects on cancer risk. Further large-scale and functional studies are necessary to elucidate this possible effect.

  19. Integrating a Narrative Medicine Telephone Interview with Online Life Review Education for Cancer Patients: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Meg; Marchand, Lucille; Cleary, James F.; Aeschlimann, Elizabeth; Causier, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We describe an online narrative and life review education program for cancer patients and the results of a small implementation test to inform future directions for further program development and full-scale evaluation research. The intervention combined three types of psycho-oncology narrative interventions that have been shown to help patients address emotional and existential issues: 1) a physician-led dignity-enhancing telephone interview to elicit the life narrative and delivery of an ed...

  20. Progress in the treatment of ovarian cancer-lessons from homologous recombination deficiency-the first 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, S B

    2016-04-01

    For several years, a major obstacle in the systemic treatment of ovarian cancer has been the lack of a therapeutic strategy tailored to specific biomarkers present in the individual patient's tumour. However, considerable progress has been made recently through the development of drugs targeting cells deficient in the key mechanism of double-strand DNA repair, known as homologous recombination (HRD). These drugs, inhibitors of the enzyme poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP), selectively kill HRD cells through a process known as tumour-selective synthetic lethality. Olaparib is the first such agent, now approved for the treatment of ovarian cancer associated with mutations in the BRCA 1/2 genes, since these are characterised by cells with HRD. Importantly, another group of patients with tumours bearing a similar repair deficiency but without BRCA mutations may also be susceptible to PARP inhibition and efforts to develop an HRD assay are therefore a priority so that these patients can be identified as PARPi candidates. In addition, combination strategies are an area of intense research; these include combinations with antiangiogenic agents and with inhibitors of the P13K/AKT pathway and others are likely to merit assessment since resistance to PARP inhibitors will certainly emerge as the next challenge. While olaparib is the first PARP inhibitor to receive approval for ovarian cancer treatment, others including rucaparib and niraparib are clearly effective in this disease and, within the next year or two, the results of ongoing randomised trials will clarify their respective roles. PARP inhibitors are generally well tolerated; regulatory approval at present supports their use as a maintenance therapy (in Europe) and as treatment for advanced recurrent disease (in the United States), but it is likely that these indications will extend as the results of ongoing trials become available. Ten years have elapsed between the first pre-clinical publications and the

  1. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods. PMID:27601396

  2. A Novel Cross-Disciplinary Multi-Institute Approach to Translational Cancer Research: Lessons Learned from Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar A. Patel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC, http://www.pcabc.upmc.edu is one of the first major project-based initiatives stemming from the Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance that was funded for four years by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The objective of this was to initiate a prototype biorepository and bioinformatics infrastructure with a robust data warehouse by developing a statewide data model (1 for bioinformatics and a repository of serum and tissue samples; (2 a data model for biomarker data storage; and (3 a public access website for disseminating research results and bioinformatics tools. The members of the Consortium cooperate closely, exploring the opportunity for sharing clinical, genomic and other bioinformatics data on patient samples in oncology, for the purpose of developing collaborative research programs across cancer research institutions in Pennsylvania. The Consortium’s intention was to establish a virtual repository of many clinical specimens residing in various centers across the state, in order to make them available for research. One of our primary goals was to facilitate the identification of cancer specific biomarkers and encourage collaborative research efforts among the participating centers.Methods: The PCABC has developed unique partnerships so that every region of the state can effectively contribute and participate. It includes over 80 individuals from 14 organizations, and plans to expand to partners outside the State. This has created a network of researchers, clinicians, bioinformaticians, cancer registrars, program directors, and executives from academic and community health systems, as well as external corporate partners - all working together to accomplish a common mission. The various sub-committees have developed a common IRB protocol template, common data elements for standardizing data collections for three organ sites, intellectual

  3. An update on TroVax® for the treatment of progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abern M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael Abern1, Howard L Kaufman2, Kalyan Latchamsetty11Department of Urology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of General Surgery and Immunology and Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is a common human malignancy with few effective therapeutic options for treating advanced castration-resistant disease. The potential therapeutic effectiveness of immunotherapy and vaccines, in particular, has gained popularity based on the identification of prostate-associated antigens, potent expression vectors for vaccination, and data from recent clinical trials. A modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus expressing 5T4, a tumor-associated glycoprotein, has shown promise in preclinical studies and clinical trials in patients with colorectal and renal cell carcinoma. This review will discuss the rationale for immunotherapy in prostate cancer and describe preclinical and limited clinical data in prostate cancer for the MVA-5T4 (TroVax® vaccine.Keywords: castration resistance, prostate cancer, TroVax, vaccine

  4. Association of GSTT1 gene polymorphisms with the risk of prostate cancer: an updating meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jihong; Xu, Yuemin; Fu, Qiang; Yu, Jianjun; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Zhangshun; Li, Chao; Guo, Hui; Xie, Mingkai

    2013-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that the glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily helps remove carcinogens from the body and thus might be associated with prostate cancer risk. In recent years, GSTT1 polymorphism has been extensively studied as a potential prostate cancer risk factor; however, the results are inconsistent. To investigate the association between GSTT1 and prostate cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of 33 studies with 6,697 prostate patients and 7,643 controls. For GSTM1 null versus present genotype, the random effects odds ratio was 0.98 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.83-1.16) based on a wide population. Subgroup analyses in the different ethnic groups and different controls were performed. The OR was 1.01 (95 % CI 0.86-1.19) in Caucasians, 1.01 (95 % CI 0.70-1.47) in Asians, and 0.77 (95 % CI 0.42-1.42) in Africans. The OR was 0.98 (95 % CI 0.82-1.16) in non-benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) controls and 1.09 (95 % CI 0.66-1.79) in BPH controls. In conclusion, our present meta-analysis demonstrates that there is no association between GSTT1 polymorphism and prostate cancer, even in the sub-analysis concerning different races and control sources. The direction of further research should focus not only on the simple relationship of GSTT1 and prostate cancer but also on gene-environment interaction and distinctions of different GSTs. PMID:23456766

  5. Circular Updates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Circular Updates are periodic sequentially numbered instructions to debriefing staff and observers informing them of changes or additions to scientific and specimen...

  6. Cybersecurity Update

    CERN Document Server

    Heagerty, Denise

    2008-01-01

    An update on recent security issues and vulnerabilities affecting Windows, Linux and Mac platforms. This talk is based on contributions and input from a range of colleagues both within and outside CERN. It covers clients, servers and control systems.

  7. Email Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/listserv.html Email Updates To use the sharing features on this ... view your email history or unsubscribe. Prevent MedlinePlus emails from being marked as "spam" or "junk" To ...

  8. Website updates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Updates to Website: (Please add new items at the top of this description with the date of the website change) May 9, 2012: Uploaded experimental data in matlab...

  9. One life saved by four prevented recurrencies? Update of the early breast cancer trialists confirms. Postoperative radiotherapy improves survival after breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Sedlmayer, F. [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (DE)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    The debate about the impact of local control on survival in early breast cancer patients is still going on, in spite of the continuously growing evidence that avoidance of locoregional disease reduces the risk of tumor-specific death. Recently, B. Fisher, one of the pioneers of breast conserving therapy claimed that during the last two decades, as a result of the use of systemic therapy in conjunction with breast conserving surgery and radiation, the incidence of locoregional recurrence has been reduced to a level where further reduction is likely to have little impact on survival. The penultimate meta-analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG) reported the effect of radiotherapy in early breast cancer on recurrence and survival in 2005 and provided the essential message that four prevented local recurrences at 5 years would avoid one breast cancer death in 15 years. The scientific community has eagerly awaited the quinquennial update of the EBCTCG which has now been published. A total of 17 randomized studies comparing postoperative radiotherapy vs. none were analyzed and comprised 7 new studies in addition to follow-up data of from 9 previously reported trials. A total of 10,801 patients with pT1-2 tumors were included, the majority of whom (n=7,287) were node negative, while 1,050 were node positive (2,464 unknown). In contrast to the previous meta-analysis, all patients received breast conserving surgery, consisting of lumpectomy (n=8,422) or more extensive techniques like quadrantectomy or sectoral resection (n= 2,399). The effect of radiotherapy on 10-year recurrences of any type and their relation to the 15-year breast cancer death rate were studied in correlation to various prognostic parameters and treatment characteristics (e.g., surgery, tamoxifen use). Moreover, a subgroup analysis was performed according to low, intermediate, and high initial risk of recurrence, from which the expected absolute benefit was derived

  10. Preoperative mediastinal lymph node staging for non-small cell lung cancer: 2014 update of the 2007 ESTS guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    De Leyn, Paul; Dooms, Christophe; Kuzdzal, Jaroslaw; Lardinois, Didier; Passlick, Bernward; Rami-Porta, Ramon; Turna, Akif; Van Schil, Paul; Venuta, Frederico; Waller, David; Weder, Walter; Zielinski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging and restaging of mediastinal lymph nodes in patients with potentially resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is of paramount importance. In 2007, the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) published an algorithm on preoperative mediastinal staging integrating imaging, endoscopic and surgical techniques. Over the last years more evidence of the different mediastinal staging technique has become available. Therefore, a revision of the ESTS guidelines w...

  11. Update on the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: focus on the cost-effectiveness of new agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergnenègre A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A Vergnenègre,1,4 I Borget,2 C Chouaid3,4 1Service de Pathologie Respiratoire et d'Allergologie, CHU Dupuytren, Limoges, France; 2Etudes et Recherche en Économie de la Santé, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 3Service de Pneumologie, CHU Saint-Antoine, Paris, France; 4Inserm, U707, Paris, France Background: The incidence of lung cancer and the cost of drug treatment have increased dramatically in the last decade. This article examines the costs of new target agents, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs and anti-angiogenic drugs. Methods: This study uses PubMed research to focus on the topics of lung cancer, economics, and new targeted therapies. Results: The published papers only addressed TKIs and anti-angiogenic antibodies. For gefitinib, the results favored a clinical-based selection, despite the low number of studies. Erlotinib was studied in second line and as a maintenance treatment (with the studies reaching opposite conclusions in terms of cost-effectiveness. Economic analyses were not in favor of bevacizumab, but the studies on this topic were very heterogeneous. Conclusion: The economic impact of a drug depends on the health care system organization. Future clinical trials must include economic analyses, particularly with TKIs in the first line. Keywords: lung cancer, new target agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, anti-angiogenic, bevacizumab

  12. Activated Ras signaling pathways and reovirus oncolysis: an update on the mechanism of preferential reovirus replication in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunGong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of wild-type, unmodified Type 3 Dearing (T3D strain reovirus as an anticancer agent has currently expanded to 32 clinical trials (both completed and ongoing involving reovirus in the treatment of cancer. It has been more than 30 years since the potential of reovirus as an anticancer agent was first identified in studies that demonstrated the preferential replication of reovirus in transformed cell lines but not in normal cells. Later investigations have revealed the involvement of activated Ras signaling pathways (both upstream and downstream and key steps of the reovirus infectious cycle in promoting preferential replication in cancer cells with reovirus-induced cancer cell death occurring through necrotic, apoptotic, and autophagic pathways. There is increasing evidence that reovirus-induced antitumor immunity involving both innate and adaptive responses also contributes to therapeutic efficacy though this discussion is beyond the scope of this article. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanism of oncolysis contributing to the broad anticancer activity of reovirus. Further understanding of reovirus oncolysis is critical in enhancing the clinical development and efficacy of reovirus.

  13. Breast cancer screening in women at increased risk according to different family histories: an update of the Modena Study Group experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortesi Laura

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BC detection in women with a genetic susceptibility or strong family history is considered mandatory compared with BC screening in the general population. However, screening modalities depend on the level of risk. Here we present an update of our screening programs based on risk classification. Methods We defined different risk categories and surveillance strategies to identify early BC in 1325 healthy women recruited by the Modena Study Group for familial breast and ovarian cancer. Four BC risk categories included BRCA1/2 carriers, increased, intermediate, and slightly increased risk. Women who developed BC from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 2005 (N = 44 were compared with the number of expected cases matched for age and period. BRCA1/2 carriers were identified by mutational analysis. Other risk groups were defined by different levels of family history for breast or ovarian cancer (OC. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR was used to evaluate the observed and expected ratio among groups. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results After a median follow-up of 55 months, there was a statistically significant difference between observed and expected incidence [SIR = 4.9; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.6 to 7.6; p P P P = 0.0018 was higher than expected, while the difference between observed and expected among women at slightly increased risk was not statistically significant (SIR = 2.4, 95% CI = 0.9 to 8.3; P = .74. Conclusion The rate of cancers detected in women at high risk according to BRCA status or strong family history, as defined according to our operational criteria, was significantly higher than expected in an age-matched general population. However, we failed to identify a greater incidence of BC in the slightly increased risk group. These results support the effectiveness of the proposed program to identify and monitor individuals at high risk, whereas prospective trials are needed for

  14. Lesson Learning at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  15. Lessons learned from joint working group report on assessment and management of cancer risks from radiological and chemical hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation of radiological hazards to humans is greatly simplified by the existence of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The average RBE values or radiation weighting factors recommended by the ICRP are based on non-human data. The ICRP has also indicated that 'the standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk.' This statement appears to be supported by technical publications from other organizations. Two published objections by AECB staff to the scientific technical background of the ICRP statement do not offer any good reason to reject this ICRP statement. A brief summary is given of the joint working group report on the topic indicated in the title. It is noted that regulators of cancer-causing chemicals have in general paid less attention to natural sources than have the regulators of radiological hazards. Most non-human species are exposed to about 1 millisievert (mSv) equivalent dose of radiation per year from natural sources. Caribou and organisms living underground are noted as examples where radiation exposures from natural sources are considerably higher. The natural biota is in general remarkably resistant, both in the laboratory and in field studies, to the effects of high doses of radiation. A recent review by the International Atomic Agency concluded that dose rates below the equivalent of 400 mSv per year are unlikely to after the survival of non-human species. It is recommended that caution and common sense be applied in any future research on radiological protection of non-human species in the environment in Canada. Many of the proposed U.S. regulations to control chemical and radiation in the environment are not cost-effective. It is to be hoped that efforts to protect non-human species from potential radiological hazards in Canada do not slide into a similar kind of irrational quagmire. (author)

  16. Adjuvant radiation therapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials- an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of regional lymph nodes (LN) in early breast cancer is still a matter of debate. RT increases the Overall survival (OS) rate of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved LN. The contribution of RT to regional LN to this improvement was poorly identified. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question were published as full papers. Published data of the MA.20 (n = 1832), the EORTC22922–10925 (EORTC) (n = 4004) trial and the French trial (n = 1334) were the foundation of this meta-analysis. Major eligibility criteria were positive i) axillary LN (all trials), ii) LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and iii) medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial analyzed the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Regional RT of MS-LN and IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS [Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.88 (95 % CL 0.78 - 0.99)]. Adding results of the French trial and using a random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional RT remained significant [HR 0.90 (95 % CL 0.82 - 0.99)]. The absolute benefits in OS were 1 % in the MA.20 trial at 10 years, 1.6 % in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3 % in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional RT of MS-LN and IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) yielded to a significant improvement of DFS [HR 0.86 (95 % CL 0.78 - 0.95)] and DMFS [HR 0.84 (95 % CL 0.75 - 0.94)]. Additional regional RT to the internal mammary and medial supraclavicular LN statistically significantly improved DFS

  17. Putting evidence into practice: an update of evidence-based interventions for cancer-related fatigue during and following treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sandra A; Hoffman, Amy J; Clark, Jane C; DeGennaro, Regina M; Poirier, Patricia; Robinson, Carolene B; Weisbrod, Breanna L

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has deleterious effects on physical, social, cognitive, and vocational functioning, and causes emotional and spiritual distress for patients and their families; however, it remains under-recognized and undertreated. This article critically reviews and integrates the available empirical evidence supporting the efficacy of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment approaches to CRF, highlighting new evidence since 2007 and 2009 Putting Evidence Into Practice publications. Interventions that are recommended for practice or likely to be effective in improving fatigue outcomes include exercise; screening for treatable risk factors; management of concurrent symptoms; yoga; structured rehabilitation; Wisconsin ginseng; cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia, pain, and depression; mindfulness-based stress reduction; and psychoeducational interventions such as anticipatory guidance, psychosocial support, and energy conservation and activity management. This information can be applied to improve the management of CRF, inform health policy and program development, shape the design of clinical trials of new therapies for CRF, and drive basic and translational research. PMID:25427608

  18. Update '98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    Updates cases and issues previously discussed in this regular column on human rights in Canada, including racism and anti-Semitism, laws on hate crimes, hate sites on the World Wide Web, the use of the "free speech" defense by hate groups, and legal challenges to antiracist groups by individuals criticized by them. (DSK)

  19. Red bone marrow dose calculations in radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the updated VCH adult male phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jinqin; Xie, Tianwu; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Qian

    2014-04-01

    Red bone marrow (RBM) is an important dose-limiting tissue that has high radiosensitivity but is difficult to identify on clinical medical images. In this study, we investigated dose distribution in RBM for prostate cancer radiotherapy. Four suborgans were identified in the skeleton of the visible Chinese human phantom: cortical bone (CB), trabecular bone (TB), RBM, and yellow bone marrow (YBM). Dose distributions in the phantom were evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. When the left os coxae was taken as the organ-at-risk (OAR), the difference in absorbed dose between RBM and each CB and TB was up to 20%, but was much less (≤3.1%) between RBM and YBM. When the left os coxae and entire bone were both taken as OARs, RBM dose also increased with increasing planning target volume size. The results indicate the validity of using dose to homogeneous bone marrow mixture for estimating dose to RBM when RBM is not available in computational phantoms. In addition, the human skeletal system developed in this study provides a model for considering RBM dose in radiotherapy planning.

  20. Red bone marrow dose calculations in radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the updated VCH adult male phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red bone marrow (RBM) is an important dose-limiting tissue that has high radiosensitivity but is difficult to identify on clinical medical images. In this study, we investigated dose distribution in RBM for prostate cancer radiotherapy. Four suborgans were identified in the skeleton of the visible Chinese human phantom: cortical bone (CB), trabecular bone (TB), RBM, and yellow bone marrow (YBM). Dose distributions in the phantom were evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. When the left os coxae was taken as the organ-at-risk (OAR), the difference in absorbed dose between RBM and each CB and TB was up to 20%, but was much less (≤3.1%) between RBM and YBM. When the left os coxae and entire bone were both taken as OARs, RBM dose also increased with increasing planning target volume size. The results indicate the validity of using dose to homogeneous bone marrow mixture for estimating dose to RBM when RBM is not available in computational phantoms. In addition, the human skeletal system developed in this study provides a model for considering RBM dose in radiotherapy planning. (paper)

  1. Worldwide Incidence of Colorectal Cancer, Leukemia, and Lymphoma in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, Chelle L.; Clark-Snustad, Kindra; Devine, Beth; Grembowski, David; Thornton, Timothy A.; Ko, Cynthia W.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In addition, there may be an association between leukemia and lymphoma and IBD. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the IBD literature to estimate the incidence of CRC, leukemia, and lymphoma in adult IBD patients. Methods. Studies were identified by a literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, EMBASE, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. Pooled incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years [py]) were calculated through use of a random effects model, unless substantial heterogeneity prevented pooling of estimates. Several stratified analyses and metaregression were performed to explore potential study heterogeneity and bias. Results. Thirty-six articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. For CRC, the pooled incidence rate in CD was 53.3/100,000 py (95% CI 46.3–60.3/100,000). The incidence of leukemia was 1.5/100,000 py (95% CI −0.06–3.0/100,000) in IBD, 0.3/100,000 py (95% CI −1.0–1.6/100,000) in CD, and 13.0/100,000 py (95% CI 5.8–20.3/100,000) in UC. For lymphoma, the pooled incidence rate in CD was 0.8/100,000 py (95% CI −0.4–2.1/100,000). Substantial heterogeneity prevented the pooling of other incidence estimates. Conclusion. The incidence of CRC, leukemia, and lymphoma in IBD is low. PMID:27293427

  2. Câncer de mama estádio inicial e radioterapia: atualização Early stage breast cancer and radiotherapy: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Nader Marta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O câncer de mama é a neoplasia maligna mais frequente entre as mulheres. A escolha terapêutica depende do estádio clínico da doença, das características anatomopatológicas, idade, entre outros. O objetivo do presente estudo é apresentar uma atualização dos conceitos e definições da radioterapia (RT no tratamento conservador do câncer de mama estádio inicial, enfatizando as indicações, contraindicações, dose e fracionamento da RT (esquema clássico, hipofracionado e irradiação parcial da mama, RT adjuvante no carcinoma ductal in situ (CDIS, irradiação das cadeias linfonodais e relação da RT com preditores moleculares de recorrência. Foram utilizadas as bases de dados MEDLINE, SciELO e Cochrane para a seleção dos principais artigos disponíveis sobre a temática proposta. A RT adjuvante tem um papel definido na abordagem das pacientes com câncer da mama submetidas à terapia cirúrgica conservadora. Em pacientes selecionadas, podem-se empregar esquemas de RT hipofracionada ou irradiação parcial das mamas. Todas as pacientes com CDIS devem receber RT adjuvante. Não se sabe a correlação do papel da RT com preditores moleculares de recorrência local e sistêmica.Breast cancer (BC is the most common malignancy among women. Therapeutic options are based on disease staging, histopathological characteristics, age, and others. The objective of the present study is to carry out an update of the concepts and definitions of radiotherapy (RT in conservative treatment of early-stage breast cancer, with emphasis on indications, contraindications, RT dose fractionation schedules (classic, hypofractionated and partial breast irradiation, adjuvant RT in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and molecular predictors of recurrence. MEDLINE, SciELO and Cochrane databases were used for article selection. Adjuvant RT is indicated for patients with BC who underwent conservative breast surgery. In selected patients, hypofractionated or partial

  3. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: tobacco control--reducing cancer incidence and saving lives. 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-15

    As an international medical society dedicated to cancer prevention, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates a fundamental reform of United States and international policy toward addictive tobacco products. ASCO's goal is the immediate reduction of tobacco use and ultimate achievement of a tobacco-free world. The centerpiece of ASCO's policy is the recommendation for an independent commission to study the tobacco problem in all of its dimensions: social, medical, legal, and economic (both domestically and globally). The commission membership should include broad-based representation and expertise on tobacco issues. In ASCO's view, tobacco control efforts to date have been less than successful because they are too fragmented and incremental, leaving many important issues unaddressed. A more comprehensive solution could flow from this study, including input from a variety of government agencies involved with public health, agriculture, First Amendment and other legal considerations, and international trade. The study, within defined time limits, should culminate in a report that outlines a strategy for achieving immediate reduction of tobacco use and ultimate achievement of a tobacco-free world, including explicit plans and a timetable for implementation. Although this comprehensive approach to tobacco control will take many years to implement even under the best of circumstances, there are certain measures that could be undertaken immediately with meaningful impact on tobacco usage. These include: Increasing efforts to discourage tobacco use, particularly among the young Raising federal excise taxes by at least $2 per pack and encouraging states to consider tobacco taxes as a first resort in revenue enhancement Ensuring that tobacco settlement funds be devoted only to health-related projects, including medical treatment, biomedical research, and tobacco prevention efforts Requiring disclosure of all ingredients in tobacco products Comprehensively

  4. Lesson Learned from Nature for the Development of Novel Anti-Cancer Agents: Implication of Isoflavone, Curcumin, and their Synthetic Analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Fazlul H; Li, Yiwei; Wang, Zhiwei; Padhye, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, naturally occurring dietary compounds have received greater attention in the field of cancer prevention and treatment research. Among them, isoflavone genistein and curcumin are very promising anti-cancer agents because of their non-toxic and potent anti-cancer properties. However, it is important to note that the low water solubility, poor in vivo bioavailability and unacceptable pharmacokinetic profile of these natural compounds limit their efficacy as anti-cancer agents fo...

  5. Lessons learned bulletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T'he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel

  6. Locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer treated by combined chemotherapy and preoperative irradiation: updated results in a series of 120 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To evaluate our updated data concerning survival and locoregional control in a study of locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer after primary chemotherapy followed by external preoperative irradiation. Patients and methods. - Between 1982 and 1998, 120 patients (75 stage IIIA, 41 stage IIIB, and 4 stage IIIC according to AJCC staging system 2002) were consecutively treated by four courses of induction chemotherapy with anthracycline-containing combinations followed by preoperative irradiation (45 Gy to the breast and nodal areas) and a fifth course of chemotherapy. Three different locoregional approaches were proposed, depending on tumour characteristics and tumour response. After completion of local therapy, all patients received a sixth course of chemotherapy and a maintenance adjuvant chemotherapy regimen without anthracycline. The median follow-up from the beginning of treatment was 140 months. Results. - Mastectomy and axillary dissection were performed in 49 patients (with residual tumour larger than 3 cm in diameter or located behind the nipple or with bifocal tumour), and conservative treatment in 71 patients (39 achieved clinical complete response or partial response >90% and received additional radiation boost to initial tumour bed; 32 had residual mass ≤3 cm in diameter and were treated by wide excision and axillary dissection followed by a boost to the excision site). Ten-year actuarial local failure rate was 13% after irradiation alone, 23% after wide excision and irradiation, and 4% after mastectomy (p =0.1). After multivariate analysis, possibility of breast-conserving therapy was related to initial tumour size (<6 vs. ≥6 cm in diameter, p =0.002). Ten-year overall metastatic disease-free survival rate was 61%. After multivariate analysis, metastatic disease-free survival rates were significantly influenced by clinical stage (stage IIIA-B vs. IIIC, p =0.0003), N-stage (N0 vs. N1-2a, and 3c, p = 0.017), initial tumour size (<6

  7. Lessons Learned in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations.

  8. NASA Engineering Network Lessons Learned

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Lessons Learned system provides access to official, reviewed lessons learned from NASA programs and projects. These lessons have been made available to the...

  9. Second-generation speed limit map updating applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tradisauskas, Nerius; Agerholm, Niels; Juhl, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    Intelligent Speed Adaptation is an Intelligent Transport System developed to significantly improve road safety in helping car drivers maintain appropriate driving behaviour. The system works in connection with the speed limits on the road network. It is thus essential to keep the speed limit map...... used in the Intelligent Speed Adaptation scheme updated. The traditional method of updating speed limit maps on the basis of long time interval observations needed to be replaced by a more efficient speed limit updating tool. In a Danish Intelligent Speed Adaptation trial a web-based tool was therefore...... developed to give road authorities the opportunity to keep the speed limit map updated. However, the feedback from road authorities was insufficient. Hence a new web application based on Google Maps was made to provide easier speed limit updates for road authorities. The lessons learnt were that tools for...

  10. Summary of Planned Implementation for the HTGR Lessons Learned Applicable to the NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Mckirdy

    2011-09-01

    This document presents a reconciliation of the lessons learned during a 2010 comprehensive evaluation of pertinent lessons learned from past and present high temperature gas-cooled reactors that apply to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project along with current and planned activities. The data used are from the latest Idaho National Laboratory research and development plans, the conceptual design report from General Atomics, and the pebble bed reactor technology readiness study from AREVA. Only those lessons related to the structures, systems, and components of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), as documented in the recently updated lessons learned report are addressed. These reconciliations are ordered according to plant area, followed by the affected system, subsystem, or component; lesson learned; and finally an NGNP implementation statement. This report (1) provides cross references to the original lessons learned document, (2) describes the lesson learned, (3) provides the current NGNP implementation status with design data needs associated with the lesson learned, (4) identifies the research and development being performed related to the lesson learned, and (5) summarizes with a status of how the lesson learned has been addressed by the NGNP Project.

  11. Cancer in British vegetarians: updated analyses of 4998 incident cancers in a cohort of 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, 18,298 vegetarians, and 2246 vegans 1 2 3 4

    OpenAIRE

    Key, Timothy J; Appleby, Paul N.; Crowe, Francesca L.; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Julie A Schmidt; Ruth C Travis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vegetarian diets might affect the risk of cancer. Objective: The objective was to describe cancer incidence in vegetarians and nonvegetarians in a large sample in the United Kingdom. Design: This was a pooled analysis of 2 prospective studies including 61,647 British men and women comprising 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, and 20,544 vegetarians (including 2246 vegans). Cancer incidence was followed through nationwide cancer registries. Cancer risk by vegetarian status was e...

  12. Lessons in Everyday Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Kit

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author presents and discusses some of the lessons she has learned in everyday leadership. It's the kind of leadership one learns when he or she doesn't expect it--and the kind of lessons one teaches when he or she doesn't even know he or she is doing it.

  13. Automatic Dance Lesson Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Leung, H.; Yue, Lihua; Deng, LiQun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an automatic lesson generation system is presented which is suitable in a learning-by-mimicking scenario where the learning objects can be represented as multiattribute time series data. The dance is used as an example in this paper to illustrate the idea. Given a dance motion sequence as the input, the proposed lesson generation…

  14. Don Quixote. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Kristen

    Based on Miguel de Cervantes' novel "Don Quixote," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Quixote's misperceptions are understandable; writers often describe one object to sound as if it were something else; and metaphors help readers see with new eyes. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  15. Randomized trials of high-dose chemotherapy in breast cancer: fraud, the press and the data (or lessons learned in medical policy governing clinical research).

    OpenAIRE

    Antman, Karen

    2002-01-01

    High dose therapy for breast cancer remains controversial. Of the 15 randomized trials of high dose therapy in breast cancer reported to date, two South African studies have been discredited leaving 13 remaining studies. Mortality was consistently low, in the 0 to 2.5% range, except for the BCNU containing American Intergroup study, which had a 7.4% toxic mortality rate. Seven of the remaining 13 studies randomized fewer than 200 patients. Three of these small studies have significant differe...

  16. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Publications Shop AICR Health @ Work Healthy Recipes Cancer Research Update AICR eNews AICR Newsletter ScienceNow CancerResource Where ... Patients and Survivors Materials for Health Professionals Our Cancer Research Research Grants Conference Continuous Update Project Research Progress ...

  17. Update on HER-2 as a target for cancer therapy: HER2/neu peptides as tumour vaccines for T cell recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decade there has been renewed interest in the use of vaccine immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. This review focuses on HER2/neu, a tumour-associated antigen that is overexpressed in 10–40% of breast cancers and other carcinomata. Several immunogenic HER2/neu peptides recognized by T lymphocytes have been identified to be included in cancer vaccines. Some of these peptides have been assessed in clinical trials of patients with breast and ovarian cancer. Although it has been possible to detect immunological responses against the peptides in the immunized patients, no clinical responses have so far been described. Immunological tolerance to self-antigens like HER2/neu may limit the functional immune responses against them. It will be of interest to determine whether immune responses against HER2/neu epitopes can be of relevance to cancer treatment

  18. Knowledge Economy Gaps, Policy Syndromes and Catch-up Strategies: Fresh South Korean Lessons to Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Simplice A. Asongu

    2014-01-01

    Africa’s overall knowledge index fell between 2000 and 2009. South Korea’s economic miracle is largely due to a knowledge-based development strategy that holds valuable lessons for African countries in their current pursuit towards knowledge economies. Using updated data (1996-2010), this paper presents fresh South Korean lessons to Africa by assessing the knowledge economy (KE) gaps, deriving policy syndromes and providing catch-up strategies. The 53 African frontier countries are decomposed...

  19. Assessing outcomes of cancer care: lessons to be learned from a retrospective review of the management of small cell lung cancer at the Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool Hospital, January 1996-July 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present paper was to review the outcomes of care of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) at one Sydney teaching hospital. A retrospective cohort study was carried out of patients with SCLC seen between January 1996 and July 2000. The main outcomes were relapse-free and overall survival. Secondary outcomes of interest were the uniformity of staging investigations, initial treatment, use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), patterns of relapse and treatment received following relapse. One hundred and three patients with SCLC were treated at the Liverpool Hospital Cancer Therapy Centre during this period. There were 58 men (56%) and 45 women (44%). Forty-two patients (41 %) had limited stage disease (LD) and 61 (59%) had extensive stage disease (ED). There was considerable variation in staging investigations. There was little variation in systemic treatment of SCLC. Only 32 of 42 patients with limited stage SCLC were candidates for thoracic radiotherapy and only seven patients received PCI. Median relapse-free survival was 11.2 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.7-14.8) for patients with LD and 6 months (95%CI: 4.4-7.5) for ED. Median overall survival was 15.1 months (95%CI: 11-19.1) for patients with LD and 8.9 months (95%CI: 7.5-10.2) for ED. Some health outcomes similar to that reported in clinical trials can be achieved in clinical practice. Measuring health outcomes is an important process of maintaining quality of care. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  20. Static and Dynamic Model Update of an Inflatable/Rigidizable Torus Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, mercedes C.

    2006-01-01

    The present work addresses the development of an experimental and computational procedure for validating finite element models. A torus structure, part of an inflatable/rigidizable Hexapod, is used to demonstrate the approach. Because of fabrication, materials, and geometric uncertainties, a statistical approach combined with optimization is used to modify key model parameters. Static test results are used to update stiffness parameters and dynamic test results are used to update the mass distribution. Updated parameters are computed using gradient and non-gradient based optimization algorithms. Results show significant improvements in model predictions after parameters are updated. Lessons learned in the areas of test procedures, modeling approaches, and uncertainties quantification are presented.

  1. Actualización de la estadificación del cáncer de pulmón Lung cancer staging: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Christian González; Gabriel Bruno; Osvaldo Salariato; Claudia Álvarez; Lisandro Paganini; Javier Vallejos; Adriana Dieguez

    2012-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), junto con The International Union Against Cancer (UICC) y The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), crearon un Comité Internacional de Estadificación (ISC) que recopiló retrospectivamente y analizó los datos procedentes de pacientes de diferentes partes del mundo, con el propósito de efectuar cambios en la 6a edición del TNM de cáncer de pulmón. La misma había sido publicada en el 2002 y no había tenido modificaciones de...

  2. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  3. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  4. Association between MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism and the risk of bladder cancer: new data in a Chinese population and an updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linguo; Sun, Yan; Chen, Tao; Tian, Dawei; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yu; Ding, Na; Shen, Zhonghua; Xu, Hao; Nian, Xuewu; Sha, Nan; Han, Ruifa; Hu, Hailong; Wu, Changli

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human murine double minute 2 protein (MDM2) is mainly a negative regulator of p53 tumor suppressor pathway. We aimed to investigate the association between MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism and bladder cancer risk. Methods A total of 535 bladder cancer patients and 649 health controls were recruited for our study. MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between the genotype and susceptibility of bladder cancer. Kaplan–Meier estimates and log-rank test were obtained to analyze the association between the genotype and risk of recrudesce in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer patients. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to identify independent prognostic factors. To further investigate the association, we conducted a meta-analysis including six studies. Results The frequency of the MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism showed no significant difference between cases and controls (all P>0.05). In the stratification analysis, the results showed that G allele carriers were prone to have a significant decrease in risk of low-grade bladder cancer (adjusted odds ratio: 0.613, 95% confidence interval: 0.427–0.881), and G variant was associated with a significantly reduced risk of recurrence in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer patients with or without chemotherapy (P0.05). Conclusion MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism has no influence on bladder cancer risk in Asians, but this single nucleotide polymorphism may be associated with genetic susceptibility of bladder cancer among Caucasians. PMID:26672516

  5. Standards and options: recommendations for the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) in anemic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (2007 update); Standards, options: recommandations 2007. Indication des agents stimulants l'erythropoiese (ASE) dans la prise en charge de l'anemie induite par la radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchal, Ch. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Misset, J.L. [Hopital Saint-Louis, 75 - Paris (France); Casadevall, N. [Hopital Saint Antoine, 75 - Paris (France); Marec-Berard, P.; Ray-Coquard, I. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Chastagner, P. [Hopital d' Enfants Nancy, 54 (France); Kassab-Chahmi, D. [Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer (FNCLCC), 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-03-15

    Introduction. - Beginning 1998, a working group of specialists convened by the guidelines department (Standards, Options and Recommendations: S.O.R.) of the National French Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres (F.N.C.L.C.C.) published then regularly updated Recommendations relative to the use of ESA (epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, darbepoetin) in anemic patients with cancer. This article presents the updated Recommendations set up in 2007. Methods. - This updating process is based on the methodology developed and used in the 'Standards, Options: Recommendations' programme. The methodological approach combines systematic review with the judgement of a multidisciplinary group of experts. On the basis of analysis of literature, the conclusions and their level of evidence are established. Then, the conclusions accompanied by experts judgement lead to the Recommendations. A Recommendation is a proposal of one or several clinical attitudes intended to improve cancer patient care. Before publication, the R.P.C.-S.O.R. are re-examined by independent reviewers selected according to the same principles as the group of expert writers. Results. - New data, relative to the 'use of ESA in anemic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', did not lead to update the latest Recommendations validated in 2003. However, new data relative to the 'use of ESA in anaemia prophylaxis among adult patients with cancer' and to the 'use of iron with ESA in cancer patients' were sufficient to generate either major or minor modifications to the initial Recommendations. Conclusions. - Thus, it appears relevant to re-examine these Recommendations according to a systematic monitoring process which should be renewed in two years. (authors)

  6. Association between MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism and the risk of bladder cancer: new data in a Chinese population and an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie LG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Linguo Xie,1,2,* Yan Sun,2,* Tao Chen,1,2,* Dawei Tian,1,2 Yujuan Li,3 Yu Zhang,1,2 Na Ding,2 Zhonghua Shen,1,2 Hao Xu,1,2 Xuewu Nian,4 Nan Sha,1,2 Ruifa Han,1,2 Hailong Hu,1,2 Changli Wu1,2 Objective: Human murine double minute 2 protein (MDM2 is mainly a negative regulator of p53 tumor suppressor pathway. We aimed to investigate the association between MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism and bladder cancer risk. Methods: A total of 535 bladder cancer patients and 649 health controls were recruited for our study. MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between the genotype and susceptibility of bladder cancer. Kaplan–Meier estimates and log-rank test were obtained to analyze the association between the genotype and risk of recrudesce in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer patients. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to identify independent prognostic factors. To further investigate the association, we conducted a meta-analysis including six studies. Results: The frequency of the MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism showed no significant difference between cases and controls (all P>0.05. In the stratification analysis, the results showed that G allele carriers were prone to have a significant decrease in risk of low-grade bladder cancer (adjusted odds ratio: 0.613, 95% confidence interval: 0.427–0.881, and G variant was associated with a significantly reduced risk of recurrence in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer patients with or without chemotherapy (P<0.05. The results of the meta-analysis showed that G allele and GG genotype of MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism were significantly associated with increased risk of bladder cancer in Caucasians (both P<0.05, and no association was observed in total populations and Asians (P>0.05. Conclusion: MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism has no influence on bladder cancer risk in Asians, but

  7. Providing community education: lessons learned from Native Patient Navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities' needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research. PMID:25087698

  8. Sanitary surveillance in France in relation with the Chernobylsk accident. Updated situation on thyroid cancers and epidemiological studies during 2006; Surveillance sanitaire en France en lien avec l'accident de Tchernobyl. Bilan actualise sur les cancers thyroidiens et etudes epidemiologiques en cours en 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belot, A. [Institut de veille sanitaire (InVS), Dept. de Biostatistiques des Hospices civils de Lyon, Dept. Maladies Chroniques et Traumatismes (DMCT), Unite cancer, 69 - Lyon (France); Caserio-Schonemann, C. [Institut de veille sanitaire (InVS), DMCT, unite cancer, 94 - Saint-Maurice (France); Cherie-Challine, M. [Institut de veille sanitaire (InVS), DMCT, unitr cancer, 94 - Saint-Maurice (France); Colonna, M. [Registre du cancer de l' Isere - reseau Francim, 38 - Grenoble (France); Lacour, B. [Registre National des Tumeurs Solides de l' enfant (RNTSE) - reseau Francim, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Lasalle, J.L. [Cellule interregionale d' epidemiologie Sud, Drass Paca, 13 - Marseille (France); Leenhardt, L. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Service central de medecine nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Orgiazzi, J. [Centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Service d' endocrinologie, 69 - Lyon (France); Pirard, Ph. [Institut de veille sanitaire (InVS), Dept. sante environnement (DSE), 94 - Saint-Maurice (France); Schvartz, C. [Registre des cancers thyroidiens de Marne Ardennes - reseau Francim, Centre de lutte contre le cancer, 51 - Reims (France)

    2006-07-01

    An increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in children has been reported since 1990 in areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine which have been highly contaminated during the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A similar increase is now observed in young adults in the same areas. In France, thyroid cancer is characterized by low occurrence and good prognosis. However, the incidence of thyroid cancer has been increasing for more than 20 years, and in 1986, the Chernobyl cloud of radioactive dust crossed the French territory. Thus, the National institute for public health surveillance (I.n.V.S.) carried out several studies to evaluate whether the incidence increase in thyroid cancer is related to radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident. Since 2000, the I.n.V.S. is in charge of a national multidisciplinary approach involving a wide range of public health actors, including the French network of cancer registries (Francim). Since 2003, the I.n.V.S. has been working on improving the surveillance system according to the actions described in the national cancer plan 2003-2007. The I.n.V.S. has increased its financial contribution to cancer registries including the national registry of solid tumors in children, which was created in 2000. The Institute is also working on the implementation of a multi source system for the national cancer surveillance in link with cancer registries. For the twentieth anniversary of the Chernobyl accident, the I.n.V.S. is publishing updated results from the latest research conducted in close collaboration with the partners. These results do not support the initial hypothesis of a potential 'Chernobyl effect' in France. The increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer is also reported in most of developed countries. Practices in cancer diagnosis and the increased rate of total thyroidectomy for benign lesion may lead pathologists to unexpectedly discover small thyroid tumors. This fact is likely to explain most of the incidence increase

  9. Music lessons enhance IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2004-08-01

    The idea that music makes you smarter has received considerable attention from scholars and the media. The present report is the first to test this hypothesis directly with random assignment of a large sample of children (N = 144) to two different types of music lessons (keyboard or voice) or to control groups that received drama lessons or no lessons. IQ was measured before and after the lessons. Compared with children in the control groups, children in the music groups exhibited greater increases in full-scale IQ. The effect was relatively small, but it generalized across IQ subtests, index scores, and a standardized measure of academic achievement. Unexpectedly, children in the drama group exhibited substantial pre- to post-test improvements in adaptive social behavior that were not evident in the music groups. PMID:15270994

  10. Headway and Hurdles in the Clinical Development of Dietary Phytochemicals for Cancer Therapy and Prevention: Lessons Learned from Vitamin A Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Christina Y.; Mao, Pingping; Spinella, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating epidemiologic and preclinical evidence support the pharmacologic use of a variety of dietary chemicals for the prevention and treatment of cancer. However, it will be challenging to translate these findings into routine clinical practice since phytochemicals have pleiotropic biological activities that have to be balanced for optimal efficacy without unacceptable and potentially unanticipated toxicities. Correctly matching patient populations and settings with optimal, natural pro...

  11. Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE) 4. report. The incidence of cancer and leukaemia in young people in the vicinity of the Sellafield site, West Cumbria: Further studies and an update of the situation since the publication of the report of the Black Advisory Group in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fourth Report of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE) updates the information on the incidence of cancer and leukaemia in young people in the vicinity of the Sellafield site since the publication of the Black Advisory Group report in 1984. Data are reviewed on radiation exposure and the risk of radiation-induced leukaemia and cancer in young people living in Seascale; possible effects of paternal preconception irradiation in cancer; exposure to chemicals used at and discharged from the Sellafield site and the risk to the general population and offspring of site workers; and the infectious aetiology of childhood cancer. The history of the Royal Ordnance Factories sited at Sellafield and Drigg in the 1940s and a historical review of childhood cancer in Seascale is also given. (UK)

  12. Influence of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism on the Risk of Lung Cancer and the Clinical Response to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ning; Gong, Yi; He, Jian; Xia, Jingwen; Chen, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has been implicated in lung cancer risk and response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the results are controversial. We performed meta-analysis to investigate the effect of MTHFR C677T polymorphism on lung cancer risk and response to platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC. Materials and Methods The databases of PubMed, Ovid, Wanfang and Chinese Biomedicine were searched for eligib...

  13. [Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  14. Quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer receiving targeted or multimodal therapy - Update of the EORTC QLQ-H & N35, Phase I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singer, Susanne; Arraras, Juan I.; Baumann, Ingo; Boehm, Andreas; Chie, Wei-Chu; Galalae, Razvan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Hammerlid, Eva; Pinto, Monica; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Schmalz, Claudia; Sen, Mehmet; Sherman, Allen C.; Spiegel, Karin; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma; Yarom, Noam; Zotti, Paola; Hofmeister, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to identify relevant quality of life (QOL) issues in patients with head and neck cancer receiving multimodal and/or targeted therapies. Methods. The literature was searched for QOL issues reported after multimodal and/or targeted therapies resulting in a l

  15. Design Lessons Drawn from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an updated compilation incorporating the most recent lessons learned from decommissioning and remediation projects. It is intended as a 'road map' to those seeking to apply these lessons. The report presents the issues in a concise and systematic manner, along with practical, thought-provoking examples. The most important lessons learned in recent years are organized and examined to enable the intended audience to gauge the importance of this aspect of the planning for new nuclear facilities. These will be of special interest to those seeking to construct nuclear facilities for the first time. In Sections 1 and 2, the current situation in the field of decommissioning is reviewed and the relevance and importance of beneficial design features is introduced. A more detailed review of previous and current lessons learned from decommissioning is given in Section 3 where different aspects of the decommissioning process are analysed. From this analysis beneficial design features have been extracted and identified in Section 4 which includes two comprehensive tables where brief descriptions of the features are summarized and responsibilities are identified. Conclusions and key design features and key recommendations are given in Section 5. Two Annexes are included to provide lessons from past projects and past experience and to record notes and extracts taken from a comprehensive list of publications listed in the References on page 47.

  16. A to Z List of Cancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Y Z Get email updates from NCI on cancer health information, news, and other topics Get email updates from NCI A Abiraterone Acetate Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) ABVD ABVE ...

  17. Creating A Guided- discovery Lesson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田枫

    2005-01-01

    In a guided - discovery lesson, students sequentially uncover layers of mathematical information one step at a time and learn new mathematics. We have identified eight critical steps necessary in developing a successful guided- discovery lesson.

  18. Mechanism of Cancer Growth Suppression of Alpha-Fetoprotein Derived Growth Inhibitory Peptides (GIP): Comparison of GIP-34 versus GIP-8 (AFPep). Updates and Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizejewski, Gerald J. [Division of Translational Medicine, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) derived Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP) is a 34-amino acid segment of the full-length human AFP molecule that inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. The GIP-34 and its carboxy-terminal 8-mer segment, termed GIP-8, were found to be effective as anti-cancer therapeutic peptides against nine different human cancer types. Following the uptake of GIP-34 and GIP-8 into the cell cytoplasm, each follows slightly different signal transduction cascades en route to inhibitory pathways of tumor cell growth and proliferation. The parallel mechanisms of action of GIP-34 versus GIP-8 are demonstrated to involve interference of signaling transduction cascades that ultimately result in: (1) cell cycle S-phase/G2-phase arrest; (2) prevention of cyclin inhibitor degradation; (3) protection of p53 from inactivation by phosphorylation; and (4) blockage of K{sup +} ion channels opened by estradiol and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The overall mechanisms of action of both peptides are discussed in light of their differing modes of cell attachment and uptake fortified by RNA microarray analysis and electrophysiologic measurements of cell membrane conductance and resistance. As a chemotherapeutic adjunct, the GIPs could potentially aid in alleviating the negative side effects of: (1) tamoxifen resistance, uterine hyperplasia/cancer, and blood clotting; (2) Herceptin antibody resistance and cardiac (arrest) arrhythmias; and (3) doxorubicin's bystander cell toxicity.

  19. Mechanism of Cancer Growth Suppression of Alpha-Fetoprotein Derived Growth Inhibitory Peptides (GIP): Comparison of GIP-34 versus GIP-8 (AFPep). Updates and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) derived Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP) is a 34-amino acid segment of the full-length human AFP molecule that inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. The GIP-34 and its carboxy-terminal 8-mer segment, termed GIP-8, were found to be effective as anti-cancer therapeutic peptides against nine different human cancer types. Following the uptake of GIP-34 and GIP-8 into the cell cytoplasm, each follows slightly different signal transduction cascades en route to inhibitory pathways of tumor cell growth and proliferation. The parallel mechanisms of action of GIP-34 versus GIP-8 are demonstrated to involve interference of signaling transduction cascades that ultimately result in: (1) cell cycle S-phase/G2-phase arrest; (2) prevention of cyclin inhibitor degradation; (3) protection of p53 from inactivation by phosphorylation; and (4) blockage of K+ ion channels opened by estradiol and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The overall mechanisms of action of both peptides are discussed in light of their differing modes of cell attachment and uptake fortified by RNA microarray analysis and electrophysiologic measurements of cell membrane conductance and resistance. As a chemotherapeutic adjunct, the GIPs could potentially aid in alleviating the negative side effects of: (1) tamoxifen resistance, uterine hyperplasia/cancer, and blood clotting; (2) Herceptin antibody resistance and cardiac (arrest) arrhythmias; and (3) doxorubicin's bystander cell toxicity

  20. Role of MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphism in the etiology of prostate cancer: A systematic review and updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Yadav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is an important enzyme of folate/homocysteine pathway and is essential for synthesis, repair and methylation of DNA. Various studies have performed to evaluate the role of MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphism to the risk of prostate cancer and the results were inconclusive and inconsistent. A meta-analysis of published case-control studies, up to December 2014, was performed to investigate the association between MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphism and the susceptibility of prostate cancer. PubMed, Science direct, Springer link and Google scholar databases were searched for case-control studies and crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to estimate the strength of association. The analyses were conducted with Open Meta-Analyst and MIX softwares. Total thirteen case-control studies with 4673 prostate cancer patients and 6982 controls were included in this meta-analysis. No associations were observed between MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphism and prostate cancer in any genetic model (allele contrast (C vs. A: OR = 1.01; 95% CI: 0.91–1.13; p = 0.73; dominant model (CC + AC vs. AA: OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.91–1.06, p = 0.73; homozygote model (CC vs. AA: OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.83–1.10, p = 0.55; co-dominant model (AC vs. AA: OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.91–1.07, p = 0.76; and recessive model (CC vs. AC + AA: OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.84–1.10, p = 0.61. Moreover, when the data were stratified on the basis of ethnicity no significant associations were observed. The results of the present meta-analysis suggest that the MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphism has no effect on the etiology of prostate cancer.

  1. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  2. Moving Objects Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jidong; Meng, Xiaofeng

    In moving objects applications, large numbers of locations can be sampled by sensors or GPS periodically, then sent from moving clients to the server and stored in a database. Therefore, continuously maintaining in a database the current locations of moving objects by using a tracking technique becomes very important. The key issue is minimizing the number of updates, while providing precise locations for query results. In this chapter, we will introduce some underlying location update methods. Then, we describe two location update strategies in detail, which can improve the performance. One is the proactive location update strategy, which predicts the movement of moving objects to lower the update frequency; the other is the group location update strategy, which groups the objects to minimize the total number of objects reporting their locations.

  3. The lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What happened at TMI-2 and to the United States Nuclear Industry since the accident to that plant is recounted. Four main points are made: commercial use of nuclear power evolved so rapidly that neither industry nor society generally, was able to assimilate this dramatically new technology fast enough; accidents like TMI-2, and now, the much more damaging Chernobyl, are a part of the price paid; we must take every possible step so that the risks from nuclear power are reduced by learning from accidents and putting that knowledge into practice; the lessons learned and applied after TMI-2 have tended to be the readily achievable, shorter term ones. The most drastic changes will take more time. The organizational and institutional lessons are considered first, then the technical ones. The sequence and status of the TMI-2 cleanup is discussed. The design lessons are summarized. (author)

  4. Update on the role of melatonin in the prevention of cancer tumorigenesis and in the management of cancer correlates, such as sleep-wake and mood disturbances: review and remarks

    OpenAIRE

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Faliva, Milena Anna; Perna, Simone; Antoniello, Neldo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article was to perform a systematic review on the role of melatonin in the prevention of cancer tumorigenesis—in vivo and in vitro—as well as in the management of cancer correlates, such as sleep-wake and mood disturbances. The International Agency for Research on Cancer recently classified “shift-work that involves circadian disruption” as “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A) based on “limited evidence in humans for the carcinogenicity of shift-work that involves nigh...

  5. Long-Term Improvement in Treatment Outcome After Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Locoregionally Advanced Cervix Cancer: An Update of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The local failure rate in patients with locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is 41-72% after radiotherapy (RT) alone, whereas local control is a prerequisite for cure. The Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial showed that combining RT with hyperthermia (HT) improved 3-year local control rates of 41-61%, as we reported earlier. In this study, we evaluate long-term results of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial after 12 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1996, a total of 114 women with locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma were randomly assigned to RT or RT + HT. The RT was applied to a median total dose of 68 Gy. The HT was given once weekly. The primary end point was local control. Secondary end points were overall survival and late toxicity. Results: At the 12-year follow-up, local control remained better in the RT + HT group (37% vs. 56%; p = 0.01). Survival was persistently better after 12 years: 20% (RT) and 37% (RT + HT; p = 0.03). World Health Organization (WHO) performance status was a significant prognostic factor for local control. The WHO performance status, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and tumor diameter were significant for survival. The benefit of HT remained significant after correction for these factors. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Grade 3 or higher radiation-induced late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: For locoregionally advanced cervical cancer, the addition of HT to RT resulted in long-term major improvement in local control and survival without increasing late toxicity. This combined treatment should be considered for patients who are unfit to receive chemotherapy. For other patients, the optimal treatment strategy is the subject of ongoing research

  6. The history of a lesson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    2003-01-01

    and emphasises the need to study the history of lessons rather than the lessons of history. This approach shows that Munich is the end point of a constitutive history that begins in the failure of the Versailles treaty to create a durable European order following the First World War. The Munich lesson...... is thus one element of the lesson of Versailles, which is a praxeology that defines how the West is to make peace, and against whom peace must be defended. The lesson of Versailles has been, at least in part, constitutive of the outbreak of the Cold War, and it continues to define the Western...

  7. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01): lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment). Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated 'help-desk' team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%), technical problems (46%) while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support. (author)

  8. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  9. Lessons from the history of tobacco harm reduction: The National Cancer Institute's Smoking and Health Program and the "less hazardous cigarette".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandola, Mark

    2005-10-01

    Scientists and public health practitioners are sharply divided today over the risks and benefits of tobacco harm-reduction strategies. At the same time, a range of novel tobacco products is being marketed with claims of reduced exposure or risk. Current scientific efforts to study tobacco products and harm reduction should be informed by past experience. During the 1960s and 1970s, there was substantial support within government and academia, as well as among voluntary health organizations, for efforts to modify tobacco products to reduce harm. This paper analyzes the former National Cancer Institute (NCI) Smoking and Health Program, which, between 1968 and 1980, pursued the development of "less hazardous" cigarettes as its primary goal. During this period, the program spent over dollar 50 million on contract research, of which 74% went toward biological and chemical analysis of modified cigarettes, 9.6% to epidemiological studies of risk factors, and only 1.4% to studies evaluating smoking cessation or prevention programs. NCI officials predicted during the mid-1970s that new "low-tar" cigarette brands would substantially reduce smoking-related mortality, but by 1978 the research agenda began to change in response to a reorganization of NCI research activities, modification of government antismoking efforts, and an emerging understanding of nicotine addiction that challenged key scientific assumptions. In retrospect, the program suffered from significant weaknesses that severely limited the likelihood that it would generate knowledge beneficial to public health, including a research agenda that failed to include surveillance and behavioral research, tobacco industry influence of the research agenda, and a lack of access to information about the characteristics of products on the market. There exists today a need for a public health-oriented research agenda on tobacco products and harm reduction, but current efforts should include input from a diverse range of

  10. Can colorectal cancer mass-screening organization be evidence-based? Lessons from failures: The experimental and pilot phases of the Lazio program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Sabrina

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening programmes should be organized to translate theoretical efficacy into effectiveness. An evidence-based organizational model of colorectal cancer screening (CRCS should assure feasibility and high compliance. Methods A multidisciplinary Working Group (WG, reviewed literature and guidelines to define evidence-based recommendations. The WG identified the need for further local studies: physicians' CRCS attitudes, the effect of test type and provider on compliance, and individual reasons for non-compliance. A survey of digestive endoscopy services was conducted. A feasibility study on a target population of 300.000 has begun. Results Based on the results of population trials and on literature review the screening strategy adopted was Faecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT every two years for 50–74 year olds and, for positives, colonoscopy. The immunochemical test was chosen because it has 20% higher compliance than the Guaiac. GPs were chosen as the preferred provider also for higher compliance. Since we observed that distance is the major determinant of non-compliance, we choose GPs because they are the closest providers, both geographically and emotionally, to the public. The feasibility study showed several barriers: GP participation was low, there were administrative problems to involve GPs; opportunistic testing by the GPs; difficulties in access to Gastroenterology centres; difficulties in gathering colonoscopy results; little time given to screening activity by the gastroenterology centre. Conclusion The feasibility study highlighted several limits of the model. Most of the barriers that emerged were consequences of organisational choices not supported by evidence. The principal limit was a lack of accountability by the participating centres.

  11. Lessons From The Crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The current worldwide economic recession is not the first of its kind and will not likely be the last. But what should we learn from it? Vinod Thomas, Director General of Independent Evaluation Group at the World Bank Group, discussed the lessons from the crisis during a speech at Peking University in Beijing on February 18. Edited excerpts follow.

  12. Rethinking lessons learned processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttler, T.; Lukosch, S.G.; Kolfschoten, G.L.; Verbraeck, A.

    2012-01-01

    Lessons learned are one way to retain experience and knowledge in project-based organizations, helping them to prevent reinventin,g the wheel or to repeat past mistakes. However, there are several challenges that make these lessonts learned processes a challenging endeavor. These include capturing k

  13. School Violence. Web Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.

    In answer to the concerns about school violence in the United States (especially since the tragedy in 1999 at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado), this Internet curriculum offers lessons and resources that address the topic of school violence and its causes, as well as the search for solutions. The curriculum presents four world wide web…

  14. A Lesson from Mangroves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of interpretive programs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Describes the typical interpretive approach of local school science curricula, which serve 20,000 Aboriginal children. Addresses the curriculum framework, learning strategies, and process skill development, illustrating them through a lesson on mangroves. (TW)

  15. The First Lesson

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Keith

    2003-01-01

    A lesson plan using visual arts and reading skills to introduce the concept of delodomatic creativity (thinking “in the box” and “out of the box”) to children. Designed for 1st or 2nd graders it can be adapted to all grade levels.

  16. Lessons Learned in Preparation and Review of Safety Analysis Report of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) is the one and only research reactor in Malaysia. Since the day it was supplied by General Atomic (GA) in 1983, periodic safety reviews were carried out but not published in the form of a complete SAR. In fact, the original SAR (SAR 1983) document was provided by GA as soon as GA was selected as the supplier of RTP. The focus of this report is on the lessons learned from the preparation of SAR. The lessons learned were to address the preparation and regulatory review of the second SAR (SAR 2006). Realizing that safety is important as RTP is aging, the experiences and lessons learned from SAR development and updating processes are of great value for all parties involved. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and organize the lessons learned and suggest the best practice for the next SAR development both in preparation and regulatory review

  17. Automatisches Software-Update

    OpenAIRE

    Clauß, Matthias; Fischer, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Vorgestellt wird ein neuer Dienst zum eigenverantwortlichen Software-Update von PC-Systemen, die unter Linux Red Hat 7.3 betrieben werden. Grundlage des Dienstes bildet das Verfahren YARU (Yum based Automatic RPM Update) als Bestandteil der im URZ eingesetzten Admin-Technologie für Linux-Rechner.

  18. Livestock Update. January 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Scott P.; McCann, Mark A.; Smith, Jason

    2015-01-01

    This issue of Livestock Update includes articles on dates to remember, herd management, selection for marbling in a cowherd, 2014 Culpeper Senior BCIA Bull Sale results, 2015 Stocker Cattle Summit to focus on forage management for optimal animal gain, sheep update, and the 48th Virginia Pork Industry Conference.

  19. Livestock Update. September 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Scott Patrick; McCann, Mark A.; Saville, Joi; Neil, Scott J.; Harmon, Deidre D.; Callan, Peter; Estienne, Mark Joseph, 1960-; Wiegert, Jeffrey; Clark, Sherrie

    2014-01-01

    This LIVESTOCK UPDATE contains timely subject matter on beef cattle, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and related junior work. This issue includes: Dates to Remember; September Herd Management Advisor; Time for Fall Nutrition Tune-Up; BVD's Role in Shipping Fever Pneumonia; Sheep Field Day & Ram Lamb Sale; 2014 Virginia Tech Sheep Management Basics Workshop; Sheep Update; and Swine Production in Virginia.

  20. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risk of breast cancer: Having an abortion. Making diet changes such as eating less fat or more ... does not give formal guidelines or recommendations for making decisions about health care. Reviewers and Updates Editorial Boards ...

  1. Update on HER-2 as a target for cancer therapy: Intracellular signaling pathways of ErbB2/HER-2 and family members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ErbB (also termed HER) receptors are expressed in various tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin, in which they are involved in the control of diverse biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Furthermore, their deregulated expression has been implicated in many types of human cancers and is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Owing to the importance of ErbB proteins in both development and cellular transformation, a lot of attention has been drawn to the intracellular signals initiated by the engagement of this family of receptor tyrosine kinases. This review will focus on the membrane proximal events triggered by the ErbB receptor network and will address questions of how receptor heterodimerization may contribute to signal specification and diversification

  2. Non-small cell lung cancer: current status of chemoradiation for locally advanced disease and an update on susceptibility and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) afflicts 40,000 patients yearly. The traditional treatment has been radiation therapy (RT) alone with 5 year survival rates averaging around 5%. Recent reports of randomized clinical trials using combined radiochemotherapy suggest significant improvement in survival compared to RT alone. These trials are difficult to evaluate because of differences in dose, timing and sequencing of both the chemotherapy (CT) and the RT. Dr. Byhardt will give an overview of the significant chemoradiation trials, especially with respect to the factors associated with reduction of local failure and distant metastasis. Dr. Tishler will review the biologic rationale of these regimens and make some prognostications about the potential role of new chemotherapy agents, new developments in RT dose-time-fractionation, and new RT technology in future radiochemotherapy trials. While progress continues to be made using the more traditional cancer treatment modalities, investigations in NSCLC epidemiology and prevention are providing new insights regarding susceptibility, etiology, failure risk stratification, and potential avenues of therapeutic intervention. Dr. Spitz will discuss NSCLC as a paradigm of an environmentally induced disease in which host susceptibility may be determined by genetically determined modulation of environmental exposures. A mutagen sensitivity assay can determine individuals at high risk for developing NSCLC if exposed to carcinogens such as those in cigarette smoke. This susceptibility may have prognostic implications that could influence choice of therapy. Highly susceptible individuals can also be selected for special counseling, smoking cessation, with consideration given to chemoprevention. Dr. Gritz will review major work done in this area

  3. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pellizzon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group (RG for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. RESULTS: Disease specific survival (DSS at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk, IR (intermediate risk and HR (high risk, the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040, Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002, total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001 On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI - 1.147-3.561. CONCLUSIONS: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Association of MHTFR Ala222Val (rs1801133 polymorphism and breast cancer susceptibility: An update meta-analysis based on 51 research studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liwa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between MHTFR Ala222Val polymorphism and breast cancer (BC risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted through researching MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases before August 2012. Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to estimate the strength of the association. Results A total of 51 studies including 20,907 cases and 23,905 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, significant associations were found between MTHFR Ala222Val polymorphism and BC risk when all studies pooled into the meta-analysis (Ala/Ala vs Val/Val: OR=0.870, 95%CI=0.789–0.958,P=0.005; Ala/Val vs Val/Val: OR=0.895, 95%CI=0.821–0.976, P=0.012; dominant model: OR=0.882, 95%CI=0.808–0.963, P=0.005; and recessive model: OR = 0.944, 95%CI=0.898–0.993, P=0.026; Ala allele vs Val allele: OR = 0.935, 95%CI=0.887–0.986, P=0.013. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the same results were found in Asian populations, while no significant associations were found for all comparison models in other Ethnicity populations. Conclusion In conclusion, our meta-analysis provides the evidence that MTHFR Ala222Val gene polymorphisms contributed to the breast cancer development. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1966146911851976

  5. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. Materials and methods: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA), risk group (RG) for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. Results: Disease specific survival (DSS) at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk), IR (intermediate risk) and HR (high risk), the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040), Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002), total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001) On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED) was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI -1.147-3.561). Conclusions: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  6. Prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1 expression in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: evidence from an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong AY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anyuan Zhong,1,* Yufei Xing,1,* Xue Pan,1,* Minhua Shi,1 Huajun Xu2 1Department of Respiratory Diseases, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 2Department of Otolaryngology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Otolaryngology Institute of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The association between the expression of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 and survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is controversial. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis of all available studies to evaluate the prognostic role of PD-L1 expression in NSCLC.Materials and methods: PubMed, Embase, and Chinese (China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang databases were searched to identify all eligible studies evaluating PD-L1 expression and the survival of NSCLC patients. Hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence interval (CI used to assess overall survival were extracted and pooled. Subgroup, sensitivity, and publication-bias analyses were also performed.Results: Eleven articles reporting 12 studies that included a total of 1,653 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Higher PD-L1 expression did not correlate with prognosis in terms of overall survival in patients with NSCLC (HR =1.21, 95% CI: 0.85–1.71, P=0.29. However, a subgroup analysis showed a significant association between PD-L1 expression and poor prognosis in Chinese patients with NSCLC (HR =1.55, 95% CI: 1.04–2.29, P=0.03. The sensitivity analysis showed that the pooled results were not affected by the removal of any single study. There was also no significant publication bias.Conclusion: Our meta-analysis indicated no statistically significant difference between PD-L1 expression and prognosis for patients with NSCLC. Additional, high-quality studies with larger sample sizes are needed to determine

  7. 早期胃癌淋巴结转移的研究进展%Updates on lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国栋; 李晓波; 李昌荣; 李伟锋; 从丽; 曹关义; 李红浪

    2016-01-01

    Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines list options for treatment of each stage of early gastric cancer (EGC).The treatment of EGC is closely related to the lymph node metastasis, and the accurate prediction of lymph node metastasis is related to the choice of the treatment options and the prognosis of the patients.The lymph node metastasis of EGC is evaluated according to the clinicopathological factors, imaging,molecular markers and sentinel lymph node (SLN) tracer biopsy.A two-step method for the management of EGC treated with endoscopic mucosal resection/endoscopic submucosal dissection (EMR/ESD) is recommended.While for those EGC patients not suitable to receive EMR/ESD, imaging or molecular marker and SLN tracer biopsy technology are applied to determine lymph node status.%日本胃癌治疗指南建议根据分期的不同来选择早期胃癌的治疗策略.早期胃癌的治疗与淋巴结转移状态密切相关,对淋巴结转移状态的精确评估关系到治疗方案的选择及患者的预后.目前评估淋巴结转移状态的方法主要有:根据临床病理学因素评估、根据影像学和分子标志物评估以及前哨淋巴结示踪活组织检查技术.对于适合内镜下黏膜下层切除术(EMR)或内镜下黏膜下层剥离术(ESD)治疗的早期胃癌建议使用二步法来管理;对于EMR或ESD适应证之外的早期胃癌可结合使用影像学和分子标志物及前哨淋巴结示踪活组织检查技术来判断淋巴结转移状态.

  8. Association between CD14 SNP -159 C/T and gastric cancer: an independent case–control study and an updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ai-Min; Li, Xin-Yuan; Xie, Yi-Qiang; Jia, Zhan-Dong; Li, Yuan-Xin; Zou, Yong-Yan; Xu, Chang-Qing; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between CD14 -159C/T polymorphism and the susceptibility to gastric cancer (GC) has been reported. However, the results were inconclusive. In the present study, a case–control study and a meta-analysis were performed to assess the possible association between -159C/T in the CD14 gene and GC risk. Patients and methods Relevant studies were searched in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, and Wanfang database (last search was performed on December 30, 2015). In addition, a case–control study involving 164 GC cases and 169 controls was also performed in the analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by the software Revman5.3. Results A total of ten published studies and the present case–control study involving 2,844 GC and 3,983 controls were included for the meta-analysis. The analysis result indicated that the T allele of CD14 -159C/T polymorphism did not confer risk for GC (in our study: [P=0.93]; in the meta-analysis: T vs 2N odds ratio =1.28 and 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.95–1.24, [P=0.24]). However, we found a significant association in the recessive model (in our study: TT vs TC+CC [P=0.04]; in the meta-analysis: TT vs TC+CC odds ratio =1.12 and 95% CI =1.01–1.26, [P=0.04]). Furthermore, a subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed that TT genotype was significantly associated with GC in Asian (odds ratio =1.17 and 95% CI =1.02–1.34, [P=0.02]) but not in Caucasian. Conclusion Our results highlight the TT genotype of CD14 -159C/T as a genetic susceptibility factor for gastric cancer, particularly, in Asians and population-based controls. PMID:27486336

  9. Bicalutamide 150 mg in addition to standard care for patients with early non-metastatic prostate cancer: updated results from the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Period Group-6 Study after a median follow-up period of 7.1 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Lodding, Pär; Kylmälä, Timo; Lundmo, Per; Klarskov, Peter; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Tasdemir, Ilker; Morris, Thomas; Armstrong, Jon

    2006-01-01

    The Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) programme is evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide following standard care (radiotherapy, radical prostatectomy or watchful waiting) in patients with localized (T1-2, N0/Nx) or locally advanced (T3-4, any N; or any T, N + ) non-metastatic prostat...

  10. Utilization and impact of 21-gene recurrence score assay for breast cancer in clinical practice across the United States: lessons learned from the 2010 to 2012 National Cancer Data Base analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orucevic, Amila; Heidel, Robert E; Bell, John L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate patient selection for the 21-gene recurrence score assay (RS) for breast cancer (BC) and the RS impact on chemotherapy administration (Chemo) in clinical practice across the United States through the retrospective observational study of National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) patients from 2010 to 2012. NCDB captures ~70 % of all newly diagnosed malignancies in the USA annually. The 2010-2012 period depicts data from the beginning of the NCDB that required recording of molecular assays and their data release in April 2015. De-identified demographic and clinical variables of patients that had RS results were analyzed. 513,080 patients had BC; 406,525 were estrogen receptor-positive (ER+). 74,334/91,651 patients with RS recorded as a numerical value (0-100) were analyzed (18.2 % of ER+). Patients' ages ranged from 18 to 90 (mean = 58.8, median = 59); 99.1 % were females. Patients of Caucasian race, from regions with $63,000 median household income were more likely to be tested than patients of other races, education, or income (p 1 cm tumors; 16.4 % included ≥N1 disease; 9.9 % included T1a, T3, Stage III and IV, or HER2-positive cancers. Low-risk RS result had 92.2 % negative predictive value for no Chemo. Intermediate-risk RS result had 40.1 % positive predictive value (PPV); high-risk RS had 81.2 % PPV for Chemo. RS is obtained in ~1/5 of ER + BC patients across the USA. Further studies investigating influence and implementation of the newest evidence-based management guidelines regarding patients' selection for RS test and chemotherapy administration upon obtaining of test results are warranted. PMID:27206678

  11. Update on the management of anorectal malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Andrea; Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-three years ago, on 10 August 1980, in Mexico City, the first patient with an anorectal malformation was operated on using the posterior sagittal approach. At that time it was not obvious that we were actually opening a "Pandora's box" that continues to give many positive surprises, a few disappointments, and the constant hope that each day we can learn more about how to improve the quality of life of children born with all different types of anorectal malformations. In November 2012, patient number 3000 in our database was operated in the city of Cochabamba, Bolivia; during one of our International Courses of Anorectal Malformations and Colorectal Problems in Children. The goal of this article is to give a brief update on the current management of patients with anorectal malformation, based on the multiple lessons learned during this period. PMID:23913263

  12. Lessons from Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lessons learned from the radiological accident of Goiania in 1987 derived from the observations from the Regulatory Agency which was in charge of the decontamination tasks may be consolidated into four classes: Preventive Actions, characterised as those that aim to minimise the probability of occurrence of a radiological accident; Minimisation of time between the moment of the accident occurrence and the beginning of intervention, in case a radiological accident does occur, despite all preventive measures; Intervention, which is correlated to the type of installation, its geographical location, the social classes involved and their contamination vectors; and Follow up, for which well established rules to allow continuing monitoring of the victims and rebuilding of homes are necessary. The greatest lesson of all was the need for integration of the professionals involved, from all organizations. (author)

  13. Lesson study, deel 1

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, Nellie

    2011-01-01

    Nellie Verhoef schreef in het Nieuw Archief voor Wiskunde al over de Lesson Study. Een handreiking om denkactiviteiten te ontwerpen in een samenwerkingsverband. Het onderwerp is echter zo veelzijdig dat ze er in Euclides ook aandacht aan besteedt, we publiceren haar artikel in twee delen. Dit eerste deel geeft een overzicht van de methode en een voorbeeld van denkactiviteiten. Het tweede deel gaat concreet in op het samenwerkingsverband en de resultaten daarvan

  14. National Pediatric Program Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book of the National Pediatric Program Update, issued by the Argentina Society of Pediatrics, describes important issues, including: effective treatment of addictions (drugs); defects of the neural tube; and the use of radiation imaging in diagnosis.

  15. Livestock Update. August 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Scott Patrick; McCann, Mark A.; Neil, Scott J.; Harmon, Deidre D.; Whittier, W. Dee

    2013-01-01

    Includes articles on August herd management, phosphorus supplementation of beef cattle, 2013 across-breed EPD table, Applied Reproduction in Beef Cattle event, sheep breeding season tips, and a sheep update.

  16. Correlation Between CASC8, SMAD7 Polymorphisms and the Susceptibility to Colorectal Cancer: An Updated Meta-Analysis Based on GWAS Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kunhou; Hua, Long; Wei, Lunshou; Meng, Jiming; Hu, Junhong

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and a number of case-control studies have suggested that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7837328, rs7014346, rs6983267, rs10505477 on CASC8 gene and rs4939827, rs4464148, rs12953717 on SMAD7 gene are significantly correlated with the susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). For the sake of clarifying the association, a meta-analysis was conducted and population heterogeneity was considered in the study.A total of 34 articles including 90 studies (168,471 cases and 163,223 controls) that evaluated the relationship between the CASC8, SMAD7 genes and the risk of CRC under the allelic model were reviewed. Also subgroup analysis was performed by ethnicity (Caucasian, Asian, and African) and all of the analyses were implemented in R 3.2.1 software.Pooled data from the meta-analysis revealed that the A allele of rs7837328, the A allele of rs7014346, the G allele of rs6983267, the A allele of rs10505477, the T allele of rs4939827, the T of rs4464148, and the T of rs12953717 were significantly associated with an increased risk of CRC under the allelic model. Additionally, subgroup analyses of 6 SNPs by ethnicity (rs4464148 excepted) witnessed that the A allele of rs7837328, the G allele of rs6983267, and the T of rs12953717 were notably associated with an increased risk of CRC among Caucasian and Asian. Furthermore, the A allele of rs7014346, the A allele of rs10505477, and the T allele of rs4939827 were significantly related with an elevated risk of CRC only among Caucasian.Our study suggested that for CASC8 gene, SNP of rs7837328 and rs6983267 are risk factors for CRC among both Caucasian and Asian whereas rs7014346 and rs10505477 are risky gene polymorphisms only among Caucasian. For SMAD7 gene, rs4939827 and rs4464148 are risk factors for CRC among Caucasian whereas rs12953717 could elevate the susceptibility to CRC in both Caucasian and Asian. PMID:26579801

  17. Inference and update

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez-Quesada, F.R.

    2008-01-01

    We look at two fundamental logical processes, often intertwined in planning and problem solving: inference and update. Inference is an internal process with which we draw new conclusions, uncovering what is implicit in the information we already have. Update, on the other hand, is produced by external communication, usually in the form of announcements and in general in the form of observations, giving us information that might have been not available (even implicitly) to us before. Both proc...

  18. Livestock Update. October 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Scott Patrick; McCann, Mark A.; Groover, Gordon Eugene, 1956-; Callan, Peter; Wiegert, Jeffrey; Estienne, Mark Joseph, 1960-

    2014-01-01

    This LIVESTOCK UPDATE contains timely subject matter on beef cattle, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and related junior work. This issue includes: Dates to Remember; November Herd Management Advisor; Evaluate Nutrition Needs and Plan for Winter; 2014 Culpeper Senior Bull Sale; Tax and Financial Management in Profitable Years; Sheep Management Tips- Late Fall; Sheep Update; and Methods for Improving Pre-Weaning Survival Rates of Piglets.

  19. CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavoussi

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many carcinogenetic elements in industry and it is for this reason that study and research concerning the effect of these materials is carried out on a national and international level. The establishment and growth of cancer are affected by different factors in two main areas:-1 The nature of the human or animal including sex, age, point and method of entry, fat metabolism, place of agglomeration of carcinogenetic material, amount of material absorbed by the body and the immunity of the body.2 The different nature of the carcinogenetic material e.g. physical, chemical quality, degree of solvency in fat and purity of impurity of the element. As the development of cancer is dependent upon so many factors, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a causative element is principle or contributory. Some materials are not carcinogenetic when they are pure but become so when they combine with other elements. All of this creates an industrial health problem in that it is almost impossible to plan an adequate prevention and safety program. The body through its system of immunity protects itself against small amounts of carcinogens but when this amount increases and reaches a certain level the body is not longer able to defend itself. ILO advises an effective protection campaign against cancer based on the Well –equipped laboratories, Well-educated personnel, the establishment of industrial hygiene within factories, the regular control of safety systems, and the implementation of industrial health principles and research programs.

  20. What Lessons Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    It has become commonplace to ask, whenever anything has gone wrong, what lessons can be learned from the experience. But the appearance of open-endedness in that question is misleading: not every answer that we could give to it is acceptable. There are, in the context of such a question, tacit constraints in what counts as a valid lesson to be…

  1. Austin ISD. Integrated Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Educational Development and Training Center.

    This packet contains 14 lesson plans for integrated academic and vocational education courses. Lesson plans for the following courses are included: integrated physics and principles of technology; algebra and principles of technology; principles of technology, language arts, and economics; physics and industrial electronics; physics and…

  2. The lesson of Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cesium-137 source used for radiological treatment was left unattended in a private clinic in the city of Goiania in Brazil. On 13 September 1987, the capsule containing the radioactive material was brought to a junk yard and violated, and its content was unintentionally handled by many people. In 1987 the intensity of the source was 50 · 1012 Bq. Four people died and several hundred injured people were treated clinically or monitored. The lessons learned from this accident are evaluated. (R.P.)

  3. Lessons from Mayan Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The Mayan culture collected exquisite astronomical data for over a millennium. However, it failed to come up with the breakthrough ideas of modern astronomy because the data was analyzed within a mythological culture of astrology that rested upon false but mathematically sophisticated theories about the Universe. Have we learned the necessary lessons to prevent our current scientific culture from resembling Mayan Astronomy? Clearly, data collection by itself is not a guarantee for good science as commonly assumed by funding agencies. A vibrant scientific culture should cultivate multiple approaches to analyzing existing data and to collecting new data.

  4. French Lessons A Memoir

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Brilliantly uniting the personal and the critical, French Lessons is a powerful autobiographical experiment. It tells the story of an American woman escaping into the French language and of a scholar and teacher coming to grips with her history of learning. Kaplan begins with a distinctly American quest for an imaginary France of the intelligence. But soon her infatuation with all things French comes up against the dark, unimagined recesses of French political and cultural life.The daughter of a Jewish lawyer who prosecuted Nazi war criminals at Nuremburg, Kaplan grew up in the 1960s in the Mi

  5. Financial Lessons Learned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ As the Wall Street chaos of 2008 swept the globe,China-with little exposure to subprime mortgages-was one of the only calm ports in the growing financial storm.Ifone lesson can be learned from the crisis,it is this: maintain a constant state of financial vigilance against risks even in boom times.China now faces the task of ensuring its financial health as it further opens to the world amid a global financial landscape reshaped by deep recessions.Economists and finance professors discussed these challenges at the Asia-Pacific Economic and Financial Forum recently held in Beijing.Edited excerpts follow:

  6. Financial Lessons Learned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As the Wall Street chaos of 2008 swept the globe,China-with little exposure to subprime mortgages-was one of the only calm ports in the growing financial storm.If one lesson can be learned from the crisis,it is this: maintain a constant state of financial vigilance against risks even in boom times.China now faces the task of ensuring its financial health as it further opens to the world amid a global financial landscape reshaped by deep recessions.Economists and finance professors discussed these challenges at the Asia-Pacific Economic and Financial Forum recently held in Beijing.Edited excerpts follow

  7. Classroom Management and Lesson Planning(4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Lesson Planning Task 1 As teachers,we all need to plan our lessons before we teach.Make a list of things that you think need to be included in a lesson plan.Then compare and discuss your list with another teacher.Also think about reasons why we need to plan our lessons.

  8. Interstitial brachytherapy dosimetry update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 2004, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) published an update to the AAPM Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) which was initially published in 1995. This update was pursued primarily due to the marked increase in permanent implantation of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources in the United States over the past decade, and clinical rationale for the need of accurate dosimetry in the implementation of interstitial brachytherapy. Additionally, there were substantial improvements in the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, accuracy of related parameters and methods for determining these parameters. With salient background, these improvements are discussed in the context of radiation dosimetry. As an example, the impact of this update on the administered dose is assessed for the model 200 103Pd brachytherapy source. (authors)

  9. Assessment Update: Progress, Trends, and Practices in Higher Education. Volume 25, Issue 3, May-June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Trudy W., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This issue of "Assessment Update" presents the following articles: (1) Launching E-Portfolios: An Organic Process; (2) Editor's Notes: Envisioning Learning; (3) Promoting Student Affairs Buy-In for Assessment: Lessons Learned; (4) Working at Assessment; (5) Making the Case for Formative Assessment: How It Improves Student Engagement…

  10. Statistical Handbook: 1999 updates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication consists of a series of tables containing the updated figures for: Crown land sales, drilling activity, established oil and natural gas reserves, crude oil, synthetic oil and bitumen and natural gas production, net cash expenditures of the petroleum industry, value of producers' sales, average crude oil and natural gas prices, Canadian demand for motor gasoline, diesel and heavy fuel oil, yields of refined petroleum products in Canada, and Canadian exports of energy materials. The data provided covers varying periods, in all cases updated to include data for 1999

  11. Update of European bioethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2015-01-01

    principles of autonomy, dignity, integrity and vulnerability are proposed as the most important ethical principles for respect for the human person in biomedical and biotechnological development. This approach to bioethics and biolaw is presented here in a short updated version that integrates the earlier......This paper presents an update of the research on European bioethics undertaken by the author together with Professor Peter Kemp since the 1990s, on Basic ethical principles in European bioethics and biolaw. In this European approach to basic ethical principles in bioethics and biolaw, the...... research in a presentation of the present understanding of the basic ethical principles in bioethics and biolaw....

  12. Updated prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS v2) recommendations for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiparametric MRI: critical evaluation using whole-mount pathology as standard of reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, H.A.; Hoetker, A.M.; Woo, S.; Sala, E.; Hricak, H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Goldman, D.A.; Moskowitz, C.S. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Gondo, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Ehdaie, B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Fine, S.W.; Reuter, V.E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the recommendations for multiparametric prostate MRI (mp-MRI) interpretation introduced in the recently updated Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System version 2 (PI-RADSv2), and investigate the impact of pathologic tumour volume on prostate cancer (PCa) detectability on mpMRI. This was an institutional review board (IRB)-approved, retrospective study of 150 PCa patients who underwent mp-MRI before prostatectomy; 169 tumours ≥0.5-mL (any Gleason Score [GS]) and 37 tumours <0.5-mL (GS ≥4+3) identified on whole-mount pathology maps were located on mp-MRI consisting of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Corresponding PI-RADSv2 scores were assigned on each sequence and combined as recommended by PI-RADSv2. We calculated the proportion of PCa foci on whole-mount pathology correctly identified with PI-RADSv2 (dichotomized scores 1-3 vs. 4-5), stratified by pathologic tumour volume. PI-RADSv2 allowed correct identification of 118/125 (94 %; 95 %CI: 90-99 %) peripheral zone (PZ) and 42/44 (95 %; 95 %CI: 89-100 %) transition zone (TZ) tumours ≥0.5 mL, but only 7/27 (26 %; 95 %CI: 10-42 %) PZ and 2/10 (20 %; 95 %CI: 0-52 %) TZ tumours with a GS ≥4+3, but <0.5 mL. DCE-MRI aided detection of 4/125 PZ tumours ≥0.5 mL and 0/27 PZ tumours <0.5 mL. PI-RADSv2 correctly identified 94-95 % of PCa foci ≥0.5 mL, but was limited for the assessment of GS ≥4+3 tumours ≤0.5 mL. DCE-MRI offered limited added value to T2WI+DW-MRI. (orig.)

  13. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on Wednesday 14 June between 8.00 p.m. and midnight. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  14. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on Monday 3 July between 8.00 p.m. and 3.00 a.m. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  15. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on between Monday 23 October 8.00 p.m. and Tuesday 24 October 2.00 a.m. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  16. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on Monday 3 July between 8.00 p.m. and 3.00 a.m. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation.We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  17. Updating: Learning versus Supposing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiaying; Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya; Fitelson, Branden; Osherson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian orthodoxy posits a tight relationship between conditional probability and updating. Namely, the probability of an event "A" after learning "B" should equal the conditional probability of "A" given "B" prior to learning "B". We examine whether ordinary judgment conforms to the orthodox view. In three experiments we found substantial…

  18. Updated opal opacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reexamination of astrophysical opacities has eliminated gross discrepancies between a variety of observations and theoretical calculations; thus allowing for more detailed tests of stellar models. A number of such studies indicate that model results are sensitive to modest changes in the opacity. Consequently, it is desirable to update available opacity databases with recent improvements in physics, refinements of element abundance, and other such factors affecting the results. Updated OPAL Rosseland mean opacities are presented. The new results have incorporated improvements in the physics and numerical procedures as well as corrections. The main opacity changes are increases of as much as 20% for Population I stars due to the explicit inclusion of 19 metals (compared to 12 metals in the earlier calculations) with the other modifications introducing opacity changes smaller than 10%. In addition, the temperature and density range covered by the updated opacity tables has been extended. As before, the tables allow accurate interpolation in density and temperature as well as hydrogen, helium, carbon, oxygen, and metal mass fractions. Although a specific metal composition is emphasized, opacity tables for different metal distributions can be made readily available. The updated opacities are compared to other work. copyright 1996 The American Astronomical Society

  19. North Sea update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article deals with the offshore activity in the North Sea bringing together a special update feature for the petroleum industries in the United Kingdom, Norway, Denmark and the Netherlands. The total capital expenditure required for the period from 1995 to 1998 for the North Sea area which includes exploration, development projects and well abandoning, are discussed and presented. 20 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Livestock Update. August 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Scott Patrick; McCann, Mark A.; Saville, Joi; Neil, Scott J.; Harmon, Deidre D.; Callan, Peter; Estienne, Mark Joseph, 1960-; Wiegert, Jeffrey; Clark, Sherrie

    2014-01-01

    This LIVESTOCK UPDATE contains timely subject matter on beef cattle, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and related junior work. This issue includes: Dates to Remember; August Herd Management Advisor; Weaning Nutrition and Management; Breeding Season Management - Ewes and Rams; 2014 Small Ruminant Field Day; Heat Stress and Small-Scale and Niche Market Pork Production in Virginia,

  1. Carcinogenic Effects of Benzene: An Update (1997 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Mobile Sources (OMS) requested the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) to provide an updated characterization of the cancer risk of benzene to humans. The previous characterization of the carcin...

  2. Memory Updating and Mental Arithmetic

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Cheng-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Nai-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM) as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating num...

  3. Beware of Online Cancer Fraud

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information can travel around the Web in an instant. "Anyone who suffers from cancer, or knows someone ... hair loss, or impotency. back to top This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page , which features ...

  4. Conclusions and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is the third in a series of national studies conducted under a unique partnership initiative officially registered with the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development by the IAEA, in cooperation with participating Cuban organizations and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Similar studies for Brazil and South Africa were completed in 2006. This section presents the main conclusions derived from this comprehensive assessment of the Cuban energy system performed within a sustainable development framework. It also outlines 'other accomplishments' of, and 'lessons learned' from, the cooperative effort conducted jointly by Cuban and international experts. It concludes with some reflections about 'next steps' that may be followed to continue advancing the concepts and ideas supporting sustainable development at the national and international levels

  5. Higher Education ERP: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Dave; Orgill, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Shares experiences and lessons learned by chief information officers of large universities about enterprise resource planning (ERP). Specifically, provides a framework for approaching an ERP that could save universities millions of dollars. (EV)

  6. Lessons Learned from FUSRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Darina [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Carpenter, Cliff [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-06

    The US DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the long-term steward for 90 sites remediated under numerous regulatory regimes including the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In addition, LM holds considerable historical information, gathered in the 1970s, to determine site eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP. To date, 29 FUSRAP sites are in LM’s inventory of sites for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M), and 25 are with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for remediation or in the process of being transitioned to LM. It is forecasted that 13 FUSRAP sites will transfer from the USACE to LM over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is strongly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. Historically, FUSRAP sites were generally cleaned up for “unrestricted” industrial use or remediated to the “cleanup standards” at that time, and their use remained unchanged. Today, these sites as well as the adjacent properties are now changing or envisioned to have changes in land use, typically from industrial to commercial or residential uses. The implication of land-use change affects DOE’s LTS&M responsibility for the sites under LM stewardship as well as the planning for the additional sites scheduled to transition in time. Coinciding with land-use changes at or near FUSRAP sites is an increased community awareness of these sites. As property development increases near FUSRAP sites, the general public and interested stakeholders regularly inquire about the sufficiency of cleanups that impact their neighborhoods and communities. LM has used this experience to address a series of lessons learned to improve our program management in light of the changing conditions of our sites. We describe these lessons learned as (1) improved stakeholder relations, (2) enhanced LTS&M requirements for the sites, and (3) greater involvement in the transition process.

  7. Lesson "Balance in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Lesson "Balance in Nature" This simulation game-lesson (Balance in Nature) gives an opportunity for the students to show creativity, work independently, and to create models and ideas. It creates future-oriented thought connected to their experience, allowing them to propose solutions for global problems and personal responsibility for their activities. The class is divided in two teams. Each team chooses questions. 1. Question: Pollution in the environment. 2. Question: Care for nature and climate. The teams work on the chosen tasks. They make drafts, notes and formulate their solutions on small pieces of paper, explaining the impact on nature and society. They express their points of view using many different opinions. This generates alternative thoughts and results in creative solutions. With the new knowledge and positive behaviour defined, everybody realizes that they can do something positive towards nature and climate problems and the importance of individuals for solving global problems is evident. Our main goal is to recover the ecological balance, and everybody explains his or her own well-grounded opinions. In this work process the students obtain knowledge, skills and more responsible behaviour. This process, based on his or her own experience, dialogue and teamwork, helps the participant's self-development. Making the model "human↔ nature" expresses how human activities impact the natural Earth and how these impacts in turn affect society. Taking personal responsibility, we can reduce global warming and help the Earth. By helping nature we help ourselves. Teacher: Veselina Boycheva-Chapanova " Saint Patriarch Evtimii" Scholl Str. "Ivan Vazov"-19 Plovdiv Bulgaria

  8. Lessons learned from accident investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidents in three main practices - medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators - are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned from them. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the accidents described are approached bearing in mind: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  9. Lessons learned from accidents investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidents from three main practices: medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the described accidents are approached by subjects covering: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  10. AN UPDATE ON PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF RESVERATROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnihotri Gaytri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, red wine mainly present in grapes acts as a natural phytoalexin and phytoestrogen. It has potent antioxidant activity and then has been implicated in the management of various cardiovascular and inflammatory disorders. Further, it has been also documented to be successful in the reduction of ischemic reperfusion [I/R] injury. It has been found to possess immunosuppressive property and is used as anti-cancer and ameliorates the endothelial functions. Still, no evidence is availible that suggest signaling pathway mechanism associated with resveratrol. Thus, the present review deals with the update of various signaling pathway and therapeutic implications of resveratrol in the management of various disorders.

  11. Update in systemic therapy of urologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, David; Paluri, Ravikumar; Mehta, Amitkumar; Goyal, Jatinder; Sonpavde, Guru

    2014-01-01

    Systemic therapy of advanced prostate and renal cancers has gained several recent additions to the therapeutic armamentarium. Treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer now includes additional immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T), chemotherapy (cabazitaxel), androgen-signaling inhibitors (abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide), and a radiopharmaceutical (alpharadin), based on extension of patient survival. Similarly, therapy for patients with renal cell carcinoma, a chemoresistant malignancy, has undergone dramatic changes based on an understanding of the role of angiogenesis. Multiple vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, axitinib, bevacizumab) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (temsirolimus, everolimus) have been added to the therapeutic arsenal. Additionally, immunotherapy retains an important treatment role, with a continuing application of high-dose interleukin-2 in select patients and the emergence of novel immunotherapeutic agents that may have significant benefit. Other major urologic malignancies, including urothelial, testicular, and penile cancers, have witnessed relatively few or no recent advances in therapy, although testicular germ cell tumors are one of the most curable malignancies. An agent for treatment of advanced urothelial cancer now has commercial approval, the chemotherapeutic agent, vinflunine, as second-line therapy in multiple countries-but not in the United States. Our review summarizes and updates the field of systemic therapy for advanced urologic malignancies, with a focus on castration-resistant prostate cancer and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:24393751

  12. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  13. Sensors, Update 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  14. Sensors, Update 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2002-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  15. Sensors, Update 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-03-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field, presenting the current highlights of sensor and related microelectromechanical systems technology. Coverage includes most recent developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles based on micro- and nanotechnology. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update is of must-have value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  16. Sensors, Update 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  17. Sensors, Update 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-02-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, while Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors, and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be invaluable to scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  18. Sensors, Update 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  19. Sensors, Update 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-12-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Treatments include current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides an overview of suppliers and market trends for a particular section, and Sensor Standards, reviews recent legislation and requirements for sensors. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  20. Updating Choquet Beliefs.

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgen Eichberger; Simon Grant; David Kelsey

    2006-01-01

    We apply Pires’s coherence property between unconditional and conditional preferences that admit a CEU representation. In conjunction with consequentialism (only those outcomes on states which are still possible can matter for conditional preference) this implies that the conditional preference may be obtained from the unconditional preference by taking the Full Bayesian Update of the capacity. Attitudes towards sequential versus simultaneous resolution of uncertainty for a simple bet are ana...

  1. Annual Pension Fund Update

    CERN Multimedia

    Pension Fund

    2011-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual Pension Fund Update to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Tuesday 20 September 2011 from 10-00 to 12-00 a.m. Copies of the 2010 Financial Statements are available from departmental secretariats. Coffee and croissants will be served prior to the meeting as of 9-30 a.m.

  2. Journal Update : issue 1

    OpenAIRE

    Malta Medical Journal Club

    2014-01-01

    Contents: Letter from the editors - Thomas Borg Barthet and Dale Brincat; Message for Journal Update - Gilbert Gravino and Gianluca Gonzi; Anemia, an independent predictive factor for amputation and mortality in patients hospitalized for peripheral artery disease - Thomas Borg Barthet; Peripheral blood lymphocyte telomere length as a predictor of response to immunosuppressive therapy in childhood aplastic anaemia - Thomas Borg Barthet; Influenza vaccination of pregnant women and pro...

  3. How Documentalists Update SIMBAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buga, M.; Bot, C.; Brouty, M.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Cambresy, L.; Eisele, A.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Loup, C.; Neuville, M.; Oberto, A.; Ochsenbein, F.; Perret, E.; Siebert, A.; Son, E.; Vannier, P.; Vollmer, B.; Vonflie, P.; Wenger, M.; Woelfel, F.

    2015-04-01

    The Strasbourg astronomical Data Center (CDS) was created in 1972 and has had a major role in astronomy for more than forty years. CDS develops a service called SIMBAD that provides basic data, cross-identifications, bibliography, and measurements for astronomical objects outside the solar system. It brings to the scientific community an added value to content which is updated daily by a team of documentalists working together in close collaboration with astronomers and IT specialists. We explain how the CDS staff updates SIMBAD with object citations in the main astronomical journals, as well as with astronomical data and measurements. We also explain how the identification is made between the objects found in the literature and those already existing in SIMBAD. We show the steps followed by the documentalist team to update the database using different tools developed at CDS, like the sky visualizer Aladin, and the large catalogues and survey database VizieR. As a direct result of this teamwork, SIMBAD integrates almost 10.000 bibliographic references per year. The service receives more than 400.000 queries per day.

  4. Designing and Adapting Tasks in Lesson Planning: A Critical Process of Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiakira

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that a lesson plan is a necessary product of Lesson Study. However, the collaborative work among teachers that goes into creating that lesson plan is largely under-appreciated by non-Japanese adopters of Lesson Study, possibly because the effort involved is invisible to outsiders, with our attention going to its most visible…

  5. Lessons from Vietnam's first marine park

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, C

    1994-01-01

    The recent establishment of a marine park in Vietnam offers lessons for future marine reserves in the country as well as for other countries considering their establishment. These lessons are contained in this brief article.

  6. Lessons from the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief note, the implications of a condensed Sun will be examined. A celestial body composed of liquid metallic hydrogen brings great promise to astronomy, relative to understanding thermal emission and solar structure. At the same time, as an incom- pressible liquid, a condensed Sun calls into question virtually everything which is cur- rently believed with respect to the evolution and nature of the stars. Should the Sun be condensed, then neutron stars and white dwarfs will fail to reach the enormous densities they are currently believed to possess. Much of cosmology also falls into question, as the incompressibility of matter curtails any thought that a primordial atom once existed. Aging stars can no longer collapse and black holes will know no formative mechanism. A condensed Sun also hints that great strides must still be made in understanding the nature of liquids. The Sun has revealed that liquids possess a much greater potential for lattice order than previously believed. In addition, lessons may be gained with regards to the synthesis of liquid metallic hydrogen and the use of condensed matter as the basis for initiating fusion on Earth.

  7. Lessons from Rotor 37

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.D.Denton

    1997-01-01

    NASA rotor 37 was used as a blind test case for turbomachinery CFD by the Turbomachinery Committee of the IGTI.The rotor is a transonic compressor with a tip speed of 454 m/s(1500ft/s)and a relatively high pressure ratio of 2.1.It was tested in isolation with a circumferentially uniform inlet flow so that the flow through it should be steady apart from and effects of passage to passage geometry variation and mechanical vibration.As such it represents the simplest possible type of test for three-dimensional turbomachinery flow solvers.Howerver,the rotor still presents a real challenge to 3D viscous flow solvers because the shock wave-boudary layer interaction is strong and the effects of viscosity are dominant in determining the flow deviation and hence the pressure ration.Eleven blind solutions were submittewd and in addition a non-blind solution was used to prepare for the exercies.This paper reviews the flow in the test case and the comparisons of the CFD solutions with the test data.Lessons for both the Flow physics in transonic fans and for the application of CFD to such machines are pointed out.

  8. Lessons from dragonfly flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. Jane

    2005-11-01

    I will describe two lessons we learned from analyzing dragonfly flight using computers and table-top experiments. Part I: The role of drag in insect flight. Airplanes and helicopters are airborne via aerodynamic lift, not drag. However, it is not a priori clear that insects use only lift to fly. We find that dragonfly uses mainly drag to hover, which explains an anomalous factor of four in previous estimates of dragonfly lift coefficients, where drag was assumed to be negligible. Moreover, we show that the use of drag for flight is efficient at insect size. This suggests a re-consideration of the hovering efficiency of flapping flight, which is no longer described by the lift to drag ratio. Part II. Fore-hind wing interaction in dragonfly flight. A distinctive feature of dragonflies is their use of two pairs of wings which are driven by separate direct muscles. Dragonflies can actively modulate the phase delay between fore-hind wings during different maneuver. We compute the Navier-Stokes equation around two wings following the motion measured from our tethered dragonfly experiments, and find an explanation of the advantage of counter-stroking during hovering.

  9. Lessons from independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent history of Oryx provides invaluable lessons for those who plan future energy strategies, relates the author of this paper. When Oryx became an independent oil and gas company, its reserves were declining, its stock was selling below asset values, and the price of oil seemed stuck below $15 per barrel. The message from Oryx management to Oryx employees was: We are in charge of our own destiny. We are about to create our own future. Oryx had developed a new, positive corporate culture and the corporate credit required for growth. This paper points to two basic principles that have guided the metamorphosis in Oryx's performance. The first objective was to improve operational efficiency and to identify the right performance indicators to measure this improvement. It states that the most critical performance indicator for an exploration and production company must be replacement and expansion of reserves at a competitive replacement cost. Oryx has cut its finding costs from $12 to $5 per barrel, while the BP acquisition provided proven reserves at a cost of only $4 per barrel. Another performance indicator measures Oryx's standing in the financial markets

  10. Patient safety: lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional approach to patient safety in health care has ranged from reticence to outward denial of serious flaws. This undermines the otherwise remarkable advances in technology and information that have characterized the specialty of medical practice. In addition, lessons learned in industries outside health care, such as in aviation, provide opportunities for improvements that successfully reduce mishaps and errors while maintaining a standard of excellence. This is precisely the call in medicine prompted by the 1999 Institute of Medicine report ''To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.'' However, to effect these changes, key components of a successful safety system must include: (1) communication, (2) a shift from a posture of reliance on human infallibility (hence ''shame and blame'') to checklists that recognize the contribution of the system and account for human limitations, and (3) a cultivation of non-punitive open and/or de-identified/anonymous reporting of safety concerns, including close calls, in addition to adverse events. (orig.)

  11. Patient safety: lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagian, James P. [National Center for Patient Safety, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The traditional approach to patient safety in health care has ranged from reticence to outward denial of serious flaws. This undermines the otherwise remarkable advances in technology and information that have characterized the specialty of medical practice. In addition, lessons learned in industries outside health care, such as in aviation, provide opportunities for improvements that successfully reduce mishaps and errors while maintaining a standard of excellence. This is precisely the call in medicine prompted by the 1999 Institute of Medicine report ''To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.'' However, to effect these changes, key components of a successful safety system must include: (1) communication, (2) a shift from a posture of reliance on human infallibility (hence ''shame and blame'') to checklists that recognize the contribution of the system and account for human limitations, and (3) a cultivation of non-punitive open and/or de-identified/anonymous reporting of safety concerns, including close calls, in addition to adverse events. (orig.)

  12. Constellation Program Lessons Learned. Volume 2; Detailed Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer; Neubek, Deborah J.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2011-01-01

    These lessons learned are part of a suite of hardware, software, test results, designs, knowledge base, and documentation that comprises the legacy of the Constellation Program. The context, summary information, and lessons learned are presented in a factual format, as known and described at the time. While our opinions might be discernable in the context, we have avoided all but factually sustainable statements. Statements should not be viewed as being either positive or negative; their value lies in what we did and what we learned that is worthy of passing on. The lessons include both "dos" and "don ts." In many cases, one person s "do" can be viewed as another person s "don t"; therefore, we have attempted to capture both perspectives when applicable and useful. While Volume I summarizes the views of those who managed the program, this Volume II encompasses the views at the working level, describing how the program challenges manifested in day-to-day activities. Here we see themes that were perhaps hinted at, but not completely addressed, in Volume I: unintended consequences of policies that worked well at higher levels but lacked proper implementation at the working level; long-term effects of the "generation gap" in human space flight development, the need to demonstrate early successes at the expense of thorough planning, and the consequences of problems and challenges not yet addressed because other problems and challenges were more immediate or manifest. Not all lessons learned have the benefit of being operationally vetted, since the program was cancelled shortly after Preliminary Design Review. We avoid making statements about operational consequences (with the exception of testing and test flights that did occur), but we do attempt to provide insight into how operational thinking influenced design and testing. The lessons have been formatted with a description, along with supporting information, a succinct statement of the lesson learned, and

  13. Pharmaceutical Approval Update

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenberg, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Afatinib (Gilotrif) for non–small-cell lung cancer; golimumab (Simponi Aria) for moderate-to-severe active rheumatoid arthritis; and levomilnacipran (Fetzima) extended release for major depressive disorder

  14. Pharmaceutical approval update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Marvin M

    2013-09-01

    Afatinib (Gilotrif) for non-small-cell lung cancer; golimumab (Simponi Aria) for moderate-to-severe active rheumatoid arthritis; and levomilnacipran (Fetzima) extended release for major depressive disorder. PMID:24273397

  15. Psychological Aspects of Aging. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Barbara

    This lesson plan is designed for a 50-minute class to teach adult caretakers of the aged about the psychological aspects of aging. The lesson is part of a course for caregivers in residential facilities and in home care. The lesson plan contains references, a list of equipment needed, objectives, information on how to set up the classroom, and the…

  16. WIMS Library updating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of 1990 the WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP) has been initiated at the International Atomic Energy Agency. The project was organized as an international research project, coordinated at the J. Stefan Institute. Up to now, 22 laboratories from 19 countries joined the project. Phase 1 of the project, which included WIMS input optimization for five experimental benchmark lattices, has been completed. The work presented in this paper describes also the results of Phase 2 of the Project, in which the cross sections based on ENDF/B-IV evaluated nuclear data library have been processed. (author)

  17. Shipment security update - 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the 2002 RERTR, NAC reported on the interim measures taken by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to enhance the security afforded to shipments of spent nuclear fuel. Since that time, there have been a number of additional actions focused on shipment security including training programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Electric Power Research Council, investigation by the Government Accounting Office, and individual measures taken by shippers and transportation agents. The paper will present a status update regarding this dynamic set of events and provide an objective assessment of the cost, schedule and technical implications of the changing security landscape. (author)

  18. Fossil Energy Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil Energy Update (FEU) provides abstracting and indexing coverage of current scientific and technical reports, journal articles, conference papers and proceedings, books, patents, theses, and monographs from all sources on fossil energy. All information announced in FEU, plus additional backup information, is included in the energy information data base of the Department of Energy's Technical Information Center. The subject matter covered by FEU includes coal, petroleum, natural gas, oil shale, hydrogen production, hydrocarbon and alcohol fuels, electric power engineering, magnetohydrodynamic generators, fuel cells, combustion systems, and combustion chemistry

  19. Lessons of nuclear robot history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe accidents occurred at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station stirred up people's great expectation of nuclear robot's deployment. However unexpected nuclear disaster, especially rupture of reactor building caused by core meltdown and hydrogen explosion, made it quite difficult to introduce nuclear robot under high radiation environment to cease accidents and dispose damaged reactor. Robotics Society of Japan (RSJ) set up committee to look back upon lessons learned from 50 year's past experience of nuclear robot development and summarized 'Lessons of nuclear robot history', which was shown on the home page website of RSJ. This article outlined it with personal comment. History of nuclear robot developed for inspection and maintenance at normal operation and for specific required response at nuclear accidents was reviewed with many examples at home and abroad for TMI, Chernobyl and JCO accidents. Present state of Fukushima accident response robot's introduction and development was also described with some comments on nuclear robot development from academia based on lessons. (T. Tanaka)

  20. Overview of lessons learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the Tarragona International Seminar the participating high-level specialists had very open and fruitful discussion concerning strategic decommissioning issues. The lessons learnt and possible solutions for future work issues can be found below. Although there appears to be a trend towards early dismantling, there seemed to be general agreement that technical solutions support a wide variety of safe decommissioning approaches. Thus, in terms of decommissioning strategy, it appears that no one size fits all. A flexible regulatory approach is needed in order to recognize the changing operational risks and physical conditions of facilities with time, and to optimise their dismantling. The NEA has released a comprehensive study on decommissioning strategies and costs that indicates world-wide progress. According to this report, over 50% of countries with nuclear facilities have a framework of decommissioning requirements and 60% have defined radioactive waste clearance levels. Up to about 70% of the costs of D and D are attributable to dismantling and waste management. The provisions for safety of the D and D process are closely linked to the availability of the necessary funds as and when required. A number of common factors were defined for successful implementation of decommissioning strategies: i.e. safety, technical feasibility of decommissioning options, risk-informed progression of D and D activities as project proceeds, maintenance of competency and corporate memory throughout project, waste management and disposal capability, financing that suits the scope of the project, a well-defined risk-informed and performance-based regulatory process, and establishment of effective communication with local and regional governments and key stakeholders, particularly personnel, at the earliest opportunity before decommissioning. (author)

  1. Update of ICRP Publications 109 and 111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Michiaki

    2016-02-01

    The Task Group (TG) of Committee 4 was created to update the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 109 and 111 in light of the lessons from Fukushima, recent international developments concerning the protection of people in emergency exposure situations, and people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident or a radiation emergency. An important aspect of the TG's approach focuses on clarifying the consequences of the introduction of the situation-based approach to implementation of radiological protection that was introduced in ICRP Publication 103 in place of the previous approach based on the distinction between practices and interventions. The TG focused its reflection on several issues revealed by the Fukushima accident in relation to the justification and optimization of emergency decisions, the characterization of the radiological situation, the protection of emergency and recovery responders, the decontamination and waste management strategies, the management of contaminated foodstuffs and commodities, the shift from the emergency to the existing exposure situation, and the co-expertise process to develop radiological protection culture among the affected population. PMID:26717182

  2. The incidence of cancer and leukaemia in young people in the vicinity of the Sellafield site, West Cumbria. Further studies and an update of the situation since the publication of the report of the Black Advisory Group in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report discusses the incidence of cancer and leukaemia among young people living in the vicinity of Sellafield. Possible radiation effects of paternal preconception irradiation in cancer development as well as the risk involved by the general population is considered. Recommendations are provided to improve occupational safety and public health

  3. Lessons Learned from EAST's Failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Significant progresses have been obtained on EAST tokamak partially based on lessons from its failures marked by more than 20 times leakages from PFC and 1.6 ton water inside of vacuum chamber. Lessons learned from major failures in EAST have been summarized in this paper. Major failures came from design, construction, commissioning and operation phases have been described which have been classified as imperfect design, QA control, failure of components and lack of understanding. Predictions for further risks and possible ways to mitigating these risks have been given in this paper. (author)

  4. Applying pharmaceutical lessons: learning lessons from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, B

    1998-06-01

    Systematic evaluation of a project, product or other successes, and failures, is an important method for improving the performance of a company, as well as that of an individual. One should evaluate and determine if lessons learned can be applied to the systems and procedures being used in the company. Even if the company does not have to adjust its strategies, procedures, portfolio or systems as a result of lessons it has learned, there may be pointers to communicate to staff. It is easy for many aspects of a system to become outdated, particularly in an organization that is growing or changing rapidly. It is therefore generally appropriate to evaluate the company's regulatory compliance, toxicology compliance, clinical auditing practices and other appropriate systems on an annual or biannual basis. Most lessons of success or failure are specific to a single situation because of the combination of people, drug, competition, priorities and many other factors involved, and cannot be extrapolated to other situations. Some general lessons and principles are presented that will facilitate drug discovery, development and marketing. PMID:15616644

  5. [Economics] Introductory Lesson (Begin Day One). Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Roland

    This introductory lesson on teaching economics concepts contains sections on the following: purpose; objectives; time; materials needed; and step-by-step classroom procedures. The focus is on the economic problem of scarcity and opportunity costs. Attached is an original skit, "There's no such thing as a free lunch," and a chart that outlines some…

  6. The incidence of cancer and leukaemia in young people in the vicinity of the Sellafield site, West Cumbria: further studies and an update of the situation since the publication of the report of the Black Advisory Group in 1984. Fourth report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth report is the result of the Committee's review of the dosimetric, epidemiological and other scientific data relating to the Sellafield Site and the village of Seascale, together with other relevant advances in scientific knowledge, that have become available since the publication of the report of the Black Advisory Group in 1984. The review was undertaken in response to a request by Government, made to the Committee in September 1989 and recorded as a commitment in answer to a Parliamentary Question regarding COMARE's work programme which included: ''an update and review of cancer incidence in young people in the vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, in the light of emerging epidemiological work commissioned by Government in 1984 and other relevant work''. [Hansard 10 January 1990, Col 662]. In this report, we review all of the data which has become available since the publication of the Black Advisory Group report and we report our findings and conclusions to Government. (author)

  7. Working Memory Updating Latency Reflects the Cost of Switching between Maintenance and Updating Modes of Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Yoav; Oberauer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Updating and maintenance of information are 2 conflicting demands on working memory (WM). We examined the time required to update WM (updating latency) as a function of the sequence of updated and not-updated items within a list. Participants held a list of items in WM and updated a variable subset of them in each trial. Four experiments that vary…

  8. Lessons learned related to packaging and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of lessons learned as a tool for learning from past experiences is well established, especially by many organizations within the nuclear industry. Every person has, at some time, used the principles of lessons learned to adopt good work practices based on their own experiences or the experiences of others. Lessons learned can also help to avoid the recurrence of adverse practices, which is often an area that most lessons-learned programs tend to focus on. This paper will discuss how lessons learned relate to packaging and transportation issues and events experienced at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. It will also discuss the role performed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety's Office of Operating Experience Analysis and Feedback in disseminating lessons learned and operating experience feedback to the DOE complex. The central concept of lessons learned is that any organization should be able to learn from its own experiences and events. In addition, organizations should implement methodologies to scan external environments for lessons learned, to analyze and determine the relevance of lessons learned, and to bring about the necessary changes learned from these experiences. With increased concerns toward facility safety, the importance of utilizing the lessons-learned principles and the establishment of lessons-learned programs can not be overstated

  9. Cohort Profile Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Obel, Niels

    2014-01-01

    of Causes of Death, the Danish National Prescription Registry, the Attainment Register and the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research to get information on vital status, migration, cancer, hospital contacts, causes of death, dispensed prescriptions, education and employment. Using this design, rates...... to extract an age- and sex-matched comparison cohort from the general population, as well as cohorts of family members of the HIV-infected patients and of the comparison cohort. The combined cohort is linked with CRS, the Danish Cancer Registry, the Danish National Hospital Registry, the Danish Registry...

  10. Adjustment or updating of models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D J Ewins

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, first a review of the terminology used in the model adjustment or updating is presented. This is followed by an outline of the major updating algorithms cuurently available, together with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each, and the current state-of-the-art of this important application and part of optimum design technology.

  11. Updates Technologies of Media Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Whether as status notifications in news feeds or interactive prompts in online video services, updates punctuate the background routines of media by bringing a variety of changes to the attention of users. In this dissertation I argue that updates rationalize media change by making previously obscure actions of users and movements of technologies…

  12. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael; Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon

    2013-01-01

    NASA policy requires each Program or Project to develop a plan for how they will address Lessons Learned. Projects have the flexibility to determine how best to promote and implement lessons learned. A large project might budget for a lessons learned position to coordinate elicitation, documentation and archival of the project lessons. The lessons learned process crosses all NASA Centers and includes the contactor community. o The Office of The Chief Engineer at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C., is the overall process owner, and field locations manage the local implementation. One tool used to transfer knowledge between program and projects is the Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). Most lessons come from NASA in partnership with support contractors. A search for lessons that might impact a new design is often performed by a contractor team member. Knowledge is not found with only one person, one project team, or one organization. Sometimes, another project team, or person, knows something that can help your project or your task. Knowledge sharing is an everyday activity at the Kennedy Space Center through storytelling, Kennedy Engineering Academy presentations and through searching the Lessons Learned Information system. o Project teams search the lessons repository to ensure the best possible results are delivered. o The ideas from the past are not always directly applicable but usually spark new ideas and innovations. Teams have a great responsibility to collect and disseminate these lessons so that they are shared with future generations of space systems designers. o Leaders should set a goal for themselves to host a set numbers of lesson learned events each year and do more to promote multiple methods of lessons learned activities. o High performing employees are expected to share their lessons, however formal knowledge sharing presentation are not the norm for many employees.

  13. EMU Lessons Learned Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kevin M., Jr.; Crocker, Lori; Cupples, J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    As manned space exploration takes on the task of traveling beyond low Earth orbit, many problems arise that must be solved in order to make the journey possible. One major task is protecting humans from the harsh space environment. The current method of protecting astronauts during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is through use of the specially designed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). As more rigorous EVA conditions need to be endured at new destinations, the suit will need to be tailored and improved in order to accommodate the astronaut. The Objective behind the EMU Lessons Learned Database(LLD) is to be able to create a tool which will assist in the development of next-generation EMUs, along with maintenance and improvement of the current EMU, by compiling data from Failure Investigation and Analysis Reports (FIARs) which have information on past suit failures. FIARs use a system of codes that give more information on the aspects of the failure, but if one is unfamiliar with the EMU they will be unable to decipher the information. A goal of the EMU LLD is to not only compile the information, but to present it in a user-friendly, organized, searchable database accessible to all familiarity levels with the EMU; both newcomers and veterans alike. The EMU LLD originally started as an Excel database, which allowed easy navigation and analysis of the data through pivot charts. Creating an entry requires access to the Problem Reporting And Corrective Action database (PRACA), which contains the original FIAR data for all hardware. FIAR data are then transferred to, defined, and formatted in the LLD. Work is being done to create a web-based version of the LLD in order to increase accessibility to all of Johnson Space Center (JSC), which includes converting entries from Excel to the HTML format. FIARs related to the EMU have been completed in the Excel version, and now focus has shifted to expanding FIAR data in the LLD to include EVA tools and support hardware such as

  14. Small Business. Lesson Plan Three.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, Thomas S.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan that requires students to use their research and analytical skills in studying the social and economic importance of small business. Activities include interviewing local business owners and producing a written summary, developing a survey showing and explaining area land use, and researching opposition to Wal-Mart stores.…

  15. Multimedia Principle in Teaching Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari Jabbour, Khayrazad

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia learning principle occurs when we create mental representations from combining text and relevant graphics into lessons. This article discusses the learning advantages that result from adding multimedia learning principle into instructions; and how to select graphics that support learning. There is a balance that instructional designers…

  16. Basic safety principles: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation reviews the following issues: basic safety principles and lessons learned; some conclusions from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; some recommendations from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; conclusions and recommendations from the Rogovin report on the accident on TMI; instrumentation deficiencies (from Rogovin report)

  17. Analysing student teachers’ lesson plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Louise Meier

    2015-01-01

    I investigate 17 mathematics student teachers’ productions, in view of examining the synergy and interaction between their mathematical and didactical knowledge. The concrete data material consists in lesson plans elaborated for the final exam of a unit on “numbers, arithmetic and algebra”. The...... anthropological theory of the didactic is used as a framework to analyse these components of practical and theoretical knowledge....

  18. Moby-Dick. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Herman Melville's novel "Moby-Dick," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that the novel is grounded in facts that Melville acquired in his own experiences at sea; New England was the center of a prospering whaling industry in the 19th century; and journal keeping was not uncommon among 19th-century…

  19. Constellation Lessons Learned Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Neubek, Deb

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the lessons learned from the Constellation Program (CxP) and identified several factors that contributed to the inability of the CxP to meet the cost and schedule commitments. The review includes a significant section on the context in which the CxP operated since new programs are likely to experience the same constraints.

  20. Update of RIPL Discrete Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first update of the Reference Input Parameter Library Phase II (RIPL-2) Discrete Level Scheme Library (DLSL) was performed in October 2005 by T. Belgya under a Contract Agreement with the IAEA. The second update followed in 2007 with the setup of easy-to-use programs which can use the original ENSDF files to create the DLSL in the format that was defined in RIPL-2. There is a description which serves as a guide to any user who wants to run the program(s). The results of the update were also reported. The current work represents a new update of the database, addressing and amending the problems which have occurred and were reported during the last 5 years. The updated version of RIPL- 2, RIPL-3 was published in December 2009. The purpose of this report is to document the changes in the new DLSL.

  1. Update on infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Infection control is a dynamic and ever-changing subject and all dental staff should be kept aware of the most up-to-date procedures required to prevent the transmission of infection and should understand why these procedures are necessary. Regular monitoring and updating of all procedures in the light of new scientific evidence is necessary and all new staff must be trained in infection control procedures prior to working in the surgery. A practitioner who is routinely following an appropriate infection control policy, including the use of techniques and products of proven efficacy (perhaps through accreditation), is better placed to refute allegations arising in the course of civil litigation, health and safety at work prosecution, complaints and disciplinary procedures, or investigations by the GDC. PMID:16892574

  2. Neurocritical care update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    This update comprises six important topics under neurocritical care that require reevaluation. For post-cardiac arrest brain injury, the evaluation of the injury and its corresponding therapy, including temperature modulation, is required. Analgosedation for target temperature management is an essential strategy to prevent shivering and minimizes endogenous stress induced by catecholamine surges. For severe traumatic brain injury, the diverse effects of therapeutic hypothermia depend on the complicated pathophysiology of the condition. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring is an essential tool for detecting nonconvulsive status epilepticus in the intensive care unit (ICU). Neurocritical care, including advanced hemodynamic monitoring, is a fundamental approach for delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage. We must be mindful of the high percentage of ICU patients who may develop sepsis-associated brain dysfunction. PMID:27239312

  3. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  4. Oil sands development update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed review and update of oil sands development in Alberta are provided covering every aspect of the production and economic aspects of the industry. It is pointed out that at present oil sands account for 28 per cent of Canadian crude oil production, expected to reach 50 per cent by 2005. Based on recent announcements, a total of 26 billion dollars worth of projects are in progress or planned; 20 billion dollars worth of this development is in the Athabasca area, the remainder in Cold Lake and other areas. The current update envisages up to 1,800,000 barrels per day by 2008, creating 47,000 new jobs and total government revenues through direct and indirect taxes of 118 billion dollars. Provinces other than Alberta also benefit from these development, since 60 per cent of all employment and income created by oil sands production is in other parts of Canada. Up to 60 per cent of the expansion is for goods and services and of this, 50 to 55 per cent will be purchased from Canadian sources. The remaining 40 per cent of the new investment is for engineering and construction of which 95 per cent is Canadian content. Aboriginal workforce by common consent of existing operators matches regional representation (about 13 per cent), and new developers are expected to match these standards. Planned or ongoing development in environmental protection through improved technologies and optimization, energy efficiency and improved tailings management, and active support of flexibility mechanisms such as emission credits trading, joint implementation and carbon sinks are very high on the industry's agenda. The importance of offsets are discussed extensively along with key considerations for international negotiations, as well as further research of other options such as sequestration, environmentally benign disposal of waste, and enhanced voluntary action

  5. Genomics and Health Impact Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Blog Post Prostate Cancer: Family History & Genetics Microbiome: Public Health Implications Colorectal Cancer: Screening & Genomics About ... 23) Birth Defects and Child Health Cancer Cardiovascular Disease Chronic Diseases Ethics/ Policy/ Law Genomics in Practice ...

  6. Lessons Learned In Aerosol Monitoring With The RASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated aerosol collection and analysis system designed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the 1990's and is deployed in several locations around the world as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) required under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The RASA operates unattended, save for regularly scheduled maintenance, iterating samples through a three-step process on a 24-hour interval. In its 15-year history, much has been learned from the operation and maintenance of the RASA that can benefit engineering updates or future aerosol systems. On 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami rocked the eastern coast of Japan, resulting in power loss and cooling failures at the Daiichi nuclear power plants in Fukushima Prefecture. Aerosol collections were conducted with the RASA in Richland, WA. We present a summary of the lessons learned over the history of the RASA, including lessons taken from the Fukushima incident, regarding the RASA IMS stations operated by the United States.

  7. IAEA International Generic Ageing Lessons Learned programme phase 1 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • International Generic Ageing Lessons Learned (IGALL) Programme was commenced to develop a practical guide for ageing management programmes. • Results of IGALL Phase 1 are publicly available on IAEA web sites. • 76 ageing management programmes and 27 time limited ageing analyses is provided. • More than 2000 consolidated line items in ageing management review tables was prepared. • The IGALL represents a common internationally agreed basis on what constitutes acceptable ageing management programme. - Abstract: This paper presents purpose and results of the IAEA International Generic Ageing Lessons Learned (IGALL) programme phase 1. The IGALL programme phase 1 (2010–2013) was successfully completed in September 2013. The IGALL safety report, which includes consolidated IGALL database information on 76 ageing management programmes, 27 time limited ageing analyses and more than 2000 consolidated line items in ageing management review tables was prepared for publication. The IGALL database was made publicly available in February 2014. The IGALL safety report represents a common internationally agreed basis on what constitutes acceptable ageing management programmes, as well as a knowledge base on ageing management for design of new plants, design reviews, safety reviews (such as periodic safety review), etc., and serves as a roadmap to available information on ageing management. The IAEA IGALL programme assures that information contained in the IGALL safety report will be kept updated and creates an international network for continuous discussion and development of AMPs and TLAAs as recommended tools to manage ageing

  8. Experiences and lessons learned worldwide in the cleanup and decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the aftermath of accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication reviews experiences in IAEA Member States relevant to the cleanup and decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the aftermath of accidents and provides an overview of lessons learned worldwide. It also updates information from earlier publications on this topic, according to the different phases of activity after the accident has been declared ended (site stabilization, post-accident cleanup, safe enclosure) and, in the longer term, final decommissioning and site remediation

  9. Updates on Treatment of Gemcitabine-Refractory Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektaria Makrilia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine monotherapy and gemcitabine-based regimens are the current standard of care for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, there is still great controversy over the role of salvage chemotherapy after failure of gemcitabine. This review is an update on the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting regarding the most important developments in the treatment of refractory pancreatic cancer, as they were reported in Abstracts #e14542 and #e14588.

  10. Update of CERN exchange network

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An update of the CERN exchange network will be done next April. Disturbances or even interruptions of telephony services may occur from 4th to 24th April during evenings from 18:30 to 00:00 but will not exceed more than 4 consecutive hours (see tentative planning below). CERN divisions are invited to avoid any change requests (set-ups, move or removals) of telephones and fax machines from 4th to 25th April. Everything will be done to minimize potential inconveniences which may occur during this update. There will be no loss of telephone functionalities. CERN GSM portable phones won't be affected by this change. Should you need more details, please send us your questions by email to Standard.Telephone@cern.ch. DateChange typeAffected areas April 11 Update of switch in LHC 4 LHC 4 Point April 14 Update of switch in LHC 5 LHC 5 Point April 15 Update of switches in LHC 3 and LHC 2 Points LHC 3 and LHC 2 April 22 Update of switch N4 Meyrin Ouest April 23 Update of switch  N6 Prévessin Site Ap...

  11. Incidence of cancer in infants (1983-1998) and cancer deaths in the total population (1979-1997) in Bavaria. 2nd update of the report 'Inzidenz und Mortalitaet boesartiger Neubildungen in Bayern'' of 1993. Report in the context of radiobiological environmental monitoring in Bavaria; Inzidenz kindlicher boesartiger Neubildungen (1983-1998) und Mortalitaet aufgrund boesartiger Neubildungen in der Gesamtbevoelkerung (1979-1997) in Bayern. 2. Fortschreibung des Berichts 'Inzidenz und Mortalitaet boesartiger Neubildungen in Bayern' von 1993. Bericht im Rahmen des 'Strahlenbiologischen Umweltmonitoring Bayern'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahraus, H.; Grosche, B. (eds.)

    2002-08-01

    The second update contains data on the incidence of infant neoplasms for the period of 1983-1998, data on mortality from cancer for the years 1979-1997 in the form of tables and maps, a table on mortality rates for the periods of 1979-1988 (Report of 1993), 1989-1993 (1st update), and 1994-1997, as well as data for the whole period during which causes of death were classified according to ICD 9, i.e. 1978-1998. The rare cases of gonadal and bone tumours in infants are omitted, but renal tumours as well as tumours of the sympathetic nervous system, which are more frequent, are included. (orig.)

  12. Orthomolecular oncology review: ascorbic acid and cancer 25 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Michael J; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R; Mora, Edna M; Guzmán, Angelik; Riordan, Neil H; Riordan, Hugh D; Casciari, Joseph J; Jackson, James A; Román-Franco, Angel

    2005-03-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid on cancer has been a subject of great controversy. This is a follow-up review of the 1979 article by Cameron, Pauling, and Leibovitz published in Cancer Research. In this updated version, the authors address general aspects of ascorbic acid and cancer that have been presented before, while reviewing, analyzing, and updating new existing literature on the subject. In addition, they present and discuss their own mechanistic hypothesis on the effect of ascorbic acid on the cancer cell. The objective of this review is to provide an updated scientific basis for the use of ascorbic acid, especially intravenously as adjuvant treatment in pharmacological nutritional oncology. PMID:15695476

  13. Multiplicative updates for the LASSO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    Multiplicative updates have proven useful for non-negativity constrained optimization. Presently, we demonstrate how multiplicative updates also can be used for unconstrained optimization. This is for instance useful when estimating the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), i.......e. least squares minimization with $L_1$-norm regularization, since the multiplicative updates (MU) can efficiently exploit the structure of the problem traditionally solved using quadratic programming (QP). We derive an algorithm based on MU for the LASSO and compare the performance to Matlabs standard QP...

  14. Locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer treated by combined chemotherapy and preoperative irradiation: updated results in a series of 120 patients; Cancer du sein localement evolue non inflammatoire traite par association de chimiotherapie et de radiotherapie a dose preoperatoire: reactualisation des resultats d'une serie de 120 patientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, D.; Touboul, E.; Moureau-Zabotto, L. [Hopital Tenon AP-HP, Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Lefran, J.P.; Blondon, J. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere AP-HP, Service de chirurgie generale et gynecologique, 75 - Paris (France); Genestie, C. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere AP-HP, Service d' anatomopathologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-06-01

    Purpose. - To evaluate our updated data concerning survival and locoregional control in a study of locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer after primary chemotherapy followed by external preoperative irradiation. Patients and methods. - Between 1982 and 1998, 120 patients (75 stage IIIA, 41 stage IIIB, and 4 stage IIIC according to AJCC staging system 2002) were consecutively treated by four courses of induction chemotherapy with anthracycline-containing combinations followed by preoperative irradiation (45 Gy to the breast and nodal areas) and a fifth course of chemotherapy. Three different locoregional approaches were proposed, depending on tumour characteristics and tumour response. After completion of local therapy, all patients received a sixth course of chemotherapy and a maintenance adjuvant chemotherapy regimen without anthracycline. The median follow-up from the beginning of treatment was 140 months. Results. - Mastectomy and axillary dissection were performed in 49 patients (with residual tumour larger than 3 cm in diameter or located behind the nipple or with bifocal tumour), and conservative treatment in 71 patients (39 achieved clinical complete response or partial response >90% and received additional radiation boost to initial tumour bed; 32 had residual mass {<=}3 cm in diameter and were treated by wide excision and axillary dissection followed by a boost to the excision site). Ten-year actuarial local failure rate was 13% after irradiation alone, 23% after wide excision and irradiation, and 4% after mastectomy (p =0.1). After multivariate analysis, possibility of breast-conserving therapy was related to initial tumour size (<6 vs. {>=}6 cm in diameter, p =0.002). Ten-year overall metastatic disease-free survival rate was 61%. After multivariate analysis, metastatic disease-free survival rates were significantly influenced by clinical stage (stage IIIA-B vs. IIIC, p =0.0003), N-stage (N0 vs. N1-2a, and 3c, p = 0.017), initial tumour size (<6

  15. Update on Radioactive Waste Management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a brief background to the current position in the United Kingdom (UK) and provides an update on the various developments and initiatives within the field of radioactive waste management that have been taking place during 2002/03. These include: The UK Government's Department of Trade and Industry (DTi) review of UK energy policy; The UK Government's (Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and Devolved Administrations*) consultation program; The UK Government's DTi White Paper, 'Managing the Nuclear Legacy: A Strategy for Action'; Proposals for improved regulation of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) conditioning and packaging. These various initiatives relate, in Nirex's opinion, to the three sectors of the industry and this paper will provide a comment on these initiatives in light of the lessons that Nirex has learnt from past events and suggest some conclusions for the future

  16. Some Lesson Plans for Economic Geography in the Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockledge, Ann

    1991-01-01

    Provides three sample lessons for teaching elementary school children about economic geography. Includes lessons dealing with natural resources, economic activity, and forests. Provides lesson objectives, focus, and instructional strategies. Offers a list of suggested readings from recent trade books. (SG)

  17. [Vitamin D. A geriatric updated perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera Casado, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to offer an updated survey about the relationship between old age, vitamin D and different clinical conditions. Two third of people over 65 years has insufficient serum levels of vitamin D (Vitamin D. Low serum vitamin D concentration has been linked to mortality, osteoporosis, falls propensity, fractures, frailty, and cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Several epidemiological studies open the possibility to a relationship between low levels of the vitamin D and many other diseases. Among them with different cancer, diabetes, some types of dementia, Parkinson's disease, macular degeneration or periodontitis. Also with muscle strength, mobility and physical performance. Vitamin D supplementation has beneficial clinical effects, with a significant reduction of risks, specially in subjects living in nursing-homes and in those treated with corticoids or antireabsortive drugs. These effects are doses dependent. Risk of intoxication is minimal, even with high doses of vitamin. PMID:24294732

  18. Complete Edentulism and Comorbid Diseases: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, David A

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between complete edentulism, which is the terminal outcome of a multifactorial oral disease process and other comorbid diseases, was first reported in 2009. Although the relationship between edentulism and a multitude of systemic diseases was reported, none of the publications studied could determine causality of tooth loss on the incidence of any comorbid disease. Since that publication, there has been a renewed interest in this relationship, and a plethora of new articles have been published. This article will provide an update on articles published since 2008 on the relationship between edentulism and comorbid diseases, and will include the relationship between complete edentulism and such comorbid conditions as malnutrition, obesity, cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pulmonary diseases (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), cancer, and even mortality. PMID:26371954

  19. Update on the epidemiology of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R L; Zmuda, J M; Stone, K L; Cauley, J A

    2000-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health problem that affects the entire aging population. This report provides an update on the epidemiology of osteoporosis and its associated fractures. Published studies from 1997 to the present are highlighted. The current US prevalence estimates for osteoporosis, trends in fracture incidence rates, and latest reports on the morbidity, mortality, and costs attributable to osteoporotic fractures are discussed. Recent advances in our understanding of risk factors associated with osteoporosis and related fractures are reviewed. Special attention is paid to the rapid progress being made in the field of genetics, the growing importance of nutrition, and the new questions being raised as to the influence of hormonal factors on bone mineral density and fracture risk. New studies linking osteoporosis to several other important diseases in women including breast cancer, osteoarthritis, and stroke are also reviewed. PMID:11123043

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update; Autoimmunpankreatitis. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmberger, T. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Staedt. Klinikum, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Neuroradiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  1. Five Years after the Fukushima Daiichi Accident: Nuclear Safety Improvements and Lessons Learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Countries around the world continue to implement safety improvements and corrective actions based on lessons learnt from the 11 March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This report provides a high-level summary and update on these activities, and outlines further lessons learnt and challenges identified for future consideration. It focuses on actions taken by NEA committees and NEA member countries, and as such is complementary to reports produced by other international organisations. It is in a spirit of openness and transparency that NEA member countries share this information to illustrate that appropriate actions are being taken to maintain and enhance the level of safety at their nuclear facilities. Nuclear power plants are safer today because of these actions. High-priority follow-on items identified by NEA committees are provided to assist countries in continuously benchmarking and improving their nuclear safety practices. (authors)

  2. The update study of the initiation mechanism and drug therapies of cancer pain%癌痛的发生机制及其相关药物治疗的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王妙苗

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain is a unique and complex kind of chronic pain. The animal model of cancer pain shows hyperalgesia, hypersensitivity and pain-related behavior, and unique neurochemical changes occur in the corresponding spinal cord segment. Cancer pain is related to peripheral afferent sensitization and central sensitization. At the early stage of cancer pain, the tumor cells, inflammatory cells of induced pain substance, and the continued activation of osteoclasts induced sensitization of primary afferent-based. At the late stage, nerve compression caused by tumor growth and damage involved in the genesis of cancer pain. The treatment drugs for cancer pain includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs) , opioids, bisphosphonates and other drugs under development in medicine. The research on the internal mechanisms of cancer pain and the development of related drugs would provide important theoretical basis and direction for the clinical practice of cancer pain management.%癌痛是一种机制独特而复杂的慢性疼痛,在动物模型中表现出对痛觉过敏、超敏等疼痛相关行为,其相应的脊髓节段内发生独特的神经化学改变.癌痛的发生与外周传入神经敏化和中枢敏化有关,在癌痛早期,以肿瘤细胞、炎症细胞产生的致痛物质以及破骨细胞的持续活化所致的初级传人神经敏化为主;在癌痛后期,肿瘤生长引起的神经压迫与损伤参与了癌痛的发生过程.癌痛的治疗药物包括非类固醇类抗炎药(NSAIDs)、阿片类药物、双膦酸盐类药物和其他尚在开发中的药物等.研究癌痛产生的内在机制及其相关药物治疗将为临床肿瘤患者疼痛治疗提供重要的理论依据和方向指导.

  3. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Geography lessons and the results of these activities. The activities are from fifth to twelfth grade, passing through a first example of water pollution resulting from a Hercules labour, through the lyricism of the aurora borealis description, through the dramatic life of a refugee from Darfur, through the Dobrudgea winter landscape, through the grey urban landscape of Bucharest in the 90s and so on. Students were put into learning situations that stimulated their creativity, developed communication competencies and enriched their general knowledge.

  4. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  5. Updates of pathologic myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Lai, Chi-Chun; Cheung, Chiu Ming Gemmy

    2016-05-01

    Complications from pathologic myopia are a major cause of visual impairment and blindness, especially in east Asia. The eyes with pathologic myopia may develop loss of the best-corrected vision due to various pathologies in the macula, peripheral retina and the optic nerve. Despite its importance, the definition of pathologic myopia has been inconsistent. The refractive error or axial length alone often does not adequately reflect the 'pathologic myopia'. Posterior staphyloma, which is a hallmark lesion of pathologic myopia, can occur also in non-highly myopic eyes. Recently a revised classification system for myopic maculopathy has been proposed to standardize the definition among epidemiological studies. In this META-PM (meta analyses of pathologic myopia) study classification, pathologic myopia was defined as the eyes having chorioretinal atrophy equal to or more severe than diffuse atrophy. In addition, the advent of new imaging technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) has enabled the detailed observation of various pathologies specific to pathologic myopia. New therapeutic approaches including intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents and the advance of vitreoretinal surgeries have greatly improved the prognosis of patients with pathologic myopia. The purpose of this review article is to provide an update on topics related to the field of pathologic myopia, and to outline the remaining issues which need to be solved in the future. PMID:26769165

  6. [Emergency departments - 2016 update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, M; Brokmann, J C; Gräff, I; Kumle, B; Wilke, P; Gries, A

    2016-04-01

    Acute medical care in hospital emergency departments has experienced rapid development in recent years and gained increasing importance not only from a professional medical point of view but also from an economic and health policy perspective. The present article therefore provides an update on the situation of emergency departments in Germany. Care in emergency departments is provided with an increasing tendency to patients of all ages presenting with varying primary symptoms, complaints, illnesses and injury patterns. In the process, patients reach the emergency department by various routes and structural provision. Cross-sectional communication and cooperation, prioritization and organization of emergency management and especially medical staff qualifications increasingly play a decisive role in this process. The range of necessary knowledge and skills far exceeds the scope of prehospital medical emergency care and the working environment differs substantially. In addition to existing structural and economic problems, the latest developments, as well as future proposals for the design of in-hospital emergency medical care in interdisciplinary emergency departments are described. PMID:26952123

  7. Higgcision Updates 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2014-01-01

    During the 2014 Summer Conferences, both ATLAS and CMS Collaborations of the LHC experiments have demonstrated tremendous efforts in treatment of data and processing more data such that most data on signal strengths have improved; especially the diphoton and fermionic modes of both experiments. Here in this note we perform an update to our previous model-independent Higgs precision analysis -- Higgcision. We found the followings: (i) the uncertainties on most couplings shrink about 10--20%, (ii) the nonstandard (e.g. invisible) decay branching ratio of the Higgs boson is constrained to be less than 18.5% if only the width is allowed to vary, (iii) the gauge-Higgs coupling C_v is constrained to be 0.95^{+0.11}_{-0.12}, in which the uncertainty is reduced by about 10%, and (iv) the standard model (SM) Higgs boson still provides the best fit to all the Higgs boson data, and compared to the previous results the SM Higgs boson now enjoys a higher p value than the last year.

  8. Dali server update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M

    2016-07-01

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo. PMID:27131377

  9. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, S.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  10. Lessons from the Asian Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Mishkin, Frederic S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an asymmetric information analysis of the recent East Asian crisis. It then outlines several lessons from this crisis. First, there is a strong rationale for an international lender of last resort. Second, without appropriate conditionality for this lending, the moral hazard created by operation of an international lender of last resort can promote financial instability. Third, although capital flows did contribute to the crisis, they are a symptom rather than an underlyin...

  11. Project work in informatics lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Gurbiel, Ewa; Hardt-Olejniczak, Grazyna; Kolczyk, Ewa; Krupicka, Helena; Syslo, Maciej M.

    2001-01-01

    The best known method of integrating knowledge from different subjects is by doing cross-curricula projects. Projects carried out in the classroom involve planning, designing, realisation, presentation and evaluation of the task, which can create many links between subjects. Starting cross-curricula work can be demanding and difficult for teachers and pupils, so our proposal is to start by doing simple projects within informatics lessons. The first projects can concern one subject...

  12. Lessons from the Iron Dome

    OpenAIRE

    Yiftah S. Shapir

    2013-01-01

    Israel has been under rocket attack for many years. Over the years, the State of Israel has developed a doctrine for defense against high trajectory weapons, of which rocket fire is one type. This article focuses on the Iron Dome system, which entered into operational service in early 2011 and demonstrated what it was capable of within a few months of its deployment. The article attempts to examine the lessons from the system's deployment and to reassess the decision about purchasing the syst...

  13. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Cairns, Warren R. L.; Cook, Jennifer M.; Davidson, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the 27th annual review published in Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry of the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This Update refers to papers published approximately between September 2010 and August 2011 and continues the series of Atomic Spectrometry Updates (ASUs) in Environmental Analysis1 that should be read in conjunction with other related ASU reviews in the series, namely: clinical and biological materials, foods and be...

  14. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Warren R. L. Cairns; Cook, Jennifer M.; Davidson, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    This is the 28th annual review published in JAAS on the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This Update refers to papers published approximately between September 2011 and August 2012 and continues the series of Atomic Spectrometry Updates (ASUs) in Environmental Analysis1 that should be read in conjunction with other related ASUs in the series, namely: clinical and biological materials, foods and beverages2; advances in atomic spectrometry an...

  15. Communication technology update and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, August E

    2010-01-01

    New communication technologies are being introduced at an astonishing rate. Making sense of these technologies is increasingly difficult. Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals is the single best source for the latest developments, trends, and issues in communication technology. Featuring the fundamental framework along with the history and background of communication technologies, Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals, 12th edition helps you stay ahead of these ever-changing and emerging technologies.As always, every chapter ha

  16. Communication technology update and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, August E

    2008-01-01

    New communication technologies are being introduced at an astonishing rate. Making sense of these technologies is increasingly difficult. Communication Technology Update is the single best source for the latest developments, trends, and issues in communication technology. Now in its 11th edition, Communication Technology Update has become an indispensable information resource for business, government, and academia. As always, every chapter has been completely rewritten to reflect the latest developments and market statistics, and now covers mobile computing, dig

  17. The lesson of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concepts of quantal states and complementarity introduced by Niels Bohr in an intuitive though definitive manner more than a generation ago have come to form cornerstones in our description of nature. The Centenary Symposium celebrating Niels Bohr pays tribute to his work which gave birth to contemporary physics and nourished related fields of knowledge. The book is divided into three parts. Part One consists of two communications to the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters in memory of Niels Bohr. Part Two containing the main theme of the proceedings is divided into three sections. The title of the first, The Lesson of Quantum Theory, is an expression often used by Niels Bohr as time and again he endeavoured an ever deeper analysis of this lesson and its succinct formulation. For Bohr the lesson of quantum theory went beyond physics encompassing not only the natural sciences but all human conceptions. Thus the second section, Unity of Knowledge, conveys the progress in neighbouring disciplines in which Bohr took a particular interest. The last section, Niels Bohr, is dedicated to his personality, his activities, and his world of thought. Part three renders speeches and anecdotes presented during the evening gathering at Ny Carlsberg Glyptoteket on Niels Bohr's one hundredth birthday. (Auth.)

  18. Closing the loop: an interactive action-research conference format for delivering updated medical information while eliciting Latina patient/family experiences and psychosocial needs post-genetic cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Deborah J; Deri, Julia; Ricker, Charité; Perez, Martin A; Ogaz, Raquel; Feldman, Nancy; Viveros, Lori A; Paz, Benjamin; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R

    2012-09-01

    A patient/family-centered conference was conducted at an underserved community hospital to address Latinas' post-genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) medical information and psychosocial support needs, and determine the utility of the action research format. Latinas seen for GCRA were recruited to a half-day conference conducted in Spanish. Content was partly determined from follow-up survey feedback. Written surveys, interactive discussions, and Audience Response System (ARS) queries facilitated the participant-healthcare professional action research process. Analyses included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. The 71 attendees (41 patients and 27 relatives/friends) were primarily non-US born Spanish-speaking females, mean age 43 years. Among patients, 73 % had a breast cancer history; 85 % had BRCA testing (49 % BRCA+). Nearly all (96 %) attendees completed the conference surveys and ARS queries; ≥48 % participated in interactive discussions. Most (95 %) agreed that the format met their personal interests and expectations and provided useful information and resources. Gaps/challenges identified in the GCRA process included pre-consult anxiety, uncertainty about reason for referral and expected outcomes, and psychosocial needs post-GCRA, such as absorbing and disseminating risk information to relatives and concurrently coping with a recent cancer diagnosis. The combined action research and educational conference format was innovative and effective for responding to continued patient information needs and addressing an important data gap about support needs of Latina patients and family members following genetic cancer risk assessment. Findings informed GCRA process improvements and provide a basis for theory-driven cancer control research. PMID:22678665

  19. BRCA and Pancreatic Cancer: Selection of Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in BRCA genes are associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. There are pre clinical data which suggests that DNA cross linking agents should be used in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutations. This review is an update from the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium regarding recent developments in the treatment of pancreatic cancer with BRCA mutation. Only one study (Abstracts #217 was presented and it is described here.

  20. NB market update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2004 New Brunswick proclamation introduced several changes to the industry. This paper presents an update of the current New Brunswick electricity market from the perspective of the recently created New Brunswick System Operator (NBSO). A comparison was made between the modified industry and the previous industry structure. Significant changes included: corporate restructuring and market implementation; the formation of the independent system operator; and an increase in Public Utilities Board regulatory authority. The main objectives of the NBSO were reviewed, including its intention to reliably plan and operate the integrated power system as well as facilitating and operating the electricity market. Details of directors and officers were provided along with a list of legislated functions which included entering agreements with transmitters; provision and procurement of ancillary services; maintenance of integrated system; coordination of external activities; participation with standards authorities; planning and development of transmission; and the facilitation of a competitive market. An outline of the NBSO, Transco and Public Utilities Board relationships were presented. Details of the market advisory committee were outlined, with information concerning contracts, operations and services agreements. Transmission and ancillary services were also discussed, as well as issues concerning interruptible load agreements. A chart of the New Brunswick electricity market structure was presented, along with a market overview including details of capacity, ancillary services and suppliers. Market rules and amendments were presented, as well as market participation guides. Details of generation resource adequacy requirements and the imposition of penalties were outlined. Scheduling and dispatch issues were overviewed, as well as settlement processes, inputs and their sources, including settlements for variances. Future development possibilities included an expansion of

  1. Lessons learned after one year in space for the AAUSAT3 satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Mortensen, Hans Peter; Jessen, Troels;

    2014-01-01

    and Logging, interconnected through a CAN bus running the Cubesat Space Protocol. In the absence of an Onboard Computer, each subsystem has been developed as a completely autonomous subsystem, thus reducing interdependencies between subsystems. As this was the first cubesat satellite ever to try and...... receiver, and the linux based software update system was used four times to test and compare individual algorithms. After more than one year in space, a number of design flaws and important lessons learned have been identified and is presented on this paper. The mission of AAUSAT3 is not only to receive...

  2. CT colonography: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschoff, Andrik J.; Ernst, Andrea S.; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus S. [University Hospitals of Ulm, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Computed tomographic (CT) colonography (CTC) - also known as ''virtual colonoscopy'' - was first described more than a decade ago. As advancements in scanner technology and three-dimensional (3D) postprocessing helped develop this method to mature into a potential option in screening for colorectal cancer, the fundamentals of the examination remained the same. It is a minimally invasive, CT-based procedure that simulates conventional colonoscopy using 2D and 3D computerized reconstructions. The primary aim of CTC is the detection of colorectal polyps and carcinomas. However, studies reveal a wide performance variety in regard to polyp detection, especially for smaller polyps. This article reviews the available literature, discusses established indications as well as open issues and highlights potential future developments of CTC. (orig.)

  3. Lessons learned enhancing EPICS CA for LANSCE timed and flavored data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Jeffrey O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A previous paper described an upgrade to EPICS enabling client side tools at LANSCE to receive subscription updates filtered selectively to match a logical configuration of LANSCE beam gates, as configured by the control room. The upgrade required fundamental changes in the EPICS core components. First, the event queue in the EPICS server was upgraded to buffer record (function block) and device specific parameters accessed generically via software interfaces for introspection of 3rd party data. In contrast, event queues in previous versions of EPICS were strictly limited to buffering only value, timestamp, and alarm status tuples. Second, the Channel Access server is being upgraded to filter subscription updates. In this follow on paper some necessary design changes mid-project and the lessons learned during the software development will be described.

  4. Updates of Adjuvant Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer: Where Are We and Where Are We Going? Highlights from the '2010 ASCO Annual Meeting'. Chicago, IL, USA. June 4-8, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer represents the 4th leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Surgical resection remains the only potential curative approach. Current standard adjuvant therapy is gemcitabine monotherapy for 6 months. This year several trials investigated other combinations with or without molecular target agents, with or without concurrent radiation attempting to optimize adjuvant therapy. Several abstracts presented at the 2010 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting are highlighted here and will be further discussed in this review article. Abstracts #4012, #4059, and TPS226 added immunotherapy to adjuvant treatment. Abstract #4034 demonstrated lack of efficacy by adding either cetuximab or bevacizumab to known adjuvant therapies. Abstract e14625 combined S-1 to gemcitabine and abstract #4113 demonstrated a positive correlation between symptoms and CA 19-9 levels with the length of survival

  5. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    (post16) Making physics connect Doesn't Melvyn Bragg do a wonderful job, engaging both scientists and artists in sensitive discussion on Radio 4 about their methods and their purposes? But every week teachers have the chance to show their students that physics is a way of seeing the world that is well-connected with other aspects of knowledge and culture. The stakes are high: students who fail to appreciate this generally choose not to study the subject beyond GCSE. Most students find our preoccupation with technical detail off-putting. Accepting that we have a syllabus to cover, it's still a question of balance. In our teaching we should aim for variety in order to find ways to connect with every student's interests. Also, we can show that we (the nearest embodiment of a physicist some students will experience) are multidimensional and so fully human. Most important, teachers need flexibility to both encourage and respond to student comment and questions. The first booklet in the discussion series Shaping the Future takes up these themes. Rich in ideas for both immediate use and the longer term, it aims to stimulate debate and improve teaching. Copies cost £5.50 including postage and are available from Ingrid Ebeyer, Post-16 Initiative, Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH. How far is it? This question is asked in many family cars and school minibuses at the start of a journey, and answered by most in terms of hours and minutes rather than miles. What a good idea for introducing a social and historical perspective to a lesson on distance, velocity and time. How far can you actually get in a day? What is the range of human activity? Walking for eight hours will get many people about 25 miles. A pack horse will progress at much the same rate, but fast riding or a coach and team of horses will get further. Motorway driving (when the cones are on holiday) would take you nearly 500 miles. The 05.15 am train from Penzance arrives in Inverness at 7

  6. Supercharging Lessons with a Virtual Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jefferson; Vincent, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The authors describes their experiences incorporating the virtual lab into a simple circuit lesson during an energy unit in a sixth-grade class. The lesson included a hands-on group experiment using wire, batteries, and light bulbs to make a circuit and an online simulation, using a virtual lab. Class discussions, student inquiries, and the study…

  7. Population Education in Health: Some Sample Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This manual for home economics teachers contains eight sample lessons on health issues related to population growth. Among the topics treated are nutrition, family health, communicable diseases, causes of high mortality, and community health services. Lessons are designed for lower primary through high school students. A scope and sequence chart…

  8. How Does Lesson Study Improve Mathematics Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical model of lesson study's impact on instruction, through intervening impact on teachers' knowledge, beliefs and dispositions, teachers' learning community, and curriculum. It also describes four different types of lesson study in Japan, pointing out their synergies in producing a system where local teachers…

  9. Lesson Planning with the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Linda A.; McDuffie, Amy Roth; Tate, Cathie

    2014-01-01

    Planning a lesson can be similar to planning a road trip--a metaphor the authors use to describe how they applied research and theory to their lesson planning process. A map and mode of transportation, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) and textbooks as resources, can lead to desired destinations, such as students engaging in…

  10. Lesson study - Could it work for you?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doing, B.; Groves, S.; Macháčková, Jana

    Praha : Pedagogická fakulta UK, 2009 - (Novotná, J.; Moraová, H.), s. 271-272 ISBN 978-80-7290-398-6. [SEMT'09 - International Symposium, Elementary Maths Teaching. Praha (CZ), 23.08.2009-28.08.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : lesson study - research lesson * elementary level * mathematics education Subject RIV: AM - Education

  11. A Lesson on Homophobia and Teasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Eva S.

    2006-01-01

    Homophobia and gay-related teasing are already present among young children. This lesson introduces the term "prejudice" and places the concept of homophobia within the context of bullying and teasing with which 8-11 year olds are already familiar. The lesson builds empathy as children think about and discuss how they have felt when they have been…

  12. ESOL Workplace Photos and Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavez, Joan; And Others

    This teaching guide contains nine lesson plans for teaching job-related English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) to employees at Barber Foods in Maine. The lessons cover the following topics: (1) rotation directions; (2) protective clothing (level 2 and level 2/3); (3) talking to supervisors; (4) accident prevention; (5) machinery…

  13. CT1, Lessons learned in CA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2010-01-01

    This report summarises lessons learned from the 3 years of the Concerted Action 2 project with focus on the topic building energy "Certification Processes".......This report summarises lessons learned from the 3 years of the Concerted Action 2 project with focus on the topic building energy "Certification Processes"....

  14. Reading and Questioning in Content Area Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Bonnie B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Determines how science and social studies textbooks were used by teachers and students in 12 fourth grade lessons and what kinds of questions the teachers asked during the lessons. Finds that students do not get much practice reading informational text, and instruction often fails to promote conceptual understanding and meaningful learning from…

  15. Authoring a CAI Lesson in Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Carol P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A nutrition lesson on vegetarianism (focusing on vegetarian types, complementary protein, special-care nutrients, and diet planning) that uses a pre-developed plan which concentrates on lesson content and design has been developed. Initial planning and procedures involved in developing the unit (selecting teaching modes, text writing, formatting,…

  16. Breast Cancer:Detection and Diagnosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... States Preventive Services Task Force updated recommendations on breast cancer screening, suggesting that women ages 50 to 74 ...

  17. Bevacizumab Significantly Improves Survival for Patients with Recurrent and Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improves survival for patients with recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer Posted: February 7, 2013 Updated: June 2, 2013 ... 496-6641 Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who ...

  18. Air issues update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    A government sponsored poll revealed that the primary environmental concern for Ontarians in 2000 was air pollution. While scientists tend to focus on smog episodes, greenhouse gas emissions, acid rain or emissions of toxic pollutants, the public shows concern in more practical terms such as the overall impact of poor air quality on people and the ecosystem, and how this will affect future life on earth. It was emphasized that policy makers should try to apply this holistic approach to the complex issues associated with air quality. Climate change, acid rain and ultraviolet radiation are some examples of how air emissions impact on ecosystems. Other examples include elevated levels of mercury in otters in Ontario. Climate change has also been linked with the re-acidification of lakes, as droughts typically occur in years following an El Nino cycle which has been pronounced as a possible consequence of greenhouse gas emissions. The Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO) has reviewed the efforts of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment (MOE) regarding the regulation of air quality. The MOE has proposed several initiatives, including newer air dispersion models into legislation, establishing a new consultation process for applying new air quality standards to emission sources, an expansion of the Drive Clean Program, and a discussion paper on a proposed emission cap and trade system. This paper presents ECO's review of these initiatives and provides updates on other air quality issues such as control of emissions from Ontario's transportation, industrial and electricity sectors. It also described policy proposals related to standard-setting for air pollutants, as well as the newly adopted Canada-wide Standards for Particulate Matter and Ozone. A progress report on Ontario's Anti-Smog Action Plan (ASAP) confirms that major reductions in NO{sub x} expected from Ontario's coal-fired power plants never materialized. Emissions of nitrogen oxide

  19. How to Green Windows Update?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifedine Kadry

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The most important challenges facing the earth in the future are energy, water, environment and food security, Green IT contributes in significant role in finding solutions because it consume energy more efficient and reduce pollution in water, air and soil in addition to improving economy because Green IT is manage energy sources by reducing energy consumption with good performance. Most of energy consumed around the world depends on non-renewable energy and part of this energy consumed to update technologies In this paper ,we will study one of the most important tools in Microsoft, which is used in order to help users to get updates of Microsoft's products, which is called windows server update services (WSUS, which is helping to reduce energy consumption, we will study this tool and then try to make it more green by reducing the send / receive between Microsoft Update (MU and WSUS, which will reduce energy consumption, and we will propose algorithm and compared the energy consumption in the current design with energy consumption in the proposed design. This design will open the way for future work in order to make sending updates in MU less energy consumption by apply conditional sending and that will help to improve the performance of MU added to improve the network performance with more efficient consumption of energy.

  20. 胰岛素及其类似物与肿瘤相关性研究进展%Relationship of insulin and insulin analogue with cancer: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周佳雁; 沈捷; 马向华

    2011-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia has a close relationship with many cancers, and there is a higher risk of cancer in patients with hyperinsulinemia and particularly in those with insulin resistance. Hyperinsulinemia can amplify the growth-promoting effect of insulin via classical signaling, produce synergetic cell proliferation-promoting and anti-cell-apoptosis effects by changing the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway, and consequently induce tumor formation. Given the fact that insulin has became one of the most effective glucose-lowering therapies in diabetic patients, researchers are paying more and more attention to the issue whether diabetic patients who receive any insulin therapy are exposed to a greater cancer risk than those who don't. Findings show that either human insulin or insulin analogue is associated with an increased risk of cancer, though controversy does exist whether insulin analogue induces a higher cancer incidence than human insulin.%大量研究发现,在多种癌症患者中均伴有血浆胰岛素水平的升高,而体内高水平的胰岛素尤其是有胰岛素抵抗的患者,患各种肿瘤的危险性明显增高.高水平的血浆胰岛素可能通过胰岛素信号经典途径放大胰岛素的促生长作用,同时,也可通过改变胰岛素样生长因子(insulin-like growth factor,IGF)信号途径作用,产生协同促细胞增殖及抗细胞凋亡作用,从而诱导肿瘤的形成.由于胰岛素现已成为糖尿病患者降血糖的主要手段之一,越来越多的研究者开始关注接受胰岛素治疗的糖尿病者其肿瘤的发生风险是否会增高.结果显示,无论接受人胰岛素还是胰岛素类似物治疗,肿瘤形成的风险均增高,而同人胰岛素相比,使用胰岛索类似物是否会更加促肿瘤的发生尚存争议.

  1. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.”  As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  2. Update on Aromatase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert-Klauss V

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase inhibitors (AI block the last phase of estrogen production in many types of tissues which express the enzym aromatase, among them muscle, liver, adrenal, brain and fat. The enzyme catalyzes the last step of the biosynthesis of the estrogens, i. e. the aromatisation of testosterone to estradiol and of androstendion to estrone. Aromatase is localized in the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum and is also produced in the placenta and the gonads. Mutations in the gene CYP19A1, which codes for aromatase, can lead either to lack or excess of aromatase. Gene polymorphisms also influence the amount of bioavailable estrogen and bone density.br Indications: AI are approved for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer, both in the adjuvant setting as well as after recurrence and in progressive disease. In premenopausal and in perimenopausal women AI cause an increased sensitivity of the ovaries to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and can thereby lead to a boosted estrogen answer – this effect is particularly pronounced in early perimenopausal women – so that these situations demand a combination with GnRH-analogue if AI treatment is to be initiated. Alternatively, tamoxifene may be used in premenopausal patients, with or without GnRH analogues. Treatment of premenopausal patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer with aromatase inhibiting therapy alone constitutes an absolute contraindication. Aromatase inhibitors do not lead to estrogen receptor downregulation or block the receptor such as tamoxifene. An exceptional application is the application in reproductive medicine in women who do not have hormone receptor positive breast cancer: because of the higher sensitivity induced by AI-co-therapy, FSH-doses and -costs for assisted reproduction are reduced, and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS may be avoided. For premenopausal diseases which are said to be positively affected by

  3. Southwest Airlines: lessons in loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurizio, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Southwest Airlines continues to garner accolades in the areas of customer service, workforce management, and profitability. Since both the health care and airlines industries deal with a service rather than a product, the customer experience depends on the people who deliver that experience. Employees' commitment or "loyalty" to their customers, their employer, and their work translates into millions of dollars of revenue. What employee wants to work for "the worst employer in town?" Nine loyalty lessons from Southwest can be carried over to the health care setting for the benefit of employees and patients. PMID:19330974

  4. Lessons from the Iron Dome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiftah S. Shapir

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Israel has been under rocket attack for many years. Over the years, the State of Israel has developed a doctrine for defense against high trajectory weapons, of which rocket fire is one type. This article focuses on the Iron Dome system, which entered into operational service in early 2011 and demonstrated what it was capable of within a few months of its deployment. The article attempts to examine the lessons from the system's deployment and to reassess the decision about purchasing the system. It will also examine future ramifications of deploying this system and other systems that are expected to enter into service in the near future.

  5. Differentiated Phonics Lessons Effect on Fluency and School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Margaret Quinlan

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study investigates the effect of differentiated phonics lessons on reading fluency and examines the effect of these lessons on student and teacher perceptions of school culture. The study examines quantitative data on the effectiveness of the skill lessons. The qualitative findings examine the impact of the lessons on the…

  6. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings. PMID:26303026

  7. Yellow fever: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    Yellow fever, the original viral haemorrhagic fever, was one of the most feared lethal diseases before the development of an effective vaccine. Today the disease still affects as many as 200,000 persons annually in tropical regions of Africa and South America, and poses a significant hazard to unvaccinated travellers to these areas. Yellow fever is transmitted in a cycle involving monkeys and mosquitoes, but human beings can also serve as the viraemic host for mosquito infection. Recent increases in the density and distribution of the urban mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, as well as the rise in air travel increase the risk of introduction and spread of yellow fever to North and Central America, the Caribbean and Asia. Here I review the clinical features of the disease, its pathogenesis and pathophysiology. The disease mechanisms are poorly understood and have not been the subject of modern clinical research. Since there is no specific treatment, and management of patients with the disease is extremely problematic, the emphasis is on preventative vaccination. As a zoonosis, yellow fever cannot be eradicated, but reduction of the human disease burden is achievable through routine childhood vaccination in endemic countries, with a low cost for the benefits obtained. The biological characteristics, safety, and efficacy of live attenuated, yellow fever 17D vaccine are reviewed. New applications of yellow fever 17D virus as a vector for foreign genes hold considerable promise as a means of developing new vaccines against other viruses, and possibly against cancers. PMID:11871403

  8. Environmental Chemistry Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Human Health Effects of the Chernobyl DisasterIncreased Incidence of Thyroid CancerThe release of radioactivity from the famous explosion at the fission nuclear power reactor at Chernobyl eight years ago has resulted in a substantial increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in children in the immediate area but no great increase in the incidence of childhood leukemia, tumors, or genetic defects. In the region of the Belarus republic closest to Chernobyl, the childhood thyroid cancer rate has reached over 100 cases per million children, compared to less than 3 per million in most countries. More than 500 children in Belarus and Ukraine have been diagnosed with this disease. The likely cause of the cancers is radioactivity from the isotope 131-I and perhaps 133-I released during the explosion (1). Lead PollutionAnalysis of snow in the Greenland ice sheet indicates rather high levels of lead pollution in air from 500 BC to AD 300 and AD 1000-1500. The earliest lead pollution was associated with mining in Greece and then mining by the Romans, especially in Spain. The later pollution was due mainly to lead and silver smelting in Germany (2). Detrimental Effect of Lead upon IQ in AustraliaStudies of children in Port Pirie, Australia have produced further evidence of the detrimental effect of lead upon IQ. The cumulative exposure to lead of the children from birth to age seven years was determined by analyzing for the element in their baby teeth (3). Ozone Hole PhenomenaThe AntarcticThe Antarctic ozone hole appeared earlier than usual in 1994; it was as large and as severe as the holes in 1992 and 1993. The region of severe depletion covered about 24 million square kilometers, which is approximately the size of North America (4). The Role of Nitric AcidOur knowledge of the role of nitric acid in the formation of ozone holes over polar areas has recently been improved by a joint publication from researchers in Scotland and the United States. Using data obtained by

  9. How "lucky" we are that the Fukushima disaster occurred in early spring: predictions on the contamination levels from various fission products released from the accident and updates on the risk assessment for solid and thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Balkanski, Yves; Cozic, Anne; Møller, Anders Pape

    2014-12-01

    The present paper studies how a random event (earthquake) and the subsequent disaster in Japan affect transport and deposition of fallout and the resulting health consequences. Therefore, except for the original accident in March 2011, three additional scenarios are assessed assuming that the same releases took place in winter 2010, summer 2011 and autumn 2011 in order to cover a full range of annual seasonality. This is also the first study where a large number of fission products released from the accident are used to assess health risks with the maximum possible efficiency. Xenon-133 and (137)Cs are directly estimated within the model, whereas 15 other radionuclides are calculated indirectly using reported isotopic ratios. As much as 85% of the released (137)Cs would be deposited in continental regions worldwide if the accident occurred in winter 2010, 22% in spring 2011 (when it actually happened), 55% in summer 2011 and 48% if it occurred during autumn 2011. Solid cancer incidents and mortalities from Fukushima are estimated to be between 160 and 880 and from 110 to 640 close to previous estimations. By adding thyroid cancers, the total number rises from 230 to 850 for incidents and from 120 to 650 for mortalities. Fatalities due to worker exposure and mandatory evacuation have been reported to be around 610 increasing total estimated mortalities to 730-1260. These estimates are 2.8 times higher than previously reported ones for radiocaesium and (131)I and 16% higher than those reported based on radiocaesium only. Total expected fatalities from Fukushima are 32% lower than in the winter scenario, 5% that in the summer scenario and 30% lower than in the autumn scenario. Nevertheless, cancer fatalities are expected to be less than 5% of those from the tsunami (~20,000). PMID:25217754

  10. Operating experience and lessons learned in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageing management is seen as a process that needs periodic assessments and updates. One of the main sources for improvement in ageing management is feedback from OE, which is therefore used to continually improve the AMPs that are the main tools to ensure SSC ageing is properly managed in the plant. Most of the changes that arise in the programmes are connected with maintenance activities. Some examples are: — New guidelines to reflect the condition of equipment accessible during maintenance activities; — New guidelines to inspect cables and determine their condition; — Training and guidelines for walkdowns; — Improvements to the identification of structural components. The implementation of these AMPs has shown growing issues that could be expected in the LTO of other plants. Some examples are: — Flow accelerated corrosion. This becomes a challenge in LTO as the replacement of large equipment is required for plants where carbon steel is issued. A flow accelerated corrosion programme is a classic ageing management intervention typically implemented well before reaching LTO to avoid its impact becoming too costly, since the need for inspections, repairs and replacements increases with time. —Cable ageing. This is another challenging issue in operating plants. Cable replacement is a complex operation simply because the scope of the programme involves thousands of cables. A substantial effort is required and many new procedures for inspection walkdowns and testing had to be created. This programme also required much planning to define which areas require inspection and testing, and to minimize loss of availability and high doses related to the sheer number of inspections and tests required. Environmental qualification has led to the replacement, before LTO, of large equipment, such as four emergency electrical motors. Similar situations could happen in other plants as the qualification of some expensive equipment normally ends at the beginning of the LTO

  11. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  12. Cancer Statistics: Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a third party. HPF: Did You Know? Endometrial Cancer Endometrial Cancer - Did you know that endometrial cancer ... mfhs0vbvWi8?rel=0 SEER Stat Fact Sheets: Endometrial Cancer Expand All Collapse All Lifetime risk estimates are ...

  13. Contraception - Update and Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabe T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the future, fertility control will focus on the improvement of existing methods (efficacy, side effects, easy use, duration of action, manufacturing process, costs, on new approaches (mode of action and on new targets for contraception. Counselling of women in view of contraceptive choices based on individual risks (e. g. cardiovascular disease, thrombophilia, family risk of breast cancer, sexually transmitted diseases will gain more and more importance. Only a few companies can afford research in contraception such as Bayer-Schering-Pharma, Wyeth-Ayerst, Ortho-McNeil and Organon. Female contraception: Ovulation inhibition: In the future, a focus will be placed on the preselection of patients to minimize their individual risk, new oral contraceptive (OC regimen, OC with new progestins, OC with estradiol or estradiolesters, new ovulation inhibitors with new progestins and new regimens including long cycles and continuous steroidal contraceptives, new contraceptive patches, vaginal rings, spray-on contraceptives, recently identified genes involved in the ovulation process as new targets for ovulation inhibitors. Fertilisation inhibition: New intrauterine systems will comprise: a smaller Mirena intrauterine system releasing levonorgestrel (LNG and new frameless progestin-releasing intrauterine systems (IUS. Various new contraceptive barriers have been introduced. Research is ongoing on substances acting both as spermicides and as microbicides, reducing the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. New implantables and injectables will feature an improved pharmacokinetic profile, decreased side effects and a safer delivery system. Additionally, there are various new approaches in female sterilisation. Immunocontraception for the female will not be available in the near future. Implantation inhibition: Selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRMs are tested for postcoital contraception. New targets are analysed for immunocontraceptives. Male

  14. Alternative Energy Lessons in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Julie

    2010-05-01

    In Scotland the new science curriculum for pupils aged 12 to 15 shall include the following outcomes: "Using my knowledge and understanding, I can express an informed view on a national or global environmental issue;" "I have participated in constructing a model to harness a renewable source of energy and can investigate how to optimise the output;" and "I can discuss why it is important to me and to the future of the world that alternatives to fossil fuels are developed." There will be an emphasis on creating lessons that will nurture responsible citizens, improve pupil engagement and allow students to develop their team working skills. To help teachers plan lessons to address this, the Scottish Schools Equipment Research Centre and Edinburgh University made teaching materials on four renewable energy resources. This poster describes how their suggested activities on solar cells, wind turbines, hydroelectric power stations and wave power were used in science lessons with twelve year old students. After an initial class discussion based on issues related to climate change and diminishing fossil fuel supplies, a workshop activity was carried out in three stages. The students were issued with a fact sheet about one of four imaginary islands (Skisdale, Cloudy Island, Surfsville and Sun City) and they were asked to work in teams to choose the most suitable method of generating electricity for their island. Issues such as costs, where it will be sited and environmental implications were considered. They were then asked to conduct practical activities by constructing and testing models for these forms of renewable energy. To conclude, they presented their proposal to the rest of the class with reasoned explanations. The kits used in the lessons can be purchased from Anderson Scientific (sales@andersonscientific.co.uk). The solar cells were simply connected to a voltmeter. The wind and hydroelectric groups used the same basic equipment. This was made using a small water

  15. Colon and Rectal Cancer Screening (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology. CA Cancer J Clin 2008; 58:130. Whitlock EP, Lin JS, Liles E, et al. Screening for colorectal cancer: a targeted, updated systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med 2008; 149:638. ...

  16. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Cancer Statistics Cancer has a major impact on society in ... success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The Burden of Cancer in ...

  17. Deductive Updating Is Not Bayesian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, Henry; Brisson, Janie; de Chantal, Pier-Luc

    2015-01-01

    One of the major debates concerning the nature of inferential reasoning is between counterexample-based theories such as mental model theory and probabilistic theories. This study looks at conclusion updating after the addition of statistical information to examine the hypothesis that deductive reasoning cannot be explained by probabilistic…

  18. Medicare Update: Annual Wellness Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health condition (such as diabetes, heart disease or depression), you might consider bringing a family member or friend with you to the appointment. ... annual wellness visit: • Review and update medical and family ... potential risk factors for depression, including current or past experiences with depression or ...

  19. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: epidemiology update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this article is to outline the history of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a new and serious disease of patients with renal failure, and to give an update on its aetiology and prevalence. Recent findings Epidemiological and histochemical studies demonstrated that...

  20. AMDIS and CHART update. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, I.; Kato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Igarashi, A. [Miyazaki Univ., Miyazaki (JP)] [and others

    2002-10-01

    A working group for updating atomic and molecular collision data in the NIFS database AMDIS (electron scattering) and CHART (ion scattering) has been organized. This group has searched and reviewed literatures for collecting relevant atomic data with are to be included into the database. This is a summary report of the activities of this working group. (author)

  1. Model validation: Correlation for updating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D J Ewins

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, a review is presented of the various methods which are available for the purpose of performing a systematic comparison and correlation between two sets of vibration data. In the present case, the application of interest is in conducting this correlation process as a prelude to model correlation or updating activity.

  2. Update of CERN exchange network

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An update of the CERN exchange network will be done next April. Disturbances or even interruptions of telephony services may occur from 4th to 24th April during evenings from 18:30 to 00:00 but will not exceed more than 4 consecutive hours (see tentative planning below). In addition, the voice messaging system will be shut down on March, 26th April from 18:00 to 00:00. Calls supposed to be routed to the voice messaging system will not be possible during the shutdown. CERN divisions are invited to avoid any change requests (set-ups, move or removals) of telephones and fax machines from 4th to 25th April. Everything will be done to minimize potential inconveniences which may occur during this update. There will be no loss of telephone functionalities. CERN GSM portable phones won't be affected by this change. Should you need more details, please send us your questions by email to Standard.Telephone@cern.ch. DateChange typeAffected areas March 26Update of the voice messaging systemAll CERN sites April 4Updat...

  3. Update of CERN exchange network

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An update of the CERN exchange network will be done next April. Disturbances or even interruptions of telephony services may occur from 4th to 24th April during evenings from 18:30 to 00:00 but will not exceed more than 4 consecutive hours (see tentative planning below). In addition, the voice messaging system will be shut down on March, 26th April from 18:00 to 00:00. Calls supposed to be routed to the voice messaging system will not be possible during the shutdown. CERN divisions are invited to avoid any change requests (set-ups, move or removals) of telephones and fax machines from 4th to 25th April. Everything will be done to minimize potential inconveniences which may occur during this update. There will be no loss of telephone functionalities. CERN GSM portable phones won't be affected by this change. Should you need more details, please send us your questions by email to Standard.Telephone@cern.ch. Date Change type Affected areas April 8 Update of switch in LHC 7 LHC 7 Point April 9 Update of...

  4. Evidence-based guideline update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Peer Carsten Tfelt-Hansen, Glostrup, Denmark: According to the recent American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline update, a drug can be recommended as possibly effective for migraine prevention if it had demonstrated efficacy in one Class II study.(1) Eight drugs are recommended as possibly eff...

  5. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  6. Bangladesh Development Update, April 2016

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this report is to update the Government of Bangladesh, think tanks and researchers, the general public as well as the Bank’s senior management on the state of the economy, outlook, risks, progress on structural policy reforms, and key challenges the economy is currently facing. The coverage includes developments in the real sector focusing on growth, inflation, and poverty...

  7. AMDIS and CHART update. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group for updating atomic and molecular collision data in the NIFS database AMDIS (electron scattering) and CHART (ion scattering) has been organized. This group has searched and reviewed literatures for collecting relevant atomic data with are to be included into the database. This is a summary report of the activities of this working group. (author)

  8. Software Update Recovery for Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Stephen; Sreenan, Cormac J.

    2009-01-01

    Updating software over the network is important for Wireless Sensor Networks in support of scale, remote deployment, feature upgrades, and fixes. The risk of a fault in the updated code causing system failure is a serious problem. In this paper, we identify a single, critical, symptom loss-of-control, that complements exception-based schemes, and supports failsafe recovery from faults in software updates. We present a new software update recovery mechanism that uses loss-ofc...

  9. Contraception - Update and Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabe T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fertility control in the future will focus on the improvement of existing methods (efficacy, side effects, easy use, duration of action, manufacturing process, costs, on new approaches (mode of action bringing additional health benefits, and on new targets for nonhormonal contraception. Counselling of women in view to contraceptive choices based on the individual risk (e. g. cardiovascular disease, thrombophilia, family risk of breast cancer, sexually transmitted diseases will gain more and more importance. Only a few companies can afford research in contraception such as Bayer-Schering-Pharma, and MSD. Female contraception: Ovulation inhibition: preselection of patients to minimize the individual risk. New oral contraceptive (OC regimen, OC with new progestins, OC with estradiol or estradiol esters, new ovulation inhibitors with new progestins and new regimen including long cycles and continuous delivery of steroidal contraceptives, new contraceptive patches, vaginal rings andsprayon contraceptives. Recently identified genes involved in the ovulation process as new targets for ovulation inhibitors. Fertilisation inhibition: new intrauterine systems have been developed: a smaller Mirena intrauterine system releasing levonorgestrel (LNG and a new frameless progestinreleasing intrauterine systems (IUS. Various new contraceptive barriers have been introduced. Research is ongoing on substances acting both as spermicide and as microbicides as a dualprotection method reducing both the risk of unwanted pregnancy and the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. New implantable systems and improved injectables (with improved pharmacokinetic profile, decreased side effects and a safer delivery system have been made available recently. Various new approaches in female sterilisation include non invasive method of tubal occlusion Immunocontraception for the female will not be available in the near future. Implantation inhibition: selective progesterone

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  11. Efficacy of intensified hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil: Updated results of a randomized multicentric trial in advanced head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prove an expected benefit of concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT), a two-arm randomized multicentric study was performed. In a subgroup analysis the influence of pretherapeutical hemoglobin level (p-Hb) on survival under locoregional control (SLC) was tested. Patients and Methods: The study included primarily untreated Stage III/IV (International Union Against Cancer [UICC]) oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Patients were randomized to receive either hyperfractionated (hf) and accelerated (acc) RCT with two cycles 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/day) and carboplatin (70 mg/m2/day) on Days 1-5 and 29-33 or hf-acc radiotherapy (RT) alone. Total RT dose in both arms was 69.9 Gy in 38 days in concomitant boost technique. Results: After a median follow-up time of 57 months, SLC is significantly better in RCT than in RT (p = 0.01), with median SLC of 17 months and 11 months, respectively. Also overall survival (OS) shows a benefit for RCT (p 0.016), with a median survival of 23 months for RCT and 16 months for RT. However, the benefit in SLC and OS is not seen in hypopharyngeal carcinomas. In a multivariate analysis of oropharyngeal cancer patients, p-Hb levels lower than 12.7 g/dL resulted in lower SLC compared with higher p-Hb levels up to 13.8 g/dL. P-Hb levels >13.8 g/dL did not further improve SLC. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated-accelerated RCT is superior to hf-acc RT in oropharyngeal carcinomas. P-Hb levels >13.8 g/dL do not further improve SLC

  12. Improving the Identification, Dissemination and Implementation of Deactivation and Decommissioning Lessons Learned and Best Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately $150 billion of work currently remains in the United States Department of Energy's (DoE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) life cycle budget for U.S. projects. Contractors who manage facilities for the DOE have been challenged to identify transformational changes to reduce the life cycle costs and to develop a knowledge-management system that identifies, disseminates, and tracks the implementation of lessons learned and best practices. This paper discusses DoE's rationale for using lessons learned and best practices to improve safety and performance while reducing life cycle costs for Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) projects. It also provides an update on the Energy Facility Contractors Group's (EFCOG's) progress in supporting DoE's efforts. At this juncture the best practice efforts described are in developmental stages; however, the commitment to and the concrete nature of the work thus far is noteworthy in regard to improving the way D and D lessons learned and best practices are identified, disseminated and implemented across the DOE Complex

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSA tests. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 10 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advanced melanoma. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 12 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain people. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 11 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  16. Lessons from World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Scales Avery

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of World War I is reviewed, starting with a discussion of the development of nationalist movements in Europe. It is pointed out that the global disaster started with a seemingly small operation by Austria, which escalated uncontrollably into an all-destroying conflagration. A striking feature of the war was that none of the people who started it had any idea of what it would be like. Technology had changed the character of war, but old patterns of thought remained in place. We also examine the roots of the war in industrial and colonial competition, and in an arms race. Finally, parallels with current events, and the important lessons for today’s world are discussed.

  17. Lessons for (and from) America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    Drawing lessons from international experience for health care reform in the United States requires striking a difficult balance between historical determinism and free will, between cynical pessimism and naïve optimism. The key to this puzzle may lie in a paradox: the United States is the most successful exporter of public health policy ideas and instruments yet has failed to build an effective health care system. General ideas (like notions about the role of competition) and microinstruments (like diagnosis-related groups) travel better than do health care systems. Ideas can be adapted to local circumstances, and instruments may easily fit into preexisting systems. Importing systems from countries with different histories and institutions would require a tectonic shift in the American political landscape. PMID:12511387

  18. Lessons Learned from TOPOFF 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Top Officials (TOPOFF) National Domestic Counter-terrorism Exercise Series mandated by Public Law 106-553 established through the Department of Homeland Security National Exercise Program (NEP) conducted the fourth nationwide exercise, TOPOFF 4, October 15-20, 2007. The exercise simulated a terrorist attack using radiological dispersion devices (RDD) in multiple locations in US cities and a US territory. Roughly 15,000 individuals participated in the exercise with the goal of determining the readiness of our emergency responders to implement the National Response Plan, Incident Command Systems, and National Incident Management Systems to handle a terrorist attack using unconventional weapons. This paper will address the publicly available 'lessons learned' from the latest of the nationwide exercises through a review of the 'after action reports' prepared by participating agencies and related documentation. (authors)

  19. Emergency preparedness lessons from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergency preparedness at nuclear power plants in the U.S has been considerably enhanced since the Three Mile Island accident, The Chernobyl accident has provided valuable data that can be used to evaluate the merit of some of these enhancements and to determine the need for additional improvements, for example, the USSR intervention levels of 25 rem and 75 rem for evacuation are contrasted with U.S Environmental Protection agency protective action guides. The manner in which 135,000 persons were evacuated from the 30-km zone around Chernobyl is contrasted with typical U.S. evacuation plans. Meteorological conditions and particulate deposition patterns were studied to infer characteristics of the radioactive plume from Chernobyl. Typical plume monitoring techniques are examined in light of lessons learned by the Soviets about plume behavior. This review has indicated a need for additional improvements in utility and government emergency plans, procedures, equipment, and training

  20. Seven brief lessons on physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    These seven "short lessons" guide us, with admirable clarity, through the scientific revolution that shook physics in the twentieth century and still continues to shake us today. In this short, playful, entertaining and mind-bending introduction to modern physics, Rovelli explains Einstein's theory of general relativity, quantum mechanics, black holes, the complex architecture of the universe, elementary particles, gravity, and the nature of the mind. In under one hundred pages, readers will understand the most transformative scientific discoveries of the twentieth century. Not since Richard Feynman's celebrated best-seller Six Easy Pieces has physics been so vividly, intelligently and entertainingly revealed. Carlo Rovelli is an eminent physicist with an extraordinary ability to write about complex topics in a lucid, clear prose. His book was top of the bestseller charts in Italy for months and has sold over 150,000 copies since publication in November. He is the head of the Équipe de Gravité Quantique at ...

  1. WPPSS debacle: explanations and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principal explanations for the WPPSS events to date can be more or less satisfactorily derived. Five explanations appear to dominate: (1) the long and previously successful history of public power in the Pacific Northwest; (2) overoptimism by architect/engineers and consulting engineers about construction costs and construction durations; (3) laxness by bond counsel in scrutinizing and disclosing potential legal impediments to the various transactions involved; (4) WPPSS easy access to capital markets, combined with naivete in those markets; and (5) the inability of WPPSS to manage and oversee the construction process. This paper explains the specific reasons for, and the importance of, each of these five explanations for the WPPSS debacle. It then develops lessons and conclusions for the future which can be derived from this debacle. 12 references

  2. Lessons learned from external hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study performed by the European Clearinghouse of the Joint Research Centre on Operational Experience for nuclear power plants in cooperation with IRSN and GRS covering events reported by nuclear power plants in relation to external hazards. It summarizes the review of 235 event reports from 3 different databases. The events were grouped in 9 categories according to the nature of the external hazard involved, and the specific lessons learned and recommendations that can be derived from each of these categories are presented. Additional 'cross-cutting' recommendations covering several or all the external hazards considered are also discussed. These recommendations can be useful in preventing this type of events from happening again or in limiting their consequences. The study was launched in 2010 and therefore it does not cover the Fukushima event. This paper presents the main findings and recommendations raised by this study. (orig.)

  3. TSGene 2.0: an updated literature-based knowledgebase for tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Kim, Pora; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are a major type of gatekeeper genes in the cell growth. A knowledgebase with the systematic collection and curation of TSGs in multiple cancer types is critically important for further studying their biological functions as well as for developing therapeutic strategies. Since its development in 2012, the Tumor Suppressor Gene database (TSGene), has become a popular resource in the cancer research community. Here, we reported the TSGene version 2.0, which has substantial updates of contents (e.g. up-to-date literature and pan-cancer genomic data collection and curation), data types (noncoding RNAs and protein-coding genes) and content accessibility. Specifically, the current TSGene 2.0 contains 1217 human TSGs (1018 protein-coding and 199 non-coding genes) curated from over 9000 articles. Additionally, TSGene 2.0 provides thousands of expression and mutation patterns derived from pan-cancer data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. A new web interface is available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/TSGene/. Systematic analyses of 199 non-coding TSGs provide numerous cancer-specific non-coding mutational events for further screening and clinical use. Intriguingly, we identified 49 protein-coding TSGs that were consistently down-regulated in 11 cancer types. In summary, TSGene 2.0, which is the only available database for TSGs, provides the most updated TSGs and their features in pan-cancer. PMID:26590405

  4. Translating the cancer genome: Going beyond p values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Lynda; Chin, Lynda; Gray, Joe W.

    2008-04-03

    Cancer cells are endowed with diverse biological capabilities driven by myriad inherited and somatic genetic and epigenetic aberrations that commandeer key cancer-relevant pathways. Efforts to elucidate these aberrations began with Boveri's hypothesis of aberrant mitoses causing cancer and continue today with a suite of powerful high-resolution technologies that enable detailed catalogues of genomic aberrations and epigenomic modifications. Tomorrow will likely bring the complete atlas of reversible and irreversible alteration in individual cancers. The challenge now is to discern causal molecular abnormalities from genomic and epigenomic 'noise', to understand how the ensemble of these aberrations collaborate to drive cancer pathophysiology. Here, we highlight lessons learned from now classical examples of successful translation of genomic discoveries into clinical practice, lessons that may be used to guide and accelerate translation of emerging genomic insights into practical clinical endpoints that can impact on practice of cancer medicine.

  5. Experimental Garden Plots for Botany Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodnicheva, V. V.; Vasil'eva, E. I.

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of the botany lessons used at two schools points out the need for fifth and sixth grade students to be taught the principles of plant life through observations made at an experimental garden plot at the school. (ND)

  6. Incidents in the Spanish Industry. Learned Lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned: It is necessary to check the by-products with which these leave the facility; It is very important to communicate as soon as possible the event in order to minimize the generated radioactive wastes

  7. Energy deregulation: lessons from the American experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiam, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of US energy regulation, considers some of the important issues arising from the US experience and finally, suggests some lessons which Australia might draw from the US deregulation of energy industries. 5 refs.

  8. Energy deregulation: lessons from the American experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a brief history of US energy regulation, considers some of the important issues arising from the US experience and finally, suggests some lessons which Australia might draw from the US deregulation of energy industries. 5 refs

  9. Daisy Shooting Education. 10 Lesson Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narcheaur, Mary Elizabeth; And Others

    This instructor's manual is a ten lesson curriculum designed to instruct young shooters in the skills of proper gun handling and marksmanship. Gunology (knowledge of guns and ammunition) and rules for air rifle competition are also discussed. (CJ)

  10. Beyond the Guidelines: Practical lessons for monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, L H; Smart, A

    1993-07-01

    A series of workshops have provided extensive feedback on a recently published manual, Monitoring Guidelines to Evaluate Effects of Forestry Activities on Streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska (Guidelines) (MacDonald et al., 1991). These workshops and other discussions have led to the identification of fourteen additional 'lessons' for monitoring. These lessons are concepts which either were not incorporated into the Guidelines, were not sufficiently emphasized, or which are needed to put the Guidelines in context. The topics include: monitoring as a continuum; defining objectives and hypotheses; peer review; uncertainty and risk; upslope vs. instream monitoring; photo sequences; scale considerations; data storage, data interpretation, and data base management; 'activities monitoring'; and personal commitment as a critical component in monitoring projects. Many of these lessons might appear self-evident, but our experience indicates that they are often ignored. Like the Guidelines, these lessons are widely applicable and should be explicitly recognized when formulating and conducting monitoring projects. PMID:24220836

  11. Lessons of the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the lessons teamed from the radiological accident of Goiania, actions are described which a nuclear regulatory body should undertake while responding to an accident of this nature. (author)

  12. Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William A.; DeWeck, Olivier; Laufer, Deanna; Shull, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration sets out a number of goals, involving both strategic and tactical objectives. These include returning the Space Shuttle to flight, completing the International Space Station, and conducting human expeditions to the Moon by 2020. Each of these goals has profound logistics implications. In the consideration of these objectives,a need for a study on NASA logistics lessons learned was recognized. The study endeavors to identify both needs for space exploration and challenges in the development of past logistics architectures, as well as in the design of space systems. This study may also be appropriately applied as guidance in the development of an integrated logistics architecture for future human missions to the Moon and Mars. This report first summarizes current logistics practices for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and the International Space Station (ISS) and examines the practices of manifesting, stowage, inventory tracking, waste disposal, and return logistics. The key findings of this examination are that while the current practices do have many positive aspects, there are also several shortcomings. These shortcomings include a high-level of excess complexity, redundancy of information/lack of a common database, and a large human-in-the-loop component. Later sections of this report describe the methodology and results of our work to systematically gather logistics lessons learned from past and current human spaceflight programs as well as validating these lessons through a survey of the opinions of current space logisticians. To consider the perspectives on logistics lessons, we searched several sources within NASA, including organizations with direct and indirect connections with the system flow in mission planning. We utilized crew debriefs, the John Commonsense lessons repository for the JSC Mission Operations Directorate, and the Skylab Lessons Learned. Additionally, we searched the public version of the Lessons Learned

  13. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations regarding national program goals and...

  14. Personal training and development of creative abilities of pupils at history lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolova M. P.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article offers inovative model of the lessonLesson-Image. This lesson allow to develop creative skills for the students. The result of their work on the lesson is to create a symbolic drawing.

  15. Student teachers learning to plan mathematics lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, K; Smith, K.

    1997-01-01

    Most educational professionals would agree that planning is an essential component of teaching. Such planning, educational texts and reports often stress, must focus on the specifying of clear objectives and a clear lesson structure. As a result, a common framework used to introduce student teachers to the complexities of lesson planning is premised on starting the planning process with specifying objectives. Yet there is considerable evidence that experienced teachers do not plan in this way...

  16. Collection of "strengthening sets" of aerobics lesson.\\\\

    OpenAIRE

    CAKL, Vojtěch

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor study was to create a strengthening sets for aerobic lessons including showing these possisions in practice on selective aerobic lessons . Based on special literature the author had chosen suitable muscle development exercises to increase the body strenth. These exercises were there practised for six weeks continuously. Before and after the research were selected individuals who were compared by 4 exact same tests to detect static and dynamic body strength. The result...

  17. USAR managing and updating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper basis and background of the FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report) document and its conversion process to the USAR (Updated Safety Analysis Report) document are described. In addition, there are internal and external reviews as approval process presented. The following is included in our new approach to manage USAR changes: initiating the USAR change, technical reviewing, preparing a safety evaluation, KSC (Krsko Safety Committee) and KOC (Krsko Operating Committee) review, ESD Director approval, and the Regulatory Body review or approval. The intensive technological modification activities started in the year 1992 when the NEK Engineering Services Division was established. These activities are one of the most important reason for a very intensive USAR items change. The other reason for its conversation to an electronic format is a possibility for easier and faster searching, updating and changing process and introducing a new systematic USAR managing approach as mentioned above. (author)

  18. [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography in breast cancer and gynecologic cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Kodahl, Annette Raskov; Teilmann-Jørgensen, Dorte; Mogensen, Ole; Jensen, Pernille Tine

    2015-01-01

    In this literature review, an update is provided on the role of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography in different clinical settings of the 4 most frequent female-specific cancer types: breast, endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancer. The most recent knowledge regarding primary diag...

  19. The Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Space Flight Chart: Lessons Learned Gone Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bill; Pate, Dennis; Thelen, David

    2010-01-01

    This presentation will explore the surprising history and events that transformed a mundane spreadsheet of historical spaceflight incidents into a popular and widely distributed visual compendium of lessons learned. The Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Space Flight Chart (a.k.a. The Significant Incidents Chart) is a popular and visually captivating reference product that has arisen from the work of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) Flight Safety Office (FSO). It began as an internal tool intended to increase our team s awareness of historical and modern space flight incidents. Today, the chart is widely recognized across the agency as a reference tool. It appears in several training and education programs. It is used in familiarization training in the JSC Building 9 Mockup Facility and is seen by hundreds of center visitors each week. The chart visually summarizes injuries, fatalities, and close calls sustained during the continuing development of human space flight. The poster-sized chart displays over 100 total events that have direct connections to human space flight endeavors. The chart is updated periodically. The update process itself has become a collaborative effort. Many people, spanning multiple NASA organizations, have provided suggestions for additional entries. The FSO maintains a growing list of subscribers who have requested to receive updates. The presenters will discuss the origins and motivations behind the significant incidents chart. A review of the inclusion criteria used to select events will be offered. We will address how the chart is used today by S&MA and offer a vision of how it might be used by other organizations now and in the future. Particular emphasis will be placed on features of the chart that have met with broad acceptance and have helped spread awareness of the most important lessons in human spaceflight.

  20. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Olive, Keith A.; Scully, Sean T.

    1995-01-01

    WThe current status of big bang nucleosynthesis is reviewed with an emphasis on the comparison between the observational determination of the light element abundances of \\D, \\he3, \\he4 and \\li7 and the predictions from theory. In particular, we present new analyses for \\he4 and \\li7. Implications for physics beyond the standard model are also discussed. Limits on the effective number of neutrino flavors are also updated.