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Sample records for cancer undergoing brachytherapy

  1. Perioperative Search for Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients Undergoing Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyasu Tsumura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of local prostate cancer recurrence, some patients develop distant metastases after prostate brachytherapy. We evaluate whether prostate brachytherapy procedures have a potential risk for hematogenous spillage of prostate cancer cells. Fifty-nine patients who were undergoing high-dose-rate (HDR or low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy participated in this prospective study. Thirty patients with high-risk or locally advanced cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Twenty-nine patients with clinically localized cancer were treated with LDR brachytherapy without neoadjuvant ADT. Samples of peripheral blood were drawn in the operating room before insertion of needles (preoperative and again immediately after the surgical manipulation (intraoperative. Blood samples of 7.5 mL were analyzed for circulating tumor cells (CTCs using the CellSearch System. While no preoperative samples showed CTCs (0%, they were detected in intraoperative samples in 7 of the 59 patients (11.8%; preoperative vs. intraoperative, p = 0.012. Positive CTC status did not correlate with perioperative variables, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA at diagnosis, use of neoadjuvant ADT, type of brachytherapy, Gleason score, and biopsy positive core rate. We detected CTCs from samples immediately after the surgical manipulation. Further study is needed to evaluate whether those CTCs actually can survive and proliferate at distant sites.

  2. CyberKnife Boost for Patients with Cervical Cancer Unable to Undergo Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Jonathan Andrew; Witten, Matthew R.; Clancey, Owen; Episcopia, Karen; Accordino, Diane; Chalas, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Standard radiation therapy for patients undergoing primary chemosensitized radiation for carcinomas of the cervix usually consists of external beam radiation followed by an intracavitary brachytherapy boost. On occasion, the brachytherapy boost cannot be performed due to unfavorable anatomy or because of coexisting medical conditions. We examined the safety and efficacy of using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost to the cervix after external beam radiation in those patients unable to have brachytherapy to give a more effective dose to the cervix than with conventional external beam radiation alone. Six consecutive patients with anatomic or medical conditions precluding a tandem and ovoid boost were treated with combined external beam radiation and CyberKnife boost to the cervix. Five patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis with serial intensity-modulated radiation therapy boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 61.2 Gy. These five patients received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 20 Gy in five fractions of 4 Gy each. One patient was treated to the pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy with an external beam boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 50.4 Gy. This patient received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 19.5 Gy in three fractions of 6.5 Gy. Five percent volumes of the bladder and rectum were kept to ≤75 Gy in all patients (i.e., V75 Gy ≤ 5%). All of the patients remain locally controlled with no evidence of disease following treatment. Grade 1 diarrhea occurred in 4/6 patients during the conventional external beam radiation. There has been no grade 3 or 4 rectal or bladder toxicity. There were no toxicities observed following SBRT boost. At a median follow-up of 14 months, CyberKnife radiosurgical boost is well tolerated and efficacious in providing a boost to patients with cervix cancer who are unable to undergo brachytherapy boost. Further follow-up is required to see if these results remain durable.

  3. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F.; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125 I/Pd 103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  4. Brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Ajimu, Akira; Morikawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shintarou; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Ikenaga, Kouji; Sakamoto, Ichirou.

    1988-01-01

    13 cases with oral cancer were treated using brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University Hospital from September 1985 to February 1988. Among 11 cases of tongue cancer, T1 and T2 cases were well controlled by radiation therapy using 226 Ra needles. Cancer of oral floor and buccal mucosa were controlled by the use of 192 Au grains. (author)

  5. Isotope selection for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Christine M.; Potters, Louis; Ashley, Richard; Freeman, Katherine; Wang Xiaohong; Waldbaum, Robert; Leibel, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound-guided trans perineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) is generally performed with either 103 Pd or 125 I. The use of 125 I for low Gleason score tumors and 103 Pd for higher Gleason scores has been suggested based on isotope dose rate and cell doubling time observed in in vitro studies. While many centers follow these isotope selection criteria, other centers have elected to use only a single isotope, regardless of Gleason score. No clinical data have been published comparing these isotopes. This study was undertaken to compare outcomes between 125 I and 103 Pd in a matched pair analysis for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Six hundred forty-eight consecutively treated patients with clinically confined prostate cancer underwent TIPPB between June 1992 and February 1997. Five hundred thirty-two patients underwent TIPPB alone, whereas 116 received pelvic external beam irradiation and TIPPB. Ninety-three patients received androgen deprivation therapy prior to TIPPB. The prescribed doses for TIPPB were 160 Gy for 125 I (pre-TG43) and 120 Gy for 103 Pd. Patients treated with combination therapy received 41.4 or 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) external beam irradiation followed by a 3- to 5-week break and then received either a 120-Gy 125 I or a 90-Gy 103 Pd implant. Until November 1994, all patients underwent an 125 I implant after which the isotope selection was based on either Gleason score (Gleason score 2-5: 125 I; Gleason 5-8: 103 Pd) or isotope availability. A matched pair analysis was performed to assess any difference between isotopes. Two hundred twenty-two patients were matched according to Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and stage. PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) was calculated based on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Group definition of failure. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival curves were compared to assess differences in

  6. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

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    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: Daniel.krauss@beaumont.edu

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  7. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  8. Brachytherapy of endometrial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.; Hoffstetter, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C.

    2003-01-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinomas rank third as tumoral sites en France. The tumors are confined to the uterus in 80% of the cases. Brachytherapy has a large place in the therapeutic strategy. The gold standard treatment remains extra-fascial hysterectomy with bilateral annexiectomy and bilateral internal iliac lymph node dissection. However, after surgery alone, the rate of locoregional relapses reaches 4-20%, which is reduced to 0-5% after postoperative brachytherapy of the vaginal cuff. This postoperative brachytherapy is delivered as outpatients treatment, by 3 or 4 fractions, at high dose rate. The utero-vaginal preoperative brachytherapy remains well adapted to the tumors which involve the uterine cervix. Patients presenting a localized tumor but not operable for general reasons (< 10%) can be treated with success by exclusive irradiation, which associates a pelvic irradiation followed by an utero-vaginal brachytherapy. A high local control of about 80-90% is obtained, a little lower than surgery, with a higher risk of late complications. Last but not least, local relapses in the vaginal cuff, or in the perimeatic area, can be treated by interstitial salvage brachytherapy, associated if possible with external beam irradiation. The local control is reached in half of the patients, but metastatic dissemination is frequent. We conclude that brachytherapy has a major role in the treatment of endometrial adenocarcinomas, in combination with surgery, or with external beam irradiation for not operable patients or in case of local relapses. It should use new technologies now available including computerized after-loaders and 3D dose calculation. (authors)

  9. Stevens Johnson Syndrome in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy: An association or an incident?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M. R.; Amado, A.; Jorge, M.; Grillo, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stevens Johnson Syndrome and Erythema Multiforme are hypersensitivity skin reactions generally arising in the context of multiple causes. Radiation therapy is considered to be one of these causes, although most reports are hindered by concomitant medications. Aim: The aim of this paper was to present a case of Stevens Johnson Syndrome arising in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy with an unusual presentation. Case:We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman with endometrial cancer undergoing adjuvant gynaecological radiotherapy. While undergoing a gynaecological brachytherapy boost, she developed bilateral conjunctivitis that progressed to oral mucositis and pruritic erythema with sloughing of the skin on her arms and legs but not the torso or irradiated fields (namely the vaginal mucosa). Conclusion: This case illustrates the association of RT/SJS; however, it also raises the question of patients undergoing RT being more susceptible to SJS as opposed to a direct cause of the disease. (authors)

  10. The Meaning and Experience of Patients Undergoing Rectal High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Samara; Néron, Sylvain; Benc, Renata; Rosberger, Zeev; Vuong, Té

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a precise form of radiation therapy that targets cancerous tumors by directly applying the radiation source at the site or directly next to the tumor. Patients often experience but underreport pain and anxiety related to cancer treatments. At present, there is no research available concerning the pervasiveness and intensity of patients' pain and anxiety during rectal brachytherapy. The aim of this study was to examine patients' thoughts, emotions, coping strategies, physical sensations, and needs during rectal HDR brachytherapy treatment. Twenty-five patients with rectal cancer were interviewed using a semi-structured qualitative interview following the completion of their brachytherapy treatment delivered at a Montreal-based hospital in Quebec, Canada. The experiences of pain and discomfort varied greatly between patients and were linked to the meaning patients attributed to the treatment itself, sense of time, the body's lithotomic position, insertion of the treatment applicator, and the patients' sense of agency and empowerment during the procedure. Patients drew upon a variety of internal and external resources to help them cope with discomfort. Staff need to know about the variation in the physical and emotional experiences of patients undergoing this treatment. Clinical teams can tailor their procedural behavior (eg, using certain language, psychosocial interventions) according to patients' needs to increase patients' comfort and ultimately improve their experience of HDR rectal brachytherapy.

  11. American brachytherapy society (ABS) guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Gaspar, Laurie; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Prasad; Speiser, Burton

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, techniques, treatment regimens and dosimetry being used to treat cancer of the esophagus and no guidelines exist for optimal therapy. Methods: The Clinical Research Committee of the ABS met to formulate consensus guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal disease, with thoracic tumor 10 cm primary regional lymph adenopathy or tumor located in the gastro-esophageal junction or cervical esophagus. Contraindications include tracheo-esophageal fistula or stenosis that cannot be by-passed. The esophageal or nasogastric tube inserted should have a diameter of 6-10 mm whenever possible. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 50 Gy external beam (EBRT) are used, it is suggested that the low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) dose be 20 Gy at 0.4-1 Gy/hr, prescribed at 1 cm from the source. If high dose rate (HDR) is used, the dose recommended is 10 Gy in 2 weekly fractions of 5 Gy each, given after EBRT. Chemotherapy is not usually given concurrently with brachytherapy, and when it is, the brachytherapy dose is reduced. The length of esophagus treated by brachytherapy includes the post-EBRT involved area and a 1-2 cm margin proximally and distally. Supportive care, given during EBRT includes an antifungal agent (e.g., diflucan) and carafate. Gradual dilatation of the esophagus is required post-treatment for esophageal strictures. Conclusion: Guidelines were developed for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. As more clinical data becomes available, these guidelines will be updated by the ABS

  12. Polyethylene glycol hydrogel rectal spacer implantation in patients with prostate cancer undergoing combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jekwon; Lehrich, Brandon; Tran, Carolyn; Mesa, Albert; Baghdassarian, Ruben; Yoshida, Jeffrey; Torrey, Robert; Gazzaniga, Michael; Weinberg, Alan; Chalfin, Stuart; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    To present rectal toxicity rates in patients administered a polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel rectal spacer in conjunction with combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Between February 2010 and April 2015, 326 prostate carcinoma patients underwent combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy of 16 Gy (average dose 15.5 Gy; standard deviation [SD] = 1.6 Gy) and external beam radiotherapy of 59.4 Gy (average dose 60.2 Gy; SD = 2.9 Gy). In conjunction with the radiation therapy regimen, each patient was injected with 10 mL of a PEG hydrogel in the anterior perirectal fat space. The injectable spacer (rectal spacer) creates a gap between the prostate and the rectum. The rectum is displaced from the radiation field, and rectal dose is substantially reduced. The goal is a reduction in rectal radiation toxicity. Clinical efficacy was determined by measuring acute and chronic rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Center Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 grading scheme. Median followup was 16 months. The mean anterior-posterior separation achieved was 1.6 cm (SD = 0.4 cm). Rates of acute Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity were 37.4% and 2.8%, respectively. There were no acute Grade 3/4 toxicities. Rates of late Grade 1, 2, and 3 rectal toxicity were 12.7%, 1.4%, and 0.7%, respectively. There were no late Grade 4 toxicities. PEG rectal spacer implantation is safe and well tolerated. Acute and chronic rectal toxicities are low despite aggressive dose escalation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  14. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  15. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the use of a type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External ... In all cases of brachytherapy, the source of radiation is encapsulated ... non-radioactive metallic capsule. This prevents the radioactive materials ...

  16. Brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spikalovas, V.; Mudenas, A.; Karoesiene, E.; Mickevicius, R.

    1996-01-01

    In 1987-1995 a total of 347 patients with breast cancer underwent interstitial treatment. Two methods of irradiation were applied. 1. When patients refused surgery, external radiotherapy was given followed by implant radiotherapy for a dose of 20-30 Gy. Needle sources were applied for treatment with an increasing activity on the ends. The application of special template devices made it possible to implant radioactive sources in a strictly pre-set geometry. This allowed to place the sources in the necessary geometry for the whole course of irradiation. Dosimetric planning was performed in Gray-equivalents to a selected isodose curve mostly 85%. Treatment time was 20-50 hours. 2. In cases when the tumour was localized in the medial quadrant of breast, interstitial therapy was applied to the parasternal lymph nodes. During mastectomy catheters were placed in a. thoracica interna of the corresponding side. On the first or second postoperative day flexible radioactive sources were inserted into catheters. Their active length was 10-12 cm. Irradiation dose at a distance of 2 cm from the centre of source was 40-45 Gy. Results: There was minimum radiation effect on the adjusting organs and tissues. Local recurrence of tumour in the region of irradiation was in 6 patients. Conclusions: The application of interstitial radiotherapy in treatment of breast cancer is effective and the results of radiation treatment are encouraging

  17. Image based brachytherapy planning with special reference to gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, C.

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in India and one of the most frequent malignancies in Europe and in North America. In addition endometrium, vagina and vulva cancer are treated with brachytherapy. Especially for locally advanced cervix cancer the integration of image based brachytherapy planning into clinical routine is becoming a new standard for the future

  18. Proficiency-based cervical cancer brachytherapy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sherry; Francis, Louise; Todor, Dorin; Fields, Emma C

    2018-04-25

    Although brachytherapy increases the local control rate for cervical cancer, there has been a progressive decline in its use. Furthermore, the training among residency programs for gynecologic brachytherapy varies considerably, with some residents receiving little to no training. This trend is especially concerning given the association between poor applicator placement and decline in local control. Considering the success of proficiency-based training in other procedural specialties, we developed and implemented a proficiency-based cervical brachytherapy training curriculum for our residents. Each resident placed tandem and ovoid applicators with attending guidance and again alone 2 weeks later using a pelvic model that was modified to allow for cervical brachytherapy. Plain films were taken of the pelvic model, and applicator placement quality was evaluated. Other evaluated metrics included retention of key procedural details, the time taken for each procedure and presession and postsession surveys to assess confidence. During the initial session, residents on average met 4.5 of 5 placement criteria, which improved to 5 the second session. On average, residents were able to remember 7.6 of the 8 key procedural steps. Execution time decreased by an average of 10.5%. Resident confidence with the procedure improved dramatically, from 2.6 to 4.6 of 5. Residents who had previously never performed a tandem and ovoid procedure showed greater improvements in these criteria than those who had. All residents strongly agreed that the training was helpful and wanted to participate again the following year. Residents participating in this simulation training had measurable improvements in the time to perform the procedure, applicator placement quality, and confidence. This curriculum is easy to implement and is of great value for training residents, and would be particularly beneficial in programs with low volume of cervical brachytherapy cases. Simulation programs could

  19. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 ± 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 ± 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 ± 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 ± 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  20. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  1. Brachytherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Yul

    1999-01-01

    Brachytherapy has been proved to be an effective method for the purpose of increasing radiation dose to the tumor and reducing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, the rationale of brachytherapy is as follows; Firstly, early small lesion is radiocurative and the major cause of failure is local recurrence. Secondly, it can diminish evidently the dose to the normal tissue especially masseteric muscle and salivary gland. Thirdly, the anatomy of head and neck is suitable to various technique of brachytherapy. On background of accumulated experience of LDR iridium brachytherapy of head and neck cancer for the last 15 years, the author reviewed the history of radioisotope therapy, the characteristics of radionuclides, and some important things in the method, clinical technique and treatment planning. The author analyzed the clinical result of 185 cases of head and neck cancer treated in the Korea Cancer Center Hospital. Finally the future prospect of brachytherapy of head and neck cancer is discussed

  2. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  3. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at ≥6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed ≥1 year, 11 (24%) ≥2 years, and 7 (16%) ≥3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At ≥6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at ≥6 months. Persistent seroma ≥6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  4. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  5. American brachytherapy society (ABS) consensus guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Laurie E.; Nag, Subir; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Rao; Speiser, Burton

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, treatment regimens, and dosimetry for brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of the esophagus. No guidelines for optimal therapy currently exist. Methods and Materials: Utilizing published reports and clinical experience, representatives of the Clinical Research Committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) formulated guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Recommendations were made for brachytherapy in the definitive and palliative treatment of esophageal cancer. (A) Definitive treatment: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal thoracic adeno- or squamous cancers ≤ 10 cm in length, with no evidence of intra-abdominal or metastatic disease. Contraindications include tracheal or bronchial involvement, cervical esophagus location, or stenosis that cannot be bypassed. The esophageal brachytherapy applicator should have an external diameter of 6-10 mm. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 45-50-Gy external beam are used, recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10 Gy in two weekly fractions of 5 Gy each; or (ii) LDR 20 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. All doses are specified 1 cm from the midsource or middwell position. Brachytherapy should follow external beam radiation therapy and should not be given concurrently with chemotherapy. (B) Palliative treatment: Patients with adeno- or squamous cancers of the thoracic esophagus with distant metastases or unresectable local disease progression/recurrence after definitive radiation treatment should be considered for brachytherapy with palliative intent. After limited dose (30 Gy) EBRT, the recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10-14 Gy in one or two fractions; or (ii) LDR 20-25 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. The need for external beam radiation in newly diagnosed patients with a life expectancy of less than 3 months is controversial. In these cases, HDR of 15-20 Gy in two to four fractions or

  6. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anker, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.anker@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); O' Donnell, Kristen [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Boucher, Kenneth M. [Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  7. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Abe, Madoka; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  8. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  9. About brachytherapy for the handling of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Silva, Nilton O.; Damaso, Renato S.; Costa, Helder R.; Borges, Paulo H.R.; Mendes, Bruno M.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of brachytherapy is argued in this article. The 'hardware' and 'necessary software' for the handling are summarily presented. Being the macro-dosimetry an important stage in the radiation therapy procedure, a simplified method of doses evaluation in conventional brachytherapy is presented. In an illustrative form, isodoses of a three-dimensional distribution of linear sources are drawn on a digitalized X-ray picture, exemplifying the handling of breast brachytherapy by sources of iridium

  10. High versus low-dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Sonali S; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Ananth, Cande V; Huang, Yongmei; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cervical cancer. While small trials have shown comparable survival outcomes between high (HDR) and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, little data is available in the US. We examined the utilization of HDR brachytherapy and analyzed the impact of type of brachytherapy on survival for cervical cancer. Women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with primary (external beam and brachytherapy) radiotherapy between 2003-2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were analyzed. Generalized linear mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine predictors of HDR brachytherapy use and the association between HDR use and survival. A total of 10,564 women including 2681 (25.4%) who received LDR and 7883 (74.6%) that received HDR were identified. Use of HDR increased from 50.2% in 2003 to 83.9% in 2011 (Puse of HDR. While patients in the Northeast were more likely to receive HDR therapy, there were no other clinical or socioeconomic characteristics associated with receipt of HDR. In a multivariable Cox model, survival was similar between the HDR and LDR groups (HR=0.93; 95% CI 0.83-1.03). Similar findings were noted in analyses stratified by stage and histology. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated no difference in survival based on type of brachytherapy for stage IIB (P=0.68), IIIB (P=0.17), or IVA (P=0.16) tumors. The use of HDR therapy has increased rapidly. Overall survival is similar for LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  12. High dose rate brachytherapy for superficial cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, Philippe; D'Hombres, Anne; Truc, Gilles; Barillot, Isabelle; Michiels, Christophe; Bedenne, Laurent; Horiot, Jean Claude

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with external radiotherapy, combined modality treatment, or HDR brachytherapy alone to limited esophageal cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1996, 25 patients with limited superficial esophagus carcinomas were treated by high dose rate brachytherapy. The mean age was 63 years (43-86 years). Five patients showed superficial local recurrence after external radiotherapy. Eleven patients without invasion of the basal membrane were staged as Tis. Fourteen patients with tumors involving the submucosa without spreading to the muscle were staged as T1. Treatment consisted of HDR brachytherapy alone in 13 patients, external radiotherapy and brachytherapy in 8 cases, and concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy in 4 cases. External beam radiation was administered to a total dose of 50 Gy using 2 Gy daily fractions in 5 weeks. In cases of HDR brachytherapy alone (13 patients), 6 applications were performed once a week. Results: The mean follow-up is 31 months (range 24-96 months). Twelve patients received 2 applications and 13 patients received 6 applications. Twelve patients experienced a failure (48%), 11/12 located in the esophagus, all of them in the treated volume. One patient presented an isolated distant metastasis. In the patients treated for superficial recurrence, 4/5 were locally controlled (80%) by brachytherapy alone. After brachytherapy alone, 8/13 patients were controlled (61%). The mean disease-free survival is 14 months (1-36 months). Overall survival is 76% at 1 year, 37% at 2 years, and 14% at 3 years. Overall survival for Tis patients is 24% vs. 20% for T1 (p 0.83). Overall survival for patients treated by HDR brachytherapy alone is 43%. One patient presented with a fistula with local failure after external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Four stenosis were registered, two were diagnosed on barium swallowing without symptoms, and two required dilatations. Conclusion: High dose rate brachytherapy permits the treating

  13. External beam techniques to boost cervical cancer when brachytherapy is not an option—theories and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Sarah; Khan, Atif J.; Beriwal, Sushil; Small, William

    2017-01-01

    The management of locally advanced cervical cancer relies on brachytherapy (BT) as an integral part of the radiotherapy delivery armamentarium. Occasionally, intracavitary BT is neither possible nor available. In these circumstances, post-external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) interstitial brachytherapy and/or hysterectomy may represent viable options that must be adequately executed in a timely manner. However, if these options are not applicable due to patient related or facility related reasons, a formal contingency plan should be in place. Innovative EBRT techniques such as intensity modulated and stereotactic radiotherapy may be considered for patients unable to undergo brachytherapy. Relying on provocative arguments and recent data, this review explores the rationale for and limitations of non-brachytherapy substitutes in that setting aiming to establish a formal process for the optimal execution of this alternative plan. PMID:28603722

  14. Local vaginal anesthesia during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.-C.; Wan Leung, Stephen; Wang, C.-J.; Sun, L.-M.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, S.-J.; Yang, C.-W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of local vaginal lidocaine application for pain relief during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy for patients with cervical cancer, and to investigate sequential changes in serum levels of lidocaine during the procedures. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was designed to examine the analgesic effect, physical response, and side effects of local anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. Forty patients were enrolled. All patients received 10-15 MV X-rays to the pelvis with a total dose of 45-59.4 Gy 5-6 weeks before undergoing HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. All patients underwent first intracavitary brachytherapy under general anesthesia. These patients were randomly allocated to receive one of two different treatment protocols as follows: (1) treatment session - control session - treatment session - control session; or (2) control session - treatment session- control session - treatment session. In the treatment sessions, topical anesthesia was administered using 4 ml of 10% lidocaine solution sprayed liberally on the cervix and vagina during intracavitary brachytherapy. In the control sessions, a placebo was administered in the same manner during brachytherapy. The Hensche's applicators for brachytherapy were inserted into the cervix and vagina 5 min after lidocaine application. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess pain and discomfort during brachytherapy. Blood pressure and heart rates were measured to evaluate the physiological response. Another prospective study was then performed to investigate the sequential changes of serum lidocaine levels during the anesthetic procedure. Eleven additional patients with similar disease state and demographic characteristics were enrolled and blood samples were obtained before, and 5, 15, 30, and 45 min after the initiation of lidocaine application. Results: The mean VAS values recorded during the treatment sessions and control

  15. Current status of brachytherapy in cancer treatment – short overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer incidence and mortality depend on a number of factors, including age, socio-economic status and geographical location, and its prevalence is growing around the world. Most of cancer treatments include external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy with energy from radionuclides inserted directly into the tumor, is increasingly used in cancer treatment. For cervical and skin cancers, it has become a standard therapy for more than 100 years as well as an important part of the treatment guidelines for other malignancies, including head and neck, skin, breast, and prostate cancers. Compared to external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy has the potential to deliver an ablative radiation dose over a short period of time directly to the altered tissue area with the advantage of a rapid fall-off in dose, and consequently, sparing of adjacent organs. As a result, the patient is able to complete the treatment earlier, and the risks of occurrence of another cancer are lower than in conventional radiotherapy treatment. Brachytherapy has increased its use as a radical or palliative treatment, and become more advanced with the spread of pulsed-dose-rate and high-dose-rate afterloading machines; the use of new 3D/4D planning systems has additionally improved the quality of the treatment. The aim of the present study was to present short summaries of current studies on brachytherapy for the most frequently diagnosed tumors. Data presented in this manuscript should help especially young physicians or physicists to explore and introduce brachytherapy in cancer treatments.

  16. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Quentin E.; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq 153 Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D 98% ), I-RSBT reduced urethral D 0.1cc below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D 1cc was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D 1cc was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq 153 Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed 153 Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29%–44% if the clinician allows

  17. Brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Fujita, Minoru; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ito, Katsuhide

    2003-01-01

    In treatment choices of stage II (T2N0M0) tongue cancer, brachytherapy is less invasive and superior in function preservation, therefore its role is more important in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate treatment results and morbidity of brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. Between 1980 and 2001, 198 patients with stage II tongue cancer were treated with brachytherapy at Hiroshima University Hospital. Patient ages ranged from 21 to 89 years old (median: 62 years old). Patients were divided into three groups as follows: 119 patients younger than 65 years old (Non-Elderly group), 53 patients between 65 and 75 years old (Junior Elderly group), and 26 patients 75 years or older (Senior Elderly group). Radiotherapy was performed in 101 patients with brachytherapy alone, and in 97 patients with brachytherapy and external radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was also performed in 77 patients. Follow-up period ranged from 4 to 243 months (median: 55 months). The 5-year local control rate was 85% in the Non-Elderly group, 85% in the Junior Elderly group and 81% in the Senior Elderly group. There was no significant difference among these groups. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 85%, 81% and 70% respectively. The Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate than the other two groups (p=0.03). There was also a tendency of higher incidence of neck metastasis and low salvage rate by neck dissection in the Senior Elderly group. Although the Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate, the local control rate was similar to those of the other two groups. Brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. (author)

  18. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  19. Brachytherapy in vulvar cancer: analysis of 18 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frezza, G.; Baldissera, A.; Bernardi, L.; Bunkheila, F.; Galuppi, A.; Salvi, F.

    1996-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vulvar cancer is a rather common neoplasm in elderly patients. Surgery, followed eventually by postoperative radiotherapy, is the treatment of choice. The results of exclusive radiotherapy (external beam irradiation and/or brachytherapy) are not well defined and in the recent literature only small series are reported. Radiotherapy however is the only therapeutic option in patients who are not fit for radical surgery. It is thus necessary to review its indications and its modalities. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1990 to 1994 18 pts with a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva have been submitted to brachytherapy. Age ranged from 60 to 92 years (mean age 76, 1 ys). 14 pts were treated at diagnosis (11 pts) or for recurrent disease after surgery (3 pts). In 8 of them brachytherapy (total dose 35-45 Gy, dose rate: 0,4-0,78 Gy/h) was preceded by external beam irradiation (Co60 or electron beam, 40-50 Gy to primary and inguinal nodes); 6 pts were treated with brachytherapy alone (58-60 Gy; dose rate 0,44-0,63 Gy/h). 4 pts underwent to brachytherapy alone for local recurrence after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (total dose 45-60 Gy; dose rate 0,37-0,49 Gy/h). Brachytherapy was always performed with 192 Ir. Plastic tubes (2 to 5 lines) were used for single plane implantation of small exophytic lesions limited to the labia (8 cases); a perineal template (10 cases) was employed in lesions extended to the vaginal mucosa or involving the clitoris or the area of the perineum. (10(14)) pts treated at diagnosis are alive and free from local recurrence after 11-48 mos. 3 of them, treated with brachytherapy alone, have presented a nodal recurrence in the groin after 14, 15 and 27 mos. respectively. All of them are alive and free from disease after surgery and external radiotherapy. None of the pts treated for recurrent disease after surgery + external beam radiotherapy has achieved a local control. CONCLUSION: Brachytherapy alone or

  20. Perineural invasion on prostate needle biopsy does not predict biochemical failure following brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight, Christopher J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhou Ming; Klein, Eric A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if the presence of perineural invasion (PNI) predicts biochemical recurrence in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case control matching study was performed. The records of 651 patients treated with brachytherapy between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed. Sixty-three of these patients developed biochemical failure. These sixty-three patients were then matched in a one-to-one ratio to patients without biochemical failure, controlling for biopsy Gleason score, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, age, and the use of androgen deprivation. The pathology of the entire cohort was then reviewed for evidence of perineural invasion on initial prostate biopsy specimens. The biochemical relapse free survival rates for these two groups were compared. Results: Cases and controls were well matched, and there were no significant differences between the two groups in age, Gleason grade, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, and the use of androgen deprivation. PNI was found in 19 (17%) patients. There was no significant difference in the rates of PNI between cases and controls, 19.6% and 14.3% respectively (p 0.45). PNI did not correlate with biochemical relapse free survival (p 0.40). Conclusion: Perineural invasion is not a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing brachytherapy for prostate cancer

  1. Shifting brachytherapy monotherapy case mix toward intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, Vinayak; Mahal, Brandon A; Ziehr, David R; Chen, Yu-Wei; Nezolosky, Michelle D; Viswanathan, Vidya B; Beard, Clair J; Devlin, Phillip M; Martin, Neil E; Orio, Peter F; Nguyen, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    The relative use of brachytherapy (BT) for prostate cancer has declined in recent years. In this setting, we sought to determine whether the case mix of BT monotherapy-treated men has changed over time in terms of risk group composition. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was used to identify 30,939 patients diagnosed with prostate adenocarcinoma between 2004 and 2011 who received BT monotherapy. The case mix of BT monotherapy patients was calculated by patient risk group and year of diagnosis. Between 2004 and 2011, the use of BT monotherapy declined overall. The relative percentage of men undergoing BT with low-risk disease declined by 4.5%, whereas the relative percentage of patients with intermediate-risk disease increased by 4.7%. Non-white patients and those from poorer counties did not show shifts in the risk group makeup of BT monotherapy patients, whereas white patients and those from wealthier counties did. Although fewer patients with prostate cancer are undergoing BT monotherapy, men with intermediate-risk disease comprised a significantly larger portion of the BT case mix in 2011 compared with 2004. Future research efforts by brachytherapists should be directed toward improving BT technique, optimizing radiation doses, and obtaining long-term followup data for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Brachytherapy in cervix cancers: techniques and concepts evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Crevoisier, R. de; Petrow, P.; Fromm, S.; Delapierre, M.; Albano, M.; Petit, C.; Briot, E.

    2003-01-01

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with cervical carcinoma. Technical modalities have evolved during the last years and have benefited from imaging modalities development, specially MRI. Imaging modalities contribute to a better knowledge of tumoral extension and critical organs. Ultrasound during brachytherapy has led to the almost complete eradication of uterine perforation. In the future, a more systematic use of systems allowing optimization may induce a better dose distribution in the tumor as well as in the critical organs. Recent data provided information in favor of a better analysis in the relative role of dose-rate, total dose and treated volume and their influence on the local control and complication incidence. Concomitant radio-chemotherapy represents a standard in the treatment of patients with tumoral size exceeding 4 cm. Some questions still remain: is concomitant chemotherapy of benefit during brachytherapy? Is there any place for complementary surgery, specially in patients with complete response after external irradiation with concomitant chemotherapy and brachytherapy? In order to answer the former question, a phase III randomized trial is going to start, with the Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer as a promoter. (authors)

  3. Cervical cancer. Application of MR imaging in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of application of MRI in arrangement of brachytherapy of cervical cancer, a method was proposed to see the radiation doses in surrounding tissues by superimposing the dose distribution pattern of the radiation source on the MR image. The applicator for the source was filled with water to get its T2-weighted image and was inserted in the patients. The MRI apparatus was Siemens Magnetom Vision (1.5T) with phased array coil. T2-weighted sagittal and coronary images were taken by turbospin echo and HASTE methods. The section thickness was 5 mm. The dose distribution pattern was superimposed on the frontal and lateral images by Siemens Mevaplan to see the doses in surrounding tissues. In 4 patients, it was possible to estimate the radiation dose in the posterior wall of bladder, anterior wall of rectum and urinary duct. The method is promising for arranging brachytherapy of cervical cancer. (K.H.)

  4. Patient-based dosimetric comparison of interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Anil K.; Julka, P.K.; Sharma, D.N.; Rustogi, Ashish; Subramani, V.; Prabhakar, R.; Rath, G.K.; Semwal, Manoj K.; Thulkar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy in the form of High Dose Rate (HDR) intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) along with external beam radiotherapy(EBRT) is the main treatment in cancer cervix. Of late, some large centres have started practicing template based transperineal interstitial brachytherapy (TIB) for advanced/ bulky cancer cervix. Usually, TIB is given for patients with advanced disease/ distorted anatomy or recurrent disease for better lateral target coverage. CT/MRI/USG based planning has made volumetric dosimetry possible for the target and the organs at risk (OARs). This has resulted in better correlation between dose received and treatment outcome in terms of tumour control and late toxicities as against the point dosimetry system. It has been shown by many studies that ICRU based point dose reporting may not represent the actual doses received by the OARs. Though it is expected that TIB gives better target coverage and OAR sparing in advanced/ bulky cancer cervix cases as compared to ICRT, detailed patient studies on the subject have not been reported. We have carried out dosimetric comparison between ICRT and TIB for cancer cervix patients undergoing treatment at our centre in terms of treated volume and doses to OARs

  5. Brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Comparative characteristics of procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kanaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of interstitial radiation sources is the «youngest» of the radical method of treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PC. The high level of efficiency comparable to prostatectomy at a significantly lower rate of complications causes rapid growth of clinical use of brachytherapy (BT. Depending on the radiation source and the mode of administration into the prostate gland are two types BT – high-dose rate (temporary (HDR-BT and low-dose rate (permanent (LDR-BT brachytherapy. At the heart of these two methods are based on a single principle of direct effect of the quantum gamma radiation on the area of interest. However, the differences between the characteristics of isotopes used and technical aspects of the techniques cause the difference in performance and complication rates for expression HDR-BT and LDR-BT.

  6. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  7. Underuse of brachytherapy for the treatment of dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer. An Italian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Guido, Alessandra; Hassan, Cesare; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Arcelli, Alessandra; Farioli, Andrea; Giaccherini, Lucia; Galuppi, Andrea; Mandolesi, Daniele; Cellini, Francesco; Mantello, Giovanna; Macchia, Gabriella; de Bortoli, Nicola; Repici, Alessandro; Valentini, Vincenzo; Bazzoli, Franco; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    International guidelines strongly recommend brachytherapy as valid alternative or in addition to stenting in patients with dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer. However, for not well understood reasons, brachytherapy is definitively underused for the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia. Aim of the current survey was to investigate the use of brachytherapy for the treatment of malignant dysphagia in Italy. A structured questionnaire was submitted to the 1510 members of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncologists (AIRO). These members refer to 177 centres of radiotherapy across Italy and in 68 (38.4%) of them brachytherapy is routinely performed. Of the 1510 invited members, 178 completed the survey (11.7%). The answers provided by the 178 participants allowed to get information on 40 out of 68 brachytherapy centres (58.8%). Seven out of 40 (17.5%) centres perform brachytherapy of the oesophagus, in 3 out of 40 (7.5%) centres brachytherapy represents the first line of treatment. The main reason why brachytherapy is not routinely performed is the lack of experience. Despite the strong recommendations of the international guidelines and the wide diffusion of brachytherapy centres across Italy, only very few of them routinely considered brachytherapy for the treatment of dysphagia due to esophageal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MRI-guided brachytherapy for cancer of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, H.; Bachmann, G.; Lieven, H. von; Sens, M.

    1993-01-01

    A method of brachytherapy treatment planning using MRI is presented. In 13 patients with inoperable squamous cell cancer of the thoracic oesophagus an intraluminal afterloading boost with MRI assistance was performed. A new type of flexible catheter was filled with 1/100 diluted Gd-DTPA and introduced into the oesophagus before performing MRI in the sagittal, coronal and transverse planes. One sagittal or coronal picture which showed the catheter tip and the residual cancer was magnified to ''life size''. The position of the catheter was corrected if necessary and the treatment volume decided. The contrast medium was then aspirated out of the catheter and a thinner afterloading catheter pushed into the outer catheter. The patient was moved immediately to the afterloading room and received the first dose of boost irradiation. This method allows much more precise brachytherapy planning since it shows the cancer and the catheter together. It is superior to localising the cancer with a barium swallow or endoscopy because MRI visualises the whole extent of the residual cancer, which can then be covered with the necessary dose. (orig.)

  9. Utilization of prostate brachytherapy for low risk prostate cancer: Is the decline overstated?

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Safdieh; Andrew Wong; Joseph P. Weiner; David Schwartz; David Schreiber

    2016-01-01

    Purpose : Several prior studies have suggested that brachytherapy utilization has markedly decreased, coinciding with the recent increased utilization of intensity modulated radiation therapy, as well as an increase in urologist-owned centers. We sought to investigate the brachytherapy utilization in a large, hospital-based registry. Material and methods: Men with prostate cancer diagnosed between 2004-2012 and treated with either external beam radiation and/or prostate brachytherapy ...

  10. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase ≥25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease ≥25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  11. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology, Mountain View, CA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  12. HDR brachytherapy for superficial non-melanoma skin cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauden, Ruth; Pracy, Martin; Avery, Anne-Marie; Hodgetts, Ian; Gauden, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Our initial experience using recommended high dose per fraction skin brachytherapy (BT) treatment schedules, resulted in poor cosmesis. This study aimed to assess in a prospective group of patients the use of Leipzig surface applicators for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, for the treatment of small non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) using a protracted treatment schedule. Treatment was delivered by HDR brachytherapy with Leipzig applicators. 36Gy, prescribed to between 3 to 4mm, was given in daily 3Gy fractions. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated weekly during irradiation using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Local response, late skin effects and cosmetic results were monitored at periodic intervals after treatment completion. From March 2002, 200 patients with 236 lesions were treated. Median follow-up was 66 months (range 25–121 months). A total of 162 lesions were macroscopic, while in 74 cases, BT was given after resection because of positive microscopic margins. There were 121 lesions that were basal cell carcinomas, and 115 were squamous cell carcinomas. Lesions were located on the head and neck (198), the extremities (26) and trunk (12). Local control was 232/236 (98%). Four patients required further surgery to treat recurrence. Grade 1 acute skin toxicity was detected in 168 treated lesions (71%) and grade 2 in 81 (34%). Cosmesis was good or excellent in 208 cases (88%). Late skin hypopigmentation changes were observed in 13 cases (5.5%). Delivering 36Gy over 2 weeks to superficial NMSC using HDR brachytherapy is well tolerated and provides a high local control rate without significant toxicity.

  13. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Wei, Ming-Chow; Hsu, Yao-Peng; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hsiao, Sheng-Mou; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Wang, Li-Ying; Shueng, Pei-Wei

    2010-11-23

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT) system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted.

  14. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. Case Presentation A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. Conclusions CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted.

  15. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Wei, Ming-Chow; Hsu, Yao-Peng; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hsiao, Sheng-Mou; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Wang, Li-Ying; Shueng, Pei-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT) system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted

  16. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  17. Does immediate postoperative brachytherapy allow to broaden the indications of conservative treatment in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floiras, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    A 1997 study of long-term outcomes in 109 patients with unilateral stage I or II breast cancer treated by brachytherapy between 1983 and 1985 found significantly lower recurrence rates than in a conservatively-treated group of patients managed at the same institution. The benefits of brachytherapy, of a booster dose after after surgery, and of adjuvant medical therapy are emphasized. (author)

  18. The role of brachytherapy in the definitive management of prostate cancer; Place de la curietherapie dans le traitement du cancer prostatique localise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crook, J. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Center for the Southern Interior, 399, Royal Avenue, Kelowna, British Columbia, V1Y 5L33 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Over the past two decades, brachytherapy has played an ever expanding role in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Brachytherapy surpasses external beam radiotherapy in its ability to deliver intense intra-prostatic dose escalation. Although initially low dose rate permanent seed brachytherapy was favored for favorable risk prostate cancers, and high dose rate temporary brachytherapy for intermediate and advanced disease, both types of brachytherapy now have a place across all the risk groups of localized prostate cancer. This article will review indications and patient selection, planning and technical aspects, toxicity and efficacy for both low and high dose rate prostate brachytherapy. (author)

  19. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kathy, E-mail: Kathy.Han@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases.

  20. Temporal relationship between prostate brachytherapy and the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, Sarah A.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the location of pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal malignancies and posttreatment colorectal polyps in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through July 2004, 1,351 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2002) prostate cancer. Supplemental external beam radiotherapy (XRT) was administered to 699 patients. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Operative and pathology reports were reviewed for all patients with pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal cancer and posttreatment colorectal polyps. Multiple parameters were evaluated for the development of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 23 and 25 patients before and after prostate brachytherapy, respectively. No differences were identified in the distribution of colorectal cancers either before or after treatment (3 and 4 rectal cancers in the pre- and postbrachytherapy cohorts). Thirty-five of the 48 colorectal cancers (73%) were diagnosed within 5 years of brachytherapy with a peak incidence 1 year after brachytherapy. One hundred ninety-two colorectal polyps were diagnosed after brachytherapy, 160 (83%) occurred within 4 years of brachytherapy, and only 27 (14%) were located in the rectum. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, prostate D 9 (minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume) predicted for posttreatment colorectal cancer. Rectal polyps were most closely related to patient age and percent positive biopsies, whereas sigmoid/colon polyps were best predicted by patient age, planning volume, and supplemental XRT. Conclusions: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed with equal frequency before and after brachytherapy with comparable geographic distributions. In addition, the vast majority of postbrachytherapy colorectal polyps were located beyond the confines of the rectum

  1. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, Jason A.; Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m 2 (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m 2 ), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m 2 , 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m 2 , and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m 2 or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment strategy in obese

  2. A new afterloading applicator for primary brachytherapy of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe and have used a new afterloading applicator in six patients for primary radiation therapy of endometrial cancer. The first introduction of the applicator was done under general anaesthesia. Dilating the cervical canal to Heger 9 made insertion easier. Prior to application it is advisable to probe the lumen of the uterine cavity with a tube or curette to estimate how far the applicator must be spread open. For brachytherapy it is advantageous to remove necrotic tumour portions. This requires experienced hands to avoid perforation of the uterus. The new afterloading applicator is easy to use, and permits direct contact between the six tubes and the tumour. In conjunction with careful planning with the help of MRI, it provides an optimal system for the treatment of endometrial cancer. (Author)

  3. Experience with LDR and MDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Okawa, Midori-Kita; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Karasawa, Kumiko; Fukuhara, Noboru

    1996-01-01

    As the brachytherapy dose-rate increases, it is necessary to reduce the total dose or to increase the fraction number with reducing the fraction dose in order not to increase the incidence of the late effect. With the introduction to the Tokyo Women's Medical College, Hospital of a remote afterloading system of Selectron - MDR, delivering dose-rate to point A became approximately twice of that with our classical cesium LDR manual afterloading technique. Material and Methods: Between 1987 to 1993 a total of, previously untreated 74 patients with cervical cancer received MDR brachytherapy using a Selection - MDR. This analysis is therefore of those patients series who underwent radical radioradiotherapy with MDR, 1987-1993, in comparison with the 347 cases who were treated with classical manual LDR afterloading machine, 1969-1986. The treatment was a brachytherapy during external radiotherapy and dos-rate at point A was 160-180 cGy/hour with MDR and 80-90 cGy/hour with LDR. The mean fraction dose was 800-1000 cGy by MDR and 1000-1200 cGy by LDR and fraction number was increased 1-2times in the MDR group with no change of a total dose at point A. Results: The mean age was 63.3 years in the MDR group and 60.2 in the LDR group. In the MDR group, 4 patients were at stage I, 16 stage II, 32 stage III, and 22 stage IV. In the LDR group, 32 were at stage I, 83 stage II, 183 stage III, and 49 stage IV. The medical rate was not significantly different between two groups. The tumor response by manual examination one month after radiotherapy showed no significant difference. The 5-year survival rate for the MDR and LDR groups were 100% : 78% at stage I, 61% : 71% at stage II and 52% : 53% at stage III, with no significant differences. Late complications by severity with grade II-III according to Kottureire's classification were not significantly different in the rectum or bladder. These results suggested that MDR brachytherapy was useful for the patients' QOL as it reduced the

  4. Results of brachytherapy boost in high risk breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battermann, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: in breast conserving therapy the role of brachytherapy as a boost after whole breast irradiation is not clear. The series from the Netherlands Cancer Institute show a very high local control rate, but the question could be raised whether all these patients need a brachy boost. Therefore, it was decided at our institute, to deliver a brachy boost only to high risk patients, viz. patients with incomplete resection margins and/or extensive in situ cancer (ECI). Materials and methods: in the period 1988 through 1993 a total of 148 patients with 151 breast tumours received a boost on the tumour bed using brachytherapy. Age varied from 25 till 74 years, with a mean age of 52.3 years. Incomplete resection margins were found in 60 patients, ECI in 31 and both in 49 patients. In the majority of patients, the ECI component was not completely removed. T-stage was unknown in 9 patients. T1 in 83, T2 in 49 and T3 in 10. Nodal status was N0 in 119 and N1 in 33 patients. Infiltrating duct carcinoma was the most common histology. No infiltrating growth was found in 6 patients, but one patient presented a positive node. The interval period between day of operation and day of brachytherapy implantation was between 3 and 4 months in 62%. The mean interval between completion of beam irradiation and day of implantation was 18 days, while 12 patients received their brachytherapy previous to the beam irradiation. External irradiation was with two tangential fields and a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 6 weeks (9 fractions in two weeks). The number of needles in two planes. Most patients were implanted under local anaesthesia. Dose rate in 97 patients was 51 - 60 cGy/h. Results: follow-up for patients alive varied from 2 years till 7 years with a mean follow-up period of 4 years. One hundred and twenty five patients are alive, including 6 patients with manifest metastases. Local recurrence was encountered in 8 patients (interval 14 - 60 months, mean 30 months), with

  5. Treatment of localized prostate cancer with brachytherapy: six years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Pablo; Dourado, Leandro; Giudice, Carlos; Villamil, Wenceslao; Palacios, Victor; Sardi, Mabel; Damia, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    The usage of ultrasound scan to perform prostate biopsy punctures, the new radiation therapies and the more accurate selection of patients has allowed brachytherapy to play an important role in the treatment of the localized pathology. The objective of this paper is to review the results obtained when treating the localized prostate cancer by using brachytherapy with mud 125. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and July 2006, 100 prostate cancer patients were treated at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, using brachytherapy with mud 125. One of the patients was treated with a combined therapy (brachytherapy + external radiotherapy). For that reason, the patient was not taken into consideration for this paper. The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The tumoral stages were T1c in 81% of the patients and T2a in 19% of them. The PSA was always below 15 ng/ml, with an average of 8.92 ng/ml; inferior to 10 ng/ml in 72 patients and between 10 and 15 ng/m ml in 28 of them. The average prostate volume was 34.68 c.c. (18.70 c.c.-58.00 c.c.). The combined Gleason score was below 6 (except for three patients with Gleason 7 who had a PSA below 10, stage T1c). The dose used was 16,000 cGy as recommended by the TG43. The energy charge of each seed was between 0.28 and 0.40 mci. Thirty days later, a prostate axial computer tomography was carried out every 3 mm. with a scanning set every 5 mm. to perform a dosimetric control of the implant. Results: The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The control computer tomography showed an adequate dosimetric coverage for the entire prostate volume, with a maximum urethral dose not above 400 Gy and a maximum rectal dose below 100 Gy. The PSA of all patients decreased to a normal level 6 months after the treatment started. The average follow-up of the 71 patients able to be tested from an oncological perspective lasted 31.15 months, with a minimum of 18 and a maximum of 72 months. Currently, seven patients of those tested (9.86%) manifest

  6. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  7. Comparison between Japanese and French interstitial brachytherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy is the optimal radiotherapy modality for head and neck cancer because the highest dose conformity can be achieved, and implanted tubes can move synchronously with the tumor movement. Compared with radical surgery, interstitial brachytherapy can achieve equivalent local control with less morbidity and less functional deficit. In Japan, because of technical limitations, interstitial brachytherapy has been confined to treatment of small tongue cancers. To improve our head and neck cancer treatment, technical limitations should be eliminated and a wider indication for interstitial brachytherapy should be achieved. In France, interstitial brachytherapy has been technically more developed and widely indicated than in Japan. We analyzed the differences between Japanese (Osaka) and French (Lyon and Nancy) techniques, to improve our interstitial brachytherapy. Implant devices and techniques: French applicators (Longcip 1) are more flexible and more suitable for loop techniques of the soft palate, the base of the tongue, and the vallecula, than applicators available in Japan. Various implant techniques are established especially for the oropharynx in France. Mandibular protection: Lead blocks used in France can more effectively shield the mandible than our silicone spacers. We showed the dosimetric results in an experimental treatment setting. Dose specification: The five-mm dose specification method used in Japan can work only for easy cases, such as small oral tongue cancers and mouth floor cancers. For complicated implants, such as for the oropharynx, the CTV-based dose specification method used in France is essential for sufficient irradiation. Indications: The indication for head and neck interstitial brachytherapy in Japan is limited mostly to small oral tongue cancers. The indication in France is wider, including the oral cavity, the oropharynx, and postoperative cases. We can refine our head and neck cancer treatment if we combine French

  8. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiation for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Daniel E; Soni, Payal D; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Merrick, Gregory S; Stock, Richard G; Blasko, John C; Zelefsky, Michael J

    To review outcomes for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy (CMRT) utilizing external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with a brachytherapy boost. The available literature for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy was reviewed and summarized. At this time, the literature suggests that the majority of high-risk cancers are curable with multimodal treatment. Several large retrospective studies and three prospective randomized trials comparing CMRT to dose-escalated EBRT have demonstrated superior biochemical control with CMRT. Longer followup of the randomized trials will be required to determine if this will translate to a benefit in metastasis-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Although greater toxicity has been associated with CMRT compared to EBRT, recent studies suggest that technological advances that allow better definition and sparing of critical adjacent structures as well as increasing experience with brachytherapy have improved implant quality and the toxicity profile of brachytherapy. The role of androgen deprivation therapy is well established in the external beam literature for high-risk disease, but there is controversy regarding the applicability of these data in the setting of dose escalation. At this time, there is not sufficient evidence for the omission of androgen deprivation therapy with dose escalation in this population. Comparisons with surgery remain limited by differences in patient selection, but the evidence would suggest better disease control with CMRT compared to surgery alone. Due to a series of technological advances, modern combination series have demonstrated unparalleled rates of disease control in the high-risk population. Given the evidence from recent randomized trials, combination therapy may become the standard of care for high-risk cancers. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. HDR intralumenal brachytherapy in bronchial cancer: review of our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, P.; Ravo, V.; Muschera, R.

    1996-01-01

    The main indications for brachytherapy in the treatment of endobronchial cancer are dyspnea. postobstructive pneumonia and atelectasis, cough and hemoptysis resulting from broncus obstruction by exophytic intralumenal tumor growth. High Dose Rate intralumenal brachytherapy (HDRBT) may be combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in particular as almost all tumors are too large for HDRBT alone. From January 1992 to September 1995 we treated 268 patients affected by bronchial cancer, with EBRT combined with HDRBT. All patients were staged as IIIa-IIIb-IV but KPS was >60 and expectancy of life > than 3 months. After bronchoscopy and Tc simulation we found that almost 10% of patients were downstaged. Treatment was always realized delivering 60 Gy to the tumour volume and 50 Gy to the mediastinal structures with EBRT. Brachytherapy was performed during the radiotherapy course. In 38 patients HDRBT was realized just one time, at the beginning of EBRT, with a dose of 10 Gy calculated at 1cm from the central axis of the catheter. In 47 HDRBT was performed twice (at the beginning and at the end of EBRT) with a dose of 7 Gy calculated at 1 cm from the central axis. From 1994 we started a 3 fractions protocol (Timing: days 1.15.30) with a dose of 5 Gy calculated at 0.5 cm from the axis. Of the 183 patients introduced in the protocol 170 received the three fractions of HDRBT and 13 were excluded from the study for personal or clinical reasons. In 97% of cases the application did not need general anesthesia; local anesthesia has been sufficient supplemented by some drug for sedation and coughing. Anyway both bronchoscopy and HDRBT (with anterior-posterior and lateral chest X-ray) are performed in the same shielded room without the necessity of displacing the patient. In almost 60% of treatments we used just one endobronchial applicator. In case of tumor involvement of the carina, two applicators were introduced. By this a larger tumor volume can be treated with adequate

  10. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Lois C.; Abdallah, Rita; Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  11. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  12. Assessment of Absorbed Dose in Persons close to the Patients during 192Ir brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joo Young; Kang, Se Sik

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2007 Annual Report of the National Cancer Registry, cervical cancer showed an occurring frequency of 7th in female cancers and 4rd in females with an age of 35-64 years. Both radiotherapy and chemotherapy are mainly used for the treatment of cervical cancer. In case of radiotherapy, brachytherapy using radioisotopes in conjunction with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using a linear accelerator is used in most cases to improve the outcome of cancer treatment. Brachytherapy, one of the cervical cancer radiotherapies, is a method that can minimize the damage of normal tissues restricting absorbed dose to uterus. It is, however, necessary to conduct a quantitative assessment on brachytherapy because it may cause radiation exposure to medical care providers during the radiotherapy. Therefore, the study provides the basic research data regarding brachytherapy for cervical cancer, estimating the absorbed dose in persons close to the patients using a mathematical phantom during 192Ir brachytherapy for cervical cancer

  13. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Smith, Grace L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  14. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L., E-mail: glsmith@mdanderson.org [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  15. Results in patients treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Shirane, Makoto; Ueda, Tsutomu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Eight patients were treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for oral tongue cancer between September 2000 and August 2004. The patient distribution was 1 T1, 5 T2, 1 T3, and 1 T4a. Patients received 50-60 Gy in 10 fractions over seven days with high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Six of the eight patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy (20-30 Gy) and interstitial brachytherapy. The two-year primary local control rate was 83% for initial case. High-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed safely even for an aged person, and was a useful treatment modality for oral tongue cancer. (author)

  16. Brachytherapy in early prostate cancer--early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, B O; Bailen, J L; Albrink, F H; Steinbock, G S; Cornett, M S; Benson, D C; Schmied, W K; Medley, R N; Spanos, W J; Paris, K J; Koerner, P D; Gatenby, R A; Wilson, D L; Meyer, R

    1999-01-01

    Use of brachytherapy with radioactive seeds in the management of early prostate cancer is commonly used in the United States. The early experience has been reported from the prostate treatment centers in Seattle for the last 10 years. In this manuscript we are reporting our early experience of 150 radioactive seed implantations in early stage prostate cancer using either Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. The average age of the patient is 66 years and the median Gleason score is 5.4 with a median PSA of 6. A brief description of the evolution of the treatment of prostate cancer as well as the preparation for the seed implantation using the volume study with ultrasound of the prostate, pubic arch study using CT scan of the pelvis and the complete planning using the treatment planning computers are discussed. We also have described the current technique which is used in our experience based on the Seattle guidelines. We plan a follow-up report with the results of the studies with longer follow-up.

  17. Impact of point A asymmetry on local control and survival for low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfermann, Krisha J; Wahlquist, Amy; Watkins, John; Kohler, Matthew; Jenrette, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate whether Point A asymmetry in low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy is associated with local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS) and/or overall survival (OS). A retrospective analysis of disease control and survival outcomes was conducted for patients who underwent LDR brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer. Institutional protocol entailed concurrent chemotherapy and whole pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) over 5 weeks, followed by placement of Fletcher-Suit tandem and colpostat applicators at weeks 6 and 8. Objective Point A doses, 80-85 Gy, were accomplished by placement of Cesium-137 (Cs-137) sources. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess associations between disease control and survival endpoints with variables of interest. The records of 50 patients with FIGO stage IB1-IVA cervical cancer undergoing LDR brachytherapy at our institution were identified. Thirty of these patients had asymmetry > 2.5%, and 11 patients had asymmetry > 5%. At a median survivor follow-up of 20.25 months, 15 patients had experienced disease failure (including 5 cervical/vaginal apex only failures and 2 failures encompassing the local site). Right/left dose asymmetry at Point A was associated with statistically significantly inferior LC (p = 0.035) and inferior DFS (p = 0.011) for patients with mean Point A dose of > 80 Gy. Insufficient evidence existed to conclude an association with OS. LDR brachytherapy may be associated with clinically significant dose asymmetry. The present study demonstrates that patients with Point A asymmetry have a higher risk of failure for DFS and LC.

  18. LDR vs. HDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer: the view from radiobiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher R

    2002-01-01

    Permanent LDR brachytherapy and temporary HDR brachytherapy are competitive techniques for clinically localized prostate radiotherapy. Although a randomized trial will likely never be conducted comparing these two forms of brachytherapy, a comparative radiobiological modeling analysis proves useful in understanding some of their intrinsic differences, several of which could be exploited to improve outcomes. Radiobiological models based upon the linear quadratic equations are presented for fractionated external beam, fractionated (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy, and (125)I and (103)Pd LDR brachytherapy. These models incorporate the dose heterogeneities present in brachytherapy based upon patient-derived dose volume histograms (DVH) as well as tumor doubling times and repair kinetics. Radiobiological parameters are normalized to correspond to three accepted clinical risk factors based upon T-stage, PSA, and Gleason score to compare models with clinical series. Tumor control probabilities (TCP) for LDR and HDR brachytherapy (as monotherapy or combined with external beam) are compared with clinical bNED survival rates. Predictions are made for dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy regimens. Model predictions for dose escalation with external beam agree with clinical data and validate the models and their underlying assumptions. Both LDR and HDR brachytherapy achieve superior tumor control when compared with external beam at conventional doses (LDR brachytherapy as boost achieves superior tumor control than when used as monotherapy. Stage for stage, both LDR and current HDR regimens achieve similar tumor control rates, in agreement with current clinical data. HDR monotherapy with large-dose fraction sizes might achieve superior tumor control compared with LDR, especially if prostate cancer possesses a high sensitivity to dose fractionation (i.e., if the alpha/beta ratio is low). Radiobiological models support the current clinical evidence for equivalent outcomes in localized

  19. Brachytherapy for head and neck cancer. Treatment results and future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Ro-ichi; Miura, Masahiko; Ayukawa, Fumio; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Following the increasing desire of many patients to keep the form and function of speech and swallowing, interstitial brachytherapy has become the main treatment for head and neck cancer. In addition, aged and physically handicapped patients who are refused general anesthesia have come to be referred to our clinic to receive less invasive and curative treatment. In the field of brachytherapy for head and neck cancers, less complicated and more superior treatment results have been achieved following the introduction of spacers, computer dosimetry and so on. As a result of these efforts, treatment results have come to fulfill the desire of patients and their families. During the past 43 years from 1962 to 2005, we have treated over 2, 100 patients of head and neck cancer including 850 with stage I·II oral tongue carcinoma by brachytherapy and acquired a lot of important and precious data including the treatment results, multiple primary cancers as well as radiation-induced cancers. (author)

  20. Utilization of prostate brachytherapy for low risk prostate cancer: Is the decline overstated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdieh, Joseph; Wong, Andrew; Weiner, Joseph P; Schwartz, David; Schreiber, David

    2016-08-01

    Several prior studies have suggested that brachytherapy utilization has markedly decreased, coinciding with the recent increased utilization of intensity modulated radiation therapy, as well as an increase in urologist-owned centers. We sought to investigate the brachytherapy utilization in a large, hospital-based registry. Men with prostate cancer diagnosed between 2004-2012 and treated with either external beam radiation and/or prostate brachytherapy were abstracted from the National Cancer Database. In order to be included, men had to be clinically staged as T1c-T2aNx-0Mx-0, Gleason 6, PSA ≤ 10.0 ng/ml. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze brachytherapy utilization over time and were compared via χ(2). Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess for covariables associated with increased brachytherapy usage. There were 89,413 men included in this study, of which 37,054 (41.6%) received only external beam radiation, and 52,089 (58.4%) received prostate brachytherapy. The use of brachytherapy declined over time from 62.9% in 2004 to 51.3% in 2012 (p facilities (60.8% in 2004 to 47.0% in 2012, p facilities (63.7% in 2004 to 53.0% in 2012, p facilities than those who lived further. The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy increased during this same time period from 18.4% in 2004 to 38.2% in 2012 (p usage. In this hospital-based registry, prostate brachytherapy usage has declined for low risk prostate cancer as intensity modulated radiation therapy usage has increased. However, it still remains the treatment of choice for 51.3% of patients as of 2012.

  1. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Brömme, Jens O.; Geretschläger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3–23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  2. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Bojaxhiu, Beat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Simcock, Mathew [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  3. Focal low-dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Y Tong, Gilad Cohen, Yoshiya Yamada Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Whole-gland low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy has been a well-established modality of treating low-risk prostate cancer. Treatment in a focal manner has the advantages of reduced toxicity to surrounding organs. Focal treatment using LDR brachytherapy has been relatively unexplored, but it may offer advantages over other modalities that have established experiences with a focal approach. This is particularly true as prostate cancer is being detected at an earlier and more localized stage with the advent of better detection methods and newer imaging modalities. Keywords: prostate cancer, focal, low dose rate, brachytherapy

  4. Adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy as a part of management in early endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas-Ślęczka, Sylwia; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Białas, Brygida

    2012-12-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most frequent cancer of female genital tract. Metro- and menorrhagia or postmenopausal bleeding results in its early presentation. It allows radical treatment. However, controversies remain on surgery coverage or adjuvant therapies in early endometrial women cancer. Optimal management should minimize intervention instead of aggressive approach, as showed by recent studies. There is a role for brachytherapy as an adjuvant irradiation. Crucial publications including PORTEC-1, GOG 99, MRC ASTEC, ASTEC/EN.5, PORTEC-2 or Italian lymphadenectomy trial are discussed. Moreover, there is attention paid on adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy analyses for the past fifteen years.

  5. Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR - BT) brachytherapy in treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast became widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of RT after breast conservation is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 45 to 50 Gy. Initially brachytherapy for breast cancer was used in addition of external radiation to boost a portion of the breast to higher doses. However, over the past 10 years, the application of brachytherapy in breast cancer has changed. In early stage breast cancer, research has shown that the area that requires radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from returning is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Because this typically includes only a part of the breast, brachytherapy is now being used to treat the targeted portion of the breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose so that treatment is completed in four to five days. Another indications for PDR - BT as a part of treatment in locally advanced breast cancer or as a palliative treatment are discussed in the paper, too. Preliminary results with PDR - BT boost technique are promising. However, more experience and longer follow-up are required to define whether these methods might improve local tumor control for breast cancer patients. In this article the current status, indications, technical aspects and published results of PDR brachytherapy (PDR - BT) in breast cancer treatment are reviewed. (author)

  6. Erectile function following brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putora, P.M.; Buchauer, K.; Plasswilm, L.; Engeler, D.; Schmid, H.P.; Haile, S.R.; Graf, N.

    2016-01-01

    For localized prostate cancer, treatment options include external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), radical prostatectomy (RP), and brachytherapy (BT). Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common side-effect. Our aim was to evaluate penile erectile function (EF) before and after BT, EBRT, or RP using a validated self-administered quality-of-life survey from a prospective registry. Analysis included 478 patients undergoing RP (n = 252), EBRT (n = 91), and BT (n = 135) with at least 1 year of follow-up and EF documented using IIEF-5 scores at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and annually thereafter. Differences among treatments were most pronounced among patients with no or mild initial ED (IIEF-5 ≥ 17). Overall, corrected for baseline EF and age, BT was associated with higher IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 7.8 IIEF-5 score) or EBRT (+ 3.1 IIEF-5 score). EBRT was associated with better IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 4.7 IIEF-5 score). In patients undergoing EBRT or RP with bilateral nerve sparing (NS), recovery of EF was observed and during follow-up, the differences to BT were not statistically significant. Overall age had a negative impact on EF preservation (corrected for baseline IIEF). In our series, EF was adversely affected by each treatment modality. Considered overall, BT provided the best EF preservation in comparison to EBRT or RP. (orig.) [de

  7. Perineal recurrence of prostate cancer six years after trans-perineal brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, Wietse; Vijverberg, Peter; Moerland, Rien; Brand, Eric; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; Noteboom, Juus; van Vulpen, Marco

    We report a case of perineal recurrence of prostate cancer 6 years after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. The most common approach to treat such perineal masses, including those occurring after prior biopsy or surgery, is local excision. We report the use of

  8. Iodine-125 seed implantation (permanent brachytherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Shin; Katayama, Yoshihisa; Tanimoto, Ryuta

    2008-01-01

    From January 2004 to March 2007, 308 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated using iodine-125 ( 125 I) seed implantation (permanent brachytherapy) at Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences. We evaluated the treatment's efficacy and morbidity in 300 prostate cancer patients who were followed up for more than 1 month after brachytherapy. Based on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, patients with a prostate volume of less than 40 ml in transrectal ultrasound imaging were classified as low or intermediate risk. The median patient age was 67 years (range 50 to 79 years), the median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value before biopsy was 6.95 ng/ml (range 1.13 to 24.7 ng/ml), and the median prostate volume was 24.33 ml (range 9.3 to 41.76 ml). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 1 to 36 months) and the PSA levels decreased in almost all patients after brachytherapy. Although 194 of 300 patients (64.7%) complained of difficulty in urination, pollakisuria/urgency, miction pain, and/or urinary incontinence, all of which might be associated with radiation prostatitis during the first month after brachytherapy, these symptoms gradually improved. 125 I seed implantation brachytherapy is safe and effective for localized prostate cancer within short-term follow up. (author)

  9. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gestaut, Matthew M.; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J.; Hasan, Salman A.; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  10. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestaut, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.Gestaut@BSWHealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Cai, Wendi [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Vyas, Shilpa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States); Patel, Belur J. [Department of Urology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Hasan, Salman A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); MunozMaldonado, Yolanda [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  11. Simultaneous treatment of tongue cancer with interstitial brachytherapy and bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarai, Jiro; Itagaki, Takatomo; Yamaguchi, Kouichi

    1983-01-01

    During a period of 5 years, from 1977 to 1982, twenty five patients with tongue cancer were treated by radium needle implantation and bleomycin at Yamagata University Hospital. In this paper, authors analysed seventeen patients followed over two years. All had biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma. According to the TNM system (UICC, 1978), primary tumor was classified into 4 cases of T1, 8 cases of T2 and 5 cases of T3. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a high local control rate and reduce subsequent regional lymphnode metastasis. Our curative treatment method was simultaneous combination of 70 Gy of brachy-therapy and 40 mg of bleomycin. The results of this study were as follows: 1. A control rate in the primary lesion was 91% (10/11) in survivors having survived more than 2 years. 2. Radioosteonecrosis of mandible was found in 6% (1/17) and transient ulcer formation in the primary site was observed in 35% (6/17) of patients treated. However, all patients were cured by conservative treatment. 3. This treatment method did not reduce subsequent lymph node metastasis. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional brachytherapy optimization techniques in the treatment of patients with cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Mazeron, R.; Verezesan, O.; Monnier, L.; Vieillot, S.; Dumas, I.; Lhomme, C.; Morice, P.; Barillot, I.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, prescription and treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer have used either reference points (mainly points A and B) or reference isodoses (60 Gy according to ICRU recommendations) to report doses to the target volume. Doses to critical organs were reported at bladder and rectum ICRU points. This practice has been supported by a long-standing clinical experience that has yielded an acceptable therapeutic ratio. The recent development of imaging has contributed to the improvement in target and organs at risk knowledge. In 2005 and 2006, the European group of brachytherapy -European Society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (GEC-E.S.T.R.O.) recommendations publications on 3-D based image brachytherapy have defined the different volumes of interest. These recommendations have been validated with intercomparison delineation studies. With the concomitant development of remote after-loading projectors, provided with miniaturized sources, it is now possible to plan radiation doses by adjusting dwell positions and relative dwell time values. These procedures allow better coverage of the targets while sparing O.A.R.. The recent literature data evidence a significant improvement in local control with no increase in complications. Further studies are needed to better define the dose recommended in both tumour and organs at risk. This is one of the goals of the European study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (E.M.B.R.A.C.E.) protocol (meaning of acronym: an international study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer). (authors)

  13. A study on applying Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shunichi; Komiya, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Ikuhiro; Tashiro, Kazuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    To investigate applicability of Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy, 93 cases of oral squamous carcinoma were examined. The patients underwent Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy as thorough therapy in our hospital. The criteria of applying Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy was diameter of within 5 cm and depth within 2 cm of tumor size. Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy was applied to 82 cases of tongue, 10 cases of oral floor and one case of lower lip carcinomas. The local control rate was 92.5%, and secondary neck metastasis was 32.3% in all cases applied Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy. The results were not bad compared with surgical treatment. However, the 5-year cumulative survival rate was 64.9%, which was not good enough at the result to obtain a good local control rate and secondary neck metastasis rate. The result was relative to low treatment result of local recurrence cases with Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy. To improve the result, it is important to distinguish local recurrence from radioinduced ulcer, and to start early secondary treatment. The cases in which cervical lymph node metastasis was found as the first examination underwent neck dessection after Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 83.3% in N1 cases and 40.6% in N2 cases, and the result of N2 cases was poorer than N1 cases with a significant difference. The results indicate that a needle having a diameter of within 5 cm, depth of within 2 cm and less than N1 can be applied during Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy for complete cure of cancer. (author)

  14. Potency after permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potters, Louis; Torre, Taryn; Fearn, Paul A.; Leibel, Steven A.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The evaluation of potency preservation after treatment of localized prostate cancer with transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and the efficacy of sildenafil were studied. Methods and Materials: This study comprised 482 patients who were able to maintain an erection suitable for intercourse before treatment from a cohort of 1166 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with PPB. All patients have been followed prospectively, and actuarial analysis was performed to assess potency preservation over time. Patients treated with sildenafil were evaluated as to its efficacy. Results: The median follow-up of this cohort was 34 months (6-92), with a median age of 68 years (47-80). Potency was preserved in 311 of the 482 patients, with a 5-year actuarial potency rate of 52.7%. The 5-year actuarial potency rate for patients treated with PPB as monotherapy was 76%, and, for those treated with combination external beam radiotherapy (EBT) + PPB, 56% (p=0.08). Patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAAD) + PPB had a 5-year potency rate of 52%, whereas those with combination EBT + PPB + NAAD had a potency rate of 29% (p=0.13). Cox regression analysis identified that pretreatment use of NAAD and patient age predicted for impotence (p=0.0001 and 0.04, respectively). Of 84 patients treated with sildenafil, 52 had a successful outcome (62%). The response to sildenafil was significantly better in those patients not treated with NAAD (p=0.04). Conclusions: The actuarial potency rates at 5 years for patients treated with PPB are lower than generally acknowledged, except for those patients treated with PPB as monotherapy. Patients who received sildenafil exhibited improved potency in a majority of cases

  15. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  16. A study on the variation of bladder and rectal doses with respiration in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Karuna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In cervical intracavitary brachytherapy, it is mandatory to evaluate if the doses to bladder and rectum are within tolerance limits. In this study, an effort has been made to evaluate the effect of respiration on the doses to bladder and rectum in patients undergoing brachytherapy.Material and methods: Fifteen patients with cervix cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation followed by intracavitary brachytherapy were included in this study. At the time of brachytherapy, all patients underwent 4D computed tomography (CT imaging. Five out of fifteen patients were scanned with empty bladder while the rest had full bladder during sectional imaging. Four sets of pelvic CT image datasets with applicators in place were acquired at equal interval in a complete respiratory cycle. Treatment plans were generated for all the CT datasets on a PlatoTM Sunrise planning system. A dose of 7 Gy was prescribed to Point A. Doses to ICRU (Report No.38 bladder (IBRP and rectal (IRRP reference points were calculated in all the CT datasets.Results: The mean of maximum dose to IBRP at four different respiratory phases for full and empty bladder were 53.38 ± 19.20%, 55.75 ± 16.71%, 56.13 ± 17.70%, 57.50 ± 17.48% and 60.93 ± 15.18%, 60.29 ± 16.28%, 60.86 ± 15.90%, 60.82 ± 15.42% of the prescribed dose respectively. Similarly, maximum dose to IRRP for full and empty bladder were 55.50 ± 18.66%, 57.38 ± 14.81%, 58.00 ± 14.97%, 58.38 ± 17.28% and 71.96 ± 6.90%, 71.58 ± 7.52%, 68.92 ± 6.21%, 71.45 ± 7.16% respectively.Conclusions: Our study shows that respiration affects the dose distribution to the bladder and rectum in intracavitary brachytherapy of cervix cancer. It is advisable to reduce the critical organ dose to account for the dose variation introduced by respiratory motion.

  17. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J; Hasan, Salman A; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (Pcryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (Pcryotherapy patients was -35°C (range, -96°C to -6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Patient selection criteria for consideration of cryotherapy and brachytherapy are similar in terms of anesthesia candidacy. Therefore, cryotherapy would not be recommended as a first-line local therapy for this particular

  18. Medium-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of medium-dose-rate (MDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICRT) for cervical cancer. Between May 1991 and March 2001, 80 patients with cervical cancer were treated with external radiotherapy combined with MDR-ICRT. Two patients were excluded from this study. The median age of patients was 61 years (range: 30-87 years). Seventy-five patients had pathologically proved squamous cell carcinoma, and 3 had adenocarcinoma. The patients were staged by Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) classification as follows: Stage IA (2), Stage IB (4), Stage IIA (5), Stage IIB (22), Stage IIIA (1), Stage IIIB (32), Stage IVA (5), Stage IVB (7). Median follow-up for survivor was 68 months (range: 12-131 months). The radiation therapy was based on a combination of ICRT and external pelvic irradiation. Patients with stages II, III and IVA were treated with whole-pelvic irradiation with respective total doses of 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Doses of 40, 30, 20, and 20 Gy parametrial irradiation were added with central shield pelvic irradiation for stages IB, II, III and IVA lesions respectively. For MDR-ICRT, from May 1991 to December 1995, point A dose were 40 Gy/4 fractions for stages I and II, 38 Gy/4 fractions for stage III, and 28.5 Gy/3 fractions for stage IVA. And from January 1996 to March 2001, point A dose of 36 Gy/4 fractions for stages I and II, 34 Gy/4 fractions for stage III, and 25.5 Gy/3 fractions for stage IVA. The median dose rate at point A was 1.7 Gy/hour (range: 1.3-2.2 Gy/hour). The 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 100%, 76%, 51% and 40% for stages I, II, III and IVA respectively. All patients with stage IVB died from the tumor with a median survival time of 12 months. The 5-year pelvic control rates were 100%, 88%, 69% and 40% for stages I, II, III and IVA respectively. Major late complications occurred in 2 patients (3%). One patient developed vesico- and recto-vaginal fistulae, and died of pelvic infection

  19. Transition from LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Evaluation of tumor control, survival, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, K D; Pugh, K J; Trifiletti, D M; Libby, B; Showalter, T N

    In 2012, our institution transitioned from low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. We report clinical outcomes after brachytherapy for cervical cancer at our institution over a continuous 10-year period. From 2004 to 2014, 258 women (184 LDR and 74 HDR) were treated with tandem and ovoid brachytherapy in the multidisciplinary management of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages IA-IVB cervical cancer. Clinical and treatment-related prognostic factors including age, stage, smoking status, relevant doses, and toxicity data were recorded. Median followup for the LDR and HDR groups was 46 months and 12 months, respectively. The majority of patients (92%) received external beam radiotherapy as well as concurrent chemotherapy (83%) before the start of brachytherapy. For all stages, the 1-year local control and overall survival (OS) rates were comparable between the LDR and HDR groups (87% vs. 81%, p = 0.12; and 75% vs. 85%, p = 0.16), respectively. Factors associated with OS on multivariate analysis include age, stage, and nodal involvement. On multivariate analysis, severe toxicity (acute or chronic) was higher with HDR than LDR (24% vs. 10%, p = 0.04). Additional prognostic factors associated with increased severe toxicity include former/current smokers and total dose to lymph nodes. This comparative retrospective analysis of a large cohort of women treated with brachytherapy demonstrates no significant difference in OS or local control between the LDR and HDR. Acute and chronic toxicity increased shortly after the implementation of HDR, highlighting the importance of continued refinement of HDR methods, including integrating advanced imaging. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-dose brachytherapy versus metal stent placement for the palliation of dysphagia from oesophageal cancer: multicentre randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homs, Marjolein Y. V.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M. H.; Tilanus, Hugo W.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Bartelsman, Joep F. W. M.; van Lanschot, Jan J. B.; Wijrdeman, Harm K.; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Reinders, Janny G.; Boot, Henk; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2004-01-01

    Background Both single-dose brachytherapy and self-expanding metal stent placement are commonly used for palliation of oesophageal obstruction due to inoperable cancer, but their relative merits are unknown. We under-took a randomised trial to compare the outcomes of brachytherapy and stent

  1. Stent placement or brachytherapy for palliation of dysphagia from esophageal cancer: a prognostic model to guide treatment selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Homs, Marjolein Y. V.; Stokvis, Annemieke; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Siersema, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachytherapy was found to be preferable to metal stent placement for the palliation of dysphagia because of inoperable esophageal cancer in the randomized SIREC trial. The benefit of brachytherapy, however, only occurred after a relatively long survival. The objective is to develop a

  2. An orthodontic device for retaining implanted radioactive sources during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuko, Noriko; Katsura, Kouji; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Sato, Katsurou; Kawana, Masahiro; Nonomura, Naobumi

    2000-01-01

    An orthodontic retainer was devised to keeping implanted radioactive sources in position and improve the quality of life during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The retainer was used in 3 patients with oral cancer, one with cancer of the hard palate, one with cancer of the soft palate, and one with cancer of the floor of mouth, during brachytherapy using 198 Au grains and 137 Cs needles. These patients could speak freely. One with cancer of the hard palate could drink water and ingest semi-liquid food during treatment instead of nasal tube feeding. The plaster dental model obtained while making the retainer proved to be useful for training radiation oncologists. (author)

  3. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Eduardo J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52, local recurrence (p = 0.68, or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06 rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix

  4. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Gustavo A; Manta, Gustavo B; Stefano, Eduardo J; de Fendi, Ligia I

    2009-01-01

    Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients) of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52), local recurrence (p = 0.68), or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06) rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix cancer. PMID:19344527

  5. Neither high-dose nor low-dose brachytherapy increases flap morbidity in salvage treatment of recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Henderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While brachytherapy is often used concurrently with flap reconstruction following surgical ablation for head and neck cancer, it remains unclear whether it increases morbidity in the particularly high risk subset of patients undergoing salvage treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer (RH&NC. Material and methods : A retrospective chart review was undertaken that evaluated patients with RH&NC who underwent flap coverage after surgical re-resection and concomitant brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was flap viability, and the secondary endpoints were flap and recipient site complications. Results : In the 23 subjects included in series, flap viability and skin graft take was 100%. Overall recipient site complication rate was 34.8%, high-dose radiation (HDR group 50%, and low-dose radiation (LDR group 29.4%. There was no statistically significant difference between these groups. Conclusions : In patients who undergo flap reconstruction and immediate postoperative radiotherapy following salvage procedures for RH&NC, flap coverage of defects in combination with brachytherapy remains a safe and effective means of providing stable soft tissue coverage.

  6. Utilization of prostate brachytherapy for low risk prostate cancer: Is the decline overstated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Safdieh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Several prior studies have suggested that brachytherapy utilization has markedly decreased, coinciding with the recent increased utilization of intensity modulated radiation therapy, as well as an increase in urologist-owned centers. We sought to investigate the brachytherapy utilization in a large, hospital-based registry. Material and methods: Men with prostate cancer diagnosed between 2004-2012 and treated with either external beam radiation and/or prostate brachytherapy were abstracted from the National Cancer Database. In order to be included, men had to be clinically staged as T1c-T2aNx-0Mx-0, Gleason 6, PSA ≤ 10.0 ng/ml. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze brachytherapy utilization over time and were compared via χ2. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess for covariables associated with increased brachytherapy usage. Results : There were 89,413 men included in this study, of which 37,054 (41.6% received only external beam radiation, and 52,089 (58.4% received prostate brachytherapy. The use of brachytherapy declined over time from 62.9% in 2004 to 51.3% in 2012 (p < 0.001. This decline was noted in both academic facilities (60.8% in 2004 to 47.0% in 2012, p < 0.001 as well as in non-academic facilities (63.7% in 2004 to 53.0% in 2012, p < 0.001. The decline was more pronounced in patients who lived closer to treatment facilities than those who lived further. The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy increased during this same time period from 18.4% in 2004 to 38.2% in 2012 (p < 0.001. On multivariate analysis, treatment at an academic center, increasing age, decreasing distance from the treatment center, and years of diagnosis from 2006-2012 were significantly associated with reduced brachytherapy usage. Conclusions : In this hospital-based registry, prostate brachytherapy usage has declined for low risk prostate cancer as intensity modulated radiation therapy usage has increased. However, it still

  7. Can reduction of uncertainties in cervix cancer brachytherapy potentially improve clinical outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of different types and magnitudes of dosimetric uncertainties in cervix cancer brachytherapy (BT) on tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) curves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A dose-response simulation...

  8. Bronchoscopic brachytherapy in roentgenologically occult cancer of the trachea and bronchus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Ryosuke; Hirano, Hiroshi (National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Central Hospital)

    1994-12-01

    Bronchoscopic brachytherapy is a new technique presently being investigated for the treatment of cancer involving the tracheobronchial tree. This paper reports on the potential application of bronchoscopic brachytherapy to the local treatment of cancer of the respiratory tract. Bronchoscopic brachytherapy was performed on 8 patients with roentgenographically occult lung cancer after biopsies proved malignant lesions of the trachea and bronchus in each case. These patients came to the National Cancer Center Hospital during the period from September 1992 to December 1992. Among these 8 cases of malignant lesions of the trachea and bronchus, 5 malignant lesions of the bronchus were diagnosed by bronchoscopic ultrasonography prior to the bronchoscopic brachytherapy, and these 5 patients have completed at least three courses of this therapy carried out by means of a videobronchoscope. Among the 8 cases of malignant lesions of the trachea and bronchus, complete remission was obtained in 7 cases. Of the 8 patients, the death of one patient was caused by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, while the remaining 7 patients have survived for 13-15 months (14.1 months on average) to date, without showing recurrence or metastasis. As for the complications involved in this treatment, only a light degree of excessive secretions was observed, and there was no abscess formation in any of the cases. (author).

  9. Bronchoscopic brachytherapy in roentgenologically occult cancer of the trachea and bronchus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ryosuke; Hirano, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    Bronchoscopic brachytherapy is a new technique presently being investigated for the treatment of cancer involving the tracheobronchial tree. This paper reports on the potential application of bronchoscopic brachytherapy to the local treatment of cancer of the respiratory tract. Bronchoscopic brachytherapy was performed on 8 patients with roentgenographically occult lung cancer after biopsies proved malignant lesions of the trachea and bronchus in each case. These patients came to the National Cancer Center Hospital during the period from September 1992 to December 1992. Among these 8 cases of malignant lesions of the trachea and bronchus, 5 malignant lesions of the bronchus were diagnosed by bronchoscopic ultrasonography prior to the bronchoscopic brachytherapy, and these 5 patients have completed at least three courses of this therapy carried out by means of a videobronchoscope. Among the 8 cases of malignant lesions of the trachea and bronchus, complete remission was obtained in 7 cases. Of the 8 patients, the death of one patient was caused by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, while the remaining 7 patients have survived for 13-15 months (14.1 months on average) to date, without showing recurrence or metastasis. As for the complications involved in this treatment, only a light degree of excessive secretions was observed, and there was no abscess formation in any of the cases. (author)

  10. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Lænsø Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary–interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented...

  11. Surface membrane based bladder registration for evaluation of accumulated dose during brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2011-01-01

    of the fixed surface. Optional landmark based matches can be included in the suggested iterative solver. The technique is demonstrated for bladder registration in brachytherapy treatment evaluation of cervical cancer. It holds promise to better estimate the accumulated but unintentional dose delivered...

  12. The use of disposable vascular catheters in interstitial brachytherapy of skin cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, N.J.; Malissard, L.; Douchez, J.; Combes, P.F.

    1978-01-01

    Technical improvements dealing with interstitial brachytherapy (Ir 192 ) of skin cancers are presented. Fine disposable plastic tubes fitted with mandril, which allow loading of light radioactive material in any case are used. Short term results are discussed according to 101 applications [fr

  13. The pre, post brachytherapy and postoperative CEA serum concentration of 53 rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thanh Danh; Nguyen Kim Luu; Phan Van Dan

    2008-01-01

    CEA serum concentration level of 53 rectal cancer patients was measured at moments pre, post brachytherapy (45 Gy), post surgery one week, 6 months and 12 months. Response to radiation with reduce CEA serum concentration was achieved in 20/53 patients (37,7%), mainly at staging Dukes B, C. Postoperative CEA level of patients significantly decreased, especially in resection group. (author)

  14. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  15. Palliative brachytherapy with or without primary stent placement in patients with oesophageal cancer, a randomised phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amdal, Cecilie Delphin; Jacobsen, Anne-Birgitte; Sandstad, Berit; Warloe, Trond; Bjordal, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether a combination of self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) and brachytherapy provided more rapid and prolonged effect on dysphagia without increased pain compared to brachytherapy alone in patients with incurable oesophageal cancer. Methods: 41 Patients were randomised to SEMS followed by brachytherapy, 8 Gy × 3 (n = 21) or brachytherapy alone, 8 Gy × 3 (n = 20). Change in dysphagia and pain three and seven weeks after randomisation (FU1 and FU2) was assessed by patient-reported outcome. Dysphagia, other symptoms and health-related quality of life were assessed every four weeks thereafter. The study was closed before the estimated patient-number was reached due to slow recruitment. Results: Patients receiving SEMS followed by brachytherapy had significantly improved dysphagia at FU1 compared to patients receiving brachytherapy alone (n = 35). Difference in pain was not observed. At FU2, patients in both arms (n = 21) had less dysphagia. Four patients in the combined treatment arm experienced manageable complications, no complications occurred after brachytherapy alone. Conclusion: For the relief of dysphagia, SEMS followed by brachytherapy is preferable and safe for patients in need of immediate alleviation, while brachytherapy with or without preceding SEMS provides relief within a few weeks after treatment

  16. A new applicator design for endocavitary brachytherapy of cancer in the nasopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levendag, Peter C.; Peters, Rob; Meeuwis, Cees A.; Visch, Leo L.; Sipkema, Dick; Pan, Connie de; Schmitz, Paul I.M.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: In attempting to improve local tumor control by higher doses of radiation, there has been a resurgence of interest in the implementation of brachytherapy in the management of primary and recurrent cancers of the nasopharynx. Brachytherapy with its steep dose fall-off is of particular interest because of the proximity of critical dose limiting structures. Recent developments in brachytherapy, such as the introduction of pulsed-dose-rate and high-dose-rate computerized afterloaders, have encouraged further evolution of brachytherapy techniques. Materials and methods: We have designed an inexpensive, re-usable and flexible silicone applicator, tailored to the shape of the soft tissues of the nasopharynx, which can be used with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy or high (pulsed)-dose-rate remote controlled afterloaders. Results and conclusions: This Rotterdam nasopharynx applicator proved to be easy to introduce, patient friendly and can remain in situ for the duration of the treatment (2-6 days). The design, technique of application and the first consecutive 5 years of clinical experience in using this applicator are presented

  17. Interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy as boost for anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Alexander Tuan; Claren, Audrey; Benezery, Karen; François, Eric; Gautier, Mathieu; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    To assess clinical outcomes of patients treated with a high-dose rate brachytherapy boost for anal canal cancer (ACC). From August 2005 to February 2013, 28 patients presenting an ACC treated by split-course external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy in a French regional cancer center in Nice were retrospectively analyzed. Median age was 60.6 years [34 – 83], 25 patients presented a squamous cell carcinoma and 3 an adenocarcinoma; 21 received chemotherapy. Median dose of EBRT was 45 Gy [43.2 – 52]. Median dose of HDR brachytherapy was 12 Gy [10 - 15] with a median duration of 2 days. Median overall treatment time was 63 days and median delay between EBRT and brachytherapy was 20 days. Two-year local relapse free, metastatic free, disease free and overall survivals were 83%, 81.9%, 71.8% and 87.7% respectively. Acute toxicities were frequent but not severe with mostly grade 1 toxicities: 37% of genito-urinary, 40.7% of gastro-intestinal and 3.7% of cutaneous toxicities. Late toxicities were mainly G1 (43.1%) and G2 (22%). Two-year colostomy-free survival was 75.1%, one patient had a definitive sphincter amputation. High-dose rate brachytherapy for anal canal carcinoma as boost represents a feasible technique compared to low or pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy. This technique remains an excellent approach to precisely boost the tumor in reducing the overall treatment time

  18. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  19. Rectal complications associated with transperineal interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: As transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) grows in acceptance as an option in the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer, its associated toxicities are being defined. This clinical report documents rectal toxicity from a large cohort of men treated by a single practitioner for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Eight hundred twenty-five men were treated from September 1992 to September 1998 with TIPPB. One hundred-forty were treated in conjunction with external beam irradiation (EBRT) and 685 with TIPPB alone. All patients were implanted under real-time ultrasound guidance. No dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for this study. All patients were followed at 5 weeks after the procedure, then every 3-6 months thereafter. Rectal morbidity was graded by a modified RTOG toxicity scale. Therapy to control symptoms was recommended on an individual basis. Results: The median follow-up for the cohort is 48 months. A total of 77 patients (9.4%) reported Grade 1 toxicity at some time following an implant whereas 54 patients (6.6%) reported Grade 2 toxicity. The peak post-TIPPB time for experiencing rectal toxicity was 8 months at which time Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 9.5% of the patients. This improved over the subsequent months and resolved in all patients by 3((1)/(2)) years. Four patients (0.5%) reported Grade 3 rectal toxicity with rectal ulceration identified on colonoscopy at 1 year from implant. Two of the four patients had colonic manipulation in the radiated portion of the colon which subsequently caused it to bleed. None of the patients required blood product transfusion. In 3 of the 4 patients the Grade 3 rectal toxicity has resolved spontaneously and 1 patient continues to heal at the time of this report. No patient required hospitalization or surgical intervention. Conclusion: TIPPB is a tolerable and acceptable treatment option when used alone in early-stage, organ

  20. Outcomes and toxicities in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlussel Markovic, Emily; Buckstein, Michael; Stone, Nelson N; Stock, Richard G

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the cancer control outcomes and long-term treatment-related morbidity of brachytherapy as well as combination brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. A retrospective review was conducted in a prospectively collected database of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who were treated either with brachytherapy or brachytherapy and EBRT, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), in the period 1990-2014. Urinary and erectile dysfunction symptoms were measured using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the Mount Sinai erectile function scale and the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM). Cancer control endpoints included biochemical failure and development of distant metastases. All statistical analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Survival curves were calculated using Kaplan-Meier actuarial methods and compared using log-rank tests. Cox regression multivariate analyses were used to test the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcomes. A total of 902 patients were identified, with a median follow-up of 91 months. Of these, 390 received brachytherapy and 512 received combination therapy with EBRT. In patients with one intermediate-risk factor, the addition of EBRT did not significantly affect freedom from biochemical failure or distant metastases. Among patients with two or three intermediate-risk factors, added EBRT did not improve freedom from biochemical failure. Significant differences in late toxicity between patients treated with brachytherapy vs combination brachytherapy and EBRT were identified including urge incontinence (P actuarial methods showed that patients receiving combination therapy more frequently experienced loss of potency, as measured by the Mount Sinai erectile function scale (P = 0.040). Brachytherapy monotherapy results in equal biochemical and distant control in both patients with

  1. Standards, options and recommendations for brachytherapy of prostate cancer: efficacy and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, P.; Villers, A.; Bataillard, A.

    2001-01-01

    Context. - The 'Standards, Options and Recommendations' (SOR) collaborative project was initiated in 1993 by the Federation of the French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), with the 20 French Regional Cancer Centres, several French public university and general hospitals, as well as private clinics and medical specialty societies. Its main objective is the development of serviceable clinical practice guidelines in order to improve the quality of health care and the outcome of cancer patients. The methodology is based on a literature review, followed by a critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts. Draft guidelines are produced, then validated by specialists in cancer care delivery. Objectives. - Produce technical practice guidelines for the brachytherapy of prostate cancer using the methodology developed by the Standards, Options and Recommendations project. Methods. - The FNCLCC and the French Urology Association (AFU) first designated the multidisciplinary group of experts. Available data were collected by a search of Medline and lists selected by experts in the group. A first draft of the guidelines was written, they validated by independent reviewers. Results. - The main recommendations are: 1/ Brachytherapy with permanent seeds alone is a possible curative treatment for prostate cancer patients with the following prognosis factors: tumour stage T1 or T2a (TNM 1992), Gleason score ≤ 6 and PSA 7 and/or PSA > 10. 3/ Combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy can be proposed to prostate cancer patients with intermediate prognosis. 4/ Before and after seed implantation, risks of infection must be prevented by appropriate antibiotic therapy (recommendation). 5/ Brachytherapy must not be performed within 2 months of trans-urethral prostate resection. 6/The height of the urethra receiving more than 200 of the prescribed dose must be reported. The portion of the rectum receiving 100 and 120 % of the prescribed dose must be limited to 10

  2. PSA bounce after 125I-brachytherapy for prostate cancer as a favorable prognosticator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engeler, Daniel S.; Schwab, Christoph; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Thoeni, Armin F.; Hochreiter, Werner; Prikler, Ladislav; Suter, Stefan; Stucki, Patrick; Schiefer, Johann; Plasswilm, Ludwig; Putora, Paul Martin

    2015-01-01

    Permanent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (BT) with iodine 125 is an established curative treatment for localized prostate cancer. After treatment, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics may show a transient rise (PSA bounce). Our aim was to investigate the association of PSA bounce with biochemical control. Patients treated with BT in Switzerland were registered in a prospective database. Only patients with a follow-up of at least 2 years were included in our analysis. Clinical follow-up and PSA measurements were assessed after 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months, and annually thereafter. If PSA increased, additional follow-up visits were scheduled. Cases of PSA bounce were defined as a rise of at least 0.2 ng/ml above the initial PSA nadir with a subsequent decline to or below the initial nadir without treatment. Biochemical failure was defined as a rise to nadir + 2 ng/ml. Between March 2001 and November 2010, 713 patients with prostate cancer undergoing BT with at least 2 years of follow-up were registered. Median follow-up time was 41 months. Biochemical failure occurred in 28 patients (3.9 %). PSA bounce occurred in 173 (24.3 %) patients; only three (1.7 %) patients with PSA bounce developed biochemical failure, in contrast to 25 (4.6 %) patients without previous bounce (p < 0.05). The median time to bounce was 12 months, the median time to biochemical failure was 30 months. The median bounce increase was 0.78 ng/ml. Twenty-eight patients with bounce (16.5 %) had a transient PSA rise of + 2 ng/ml above the nadir. In most cases, an early increase in PSA after BT indicates PSA bounce and is associated with a lower risk of biochemical failure. (orig.) [de

  3. Ejaculatory Function After Permanent 125I Prostate Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyghe, Eric; Delannes, Martine; Wagner, Fabien M.; Delaunay, Boris; Nohra, Joe; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Shut-Yee, J. Yeung; Plante, Pierre; Soulie, Michel; Thonneau, Patrick; Bachaud, Jean Marc

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Ejaculatory function is an underreported aspect of male sexuality in men treated for prostate cancer. We conducted the first detailed analysis of ejaculatory function in patients treated with permanent 125 I prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Of 270 sexually active men with localized prostate cancer treated with permanent 125 I prostate brachytherapy, 241 (89%), with a mean age of 65 years (range, 43-80), responded to a mailed questionnaire derived from the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire regarding ejaculatory function. Five aspects of ejaculatory function were examined: frequency, volume, dry ejaculation, pleasure, and pain. Results: Of the 241 sexually active men, 81.3% had conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy; however, the number of patients with rare/absent ejaculatory function was double the pretreatment number (p < .0001). The latter finding was correlated with age (p < .001) and the preimplant International Index of Erectile Function score (p < .001). However, 84.9% of patients with maintained ejaculatory function after implantation reported a reduced volume of ejaculate compared with 26.9% before (p < .001), with dry ejaculation accounting for 18.7% of these cases. After treatment, 30.3% of the patients experienced painful ejaculation compared with 12.9% before (p = .0001), and this was associated with a greater number of implanted needles (p = .021) and the existence of painful ejaculation before implantation (p < .0001). After implantation, 10% of patients who continued to be sexually active experienced no orgasm compared with only 1% before treatment. in addition, more patients experienced late/difficult or weak orgasms (p = .001). Conclusion: Most men treated with brachytherapy have conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy. However, most of these men experience a reduction in volume and a deterioration in orgasm.

  4. Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy: an advance for bulky localized cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The physical and radiobiogical basis as well as the rationale for neutron brachytherapy, using Cf-252, in human cancer therapy is reviewed. Cf-252 brachytherapy represents an economical and effective form of neutron radiotherapy that is readily and safely applied clinically. It can be used anywhere in the world without unusual personnel, equipment or facilities, or prohibitive expenses or maintenance costs. Used on bulky head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, pelvic, brain and appendage cancers, it overcomes hypoxic radioresistance and produces remarkable rates of tumor clearance. It is easily combined with photon radiotherapy and in proper schedules and doses, it can control advanced but still localized regional cancers to produce tumor cure. It will clear the local manifestations of recurrent or metastatic tumors or advanced stages of primary tumors and therefore in conjunction with other adjuvant therapies offers much more effective tumor control and palliation than present conventional therapy. (Auth.)

  5. Impact of short course hormonal therapy on overall and cancer specific survival after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, David C.; McKeough, Timothy; Thomas, Theresa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of prior hormonal therapy on 10-year overall and prostate cancer specific survival after primary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on the Arizona Oncology Services tumor registry for 2,378 consecutive permanent prostate brachytherapy cases from 1988 through 2001. Hormonal therapy was administered before the implant in 464 patients for downsizing of the prostate or at the discretion of the referring physician. All deceased patients with known clinical recurrence were considered to have died of prostate cancer, irrespective of the immediate cause of death. Risk groups were defined, with 1,135 favorable (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] 70 years (p = 0.0013), Gleason score ≥ 7 (p = 0.0005), and prior hormone use (p = 0.0065) on overall survival. Conclusions: At 10 years, in prostate cancer patients receiving brachytherapy, overall survival is worse in men receiving neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, compared with hormone naive patients. This does not appear to be due to other known risk factors for survival (i.e., stage, grade, PSA, age) on multivariate analysis. The leading causes of death were cardiovascular, prostate cancer, and other cancers with no obvious discrepancy between the two groups. This finding is unexpected and requires confirmation from other centers

  6. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy and endoluminal HDR brachytherapy in esophageal cancer; Simultane Radiochemotherapie mit intraluminaler HDR-Brachytherapie des Oesophaguskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patonay, P.; Naszaly, A.; Mayer, A. [Hauptstaedtisches Zentrum fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: to study efficacy and toxicity of radiochemotherapy in esophageal cancer including initial endoluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Patients and methods: between 01/1995 and 06/2005, 61 patients with esophageal cancer were treated preoperatively with definitive and palliative intent. Treatment started with intraluminal HDR-BT for recanalization of the esophagus (single fraction size of 8 Gy in 0.5 cm depth, three times, q7d) followed by external-beam radiation therapy (50 Gy total dose, 5 x 2 Gy/week, 25 fractions in 5 weeks). Chemotherapy was started simultaneously with external irradiation (three courses of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, q21d). Results: swallowing function improved in 55/61 patients (dysphagia classification according to the RTOG), and worsened in 6/61 patients, respectively. Median duration of symptomatic improvement was 11 months, median follow-up 12 months (range 3-68 months). Following simultaneous radiochemotherapy, tumor resectability was achieved in 7/25 patients of the neoadjuvant group, and the histological specimen showed complete remission in 6/7 patients. Conclusion: these results indicate a favorable effect of simultaneous radiochemotherapy starting with endoluminal HDR-after-loading-(AL-)BT in esophageal cancer. (orig.)

  7. Brachytherapy for treatment of cervix cancer in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignon, T.; Ratovonarivo, H.; Rafaramino, F.; Ruggieri, S.

    1993-01-01

    From March 1986 to June 1988, 60 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated by radiotherapy alone or combined radiotherapy and surgery at the only radiotherapy-oncology department of Madagascar in Antananarivo. There were 20 stage IB, 28 stage II, 5 stage III and 7 cases where initial stage before surgery was unknown. After a limited pre-therapeutic investigation, treatment for stage IB consisted of utero-vaginal brachytherapy followed by a colpo-hysterectomy and external iliac lymphadenectomy. Others received combined external radiotherapy and brachytherapy according to the Fletcher guidelines, although 30 patients also received surgery. An obsolete and inefficient cobalt unit with lack of computerized dosimetry made the management of therapeutic schemas difficult. Nineteen patients (31.6%) were not available for follow-up immediately after the end of the treatment and one patient died from intestinal occlusion during brachytherapy. The overall rate of severe complications was 4.8%. There were 12 recurrences which occurred in stage II or in patients with unknown initial staging. At the time of analysis, 25 patients were alive: 15 stage I and 10 stage II. In this country, cervical carcinomas are the most frequent tumors: only the rehabilitation of radiotherapy facilities will allow results to be improved

  8. Implication for QOL after I-125 brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teishima, Jun; Yasumoto, Hiroaki; Inoue, Syogo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Matsubara, Akio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of patients following prostate brachytherapy. Between July 2004 and May 2008, 139 patients underwent I-125 permanent brachytherapy. Among those patients, 69 who were followed up for more than one year using the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), Japanese version v1 TM , were enrolled in this study. Urinary summary scores became worse temporarily at 1 month after the end of treatment, but then recovered gradually to the level before treatment. Sexual summary scores before treatment were 42.2±16.3. They became worse temporarily at 1 month after treatment but then recovered gradually in patients whose sexual summary scores were more than 40. Urinary morbidity scores after prostate brachytherapy were not so severe and recovered within a short period. Further long-term observation is thought to be required in the future. Sexual function scores of patients before treatment in the present study were lower compared with those recorded in previous studies. (author)

  9. Fractionated high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy in palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, Ranjan K.; Donde, Bernard; Levin, Victor C.; Mannell, Aylwyn

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the dose of fractionated brachytherapy for palliation of advanced esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-two patients with advanced esophageal cancer were randomized to receive 12 Gy/2 fractions (group A); 16 Gy/2 fractions (group B), and 18 Gy/3 fractions (group C) by high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy (HDRILBT). Treatment was given weekly and dose prescribed at 1 cm from the source axis. Patients were followed up monthly and assessed for dysphagia relief and development of complications. Results: Twenty-two patients died before completing treatment due to advanced disease and poor general condition. The overall survival was 19.4% at the end of 12 months for the whole group (A--9.8%, B--22.46%, C--35.32%; p > 0.05). The dysphagia-free survival was 28.9% at 12 months for the whole group (A--10.8%, B--25.43%, C--38.95%; p > 0.05). Forty-three patients developed fibrotic strictures needing dilatation (A--5 of 35, B--15 of 60, C--23 of 55; p = 0.032). Twenty-seven patients had persistent luminal disease (A--11, B--6, C--10), 15 of which progressed to fistulae (A--7, B--2, C--6; p = 0.032). There was no effect of age, sex, race, histology, performance status, previous dilation, presenting dysphagia score, presenting weight, grade, tumor length, and stage on overall survival, dysphagia-free, and complication-free survival (p > 0.05). On a multivariate analysis, brachytherapy dose (p = 0.002) and tumor length (p = 0.0209) were found to have a significant effect on overall survival; brachytherapy dose was the only factor that had an impact on local tumor control (p = 0.0005), while tumor length was the only factor that had an effect on dysphagia-free survival (p = 0.0475). When compared to other forms of palliation currently available (bypass surgery, laser, chemotherapy, intubation, external radiotherapy), fractionated brachytherapy gave the best results with a median survival of 6.2 months. Conclusions: Fractionated

  10. Effect of demographic factors on brachytherapy treatment results in patients with endometrial cancer 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczyk, Mieczysława U; Chmaj-Wierzchowska, Karolina; Klofik, Joanna; Sajdak, Stefan; Opala, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 20 female cancers in Europe is of the endometrium. Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynaecologic cancer. Considering the fact that an upward tendency has recently been observed in morbidity due to this type of cancer, this is a serious medical problem. The presented report describes the results of the analysis of selected demographic factors and their effect on the incidence of endometrial cancer. Analysis of the results of treatment of endometrial cancer during 1995-2010 was also an objective of the study. Based on medical records obtained from the HDR Laboratory of Brachytherapy at the Gynaecological & Obstetrics Clinical Hospital, University of Medical Sciences in Poznań, the results of treatment of patients with endometrial cancer by brachytherapy were analyzed. The analysis covered a group of 400 patients. More than a half of the patients completed their education on the level of elementary or secondary school. Taking into consideration the weight of the patients, it appeared that most women had excessive body weight. Most frequently, concomitant hypertension was observed. Moreover, the age at menarche was 12 and 13. Demographic factors exert a significant effect on the incidence of endometrial cancer. 1. Overweight and obesity are important risk factors of endometrial cancer. 2. A strong relationship is observed between the occurrence of hypertension or diabetes, and the development of endometrial cancer. 3. Women who come from the rural environment and continue to live in this environment are more likely to contract endometrial cancer.

  11. Surgery and postoperative brachytherapy for treatment of small volume uterine cervix cancer: an alternative to the standard association of utero vaginal brachytherapy + surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallocher, O.; Thomas, L.; Pigneux, J.; Stocke, E.; Bussieres, E.; Avril, A.; Floquet, A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. -Evaluate the results of the treatment of small uterine cervix cancer with the association of surgery and postoperative vaginal brachytherapy, without unfavourable prognostic factors. Patients and methods. -After radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy, 29 women (mean age: 44 years) with carcinoma < 25 mm (26 stage IB1, 3 IIA, mean size: 15 mm) were treated by post-operative prophylactic vaginal brachytherapy using low dose rate. Ovarian transposition was performed at the surgical time in 14 young women (mean age 35 years). Results. - The actuarial specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 100% and 90% respectively, with a mean follow-up 75 months. Only one local recurrence was observed. The rate of grade 1 post-operative complication was 7%. The conservation rate of the ovarian function was 85% for young women. Conclusion. -Treatment of small volume uterine cervix cancer using first surgery and post-operative vaginal brachytherapy is a reliable therapeutic option. The results in terms of specific survival and complications are the same with those after standard association of preoperative utero-vaginal brachytherapy and surgery. (authors)

  12. Current situation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rogerio Matias Vidal da; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento, E-mail: rmv.fisica@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Pinezi, Juliana Castro Dourado [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Goias (PUC-Goias), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Macedo, Luiz Eduardo Andrade [Hospital Chama, Arapiraca, AL (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    To assess the current situation of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix in Brazil, regarding apparatuses, planning methods, prescription, fractionation schedule and evaluation of dose in organs at risk. Materials and methods: in the period between March/2012 and May/2013, a multiple choice questionnaire was developed and sent to 89 Brazilian hospitals which perform HDR brachytherapy. Results: sixty-one services answered the questionnaire. All regions of the country experienced a sharp increase in the number of HDR brachytherapy services in the period from 2001 to 2013. As regards planning, although a three-dimensional planning software was available in 91% of the centers, conventional radiography was mentioned by 92% of the respondents as their routine imaging method for such a purpose. Approximately 35% of respondents said that brachytherapy sessions are performed after teletherapy. The scheme of four 7 Gy intracavitary insertions was mentioned as the most frequently practiced. Conclusion: the authors observed that professionals have difficulty accessing adjuvant three-dimensional planning tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  13. High-dose-rate brachytherapy alone post-hysterectomy for endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, Craig; Fowler, Allan; Duval, Peter; D'Costa, Ieta; Dalrymple, Chris; Firth, Ian; Elliott, Peter; Atkinson, Ken; Carter, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of post-hysterectomy adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on a series of 143 patients with endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy alone post-hysterectomy from 1985 to June 1993. Of these patients, 141 received 34 Gy in four fractions prescribed to the vaginal mucosa in a 2-week period. The median follow-up was 6.9 years. Patients were analyzed for treatment parameters, survival, local recurrence, distant relapse, and toxicity. Results: Five-year relapse free survival and overall survival was 100% and 88% for Stage 1A, 98% and 94% for Stage IB, 100% and 86% for Stage IC, and 92% and 92% for Stage IIA. The overall vaginal recurrence rate was 1.4%. The overall late-toxicity rate was low, and no RTOG grade 3, 4, or 5 complications were recorded. Conclusion: These results are similar to reported international series that have used either low-dose-rate or HDR brachytherapy. The biological effective dose was low for both acute and late responding tissues compared with some of the HDR brachytherapy series, and supports using this lower dose and possibly decreasing late side-effects with no apparent increased risk of vaginal recurrence

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life up to Six Years After 125I Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A.; Lips, Irene M.; Gellekom, Marion P.R. van; Roermund, Joep van; Frank, Steven J.; Battermann, Jan J.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after prostate brachytherapy has been extensively described in published reports but hardly any long-term data are available. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess long-term HRQOL 6 years after 125 I prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 127 patients treated with 125 I brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer between December 2000 and June 2003 completed a HRQOL questionnaire at five time-points: before treatment and 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years after treatment. The questionnaire included the RAND-36 generic health survey, the cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTCQLQ-C30), and the tumor-specific EORTC prostate cancer module (EORTC-PR25). A change in a score of ≥10 points was considered clinically relevant. Results: Overall, the HRQOL at 6 years after 125 I prostate brachytherapy did not significantly differ from baseline. Although a statistically significant deterioration in HRQOL at 6 years was seen for urinary symptoms, bowel symptoms, pain, physical functioning, and sexual activity (p 125 I prostate brachytherapy. HRQOL scores returned to approximately baseline values at 1 year and remained stable up to 6 years after treatment. 125 I prostate brachytherapy did not adversely affect patients' long-term HRQOL.

  15. Applicability and dosimetric impact of ultrasound-based preplanning in high-dose-rate brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aebersold, D.M.; Isaak, B.; Behrensmeier, F.; Kolotas, C.; Mini, R.; Greiner, R.H.; Thalmann, G.; Kranzbuehler, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: analyses of permanent brachytherapy seed implants of the prostate have demonstrated that the use of a preplan may lead to a considerable decrease of dosimetric implant quality. The authors aimed to determine whether the same drawbacks of preplanning also apply to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients and methods: 15 patients who underwent two separate HDR brachytherapy implants in addition to external-beam radiation therapy for advanced prostate cancer were analyzed. A pretherapeutic transrectal ultrasound was performed in all patients to generate a preplan for the first brachytherapy implant. For the second brachytherapy, a subset of patients were treated by preplans based on the ultrasound from the first brachytherapy implant. Preplans were compared with the respective postplans assessing the following parameters: coverage index, minimum target dose, homogeneity index, and dose exposure of organs at risk. The prostate geometries (volume, width, height, length) were compared as well. Results: at the first brachytherapy, the matching between the preplan and actual implant geometry was sufficient in 47% of the patients, and the preplan could be applied. The dosimetric implant quality decreased considerably: the mean coverage differed by -0.11, the mean minimum target dose by -0.15, the mean homogeneity index by -0.09. The exposure of organs at risk was not substantially altered. At the second brachytherapy, all patients could be treated by the preplan; the differences between the implant quality parameters were less pronounced. The changes of prostate geometry between preplans and postplans were considerable, the differences in volume ranging from -8.0 to 13.8 cm 3 and in dimensions (width, height, length) from -1.1 to 1.0 cm. Conclusion: preplanning in HDR brachytherapy of the prostate is associated with a substantial decrease of dosimetric implant quality, when the preplan is based on a pretherapeutic ultrasound. The implant quality

  16. Relevance of brachytherapy in the era of IMRT/IGRT in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoshal, Sushmita

    2016-01-01

    Cancers arising in the head and neck area are predominantly squamous cell carcinoma that are only moderately sensitive to radiation. They also have a propensity for local and lymphatic spread that require adequate safety margins while planning radiation. As a result, the volume of normal tissue irradiated increases with a risk of increased radiation induced toxicity. Various attempts have been made to improve the therapeutic ratio but one of the best ways of achieving this is by brachytherapy

  17. Radiation proctitis after the high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Masashi; Katsumata, Tomoe; Satoh, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 12 patients treated for rectal bleeding after high-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. All patients developed grade 2 proctitis according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAC) and no patients needed blood transfusion. The patients were treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and/or steroid suppositories. The bleeding stopped or improved in 11 patients. Although re-bleeding was noticed in 7 patients the same treatment was effective in 5 patients. (author)

  18. Evaluation of functioning of high dose rate brachytherapy at the Instituto Nacional do Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, Laura M.A.; Barreto, Rodrigo V.; Silva, Penha M.; Macedo, Afranio A.; Borges, Solange C.; Martinez, Valeria P.O.

    2001-01-01

    Quality control tests are very useful tools to assure the quality of patient's treatment. A daily control of the high dose rate micro selectron was performed based on the security parameters of the equipment and on the quickness of performance. The purpose of this report is to evaluate and to discuss the errors found during the first three years with the high dose rate brachytherapy, at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer. (author)

  19. Preparation and characterization of composite microspheres for brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Di; Huang Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Wang Deping; Gu Yifei

    2012-01-01

    Composite microspheres were prepared by coating yttrium–aluminum–silicate (YAS) glass microspheres (20–30 μm) with a layer of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and evaluated for potential use in brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. After neutron activation to form the β-emitting 90 Y radionuclide, the composite microspheres can be injected into a patient to destroy cancerous tumors; at the same time, the composite microspheres can generate heat upon application of a magnetic field to also destroy the tumors. The results showed that the composite microspheres were chemically durable when immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF), with ∼ 0.25% weight loss and ∼ 3.2% yttrium dissolved into the SBF after 30 days at 37 °C. The composite microspheres also showed ferromagnetic properties as a result of the Fe 3 O 4 coating; when immersed in water at 20 °C (20 mg in 1 mL of water), the application of an alternating magnetic field produced a temperature increase from 20 °C to 38−46 °C depending on the thickness of the Fe 3 O 4 coating. The results indicate that these composite microspheres have promising potential in combined brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancerous tumors. - Highlights: ► Composite microspheres for brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. ► Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles coated on the yttrium–aluminum–silicate glass microspheres. ► Microspheres are chemically stable in SBF. ► Microspheres can generate heat for hyperthermia under an alternating magnetic field. ► Microspheres can emit β-rays for brachytherapy after neutron activation.

  20. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis, E-mail: acapellizzon@hcancer.org.br [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2016-05-15

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. (author)

  1. Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. ... Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the QoL in cancer patients with solid tumors and at the different chemotherapy cycles (CT). ... Results: A significant relationship between the cancer type, pain intensity, and fatigue was found.

  2. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhjem, Matthew C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic ± paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer

  3. Organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer: Brachytherapy, an alternative to cystectomy and combined modality treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris; Horenblas, Simon; Dom, Paul; Moonen, Luc; Bartelink, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our long-term results of bladder preservation with brachytherapy in the treatment of bladder cancer. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 2000, 108 patients with T1-G3 and T2-T3a stages of bladder cancer were treated with a transurethral resection (TUR) and a course of external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions) followed by brachytherapy (40 Gy). All tumors were solitary lesions with a diameter ≤5 cm. Median follow-up was 54 months (range, 1-178 months). Results: The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 62% and 50%, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates were 73% and 67%, respectively. The actuarial local control rate was 73% at 5 and 73% at 10 years, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates for patients with a preserved bladder were 68% and 59%, respectively. Of all long-term surviving patients, 90% preserved their native bladders. The treatment was well tolerated. Acute toxicity was mild. Two patients experienced serious late toxicity: 1 patient developed a persisting vesicocutaneous fistula and the other a stricture of the urethra and ureters. Conclusion: For patients with solitary, organ confined invasive bladder cancer ≤5 cm, bladder preservation with brachytherapy is an excellent alternative to radical cystectomy and combined modality treatment

  4. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  5. Rectal dose assessment in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jetro Pereira de; Batista, Delano Valdivino Santos; Bardella, Lucia Helena; Carvalho, Arnaldo Rangel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at developing a thermoluminescent dosimetric system capable of assessing the doses delivered to the rectum of patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. Materials and methods: LiF:Mg,Ti,Na powder was the thermoluminescent material utilized for evaluating the rectal dose. The powder was divided into small portions (34 mg) which were accommodated in a capillary tube. This tube was placed into a rectal probe that was introduced into the patient's rectum. Results: The doses delivered to the rectum of six patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer evaluated by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters presented a good agreement with the planned values based on two orthogonal (anteroposterior and lateral) radiographic images of the patients. Conclusion: The thermoluminescent dosimetric system developed in the present study is simple and easy to be utilized as compared to other rectal dosimetry methods. The system has shown to be effective in the evaluation of rectal doses in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. (author)

  6. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Creutzberg, Carien L. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Craighead, Peter [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); McCormack, Mary [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Narayan, Kailash [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Reed, Nicholas [Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Long, Harry [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Kim, Hak-Jae [Department of Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Marth, Christian [Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria); Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Cerrotta, Annmarie [Department of Radiation Therapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano (Italy); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Trimble, Edward [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB-IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  7. Palliative interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent rectal cancer. Implantation techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotas, C.; Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Tselis, N.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N.; Strassmann, G.; Aebersold, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To report the methods and clinical results of CT-based interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedures for the palliative treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 brachytherapy implants were performed in 38 patients. CT-guided catheter implants were performed in 34 patients under local anesthesia and sedation, and four patients were implanted intraoperatively. Of 40 CT-guided implants, 20 were done using metallic needles introduced via the sacrum and 20 were transperineal implants of plastic tubes in the presacral region. Postimplant CT scans were used for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal brachytherapy planning. Patients implanted with metallic needles were given a single fraction of 10-15 Gy using HDR 192 Ir, and those who received transperineal implants of plastic catheters were given fractionated brachytherapy, 5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 30-40 Gy. The median tumor volume was 225 cm 3 with a range of 41-2,103 cm 3 . Results: After a median follow-up of 23.4 months, a total of 13/38 patients were alive. The median postbrachytherapy survival was 15 months with 18 of the 25 deaths due to distant metastases. Tumor response was as follows: 6/38 partial remission, 28/38 stable disease, and 4/38 local progression. A planning target volume (PTV) coverage > 85% was achieved in 42/44 implants. The treatment was well tolerated, and no acute complications were observed. One patient developed a fistula after 8 months. Pain relief was recorded in 34 patients (89.5%), and the median duration of this palliative effect was 5 months with a range of 1-13 months. Conclusions: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is a valuable tool for the delivery of high doses and achieves effective palliation in recurrent rectal carcinoma. (orig.)

  8. Palliative interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent rectal cancer. Implantation techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Tselis, N.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Strassmann, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital, Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany); Aebersold, D.M. [Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To report the methods and clinical results of CT-based interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedures for the palliative treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 brachytherapy implants were performed in 38 patients. CT-guided catheter implants were performed in 34 patients under local anesthesia and sedation, and four patients were implanted intraoperatively. Of 40 CT-guided implants, 20 were done using metallic needles introduced via the sacrum and 20 were transperineal implants of plastic tubes in the presacral region. Postimplant CT scans were used for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal brachytherapy planning. Patients implanted with metallic needles were given a single fraction of 10-15 Gy using HDR {sup 192}Ir, and those who received transperineal implants of plastic catheters were given fractionated brachytherapy, 5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 30-40 Gy. The median tumor volume was 225 cm{sup 3} with a range of 41-2,103 cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 23.4 months, a total of 13/38 patients were alive. The median postbrachytherapy survival was 15 months with 18 of the 25 deaths due to distant metastases. Tumor response was as follows: 6/38 partial remission, 28/38 stable disease, and 4/38 local progression. A planning target volume (PTV) coverage > 85% was achieved in 42/44 implants. The treatment was well tolerated, and no acute complications were observed. One patient developed a fistula after 8 months. Pain relief was recorded in 34 patients (89.5%), and the median duration of this palliative effect was 5 months with a range of 1-13 months. Conclusions: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is a valuable tool for the delivery of high doses and achieves effective palliation in recurrent rectal carcinoma. (orig.)

  9. Brachytherapy for Buccal Cancer: From Conventional Low Dose Rate (LDR) or Mold Technique to High Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Masui, Koji; Yoshida, Ken; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Akiyama, Hironori; Murakami, Shumei; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2017-12-01

    To examine the effectiveness of newly-installed high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for buccal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 36 patients (25 men and 11 women) with buccal cancer treated with curative brachytherapy with or without external radiotherapy with a median follow-up of 99 months. A total of 15 HDR-ISBT (median 48 Gy/ 8 fractions, range=24-60 Gy) patients were compared to conventional 15 cases LDR-ISBT (70 Gy, range=42.8-110 Gy) and 7 molds techniques (15 Gy, range=9-74 Gy). A total of 31 patients also underwent external radiotherapy (30 Gy, range=24-48 Gy). They comprised of 3T1, 23 T2, 8 T3, 3 T4 including 11 node positive cases. HDR-ISBT provided 82% of local control rate at 5 years, whereas conventional brachytherapy showed 72% [p=0.44; LDR-ISBT (65%), mold therapy (85.7%)]. Patients with early lesions (T1-2 or stage I-II) showed better local control rates than those with advanced lesions (T3-4 or stage III-IV). Severe late grade 3 complications developed in two patients treated with LDR-ISBT and EBRT. There is no significant difference in toxicity grade ≤2 between conventional brachytherapy (5/15=33%) and HDR-ISBT (7/32=32%, p=0.92). HDR-ISBT achieved good and comparable local control rates to conventional brachytherapy without elevating the toxicity. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. How one institution overcame the challenges to start an MRI-based brachytherapy program for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Harkenrider

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Adaptive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based brachytherapy results in improved local control and decreased high-grade toxicities compared to historical controls. Incorporating MRI into the workflow of a department can be a major challenge when initiating an MRI-based brachytherapy program. This project aims to describe the goals, challenges, and solutions when initiating an MRI-based cervical cancer brachytherapy program at our institution. Material and methods : We describe the 6-month multi-disciplinary planning phase to initiate an MRI-based brachytherapy program. We describe the specific challenges that were encountered prior to treating our first patient. Results : We describe the solutions that were realized and executed to solve the challenges that we faced to establish our MRI-based brachytherapy program. We emphasize detailed coordination of care, planning, and communication to make the workflow feasible. We detail the imaging and radiation physics solutions to safely deliver MRI-based brachytherapy. The focus of these efforts is always on the delivery of optimal, state of the art patient care and treatment delivery within the context of our available institutional resources. Conclusions : Previous publications have supported a transition to MRI-based brachytherapy, and this can be safely and efficiently accomplished as described in this manuscript.

  11. The brachytherapy with low dose-rate iridium for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momma, Tetsuo; Saito, Shiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Toya, Kazuhito; Dokiya, Takushi; Murai, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy as an option for the treatment of prostate cancer has been commonly performed in USA. As the permanent seeding of the radioactive materials is strictly restricted by the law in Japan, brachytherapy must be performed by the temporary implant. This treatment has been performed at a few facilities in Japan mostly using high dose-rate iridium. Only our facility has been using low dose-rate iridium (LDR-Ir) for prostate cancer. This study evaluates the clinical results of the treatment. Since December 1997 to December 1999, 26 patients with histologically diagnosed as prostate cancer (Stage B, 92%; Stage C, 8%) underwent brachytherapy. Twenty-two patients received brachytherapy alone, three were treated with a combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy (ERT) and one was treated with a combination of brachytherapy and neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients ranged in age from 61 to 84 (median 76) years old. Treatment was initiated with perineal needle placement. From 10 to 14 needles were placed through the holes on the template which was fixed to the stabilizer of the transrectal ultrasound probe. After the needle placement, CT scan was performed to draw distribution curves for the treatment planning. LDR-Ir wires were introduced to the sheath and indwelled during the time calculated from dosimetry. Peripheral dose was 70 Gy for the monotherapy of brachytherapy. For the combination therapy, 40 Gy was given by brachytherapy and 36 Gy with ERT afterwards. LDR-Ir wires were removed after completion of the radiation and patients were followed with serum PSA level and annual biopsy. During 2 to 26 (median 12) months follow-up, 8 out of 9 patients with initial PSA level above 20 ng/ml showed PSA failure. All 13 patients with initial PSA level lower than 20 ng/ml were free from PSA failure. Eight out of 11 patients with Gleason's score 7 or higher showed PSA failure, and all 14 patients (including three patients with combined therapy) with

  12. Sigmoid Colon is an Unexpected Organ at Risk in Brachytherapy for Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ffrrcsi, H.F.; Mrcpfrcr, I.B.; Appleby, H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify organs at risk (OAR) and analyze the dose volume histograms (DVHs) for intracavitary brachytherapy in cancer of the cervix. Late toxicities are our concern in treatment of cancer cervix especially as it is presenting in younger age population. Material and Methods: Patients with cancer of the cervix were treated using CT and MRI compatible, high dose rate, (HDR) applicators. CT images were acquired with the intra-uterine tube and colpostats in place and subsequently imported into Varian Brachyvision planning software. We identified the gross tumour volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) and analyzed the dose distribution using dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses were calculated according to ICRU 38. Critical tissue DVHs were analysed following the American Brachytherapy Society rules. Dose points are recorded as the dose encompassed by the greatest contiguous I cm3, 2 cm3, and 5 cm3 volumes in the plan. Results: We found the sigmoid colon to be a relatively immobile structure that repeatedly received doses in excess of 70% of the intended point A dose. The only solution in order to bring sigmoid DVHs within 5% toxicity limits was to reduce the dose to point A. Planning images and DVHs for the OARs are shown as an example of our work. Conclusion: The recto-sigmoid colon is identified as an unexpected OAR in a majority of cervix brachytherapy plans. A new consensus on the DVH limit of this structure will be needed in the era of CT planned brachytherapy, if arbitrary dose reductions to point A are to be the solution to the problem of sigmoid DVHs that exceed conventional tolerance limits

  13. The case for focal brachytherapy for the management of low grade prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Enari, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Radical therapy of low to intermediate prostate cancer patients can cause substantial adverse events relating to genitourinary and rectal toxicity. Yet there is little evidence that such treatment results in increased life expectancy. On the other hand, watchful waiting is associated with active surveillance and the patient must accept that the cancer remains untreated and has a risk of progression. Focal therapy of low grade prostate cancer provides an intermediate approach to the management of this cancer. The approach is to treat only those positive segments on biopsy and so reduce the likelihood of adverse events. However, continued surveillance is required because of the increased risk of disease progression. Focal therapy needs to be evaluated using available ablative therapies. Recent studies of focal HIFU for 20 patients showed PSA reduced from 7.3 to 1.5 ng/mL at 12 months. 1/20 patients had inadequate erections and 2120 required pads. 17/19 had no histological evidence of cancer and none had evidence of high volume or Gleason = 7 cancer in the treated lobe. Seed brachytherapy is commonly used for radical prostate treatment of low volume disease. As the same template can be used for seed therapy as is used for biopsy, the technique is ideally suited for focal brachytherapy. As any treatment involving less than the entire gland involves the risk of leaving viable cancer cells outside the treatment zone, a phase 3 randomised clinical trial between radical and focal brachytherapy is advocated to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the latter relative to radical therapy.

  14. Erectile function following brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putora, P.M.; Buchauer, K.; Plasswilm, L. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Engeler, D.; Schmid, H.P. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Urology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Haile, S.R.; Graf, N. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Clinical Trials Unit, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    For localized prostate cancer, treatment options include external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), radical prostatectomy (RP), and brachytherapy (BT). Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common side-effect. Our aim was to evaluate penile erectile function (EF) before and after BT, EBRT, or RP using a validated self-administered quality-of-life survey from a prospective registry. Analysis included 478 patients undergoing RP (n = 252), EBRT (n = 91), and BT (n = 135) with at least 1 year of follow-up and EF documented using IIEF-5 scores at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and annually thereafter. Differences among treatments were most pronounced among patients with no or mild initial ED (IIEF-5 ≥ 17). Overall, corrected for baseline EF and age, BT was associated with higher IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 7.8 IIEF-5 score) or EBRT (+ 3.1 IIEF-5 score). EBRT was associated with better IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 4.7 IIEF-5 score). In patients undergoing EBRT or RP with bilateral nerve sparing (NS), recovery of EF was observed and during follow-up, the differences to BT were not statistically significant. Overall age had a negative impact on EF preservation (corrected for baseline IIEF). In our series, EF was adversely affected by each treatment modality. Considered overall, BT provided the best EF preservation in comparison to EBRT or RP. (orig.) [German] Die externe Radiotherapie (EBRT), die radikale Prostatektomie (RP) sowie die Brachytherapie (BT) stellen Behandlungsoptionen fuer das lokalisierte Prostatakarzinom dar. Die erektile Dysfunktion (ED) ist eine haeufige Nebenwirkung dieser Therapien. Unser Ziel war es, die penile erektile Funktion (EF) vor und nach BT, EBRT und RP mit Hilfe eines validierten, vom Patienten ausgefuellten Lebensqualitaetsfragebogens aus einer prospektiven Datenbank zu beurteilen. Mit einer minimalen Nachbeobachtungszeit von einem Jahr wurden 478 Patienten analysiert, die eine RP (n = 252), EBRT (n = 91) oder BT (n = 135) erhalten hatten und deren EF mit

  15. Brachytherapy in head and neck cancers; Curietherapie des cancers de la sphere ORL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Noel, G.; Simon, J.M.; Racadot, S.; Jauffret, E. [Groupe Hospitalier la Pitie-Salpetriere, Centre des Tumeurs, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-02-01

    Experience accumulated over several decades with radiation of Head and Neck tumours by irradiation has demonstrated the need for a high tumour dose to achieve local control. With external beam irradiation alone, it is difficult to spare adjacent normal tissues, resulting in undesirable late effects on the salivary glands; mandible, and muscles of mastication. Interstitial implantation is ideally suited to deliver a high dose limited to the volume of the primary tumor, thus minimizing sequels. A large experience has been accumulated with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in treatment of carcinoma of oral cavity, oropharynx, and nasopharynx. Recent analysis of large clinical series provided data indicating that modalities of low dose rate brachytherapy should be optimized in treating these tumors for increasing therapeutic ratio. Low dose rate brachytherapy is now challenged by high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy. Preliminary results obtained with these two last modalities are discussed regarding to those of low dose rate brachytherapy. (authors)

  16. High-dose-rate brachytherapy using molds for oral cavity cancer. The technique and its limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Yokoe, Yoshihiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Okajima, Kaoru; Nishida, Mitsuo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    With the availability of a high-dose-rate (HDR) remote afterloading device, a Phase I/II protocol was initiated at our institution to assess the toxicity and efficacy of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy, using molds, in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity. Eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity were treated by the technique. The primary sites of the tumors were the buccal mucosa, oral floor, and gingiva. Two of the buccal mucosal cancers were located in the retromolar trigon. For each patient, a customized mold was fabricated, in which two to four afterloading catheters were placed for an 192 Ir HDR source. Four to seven fractions of 3-4 Gy, 5 mm below the mold surface, were given following external radiation therapy of 40-60 Gy/ 2 Gy. The total dose of HDR brachytherapy ranged from 16 to 28Gy. Although a good initial complete response rate of 7/8 (88%) was achieved, there was local recurrence in four of these seven patients. Both of the retromolar trigon tumors showed marginal recurrence. No serious (e.g., ulcer or bone exposure) late radiation damage has been observed thus far in the follow up period of 15-57 months. High-dose-rate brachytherapy using the mold technique seems a safe and useful method for selected early and superficial oral cavity cancer. However, it is not indicated for thick tumors and/or tumors located in the retromolar trigon. (author)

  17. Preliminary results of study comparing HDR with LDR brachytherapy for IIIb cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, N.; Pellizzon, A.C.A.; Novaes, P.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.; Ferrigno, R.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1992 we have been using a Micro-Selectron HDR device, working with Iridium 192 to treat the cervical cancer and some others pathologies. With a minimum follow up of 24 months, 59 patients with cervical cancer were randomizated for one of the following schedule of treatment: EBRT - 45Gy - fx 1,8Gy plus Brachytherapy 1-HDR - 36 (61%) - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0Gy at point A 2-LDR - 29 (39%) - two insertions fifteen days apart of 17,5Gy at point A EBRT was performed with a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement and parametrial complementation of dose with AP-PA fields. For Brachytherapy Fletcher Colpostats are used in association with intrauterine tamdens, in both arms. Brachyterapy starts in HDR group after ten days of the beginning of the treatment. The total time of treatment is shortened here in two weeks. LDR brachytherapy starts only after the end of EBRT. Results - local control was 61% in 12 months and 50% in 24 months for HDR group, versus 52,6% and 47,8% for LDR group. Local failures of 39% and 50% in 12 and 24 months for HDR and 47,8% and 52,8% for LDR groups respectively. Complications were restricted to rectites and cistites - 8,3% for HDR and 13% for LDR. Conclusions - HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent local control when compared to LDR, can treat a larger number of patients in a shorter period, has possibilities of dose optimizations and decrease the radiation exposure to the staff

  18. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chan, L; Hausen, H [Xoft Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  19. Oncological outcome, complications, lower urinary tract symptoms, and health-related quality of life after low-dose-rate salvage brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer following primary radiotherapy: a report of 8 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We evaluated our experience with low-dose-rate salvage brachytherapy for local recurrence after primary prostate radiotherapy, and described the changes in lower urinary tract symptoms and health-related quality of life. Material and methods: Between 2011 and 2016, eight men with local recurrence after primary prostate radiotherapy underwent iodine-125 salvage brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 110 or 145 Gy. Recurrence-free survival was evaluated with a post-treatment prostate-specific antigen profile. The toxicity and changes in lower urinary tract symptoms and health-related quality of life during the follow-up were evaluated on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0, International Prostate Symptom Score, Short Form-8, and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 12.2 months (range, 8.3-71.9 after salvage brachytherapy. Of all eight patients, two (25% experienced treatment failure, one of whom developed left seminal vesicle recurrence 36 months after salvage brachytherapy for the right seminal vesicle recurrence, while the other developed bone metastases after 6 months. The International Prostate Symptom Scores peaked at 3 months, and returned to baseline by 6 months. The scores of all domains of health-related quality of life remained unchanged during the 12-month follow-up after salvage brachytherapy. Early grade ≤ 2 genitourinary toxicity was observed in five patients (63%, and late grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity in one patient (13% having persistent diarrhea. No patient required intermittent catheterization and no grade 3 or greater toxicity occurred during follow-up. Conclusions: The present study is our experiment of eight patients undergoing salvage brachytherapy, suggesting that this modality is noninvasive, safe, and an effective salvage local treatment in selected patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate lower urinary

  20. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer--a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Liu

    Full Text Available To compare the efficacy and safety of high dose rate (HDR and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy in treating early-stage oral cancer.A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases, restricted to English language up to June 1, 2012, was performed to identify potentially relevant studies.Only randomized controlled trials (RCT and controlled trials that compared HDR to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of early-stage oral cancer (stages I, II and III were of interest.Two investigators independently extracted data from retrieved studies and controversies were solved by discussion. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. One RCT and five controlled trials (607 patients: 447 for LDR and 160 for HDR met the inclusion criteria. The odds ratio showed no statistically significant difference between LDR group and HDR group in terms of local recurrence (OR = 1.12, CI 95% 0.62-2.01, overall mortality (OR = 1.01, CI 95% 0.61-1.66 and Grade 3/4 complications (OR = 0.86, CI 95% 0.52-1.42.This meta-analysis indicated that HDR brachytherapy was a comparable alternative to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of oral cancer. HDR brachytherapy might become a routine choice for early-stage oral cancer in the future.

  1. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ 2 test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In

  2. High dose rate brachytherapy for medically inoperable stage I endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petereit, Daniel G; Sarkaria, Jann N; Schink, Julian; Springman, Scott R; Kinsella, Timothy J; Buchler, Dolores A

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the efficacy of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with medically inoperable endometrial cancer clinically confined to the corpus. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with endometrial cancer and an intact uterus have been treated since 1989 with HDR brachytherapy. Twenty-six patients with medically inoperable Stage I disease were treated with radiation alone and form the basis of this study. Obesity was assessed using the body mass index (BMI kg/m{sup 2}) scale. Patients with a BMI above 28 were considered obese and those above 35 morbidly obese, per standard anesthesia guidelines. Brachytherapy was delivered in 5 HDR insertions, 1 week apart, without any external beam radiation. The following doses were delivered per insertion: 5.7 Gy to point S, 7.0 Gy to point W, 8.2 Gy to the vaginal surface and 9.2 Gy to point M. Point M represents the conventional point A dose, while points S and W are myometrial points. A single tandem with either ovoids or cylinders was placed, unless the uterine cavity would accommodate 2 tandems. All treatments were outpatient using intravenous fentanyl and midazolam for sedation. Pelvic ultrasound was commonly used at the time of brachytherapy to verify tandem placement. Three year clinical endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for the study cohort was 21 months with follow-up greater than 36 months in 11 patients. Seventeen of the 26 patients were inoperable due to morbid obesity (median weight and BMI; 316 lbs and 55 kg/m{sup 2}, respectively); the other patients had poor cardiopulmonary reserve {+-} obesity. The median age, KPS (Karnofsky Performance Status), weight, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists' Physical Class System) and BMI were 63 yrs, 80%, 285 lbs, 3 and 49 kg/m{sup 2}, respectively. Two patients with an ASA of 3 and 4 died from acute cardio-pulmonary events within 30 days of the last insertion, emphasizing the need

  3. High dose rate brachytherapy for medically inoperable stage I endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Schink, Julian; Springman, Scott R.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the efficacy of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with medically inoperable endometrial cancer clinically confined to the corpus. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with endometrial cancer and an intact uterus have been treated since 1989 with HDR brachytherapy. Twenty-six patients with medically inoperable Stage I disease were treated with radiation alone and form the basis of this study. Obesity was assessed using the body mass index (BMI kg/m 2 ) scale. Patients with a BMI above 28 were considered obese and those above 35 morbidly obese, per standard anesthesia guidelines. Brachytherapy was delivered in 5 HDR insertions, 1 week apart, without any external beam radiation. The following doses were delivered per insertion: 5.7 Gy to point S, 7.0 Gy to point W, 8.2 Gy to the vaginal surface and 9.2 Gy to point M. Point M represents the conventional point A dose, while points S and W are myometrial points. A single tandem with either ovoids or cylinders was placed, unless the uterine cavity would accommodate 2 tandems. All treatments were outpatient using intravenous fentanyl and midazolam for sedation. Pelvic ultrasound was commonly used at the time of brachytherapy to verify tandem placement. Three year clinical endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for the study cohort was 21 months with follow-up greater than 36 months in 11 patients. Seventeen of the 26 patients were inoperable due to morbid obesity (median weight and BMI; 316 lbs and 55 kg/m 2 , respectively); the other patients had poor cardiopulmonary reserve ± obesity. The median age, KPS (Karnofsky Performance Status), weight, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists' Physical Class System) and BMI were 63 yrs, 80%, 285 lbs, 3 and 49 kg/m 2 , respectively. Two patients with an ASA of 3 and 4 died from acute cardio-pulmonary events within 30 days of the last insertion, emphasizing the need for accurate pre

  4. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  5. The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone after lumpectomy in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, Kathy L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Frazier, Robert C.; Kini, Vijay R.; Kestin, Larry L.; Chen, Peter Y.; Edmundson, Greg; Mele, Elizabeth; Jaffray, David; Vicini, Frank A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We present the preliminary results of our in-house protocol using outpatient high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality following lumpectomy in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients with 38 Stage I-II breast cancers received radiation to the lumpectomy cavity alone using an HDR interstitial implant with 192 Ir. A minimum dose of 32 Gy was delivered on an outpatient basis in 8 fractions of 4 Gy to the lumpectomy cavity plus a 1- to 2-cm margin over consecutive 4 days. Results: Median follow-up is 31 months. There has been one ipsilateral breast recurrence for a crude failure rate of 2.6% and no regional or distant failures. Wound healing was not impaired in patients undergoing an open-cavity implant. Three minor breast infections occurred, and all resolved with oral antibiotics. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in all patients. Conclusion: In selected patients with early-stage breast cancer, treatment of the lumpectomy cavity alone with outpatient HDR brachytherapy is both technically feasible and well tolerated. Early results are encouraging, however, longer follow-up is necessary before equivalence to standard whole-breast irradiation can be established and to determine the most optimal radiation therapy technique to be employed

  6. Aspects of the application of complementary brachytherapy for early invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, L.A.H. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas]. E-mail: luciahomma@terra.com.br; Campos, T.P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br; Silva, S.Z.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Lima, C.F. [ECOGRAF, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Nucleo de Diagnostico

    2007-07-01

    Initial studies of brachytherapy with the 'Mammosite Radiation Therapy System', a device consisted by a catheter centered inside a inflate balloon, to perform breast brachytherapy was revised. A high activity source was applied into the balloon, exposing to the tumor bed to a high absorbed dose, while the surrounding areas receives one reduced by to a factor 1/r{sup 2}, during a short interval of time. The high acute dose provides a booster to conventional radiation therapy, resulting in a better local control. The acceptable esthetic impact achieved and an easier device setting stimulated the present dosimetric study. The brachytherapy with Ir{sup 192} was simulated through the development of a computerized digital voxels phantom, which represented the breast anatomy. The Monte Carlo Code (MCNP {sup TM}, 1977) was used to evaluate the radiation of the tumor bed and health tissues. Results from simulations shows, as example, an amount of radiation absorbed by the tumor bed of 11.30 Gy up to 5 mm around the balloon surface. Radiation selectivity is also shown, in which tumour bed absorbed more radiation than the surrounding tissues, whose maximum values were: skin (6.73 Gy), muscle (7.69 Gy), and lung (3.02 Gy), for a fifteen-minute exposure of a Ir-152 source. The simulation results are presented. Reliability of this radiotherapy technique as a postoperative booster in early breast cancer is presented and confirmed in this work. (author)

  7. Aspects of the application of complementary brachytherapy for early invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, L.A.H.; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais; Campos, T.P.R.; Silva, S.Z.C.; Lima, C.F.

    2007-01-01

    Initial studies of brachytherapy with the 'Mammosite Radiation Therapy System', a device consisted by a catheter centered inside a inflate balloon, to perform breast brachytherapy was revised. A high activity source was applied into the balloon, exposing to the tumor bed to a high absorbed dose, while the surrounding areas receives one reduced by to a factor 1/r 2 , during a short interval of time. The high acute dose provides a booster to conventional radiation therapy, resulting in a better local control. The acceptable esthetic impact achieved and an easier device setting stimulated the present dosimetric study. The brachytherapy with Ir 192 was simulated through the development of a computerized digital voxels phantom, which represented the breast anatomy. The Monte Carlo Code (MCNP TM , 1977) was used to evaluate the radiation of the tumor bed and health tissues. Results from simulations shows, as example, an amount of radiation absorbed by the tumor bed of 11.30 Gy up to 5 mm around the balloon surface. Radiation selectivity is also shown, in which tumour bed absorbed more radiation than the surrounding tissues, whose maximum values were: skin (6.73 Gy), muscle (7.69 Gy), and lung (3.02 Gy), for a fifteen-minute exposure of a Ir-152 source. The simulation results are presented. Reliability of this radiotherapy technique as a postoperative booster in early breast cancer is presented and confirmed in this work. (author)

  8. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres H, F. [Universidad de Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); De la Espriella V, N. [Universidad de Cordoba, Grupo Avanzado de Materiales y Sistemas Complejos, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); Sanchez C, A., E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Enfermeria, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  9. Low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy preserves good quality of life in buccal mucosa cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayier, A.; Hayashi, Keiji; Yoshimura, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the results and long-term changes in radiation toxicity of stage I-II buccal mucosa cancer patients treated by low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy with 198 Au grains. A total of 133 stage I-II buccal mucosa carcinomas patients received 198 Au grain implantation brachytherapy between January 1982 and July 2005: 75 of them were treated by 198 Au grain implantation alone and 58 were treated by 198 Au implantation in combination with external irradiation. The average 198 Au-grain dose was 70 Gy in 7 days. Gross tumor areas ranged from 2.4 cm 2 to 9 cm 2 , and the clinical target areas ranged from 6 cm 2 to 15 cm 2 . The follow-up periods ranged from 3 months to 20 years (mean: 5 years 11 months and median: 5 years 1 months). Failure at the site of the primary lesion occurred in 17 patients. Post-treatment mucosal ulceration developed in 15 patients, and all were cured within 25 months by conservative treatment. Osteoradionecrosis was diagnosed in 8 patients, but only one patient required surgical treatment. No severe complications or aggravation of complications developed more than 10 years after treatment. The results of low-dose-rate (LDR)-brachytherapy (BT) alone and LDR-BT in combination with external irradiation at a total dose of 25 Gy were acceptable from the standpoint of cure rate and quality of life (QOL). (author)

  10. A quality indicator to evaluate high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Francisco Contreras; Soboll, Daniel Scheidegger

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this report is to prevent a simple quality indicator (QI) that can be promptly used to evaluate the high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cancer of the cervix, and if necessary, to correct applicators' geometry before starting the treatment. We selected 51 HDR intracavitary applications of brachytherapy of patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with 60 mm uterine tandem and small Fletcher colpostat, according to the Manchester method (dose prescription on point A). A QI was defined as the ratio between the volume of 100% isodose curve of the study insertion and the volume of the 100% isodose curve of an insertion considered to be ideal. The data obtained were distributed in three groups: the group with tandem placement slippage (67,5%), a group with colpostat placement slippage (21,9%), and a third group, considered normal (10,6%). Each group showed particular characteristics (p < 0.0001). QI can be the best auxiliary method to establish the error tolerance (%) allowed for HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. (author)

  11. Use of brachytherapy with permanent implants of iodine-125 in localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bladou, F.; Serment, G.; Salem, N.; Simonian, M.; Rosello, R.; Ternier, F.

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 15,000 cases of early stage prostate cancer T1 and T2 are diagnosed every year in France by testing for PSA and performing prostatic biopsies. The treatment of these localized forms is based in most cases on radical prostatectomy or nn external beam radiotherapy. Although the ontological results obtained by these two therapeutic methods are satisfactory and equivalent in the long term, the side effects can be important. For a number of years, trans-perineal brachytherapy using permanent implants of iodine -125 or palladium-103 has proved itself as an alternative therapy with equivalent medium to long-term results. The low urinary, digestive and sexual side effects of prostate brachytherapy are important reasons for the enthusiasm among patients and the medical community for this therapy and the growing number of applications and centres which practice it. In September 1998 we started the prostate brachytherapy programmes- in Marseilles with close collaboration between the department of urology of the Hopital Salvator, and the departments of radiotherapy, medical imaging and medical physics of the Institut Paoli-Calmettes. To date, around 250 patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate have benefited from this alternative therapy in our centre. Preliminary results, with a 3 year-follow-up, are comparable to results published in the literature by pioneer teams. (authors)

  12. Magnetic resonance image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Prognostic factors for survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Joo-Young [National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Center for Uterine Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngkyong; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Jonghwi [National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Chiyoung [National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Meyoung [National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Dongnam Inst. of Radiology and Medical Sciences, Research center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Myong Cheol; Seo, Sang-Soo; Park, Sang-Yoon [National Cancer Center, Center for Uterine Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to identify prognostic factors for survival after magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer. External beam radiotherapy of 45-50.4 Gy was delivered by either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or helical tomotherapy. Patients also received high-dose-rate MRI-guided brachytherapy of 5 Gy in 6 fractions. We analyzed 128 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB-IVB cervical cancer who underwent MRI-guided brachytherapy. Most patients (96 %) received concurrent chemotherapy. Pelvic lymph node metastases and para-aortic lymphadenopathies were found in 62 % and 14 % of patients, respectively. The median follow-up time was 44 months. Complete remission was achieved in 119 of 128 patients (93 %). The 5-year local recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival rates were 94, 89, and 85 %, respectively. Negative pelvic lymphadenopathy, gross tumor volume (GTV) dose covering 90 % of the target (GTV D90) of >110 Gy, and treatment duration ≤56 days were associated with better overall survival in univariate analyses. Multivariable analysis showed that GTV D90 of >110 Gy and treatment duration ≤56 days were possibly associated with overall survival with near-significant P-values of 0.062 and 0.073, respectively. The outcome of MRI-guided brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer was excellent. GTV D90 of >110 Gy and treatment duration ≤56 days were potentially associated with overall survival. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, prognostische Faktoren nach magnetresonanztomographisch (MRT-)gesteuerter Brachytherapie in Verbindung mit externer Strahlentherapie fuer Gebaermutterhalskrebs zu identifizieren. Externe Strahlentherapie von 45-50,4 Gy erfolgte entweder mittels dreidimensionaler konformaler Strahlentherapie oder helikaler Tomotherapie. Die Patientinnen erhielten auch

  13. Long-Term Outcome for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present the largest series of prostate cancer brachytherapy patients treated with modern brachytherapy techniques and postimplant day 0 dosimetric evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2006, 1,656 consecutive patients were treated with permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Risk group stratification was carried out according to the Mt. Sinai guidelines. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The median day 0 minimum dose covering at least 90% of the target volume was 118.8% of the prescription dose. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on the evaluated survival parameters. Results: At 12 years, biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 95.6%, 98.2%, and 72.6%, respectively. For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, bPFS was 98.6%, 96.5%, and 90.5%; CSS was 99.8%, 99.3%, and 95.2%; and OS was 77.5%, 71.1%, and 69.2%, respectively. For biochemically controlled patients, the median posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration was 0.02 ng/ml. bPFS was most closely related to percent positive biopsy specimens and risk group, while Gleason score was the strongest predictor of CSS. OS was best predicted by patient age, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use. At 12 years, biochemical failure and cause-specific mortality were 1.8% and 0.2%, 5.1% and 2.1%, and 10.4% and 7.1% for Gleason scores 5 to 6 and 7 and ≥8, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent long-term outcomes are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities including radical prostatectomy.

  14. Does prostate brachytherapy treat the seminal vesicles? A dose-volume histogram analysis of seminal vesicles in patients undergoing combined PD-103 prostate implantation and external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Richard G.; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Gaildon, Mohamoud; Stone, Nelson N.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Combined brachytherapy of the prostate and external beam irradiation (EBRT) of the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) is becoming a popular treatment for high-risk prostate cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the SV in patients undergoing this treatment was performed to determine the dose distribution to the SV and the adequacy of this treatment in patients with potential SV involvement. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five consecutive patients were treated with a Pd-103 implant of the prostate alone and 45 Gy of EBRT to the prostate and SV. Attempts were not made to implant the SV but seeds were routinely placed at the junction of the prostate and SV. All patients underwent CT-based post implant dosimetric analysis 1 month after implantation. As part of this analysis, DVH were generated for the prostate and total SV volume (SVT). In addition, the SV was divided into 6-mm-thick volumes identified as SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 starting from the junction of the prostate and SV and extending distally. DVH were also generated for these structures. Delivered dose was defined as the D90 (dose delivered to 90% of the organ on DVH). Results: The median volumes in cc of the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 34.33, 9.75, 2.7, 3.48, 2.92, 3.18, and 1.96 respectively. The SVT contained from 0-9 seeds (median 2). There was little dose delivered to the SVT and SV volumes from the implanted prostate. The median D90 values for the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 8615 cGy, 675 cGy, 3100 cGy, 1329 cGy, 553 cGy, 246 cGy, and 67 cGy, respectively. The dose delivered to the prostate covered small percentages of SV. The percents of SV volumes covered by the prostate D90 were 11, 35, 3.3, 0, 0, and 0 for SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5, respectively. Conclusions: DVH analysis of the SV reveals that dose generated from an implanted prostate contributes little to the SV. Those patients at high risk for SV involvement may be under treated

  15. Cosmetic results in early stage breast cancer patients with high-dose brachytherapy after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Felipe; Pineda, Beatriz E

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: to reveal cosmetic results in patients at early stages of low risk breast cancer treated with partial accelerated radiotherapy using high dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and materials: from March 2001 to July 2003,14 stages l and ll breast cancer patients were treated at the Colombian national cancer institute in Bogota with conservative surgery and radiotherapy upon the tumor bed (partial accelerated radiotherapy), using interstitial implants with iridium 192 (high dose rate brachytherapy) with a dose of 32 Gys, over 4 days, at 8 fractions twice a day. Results: with an average follow up of 17.7 months, good cosmetic results were found among 71.4 % of patients and excellent results among 14.3% of patients, furthermore none of the patients neither local nor regional or distant relapses. Conclusion: among patients who suffer from breast cancer at early stages, it showed is possible to apply partial accelerated radiotherapy upon the tumor bed with high doses over 4 days with good to excellent cosmetic results

  16. Cost minimization analysis of high-dose-rate versus low-dose-rate brachytherapy in endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinilla, James

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Endometrial cancer is a common, usually curable malignancy whose treatment frequently involves low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. These treatments involve substantial resource commitments and this is increasingly important. This paper presents a cost minimization analysis of HDR versus LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The perspective of the analysis is that of the payor, in this case the Ministry of Health. One course of LDR treatment is compared to two courses of HDR treatment. The two alternatives are considered to be comparable with respect to local control, survival, and toxicities. Labor, overhead, and capital costs are accounted for and carefully measured. A 5% inflation rate is used where applicable. A univariate sensitivity analysis is performed. Results: The HDR regime is 22% less expensive compared to the LDR regime. This is $991.66 per patient or, based on the current workload of this department (30 patients per year) over the useful lifetime of the after loader, $297,498 over 10 years in 1997 dollars. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy minimizes costs in the treatment of endometrial cancer relative to LDR brachytherapy. These results may be used by other centers to make rational decisions regarding brachytherapy equipment replacement or acquisition

  17. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Flynn, R; Kim, Y [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  18. LOW POWER BRACHYTHERAPY IN COMBINED TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH INTERMEDIATE RISK OF LOCALIZED PROST ATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Biryukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Estimation of the effectiveness of low power brachytherapy sources I-125 in the combined treatment in group of patients of intermediate risk of localized prostate cancer.Material and methods. The study included 126 patients with prostate cancer of intermediate risk. 104 patients (83,9% were conducted low power brachytherapy I‑125 in combination with hormone therapy by analogues of LHWG. 22 patients (16.1% received external beam irradiation in combination with brachytherapy I‑125 and hormonal treatment. Relapse-free survival of patients was evaluated in accordance with the criteria Phoenix (Nadir PSA + ng/ml. Evaluation of side effects of radiation treatment were carried out according to the RTOG criteria.Results. PSA relapse-free survival in the group of brachytherapy and hormone treatment at the time of observation 5 years amounted to 97.1%. In the group of combined radiation therapy with brachytherapy, and hormonal treatment PSA relapse-free survival rate was 95.5%.In both groups, relapse-free survival was noted in 96,8% of cases. Tumor-specific and overall survival in bothgroups was 100%. The major complications of treatment in both groups were radiation urethritis 1 to 2 degrees in 9.5% of cases (12 patients, urethral stricture in 5 patients (3.9% of cases, acute urinary retention in 1 patient (0.8% of cases and late radiation rectitis of 2 degree in 1.58% of cases (2 patients.Conclusions. It is possible to draw tentative conclusions about the high rate of survival without progression in both treatment groups on the background of the relatively low frequency of adverse reactions. It is necessary further follow-up for patients with estimating of survival for a longer period.

  19. HDR Brachytherapy in the Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Masson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy is used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a technique which allows delivery of large individual fractions to the prostate without exposing adjacent normal tissues to unacceptable toxicity. This approach is particularly favourable in prostate cancer where tumours are highly sensitive to dose escalation and to increases in radiotherapy fraction size, due to the unique radiobiological behaviour of prostate cancers in contrast with other malignancies. In this paper we discuss the rationale and the increasing body of clinical evidence for the use of this technique in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, where it is combined with external beam radiotherapy. We highlight practical aspects of delivering treatment and discuss toxicity and limitations, with particular reference to current practice in the United Kingdom.

  20. Can the prostate brachytherapy by permanent implants represent an alternative to external radiotherapy for the localised prostate cancers with intermediary risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnault, B.; Duberge, T.; Salem, N.; Boher, J.M.; Gravis, G.; Bladou, F.; Jochen, W.; Resbeut, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: the prostate brachytherapy stands out as treatment of low risk prostate cancers, but the data concerning its use as exclusive treatment of intermediary risk prostate cancer are rare. We present a retrospective analysis of intermediary risk prostate cancers which treatment was either an external conformal radiotherapy or an exclusive brachytherapy. conclusion: In this mono centric series, the brachytherapy brings excellent results in comparison with external conformal radiotherapy with dose escalation and could be proposed as alternative to patients suffering of intermediary risk prostate cancer. (N.C.)

  1. Efficacy and safety of iodine-125 radioactive seeds brachytherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer-A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Li, Jiawei; Li, Ran; Zhang, Ying; Han, Mingyong; Ma, Wei

    This meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of 125 I brachytherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Trials comparing 125 I brachytherapy with chemotherapy in NSCLC were identified. Meta-analysis was performed to obtain pooled risk ratios for an overall response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR) and complications, and pooled hazard ratio for overall survival (OS). Fifteen studies including 1188 cases were included. The pooled result indicated that there were significant differences in ORR, DCR, and OS between 125 I brachytherapy combined with chemotherapy and chemotherapy alone, but no statistic differences in gastrointestinal symptoms, leukopenia, myelosuppression, and hemoglobin reduction. Patients treated with 125 I brachytherapy combined with chemotherapy have a higher relative risk of pneumothorax, bloody sputum, and pneumorrhagia compared with chemotherapy alone. Seeds migration only occurred in the group treated with 125 I brachytherapy. There were significant differences in ORR, DCR, and myelosuppression between 125 I brachytherapy alone and chemotherapy. 125 I brachytherapy combined with chemotherapy can significantly enhance the clinical efficacy and improve the OS of patients with advanced NSCLC without increasing the incidence of complications of chemotherapy. 125 I brachytherapy alone can significantly enhance the clinical efficacy and reduce the incidence of myelosuppression compared with chemotherapy. However, 125 I brachytherapy may cause lung injury. Large sample and higher-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the pooled results of complications. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Salvage brachytherapy for local recurrences of prostate cancer treated previously with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawkowska-Suwinska, Marzena; Fijałkowski, Marek; Białas, Brygida; Szlag, Marta; Kellas-Ślęczka, Sylwia; Nowicka, Elżbieta; Behrendt, Katarzyna; Plewicki, Grzegorz; Smolska-Ciszewska, Beata; Giglok, Monika; Zajusz, Aleksander; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze early effects and toxicity of salvage high dose rate brachytherapy for local recurrences of adenocarcinoma of the prostate after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). In MCS Memorial Institute of Oncology in Gliwice a research programme on salvage HDR brachytherapy for local recurrences of prostate cancer treated previously with EBRT has been ongoing since February 2008. The treatment consisted of 3 fractions of 10 Gy each given every 14 days. Maximal urethral doses were constrained to be ≤ 120% of the prescribed dose. Maximal bladder and rectum doses were constrained to be ≤ 70% of the prescribed dose. Fifteen eligible patients were treated and analyzed from February 2008. All patients completed the treatment without major complications. The most common early complications were: macroscopic haematuria, pain in lower part of the abdomen, and transient dysuria. During the first week after the procedure a transient increase in IPSS score was noticed. The Foley catheter was removed on day 2 to 5. No complications after spinal anaesthesia were observed. Acute toxicity according to EORTC/RTOG was low. For bladder EORTC/RTOG score ranged from 0 to 2. Only in two patients grade 1 toxicity for rectum was observed. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 9 months. In one patient grade 2 rectal toxicity was observed, and one had urethral stricture. Other patients did not have any other significant late toxicity of the treatment. Two patients developed bone metastases. Salvage brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (3 × 10 Gy every 14 days) seems to be a safe and well tolerated procedure. A significant decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level is seen in patients with hormone-responsive cancer. Long-term efficiency and toxicity of the procedure are yet to be established.

  3. 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.; Baltas, D.; Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Kontova, M.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Skazikis, G.; Zamboglou, N.; Dannenberg, T.; Buhleier, T.; Tunn, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: pilot study to evaluate feasibility, acute toxicity and conformal quality of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer using intraoperative real-time planning. Patients and methods: between 05/2002 and 05/2003, 52 patients with prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≤ 7 and clinical stage ≤ T2a were treated. Median PSA was 6.4 ng/ml and median Gleason score 5. 24/52 patients had stage T1c and 28/52 stage T2a. For transrectal ultrasound-(TRUS-)guided transperineal implantation of flexible plastic needles into the prostate, the real-time HDR planning system SWIFT trademark was used. After implantation, CT-based 3-D postplanning was performed. All patients received one implant for four fractions of HDR brachytherapy in 48 h using a reference dose (D ref ) of 9.5 Gy to a total dose of 38.0 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed to evaluate the conformal quality of each implant using D 90 , D 10 urethra, and D 10 rectum. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the CTC (common toxicity criteria) scales. Results: median D 90 was 106% of D ref (range: 93-115%), median D 10 urethra 159% of D ref (range: 127-192%), and median D 10 rectum 55% of D ref (range: 35-68%). Median follow-up is currently 8 months. In 2/52 patients acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was observed. No gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1 occurred. Conclusion: 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy using intraoperative real-time planning is a feasible and highly conformal treatment for localized prostate cancer associated with minimal acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate late toxicity and biochemical control. (orig.)

  4. Positional variation of applicators during low dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul Ponni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to know the effect of variation in position of applicators to the dose received by the tumor volume, critical organs such as rectum and bladder and the correlation of variation on the clinical outcome.Material and methods: 36 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer, undergoing intracavitary brachythe - rapy (ICBT from October 2005 to December 2006 were the subjects of the study. Two pairs of orthogonal X-ray films were taken: one prior to loading of sources and the other after removal of sources. These patients were followed up as per the RTOG criteria.Results: The median duration of insertion was 25 hours with a median follow up period of 6.7 months. The translational variation of the applicator position for all patients was 3 mm and 1 mm (2 SD, respectively, in the patient’s lateral and antero-posterior direction. The rotational variation was 3 and 4 degrees (2 SD in the patient’s transverse and sagittal planes. Detailed analysis of source movement showed following changes in median dose: point A: 14%, point B: 2%, point P: 1%, Rectum 1: 3.5%, Rectum 2: 4% and Bladder: 9.1%. The incidence of rectal toxicity was 6/36(16.7% and that of bladder was 1/36 (2.8%. When the variables were grouped to evaluate the relationship, our study showed statistically significant relationship between: R2 and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.002, point A and rectal toxicity (Pearson: 0.792, lateral displacement/anteroposterior displacement and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.012/0.003, beta angle and R2 (p value: 0.002.Conclusions: The geometric relationships between the ICBT applicators and the critical structures vary during the course of low dose rate brachytherapy. Source movement does result in significant dose alterations in terms of increased rate of complications, but its impact on cure rates needs to be studied in the future.

  5. Results of the European research project 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment with 3D Brachytherapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solc, J.; Sochor, V.; Selbach, H.-J.; Aubineau-Laniec, I.; Lourenco, V.; Gabris, F.; Grindborg, J.-E.; Kosunen, A.; Jarvinen, H.; Sipila, P.; Gouldstone, C.; Sander, T.; Sharpe, P.; Zeman, J.; Portugal, L.; Rodrigues, M.; Carlsson Tedgren, A.; Pooter de, M

    2011-01-01

    The project iMERA + T2.J06 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment using 3D brachytherapy' was solved in the period 2008-2011 in collaboration of metrology institutes from 10 European Union countries, including participation of the Czech Republic. Its main objective was to create a means to ensure metrological quantity absorbed dose in water from brachyterapeutical (BT) sources enabling more accurate assessment of therapeutic benefit than using existing dosimetry protocols that are based on the quantity kerma in the air. This project is discussed on the poster.

  6. Comparison of efficacy of meperidine and fentanyl in terms of pain management and quality of life in patients with cervical cancer receiving intracavitary brachytherapy: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanthong, Saengrawee; Rojthamarat, Sirikorn; Worasawate, Wipra; Vichitvejpaisal, Phongthara; Nantajit, Danupon; Ieumwananontachai, Nantakarn

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two sedative regimens, a benzodiazepine with either meperidine or fentanyl, in relieving pain in patients with cervical cancer undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy in terms of pain score and quality of life. Forty unselected outpatients undergoing brachytherapy (160 fractions) were enrolled with informed consent and randomized to receive a benzodiazepine with either meperidine or fentanyl. The perceived pain score according to a standard 10-item numeric rating scale was collected every 15 min during the procedure, and the perceived quality of life was determined at the end of each procedure using the EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire. The patients and medical staff members directly involved with the procedure were blinded to the medication used. The patients' pain levels were mild in both analgesic groups. Meperidine appeared to be slightly more effective than fentanyl, although the differences in the average pain score and quality of life were not statistically significant. Both meperidine and fentanyl in combination with benzodiazepine were effective in relieving pain and discomfort in patients undergoing brachytherapy. NCT02684942, ClinicalTrials.gov.

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose on people adjacent to implant patients during brachytherapy for prostate cancer using {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Catholic University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The incidence of prostate cancer is rapidly increasing due to aging of the population and westernization of dietary habits, etc. As a result, the frequency of prostate cancer has become the fifth highest among all male cancers and the first among urological cancers. Brachytherapy is commonly used for locally progressing prostate cancers. Since the mid 1980s, therapies using radio-isotopes, such as low-invasive {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd and {sup 192}Ir, have been widely performed in the U.S. and Europe. However, brachytherapy involves implanting radio-isotopes into the human body which is of concern because it may expose the health care professionals administering the therapy to unnecessary radiation. Accordingly, this study intends to predict the radiation dose that people adjacent to patients implanted with a radio-isotope are exposed to during prostate cancer radiation therapy by using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and {sup 192}Ir.

  8. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...

  9. Estimation of the Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Gynecological Cancers and Comparison With Patterns of Care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Stephen R.; Delaney, Geoff P.; Gabriel, Gabriel S.; Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir; Barton, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to estimate the optimal proportion of all gynecological cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT)—the optimal brachytherapy utilization rate (BTU)—to compare this with actual gynecological BTU and to assess the effects of nonmedical factors on access to BT. Methods and Materials: The previously constructed inter/multinational guideline-based peer-reviewed models of optimal BTU for cancers of the uterine cervix, uterine corpus, and vagina were combined to estimate optimal BTU for all gynecological cancers. The robustness of the model was tested by univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. The resulting model was applied to New South Wales (NSW), the United States, and Western Europe. Actual BTU was determined for NSW by a retrospective patterns-of-care study of BT; for Western Europe from published reports; and for the United States from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. The effect of nonmedical factors on access to BT in NSW were analyzed. Results: Gynecological BTU was as follows: NSW 28% optimal (95% confidence interval [CI] 26%-33%) compared with 14% actual; United States 30% optimal (95% CI 26%-34%) and 10% actual; and Western Europe 27% optimal (95% CI 25%-32%) and 16% actual. On multivariate analysis, NSW patients were more likely to undergo gynecological BT if residing in Area Health Service equipped with BT (odds ratio 1.76, P=.008) and if residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged postcodes (odds ratio 1.12, P=.05), but remoteness of residence was not significant. Conclusions: Gynecological BT is underutilized in NSW, Western Europe, and the United States given evidence-based guidelines. Access to BT equipment in NSW was significantly associated with higher utilization rates. Causes of underutilization elsewhere were undetermined. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against

  10. Comparison of Measurements of the Uterus and Cervix Obtained by Magnetic Resonance and Transabdominal Ultrasound Imaging to Identify the Brachytherapy Target in Patients With Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyk, Sylvia van; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Schneider, Michal; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare measurements of the uterus and cervix obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transabdominal ultrasound to determine whether ultrasound can identify the brachytherapy target and be used to guide conformal brachytherapy planning and treatment for cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients undergoing curative treatment with radiation therapy between January 2007 and March 2012 were included in the study. Intrauterine applicators were inserted into the uterine canal while patients were anesthetized. Images were obtained by MRI and transabdominal ultrasound in the longitudinal axis of the uterus with the applicator in treatment position. Measurements were taken at the anterior and posterior surface of the uterus at 2.0-cm intervals along the applicator, from the external os to the tip of the applicator. Data were analyzed using Bland Altman plots examining bias and 95% limits of agreement. Results: A total of 192 patients contributed 1668 measurements of the cervix and uterus. Mean (±SD) differences of measurements between imaging modalities at the anterior and posterior uterine surface ranged from 1.5 (±3.353) mm to 3.7 (±3.856) mm, and −1.46 (±3.308) mm to 0.47 (±3.502) mm, respectively. The mean differences were less than 3 mm in the cervix. The mean differences were less than 1.5 mm at all measurement points on the posterior surface. Conclusion: Differences in the measurements of the cervix and uterus obtained by MRI and ultrasound were within clinically acceptable limits. Transabdominal ultrasound can be substituted for MRI in defining the target volume for conformal brachytherapy treatment of cervix cancer

  11. Comparison of Measurements of the Uterus and Cervix Obtained by Magnetic Resonance and Transabdominal Ultrasound Imaging to Identify the Brachytherapy Target in Patients With Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Sylvia van, E-mail: sylvia.vandyk@petermac.org [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas [Rural Clinical School, University of Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Schneider, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Bernshaw, David [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Narayan, Kailash [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare measurements of the uterus and cervix obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transabdominal ultrasound to determine whether ultrasound can identify the brachytherapy target and be used to guide conformal brachytherapy planning and treatment for cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients undergoing curative treatment with radiation therapy between January 2007 and March 2012 were included in the study. Intrauterine applicators were inserted into the uterine canal while patients were anesthetized. Images were obtained by MRI and transabdominal ultrasound in the longitudinal axis of the uterus with the applicator in treatment position. Measurements were taken at the anterior and posterior surface of the uterus at 2.0-cm intervals along the applicator, from the external os to the tip of the applicator. Data were analyzed using Bland Altman plots examining bias and 95% limits of agreement. Results: A total of 192 patients contributed 1668 measurements of the cervix and uterus. Mean (±SD) differences of measurements between imaging modalities at the anterior and posterior uterine surface ranged from 1.5 (±3.353) mm to 3.7 (±3.856) mm, and −1.46 (±3.308) mm to 0.47 (±3.502) mm, respectively. The mean differences were less than 3 mm in the cervix. The mean differences were less than 1.5 mm at all measurement points on the posterior surface. Conclusion: Differences in the measurements of the cervix and uterus obtained by MRI and ultrasound were within clinically acceptable limits. Transabdominal ultrasound can be substituted for MRI in defining the target volume for conformal brachytherapy treatment of cervix cancer.

  12. Novel use of ViewRay MRI guidance for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Huaising C; Huang, Jessie Y; Miller, Jessica R; Das, Rupak K; Wallace, Charles R; De Costa, Anna-Maria A; Francis, David M; Straub, Margaret R; Anderson, Bethany M; Bradley, Kristin A

    To characterize image quality and feasibility of using ViewRay MRI (VR)-guided brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Cervical cancer patients receiving intracavitary brachytherapy with tandem and ovoids, planned using 0.35T VR MRI at our institution, were included in this series. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), visible gross tumor volume, bladder, sigmoid, bowel, and rectum contours for each fraction of brachytherapy were evaluated for dosimetric parameters. Typically, five brachytherapy treatments were planned using the T2 sequence on diagnostic MRI for the first and third fractions, and a noncontrast true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence on VR or CT scan for the remaining fractions. Most patients received 5.5 Gy × 5 fractions using high-dose-rate Ir-192 following 45 Gy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy. The plan was initiated at 5.5 Gy to point A and subsequently optimized and prescribed to the HR-CTV. The goal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for the combined external beam and brachytherapy dose was 85 Gy. Soft-tissue visualization using contrast-to-noise ratios to distinguish normal tissues from tumor at their interface was compared between diagnostic MRI, CT, and VR. One hundred and forty-two fractions of intracavitary brachytherapy were performed from April 2015 to January 2017 on 29 cervical cancer patients, ranging from stages IB1 to IVA. The median HR-CTV was 27.78 cc, with median D 90 HR-CTV of 6.1 Gy. The median time from instrument placement to start of treatment using VR was 65 min (scan time 2 min), compared to 105 min using diagnostic MRI (scan time 11 min) (t-test, p < 0.01). The contrast-to-noise ratio of tumor to cervix in both diagnostic MRI and VR had significantly higher values compared to CT (ANOVA and t-tests, p < 0.01). We report the first clinical use of VR-guided brachytherapy. Time to treatment using this approach was shorter compared to diagnostic MRI. VR also provided significant

  13. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  14. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  15. Dose-volume analysis for quality assurance of interstitial brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Jaffray, David A.; Wong, John W.; Kini, Vijay R.; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer has increased significantly over the past several years. Unfortunately, few techniques have been developed to compare dosimetric quality and target volume coverage concurrently. We present a new method of implant evaluation that incorporates computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D) dose-volume analysis with traditional measures of brachytherapy quality. Analyses performed in this fashion will be needed to ultimately assist in determining the efficacy of breast implants. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, brachytherapy has been used as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy in selected protocol patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Eight patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy who had surgical clips outlining the lumpectomy cavity and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning after implant placement were selected for this study. For each patient, the postimplant CT dataset was transferred to a 3D treatment planning system. The lumpectomy cavity, target volume (lumpectomy cavity plus a 1-cm margin), and entire breast were outlined on each axial slice. Once all volumes were entered, the programmed HDR brachytherapy source positions and dwell times were imported into the 3D planning system. Using the tools provided by the 3D planning system, the implant dataset was then registered to the visible implant template in the CT dataset. The distribution of the implant dose was analyzed with respect to defined volumes via dose-volume histograms (DVH). Isodose surfaces, the dose homogeneity index, and dosimetric coverage of the defined volumes were calculated and contrasted. All patients received 32 Gy to the entire implanted volume in 8 fractions of 4 Gy over 4 days. Results: Three-plane implants were used for 7 patients and a two-plane implant for 1 patient. The median number of needles per implant was 16.5 (range

  16. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  17. Total reference air kerma can accurately predict isodose surface volumes in cervix cancer brachytherapy. A multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nkiwane, Karen S; Andersen, Else; Champoudry, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate that V60 Gy, V75 Gy, and V85 Gy isodose surface volumes can be accurately estimated from total reference air kerma (TRAK) in cervix cancer MRI-guided brachytherapy (BT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: 60 Gy, 75 Gy, and 85 Gy isodose surface volumes levels were obtained from treatm...

  18. Endoluminal brachytherapy in the treatment of oesophageal cancer: technique description, case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Castilla

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Endoesophageal brachytherapy is a useful technique for the palliative treatment of dysphagia in advanced oesophageal cancer. This technique offers good results on dysphagia control and quality of life. We report the case of a patient treated with this technique presenting complete response to the dysphagia. We describe endoesophageal brachyterapy technique and we comment on the literature.

  19. The using of megavoltage computed tomography in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Janla-or, Suwapim; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Supawongwattana, Bongkot; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Division of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan M. [Faculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrecht University (Campus Kiel), Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    We present a case of cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. In radiation therapy part, the combination of the whole pelvic helical tomotherapy plus image-guided brachytherapy with megavoltage computed tomography of helical tomotherapy was performed. We propose this therapeutic approach could be considered in a curative setting in some problematic situation as our institution.

  20. A newly developed MR simulation system for intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    We have developed a prototype system for a magnetic resonance (MR) simulation to accurately estimate radiation doses to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues during brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Six patients with cervical cancer underwent MR simulation prior to intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy using Co-60 sources. Tandem and ovoid applicators filled with tap-water were placed in the uterine cavity and vaginal fornix, then MR imaging examinations were performed. Frontal and lateral images of maximum intensity projection (MIP) of applicators generated from a data set of half-Fourier single shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) images were chosen for processing by the treatment planning computer system. Then, isodose curves on the coronal or sagittal plane of the tandem section were superimposed on corresponding T2-weighted images derived from a turbo spin-echo technique. Doses to the tumor, the posterior wall of the urinary bladder, the anterior wall of the rectum, and the urethra were read from isodose curves superimposed on the T2-weighted sagittal image. Phantom experiments were done to evaluate geometrical errors. The possible distortion of the lattice image on the phantom was small. This system promises to be useful in customizing the dose distribution corresponding to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues. (author)

  1. A newly developed MR simulation system for intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a prototype system for a magnetic resonance (MR) simulation to accurately estimate radiation doses to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues during brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Six patients with cervical cancer underwent MR simulation prior to intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy using Co-60 sources. Tandem and ovoid applicators filled with tap-water were placed in the uterine cavity and vaginal fornix, then MR imaging examinations were performed. Frontal and lateral images of maximum intensity projection (MIP) of applicators generated from a data set of half-Fourier single shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) images were chosen for processing by the treatment planning computer system. Then, isodose curves on the coronal or sagittal plane of the tandem section were superimposed on corresponding T2-weighted images derived from a turbo spin-echo technique. Doses to the tumor, the posterior wall of the urinary bladder, the anterior wall of the rectum, and the urethra were read from isodose curves superimposed on the T2-weighted sagittal image. Phantom experiments were done to evaluate geometrical errors. The possible distortion of the lattice image on the phantom was small. This system promises to be useful in customizing the dose distribution corresponding to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues. (author)

  2. CT or MRI for image-based brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnatry, R.; Patel, F.D.; Singh, P.; Sharma, S.C.; Oinam, A.S.; Shukla, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare volumes and doses of tumour and organs at risk with computed tomography vs. magnetic resonance imaging in cervical cancer brachytherapy. Seventeen previously untreated patients with cervical cancer suitable for radical treatment were included. All patients underwent brachytherapy using a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible applicator followed by both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The tumour and organs at risk (bladder, rectum, sigmoid and intestines) were contoured on computed tomography using only clinical findings and on magnetic resonance imaging using GEC-ESTRO guidelines. The volume and doses for tumour and organs at risk were evaluated using two-sided t-test. When magnetic resonance imaging information is not included in contouring on computed tomography images, there is significant underestimation of tumour height and overestimation of the width (P 100 , D 90 and D 100 for high- and intermediate-risk clinical target volume in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The volumes and doses to 0.1, 1 and 2 cc for organs at risk were also similar. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for tumour delineation, but computed tomography with clinical information can give comparable results, which need to be studied further. Computed tomography-based contouring can be used comfortably for delineation of organs at risk. (author)

  3. Evaluation of radiation doses on critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Taciana; Jansem, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one type of treatment of the cervix carcinoma. During the planning for this therapy, especial attention is given to proximal normal organs such as bladder and rectum. In fact, due to their radiosensibility and localization, bladder and rectum are considered as critical organs. In this work we have studied the influence of the positioning of patient legs in the dose delivered to these critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy. (author)

  4. Intraluminal wallstent +/- HDR brachytherapy in palliation of obstructive pancreatic and bile duct cancers: first report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetta, A.; Ricci, E.; Mortilla, M.G.; Conigliaro, R.; Zingoni, A.; Armaroli, L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To report the first data of the Reggio Emilia Trial on tolerance and effectiveness of the High Dose Rate brachytherapy in the palliative treatment of extrahepatic bile ducts obstructions. The endpoints of this study are to assess if the endoluminal irradiation can delay the biliary tract re-occlusion and prolong the survival. Material and methods: All patients were treated positioning the Wallstent prosthesis by endoscopic route in the stenotic biliary tract; then they were randomised between observation and endoluminal brachytherapy. From 6/1994, 11 patients with bilio-pancreatic locally advanced cancer (8 pancreas, 3 biliary tract) were admitted to this study: 6 in the control arm and 5 in the brachytherapy group. The radiotherapy was performed by naso-biliary route, in the same day of the stenting, using a High Dose Rate Unit (Iridium 192 source) and prescribing the dose (14 Gy) at 1 cm from the catheter axis. The treatment was always performed in only one day, in 2 fractions with 8 hours split. Clinical data and haematological tests were recorded at 1 st , 7 th , 30 th days and every 3 months. Results: All patients had a complete regression of the jaundice; haematological tests (on 7 th and 30 th day) showed bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases (SGOT, SGPT), and leukocytosis normalisation. Pancreatic or hepatic acute side effects, cholangitis (due to the endoscopy), actinic erosive gastroduodenitis, radiotherapy local necrosis, peritoneal reactions or naso-biliary tube intolerance were not observed. The average follow up is 144 days (30-476). So far, 8 patients are alive without symptoms and 3 patients died at 476,104, 87 days; 1 for cancer and 2 for other causes. Re-obstructions of the biliary tract did not occur. Conclusions: Wallstent prosthesis is highly efficient in jaundice palliation. The brachytherapy does not increase the toxicity of the disobstrucive treatments. So far, the overall and symptoms free survivals are not significantly

  5. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  6. Adjuvant high dose rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy for early stage endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannehill, S.P.; Petereit, D.G.; Schink, J.C.; Grosen, E.A.; Hartenbach, E.M.; Thomadsen, B.R.; Buchler, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant high dose rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) in patients (pts) with low risk endometrial carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Since 1989, 154 patients were treated with outpatient adjuvant VCB for low risk endometrial cancer (Stage IA-14%, Stage IB-82%). Four percent of patients with stage IC disease were treated with VCB only because of medical contraindications to pelvic radiation. Patients had the following histologic grades: 53% grade 1, 40% grade 2, 5% grade 3 and 3% unknown (99%-adenocarcinoma, <1% papillary serous histology). Seventy-three percent of patients had their surgery (TAH-BSO) performed at an outside institution with minimal surgical assessment of the lymph nodes. At a median of 6 weeks after surgery, patients were treated with 2 HDR VCB insertions delivered 1 week apart. Ovoids were placed at the vaginal apex to deliver 16.2 Gy per fraction to the vaginal surface (LDR equivalent of 60 Gy at 100 cGy/h) under conscious outpatient sedation. All clinical endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. Complications were scored using the RTOG 5-tiered system. Results: The median time in the brachytherapy suite was 60 minutes with no acute complications observed. With a median follow-up of 33 months (3-79 months), the 4-year overall and disease-free survival were 93% and 96% respectively. Five patients (3%) recurred: 2 intra-abdominally, 1 with lung metastases, and 2 in the pelvic lymph nodes. There were no vaginal cuff recurrences. The single patient with an isolated pelvic sidewall recurrence was salvaged with pelvic RT. Six patients developed a small area of asymptomatic necrosis at the vaginal cuff, which spontaneously healed at a median time of 4 months. There were no grade 3 or greater late tissue toxicities. No patient experienced significant vaginal stenosis, with 20% of the patients experiencing mild fibrosis of the vaginal apex. Conclusions: Adjuvant HDR VCB in 2

  7. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  8. High-dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for primary or recurrent cancer in the vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beriwal, Sushil; Heron, Dwight E; Mogus, Robert; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Sukumvanich, Paniti

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of HDR brachytherapy for primary or recurrent vaginal cancer. Between the years 2000 to 2006, 18 patients with primary or recurrent vaginal cancer were treated with brachytherapy (HDRB). Six patients had primary vaginal cancer (stage II to IVA) while 12 were treated for isolated vaginal recurrence (primary cervix = 4, vulva = 1 and endometrium = 7). Five patients had previous pelvic radiation therapy. All except one patient received external beam radiation therapy to a median dose of 45 Gy (range 31.2–55.8 Gy). The HDRB was intracavitary using a vaginal cylinder in 5 patients and interstitial using a modified Syed-Nesblett template in 13 patients. The dose of interstitial brachytherapy was 18.75 Gy in 5 fractions delivered twice daily. The median follow-up was 18 months (range 6–66 months). Complete response (CR) was achieved in all but one patient (94%). Of these 17 patients achieving a CR, 1 had local recurrence and 3 had systemic recurrence at a median time of 6 months (range 6–22 months). The 2-year actuarial local control and cause-specific survival for the entire group were 88% and 82.5%, respectively. In subset analysis, the crude local control was 100% for primary vaginal cancer, 100% for the group with recurrence without any prior radiation and 67% for group with recurrence and prior radiation therapy. Two patients had late grade 3 or higher morbidity (rectovaginal fistula in one patient and chronic vaginal ulcer resulting in bleeding in one patient). Both these patients had prior radiation therapy. Our small series suggests that HDRB is efficacious for primary or recurrent vaginal cancer. Patients treated with primary disease and those with recurrent disease without prior irradiation have the greatest benefit from HDRB in this setting. The salvage rate for patients with prior radiation therapy is lower with a higher risk of significant complications. Additional patients and follow-up are ongoing

  9. Relationship between two year PSA nadir and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antônio da Silva Franca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the relationship between two year PSA nadir (PSAn after brachytherapy and biochemical recurrence rates in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods In the period from January 1998 to August 2007, 120 patients were treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy alone. The results analysis was based on the definition of biochemical recurrence according to the Phoenix Consensus. Results Biochemical control was observed in 86 patients (71.7%, and biochemical recurrence, in 34 (28.3%. Mean PSAn was 0.53 ng/ml. The mean follow-up was 98 months. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, with two year PSAn < 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (74 patients; 61.7%, and group 2, with two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (46 patients; 38.3%. Group 1 presented biochemical recurrence in 15 patients (20.3%, and group 2, in 19 patients (43.2% (p < 0.02. The analysis of biochemical disease-free survival at seven years, stratified by the two groups, showed values of 80% and 64% (p < 0.02, respectively. Conclusion Levels of two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy are strongly correlated with a poor prognosis. This fact may help to identify patients at risk for disease recurrence.

  10. Accuracy Evaluation of Oncentra™ TPS in HDR Brachytherapy of Nasopharynx Cancer Using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, K.; Zohrevand, M.; Faghihi, R.; Sedighi Pashaki, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HDR brachytherapy is one of the commonest methods of nasopharyngeal cancer treatment. In this method, depending on how advanced one tumor is, 2 to 6 Gy dose as intracavitary brachytherapy is prescribed. Due to high dose rate and tumor location, accuracy evaluation of treatment planning system (TPS) is particularly important. Common methods used in TPS dosimetry are based on computations in a homogeneous phantom. Heterogeneous phantoms, especially patient-specific voxel phantoms can increase dosimetric accuracy. Materials and Methods In this study, using CT images taken from a patient and ctcreate-which is a part of the DOSXYZnrc computational code, patient-specific phantom was made. Dose distribution was plotted by DOSXYZnrc and compared with TPS one. Also, by extracting the voxels absorbed dose in treatment volume, dose-volume histograms (DVH) was plotted and compared with Oncentra™ TPS DVHs. Results The results from calculations were compared with data from Oncentra™ treatment planning system and it was observed that TPS calculation predicts lower dose in areas near the source, and higher dose in areas far from the source relative to MC code. Absorbed dose values in the voxels also showed that TPS reports D90 value is 40% higher than the Monte Carlo method. Conclusion Today, most treatment planning systems use TG-43 protocol. This protocol may results in errors such as neglecting tissue heterogeneity, scattered radiation as well as applicator attenuation. Due to these errors, AAPM emphasized departing from TG-43 protocol and approaching new brachytherapy protocol TG-186 in which patient-specific phantom is used and heterogeneities are affected in dosimetry. PMID:25973408

  11. Adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer, comparison of conventional point A and CT based individual treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderaas, Anne D.; Langdal, Ingrid; Danielsen, Signe; Frykholm, Gunilla; Marthinsen, Anne B. L; Sundset, Marit

    2012-01-01

    Background. Locally advanced cervical cancer is commonly treated with external radiation therapy combined with local brachytherapy. The brachytherapy is traditionally given based on standard dose planning with prescription of dose to point A. Dosimetric aspects when changing from former standard treatment to individualized treatment plans based on computed tomography (CT) images are here investigated. Material and methods. Brachytherapy data from 19 patients with a total of 72 individual treatment fractions were retrospectively reviewed. Standard library plans were analyzed with respect to doses to organs at risk (OARs), and the result was compared to corresponding delivered individualized plans. The theoretical potential of further optimization based on prescription to target volumes was investigated. The treatments were performed with a Fletcher applicator. Results. For standard treatment planning, the tolerance dose limits were exceeded in the bladder, rectum and sigmoid in 26%, 4% and 15% of the plans, respectively. This was observed most often for the smallest target volumes. The individualized planning of the delivered treatment gave the possibility of controlling the dose to critical organs to below certain limits. The dose was still prescribed to point A. An increase in target dose coverage was achieved when additional individual optimization was performed, while still keeping the dose to the OARs below predefined limits. Relatively low average target coverage, especially for the largest volumes was however seen. Conclusion. The individualized delivered treatment plans ensured that doses to OARs were within acceptable limits. This was not the case in 42% of the corresponding standard plans. Further optimized treatment plans were found to give an overall better dose coverage. In lack of MR capacity, it may be favorable to use CT for planning due to possible protection of OARs. The CT based target volumes were, however, not equivalent to the volumes described

  12. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using 60 Co or 192 Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of 60 Co or 192 Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by 60 Co source were smaller (8%–19%) than from 192 Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by 60 Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a 60 Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a 192 Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials such as air, bone, or lungs, produced

  13. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer with salvage interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, Vratislav; Lotter, Michael; Kreppner, Stephan; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    To assess the long-term results of protocol-based interstitial pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy as reirradiation combined with simultaneous chemotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia in selected patients with recurrent head and neck tumors. A total of 104 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with interstitial PDR brachytherapy. Salvage surgery had also been undergone by 53/104 (51 %) patients (R1 or R2 resection in > 80 % of patients). Salvage brachytherapy alone was administered in 81 patients (78 %), with a median total dose of 56.7 Gy. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was performed in 23/104 patients (32 %), using a median total dose of D{sub REF} = 24 Gy. Simultaneously to PDR brachytherapy, concomitant chemotherapy was administered in 58/104 (55.8 %) patients. A single session of interstitial hyperthermia was also used to treat 33/104 (31.7 %) patients. The analysis was performed after a median follow-up of 60 months. Calculated according to Kaplan-Meier, local tumor control rates after 2, 5, and 10 years were 92.5, 82.4, and 58.9 %, respectively. Comparing results of salvage PDR brachytherapy with or without simultaneous chemotherapy, the 10-year local control rates were 76 vs. 39 % (p= 0014), respectively. No other patient- or treatment-related parameters had a significant influence on treatment results. Soft tissue necrosis or bone necrosis developed in 18/104 (17.3 %) and 11/104 (9.6 %) patients, respectively, but only 3 % of patients required surgical treatment. PDR interstitial brachytherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy is a very effective and, in experienced hands, also a safe treatment modality in selected patients with head and neck cancer in previously irradiated areas. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte die Analyse der Langzeitergebnisse einer protokollbasierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (Re-Bestrahlung) mit simultaner Chemotherapie und interstitieller Hyperthermie

  14. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Materials and methods Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement...... at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV ⩾ 85 Gy EQD2) while reducing...... bladder and rectum (D2cm3) were reduced by 2 ± 2 Gy and 3 ± 2 Gy, respectively (p

  15. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria; Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  16. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica [Department of Radiation Physics, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  17. Coping strategies used by hospitalized children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Amanda Mota Pacciulio; Silva-Rodrigues, Fernanda Machado; Sparapani, Valéria de Cássia; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2015-03-01

    To analyze coping strategies used by children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy during hospitalization. This was an exploratory study to analyze qualitative data using an inductive thematic analysis. Semistructured interviews using puppets were conducted with 10 children with cancer, between 7 and 12 years old, who were hospitalized and undergoing chemotherapy. The coping strategies to deal with chemotherapy were: understanding the need for chemotherapy; finding relief for the chemotherapy's side effects and pain; seeking pleasure in nourishment; engaging in entertaining activities and having fun; keeping the hope of cure alive; and finding support in religion. Children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy need to cope with hospitalizations, pain, medication side effects, idle time, and uncertainty regarding the success of treatment. These challenges motivated children to develop their own coping strategies, which were effective while undergoing chemotherapy. By gaining knowledge and further understanding about valid coping strategies during chemotherapy treatment, health professionals can mobilize personal and material resources from the children, health teams, and institutions aiming to potentiate the use of these strategies to make treatments the least traumatic. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, Brian; Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin; Stoddard, Greg; Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K.; Poppe, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  19. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Stoddard, Greg [Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  20. Posttreatment biopsy results following interstitial brachytherapy in early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestidge, Bradley R.; Hoak, David C.; Grimm, Peter D.; Ragde, Haakon; Cavanagh, William; Blasko, John C.

    1997-01-01

    least an 80% pathologically confirmed local control rate following permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancer. A higher local control rate is expected with further follow-up as the majority of indeterminate biopsies convert to negative over time. The indeterminate category of postirradiation biopsy described here includes specimens that have probably been interpreted as positive in other series, but correlate clinically and biochemically with negative biopsies. These results support the use of modern interstitial brachytherapy techniques for selected patients with early stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate

  1. Radiation protection in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    1996-02-01

    It covers technical procedures in medical applications for cancer treatment. Radiation protection principles in brachytherapy. Medical uses in therapy for Sr-90, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Ir-192, Au-198, Bi-214, Pb-214. (The author)

  2. Impact of national guidelines on brachytherapy monotherapy practice patterns for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yolanda D; Paciorek, Alan T; Martin, Neil E; D'Amico, Anthony V; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Nguyen, Paul L

    2014-03-15

    In 1999 and 2000, 2 national guidelines recommended brachytherapy monotherapy (BT) primarily for treatment of low-risk prostate cancer but not high-risk prostate cancer. This study examined rates of BT use before and after publication of these guidelines, as compared with 4 other treatment options. From 1990 to 2011, 8128 men with localized prostate cancer (≤ T3cN0M0) were treated definitively within the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) registry with 1 of 5 primary treatments: BT, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), EBRT with androgen deprivation therapy, EBRT+BT, or radical prostatectomy. Men were categorized into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups based on the guidelines' risk-group definitions. Within each risk group, logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) comparing BT with other treatment options between the 1990-1998 and 1999-2011 periods, adjusting for age, disease characteristics, and clinic type. In total, 1117 men received BT alone for low- (n = 658), intermediate- (n = 244), or high-risk disease (n = 215). BT comprised 6.1% of all treatments in 1990-1998 versus 16.6% in 1999-2011 (P guidelines did not appear to influence practice patterns, as BT monotherapy use increased relative to other treatments from the 1990-1998 to 1999-2011 periods in unfavorable risk groups including men with high-risk prostate cancer. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  3. Prediction of PSA bounce after permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Kunimitsu; Nakashima, Jun; Sugawara, Akitomo

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to calculate the frequency and features of the development of a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after prostate brachytherapy alone, to correlate the bounce with clinical and dosimetric factors and to identify factors that predict PSA bounce. PSA bounce was evaluated in 86 patients with T1-T2 prostate cancer who underwent radioactive seed implantation using iodine-125 (I-125) without hormonal therapy or external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from September 2004 to December 2007. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.4 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. Calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, the incidence of PSA bounce at a 2-year follow-up was 26%. Median time to the PSA bounce was 15 months. Univariate analysis demonstrated that age, dose received by 90% of the prostate gland (D90), volume of gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100), and V150 were significantly associated with the PSA bounce, while pretreatment PSA level, Gleason score, pretreatment prostate volume, clinical T stage, and V200 were not. In multivariate analysis, age 67 years or less and D90 more than 180 Gy were identified as independent factors for predicting the PSA bounce (P<0.05). PSA bounce is not a rare phenomenon after prostate brachytherapy. It is more common in younger patients and patients receiving higher doses of radiation. (author)

  4. Androgen Deprivation Therapy Does Not Impact Cause-Specific or Overall Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Managed With Brachytherapy and Supplemental External Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Adamovich, Edward; Lief, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in high-risk prostate cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2002, 204 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or prostate-specific antigen [PSA] >20 ng/mL or clinical stage ≥T2c) underwent brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The bPFS was defined by a PSA ≤0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for the impact on survival. Results: The 10-year CSS, bPFS, and OS were 88.9%, 86.6%, and 68.6%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in bPFS was discerned between hormone naive, ADT ≤6 months, and ADT >6 month cohorts (79.7% vs. 95.% vs. 89.9%, p = 0.032). Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) did not impact CSS or OS. For bPFS patients, the median posttreatment PSA was <0.04 ng/mL. A Cox linear regression analysis demonstrated that Gleason score was the best predictor of CSS, whereas percent positive biopsies and duration of ADT best predicted for bPFS. The OS was best predicted by Gleason score and diabetes. Thirty-eight patients have died, with 26 of the deaths from cardiovascular/pulmonary disease or second malignancy. Eleven patients have died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: The ADT improved 10-year bPFS without statistical impact on CSS or OS. Death as a result of cardiovascular/pulmonary disease and second malignancies were more than twice as common as prostate cancer deaths. Strategies to improve cardiovascular health should positively impact OS

  5. Needle displacement during HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damore, Steven J.; Syed, A.M. Nisar; Puthawala, Ajmel A.; Sharma, Anil

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We used clinical patient data to examine implant displacement between high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy fractions for prostate cancer to determine its impact on treatment delivery. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the verification films taken prior to each fraction for 96 consecutive patients treated with HDR brachytherapy boosts as part of their radiation therapy for definitive treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer at our institution. Patients were treated with 18-24 Gy in 4 fractions of HDR delivered in 40 hours followed by 36-39.6 Gy external beam radiation to the prostate. We determined the mean and maximum displacement distances of marker seeds placed in the prostate and of the implanted needles between HDR fractions. Results: Mean and maximum displacement distances between fractions were documented up to 7.6 mm and 28.5 mm, respectively, for the implant needles and 3.6 mm and 11.4 mm, respectively, for the gold marker seeds. All displacement of implant needles occurred in the caudal direction. At least 1 cm caudal displacement of needles occurred prior to 15.5% all fractions. Manual adjustment of needles was required prior to 15% of fractions, and adjustment of the CLP only was required in 24%. Most of the displacement for both the marker seeds and needles occurred between the first and second fractions. Conclusions: There is significant caudal displacement of interstitial implant needles between HDR fractions in our prostate cancer patients. Obtaining verification films and making adjustments in the treatment volume prior to each fraction is necessary to avoid significant inaccuracies in treatment delivery

  6. Brachytherapy Boost Utilization and Survival in Unfavorable-risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Skyler B; Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Kelly, Jacqueline R; Kann, Benjamin H; Yu, James B; Nath, Sameer K

    2017-11-01

    There are limited comparative survival data for prostate cancer (PCa) patients managed with a low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-B) boost and dose-escalated external-beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) alone. To compare overall survival (OS) for men with unfavorable PCa between LDR-B and DE-EBRT groups. Using the National Cancer Data Base, we identified men with unfavorable PCa treated between 2004 and 2012 with androgen suppression (AS) and either EBRT followed by LDR-B or DE-EBRT (75.6-86.4Gy). Treatment selection was evaluated using logistic regression and annual percentage proportions. OS was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, Cox proportional hazards, and propensity score matching. We identified 25038 men between 2004 and 2012, during which LDR-B boost utilization decreased from 29% to 14%. LDR-B was associated with better OS on univariate (7-yr OS: 82% vs 73%; pLDR-B boost (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.89). The OS benefit of LDR-B boost persisted when limited to men aged LDR-B boost utilization declined and was associated with better OS compared to DE-EBRT alone. LDR-B boost is probably the ideal treatment option for men with unfavorable PCa, pending long-term results of randomized trials. We compared radiotherapy utilization and survival for prostate cancer (PCa) patients using a national database. We found that low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-B) boost, a method being used less frequently, was associated with better overall survival when compared to dose-escalated external-beam radiotherapy alone for men with unfavorable PCa. Randomized trials are needed to confirm that LDR-B boost is the ideal treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  8. A prospective analysis of long-term quality of life after permanent I-125 brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, Dan; Bottomley, David; Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Carey, Brendan; Gould, Kath; Henry, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To prospectively evaluate long-term urinary, bowel and sexual function after I-125 brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer using patient administered validated Quality of Life (QoL) instruments. Materials and methods: Between March 1995 and March 2004, 673 men underwent brachytherapy and recorded urinary symptoms prospectively using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). In addition, in a subgroup of 116 patients, the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) was used to record QoL information on urinary, bowel and sexual function before treatment and at regular time intervals for at least two years. Results: Initially, there was a sharp rise in urinary symptoms which was most marked within the first three months. Scores then resolved slowly and returned to within one or two units of pre-treatment level at one year. Subsequently, there was no significant deterioration in urinary symptoms up to nine years following brachytherapy. Few had significant bowel symptoms. Sexual function deteriorated initially and then improved but failed to return to pre-treatment levels by two years. Patients requiring neo-adjuvant hormones experienced significantly more dysfunction. Conclusions: After an initial period of mild to moderate urinary symptoms prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated with relatively little deterioration in long-term quality of life. Long-term reduction in sexual function may be seen particularly in those requiring hormones

  9. Meta-analysis of comparison between brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaodong; Jiang Qing; Yuan Gengbiao; Wang Jiawu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effect of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer using a Meta-analysis. Methods: The published data with randomized control trials (RCT) on comparison of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in PubMed, Wanfang database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBMdisc), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Ovid and Cochrane library were searched and screened. The quality of the studies included was evaluated and the data with 5-year event free survival rate for comparison were extracted. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0 (Cochrane reviews software). Results: From six trials, there were 5903 patients that were eligible for the analysis, in which 3323 patients were treated by brachytherapy and other 2580 by radical prostatectomy. The odds ratio of all trials was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.69-1.45, P=0.99) and there was no significant difference of 5-year event free survival rate between two treatment groups. Conclusion: This Meta analysis shows that brachytherapy may have comparable treatment effect than radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  10. Estimation of whole-body radiation exposure from brachytherapy for oral cancer using a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Kaida, A.; Miura, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Toda, K.; Yoshimura, R.; Sumi, Y.; Kurabayashi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Early stage oral cancer can be cured with oral brachytherapy, but whole-body radiation exposure status has not been previously studied. Recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee (ICRP) recommended the use of ICRP phantoms to estimate radiation exposure from external and internal radiation sources. In this study, we used a Monte Carlo simulation with ICRP phantoms to estimate whole-body exposure from oral brachytherapy. We used a Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) to model oral brachytherapy with 192 Ir hairpins and 198 Au grains and to perform a Monte Carlo simulation on the ICRP adult reference computational phantoms. To confirm the simulations, we also computed local dose distributions from these small sources, and compared them with the results from Oncentra manual Low Dose Rate Treatment Planning (mLDR) software which is used in day-to-day clinical practice. We successfully obtained data on absorbed dose for each organ in males and females. Sex-averaged equivalent doses were 0.547 and 0.710 Sv with 192 Ir hairpins and 198 Au grains, respectively. Simulation with PHITS was reliable when compared with an alternative computational technique using mLDR software. We concluded that the absorbed dose for each organ and whole-body exposure from oral brachytherapy can be estimated with Monte Carlo simulation using PHITS on ICRP reference phantoms. Effective doses for patients with oral cancer were obtained.

  11. WHO HAS TO UNDERGO CANCER GENETIC TESTING? A PERSPECTIVE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rinaldi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing is a medical tool employed to screen changes in genes linked to cancer and other genetic diseases. Genetic tests are available for breast, ovarian, colon, thyroid, and some other cancers and they represent the main tool for early identification of the “risk” subjects. The choice to undergo genetic testing by a healthy or affected cancer patient with family history of the cancer has to be the fruit of a careful and prudent assessment of the advantages and disadvantages discussed during oncogenetic counselling. The latter, in turn, in the case of a patient's positive and informed choice, must constantly affiliate the genetic testing, in order to preserve the prediction and information role of the test as much as possible.

  12. Minimal percentage of dose received by 90% of the urethra (%UD90) is the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Anai, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihide; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2012-09-14

    To clarify the significant clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters to predict PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer. We studied 200 consecutive patients who received LDR-brachytherapy between July 2004 and November 2008. Of them, 137 patients did not receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. One hundred and forty-two patients were treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and 58 were treated with LDR-brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy. The cut-off value of PSA bounce was 0.1 ng/mL. The incidence, time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were investigated. Clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters were evaluated to elucidate independent factors to predict PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients who underwent LDR-brachytherapy alone. Fifty patients (25%) showed PSA bounce and 10 patients (5%) showed PSA failure. The median time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were 17 months, 0.29 ng/mL, and 7.0 months, respectively. In 103 hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and univariate Cox proportional regression hazard model indicated that age and minimal percentage of the dose received by 30% and 90% of the urethra were independent predictors of PSA bounce. With a multivariate Cox proportional regression hazard model, minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant parameter of PSA bounce. Minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone.

  13. Brachytherapy guideline in prostate cancer (high and low dose rate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Pimentel, Leonardo [Sociedade Brasileira de Radioterapia (SBR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    Through the elaboration of seven relevant clinical questions related to the proposed theme, we sought to present the main evidences regarding safety, toxicity and effectiveness of the presented radiotherapy (RT) techniques. The study population consisted of male patients of all ages with early primary prostate cancer and candidates for treatment with curative intent. For this, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in primary scientific databases (MEDLINE - PubMed; Embase - Elsevier; LILACS - BIREME; Cochrane Library -Record of Controlled Trials). All articles available through February 22, 2015 were considered. The search strategy used in MEDLINE searches is described in Appendix 1. The articles were selected based on critical evaluation, seeking the best evidence available. The recommendations were elaborated from discussions held with a drafting group composed of four members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group, which specializes in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was released for public consultation for 15 days; the suggestions obtained were forwarded to the authors for evaluation and possible insertion in the final text. (author)

  14. Quality of Life in Elderly Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavdaniti, Maria; Zyga, Sofia; Vlachou, Eugenia; Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina

    2017-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, it is expected that 60% of all cases of cancer will be detected in elderly patients in the next two decades. Cancer treatment for older persons is complicated by a number of factors, thus negatively affecting patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to investigate quality of life in elderly cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This study was descriptive and non-experimental. It was conducted in one large hospital in a major city of Northern Greece. The sample was convenience comprising 53 elderly cancer patients undergoing cycle 3 chemotherapy. The data was collected using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale and included questions related to demographic and clinical characteristics. The majority of participants were men (n = 27, 50.9%) who were married (n = 32, 79.5%). Their mean age was 70.07 ± 3.60. Almost half of the sample (n = 30, 56.6%) had colon cancer. There was a statistical significant difference between men and women pertaining to physical wellbeing (p = 0.004) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029), functional wellbeing (p = 0.09) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029). These findings call attention to quality of life and its related factors in elderly cancer patients. It is highly recommended to envisage measures for improving quality of life in this group of cancer patients.

  15. Selective tumor irradiation by infusional brachytherapy in nonresectable pancreatic cancer: a phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order, Stanley E.; Siegel, Jeffry A.; Principato, Robert; Zeiger, Louis E.; Johnson, Elizabeth; Lang, Patricia; Lustig, Robert; Wallner, Paul E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Selective high-dose radiation of solid tumors has been a goal of radiation oncology. The physiological barriers of solid tumors (high interstitial tumor pressure, reduced tumor vascularity, and poor perfusion) have been major barriers in achieving significant tumor dose of systemically infused radioconjugates. Direct tumor infusional brachytherapy overcomes these barriers and leads to selective high tumor doses. Methods and Materials: The development of interstitial tumor infusion of macroaggregated albumin (MAA) followed by colloidal chromic phosphate 32 P has overcome solid tumor obstacles in 47 patients with nonresectable pancreatic cancer in a Phase I dose escalation study. The colloidal 32 P infusion was followed by external radiation and five fluorouracil. Results: Of the 28 patients with cancer limited to the pancreas, 15 of 16 patients retained 86-100% (mean 96%) of the infused colloidal 32 P isotope. While the other 12 patients had partial shunting to the liver, shunting to the liver was due to high interstitial resistance with tumor dose deposition of 17-88% (mean 52%). Of the 19 patients with metastatic pancreas cancer, colloidal 32 P tumor deposition ranged from 22 to 100% of the infused dose (mean 79%). The less than optimal tumor deposition led to our increasing the MAA from 600,000 to 1.5-2.5 million particles. Interstitial dexamethasone 2 mg and later 4 mg was infused first and prevented liver shunting by somehow reducing tumor resistance. The median survival in 28 Phase I patients with nonresectable pancreas cancer without metastasis, was 12 months. No significant toxicity occurred when treatment was limited to two infusions with as much as 30 mCi each. The maximum tumor dose was 17,000 Gy (1.700,000 cGy). In 19 non-resectable pancreatic cancer patients with metastasis, a 6.9 months median survival was observed. Conclusions: Infusional brachytherapy is an outpatient procedure that delivers high-dose radiation selectively to pancreatic

  16. Quality of life following 3D conformal radiation therapy or permanent interstitial brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, J.M.; Kong, F.M.; Mansur, D.B.; Ahmed, N.; Perez, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Both 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT) and Transperineal Interstitial Permanent Brachytherapy (TIPPB) are offered as suitable non-surgical alternatives to radical prostatectomy. Despite equivalent cancer control, very little data has been published that compares Quality of Life (QOL) in contemporary cohorts of patients choosing these treatments. Materials and Methods: Since 1998, patients selecting either 3DCRT alone or TIPPB (monotherapy or boost after external beam) for primary management of localized prostate cancer were asked to participate in a prospective assessment of QOL measures. In this preliminary report, 41 3DCRT and 40 TIPPB (34 monotherapy, 6 boost) patients completed validated QOL instruments at each followup visit. QOL instruments included the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), FACT-P, and Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire (SAQ). Results: The average age of men in each group was 69 years. Choice of treatment was left to the patient unless there were significant medical or technical contraindications to either modality. 3DCRT total doses ranged from 61-78 Gy (mean 73.5Gy) and TIPPB doses were 145Gy (TG43) in 34 I-125 implants and 115 Gy in 1 Pd-103 (monotherapy) or 90 Gy in 5 Pd-103 (boost) implants. Patients undergoing TIPPB reported significantly worse urinary and sexual function than their counterparts receiving 3DCRT. The mean cumulative IPSS was 12.5 with TIPPB compared to 8.3 with 3DCRT (p=0.036). Differences were most pronounced in the first 12 months after treatment, particularly with respect to the strength of stream and the need to strain. TIPPB patients were more likely to report a need to urinate frequently (p=0.02), require a pad (p=0.001), be bothered (p=0.02), or have activity limited by urinary side effects (p=0.01). TIPPB patients were less likely to resume sexual activity within 6 months after treatment (p=0.0003) and engaged in sexual activity less often (p= 0.016) than 3DCRT patients. They were also more

  17. Early quality of life outcomes in patients with prostate cancer managed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiya, Akira; Fujiuchi, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early quality of life outcomes in prostate cancer patients managed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy. A total of 51 patients with cT1c-T3aN0M0 prostate cancer treated between July 2007 and January 2010 were included in this study. The average age was 69?years, and the average initial serum prostate-specific antigen was 10.98?ng/mL. A total of 25, 18 and eight patients were considered to be low, intermediate and high risk, respectively. All patients received one implant of Ir-192 and seven fractions of 6.5?Gy within 3.5?days for a total prescribed dose of 45.5?Gy. For high-risk prostate cancer, neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was carried out for at least 6?months, and continued after high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Quality of life outcomes were measured by using the International Prostate Symptom Score, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate and the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire. The oncological outcome was assessed by serum prostate-specific antigen and diagnostic imaging. Adverse events were also recorded. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate scores decreased for a few months after high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and recovered to pretreatment condition thereafter. The International Prostate Symptom Score significantly increased 2?weeks after treatment for each of its items and their sum, and it returned to baseline after 12?weeks. Sexual function decreased at 2 and 4?weeks, and recovered after 12?weeks. Severe complications were rare. Within a median follow up of 17.2?months, two patients showed a prostate-specific antigen recurrence. High-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer is a feasible treatment modality with acceptable toxicity and only a limited impact on the quality of life. (author)

  18. Metronidazole in the treatment of cervical cancer using Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Metronidazole was tested for its possible use in the Cf-252 brachytherapy of cervical cancer as a radiosensitizer and to deal with anaerobic pelvic infection. 15 patients were treated by only 14 were evaluable. All stages from stage IB-IVB were treated and complete local tumor regression was noted in all cases although it could take place very slowly. 5/14 (36%) are 1.5-3 year survivors but only among the patients with stage I-II disease. No unusual radio-enhancing action was observed but metronidazole appeared to be useful to treat the vaginal, cervix and uterine infections often associated with high stage disease and bulky, ulcerative or necrotic tumors

  19. Late complications after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Teshima, Teruki; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study was to analyze the treatment results and late complications of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for early (T1N0, T2N0) mobile tongue cancer using the microSelectron-HDR. From January 1993 through April 2001, a total of 72 patients with early squamous cell carcinomas of the mobile tongue were treated with microSelectron-HDR interstitial brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Of the patients, 18% were treated with a combination of prior external radiation and HDR-ISBT, and 82% were treated with HDR-ISBT alone. For HDR-ISBT alone, all cases were treated with a total dose of 54 Gy/9 fractions every 5 days or 60 Gy/10 fractions every 8 days. In combined therapy with an external dose of 30 to 40 Gy, HDR-ISBT was given at a total dose of 42-50 Gy. The Brinkman and alcohol indexes were used to analyze the incidence of late complications after HDR-ISBT. The 2- and 5-year local control rates were 85% and 82%, respectively. Fifteen of 72 patients (21%) treated with HDR-ISBT had late complications. Ten of 15 patients (67%) with late complications had a Brinkman index exceeding 600. HDR-ISBT is useful and easily applied under local anesthesia to early or superficial lesions of the mobile tongue. However, we found an increase in late complications, such as soft-tissue ulcers and bone exposure, after irradiation of tongue cancer with 60 Gy HDR-ISBT in patients with a Brinkman index greater than 600. (author)

  20. Neutrophilia in locally advanced cervical cancer: A novel biomarker for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, Alexandre; Haie-Meder, Christine; Maroun, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Mazeron, Renaud; Leroy, Thomas; Bentivegna, Enrica; Morice, Philippe; Deutsch, Eric; Chargari, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the prognostic value of leucocyte disorders in a prospective cohort of cervical cancer patients receiving definitive chemoradiation plus image—guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). Results 113 patients were identified. All patients received a pelvic irradiation concomitant with chemotherapy, extended to the para-aortic area in 13 patients with IVB disease. Neutrophilia and leukocytosis were significant univariate prognostic factors for poorer local failure-free survival (p = 0.000 and p = 0.002, respectively), associated with tumor size, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and anemia. No effect was shown for distant metastases but leukocytosis and neutrophila were both poor prognostic factors for in-field relapses (p = 0.003 and p 7,500/μl (p = 0.018) were independent factors for poorer survival without local failure, with hazard ratio (HR) of 3.1. Materials and methods We examined patients treated in our Institution between April 2009 and July 2015 by concurrent chemoradiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions +/− lymph node boosts) followed by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided adaptive pulse-dose rate brachytherapy (15 Gy to the intermediate-risk clinical target volume). The prognostic value of pretreatment leucocyte disorders was examined. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia were defined as a leukocyte count or a neutrophils count exceeding 10,000 and 7,500/μl, respectively. Conclusions Neutrophilia is a significant prognostic factor for local relapse in locally advanced cervical cancer treated with MRI-based IGABT. This biomarker could help identifying patients with higher risk of local relapse and requiring dose escalation. PMID:27713124

  1. Who Really Benefits from 3D-Based Planning of Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, In Bong; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Yun Hee; Choi, Hoon Sik; Lee, Jong Hak; Choi, Won Jun; Shin, Jeong Kyu; Song, Jin Ho

    2018-04-30

    Although intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) is essential for the radiation therapy of cervical cancer, few institutions in Korea perform 3-dimensional (3D)-based ICR. To identify patients who would benefit from 3D-based ICR, dosimetric parameters for tumor targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared between 2-dimensional (2D)- and 3D-based ICR. Twenty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following 3D-based ICR were retrospectively evaluated. New 2D-based plans based on the Manchester system were developed. Tumor size was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean high risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 value was about 10% lower for 2D- than for 3D-based plans (88.4% vs. 97.7%; P = 0.068). Tumor coverage did not differ between 2D- and 3D-based plans in patients with tumors ≤ 4 cm at the time of brachytherapy, but the mean HR-CTV D90 values in patients with tumors > 4 cm were significantly higher for 3D-based plans than for 2D-based plans (96.0% vs. 78.1%; P = 0.017). Similar results were found for patients with tumors > 5 cm initially. Other dosimetric parameters for OARs were similar between 2D- and 3D-based plans, except that mean sigmoid D2cc was higher for 2D- than for 3D-based plans (67.5% vs. 58.8%; P = 0.043). These findings indicate that 3D-based ICR plans improve tumor coverage while satisfying the dose constraints for OARs. 3D-based ICR should be considered in patients with tumors > 4 cm size at the time of brachytherapy or > 5 cm initially.

  2. Dilator Use After Vaginal Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer: A Randomized Feasibility and Adherence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Alexandra; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan; Lin, Lilie L; Hanisch, Laura; Huang, Liming; Bai, Jinbing; Wells, Jessica; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    Vaginal brachytherapy, a common treatment of endometrial cancer, is associated with high rates of vaginal stenosis. Recommendations for vaginal dilator use to minimize stenosis generally include 3 times per week for approximately 10 minutes per use. However, adherence rates range widely and are generally well less than 50%. The aims of this study were to assess feasibility of recruitment to a study of dilator use and test a theoretically driven enhanced educational program (EEP) to increase adherence. Eligibility included women treated with postoperative vaginal brachytherapy for stage I to IIIc endometrial cancer. Patients were randomized to either nurse-delivered standard institutional instruction or EEP. Of eligible patients, 76% consented, 42 were randomized, and 69% completed the 6-month assessment. Mean age was 58.2 years; 48% were sexually active. There was no difference in adherence between arms. Overall, 20% and 8.3% were adherent to the prescribed use of 3 times per week, and 64% and 16% were adherent to use at least once per week at 6 weeks and 6 months, respectively. Adherence was greater among those motivated by vaginal health and having lower body mass index. Nonadherence was significantly higher among those who are college educated, in the EEP group, and with higher weight. Feasibility of recruitment into a study of vaginal dilator use was high. Adherence was low, and there was no difference between groups. Adherence to vaginal dilator use requires novel interventions to test. Nursing education that includes how dilators may maintain vaginal health may improve use because it was a motivator for adherence in this study.

  3. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaprealian, Tania; Weinberg, Vivian; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Hsu, I.-Chow

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy × 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy × 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy × 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy × 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score ≥7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  4. Propagation of registration uncertainty during multi-fraction cervical cancer brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir-Khalili, A.; Hamarneh, G.; Zakariaee, R.; Spadinger, I.; Abugharbieh, R.

    2017-10-01

    Multi-fraction cervical cancer brachytherapy is a form of image-guided radiotherapy that heavily relies on 3D imaging during treatment planning, delivery, and quality control. In this context, deformable image registration can increase the accuracy of dosimetric evaluations, provided that one can account for the uncertainties associated with the registration process. To enable such capability, we propose a mathematical framework that first estimates the registration uncertainty and subsequently propagates the effects of the computed uncertainties from the registration stage through to the visualizations, organ segmentations, and dosimetric evaluations. To ensure the practicality of our proposed framework in real world image-guided radiotherapy contexts, we implemented our technique via a computationally efficient and generalizable algorithm that is compatible with existing deformable image registration software. In our clinical context of fractionated cervical cancer brachytherapy, we perform a retrospective analysis on 37 patients and present evidence that our proposed methodology for computing and propagating registration uncertainties may be beneficial during therapy planning and quality control. Specifically, we quantify and visualize the influence of registration uncertainty on dosimetric analysis during the computation of the total accumulated radiation dose on the bladder wall. We further show how registration uncertainty may be leveraged into enhanced visualizations that depict the quality of the registration and highlight potential deviations from the treatment plan prior to the delivery of radiation treatment. Finally, we show that we can improve the transfer of delineated volumetric organ segmentation labels from one fraction to the next by encoding the computed registration uncertainties into the segmentation labels.

  5. PSYCHOSOCIAL MORBIDITY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING MASTECTOMY FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Konnakkaparambil Ramakrishnan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast Cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and carries significant psychosocial morbidity. The diagnosis of the disease and the treatment modalities like surgery and chemotherapy contribute to the morbidity. The recognition of the psychosocial morbidity associated with mastectomy can help us formulate effective counselling strategies. The objectives of this study were- to assess the psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma breast, to identify the preoperative variables that predict the morbidity and to find out the correlation between degree of neuroticism of the individual and morbidity. MATERIALS AND METHODS 35 female patients who had mastectomy for breast cancer were evaluated at three time-points, preoperatively, immediately after surgery and 2 months after surgery. Anxiety and depression was assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, psychological distress was measured using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and neuroticism was assessed by Eysenck Personality Inventory Neuroticism subscale (EPI-N. RESULTS There was a high level of anxiety, depression and GHQ scores preoperatively with a further worsening of these over the three interviews. Age, marital status and menopausal status were factors which had an influence on psychosocial morbidity. Preoperative EPI-N scores positively correlated with psychosocial morbidity. CONCLUSION There is a high level of psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer and mastectomy seems to worsen it in the first two months after surgery. Our study shows that psychosocial morbidity is affected by age, marital status, menopausal status and level of neuroticism.

  6. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  7. Stereotactic body radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy to replace brachytherapy for brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer patients – a preliminary result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Sheng-Mou Hsiao,4 Ming-Chow Wei,4 Wen-Yih Wu,4 Hsu-Dong Sun,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Yen-Ping Hsieh,6 Yu-Jen Chen,3,7–9 Pei-Wei Shueng1,101Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan; 7Department of Radiation Oncology, 8Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 9Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan; 10Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, TaiwanAim: To review the experience and to evaluate the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT via helical tomotherapy (HT, for the treatment of brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer.Methods: Between September 1, 2008 to January 31, 2012, nine cervical cancer patients unsuitable for brachytherapy were enrolled. All of the patients received definitive whole pelvic radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, followed by SBRT via HT.Results: The actuarial locoregional control rate at 3 years was 78%. The mean biological equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions of the tumor, rectum, bladder, and intestines was 76.0 ± 7.3, 73.8 ± 13.2, 70.5 ± 10.0, and 43.1 ± 7.1, respectively. Only two had residual tumors after treatment, and the others were tumor-free. Two patients experienced grade 3 acute toxicity: one had diarrhea; and another experienced thrombocytopenia. There were no grade 3 or 4 subacute toxicities. Three patients suffered from manageable rectal bleeding in

  8. A comprehensive review of prostate cancer brachytherapy: defining an optimal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kini, Vijay R.; Edmundson, Gregory B.S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Stromberg, Jannifer; Martinez, Alvaro

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A comprehensive review of prostate cancer brachytherapy literature was performed to determine if an optimal method of implantation could be identified, and to compare and contrast techniques currently in use. Methods and Materials: A MEDLINE search was conducted to obtain all articles in the English language on prostate cancer brachytherapy from 1985 through 1998. Articles were reviewed and grouped to determine the primary technique of implantation, the method or philosophy of source placement and/or dose specification, the technique to evaluate implant quality, overall treatment results (based upon pretreatment prostate specific antigen, (PSA), and biochemical control) and clinical, pathological or biochemical outcome based upon implant quality. Results: A total of 178 articles were identified in the MEDLINE database. Of these, 53 studies discussed evaluable techniques of implantation and were used for this analysis. Of these studies, 52% used preoperative ultrasound to determine the target volume to be implanted, 16% used preoperative computerized tomography (CT) scans, and 18% placed seeds with an open surgical technique. An additional 11% of studies placed seeds or needles under ultrasound guidance using interactive real-time dosimetry. The number and distribution of radioactive sources to be implanted or the method used to prescribe dose was determined using nomograms in 27% of studies, a least squares optimization technique in 11%, or not stated in 35%. In the remaining 26%, sources were described as either uniformly, differentially, or peripherally placed in the gland. To evaluate implant quality, 28% of studies calculated some type of dose-volume histogram, 21% calculated the matched peripheral dose, 19% the minimum peripheral dose, 14% used some type of CT-based qualitative review and, in 18% of studies, no implant quality evaluation was mentioned. Six studies correlated outcome with implant dose. One study showed an association of implant dose

  9. Quality of life of women undergoing treatment for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francieli Ana Dallabrida

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the quality of life of women with cervical cancer. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study developed with 43 women undergoing oncological treatment assisted at an Oncology High Complexity Center, in the Southern region of Brazil. The instrument used was the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer – Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30, and the data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. The average age was 54.6 years old. Married women prevailed (53.4%, with incomplete elementary education (72.1% and income from one to two minimum wages (62.8%. Quality of Life was considered very satisfactory. According to the development scales and emotional functioning, the result was from regular to satisfactory. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue, lack of appetite and pain. There is a need of structure of public health policies, for preventing cervical cancer in the most vulnerable population.

  10. Long-term results of a randomized trial in locally advanced rectal cancer: no benefit from adding a brachytherapy boost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R; Pløen, John

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE(S): Mature data on tumor control and survival are presented from a randomized trial of the addition of a brachytherapy boost to long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between March 2005 and November 2008, 248...... patients with T3-4N0-2M0 rectal cancer were prospectively randomized to either long-course preoperative CRT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, per oral tegafur-uracil and L-leucovorin) alone or the same CRT schedule plus a brachytherapy boost (10 Gy in 2 fractions). The primary trial endpoint was pathologic...... on stratification for tumor regression grade and resection margin status indicated the presence of response migration. CONCLUSIONS: Despite increased pathologic tumor regression at the time of surgery, we observed no benefit on late outcome. Improved tumor regression does not necessarily lead to a relevant clinical...

  11. Loading pattern calculated by inverse optimization vs traditional dosimetry systems of intracavitary brachytherapy of cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamema, S.V.; Deshpande, D.D.; Kirisits, C.; Trnkova, P.; Poetter, R.; Mahantshetty, U.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    In the recent past, inverse planning algorithms were introduced for intracavitary brachytherapy planning (ICBT) for cervical cancer. The loading pattern of these algorithms in comparison with traditional systems may not be similar. The purpose of this study was to objectively compare the loading patterns of traditional systems with the inverse optimization. Based on the outcome of the comparison, an attempt was made to obtain a loading pattern that takes into account the experience made with the inverse optimization

  12. Design and validation of a CT-guided robotic system for lung cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Huaisu; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Sun, Luqing; Ma, Xiaodong; Huo, Bin

    2017-09-01

    Currently, lung brachytherapy in clinical setting is a complex procedure. Operation accuracy depends on accurate positioning of the template; however, it is difficult to guarantee the positioning accuracy manually. Application of robotic-assisted systems can simplify the procedure and improve the manual positioning accuracy. Therefore, a novel CT-guided robotic system was developed to assist the lung cancer brachytherapy. A four degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot, controlled by a lung brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS) software, was designed and manufactured to assist the template positioning. Target position of the template can be obtained from the treatment plan, thus the robot is driven to the target position automatically. The robotic system was validated in both the laboratory and the CT environment. In laboratory environment, a 3D laser tracker and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) were used to measure the mechanical accuracy in air, which includes positioning accuracy and position repeatability. Working reliability was also validated in this procedure by observing the response reliability and calculating the position repeatability. Imaging artifacts and accuracy of the robot registration were validated in the CT environment by using an artificial phantom with fiducial markers. CT images were obtained and used to test the image artifact and calculate the registration accuracy. Phantom experiments were conducted to test the accuracy of needle insertion by using a transparent hydrogel phantom with a high imitation artificial phantom. Also, the efficiency was validated in this procedure by comparing time costs in manual positioning with robotic positioning under the same experimental conditions. The robotic system achieved the positioning accuracy of 0.28 ± 0.25 mm and the position repeatability of 0.09 ± 0.11 mm. Experimental results showed that the robot was CT-compatible and responded reliably to the control commands. The mean registration accuracy

  13. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P .05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen

  14. Effectiveness of two different HDR brachytherapy regimens with the same BED value in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Vashistha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the effectiveness of biologically effective dose (BED in two different regimens of HDR brachytherapy keeping the same total BED to point A and to compare the relationship of overall treatment time in terms of local control and bladder and rectal complications.Material and methods: The study included two groups comprising a total of 90 cervical cancer patients who underwent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT followed by HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT. EBRT treatment was delivered by a Co-60 teletherapy unit to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction in 25 fractions over a period of five weeks. Parallel opposed anterior–posterior (AP/PA fields with no central shielding were used, followed by the HDR ICBT dose, to point A, of either two fractions of 9.5 Gy with a gap of 10 days, or three fractions of 7.5 Gy with a gap of 7 days between the fractions. Gemcitabine (dose of 150 mg/m2 was given weekly to all the patients as a radiosensitizer. The calculate BED3 to point A was almost the same in both groups to keep the same late complication rates. The doses, and BED10 and BED3, were calculated at different bladder and rectal point as well as at the lymphatictrapezoid points. During and after treatment patients were evaluated for local control and complications for 24 months.Results and Conclusions: Doses and BEDs at different bladder, rectal and lymphatic trapezoid points, local control, and complications in both HDR ICBT groups did not have statistically significant differences (p > 0.05. Both HDR ICBT schedules are well tolerable and equally effective.

  15. The initial experience of electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatnagar Ajay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of people are diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC worldwide each year. While surgical approaches are the standard treatment, some patients are appropriate candidates for radiation therapy for NMSC. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy using surface applicators has shown efficacy in the treatment of NMSC and shortens the radiation treatment schedule by using a condensed hypofractionated approach. An electronic brachytherapy (EBT system permits treatment of NMSC without the use of a radioactive isotope. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from patients treated from July 2009 through March 2010. Pre-treatment biopsy was performed to confirm a malignant cutaneous diagnosis. A CT scan was performed to assess lesion depth for treatment planning, and an appropriate size of surface applicator was selected to provide an acceptable margin. An HDR EBT system delivered a dose of 40.0 Gy in eight fractions twice weekly with 48 hours between fractions, prescribed to a depth of 3-7 mm. Treatment feasibility, acute safety, efficacy outcomes, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results Thirty-seven patients (mean age 72.5 years with 44 cutaneous malignancies were treated. Of 44 lesions treated, 39 (89% were T1, 1 (2% Tis, 1 (2% T2, and 3 (7% lesions were recurrent. Lesion locations included the nose for 16 lesions (36.4%, ear 5 (11%, scalp 5 (11%, face 14 (32%, and an extremity for 4 (9%. Median follow-up was 4.1 months. No severe toxicities occurred. Cosmesis ratings were good to excellent for 100% of the lesions at follow-up. Conclusions The early outcomes of EBT for the treatment of NMSC appear to show acceptable acute safety and favorable cosmetic outcomes. Using a hypofractionated approach, EBT provides a convenient treatment schedule.

  16. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  17. Implementation of 3D-virtual brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer: a description of a new method of interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Jaffray, David A.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; DeBiose, David A.; Kini, Vijay R.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We present the initial description of a new technique of interstitial breast brachytherapy in which a computer-generated image of an implant template is applied virtually to serial-computed tomography (CT) scan images of a patient's breast. Optimal placement of the virtual template around the CT images of the proposed target volume provides the physician with a preplan for improved positioning of implant needles around the actual target volume intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, 110 patients with early-stage breast cancer were entered onto a protocol of low or high dose rate brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality for part of their breast-conserving therapy. To improve the accuracy and reproducibility of target volume coverage in patients with a closed lumpectomy cavity, 11 of these implants were performed using the virtual brachytherapy technique. The virtual implant procedure was performed by first placing radiopaque skin markers on the breast surface for reference on the CT image and ultimately as intraoperative landmarks for the placement of implant needles. A CT scan of the breast was then performed and the target volume outlined on each CT scan slice by the physician. A virtual image of the brachytherapy template was then positioned around the CT image of the target volume to achieve an idealized implant with optimal coverage. The projected entrance and exit points of all needles on the skin of the breast (from the idealized virtual implant) were then identified (by perspective rendering of multiple 3D views) and hard-copy images taken to the operating room. The implant was then constructed by referencing the virtual implant images (needle entrance and exit points) to the radiopaque skin markers on the breast. After the implant was completed, a CT scan of the breast with the template catheters or needles in position was taken for comparison of the actual target volume coverage with the virtual implant generated

  18. Prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in patients undergoing prostate 125I brachytherapy for prostate carcinoma: Final report of a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Ulchaker, James C.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.; Klein, Eric A.; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Ciezki, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in reducing the urinary symptoms in patients undergoing 125 I prostate implantation (PI) for prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and materials: This is a single-institution, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial for patients undergoing PI for prostate adenocarcinoma comparing prophylactic tamsulosin versus placebo. Eligibility criteria included patients not taking tamsulosin or other α-blockers treated with PI. The patients were randomly assigned to either tamsulosin (0.8 mg, orally once a day) or matched placebo. All patients started the medication 4 days before PI and continued for 60 days. The American Urologic Association (AUA) symptom index questionnaire was used to assess urinary symptoms. The AUA questionnaire was administered before PI for a baseline score and weekly for 8 weeks after PI. Patients were taken off the study if they developed urinary retention, had intolerable urinary symptoms, or wished to discontinue with the trial. Results: One hundred twenty-six patients were enrolled in this study from November 2001 to January 2003 (118 were evaluable: 58 in the tamsulosin arm and 60 in the placebo group). Pretreatment and treatment characteristics were comparably matched between the two groups. The urinary retention rate was 17% (10 patients) in the placebo group compared with 10% (6 patients) in the tamsulosin group (p = 0.3161). Eighty-eight percent (14 patients) of those who developed urinary retention experienced it within 2 weeks after the PI. Intolerable urinary symptoms were reported equally (10 patients in each group) with 70% occurring in the first 2 weeks after PI. There was a significant difference in mean AUA score in favor of tamsulosin at Week 5 after PI (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Prophylactic tamsulosin (0.8 mg/day) before prostate brachytherapy did not significantly affect urinary retention rates, but had a positive effect on urinary morbidity at Week 5

  19. Prostate-specific antigen bounce after high-dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Kakinoki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Akio; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Matsunobu, Toru; Uehara, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer patients was evaluated. Sixty-one patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 24 months) in our institute. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.1 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level, with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. A PSA bounce was noted in 16 (26.2%) of 61 patients (one patient had a PSA bounce twice). Median time to develop a PSA bounce was 18 months, but 23.5% developed a PSA bounce after 24 months. Median duration of PSA bounce was 6 months and 11.8% had increased PSA within a period of 12 months. Median bounce height was 0.2 ng/ml (range, 0.1 to 3.39 ng/ml). A bounce height of gerater than 2 ng/ml was seen in 11.8%. Clinical characteristics (age, prostate volume, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, risk classification, stage, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score) do not predict whether or not there will be a PSA bounce. In patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT, the incidence and characteristics of PSA bounce were similar to those in patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of PSA bounce following HDR-brachytherapy with EBRT. (author)

  20. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer, and the importance of brachytherapy timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Czyzewski, Ann; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the efficacy of HDR versus LDR brachytherapy for Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients. Material and Methods: Forty-four HDR patients were retrospectively compared to 51 LDR patients treated at the same institution from 1977 to 1988 (LDR) and from 1989 to 1995 (HDR). A tumor burden score (TBS) of 2-9 was calculated for both groups of patients to assess volume of disease (2-4 low tumor burden, 5-9 high tumor burden). LDR and HDR patients received 60 Gy to the whole pelvis at 1.7 Gy/Fx. The majority of LDR patients were treated after completion of external beam radiation (EBR) with one 25 Gy implant to Point A (55 cGy/h). The HDR patients were treated with 4-5 HDR fractions of 3.7 Gy to 5.8 Gy/Fx for an LDR equivalence of 20-25 Gy (median dose/Fx 4.3 Gy, median insertion number 5). Clinical endpoints were calculated actuarially with significance determined by the log rank test and the relative risk (RR). Results: The median follow-up for the HDR and LDR groups was 1.8 and 5 years, respectively. Pelvic control and survival was better in the LDR group than the HDR group, 51%, 73%, 32%, 44% (p = 0.004, RR = 0.4), with grade III and above RTOG complications of 19% and 15%, respectively. The median age and performance status were similar between the two groups; however, a TBS score ≥7 was present in 23% of the HDR patients and in 9% of the LDR patients. Pelvic control in the HDR group was 58% with a TBS ≤4, and 17% with a TBS >4 (p = 0.01, RR = 0.4). The median EBR dose at the first HDR insertion was 31 Gy while all the LDR patients received 60 Gy before the insertion. Pelvic control rates in Table 1 indicate a trend towards improved outcome within the HDR group and same TBS if more external beam radiation was given prior to the first HDR insertion. Pelvic control was also higher within the HDR group when Point A received a BED Gy 10≥100 versus <100: 62%, 40%, respectively (RR 0.6). Conclusion: These retrospective results of HDR versus

  1. Phantom study of radiation doses outside the target volume brachytherapy versus external radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt; Persson, Essie; Westman, Gunnar; Persliden, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is sometimes suggested as an adjuvant treatment after surgery of some tumours. When introducing this, it would be useful to have an estimate of the dose distribution to different body sites, both near and distant to target, comparing conventional external irradiation to brachytherapy. The aim of the present study was to determine radiation doses with both methods at different body sites, near and distant to target, in an experimental situation on an operated left sided breast cancer on a female Alderson phantom. Methods: Five external beam treatments with isocentric tangential fields were given by a linear accelerator. A specified dose of 1.0 Gy was given to the whole left sided breast volume. Five interstitial brachytherapy treatments were given to the upper, lateral quadrant of the left breast by a two plane, 10 needles implant. A dose of 1.0 Gy specified according to the Paris system was administered by a pulsed dose rate afterloading machine. Absorbed dose in different fixed dose points were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results: Both methods yielded an absorbed dose of the same size to the bone marrow and internal organs distant to target, 1.0-1.4% of the prescribed dose. There was a trend of lower doses to the lower half of the trunk and higher doses to the upper half of the trunk, respectively, by brachytherapy. A 90% reduction of absorbed dose with brachytherapy compared to external irradiation was found in the near-target region within 5 cm from target boundary where parts of the left lung and the heart are situated. If an adjuvant dose of 50 Gy is given with the external radiotherapy and brachytherapy, the absorbed dose in a part of the myocardium could be reduced from 31.8 to 2.1 Gy. Conclusions: Near target, brachytherapy yielded a considerably lower absorbed dose which is of special importance when considering radiation effects on the myocard and lungs. We could not demonstrate any difference of

  2. Can IMRT or Brachytherapy Reduce Dysphagia Associated With Chemoradiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer? The Michigan and Rotterdam Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Levendag, Peter C.; Feng, Felix Y.; Teguh, David; Lyden, Teresa M.A.; Schmitz, Paul I.M.; Haxer, Marc; Noever, Inge; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Heijmen, Ben J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia is a major late complication of intensive chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer. The initial clinical results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or brachytherapy, planned specifically to reduce dysphagia are presented. Patients and Methods: Previous research at Michigan University has suggested that the pharyngeal constrictors and glottic and supraglottic larynx are likely structures whose damage by chemo-RT causes dysphagia and aspiration. In a prospective Michigan trial, 36 patients with oropharyngeal (n = 31) or nasopharyngeal (n = 5) cancer underwent chemo-IMRT. IMRT cost functions included sparing noninvolved pharyngeal constrictors and the glottic and supraglottic larynx. After a review of published studies, the retropharyngeal nodes at risk were defined as the lateral, but not the medial, retropharyngeal nodes, which facilitated sparing of the swallowing structures. In Rotterdam, 77 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were treated with IMRT, three dimensional RT, or conventional RT; also one-half received brachytherapy. The dysphagia endpoints included videofluoroscopy and observer-assessed scores at Michigan and patient-reported quality-of-life instruments in both studies. Results: In both studies, the doses to the upper and middle constrictors correlated highly with the dysphagia endpoints. In addition, doses to the glottic and supraglottic larynx were significant in the Michigan series. In the Rotterdam series, brachytherapy (which reduced the doses to the swallowing structures) was the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The dose-response relationships for the swallowing structures found in these studies suggest that reducing their doses, using either IMRT aimed at their sparing, or brachytherapy, might achieve clinical gains in dysphagia

  3. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel; Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David; Gustafson, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography–defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis–free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  4. Endoluminal brachytherapy in the palliative treatment of advanced esophageal cancer, first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchali, A.; Dinges, S.; Ortner, M.; Schlenger, L.; Lochs, H.; Budach, V.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Dysphagia is the main problem in patients with advanced nonresectable esophageal cancer. Palliation can be achieved by several treatment ways. We want to evaluate the efficacy of endoluminal brachytherapy (BT) for improvement of dysphagia, performance status, time of local tumor progress, and survival time. Methods: 6 patients with esophageal cancer stage IV received a palliative treatment with 192 Ir HDR BT. The dose per fraction was 5 Gy, calculated 1 cm from the surface of the applicator, the total dose was 20 Gy (four weekly applications). Symptoms, performance status and life quality score were investigated before each application and each 4 weeks after treatment. The results were compared with 10 historical patients who were treated by implantation of nitinol stents (Ultraflex, Boston Scient. Inc.). Results: The tumor stages in the BT-group were T4, T3, T2 three, two and one, and in the stent group three, two and five, respectively. Dysphagia improved in median from grade 1.7 to grade 0.5 (BT group) and from grade 2.6 to grade 1.8 (stent group). Karnowski status improved in the BT group from 70 % to 85 %, but did not change in the stent group (75%). A strong correlation between improvement of dysphagia and life quality score could be found especially in patients with initial high grade dysphagia. The only side effect of BT mostly after the 3 rd application was esophagitis grade 1 in 3 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Relief of the esophagitis after conservative therapy could be achieved within 1 week. In the BT group 3 patients were alive without local progress after 20, 13 and 2 weeks. The other 3 patients died from local progress (2 patients, after 20, 20 weeks) or from metastasis (1 patient, after 11 weeks). All patients in the stent group died from local progress. The median survival time is 17 ± 5.2 weeks in BT group vs. 8.8 ± 8.6 weeks in the stent group. Conclusion: Endoluminal brachytherapy seems to be an effective and well tolerable

  5. Time to PSA rise differentiates the PSA bounce after HDR and LDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchardt, Wojciech; Skowronek, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce (PB) after high-dose-rate (HDR-BT) or low-dose-rate (LDR-BT) brachytherapy alone in prostate cancer patients. Ninety-four patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2cN0), age ranged 50-81 years, were treated with brachytherapy alone between 2008 and 2010. Patients were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, Gleason score ≤ 7. The LDR-BT total dose was 144-145 Gy, in HDR-BT - 3 fractions of 10.5 or 15 Gy. The initial PSA level (iPSA) was assessed before treatment, then PSA was rated every 3 months over the first 2 years, and every 6 months during the next 3 years. Median follow-up was 3.0 years. Mean iPSA was 7.8 ng/ml. In 58 cases, PSA decreased gradually without PB or biochemical failure (BF). In 24% of patients, PB was observed. In 23 cases (24%), PB was observed using 0.2 ng/ml definition; in 10 cases (11%), BF was diagnosed using nadir + 2 ng/ml definition. The HDR-BT and LDR-BT techniques were not associated with higher level of PB (26 vs. 22%, p = 0.497). Time to the first PSA rise finished with PB was significantly shorter after HDR-BT then after LDR-BT (median, 10.5 vs. 18.0 months) during follow-up. Predictors for PB were observed only after HDR-BT. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and higher Gleason score decreased the risk of PB (HR = 0.11, p = 0.03; HR = 0.51, p = 0.01). The higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB (HR 3.46, p = 0.02; HR 1.04, p = 0.04). There was no predictors for PB after LDR-BT. HDR-BT and LDR-BT for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer had similar PB rate. The PB occurred earlier after HDR-BT than after LDR-BT. ADT and higher Gleason score decreased, and higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB after HDR-BT.

  6. Value of palliation and improvement in quality of life in oesophageal cancer patients treated with iridium - 192 HDR fractionated brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaias, B.; Kaleta, R.; Fijaikowski, M.

    1996-01-01

    During December 1992 - November 1995 twenty-two patients with oesophageal cancer were treated with palliative HDR brachytherapy. Sixteen patients had local recurrence or progression after external radiotherapy and the remaining six patients were treated with brachytherapy alone. All patients received fractions of 7.5 Gy at the reference point 2 - 4 time weekly. Reference point was calculated at 0.5 cm distance from applicator surface. Microselectron HDR device with Iridium-192 source were used. Criteria for palliative effect were as follow: relive of symptoms time of occurrence and duration of palliative effect. Quality of life during and after treatment were evaluated by patients and staff independently. In majority of patients both palliative effect and significant improvement of quality of life were noted. Detail results include: - improvement in swallowing in 63,6% ((14(22))); - increase in body weight in 45% ((10(22))); - pain relive 70% ((12(17))); - appearance of palliation 1 hour - 8 days; - duration of palliation - 3-12 mo. (median 5 mo.); Quality of live - improvement - 59% ((13(22))); - no improvement - 27.3% ((6(22))); - worsening - 13.7% ((3(22))); No improvement or worsening in quality of life were observed only in patients who obtained radical radiotherapy previously. Brachytherapy is an effective method of palliative treatment for as well primary and recurrent oesophageal cancer

  7. Comparison of CT-based volumetric dosimetry with traditional prescription points in the treatment of cervical cancer with PDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrey, Nicola; Nilsson, Sanna; Moutrie, Zoe; Chan, Philip; Cheuk, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    The traditional use of two-dimensional geometric prescription points in intracavitary brachytherapy planning for locally advanced cervical cancer is increasingly being replaced by three-dimensional (3D) planning. This study aimed to directly compare the two planning methods to validate that CT planning provides superior dosimetry for both tumour and organs at risk (OARs) in our department. The CT planning data of 10 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer was audited. For each CT dataset, two new brachytherapy plans were created, comparing the dosimetry of conventional American Brachytherapy Society points and 3D-optimised volumes created for the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) and OARs. Total biologically equivalent doses for these structures were calculated using the modified EQD2 formula and comparative dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis performed. DVH analysis revealed that for the 3D-optimised plans, the prescription aim of D90 ≥ 100% was achieved for the HR CTV in all 10 patients. However, when prescribing to point A, only 50% of the plans achieved the minimum required dose to the HR CTV. Rectal and bladder dose constraints were met for all 3D-optimised plans but exceeded in two and one of the conventional plans, respectively. This study confirms that the regionally relevant practice of CT-based 3D-optimised planning results in improved tumour dose coverage compared with traditional points-based planning methods and also improves dose to the rectum and bladder.

  8. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto; D'Imperio, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  9. Quality assurance in MR image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Final results of the EMBRACE study dummy run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirisits, Christian; Federico, Mario; Nkiwane, Karen; Fidarova, Elena; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina; de Leeuw, Astrid; Lindegaard, Jacob; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2015-12-01

    Upfront quality assurance (QA) is considered essential when starting a multicenter clinical trial in radiotherapy. Despite the long experience gained for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) trials, there are only limited audit QA methods for brachytherapy (BT) and none include the specific aspects of image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). EMBRACE is a prospective multicenter trial aiming to assess the impact of (MRI)-based IGABT in locally advanced cervical cancer. An EMBRACE dummy run was designed to identify sources and magnitude of uncertainties and errors considered important for the evaluation of clinical, and dosimetric parameters and their relation to outcome. Contouring, treatment planning and dose reporting was evaluated and scored with a categorical scale of 1-10. Active feedback to centers was provided to improve protocol compliance and reporting. A second dummy run was required in case of major deviations (score 30 cases) had better performance as compared to centers with limited experience. The comprehensive dummy run designed for the EMBRACE trial has been a feasible tool for QA in IGABT of cervix cancer. It should be considered for future IGABT trials and could serve as the basis for continuous quality checks for brachytherapy centers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Brachytherapy boost and cancer-specific mortality in favorable high-risk versus other high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Muralidhar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Recent retrospective data suggest that brachytherapy (BT boost may confer a cancer-specific survival benefit in radiation-managed high-risk prostate cancer. We sought to determine whether this survival benefit would extend to the recently defined favorable high-risk subgroup of prostate cancer patients (T1c, Gleason 4 + 4 = 8, PSA 20 ng/ml. Material and methods: We identified 45,078 patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database with cT1c-T3aN0M0 intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer diagnosed 2004-2011 treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT only or EBRT plus BT. We used multivariable competing risks regression to determine differences in the rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM after EBRT + BT or EBRT alone in patients with intermediate-risk, favorable high-risk, or other high-risk disease after adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Results : EBRT + BT was not associated with an improvement in 5-year PCSM compared to EBRT alone among patients with favorable high-risk disease (1.6% vs. 1.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.21-1.52, p = 0.258, and intermediate-risk disease (0.8% vs. 1.0%, AHR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.59-1.16, p = 0.270. Others with high-risk disease had significantly lower 5-year PCSM when treated with EBRT + BT compared with EBRT alone (3.9% vs. 5.3%; AHR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.55-0.95; p = 0.022. Conclusions : Brachytherapy boost is associated with a decreased rate of PCSM in some men with high-risk prostate cancer but not among patients with favorable high-risk disease. Our results suggest that the recently-defined “favorable high-risk” category may be used to personalize therapy for men with high-risk disease.

  11. CT-image-based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Major, T; Somogyi, A; Takácsi-Nagy, Z; Mangel, L C; Forrai, G; Sulyok, Z; Fodor, J; Németh, G

    2000-03-01

    To compare the conventional 2-D, the simulator-guided semi-3-D and the recently developed CT-guided 3-D brachytherapy treatment planning in the interstitial radiotherapy of breast cancer. In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single, double and triple plane implant was used in 6, 89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3-D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. With the help of conformal semi-3-D and 3-D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25

  12. Quality of Life of Oral Cancer Patients After Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Miura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ayukawa, Fumio; Hayashi, Keiji; Toda, Kazuma

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of oral cancer patients treated with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (LDR-BT) alone. Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and July 2006, a total of 56 patients with oral cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. QOL was assessed by means of the core questionnaire and head and neck questionnaire module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 [QLQ-C30] and QLQ Head and Neck 35 [H and N35]). The questionnaires were distributed to the patients before the start of treatment and 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the start of LDR-BT. Results: It was possible to analyze the results for 20 of the initial 56 patients because they did not experience metastasis or recurrence during this study. No functions or symptoms asked about in the QLQ-C30 deteriorated during the first year. The emotional function score steadily and significantly increased. No symptoms in the QLQ-H and N35 significantly deteriorated. The scores for pain, trouble with social eating, and weight loss on the QLQ-H and N35 steadily and significantly decreased. Age, gender, and LDR-BT source had no effect on the change in QOL during the first year, but T-stage significantly affected the change in global health status, tumor site affected the changes in swallowing, sensory problems, sticky saliva, and complications affected the changes in pain, swallowing, and mouth opening. Conclusions: QOL of oral cancer patients treated with LDR-BT is high. However, tumor stage, tumor site, and complications affected the changes in a few functions and symptoms during the first year

  13. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, Seth A.; Bittner, Nathan H.J.; Beyer, David C.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Goldsmith, Brian J.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, W. Robert; Nag, Subir; Suh, W. Warren; Potters, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  14. Influence of radioactive sources discretization in the Monte Carlo computational simulations of brachytherapy procedures: a case study on the procedures for treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Costa, Kleber Souza Silva; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy computational simulation procedures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods have shown to be increasingly important to the improvement of cancer fighting strategies. One of the biases in this practice is the discretization of the radioactive source in brachytherapy simulations, which often do not match with a real situation. This study had the aim to identify and to measure the influence of radioactive sources discretization in brachytherapy MC simulations when compared to those that do not present discretization, using prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 radionuclide as model. Simulations were carried out with 108 events with both types of sources to compare them using EGSnrc code associated to MASH phantom in orthostatic and supine positions with some anatomic adaptations. Significant alterations were found, especially regarding bladder, rectum and the prostate itself. It can be concluded that there is a need to discretized sources in brachytherapy simulations to ensure its representativeness. (author)

  15. High dose rate interstitial brachytherapy with external beam irradiation for localized prostate cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Jo, Yoshimasa; Yoden, Eisaku; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Nagase, Naomi; Narihiro, Naomasa; Kubota, Juichi

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the biochemical and pathological results of combined external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy (HDR-Ir192) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Between October 1997 and August 1999, 39 evaluable patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate diagnosed by biopsy were treated with interstitial and external beam irradiation. Patients ranged in age from 58-82 years, with a mean of 69.7 years. T1c, T2 and T3 tumors, according to the UICC classification system (1997), were found in 7, 21 and 11 cases respectively. The mean initial pre-treatment PSA was 35.9 ng/ml (median 13.2), with 77% of the patients having had a pre-treatment PSA greater than 10 ng/ml. Of all patients, 17 had received pre-treatment hormonal therapy. Hormonal pretreatment was stopped at the beginning of radiotherapy in all cases. External beam four-field box irradiation was given to the small pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions. Three HDR-Ir192 treatments were given over a 30-h period, with 5.5 Gy per fraction at the circumference of the prostate gland over the course of this study. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA level >1.5 ng/ml and rising on three consecutive values. If serial post-treatment PSA levels showed a continuous downward trend, failure was not scored. The patient with clinical evidence of progression was classified as a clinical failure. The median follow-up at the time of evaluation was 19.6 months. A post-treatment PSA level {<=}1.0 ng/ml was seen in 26 (67%) patients, and values from >1.0 to {<=}2.0 ng/ml were seen in 10 (26%) patients. Biochemical failure was not seen in 38 patients except for one patient who developed a distant bone metastasis with negative prostatic biopsy 15 months after treatment. Biochemical control rate was 100% (38/38) except for the patient with bone metastasis classified as clinical failure. Negative biopsies 18 months after treatment were found in 93% (14/15) of patients. Only one patient

  16. Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.lilleby@ous-hf.no [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K. [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome (overall survival [OS], the actuarial 5-year cancer-specific survival [CSS], disease-free survival [DFS], biochemical failure-free survival [BFS]), complications and morbidity in patients treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost and hormonal treatment with curative aims. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 275 prospectively followed pN0/N0M0 patients were included: 19 patients (7%) with T2, Gleason score 7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 and 256 patients (93%) with T3 or Gleason score 8-10 or PSA >20 received multimodal treatment with conformal four-field radiotherapy (prostate/vesiculae 2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25) combined with HDR-BT (iridium 192; prostate 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: After a median observation time of 44.2 months (range, 10.4-90.5 months) 12 patients had relapsed clinically and/or biochemically and 10 patients were dead, of which 2 patients died from prostate cancer. Five-year estimates of BFS, CSS, DFS, and OS rates were 98.5%, 99.3%, 95.6%, and 96.3%, respectively. None of the patients with either Gleason score <8 or with intermediate risk profile had relapsed. The number of HDR-BT treatments was not related to outcome. Despite of age (median, 65.7 years; range, 45.7-77 years) and considerable pretreatment comorbidity in 39 of 275 patients, Genitourinary treatment-related morbidity was moderate with long-lasting Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 voiding problems in 26 patients (9.5%) and occasionally mucous discharge in 20 patients (7%), none with Grade >2 for gastrointestinal at follow-up. Complications during implantations were related to pubic arch interference (4 patients) and lithotomy time, causing 2 patients to develop compartment syndrome. Conclusion: Despite still preliminary observations, our 5-year outcome estimates favor the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in high-risk patients combined with conformal

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Computed Tomography–Based Volumetric Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Daniel R.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Carmona, Ruben; McMurtrie, Riley M.; Einck, John; Mell, Loren K.; McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Harrison, Terry; Mundt, Arno J.; Yashar, Catheryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A report of clinical outcomes of a computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) technique for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical carcinoma diagnosed between 2007 and 2014 were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy followed by high-dose-rate (HDR) IGBT. All patients underwent planning CT simulation at each implantation. A high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) encompassing any visible tumor and the entire cervix was contoured on the simulation CT. When available, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at implantation to assist with tumor delineation. The prescription dose was prescribed to the HRCTV. Results: The median follow-up time was 17 months. Thirteen patients (17%) had an MRI done before brachytherapy, and 16 patients (21%) were treated without MRI guidance. The mean EBRT/IGBT sum 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) delivered to the 90% volume of the HRCTV was 86.3 Gy. The mean maximum EQD2s delivered to 2 cm 3 of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 67.5 Gy, 66.2 Gy, and 75.3 Gy, respectively. The 2-year cumulative incidences of local, locoregional, and distant failure were 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-14.8%), 15.1% (95% CI: 5.4%-29.4%), and 24.3% (95% CI: 12.1%-38.9%), respectively. The 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 75% (95% CI, 61%-91%) and 73% (95% CI, 60%-90%), respectively. Twenty-nine patients (38%) experienced grade ≥2 acute toxicity, with 5 cases of acute grade 3 toxicity and no grade ≥4 toxicities. One patient experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. No other late grade ≥3 events were observed. Conclusions: This is the largest report to date of CT/MRI-based IGBT for the treatment of cervical cancer. The results are promising, with excellent local control and acceptable

  18. Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy for High-Dose-Rate Treatment of Cervical Cancer. I: Theoretical Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dae Yup; Webster, Matthew J.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Choi, Dongju; Song, Bongyong; Devic, Slobodan; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that utilization of the direction-modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) concept can significantly improve treatment plan quality in the setting of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The new, MRI-compatible, tandem design has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm diameter, grooved along a nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod (ρ = 18.0 g/cm 3 ), enclosed in Delrin tubing (polyoxymethylene, ρ = 1.41 g/cm 3 ), with a total thickness of 6.4 mm. The Monte Carlo N-Particle code was used to calculate the anisotropic 192 Ir dose distributions. An in-house-developed inverse planning platform, geared with simulated annealing and constrained-gradient optimization algorithms, was used to replan 15 patient cases (total 75 plans) treated with a conventional tandem and ovoids (T and O) applicator. Prescription dose was 6 Gy. For replanning, we replaced the conventional tandem with that of the new DMBT tandem for optimization but left the ovoids in place and kept the dwell positions as originally planned. All DMBT plans were normalized to match the high-risk clinical target volume V100 coverage of the T and O plans. Results: In general there were marked improvements in plan quality for the DMBT plans. On average, D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were reduced by 0.59 ± 0.87 Gy (8.5% ± 28.7%), 0.48 ± 0.55 Gy (21.1% ± 27.2%), and 0.10 ± 0.38 Gy (40.6% ± 214.9%) among the 75 plans, with best single-plan reductions of 3.20 Gy (40.8%), 2.38 Gy (40.07%), and 1.26 Gy (27.5%), respectively. The high-risk clinical target volume D90 was similar, with 6.55 ± 0.96 Gy and 6.59 ± 1.06 Gy for T and O and DMBT, respectively. Conclusions: Application of the DMBT concept to cervical cancer allowed for improved organ at risk sparing while achieving similar target coverage on a sizeable patient population, as intended, by maximally utilizing the anatomic information contained in 3-dimensional imaging. A

  19. WE-DE-201-08: Multi-Source Rotating Shield Brachytherapy Apparatus for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kim, Y; Flynn, R [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a novel multi-source rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) apparatus for the precise simultaneous angular and linear positioning of all partially-shielded 153Gd radiation sources in interstitial needles for treating prostate cancer. The mechanism is designed to lower the detrimental dose to healthy tissues, the urethra in particular, relative to conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) techniques. Methods: Following needle implantation, the delivery system is docked to the patient template. Each needle is coupled to a multi-source afterloader catheter by a connector passing through a shaft. The shafts are rotated by translating a moving template between two stationary templates. Shaft walls as well as moving template holes are threaded such that the resistive friction produced between the two parts exerts enough force on the shafts to bring about the rotation. Rotation of the shaft is then transmitted to the shielded source via several keys. Thus, shaft angular position is fully correlated with the position of the moving template. The catheter angles are simultaneously incremented throughout treatment as needed, and only a single 360° rotation of all catheters is needed for a full treatment. For each rotation angle, source depth in each needle is controlled by a multi-source afterloader, which is proposed as an array of belt-driven linear actuators, each of which drives a source wire. Results: Optimized treatment plans based on Monte Carlo dose calculations demonstrated RSBT with the proposed apparatus reduced urethral D{sub 1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 35% for urethral dose gradient volume within 3 mm of the urethra surface. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with multi-source RSBT apparatus using nineteen 62.4 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources is 117 min. Conclusions: The proposed RSBT delivery apparatus in conjunction with multiple nitinol catheter-mounted platinum-shielded {sup 153}Gd sources enables a mechanically feasible

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Computed Tomography–Based Volumetric Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Daniel R., E-mail: drsimpson@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Carmona, Ruben; McMurtrie, Riley M.; Einck, John; Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Harrison, Terry [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mundt, Arno J.; Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A report of clinical outcomes of a computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) technique for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical carcinoma diagnosed between 2007 and 2014 were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy followed by high-dose-rate (HDR) IGBT. All patients underwent planning CT simulation at each implantation. A high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) encompassing any visible tumor and the entire cervix was contoured on the simulation CT. When available, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at implantation to assist with tumor delineation. The prescription dose was prescribed to the HRCTV. Results: The median follow-up time was 17 months. Thirteen patients (17%) had an MRI done before brachytherapy, and 16 patients (21%) were treated without MRI guidance. The mean EBRT/IGBT sum 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) delivered to the 90% volume of the HRCTV was 86.3 Gy. The mean maximum EQD2s delivered to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 67.5 Gy, 66.2 Gy, and 75.3 Gy, respectively. The 2-year cumulative incidences of local, locoregional, and distant failure were 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-14.8%), 15.1% (95% CI: 5.4%-29.4%), and 24.3% (95% CI: 12.1%-38.9%), respectively. The 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 75% (95% CI, 61%-91%) and 73% (95% CI, 60%-90%), respectively. Twenty-nine patients (38%) experienced grade ≥2 acute toxicity, with 5 cases of acute grade 3 toxicity and no grade ≥4 toxicities. One patient experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. No other late grade ≥3 events were observed. Conclusions: This is the largest report to date of CT/MRI-based IGBT for the treatment of cervical cancer. The results are promising, with excellent local control and acceptable

  1. Simple DVH parameter addition as compared to deformable registration for bladder dose accumulation in cervix cancer brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Else Stougård; Noe, Karsten Østergaaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Variations in organ position, shape, and volume cause uncertainties in dose assessment for brachytherapy (BT) in cervix cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate uncertainties associated with bladder dose accumulation based on DVH parameter addition (previously...... called "the worst case assumption") in fractionated BT. Materials and methods: Forty-seven patients treated for locally advanced cervical cancer were included. All patients received EBRT combined with two individually planned 3D image-guided adaptive BT fractions. D2 and D0.1 were estimated by DVH...

  2. Quality assurance in MR image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Final results of the EMBRACE study dummy run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirisits, Christian; Federico, Mario; Nkiwane, Karen

    2015-01-01

    and BT. Centers with experience in IGABT (>30 cases) had better performance as compared to centers with limited experience. CONCLUSION: The comprehensive dummy run designed for the EMBRACE trial has been a feasible tool for QA in IGABT of cervix cancer. It should be considered for future IGABT trials...... aspects of image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: EMBRACE is a prospective multicenter trial aiming to assess the impact of (MRI)-based IGABT in locally advanced cervical cancer. An EMBRACE dummy run was designed to identify sources and magnitude of uncertainties and errors...

  3. Eradicative brachytherapy with hyaluronate gel injection into pararectal space in treatment of bulky vaginal stump recurrence of uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazushi; Mabuchi, Yasushi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Noda, Yasutaka; Sato, Morio; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a procedure for eradicative brachytherapy that can deliver a curative boost dose to bulky (>4 cm) vaginal stump recurrence of uterine cancer without risk of damaging surrounding organs. We separated risk organs (the rectum and sigmoid) from the target during brachytherapy, with a hyaluronate gel injection into the pararectal space via the percutaneous paraperineal approach under local anesthesia. The rectum anchored to the sacrum by native ligament was expected to shift posteriorly. We encountered a patient with bulky stump recurrence of uterine cancer, approximately 8 cm in maximum diameter. She was complaining of abdominal pain and constipation due to bowel encasement. Following 50 Gy of external beam radiotherapy, we applied a single fraction of brachytherapy under gel separation and delivered 14.5 Gy (50.8 GyE: equivalent dose in 2-Gy fraction calculated with linear quadratic model at α/β=3) to the target. The gel injection procedure was completed in 30 min without complications. A total irradiation dose of 100.8 GyE was delivered to the target and the cumulative minimum dose to the most irradiated rectosigmoidal volume of 2 cc (cumulative D 2cc ) was calculated as 58.5 GyE with gel injection, and was estimated to be 96 GyE without. Over three years, the local stump tumor has completely disappeared, with no complications. Brachytherapy with a pararectal gel injection can be a safe and effective eradicative option for bulky vaginal stump recurrence. (author)

  4. Clinicopathologic Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy versus Conventional Chemoradiotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting for Resectable Stages II and III Low Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess for differences in clinical, radiologic, and pathologic outcomes between patients with stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma treated neoadjuvantly with conventional external beam radiotherapy (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (EBT. Methods. Patients undergoing neoadjuvant EBT received 4 consecutive daily 6.5 Gy fractions without chemotherapy, while those undergoing 3DRT or IMRT received 28 daily 1.8 Gy fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Data was collected prospectively for 7 EBT patients and retrospectively for 25 historical 3DRT/IMRT controls. Results. Time to surgery was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P<0.001. There was a trend towards higher rate of pathologic CR for EBT (P=0.06. Rates of margin and lymph node positivity at resection were similar for all groups. Acute toxicity was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P=0.025. Overall and progression-free survival were noninferior for EBT. On MRI, EBT achieved similar complete response rate and reduction in tumor volume as 3DRT and IMRT. Histopathologic comparison showed that EBT resulted in more localized treatment effects and fewer serosal adhesions. Conclusions. EBT offers several practical benefits over conventional radiotherapy techniques and appears to be at least as effective against low rectal cancer as measured by short-term outcomes.

  5. Radiation dose and cancer risk to children undergoing skull radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, Michael; Damilakis, John; Raissaki, Maria; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist in the literature concerning the patient-effective dose from paediatric skull radiography. No information has been provided regarding organ doses, patient dose during PA skull projection, risk of cancer induction and dose to comforters, i.e. individuals supporting children during exposure. Objective: To estimate patient-effective dose, organ doses, lifetime cancer mortality risk to children and radiation dose to comforters associated with skull radiography. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 136 paediatric examinations, including AP, PA and lateral skull radiographs. Entrance-surface dose (ESD) and dose to comforters were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Patients were divided into the following age groups: 0.5-2, 3-7, 8-12 and 13-18 years. The patient-effective dose and corresponding organ doses were calculated using data from the NRPB and Monte Carlo techniques. The risk for fatal cancer induction was assessed using appropriate risk coefficients. Results: For AP, PA and lateral skull radiography, effective dose ranges were 8.8-25.4, 8.2-27.3 and 8.4-22.7 μSv respectively, depending upon the age of the child. For each skull projection, the organs receiving doses above 10 μGy are presented. The number of fatal cancers was found to be less than or equal to 2 per 1 million children undergoing a skull radiograph. The mean radiation dose absorbed by the hands of comforters was 13.4 μGy. Conclusions: The current study provides detailed tabular and graphical data on ESD, effective dose, organ doses and lifetime cancer mortality risk to children associated with AP, PA and lateral skull projections at all patient ages. (orig.)

  6. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas [Division of Gynecological Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9006@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  7. Brachytherapy or Conformal External Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Single-Institution Matched-Pair Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; Morris, W. James

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the absence of randomized study data, institutional case series have shown brachytherapy (BT) to produce excellent biochemical control (bNED) in patients with localized prostate cancer compared with alternative curative treatments. This study was designed to overcome some of the limitations of case series studies by using a matched-pair design in patients treated contemporaneously with BT and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Six hundred one eligible patients treated between 1998 and 2001 were prospectively followed up in our institutional databases and matched on a 1:1 basis for the following known prognostic variables: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, T stage, the use and duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, and the percentage of positive tissue core samples. Two hundred seventy-eight perfect matches of patients (139 in each group) with low- and intermediate-risk cancer were further analyzed. bNED (Phoenix definition) was the primary endpoint. Other endpoints were toxicity, PSA kinetics, and the secondary use of androgen deprivation therapy. Results: The 5-year bNED rates were 95% (BT) and 85% (EBRT) (p < 0.001). After 7 years, the BT bNED result was unchanged, but the rate in EBRT patients had fallen to 75%. The median posttreatment PSA nadirs were 0.04 ng/mL (BT) and 0.62 ng/mL (EBRT, p < 0.001), which predicted a higher ongoing treatment failure rate in association with EBRT use than with BT use. Late urinary toxicity and rectal/bowel toxicity were worse in patients treated with BT and EBRT, respectively. Conclusions: BT for both low-risk and selected intermediate-risk cancers achieves exceptional cure rates. Even with dose escalation, it will be difficult for EBRT to match the proven track record of BT seen over the past decade.

  8. Second salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for radiorecurrent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metha Maenhout

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Salvage treatments for localized radiorecurrent prostate cancer can be performed safely when a focal and image guided approach is used. Due to the low toxicity, the opportunity exists to investigate a second salvage treatment when a second locally recurrent prostate cancer occurs. Here, we describe a second salvage treatment procedure of 4 patients. Material and methods : Four patients with a pathologically proven second local recurrence were treated in an outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided setting with a single fraction of 19 Gy focal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT. Delineation was performed using choline-PET-CT or a 68Ga-PSMA PET in combination with multiparametric 3 Tesla MRI in all four patients. Toxicity was measured using common toxicity criteria for adverse events (CTCAE version 4.0. Results : With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-15, there were 2 patients with biochemical recurrence as defined by the Phoenix-definition. There were no patients with grade 3 or more toxicity. In all second salvage HDR-BT treatments, the constraints for rectum, bladder, and urethra were met. Median treatment volume (GTV was 4.8 cc (range, 1.9-6.6 cc. A median of 8 catheters (range, 6-9 were used, and the median dose to the treatment volume (GTV was a D95: 19.3 Gy (SD 15.5-19.4 Gy. Conclusions : Second focal salvage MRI-guided HDR-BT for a select group of patients with a second locally recurrent prostate cancer is feasible. There was no grade 3 or more acute toxicity for these four patients.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cancer of the Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwahlen, Daniel; Jezioranski, John; Chan, Philip; Haider, Masoom A.; Cho, Young-Bin; Yeung, Ivan; Levin, Wilfred; Manchul, Lee; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and benefits of optimized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy (BT) for cancer of the cervix. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB-IV cervical cancer had an MRI-compatible intrauterine BT applicator inserted after external beam radiotherapy. MRI scans were acquired, and the gross tumor volume at diagnosis and at BT, the high-risk (HR) and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (CTV), and rectal, sigmoid, and bladder walls were delineated. Pulsed-dose-rate BT was planned and delivered in a conventional manner. Optimized MRI-based plans were developed and compared with the conventional plans. Results: The HR CTV and intermediate-risk CTV were adequately treated (the percentage of volume treated to ≥100% of the intended dose was >95%) in 70% and 85% of the patients with the conventional plans, respectively, and in 75% and 95% of the patients with the optimized plans, respectively. The minimal dose to the contiguous 2 cm 3 of the rectal, sigmoid, and bladder wall volume was 16 ± 6.2, 25 ± 8.7, and 31 ± 9.2 Gy, respectively. With MRI-guided BT optimization, it was possible to maintain coverage of the HR-CTV and reduce the dose to the normal tissues, especially in patients with small tumors at BT. In these patients, the HR percentage of volume treated to ≥100% of the intended dose approached 100% in all cases, and the minimal dose to the contiguous 2-cm 3 of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder was 12-32% less than with conventional BT planning. Conclusion: MRI-based BT for cervical cancer has the potential to optimize primary tumor dosimetry and reduce the dose to critical normal tissues, particularly in patients with small tumors.

  10. Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancer: a single-institution review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuber, Simon; Weiß, Susan; Baaske, Dieter; Schöpe, Michael; Stevens, Simon; Bodis, Stephan; Zwahlen, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting the five-year biochemical control, toxicity profile and dosimetric parameters using iodine-125 low dose rate brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer at a single institution. Between April 2006 and December 2010, 169 men with early stage prostate cancer were treated with BT. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL). Treatment-related morbidities, including urinary, rectal and sexual function, were measured, applying the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the 7-grade Quality of Life Scale (QoL) and medical status, the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ), the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v4.03). Seed migration and loss, dosimetric parameters and learning effects were also analyzed. Medium follow-up time was 50 months (range, 1–85 months). The five-year biochemical failure rate was 7%. Acute proctitis rates were 19% (grade 1) and 1% (grade 2), respectively. The overall incidence of incontinence was 19% (mild), 16% (moderate) and < 1% (severe). An increase in IPSS ≥ 5 points was detected in 59% of patients, with 38% regaining their baseline. Seed dislocation was found in 24% of patients and correlated with D90 and V100. A learning curve was found for seed migration, D90 and V100. QoL correlated with the general health condition of patient, incontinence symptoms and IPSS. BT for early stage prostate cancer offers excellent five-year biochemical control with low toxicities. QoL aspects are favorable. A learning curve was detected for procedural aspects but its impact on patient relevant endpoints remains inconclusive

  11. Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kitano, Masashi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kotani, Shouko; Uemae, Mineko; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

  12. Post-operative high dose rate brachytherapy in patients with low to intermediate risk endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearcey, R.G.; Petereit, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the outcome using different dose/fractionation schedules in high dose rate (HDR) post-operative vaginal vault radiotherapy in patients with low to intermediate risk endometrial cancer. The world literature was reviewed and thirteen series were analyzed representing 1800 cases. A total of 12 vaginal vault recurrences were identified representing an overall vaginal control rate of 99.3%. A wide range of dose fractionation schedules and techniques have been reported. In order to analyze a dose response relationship for tumor control and complications, the biologically effective doses to the tumor and late responding tissues were calculated using the linear quadratic model. A threshold was identified for complications, but not vaginal control. While dose fractionation schedules that delivered a biologically effective dose to the late responding tissues in excess of 100 Gy 3 (LQED = 60 Gy) predicted for late complications, dose fractionation schedules that delivered a modest dose to the vaginal surface (50 Gy 10 or LQED = 30 Gy) appeared tumoricidal with vaginal control rates of at least 98%. By using convenient, modest dose fractionation schedules, HDR vaginal vault - brachytherapy yields very high local control and extremely low morbidity rates. (author)

  13. Long-term erectile function following permanent seed brachytherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Hindson, Benjamin R.; Beaufort, Catherine; Pharoah, Paul; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Erectile function (EF) is commonly affected following prostate cancer treatment. We aim to evaluate the long-term EF following seed brachytherapy (BT) treatment. Materials and methods: The study consisted of 366 patients treated with BT at our institution, who completed the IIEF-5 questionnaire and reported no or mild erectile dysfunction (ED) pre-BT. The probability of EF preservation post-BT was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier methods. The difference in EF preservation by patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors was assessed using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression was used to estimate the effect of each factor on EF preservation. Results: Of the 366 patients, 277 (76%) reported normal EF, and 89 (24%) reported mild ED. The patients were followed-up for a median of 41 months (range: 3–124), and the 5-year actuarial rate of EF preservation was 59%. Age at BT seed implant, presence of medical comorbidities, Gleason score and the biologically effective dose (BED) are associated with EF preservation (P < 0.005). The association for these four factors remains statistically significant in multivariate analysis, with Gleason score having the strongest effect (HR = 3.7; 95% CI = 2.6–5.4). Conclusion: The 5-year actuarial rate of EF preservation post-BT in our cohort is 59%, and is influenced by multiple factors

  14. Brachytherapy boost for breast cancer: what do we know? where do we go?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Marsiglia, H.

    2004-01-01

    Since many years, Brachytherapy (BT) appears to play an important role in the treatment of many solid tumors. For breast cancer, BT is usually used as boost after postoperative external beam radiation therapy. In certain circumstances. BT can be used as sole radiation technique focalized on the tumor bed or more rarely, as second conservative treatment in case of local recurrence for woman refusing salvage mastectomy. Boost BT is most often applied via an interstitial technique while the dose rate can vary from low to high close rate through pulse dose rate. All of those boost techniques were published and some of them compared the results obtained with BT and external beam electron therapy. The analysis of the published phase II and III trials was not able to show significant differences between the two boost techniques in term of local control as well as late skin side effects. However, we noted that the patients who received BT boost presented a higher risk of local recurrence compare to those treated with electron therapy, due to age, margin status or presence of extensive intraductal component. Only a phase III trial randomizing BT boost vs electron therapy boost could show a possible improvement of local control rate in the BT arm; however, this trial should enroll patients with a real high risk of local recurrence in order to take benefit from the dosimetric advantages of BT. (author)

  15. High dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in prostate cancer - technique description and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova Junior, Ardo Lotar; Salvajoli, Joao Victor; Pelizzon, Antonio CAssio Assis; Cecilio, Paulo Jose

    1998-01-01

    Describe the technique and preliminary results of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in localized prostate cancer. Subjects methods: Between March, 1997 and April, 1998, 26 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45 to 50.4 Gy - 1.8 Gy per day) and implants (16 Gy in 2 days - twice a day). Median age was 68 years. The distribution by clinical stage was: 5 T1c, 9 T2a, 10 T2b and 2 T3a. Median initial PSA was 16 ng/ml. Results: With a median follow-up of 4 months, 85% of patients showed normal levels of PSA, with a median of 0.6 ng/ml, 60 to 90 days after treatment. Dysuria grades 1 and 2 and proctitis grade 1 were found in 11,3 and 5 patients, respectively. Conclusion: The method is safe, with acceptable early side effects. Longer follow-up is necessary before drawing any conclusions. (author)

  16. A mechanical system design of the iridium-192 isotope wire in cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Sanda; Tri Harjanto; Atang Susila

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, brachytherapy engineering development activities have a purpose to establish a detailed design of the cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate. The brachytherapy will use an Iridium-92 source with the emitting radiation of 5 to 10 Curies. The source is wrapped in SS-316 capsule and carried by a SS-316 wire having diameter of about 1 mm dan length of 1800 mm. As part of this activity, the preliminary design of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source has been developed. The technical specifications for the main components of the mechanical drive system have been successfully determined. This is started by studying the concept design, performing calculations, determining technical specifications, and finally defining the main components. From the evaluation, some components were decided: a stepper motor PK264A1-SG10, needle bearing NKI-10/20, spiral tube in SS316-1/8'' with 120 mm in diameter, rubber-based belts with a width of 20 mm, and aluminium drum with a diameter of 100 mm. Not all components could be identified in detail, especially for the components that do not exist in the marketplace and have to be created ourself Since the main components have been identified, the detailed design step of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source can be performed. (author)

  17. The mechanical system design of the iridium-192 isotope wire in cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Sanda; Tri Harjanto; Atang Susila

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, brachytherapy engineering activities have a purpose to establish a detailed design of the cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate. The brachytherapy will use an Iridium-92 source with the emiting radiation of 5 to 10 Curies. The source is wrapped in SS-316 capsule and carried by a SS-316 wire having diameter of about 1 mm dan length of 1800 mm. As part of this activity, the preliminary design of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source has been developed. The technical specifications for the main components of the mechanical drive system have been successfully determined. This is started by studying the concept design, performing calculations, determining technical specifications, and finally defining the main components. From the evaluation, some components were decided: a stepper motor PK264A1-SG10, needle bearing NKI-10/20, spiral tube in SS316-1/8'' with 120 mm in diameter, rubber-based belts with a width of 20 mm, and aluminium drum with a diameter of 100 mm. Not all components could be identified in detail, especially for the components that do not exist in the market place and have to be created ourself. Since the main components have been identified, the detailed design step of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source can be performed. (author)

  18. HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerra, Arrate Querejeta; Mena, Estefanía Palacios; Fabregas, Joan Pera; Miguelez, Cristina Gutiérrez; Guedea, Ferran

    2010-03-01

    Lip cancer can be treated by surgery, external radiotherapy, and/or brachytherapy (BT). In recent years, BT has become increasingly favored for this type of cancer. The aim of the present study was to analyze local control and survival of patients treated at our institution between July 1989 and June 2008. We performed a retrospective study of 121 patients (109 males and 12 females) who underwent lip cancer brachytherapy from July 1989 to June 2008. Median age was 67 years and median follow-up was 31.8 months (range 20-188 months). Out of 121 patients, 100 (82.6%) were treated with low dose rate (LDR) BT while the remaining 21 patients (17.4%) received high dose rate (HDR) BT. The most common cell type was squamous cell carcinoma (115 cases; 95%) and most tumors were located on the lower lip (107 patients; 88.4%). Most cases were either stage T1 (62 patients; 51.2%), or T2 (44 cases; 36.4%). After 15 years of follow-up, overall survival was 89.5%, cause-specific survival 97.8%, and disease-free survival 86.6%. Local, regional, and distant control at 15 years were 90%, 92%, and 98.8%, respectively. Grade 3 mucosal toxicity was observed in 23% of patients treated with LDR compared to 33% of HDR patients, and grade 4 mucosal toxicity in 9% versus 0% in the HDR group. Our findings confirm that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for lip cancer. The results from our series are in line with those published elsewhere. Based on our limited data, HDR appears to be equally as good as LDR, although this needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  19. Brachytherapy for T1-T2 floor-of-the-mouth cancers: the Gustave-Roussy Institute experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsiglia, Hugo; Haie-Meder, Christine; Sasso, Giuseppe; Mamelle, Gerard; Gerbaulet, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the Gustave-Roussy Institute's experience of locoregional control, survival, and complications of low-dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the floor of the mouth. Methods and Materials: Between 1970 and 1985, 160 patients with previously untreated carcinoma of the floor of the mouth received interstitial brachytherapy as definitive treatment. Of the 160 patients, 79 (49%) had T1 and 81 (51%) had T2 lesions, and 127 (79%) had N0 and 33 (21%) had N1; 84% of tumors arose from the anterior floor of the mouth. Brachytherapy was performed with 192 Ir wires, according to the Paris system rules, followed by neck dissection (T2 or N1) or follow-up (T1N0). Results: With a follow-up period of 9-19 years, the observed survival rates were 89% at 2 years and 76% at 5 years, and the local control rates were 93% in T1 and 88% in T2 tumors. A low rate of distant metastases was noticed (5%); 31% of patients developed a second primary cancer. Severe mucosal necrosis was observed in <10% of patients. Any grade of bone necrosis was seen in 18% of cases (only 2.5% had G3 necrosis). This complication occurred more frequently in patients with poor dental status and in those treated without dental protection during implantation (p <0.001). Conclusion: Radical brachytherapy offers excellent local control (89%) and an acceptable rate of complications (<10% severe necrosis) that may be significantly decreased with dental care and the use of protective devices. The high incidence of second malignancies remains a major concern in these patients

  20. DNA-PKcs Expression Is a Predictor of Biochemical Recurrence After Permanent Iodine 125 Interstitial Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Sarah; Guerif, Stéphane; Garcia, Alexandre; Debiais, Céline; Irani, Jacques; Fromont, Gaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Predictive factors for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in localized prostate cancer (PCa) after brachytherapy are insufficient to date. Cellular radiosensitivity depends on DNA double-strand breaks, mainly repaired by the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) system. We analyzed whether the expression of NHEJ proteins can predict BCR in patients treated by brachytherapy for localized PCa. Methods and Materials: From 983 PCa cases treated by brachytherapy between March 2000 and March 2012, 167 patients with available biopsy material suitable for in situ analysis were included in the study. The median follow-up time was 47 months. Twenty-nine patients experienced BCR. All slides were reviewed to reassess the Gleason score. Expression of the key NHEJ proteins DNA-PKcs, Ku70, and Ku80, and the proliferation marker Ki67, was studied by immunohistochemistry performed on tissue microarrays. Results: The Gleason scores after review (P=.06) tended to be associated with BCR when compared with the score initially reported (P=.74). Both the clinical stage (P=.02) and the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level (P=.01) were associated with biochemical failure. Whereas the expression of Ku80 and Ki67 were not predictive of relapse, positive DNA-PKcs nuclear staining (P=.003) and higher Ku70 expression (P=.05) were associated with BCR. On multivariate analysis, among pretreatment variables, only DNA-PKcs (P=.03) and clinical stage (P=.02) remained predictive of recurrence. None of the patients without palpable PCa and negative DNA-PKcs expression experienced biochemical failure, compared with 32% of men with palpable and positive DNA-PKcs staining that recurred. Conclusions: Our results suggest that DNA-PKcs could be a predictive marker of BCR after brachytherapy, and this might be a useful tool for optimizing the choice of treatment in low-risk PCa patients.

  1. DNA-PKcs Expression Is a Predictor of Biochemical Recurrence After Permanent Iodine 125 Interstitial Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Sarah [Department of Pathology, INSERM UMR1069, CHU/Université de Tours, Tours (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, CHU/Université de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Guerif, Stéphane; Garcia, Alexandre [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHU/Université de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Debiais, Céline [Department of Pathology, CHU/Université de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Irani, Jacques [Department of Urology, CHU/Université de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Fromont, Gaëlle, E-mail: gaelle.fromont-hankard@univ-tours.fr [Department of Pathology, INSERM UMR1069, CHU/Université de Tours, Tours (France)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Predictive factors for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in localized prostate cancer (PCa) after brachytherapy are insufficient to date. Cellular radiosensitivity depends on DNA double-strand breaks, mainly repaired by the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) system. We analyzed whether the expression of NHEJ proteins can predict BCR in patients treated by brachytherapy for localized PCa. Methods and Materials: From 983 PCa cases treated by brachytherapy between March 2000 and March 2012, 167 patients with available biopsy material suitable for in situ analysis were included in the study. The median follow-up time was 47 months. Twenty-nine patients experienced BCR. All slides were reviewed to reassess the Gleason score. Expression of the key NHEJ proteins DNA-PKcs, Ku70, and Ku80, and the proliferation marker Ki67, was studied by immunohistochemistry performed on tissue microarrays. Results: The Gleason scores after review (P=.06) tended to be associated with BCR when compared with the score initially reported (P=.74). Both the clinical stage (P=.02) and the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level (P=.01) were associated with biochemical failure. Whereas the expression of Ku80 and Ki67 were not predictive of relapse, positive DNA-PKcs nuclear staining (P=.003) and higher Ku70 expression (P=.05) were associated with BCR. On multivariate analysis, among pretreatment variables, only DNA-PKcs (P=.03) and clinical stage (P=.02) remained predictive of recurrence. None of the patients without palpable PCa and negative DNA-PKcs expression experienced biochemical failure, compared with 32% of men with palpable and positive DNA-PKcs staining that recurred. Conclusions: Our results suggest that DNA-PKcs could be a predictive marker of BCR after brachytherapy, and this might be a useful tool for optimizing the choice of treatment in low-risk PCa patients.

  2. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new treatment option permitting dose distribution optimization in interstitial implants. It possesses the advantage of equipment simplification and radiation protection to the staff, compared to the manually afterloading technique. This study pre...

  3. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  4. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  5. [Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: Potentials and Limitations of Social Health Insurance Data for Benefit Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horenkamp-Sonntag, D; Linder, R; Engel, S; Verheyen, F

    2016-05-01

    Due to the insufficient data base the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) had in 2009 after 7 years of deliberation decided to initiate consultation regarding ambulatory brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer for 10 years from social health insurance (SHI) benefits. The aim is to gain more findings by means of comparative studies. Based on the non-availability of clinical primary data of a methodologically acceptable level, it was analysed to what extent secondary data of the SHI may be used in order to arrive at valid conclusions for benefit aspects. As base approx. 8 million insured of TK with their data of cost reimbursement between 2006 and 2011 were considered. In SHI secondary data no clinical information regarding tumour stage and other prognostic factors are available. Therefore, a novel method with therapy-specific multisectoral inclusion and exclusion criteria, respectively, was developed in order to differentiate between localised and advanced tumours of the prostate. Overall survival, relapse-free survival, event-free survival and side-effects associated to prostate cancer were analysed. Out of 87 822 insured persons with the diagnosis prostate cancer, 795 with PBT, 10 936 with RP and 1 925 with EBRT were investigated in detail. The 4-year event-free survival rate was 73% for RP, 77% for PBT and 71% for EBRT. Many prostate cancer-specific side effects appeared already before intervention. Side effects of the intestinal tract (23.8%) and sexual impairments (26.5%) were more frequent for EBRT than for RP (17.1%/14.8%) and PBT (16.4%/13.2%). By means of SHI secondary data and adequate operationalisation important findings regarding relevant aspects of prostate cancer in healthcare research can be generated. However, these hold methodological limitations and are not suited to draw valid conclusions for benefit assessment. Based solely on SHI routine data valid statements regarding comparative benefit assessment are limited. Limitations could be

  6. PSA bounce phenomenon after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Masashi; Lederer, J.L.; Fukagai, Takashi; Yoshida, Hideki; Shimada, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    We described the temporarily increase phenomenon in prostate-specific antigen level (PSA bounce) after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) for localized prostate cancer. From December 1998 to May 2003, 500 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with TIPPB using iodine-125 or palladium-103. We examined 200 patients who have more than 2-year PSA follow-up. Median follow-up length was 1,069 days (range, 712-1,411 days). No patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormone therapy. PSA determinations were performed every 3 months for the first 2 years after procedure, and every 6 months hereafter. PSA bounce was defined as an increase of 0.1 ng/ml or greater above the preceding PSA level after implant followed by a subsequent decrease below that level. The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus panel criteria 1996 were used to define biochemical failure. PSA bounce was observed in 40% (80/200) of the cases receiving TIPPB. The median time to PSA bounce was 13 months from the day of implant. The median magnitude of the PSA bounce was 0.3 ng/ml from the pre-bounce level. Twelve cases demonstrated biochemical failure according to the ASTRO consensus guidelines of three consecutive rises in PSA. Ten of these subsequently showed a drop in PSA, consistent with biologic control of their disease. Two cases remain classified as apparent biochemical failures. A transient rise in the PSA following TIPPB, the so-called ''bounce'' is a common occurrence. The apparent PSA control of ten of twelve cases failing by the ASTRO criteria raises some concern. Further observation will be necessary to determine ways to discriminate these from true disease progression. (author)

  7. Treatment outcome with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in early-stage oral tongue cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalavat Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Although radical radiotherapy is known to be equally effective for early-stage oral tongue cancers (T1-2 N0 with the added advantage of organ and function preservation, surgery remains the preferred treatment. We present outcome of patients treated with brachytherapy (BT either radical or boost. Materials and Methods : Fifty-seven patients (T1/T2 31/26 were studied. Seventeen patients (30% were treated with radical BT (50-67 Gy while 40 (70% with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT + BT (36-56 Gy + 15-38 Gy]. Low-dose-rate (LDR BT was delivered with 192 Ir wires, using plastic bead technique with varied dose rates (< 60 cGy/h in 29 patients, 60-90 cGy/h in 17, and> 90 cGy/h in 11. Results : The overall local control (LCR was achieved in 59.7% (34/57 patients. LCR for T1 and T2 was 67.8% and 50%, respectively. A total of 23 patients had failures [local: 20 (T1: 8; T2: 12 patients, node: 5 (T1:2; T2: 3, and local + nodal: 3]. Overall 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival (OAS were 51% and 67%, respectively and those for T1 and T2 was 64.5/77.4% and 38.5/54% respectively (P = 0.002. All 16 patients were salvaged. Median survival after salvage treatment was 13.5 months (6-100 months. Soft tissue necrosis was observed in 12.3% (7/57 and osteoradionecrosis in two patients. Conclusion : BT, as an integral part of radical radiation therapy in early-stage tongue cancers, appears to be an effective alternative treatment modality with preservation of the organ and function without jeopardizing the outcome.

  8. Radiation oncology and medical physicists quality assurance in British Columbia Cancer Agency Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Morris, William James; Spadinger, Ingrid; Araujo, Cynthia; Cheung, Arthur; Chng, Nick; Crook, Juanita; Halperin, Ross; Lapointe, Vince; Miller, Stacy; Pai, Howard; Pickles, Tom

    2013-01-01

    To describe in detail British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency (BCCA) Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy (PB) Quality Assurance (QA) Program. The BCCA PB Program was established in 1997. It operates as one system, unified and supported by electronic and information systems, making it a single PB treatment provider for province of BC and Yukon. To date, >4000 patients have received PB (450 implants in 2011), making it the largest program in Canada. The Program maintains a large provincial prospective electronic database with records on all patients, including disease characteristics, risk stratification, pathology, preplan and postimplant dosimetric data, follow-up of prostate-specific antigen, and toxicity outcomes. QA was an integral part of the program since its inception. A formal QA Program was established in 2002, with key components that include: unified eligibility criteria and planning system, comprehensive database, physics and oncologist training and mentorship programs, peer review process, individual performance outcomes and feedback process, structured continuing education and routine assessment of the program's dosimetry, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen outcomes, administration and program leadership that promotes a strong culture of patient safety. The emphasis on creating a robust, broad-based network of skilled providers has been achieved by the program's requirements for training, education, and the QA process. The formal QA process is considered a key factor for the success of cancer control outcomes achieved at BCCA. Although this QA model may not be wholly transferable to all PB programs, some of its key components may be applicable to other programs to ensure quality in PB and patient safety. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Psychosocial adjustment in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Aguilar, Salvador; Guerra-Cruz, Hilda Griselda; Cupil-Rodríguez, Aura Lizbet; Calderillo-Ruiz, Germán; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial adaptation is a measurement that represents the patient's adjustment to those changes involved in their illness. We undertook this study to search for individual characteristics and clinical aspects associated with successful psychosocial adjustment in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing (CT) chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Seventy-five patients with CRC treated with CT or CRT in a cancer center were included. Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale Self-Reporting (PAIS-SR) questionnaire was used as a measurement of psychosocial adjustment. Psychosocial adaptation was successful in 18 patients (24%) and unsuccessful in 57 patients (76%). Young patients, married patients and males showed lower psychosocial adaptation to disease. This is associated with the decrease in sexual relations, economic resources and psychological symptoms. Patients complained that they were unsatisfied due to the lack of disease and treatment information offered by the heath care team. In the process of adaptation, clinical features such as tumor location and treatment scheme are considered basic, as well as age, education, marital status. Areas such as sexuality, interpersonal and family relationships, economic status and emotional state of patients affected by the disease and treatments provide a deep complexity in the study of the psychosocial adaptation process in patients with CRC.

  10. Implementing MRI-based target delineation for cervical cancer treatment within a rapid workflow environment for image-guided brachytherapy: A practical approach for centers without in-room MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Kim, Taeho; Garda, Allison; Watkins, W Tyler; Erickson, Sarah; Ornan, Afshan; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based intracavitary brachytherapy offers several advantages over computed tomography (CT)-based brachytherapy, but many centers are unable to offer it at the time of brachytherapy because of logistic and/or financial considerations. We have implemented a method of integrating MRI into a CT-guided, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy workflow in clinics that do not have immediately available MRI capability. At our institution, patients receiving high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy as a component of the definitive treatment of cervical cancer have a Smit sleeve placed during the first brachytherapy fraction in a dedicated suite with in-room CT-on-rails. After the first fraction of brachytherapy, an MRI is obtained with the Smit sleeve, but no applicator, in place. For each subsequent fraction, CT scans are coregistered to the MRI scan by the Smit sleeve. The gross target volume is defined by MRI and overlaid on the CT images for each brachytherapy treatment for dose optimization. This MRI-integrated workflow adds workflow is a feasible compromise to preserve an efficient workflow while integrating MRI target delineation, and it provides many of the advantages of both MRI- and CT-based brachytherapy. The future collection and analysis of clinical data will serve to compare the proposed approach to non-MRI containing techniques. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos [J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Zoga, Eleni [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Strouthos, Iosif [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Butt, Saeed Ahmed [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassende Darstellung relevanter Literatur zur interstitiellen High-Dose-Rate-Brachytherapie als Salvage-Modalitaet (sHDR-BRT) bei der Behandlung des lokal rezidivierten Prostatakarzinoms nach vorausgegangener definitiver Radiotherapie (RT). In der PubMed-Datenbank wurde eine Literaturrecherche mit den Suchbegriffen ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' durchgefuehrt. Zwischen den Jahren 2000 und 2016 wurden 51 Publikationen identifiziert. Die biochemische Kontrolle (BC) sowie das assoziierte Toxizitaetsprofil waren onkologische Hauptpunkte in der Analyse der beruecksichtigten Literatur. Von onkologischen Ergebnissen und Toxizitaeten berichteten 11 Publikationen bei einer medianen Nachbeobachtungszeit von 4-191 Monaten. Eine Variabilitaet von Dosis- und Fraktionierungsregimen wurde beschrieben mit totalen physikalischen Dosen von 19,0 Gy in 2 Fraktionen bis zu 42,0 Gy in 6 Fraktionen

  12. Computed Tomography–Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Treating Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.zolciak@wp.pl [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Gruszczynska, Ewelina; Bijok, Michal [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Jonska-Gmyrek, Joanna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Dabkowski, Mateusz [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Staniaszek, Jagna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Michalski, Wojciech [Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Adam; Milanowska, Katarzyna [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of computed tomography (CT)–planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) for treating cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: CT-planned HDR BT was performed according to the adapted Group European de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) recommendations in 216 consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB to IVA, who were treated with conformal external beam radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy. We analyzed outcomes and late side effects evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Subjective, Objective, Management, Analysis evaluation scoring system and compared them with the results from a historical group. Results: The median age was 56 years (range, 32-83 years). The median follow-up time for living patients was 52 months (range 37-63 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence function for the local recurrence rate for patients with FIGO II and III was 5.5% and 20%, respectively (P=.001). The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 66.4% and 58.5%, respectively. The relative risk of failure for OS and DFS for FIGO III in relation to FIGO II was 2.24 (P=.003) and 2.6 (P=.000) and for lymph node enlargement was 2.3 (P=.002) and 2 (P=.006), respectively. In 2 patients, rectovaginal fistula occurred, and in 1 patient, vesicovaginal fistula occurred without local progression. Comparison of late adverse effects in patients treated according to the GEC-ESTRO recommendations and in the historical group revealed a reduction in fistula formation of 59% and also a reduction in rectal grade 3 to 4 late toxicity of >59%. Conclusions: This is the largest report with mature data of CT-planned BT HDR for the treatment of cervical cancer with good local control and

  13. {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy for the treatment of parotid gland cancers in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Song, T.; Zhang, J.; Yu, G.; Zhang, Y. [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2013-05-15

    Background and purpose: There is a lack of optimal treatment strategies for managing salivary gland cancers in children and adolescents. This study is aimed at assessing the effect of {sup 125}I seed implantation for the treatment of parotid cancers in children and adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 12 patients younger than 16 years with parotid gland malignant tumors underwent {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy between October 2003 and November 2008. All patients were assessed after treatment and at the local tumor control appointments. Facial nerve function, maxillofacial development, and radioactive side-effects were assessed. Results: The follow-up period ranged from 41-104 months. One patient with T4b died of pulmonary metastasis. The other patients were alive during the follow-up period. There were no serious radiation-related complications. The treatment did not affect facial nerve function and dentofacial growth in any of the children. Conclusion: For parotid gland cancers in children, {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy may be an acceptable treatment without serious complications and with satisfactory short-term effects. (orig.)

  14. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos; Zoga, Eleni; Strouthos, Iosif; Butt, Saeed Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [de

  15. Comparison between external beam radiotherapy (70 Gy/74 Gy) and permanent interstitial brachytherapy in 890 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, Gregor; Pötter, Richard; Battermann, Jan J.; Kirisits, Christian; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Sljivic, Samir; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of this analysis was to compare biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) rates in intermediate-risk prostate-cancer patients treated at two centres of excellence using different approaches: permanent interstitial brachytherapy (BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Materials and methods: A total of 890 intermediate-risk prostate-cancer patients, who were treated from 1998 to 2008, were identified in the two local databases. In Utrecht 601 patients received I-125 BT applying a dose of 144 Gy. In Vienna 289 patients were treated by EBRT, applying a local dose of 70 Gy in 105 patients and 74 Gy in 184 patients. bNED-rates (Phoenix-definition) were assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months (1–150). 5-Year actuarial bNED-rates were 81% for BT-patients and 75% for EBRT-patients (67% for 70 Gy and 82% for 74 Gy), respectively. In univariate analysis no difference between BT and EBRT could be detected. In multivariate analysis including tumour-stage, GleasonScore, initial PSA, hormonal therapy and treatment-centre (BT vs. EBRT) only T-stage, GleasonScore and PSA were found to be significant. Additional analysis including radiation dose showed the same outcome. Conclusions: Intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy show biochemical tumour-control-rates which are comparable to EBRT of 74 Gy.

  16. Clinical outcomes from an innovative protocol using serial ultrasound imaging and a single MR image to guide brachytherapy for locally advanced cervix cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Sylvia; Narayan, Kailash; Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Khaw, Pearly; Lin, Ming Yin; Schneider, Michal

    The aim of this study was to report clinical outcomes in a series of patients who underwent serial ultrasound and a single MRI to plan and verify intracavitary brachytherapy. Data for patients who were referred for curative intent radiotherapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage 1-1V cervix cancer between January 2007 and March 2012 were analyzed. All patients received external beam radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and sequential high-dose rate brachytherapy. Brachytherapy was planned and verified using serial ultrasound imaging and a single MRI. Data from 191 patients were available for analyses. The median (range) followup time was 5.08 (0.25-8.25) years. Five-year local control, failure-free survival, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were 86%, 57.3%, 70% and 63%, respectively. Mean (standard deviation) combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy target doses, equivalent to doses in 2 Gy fractions were 80.4 Gy10 (3.89), median (range) 80 (49-96) Gy10. Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal, genitourinary, or vaginal late toxicity occurred in 3%, 1.6%, and 2% of patients, respectively. Survival, patterns of failure, and late complication rates were similar to published series of MRI/CT-based brachytherapy practices. This large study demonstrates that favorable treatment outcomes can be obtained using a pragmatic and innovative combination of ultrasound and MR imaging. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of 3D imaging and awareness of GEC-ESTRO recommendations for cervix cancer brachytherapy throughout Australia and New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyk, S Van; Bernshaw, D.; Byram, D.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A 2005 survey of practices indicated limited use of three dimensional (3D) imaging modalities and planning methods in cervix cancer brachytherapy in Australia and New Zealand. However, advancing technologies and published recommendations are influencing change. This survey aims to identify both changes in practice and awareness and uptake of Groupe European de Curietherapie of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) recommendations. Methods: A survey was emailed to all radiotherapy departments with brachytherapy facilities. Twenty departments practise brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix. The survey consisted of five questions enquiring about use and type of 3D imaging; rate of reimaging and replanning; and contouring, prescribing and reporting practices. Results: A 100% response rate was obtained. Sixty-five per cent of departments use 3D CT imaging to plan brachytherapy insertions. Thirty per cent of departments use two-dimensional ( 2D ) x-rays. Four departments (20%) use a combination of imaging modalities including CT, ultrasound and MRI. Sixtyfive per cent of departments reimage and replan for each insertion. Four departments (20%) contour, prescribe dose and report treatment according to GEC-ESTRO recommendations. Conclusions: There has been a marked increase in the use of 3D imaging and awareness of GEC-ESTRO recommendations. Implementation and reporting of image-based gynaecological brachytherapy is strongly dependent on local resources and infrastructure.

  18. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G.; Forrai, G.; Sulyok, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [de

  19. Development of brachytherapy medium doserate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atang Susila; Ari Satmoko; Ahmad Rifai; Kristiyanti

    2010-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment for different types of cancers and it become a common treatment modality in most radiotherapy clinics. PRPN has had experience in development of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy for cervix cancer treatment. However the treatment process using LDR device needs 5 hours in time that the patient feel uncomfort. Therefore PRPN develops Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy with radiation activity not more than 5 Currie. The project is divided into two stages. Purchasing of TPS software and TDS design are held in 2010, and the construction will be in 2011. (author)

  20. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  1. Obstructive urination problems after high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost treatment for prostate cancer are avoidable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kragelj, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at improving treatment individualization in patients with prostate cancer treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to boost the dose to prostate (HDRB-B), the objective was to evaluate factors that have potential impact on obstructive urination problems (OUP) after HDRB-B. In the follow-up study 88 patients consecutively treated with HDRB-B at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the period 2006-2011 were included. The observed outcome was deterioration of OUP (DOUP) during the follow-up period longer than 1 year. Univariate and multivariate relationship analysis between DOUP and potential risk factors (treatment factors, patients’ characteristics) was carried out by using binary logistic regression. ROC curve was constructed on predicted values and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess the performance of the multivariate model. Analysis was carried out on 71 patients who completed 3 years of follow-up. DOUP was noted in 13/71 (18.3%) of them. The results of multivariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between DOUP and anti-coagulation treatment (OR 4.86, 95% C.I. limits: 1.21-19.61, p = 0.026). Also minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra volume was close to statistical significance (OR = 1.23; 95% C.I. limits: 0.98-1.07, p = 0.099). The value of AUC was 0.755. The study emphasized the relationship between DOUP and anticoagulation treatment, and suggested the multivariate model with fair predictive performance. This model potentially enables a reduction of DOUP after HDRB-B. It supports the belief that further research should be focused on urethral sphincter as a critical structure for OUP

  2. Use of CT or MR dosimetry in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Das, R.; See, A.; Duchesne, G.M.; Van Dyk, S.; Tai, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) has, in recent years, become a well-utilised treatment option for prostate cancer. Tumour control probability relies on accurate dosimetry, which in turn relies on the accurate definition of the prostate gland. In external beam radiotherapy and BT, MRI has been shown to be a superior imaging modality when delineating the prostate gland especially at the apex. To date, data on MRI planning in prostate BT has focussed mainly on permanent interstitial implants. No data currently exists comparing MRI vs CT planning in HDR BT and its subsequent impact on prostate dosimetry. To determine the effects of MRI vs CT in HDR BT with respect to prostatic volumes and normal tissue doses, with the evaluations made using dose-volume histograms (DVH). Dosimetry parameters derived using CT and MRI (T2 weighted) scans of 11 patients who had received TRUS guided implants for HDR BT, were compared using the PlatoTM computer planning system. Treatment plans were generated on volumes marked by the same radiation oncologist for each patient. Comparison was made of the treatment plans (dosimetry) between: 1. CT generated plans; 2. CT generated plans assessed using MRI marked volumes and 3. MRI generated plans. We confirm the previously reported results that CT scans can overestimate prostatic volumes compared with MRI. Variations were noted in CT and MRI based plans that may allow improved sparing of the rectum and urethra when using MRI planning. The main disadvantages of using MRI scans are access to facilities as well as identifying a dummy source to adequately define the tips of our catheters. It is feasible to utilise MRI scans for HDR BT planning. The clearer definition of anatomical structures has added advantages when contouring the prostate

  3. Obstructive urination problems after high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost treatment for prostate cancer are avoidable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelj, Borut

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at improving treatment individualization in patients with prostate cancer treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to boost the dose to prostate (HDRB-B), the objective was to evaluate factors that have potential impact on obstructive urination problems (OUP) after HDRB-B. In the follow-up study 88 patients consecutively treated with HDRB-B at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the period 2006-2011 were included. The observed outcome was deterioration of OUP (DOUP) during the follow-up period longer than 1 year. Univariate and multivariate relationship analysis between DOUP and potential risk factors (treatment factors, patients' characteristics) was carried out by using binary logistic regression. ROC curve was constructed on predicted values and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess the performance of the multivariate model. Analysis was carried out on 71 patients who completed 3 years of follow-up. DOUP was noted in 13/71 (18.3%) of them. The results of multivariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between DOUP and anti-coagulation treatment (OR 4.86, 95% C.I. limits: 1.21-19.61, p = 0.026). Also minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra volume was close to statistical significance (OR = 1.23; 95% C.I. limits: 0.98-1.07, p = 0.099). The value of AUC was 0.755. The study emphasized the relationship between DOUP and anticoagulation treatment, and suggested the multivariate model with fair predictive performance. This model potentially enables a reduction of DOUP after HDRB-B. It supports the belief that further research should be focused on urethral sphincter as a critical structure for OUP.

  4. SU-E-J-270: Study of PET Response to HDR Brachytherapy of Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, R; Le, Y; Armour, E; Efron, J; Azad, N; Wahl, R; Gearhart, S; Herman, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response studies in radiation therapy are typically using single response values for tumors across ensembles of tumors. Using the high dose rate (HDR) treatment plan dose grid and pre- and post-therapy FDG-PET images, we look for correlations between voxelized dose and FDG uptake response in individual tumors. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated for localized rectal cancer using 192Ir HDR brachytherapy in conjunction with surgery. FDG-PET images were acquired before HDR therapy and 6–8 weeks after treatment (prior to surgery). Treatment planning was done on a commercial workstation and the dose grid was calculated. The two PETs and the treatment dose grid were registered to each other using non-rigid registration. The difference in PET SUV values before and after HDR was plotted versus absorbed radiation dose for each voxel. The voxels were then separated into bins for every 400 cGy of absorbed dose and the bin average values plotted similarly. Results: Individual voxel doses did not correlate with PET response; however, when group into tumor subregions corresponding to dose bins, eighty percent of the patients showed a significant positive correlation (R2 > 0) between PET uptake difference in the targeted region and the absorbed dose. Conclusion: By considering larger ensembles of voxels, such as organ average absorbed dose or the dose bins considered here, valuable information may be obtained. The dose-response correlations as measured by FDG-PET difference potentially underlines the importance of FDG-PET as a measure of response, as well as the value of voxelized information.

  5. SU-E-T-661: Quantitative MRI Assessment of a Novel Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Leung, E; Ravi, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the MR image quality of a novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator for cervical cancer, using the clinical MRI scanning protocol for image guided brachytherapy. Methods: The tungsten alloy-based applicator was placed in a water phantom and clinical imaging protocol was performed. Axial images were acquired using 2D turbo-spin echo (TSE) T2-weighted sequence on a 1.5T GE 450w MR scanner and an 8-channel body coil. As multi-channel receiver coil was used, inhomogeneities in the B1 receive field must be considered before performing the quantification process. Therefore the applicator was removed from the phantom and the whole imaging session was performed again for the water phantom with the same parameters. Images from the two scans were then subtracted, resulting in a difference image that only shows the applicator with its surrounding magnetic susceptibility dipole artifact. Line profiles were drawn and plotted on the difference image at various angles and locations along the tandem. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) was measured at all the line profiles to quantify the extent of the artifact. Additionally, the extent of the artifact along the diameter of the tandem was measured at various angles and locations. Results: After removing the background inhomogeneities of the receiver coil, FWHM of the tandem measured 5.75 ± 0.35 mm (the physical tandem diameter is 5.4 mm). The average extent of the artifacts along the diameter of the tandem measured is 2.14 ± 0.56 mm. In contrast to CT imaging of the same applicator (not shown here), the tandem can be easily identified without additional correction algorithms. Conclusion: This work demonstrated that the novel DMBT tandem applicator has minimal susceptibility artifact in T2-weighted images employed in clinical practice for MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

  6. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients

  7. WE-FG-BRA-02: Docetaxel Eluting Brachytherapy Spacers for Local Chemo-Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Kumar, R; Sridhar, S [Northeastern University & Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G; Nguyen, P [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D’Amico, A [Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Cormack, R [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose an innovative combinatorial treatment strategy of Local ChemoRadiation Therapy (LCRT) using a sustained drug delivery platform in the form of a spacer to locally radio-sensitize the prostate with Docetaxel (DTX) enabling a synergistic cure with the use of lower radiation doses. These biodegradable spacers are physically similar to the inert spacers routinely used in prostate brachytherapy but are now loaded with formulations of DTX. Methods: Spacers were loaded with ∼500µg Docetaxel (DTX) for prostate cancer studies. The implants were characterized in vitro using SEM and HPLC. The release kinetic studies were carried out in buffer (pH 6.0) at 37°C. Subcutaneous PC3 tumors were xenografted in nude mice. Prostate cancer studies were done with and without radiation using SARRP at 5Gy, 10Gy, and 15Gy. Drug-loaded implants were injected once intratumorally using an 18G brachytherapy needle. Results: The release study in vitro showed a highly sustained release for multiple weeks at therapeutically relevant doses. The monotherapy with local DTX spacer showed sustained tumor inhibition compared to empty implants and an equivalent DTX dose given systemically. At 40 days, 89% survival was observed for mice treated with DTX implants compared with 0% in all other treatment groups. The combined treatment with local DTX spacer and radiation (10Gy) showed the highest degree of tumor suppression (significant tumor growth inhibition by day 90). The control mice showed continuous tumor growth and were scarified by day 56. Groups of mice treated with DTX-spacer or radiation alone showed initial tumor suppression but growth continued after day 60. A larger experiment is ongoing. Conclusion: This approach provides localized delivery of the chemotherapeutic sensitizer directly to the tumor and avoids the toxicities associated with both brachytherapy and current systemic delivery of docetaxel. Sustained release of DTX is an effective chemotherapy option alone or

  8. Nationwide, Multicenter, Retrospective Study on High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yoshioka@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kotsuma, Tadayuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Komiya, Akira [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Department of Urology, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Kariya, Shinji [Department of Radiology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nonomura, Norio [Department of Urology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Eiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Nishimura, Kensaku [Department of Urology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Fujiuchi, Yasuyoshi; Kitamura, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Yamagami, Takuji [Department of Radiology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Yamasaki, Ichiro [Department of Urology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Nishimura, Kazuo [Department of Urology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To present, analyze, and discuss results of a nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study on high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as monotherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1995 through 2013, 524 patients, 73 (14%) with low-risk, 207 (40%) with intermediate-risk, and 244 (47%) with high-risk prostate cancer, were treated with HDR-BT as monotherapy at 5 institutions in Japan. Dose fractionations were 27 Gy/2 fractions for 69 patients (13%), 45.5 Gy/7 fractions for 168 (32%), 49 Gy/7 fractions for 149 (28%), 54 Gy/9 fractions for 130 (25%), and others for 8 (2%). Of these patients, 156 (30%) did not receive androgen deprivation therapy, and 202 patients (39%) did receive androgen deprivation therapy <1 year, 112 (21%) for 1-3 years, and 54 (10%) for >3 years. Median follow-up time was 5.9 years (range, 0.4-18.1 years), with a minimum of 2 years for surviving patients. Results: After 5 years, respective actuarial rates of no biochemical evidence of disease, overall survival, cause-specific survival, and metastasis-free survival for all patients were 92%, 97%, 99%, and 94%. For low/intermediate/high-risk patients, the 5-year no biochemical evidence of disease rates were 95%/94%/89%, the 5-year overall survival rates were 98%/98%/94%, the 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 98%/100%/98%, and the 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 98%/95%/90%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of late grade 2 to 3 genitourinary toxicity at 5 years was 19%, and that of late grade 3 was 1%. The corresponding incidences of gastrointestinal toxicity were 3% and 0% (0.2%). No grade 4 or 5 of either type of toxicity was detected. Conclusions: The findings of this nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study demonstrate that HDR-BT as monotherapy was safe and effective for all patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer.

  9. Nationwide, Multicenter, Retrospective Study on High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Komiya, Akira; Kariya, Shinji; Konishi, Koji; Nonomura, Norio; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Eiichi; Nishimura, Kensaku; Fujiuchi, Yasuyoshi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yamagami, Takuji; Yamasaki, Ichiro; Nishimura, Kazuo; Teshima, Teruki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Itami, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To present, analyze, and discuss results of a nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study on high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as monotherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1995 through 2013, 524 patients, 73 (14%) with low-risk, 207 (40%) with intermediate-risk, and 244 (47%) with high-risk prostate cancer, were treated with HDR-BT as monotherapy at 5 institutions in Japan. Dose fractionations were 27 Gy/2 fractions for 69 patients (13%), 45.5 Gy/7 fractions for 168 (32%), 49 Gy/7 fractions for 149 (28%), 54 Gy/9 fractions for 130 (25%), and others for 8 (2%). Of these patients, 156 (30%) did not receive androgen deprivation therapy, and 202 patients (39%) did receive androgen deprivation therapy 3 years. Median follow-up time was 5.9 years (range, 0.4-18.1 years), with a minimum of 2 years for surviving patients. Results: After 5 years, respective actuarial rates of no biochemical evidence of disease, overall survival, cause-specific survival, and metastasis-free survival for all patients were 92%, 97%, 99%, and 94%. For low/intermediate/high-risk patients, the 5-year no biochemical evidence of disease rates were 95%/94%/89%, the 5-year overall survival rates were 98%/98%/94%, the 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 98%/100%/98%, and the 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 98%/95%/90%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of late grade 2 to 3 genitourinary toxicity at 5 years was 19%, and that of late grade 3 was 1%. The corresponding incidences of gastrointestinal toxicity were 3% and 0% (0.2%). No grade 4 or 5 of either type of toxicity was detected. Conclusions: The findings of this nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study demonstrate that HDR-BT as monotherapy was safe and effective for all patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer.

  10. Sexual potency following interactive ultrasound-guided brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Richard G.; Stone, Nelson N.; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer is associated with preservation of erectile function in the vast majority of patients, although a minor decrease in potency is not uncommon

  11. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  12. Palliation of recurrent esophageal cancer after definitive radiotherapy with intraluminal brachytherapy. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Shiau, An-Cheng; Liang, Ji-An; Yang, Shih-Neng; Lin, Fang-Jen

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of palliative intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) for recurrent esophageal cancer after definitive radiotherapy. From January 2000 to December 2002, 10 consecutive patients with recurrent esophageal cancer after definitive radiotherapy completed allocated ILBT, were enrolled into the analysis. All patients presented with a World Health Organization (WHO) dysphagia score III or more (III: 7; IV: 3). The ILBT was delivered with a special assembled applicator composed of three layers of plastic tubes, inserted transorally. The active treatment length of ILBT was defined as the site of recurrent esophageal tumor plus 1 cm each from the proximal and distal margins. The ILBT was performed by high-dose-rate iridium-192 remote after-loading technique. The ILBT consisted of 2 to 4 fractions of 3 Gy at 1-week intervals. The prescribed dose was specified at a 1 cm depth from the mid-dwell position and the dosimetry was calculated using computer-based software. Patients were followed up monthly and assessed for relief of dysphagia and development of complications. All patients completed the allocated ILBT schedule. Eight patients died (2 from distant metastasis; 3 from respiratory failure by tumor invasion; 2 from aspiration pneumonia; 1 from chemotherapy-induced sepsis). The median survival of the 10 patients was 5 months (range 2 to 32), and the estimated 1-year actuarial survival was 24%. Time to recurrence of more than 3 months was the only prognostic factor for longer survival (p=0.01). When the response of ILBT was assessed one month after treatment, eight patients achieved improvement of dysphagia, while two patients got worse. The median dysphagia progression-free interval (DPFI) of the 8 responders was 3 months (range 2 to 7). The predictive parameter for good ILBT response was an initial dysphagia score (p=0.01). Only one patient developed tracheo-esophageal fistula 3 months after ILBT. Fractionated

  13. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkati, Maroie; Williams, Scott G.; Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat; Dyk, Sylvia van; See, Andrew; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  14. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  15. Indications, techniques and results of postoperative brachytherapy in cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernot, M.; Aletti, P.; Carolus, J.M.; Marquis, I.; Hoffstetter, S.; Maaloul, F.; Peiffert, D.; Lapeyre, M.; Luporsi, E.; Marchal, C.; Noeel, A.; Bey, P.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/objective: We tried to reduce the number of local recurrences after surgery and external beam irradiation (EBI) in carcinoma of the oral cavity, when margins were positive or close. Material and methods: From 1980 to 1992, we treated 97 cases of carcinomas of the oral cavity by postoperative brachytherapy. Surgery was combined with EBI+brachytherapy in 51 cases and with brachytherapy alone in 46 cases. We treated 29 T1, 34 T2, 30 T3T4 and four Tx (73% were N0 at first examination and 23% had positive nodes). The type of surgery is analysed. Brachytherapy was performed in one or two planes along the surgical scar. If the mandibular rim was resected, especially when the tongue or the remaining floor were sutured to the internal face of the inferior lip or to the buccal mucosa, the bridge technique was used. To decrease the dose to the inferior part of the mandible, the bridge was modified thanks to experimental dosimetry. Results: At 5 years, the local control (LC) is 89%, the locoregional control (LRC) 82%, the specific survival (SS) 74% and the overall survival (OS) 67%. Complications: We noted 19% of grade 1 (minor), 12% of grade 2 (moderate) and 6% of grade 3 (major) complications. Conclusion: Compared with the results of the literature, we think that postoperative brachytherapy can improve classical radiosurgical results in selected cases with a risk of local recurrence

  16. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae

    1994-01-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author)

  17. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-10-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author).

  18. Assessment of radiation doses to the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes delivered by image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy M I; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars U

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the dose delivered to lymph nodes (LNs) by brachytherapy (BT) and the effect of BT image-guided optimization on the LN dose. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were retrospectively analyzed, 16 patients of them had LN...

  19. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a promising treatment option for the boost of oropharyngeal cancers not suitable for brachytherapy: a single-institutional experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamgani, A.; Tans, L.; Teguh, D.N.; Rooij, P. van; Zwijnenburg, E.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 2005 and 2010,

  20. Bowel morbidity following radiochemotherapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Physician- and patient reported outcome from the EMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nina Boje Kibsgaard; Pötter, Richard; Kirchheiner, Kathrin

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: This study describes late bowel morbidity prospectively assessed in the multi-institutional EMBRACE study on MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). MATERIALS/METHODS: A total of 1176 patients were analyzed. Physician reported morbidity (C...

  1. Image guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Improved pelvic control and survival in RetroEMBRACE, a multicenter cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdza, Alina; Pötter, Richard; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for locally advanced cervical cancer allows dose escalation to the high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) while sparing organs at risk (OAR). This is the first comprehensive report on clinical outcome in a large multi-institutional cohort. Patients and ...

  2. Multivariable model development and internal validation for prostate cancer specific survival and overall survival after whole-gland salvage Iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Max; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem R N; Moerland, Marinus A; Hoekstra, Carel J; van de Pol, Sandrine; Westendorp, Hendrik; Maenhout, Metha; Kattevilder, Rob; Verkooijen, Helena M; van Rossum, Peter S N; Ahmed, Hashim U; Shah, Taimur T; Emberton, Mark; van Vulpen, Marco

    BACKGROUND: Whole-gland salvage Iodine-125-brachytherapy is a potentially curative treatment strategy for localised prostate cancer (PCa) recurrences after radiotherapy. Prognostic factors influencing PCa-specific and overall survival (PCaSS & OS) are not known. The objective of this study was to

  3. A design and construction of wire drive mechanical barrier system on the medium dose brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Khasan; Tri Harjanto; Ari Satmoko

    2012-01-01

    A design and construction of wire drive mechanical barrier system on the medium dose brachytherapy for cervical cancer has been done as a complete system for security of both mechanically and electrically during the operation of the device as a whole. The design and construction were carried out by paying attention to the length of wire dimensions, the diameter of the roller drum for wire, the process of wire rolling and delivery path length of the radioactive source or also the checker. The length dimension of wire or delivery path length with a diameter of drum rollers which is converted into 2 pieces of limiting the size of the circular line on the gear system is integrated with the limit switch/divider electrically. By using this barrier the security and certainty of the wire rolling and delivery process are assured, either wire of radioactive sources or also wire of checker. The materials or components used are aluminum for gear system and limit switches for electrical systems. The result of the construction is a set of equipment that is used to complete a safety facility operating on the wire drive module of medium dose brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of a combination of brachytherapy applicators for uterine cervix cancer with involvement of the distal vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an alternative brachytherapy technique for uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina, without increasing the risk of toxicity. Materials And Methods: Theoretical study comparing three different high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy applicators: intrauterine tandem and vaginal cylinder (TC); tandem/ring applicator combined with vaginal cylinder (TR+C); and a virtual applicator combining both the tandem/ring and vaginal cylinder in a single device (TRC). Prescribed doses were 7 Gy at point A, and 5 Gy on the surface or at a 5 mm depth of the vaginal mucosa. Doses delivered to the rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon were kept below the tolerance limits. Volumes covered by the isodoses, respectively, 50% (V50), 100% (V100), 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) were compared. Results: Both the combined TR+C and TRC presented a better dose distribution as compared with the TC applicator. The TR+C dose distribution was similar to the TRC dose, with V150 and V200 being about 50% higher for TR+C (within the cylinder). Conclusion: Combined TR+C in a two-time single application may represent an alternative therapy technique for patients affected by uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina. (author)

  5. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Mahantshetty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods : This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1, after 50 ml (series 2, and 100 ml (series 3 bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results : The mean (± SD bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25 cc, 116.2 (± 28 cc, and 172.9 (± 29 cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm 3 ,1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , and 2 cm 3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1 compared to full bladder (series 3 (p = 0.03 was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions : Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume

  6. Long-Term Results of a Randomized Trial in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: No Benefit From Adding a Brachytherapy Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Pløen, John; Rafaelsen, Søren R.; Lindebjerg, Jan; Havelund, Birgitte M.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Mature data on tumor control and survival are presented from a randomized trial of the addition of a brachytherapy boost to long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and November 2008, 248 patients with T3-4N0-2M0 rectal cancer were prospectively randomized to either long-course preoperative CRT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, per oral tegafur-uracil and L-leucovorin) alone or the same CRT schedule plus a brachytherapy boost (10 Gy in 2 fractions). The primary trial endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) at the time of surgery; secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and freedom from locoregional failure. Results: Results for the primary endpoint have previously been reported. This analysis presents survival data for the 224 patients in the Danish part of the trial. In all, 221 patients (111 control arm, 110 brachytherapy boost arm) had data available for analysis, with a median follow-up time of 5.4 years. Despite a significant increase in tumor response at the time of surgery, no differences in 5-year OS (70.6% vs 63.6%, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, P=.34) and PFS (63.9% vs 52.0%, HR=1.22, P=.32) were observed. Freedom from locoregional failure at 5 years were 93.9% and 85.7% (HR=2.60, P=.06) in the standard and in the brachytherapy arms, respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of stoma. Explorative analysis based on stratification for tumor regression grade and resection margin status indicated the presence of response migration. Conclusions: Despite increased pathologic tumor regression at the time of surgery, we observed no benefit on late outcome. Improved tumor regression does not necessarily lead to a relevant clinical benefit when the neoadjuvant treatment is followed by high-quality surgery

  7. Three-dimensional computed tomography-guided monotherapeutic pararectal brachytherapy of prostate cancer with seminal vesicle invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutrouvelis, Panos; Lailas, Niko; Hendricks, Fred; Gil-Montero, Guillermo; Sehn, James; Katz, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To treat patients with prostate cancer and seminal vesicle invasion with monotherapeutic three dimensional computed tomography (3-DCT)-guided posterior pararectal brachytherapy. Methods and materials: Three hundred and sixty two patients with clinical stage T1 a,b or T2 a,b of prostate cancer were referred for 3-DCT-guided brachytherapy. Each underwent further staging with 3-D CT-guided pararectal biopsy of the seminal vesicles under local anesthesia during the pre-treatment CT-planning. Forty-three patients (12%) were upstaged to T3 cNoMo disease. In the set of 43 patients, Eight had Gleason's score≤6, 24 Gleason's score=7, and 11 patients ≥8. Initial PSA was 20 in 18 patients. Of the 43 patients, 37 patients were treated monotherapeutically with 3-D CT-guided brachytherapy. No patients received hormone therapy after the implant. The prescribed dosage to the seminal vesicles and prostate is 120 Gy with Pd-103 seeds and 144 Gy with 1-125 seeds. Results: The prescribed dosage was achieved in all 37 patient's throughout the seminal vesicles whose range of target radiation extended 5-10 mm outside the target in the adjacent fat as calculated with post-implant CT-dosimetry with Varian Brachy Vision or MMS software. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) outcome data were available in 34 patients treated with monotherapy and follow up ranged from 12-56 months (median, 24 months). Decreased PSA levels were stratified into six groups based on the presenting Gleason's score and initial PSA. In the first group (with Gleason's score≤6 and initial PSA 20 ng/ml), PSA decreased to less than 0.5 ng/ml in four out of eight patients (50%). All of the patients in the fourth group (with Gleason's score≥8 and initial PSA 20 ng/ml). There were no patients with Gleason's score of 1-6 and greater than 20 ng/ml initial PSA. Patients, irrespective of the Gleason's score and PSA, had an overall response of decreased PSA (less than 1 ng/ml) of 79%. Conclusion: 3-D CT

  8. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. Methods: The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. Results: The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with ±5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within ±5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs to be

  9. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States); Department of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. Methods: The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. Results: The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with {+-}5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within {+-}5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs

  10. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S

    2010-10-01

    The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with +/- 5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within +/- 5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs to be measured for each case with

  11. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  12. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  13. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  14. Brachytherapy for the palliation of dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Mandolesi, Daniele; Farioli, Andrea; Hassan, Cesare; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra; de Bortoli, Nicola; Cilla, Savino; Pierantoni, Chiara; Violante, Francesco Saverio; Bazzoli, Franco; Repici, Alessandro; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    The management of dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer is challenging. Brachytherapy has been proposed as an alternative option to stent placement. We performed a systematic review to examine its efficacy and safety in the resolution of dysphagia. Prospective studies recruiting at least 20 patients with malignant dysphagia and published up to April 2016 were eligible. The dysphagia-free survival (DFS) and adverse event rates were pooled by means of a random effect model. Six studies for a total of 9 treatment arms (623 patients) were eligible for inclusion. After 1month since treatment, the DFS rate was 86.9% [95%CI: 76.0-93.3%]; after 3months, it was 67.2% [95%CI: 56.1-76.7%]; after 6months, it was 47.4% [95%CI: 38.5-56.5%]; after 9months, it was 37.6% [95%CI:30.0-45.9%]; and, finally, after 12months, it was 29.4% [95%CI: 21.6-38.7%]. The heterogeneity between studies was high at 1-, 3- and 6-month assessment; the values of I 2 were 86.3%, 80.0% and 57.8%, respectively. The meta-regression analysis showed total radiation dose and number of fractions as the only positively influencing factors. Severe adverse event rate was 22.6% (95%CI 19.4-26.3). The main reported adverse events were brachytherapy-related stenosis (12.2%) and fistula development (8.3%). Two cases (0.3%) of deaths were reported due to esophageal perforation. Brachytherapy is a highly effective and relatively safe treatment option therefore its underuse is no longer justified. Further studies should investigate the optimal radiation dose and number of fractions able to achieve the highest DFS rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 02: Positional accuracy in Pd-103 permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Amy; Watt, Elizabeth; Peacock, Michael; Husain, Siraj; Meyer, Tyler; Roumeliotis, Michael [University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study aims to quantify the positional accuracy of seed delivery in permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC). Methods: Treatment planning and post-implant CT scans for 5 patients were rigidly registered using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH) and used to evaluate differences between planned and implanted seed positions. Total and directional seed displacements were calculated for each patient in a clinically relevant ‘needle coordinate system’, defined relative to the angle of fiducial needle insertion. Results: The overall average total seed displacement was 10±8 mm. Systematic seed displacements were observed in individual patients and the magnitude and direction of these offsets varied among patients. One patient showed a significant directional seed displacement in the shallow-deep direction compared with the other four patients. With the exception of this one patient outlier, no significant systematic directional displacements in the needle coordinate system were observed for this cohort; the average directional displacements were −1±5 mm, 2±3 mm, and −2±4 mm in the shallow-deep, up-down, and right-left directions respectively. Conclusion: With the exception of one patient outlier, the magnitude of seed displacements were relatively consistent among patients. The results indicate that the shallow-deep direction possesses the largest uncertainty for the seed delivery method used at the TBCC. The relatively large uncertainty in seed placement in this direction is expected, as this is the direction of needle insertion. Further work will involve evaluating deflections of delivered needle tracks from their planned positions.

  16. Adjuvant brachytherapy removes survival disadvantage of local disease extension in stage IIIC endometrial cancer: a SEER registry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Peter J; Jani, Ashesh B; Horowitz, Ira R; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2008-01-01

    To assess the role of radiotherapy (RT) in women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. The 17-registry Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was searched for patients with lymph node-positive non-Stage IV epithelial endometrial cancer diagnosed and treated between 1988 and 1998. Two subgroups were identified: those with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and those with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. RT was coded as external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). Observed survival (OS) was reported with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up; the survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. The therapy data revealed 611 women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer during this period. Of these women, 51% were treated with adjuvant EBRT, 21% with EBRT and BT, and 28% with no additional RT (NAT). Of the 611 patients, 293 had organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and 318 patients had Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. The 5-year OS rate for all patients was 40% with NAT, 56% after EBRT, and 64% after EBRT/BT. Adjuvant RT improved survival compared with NAT (p primary tumor was present, the addition of BT to EBRT was even more beneficial.

  17. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  18. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Forrai, G. [Haynal Imre Univ. of Health Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiology; Sulyok, Z. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Surgery

    2000-03-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [German] Bei 103 Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom der Stadien T1

  19. Is there a role for a brachytherapy vaginal cuff boost in the adjuvant management of patients with uterine-confined endometrial cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greven, Kathryn M.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Lanciano, Rachelle M.; Corn, Benjamin W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Many patients who have uterine-confined endometrial cancer with prognostic factors predictive of recurrence are treated with adjuvant pelvic radiation. The addition of a brachytherapy vaginal cuff boost is controversial. Materials and Methods: Between 1983 and 1993, 270 patients received adjuvant postoperative pelvic irradiation following hysterectomy for Stage I or II endometrial cancer. Group A includes 173 patients who received external beam irradiation alone (EBRT), while group B includes 97 patients who received EBRT with a vaginal brachytherapy application. The median dose of EBRT was 45 Gy. Vaginal brachytherapy consisted of a low dose rate ovoid or cylinder in 41 patients, a high dose rate cylinder in 54 patients, and a radioactive gold seed implant in two patients. The median follow-up time was 64 months. The two groups were compared in terms of age, histologic grade, favorable versus unfavorable histology, capillary space invasion, depth of myometrial invasion, and pathologic stage. Results: Chi-square analysis revealed that the only difference between the two groups was the presence of more Stage II patients in group B (38% versus 14%). No difference was detected for 5 year pelvic control and disease-free survival rates between groups A and B. Conclusion: There is no suggestion that the addition of a vaginal cuff brachytherapy boost to pelvic radiation is beneficial for pelvic control or disease-free survival for patients with Stage I or II endometrial cancer. Prospective randomized trials designed to study external irradiation alone versus external beam treatment plus vaginal brachytherapy are unlikely to show a positive result. Because EBRT provides excellent pelvic control, protocol development for uterine-confined corpus cancer should focus on identifying patients at risk for recurrence as well as other means of augmenting EBRT (e.g. addition of chemotherapy) in order to improve disease free survival in those subgroups

  20. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  1. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore; Nout, Remi A.; Sturdza, Alina; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  2. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence. Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auoragh, A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Fuerth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fuerth (Germany); Strnad, V.; Ott, O.J.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, M.W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects. (orig.) [German] Nach einer Mastektomie und adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom kommt es bei 9 % (2-20 %) zum lokalen bzw. lokoregionaeren Rezidiv. Neben den oft limitierten operativen Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten ist die Strahlentherapie mit Oberflaechenhyperthermie die

  3. Exclusive brachytherapy for T1-T2 N0 cancer of the oral tongue: prognostic factors for local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frezza, G.; Baldissera, A.; Bunkheila, F.; Caliceti, U.; Galuppi, A.; Guidetti, A.; Sorrenti, G.

    1996-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The files of a group of patients (pts) treated with brachytherapy alone for cancer of the oral tongue were reviewed to assess the prognostic role of T stage, volume of disease, total dose and dose-rate. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1982 to 1994 46 pts (29 males, 17 females, age 38-84 years, median 63.1 years) were treated with 192 Ir brachytherapy, in 2 cases followed by prophylactic neck dissection for cancer of the oral tongue (T1N0: 19 pts; T2N0: 27 pts). Brachytherapy was performed with hairpins in the early years of the study (17 pts) and more recently with plastic tubes (29 pts), according to the Parts System. Dose ranged from 60-70 Gy with a dose-rate of 0.38-0.62 Gy/h (median 63.8 and 0.52 respectively). Volume of the disease was retrospectively assessed as the product of the three diameters of the lesion calculated for provisional dosimetry (range 0.25- 16 cc.). Median follow up is 72 mos (range: 14-153 mos). RESULTS: Overall local control was 82.6% ((38(46)) pts; T1: (18(19)), 94.7 %; T2: (22(27)), 81.5 %). Five of 8 pts who recurred were submitted to salvage surgery, and 3 of them are alive and free from disease at 34, 52 and 87 mos respectively. Recurrences appeared after 3-13 mos (median 5.5 mos) and were related to total dose ( 63 Gy (1(18)); 5.5 %) and to dose-rate ( 45 cGy/h (4(36)): 11.1 %). The volume of disease was not of prognostic significance since local control was 79.6 % ((6(28)) pts) in pts with a disease smaller than 3 cc. and 88.9 % in pts with large volume ((2(18)) pts). Seven (15.2 %) grade 3 complications (necrosis of the mandibular bone and- or of the soft tissues) were observed. Complication rate was higher in the high dose group (>63 Gy (4(18)) pts: 22.2 %) and was less affected by dose-rate (> 45 cGy/h (6(36)) pts: 16.6 %). No relationship between complications and volume was observed ( 3cc.: 16.6 %). All complications healed spontaneously. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: For T1-T2 cancer of the oral tongue exclusive

  4. Estimation of the optimal brachytherapy utilisation rate in the treatment of vaginal cancer and comparison with patterns of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Stephen R.; Delaney, Geoff P.; Gabriel, Gabriel S.; Barton, Michael B.; Jacob, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    Having previously modelled the optimal proportion of uterine cervix and corpus cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT), we aimed to complete the assessment of the role of BT for gynaecological cancers by estimating the optimal proportion of vaginal cancer cases that should be treated with BT, the optimal BT utilisation (BTU) rate for vaginal cancer. We compared this with actual vaginal BTU and assessed quality of BT for vaginal cancer by a Patterns-of-Care Study (POCS). Evidence-based guidelines were used to construct an optimal BTU decision tree for vaginal cancer. Searches of the epidemiological literature to ascertain the proportion of patients who fulfilled the criteria for BT were conducted. The robustness of the model was tested by sensitivity analyses and by peer review. A retrospective POCS of BT in New South Wales (NSW) for 2003 was conducted, and actual BTU for vaginal cancer was determined. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. Quality of BT for vaginal cancer was compared with published benchmarks. The optimal vaginal cancer BTU rate was estimated to be 85% (range 81–87%). In NSW in 2003, actual vaginal cancer BTU was only 42% (95% confidence interval 22–62%). In NSW, only nine patients were treated, all with intra-vaginal cylinders, and two of four to lower than recommended doses. BT for vaginal cancers is under utilised in NSW compared with the proposed optimal models of care. BT quality may have been suboptimal and this may relate to the rarity of this disease.

  5. Matched-pair analysis and dosimetric variations of two types of software for interstitial permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi, E-mail: hishiyam@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuji [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Satoh, Takefumi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanji, Susumu [Department of Urology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Uemae, Mineko [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Baba, Shiro [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether identical dosimetric results could be achieved using different planning software for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Data from 492 patients treated with brachytherapy were used for matched-pair analysis. Interplant and Variseed were used as software for ultrasound-based treatment planning. Institution, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, prostate volume, and source strength were used for factors to match the 2 groups. The study population comprised of 126 patients with treatment planning using Interplant software and 127 matched patients using Variseed software. Dosimetric results were compared between the 2 groups. The Variseed group showed significantly higher values for dose covering 90% of prostate volume (pD90), prostate volume covered by 150% of prescription dose (pV150), and dose covering 30% of the urethra (uD30) compared with the Interplant group. Our results showed that use of different software could lead to different dosimetric results, which might affect the clinical outcomes.

  6. Modulation of toxicity following external beam irradiation preceded by high-dose rate brachytherapy in inoperable oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taal, B.G.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Koning, C.C.E.; Boot, H.

    1996-01-01

    To induce fast relief of dysphagia in inoperable oesephageal cancer, we applied high-dose rate (HDR) intraluminal irradiation followed by external irradiation (EBRT) in a phase II study. 15 patients (group A: n = 15; 10 men, 5 women; median age 66 years) were treated with 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy plus 40 Gy EBRT (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy). Severe side-effects were encountered in 60% of patients: 3 late ulceration, 2 pending fistula and 2 patients with fatal haemorrhage after an interval of 6 months. Overall response was excellent: 9 complete remissions (60%) and 6 partial responses (40%). Because of the high toxicity rate, in a subsequent study (group B: n = 30; 23 mean, 7 women; median age 66 years) the EBRT scheme was changed using smaller fractions (2.0 Gy) to reach the same total dose of 40 Gy. The complication rate (17%) was significantly reduced, while the overall response remained excellent (83%): 17 complete and 8 partial responses. The impressive change in complication rate of HDR brachytherapy and EBRT stresses the impact of the fraction per dose and illustrates the small therapeutic margins. (author)

  7. Modulation of toxicity following external beam irradiation preceded by high-dose rate brachytherapy in inoperable oesophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taal, B.G.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Koning, C.C.E.; Boot, H. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    To induce fast relief of dysphagia in inoperable oesephageal cancer, we applied high-dose rate (HDR) intraluminal irradiation followed by external irradiation (EBRT) in a phase II study. 15 patients (group A: n = 15; 10 men, 5 women; median age 66 years) were treated with 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy plus 40 Gy EBRT (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy). Severe side-effects were encountered in 60% of patients: 3 late ulceration, 2 pending fistula and 2 patients with fatal haemorrhage after an interval of 6 months. Overall response was excellent: 9 complete remissions (60%) and 6 partial responses (40%). Because of the high toxicity rate, in a subsequent study (group B: n = 30; 23 mean, 7 women; median age 66 years) the EBRT scheme was changed using smaller fractions (2.0 Gy) to reach the same total dose of 40 Gy. The complication rate (17%) was significantly reduced, while the overall response remained excellent (83%): 17 complete and 8 partial responses. The impressive change in complication rate of HDR brachytherapy and EBRT stresses the impact of the fraction per dose and illustrates the small therapeutic margins. (author).

  8. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Wallner, Kent E.; Butler, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  9. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LU, Fokdal; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) applicat...... IC/IS brachytherapy improves the therapeutic ratio in LACC by enabling a tumour specific dose escalation resulting in significantly higher local control in large tumours without adding treatment related late morbidity.......Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC....../IS) applicators. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the impact on local control and late morbidity of application of combined IS/IC brachytherapy in a large multicentre population. Material/methods 610 patients with LACC from the retroEMBRACE study were included. Patients were divided into an IC group (N...

  10. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  11. Urethral toxicity after LDR brachytherapy: experience in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2015-01-01

    Urinary toxicity is common after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy, and the resolution of urinary toxicity is a concern. In particular, urinary frequency is the most common adverse event among the urinary toxicities. We have previously reported that approximately 70% of patients experience urinary frequency during the first 6 months after seed implantation. Most urinary adverse events were classified as Grade 1, and Grade 2 or higher adverse events were rare. The incidence of urinary retention was approximately 2-4%. A high International Prostate Symptom Score before seed implantation was an independent predictor of acute urinary toxicity of Grade 2 or higher. Several previous reports from the United States also supported this trend. In Japan, LDR brachytherapy was legally approved in 2003. A nationwide prospective cohort study entitled Japanese Prostate Cancer Outcome Study of Permanent Iodine-125 Seed Implantation was initiated in July 2005. It is an important issue to limit urinary toxicities in patients who undergo LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Several investigations have revealed that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer is atypically low, and that hypofractionation or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens using appropriate radiation doses may be expected to yield tumor control and late sequelae rates that are better or at least as favorable as those achieved with conventional radiation therapy. In this setting, we attempted treating localized prostate cancer patients with HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using this approach, with special emphasis on the relationship between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral dose calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2003, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at the Gunma University Hospital. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered in fraction doses of 3 Gy, three times per week; a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided HDR brachytherapy. The fraction size and the number of fractions in HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, whereas the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The fractionation in HDR brachytherapy was as follows: 5 Gy x 5, 7 Gy x 3, 9 Gy x 2, administered twice per day, although the biologic effective dose (BED) for HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT, assuming that the α/β ratio is 3, was almost equal to 138 in each fractionation group. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on

  13. In vivo dosimetry with semiconductors in medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Jaberi, Ramin; Aghili, Mehdi; Ghahremani, Fatemeh; Geraily, Ghazale

    2013-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the role of in vivo dosimetry with semiconductor detectors in gynaecological medium dose rate brachytherapy, and to compare the actual doses delivered to organs at risk (as measured using in vivo dosimetry) with those calculated during treatment planning. Doses to the rectum and bladder were measured in a group of patients with cervical carcinoma using semiconductor detectors and compared to the doses calculated using a treatment planning system. 36 applications of brachytherapy at dose rates of 1.8-2.3 Gy/h were performed in the patients. The mean differences between the measured and calculated doses were 3 % for the rectum and 11 % for the bladder. The main reason for the differences between the measured and calculated doses was patient movement. To reduce the risk of large errors in the dose delivered, in vivo dosimetry should be performed in addition to treatment planning system computations.

  14. Update on fertility preservation in young women undergoing breast cancer and ovarian cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Matteo; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S; Partridge, Ann H

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the article is to review the available options for fertility preservation in patients with breast and ovarian cancer, and the special issues faced by BRCA mutation carriers. Future fertility is an important consideration for many young patients with cancer. There are both experimental and standard available strategies for patients with breast and ovarian cancer to preserve fertility, and each has potential advantages and disadvantages. Embryo cryopreservation is widely available with a highly successful track record. Improvements in laboratory techniques have led to oocyte cryopreservation recently being recategorized as nonexperimental. Conservative gynecologic surgery is a standard consideration for patients with stage I ovarian cancer who desire future fertility. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation as well as ovarian suppression with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs during chemotherapy are considered experimental methods at this time, although recent data suggest both safety and efficacy for the use of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs in women receiving (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Special issues should be considered for women with BRCA mutations because of the need to undergo preventive surgery at young age. Multidisciplinary teams and well functioning relationships between the oncology and reproductive units are crucial to manage the fertility issues of young women with cancer.

  15. BrachyTPS -Interactive point kernel code package for brachytherapy treatment planning of gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilagam, L.; Subbaiah, K.V.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) are always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) applicators. Most of the commercially available brachytherapy TPS softwares estimate the absorbed dose at a point, only taking care of the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. So the doses estimated by them are not much accurate under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, interactive point kernel rode (BrachyTPS) has been developed to perform independent dose calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. As primary input data, the code takes patients' planning data including the source specifications, dwell positions, dwell times and it computes the doses at reference points by dose point kernel formalisms, with multi-layer shield build-up factors accounting for the contributions from scattered radiation. In addition to performing dose distribution calculations, this code package is capable of displaying an isodose distribution curve into the patient anatomy images. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code integrated with treatment planning systems against the other tools which are available in the market. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT) made low dose rate (LDR) applicator, Fletcher Green type LDR applicator and Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR) applicator were studied to test the accuracy of the software

  16. The financial burden of cancer: Estimates from patients undergoing cancer care in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Adnan A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The emotional burden associated with the diagnosis of cancer is sometimes overshadowed by financial burden sustained by patient and the family. This is especially relevant for a developing country as there is limited state support for cancer treatment. We conducted this study to estimate the cost of cancer care for two major types of cancer and to assess the perception of patients and families regarding the burden of the cost for undergoing cancer treatment at a private tertiary care hospital. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at day care and radiotherapy unit of Aga Khan University, Hospital (AKUH Karachi, Pakistan. All adult patients with breast and head & neck cancers diagnosed for 3 months or more were included. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed using SPSS. Results Sixty seven patients were interviewed during the study period. The mean and median monthly income of these patients was 996.4 USD and 562.5 USD respectively. Comparatively the mean and median monthly cost of cancer care was 1093.13 USD and 946.42 USD respectively. The cost of the treatment either fully or partially was borne by the family in most cases (94%. The financial burden of cancer was perceived as significant by 28 (42% patients and unmanageable by 18 (27% patients. This perceived level of burden was associated significantly with average monthly income (p = Conclusion Our study indicates that the financial burden of cancer care is substantial and can be overwhelming. There is a desperate need for treatment support programs either by the government or other welfare organisations to support individuals and families who are already facing a difficult and challenging situation.

  17. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  18. New inverse planning technology for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy: Description and evaluation within a clinical frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, Petra; Poetter, Richard; Baltas, Dimos; Karabis, Andreas; Fidarova, Elena; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new inverse planning technology based on the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning and Optimisation (HIPO) algorithm for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional manual optimisation as applied in recent clinical practice based on long-term intracavitary cervical cancer brachytherapy experience. Materials and methods: The clinically applied treatment plans of 10 tandem/ring (T/R) and 10 cases with additional needles (T/R + N) planned with PLATO v14.3 were included. Standard loading patterns were manually optimised to reach an optimal coverage with 7 Gy per fraction to the High Risk CTV and to fulfil dose constraints for organs at risk. For each of these patients an inverse plan was retrospectively created with Oncentra GYN v0.9.14. Anatomy based automatic source activation was based on the topography of target and organs. The HIPO algorithm included individual gradient and modification restrictions for the T/R and needle dwell times to preserve the spatial high-dose distribution as known from the long-term clinical experience in the standard cervical cancer brachytherapy and with manual planning. Results: HIPO could achieve a better target coverage (V100) for all T/R and 7 T/R + N patients. Changes in the shape of the overdose volume (V200/400) were limited. The D 2cc per fraction for bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon was on average lower by 0.2 Gy, 0.4 Gy, 0.2 Gy, respectively, for T/R patients and 0.6 Gy, 0.3 Gy, 0.3 Gy for T/R + N patients (a decrease from 4.5 to 4 Gy per fraction means a total dose reduction of 5 Gy EQD2 for a 4-fraction schedule). In general the dwell times in the additional needles were lower compared to manual planning. The sparing factors were always better for HIPO plans. Additionally, in 7 T/R and 7 T/R + N patients all three D 0.1cc , D 1cc and D 2cc for vagina wall were lower and a smaller area of vagina was covered by the reference dose in HIPO plans. Overall loading

  19. Commissioning of a grid-based Boltzmann solver for cervical cancer brachytherapy treatment planning with shielded colpostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikell, Justin K; Klopp, Ann H; Price, Michael; Mourtada, Firas

    2013-01-01

    We sought to commission a gynecologic shielded colpostat analytic model provided from a treatment planning system (TPS) library. We have reported retrospectively the dosimetric impact of this applicator model in a cohort of patients. A commercial TPS with a grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) was commissioned for (192)Ir high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer with stainless steel-shielded colpostats. Verification of the colpostat analytic model was verified using a radiograph and vendor schematics. MCNPX v2.6 Monte Carlo simulations were performed to compare dose distributions around the applicator in water with the TPS GBBS dose predictions. Retrospectively, the dosimetric impact was assessed over 24 cervical cancer patients' HDR plans. Applicator (TPS ID #AL13122005) shield dimensions were within 0.4 mm of the independent shield dimensions verification. GBBS profiles in planes bisecting the cap around the applicator agreed with Monte Carlo simulations within 2% at most locations; differing screw representations resulted in differences of up to 9%. For the retrospective study, the GBBS doses differed from TG-43 as follows (mean value ± standard deviation [min, max]): International Commission on Radiation units [ICRU]rectum (-8.4 ± 2.5% [-14.1, -4.1%]), ICRUbladder (-7.2 ± 3.6% [-15.7, -2.1%]), D2cc-rectum (-6.2 ± 2.6% [-11.9, -0.8%]), D2cc-sigmoid (-5.6 ± 2.6% [-9.3, -2.0%]), and D2cc-bladder (-3.4 ± 1.9% [-7.2, -1.1%]). As brachytherapy TPSs implement advanced model-based dose calculations, the analytic applicator models stored in TPSs should be independently validated before clinical use. For this cohort, clinically meaningful differences (>5%) from TG-43 were observed. Accurate dosimetric modeling of shielded applicators may help to refine organ toxicity studies. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer evaluated by repeated MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Simon; Lizondo, Maria; Hokland, Steffen; Rylander, Susanne; Pedersen, Erik M; Tanderup, Kari; Bentzen, Lise

    To quantify needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer and propose a threshold for needle migration. Twenty-four high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with an HDR boost of 2 × 8.5 Gy were included. Patients received an MRI for planning (MRI1), before (MRI2), and after treatment (MRI3). Time from needle insertion to MRI3 was ∼3 hours. Needle migration was evaluated from coregistered images: MRI1-MRI2 and MRI1-MRI3. Dose volume histogram parameters from the treatment plan based on MRI1 were related to parameters based on needle positions in MRI2 or MRI3. Regression was used to model the average needle migration per implant and change in D90 clinical target volume, CTV prostate+3mm . The model fit was used for estimating the dosimetric impact in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy. Needle migration was on average 2.2 ± 1.8 mm SD from MRI1-MRI2 and 5.0 ± 3.0 mm SD from MRI1-MRI3. D90 CTV prostate+3mm was robust toward average needle migration ≤3 mm, whereas for migration >3 mm D90 decreased by 4.5% per mm. A 3 mm of needle migration resulted in a decrease of 0.9, 1.7, 2.3, 4.8, and 7.6 equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy, respectively. Substantial needle migration in high-dose-rate brachytherapy occurs frequently in 1-3 hours following needle insertion. A 3-mm threshold of needle migration is proposed, but 2 mm may be considered for dose levels ≥15 Gy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of uterine cervix cancer. Analysis of dose effectiveness and late complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Fogarolli, Ricardo Cesar; Gentil, Andre Cavalcanti; Salvajoli, Joao Victor

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective analysis aims to report results of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From September 1992 to December 1996, 138 patients with FIGO Stages II and III and mean age of 56 years were treated. Median EBR to the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Parametrial boost was performed in 93% of patients, with a median dose of 14.4 Gy. Brachytherapy with HDR was performed during EBR or following its completion with a dose of 24 Gy in four weekly fractions of 6 Gy to point A. Median overall treatment time was of 60 days. Patient age, tumor stage, and overall treatment time were variables analyzed for survival and local control. Cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at rectal and bladder reference points were correlated with late complications in these organs and dose of EBR at parametrium was correlated with small bowel complications. Results: Median follow-up time was 38 months. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years was 53.7%, 52.7%, and 62%, respectively. By multivariate and univariate analysis, overall treatment time up to 50 days was the only statistically significant adverse variable for overall survival (p=0.003) and actuarial local control (p=0.008). The 5-year actuarial incidence of rectal, bladder, and small bowel late complications was 16%, 11%, and 14%, respectively. Patients treated with cumulative BED at rectum points above 110 Gy 3 and at bladder point above 125 Gy 3 had a higher but not statistically significant 5-year actuarial rate of complications at these organs (18% vs. 12%, p=0.49 and 17% vs. 9%, p=0.20, respectively). Patients who received parametrial doses larger than 59 Gy had a higher 5-year actuarial rate of complications in the small bowel; however, this was not statistically significant (19% vs. 10%, p=0.260). Conclusion: This series suggests that 45 Gy to the whole pelvis combined with

  2. Technique adaptation, strategic replanning, and team learning during implementation of MR-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliarenko, Julia; Carlone, Marco; Tanderup, Kari; Han, Kathy; Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar; Borg, Jette; Chan, Kitty; Croke, Jennifer; Rink, Alexandra; Simeonov, Anna; Ujaimi, Reem; Xie, Jason; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    MR-guided brachytherapy (MRgBT) with interstitial needles is associated with improved outcomes in cervical cancer patients. However, there are implementation barriers, including magnetic resonance (MR) access, practitioner familiarity/comfort, and efficiency. This study explores a graded MRgBT implementation strategy that included the adaptive use of needles, strategic use of MR imaging/planning, and team learning. Twenty patients with cervical cancer were treated with high-dose-rate MRgBT (28 Gy in four fractions, two insertions, daily MR imaging/planning). A tandem/ring applicator alone was used for the first insertion in most patients. Needles were added for the second insertion based on evaluation of the initial dosimetry. An interdisciplinary expert team reviewed and discussed the MR images and treatment plans. Dosimetry-trigger technique adaptation with the addition of needles for the second insertion improved target coverage in all patients with suboptimal dosimetry initially without compromising organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. Target and OAR planning objectives were achieved in most patients. There were small or no systematic differences in tumor or OAR dosimetry between imaging/planning once per insertion vs. daily and only small random variations. Peer review and discussion of images, contours, and plans promoted learning and process development. Technique adaptation based on the initial dosimetry is an efficient approach to implementing MRgBT while gaining comfort with the use of needles. MR imaging and planning once per insertion is safe in most patients as long as applicator shifts, and large anatomical changes are excluded. Team learning is essential to building individual and programmatic competencies. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder side effects after MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, P.; Georg, D.; Poetter, R.; Doerr, W. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical University Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Comprehensive Cancer Centre; Boni, A.; Ghabuous, A. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Goldner, G.; Schmid, M.P. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Comprehensive Cancer Centre

    2013-07-15

    Background and purpose: To analyze the time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder complications after brachytherapy for cervical cancer and to compare the incidence- and prevalence rates thereof. Patients and methods: A total of 225 patients were treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. Late side effects were assessed prospectively using the Late Effects in Normal Tissue - Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT/SOMA) scale. The parameters analyzed were time to onset, duration, actuarial incidence- (occurrence of new side effects during a defined time period) and prevalence rates (side effects existing at a defined time point). Results: Median follow-up was 44 months. Side effects (grade 1-4) in rectum and bladder were present in 31 and 49 patients, 14 and 27 months (mean time to onset) after treatment, respectively. All rectal and 76 % of bladder side effects occurred within 3 years after radiotherapy. Mean duration of rectal events was 19 months; 81 % resolved within 3 years of their initial diagnosis. Mean duration of bladder side effects was 20 months; 61 % resolved within 3 years. The 3- and 5-year actuarial complication rates were 16 and 19 % in rectum and 18 and 28 % in bladder, respectively. The corresponding prevalence rates were 9 and 2 % (rectum) and 18 and 21 % (bladder), respectively. Conclusion: Late side effects after cervical cancer radiotherapy are partially reversible, but their time course is organ-dependent. The combined presentation of incidence- and prevalence rates provides the most comprehensive information. (orig.)

  4. Time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder side effects after MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, P.; Georg, D.; Poetter, R.; Doerr, W.; Medical University Vienna; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien; Boni, A.; Ghabuous, A.; Goldner, G.; Schmid, M.P.; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder complications after brachytherapy for cervical cancer and to compare the incidence- and prevalence rates thereof. Patients and methods: A total of 225 patients were treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. Late side effects were assessed prospectively using the Late Effects in Normal Tissue - Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT/SOMA) scale. The parameters analyzed were time to onset, duration, actuarial incidence- (occurrence of new side effects during a defined time period) and prevalence rates (side effects existing at a defined time point). Results: Median follow-up was 44 months. Side effects (grade 1-4) in rectum and bladder were present in 31 and 49 patients, 14 and 27 months (mean time to onset) after treatment, respectively. All rectal and 76 % of bladder side effects occurred within 3 years after radiotherapy. Mean duration of rectal events was 19 months; 81 % resolved within 3 years of their initial diagnosis. Mean duration of bladder side effects was 20 months; 61 % resolved within 3 years. The 3- and 5-year actuarial complication rates were 16 and 19 % in rectum and 18 and 28 % in bladder, respectively. The corresponding prevalence rates were 9 and 2 % (rectum) and 18 and 21 % (bladder), respectively. Conclusion: Late side effects after cervical cancer radiotherapy are partially reversible, but their time course is organ-dependent. The combined presentation of incidence- and prevalence rates provides the most comprehensive information. (orig.)

  5. Dosimetric intercomparison of permanent Ho-166 seed's implants and HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Nogueira, Luciana Batista; Trindade, Bruno; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To provide a comparative dosimetric analysis of permanent implants of Ho(166)-seeds and temporary HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy through computational simulation. Brachytherapy with Ir(192)-HDR or LDR based on temporary wires or permanent radioactive seed implants can be used as dose reinforcement for breast radiation therapy. Permanent breast implants have not been a practical clinical routine; although, I(125) and Pd(103)-seeds have already been reported. Biodegradable Ho(166)-ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. Simulations of implants of nine Ho(166)-seeds and equivalent with HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy were elaborated in MCNP5, shaped in a computational multivoxel simulator which reproduced a female thorax phantom. Spatial dose rate distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated. Protocol's analysis involving exposure time, seed's activities and dose were performed. Permanent Ho(166)-seed implants presented a maximum dose rate per unit of contained activity (MDR) of 1.1601 μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, a normalized MDR in standard points (8 mm, equidistant to 03-seeds - SP1, 10 mm - SP2) of 1.0% (SP1) and 0.5% (SP2), respectively. Ir(192)-brachytherapy presented MDR of 4.3945 × 10(-3) μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, 30% (SP1), and 20% (SP2). Therefore, seed's implant activities of 333 MBq (Ho(166)) and 259 GBq (Ir(192)) produced prescribed doses of 58 Gy (SP1; 5d) and 56 Gy (SP1, 5 fractions, 6 min), respectively. Breast Ho(166)-implants of 37-111 MBq are attractive due to the high dose rate near 6-10 mm from seeds, equivalent to Ir(192)-brachytherapy of 259 GBq (3 fractions, 6 min) providing similar dose in standard points at a week; however, with spatial dose distribution better confined. The seed positioning can be adjusted for controlling the breast tumor, in stages I and II, in flat and deep tumors, without any breast volumetric limitation.

  6. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaréchal, Yannick; Bert, Julien; Schick, Ulrike; Pradier, Olivier; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boussion, Nicolas; Visvikis, Dimitris; Falconnet, Claire; Després, Philippe; Valeri, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled 125 I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400  × 250  × 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (≈500 ms 10 −6 simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications. (paper)

  7. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaréchal, Yannick; Bert, Julien; Falconnet, Claire; Després, Philippe; Valeri, Antoine; Schick, Ulrike; Pradier, Olivier; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boussion, Nicolas; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled 125I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400  × 250  × 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (≈500 ms 10-6 simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications.

  8. Five-year biochemical outcome following permanent interstitial brachytherapy for clinical T1-T3 prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 5-year biochemical disease-free outcome for men with clinical T1b-T3a NxM0 1977 American Joint Committee on Cancer (1997 AJCC) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland who underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Four hundred twenty-five patients underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy using either 103 Pd or 125 I, for clinical T1b-T3a NxM0 (1997 AJCC) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland, from April 1995 to October 1999. No patient underwent pathologic lymph-node staging. One hundred ninety patients were implanted with either 103 Pd or 125 I monotherapy; 235 patients received moderate-dose external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), followed by a prostate brachytherapy boost; 163 patients received neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation, in conjunction with either 103 Pd or 125 I monotherapy (77 patients) or in conjunction with moderate-dose EBRT and a prostate brachytherapy boost (86 patients). The median patient age was 68.0 years (range, 48.2-81.3 years). The median follow-up was 31 months (range, 11-69 months). Follow-up was calculated from the day of implantation. No patient was lost to follow-up. Biochemical disease-free survival was defined by the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definition. Results: For the entire cohort, the 5-year actuarial biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) survival rate was 94%. For patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease, the 5-year biochemical disease-free rates were 97.1%, 97.5%, and 84.4%, respectively. For hormone-naive patients, 95.7%, 96.4%, and 79.9% of patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease were free of biochemical failure. Clinical and treatment parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, risk group, age > 65 years, and neoadjuvant hormonal therapy. Isotope choice was

  9. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  10. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, Michael J.; Wasserman, Stuart G.; Koval, John M.; Sorace, Richard A.; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of using a Pd-103 implant as a boost in conjunction with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in patients having prostate cancer associated with adverse features. Materials and Methods: 114 consecutive high risk patients have been treated with combination EBRT and Pd-103 implant. 70 patients with follow-up range of 12-42 months (median 24 months) form the basis of this report. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extra-capsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater ((66(70))), Gleason score ≥ 7 ((38(70))), significantly elevated PSA (typically > 15 ng/ml)((30(70))) or elevated serum prostatic acid phosphatase (SPAP)((17(70))). Patients received median 4140 cGy EBRT to a limited pelvic field followed by a Pd-103 boost (median prescription dose: 8000 cGy). All patients have been followed in a prospective fashion with respect to PSA response, clinical evidence of disease progression and complications. Criteria for biochemical failure was relatively strict, and was analyzed using both, PSA > 2.0 and PSA > 1.0 as end points. Patients whose PSA was still decreasing at last follow-up were censored at that time. Freedom from failure rates were calculated by the method of Kaplan and Meier. Differences between groups were determined by the Log-rank method. Sexual potency was defined as the ability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient for intercourse. Results: Actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 3 years after treatment was 90% and 78%, when PSA > 2 and PSA > 1 were used, respectively. There are no documented local relapses. 4 patients failed distantly, and all other failures are based solely on rising PSA values. Biochemical failure was higher in patients having Gleason score ≥ 7 (p=0.001), those with PSA >20 (p=0.014) and in those with elevated SPAP (p=0.007). The primary treatment related morbity was temporary, Grade 1-2 urinary symptoms. No patient developed rectal ulceration or prostatic

  11. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, Michael J; Wasserman, Stuart G; Koval, John M; Sorace, Richard A; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of using a Pd-103 implant as a boost in conjunction with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in patients having prostate cancer associated with adverse features. Materials and Methods: 114 consecutive high risk patients have been treated with combination EBRT and Pd-103 implant. 70 patients with follow-up range of 12-42 months (median 24 months) form the basis of this report. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extra-capsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater ((66(70))), Gleason score {>=} 7 ((38(70))), significantly elevated PSA (typically > 15 ng/ml)((30(70))) or elevated serum prostatic acid phosphatase (SPAP)((17(70))). Patients received median 4140 cGy EBRT to a limited pelvic field followed by a Pd-103 boost (median prescription dose: 8000 cGy). All patients have been followed in a prospective fashion with respect to PSA response, clinical evidence of disease progression and complications. Criteria for biochemical failure was relatively strict, and was analyzed using both, PSA > 2.0 and PSA > 1.0 as end points. Patients whose PSA was still decreasing at last follow-up were censored at that time. Freedom from failure rates were calculated by the method of Kaplan and Meier. Differences between groups were determined by the Log-rank method. Sexual potency was defined as the ability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient for intercourse. Results: Actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 3 years after treatment was 90% and 78%, when PSA > 2 and PSA > 1 were used, respectively. There are no documented local relapses. 4 patients failed distantly, and all other failures are based solely on rising PSA values. Biochemical failure was higher in patients having Gleason score {>=} 7 (p=0.001), those with PSA >20 (p=0.014) and in those with elevated SPAP (p=0.007). The primary treatment related morbity was temporary, Grade 1-2 urinary symptoms. No patient developed rectal ulceration or prostatic

  12. The effect of combined external beam and high-dose intracavitary brachytherapy on dysphagia and survival in patients with advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorozu, Atsunori; Dokiya, Takushi; Ogita, Mikio; Kutsuki, Shoji

    1996-01-01

    During an 11-year period, a group of 130 patients with esophageal cancer of stages 2 to 4 were treated with external beam irradiation (40 to 60 Gy) followed by boost dose of 10 to 20 Gy of high-dose intracavitary brachytherapy. The overall 2-year survival rate was 15.4%. The significant prognostic factors were tumor size, response to external beam irradiation, pretreatment dysphagia score, and presence of distant metastases. The palliative effect was excellent; the dysphagia scores of 122 of 130 patients (93.8%) improved. The significant palliative factors were response to external beam irradiation and pretreatment dysphagia score. Tracheoesophageal fistulas developed after treatment in 13 of 130 patients (10%); 3 of the fistulas were probably related to radiotherapy. We conclude that intracavitary brachytherapy is useful in the treatment of cases of advanced cancer which show a good response to external beam irradiation and may be curative in patients with mild dysphagia. (author)

  13. Clinical Use of the Utrecht Applicator for Combined Intracavitary/Interstitial Brachytherapy Treatment in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Moerland, Marinus A.; Roesink, Judith M.; Tersteeg, Robbert J.H.A.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to investigate the benefit of the Utrecht interstitial CT/MR applicator for combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) approach, using magnetic resonance imaging—guided brachytherapy, over the intracavitary approach alone in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer and to analyze the clinical use of needles. Methods and Materials: This study includes the first 20 patients treated with the new applicator. Brachytherapy consisted of two pulsed dose rate applications, and the second application was performed with the IC/IS approach. The number of needles, chosen guiding holes through the ovoids, and insertion depths were based on the dose distribution and dosimetric shortcomings of the first application (IC alone). We investigated the dosimetric gain by comparing the clinical interstitial optimized plan (IC/IS clinical ) with an additionally generated optimized plan without needle use (IC study ). Furthermore, we studied the relation of the inserted needles and their source loading patterns with the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Results: A total of 54 needles (range, 1–6 per application) were applied with an average depth of 25 mm. The chosen needle positions corresponded with the location of the HR-CTV extensions. The total and individual needle treatment times per application were on average 19% (range, 4–35%) and 7% (range, 2–14%) of the implant treatment time, respectively. The total (external-beam radiotherapy + brachytherapy) D90 HR-CTV for the IC study and the IC/IS clinical were on average 79.5 (SD 7.4) Gy α/β10 and 83.9 (SD 6.7) Gy α/β10 , respectively, with an average gain of 4.4 (SD 2.3) Gy α/β10 for the second application. Conclusions: Needle placement was feasible in all patients and resulted in a gain in dose and better coverage of HR-CTV. Defining the location of HR-CTV protrusions and analyzing the associated needles has given us deeper understanding of the possibilities in magnetic

  14. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J

    2011-01-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue ≥41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T max ≤ 47 deg. C, T rectum ≤ 41.5 deg. C, and T bladder ≤ 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360 0 or 2 x 180 0 output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180 0 , 270 0 , or 360 0 output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m -3 s -1 ) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm 3 ) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T 90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM 43deg.C ) at 1 kg m -3 s -1 with 10/14 patients ≥41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T 90 ≥ 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show

  15. Automated calculation of point A coordinates for CT-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejoo Kang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal is to develop a stand-alone application, which automatically and consistently computes the coordinates of the dose calculation point recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society (i.e., point A based solely on the implanted applicator geometry for cervical cancer brachytherapy. Material and methods: The application calculates point A coordinates from the source dwell geometries in the computed tomography (CT scans, and outputs the 3D coordinates in the left and right directions. The algorithm was tested on 34 CT scans of 7 patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ovoid applicators. A single experienced user retrospectively and manually inserted point A into each CT scan, whose coordinates were used as the “gold standard” for all comparisons. The gold standard was subtracted from the automatically calculated points, a second manual placement by the same experienced user, and the clinically used point coordinates inserted by multiple planners. Coordinate differences and corresponding variances were compared using nonparametric tests. Results: Automatically calculated, manually placed, and clinically used points agree with the gold standard to < 1 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, respectively. When compared to the gold standard, the average and standard deviation of the 3D coordinate differences were 0.35 ± 0.14 mm from automatically calculated points, 0.38 ± 0.21 mm from the second manual placement, and 0.71 ± 0.44 mm from the clinically used point coordinates. Both the mean and standard deviations of the 3D coordinate differences were statistically significantly different from the gold standard, when point A was placed by multiple users (p < 0.05 but not when placed repeatedly by a single user or when calculated automatically. There were no statistical differences in doses, which agree to within 1-2% on average for all three groups. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that the automated algorithm

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  17. Comparison of Dose When Prescribed to Point A and Point H for Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Ji Hyeong; Gim, Il Hwan; Hwang, Seon Boong; Kim, Woong; Im, Hyeong Seo; Gang, Jin Mook; Gim, Gi Hwan; Lee, Ah Ram [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seou (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare plans prescribed to point A with these prescribed to point H recommended by ABS (American Brachytherapy Society) in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. This study selected 103 patients who received HDR (High Dose Rate) brachytherapy using tandem and ovoids from March 2010 to January 2012. Point A, bladder point, and rectal point conform with Manchester System. Point H conforms with ABS recommendation. Also Sigmoid colon point, and vagina point were established arbitrarily. We examined distance between point A and point H. The percent dose at point A was calculated when 100% dose was prescribed to point H. Additionally, the percent dose at each reference points when dose is prescribed to point H and point A were calculated. The relative dose at point A was lower when point H was located inferior to point A. The relative doses at bladder, rectal, sigmoid colon, and vagina points were higher when point H was located superior to point A, and lower when point H was located inferior to point A. This study found out that as point H got located much superior to point A, the absorbed dose of surrounding normal organs became higher, and as point H got located much inferior to point A, the absorbed dose of surrounding normal organs became lower. This differences dose not seem to affect the treatment. However, we suggest this new point is worth being considered for the treatment of HDR if dose distribution and absorbed dose at normal organs have large differences between prescribed to point A and H.

  18. Permanent interstitial low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer. An interim analysis of 312 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter [University Hospital Berlin, Department for Radiation Oncology of Charite School of Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate after treatment with permanent iodine-125 seed implantation (PSI) or combined seeds and external beam radiotherapy (COMB) for clinical stage T1-T2 localized prostate cancer is a clinically relevant endpoint. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of relevant patient- and treatment-related factors. The study population comprised 312 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implantation. All patients were evaluable for analysis of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), 230 for bRFS, of which 192 were in the PSI group and 38 in the COMB group. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose was 145 Gy for PSI, for COMB 110 Gy implant and external beam radiotherapy of 45 Gy. The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 8-66 months). bRFS was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≤ 0.2 ng/ml at last follow-up. Overall, the actuarial bRFS at 50 months was 88.4 %. The 50-month bRFS rate for PSI and COMB was 90.9 %, and 77.2 %, respectively. In the univariate analysis, age in the categories ≤ 63 and > 63 years (p < 0.00), PSA nadir (≤ 0.5 ng/ml and > 0.5 ng/ml) and PSA bounce (yes/no) were the significant predicting factors for bRFS. None of the other patient and treatment variables (treatment modality, stage, PSA, Gleason score, risk group, number of risk factors, D90 and various other dose parameters) were found to be a statistically significant predictor of 50-month bRFS. The biochemical failure rates were low in this study. As a proof of principle, our large monocenteric analysis shows that low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective and safe procedure for patients with early stage prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das biochemisch rezidivfreie Ueberleben (bRFS) nach der Brachytherapie mit permanenter Iod-125-Seed-Implantation (PSI) oder in Kombination mit externer Radiotherapie (COMB) ist beim Patienten mit fruehem Prostatakarzinom (T1/T2) ein relevanter

  19. Dosimetry experience of 192IR sources used In HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Myrku, Rodina Cela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The 192IR Sources are the most commonly used in radiotherapy treatments HDR worldwide. According to international recommendations on quality assurance in HDR brachytherapy, an acceptance test based on the determination of the source strength of any new source shall be carried out before first application to verify the manufacturer’s calibration data. The present paper gives the experimental determination of the source strength for our brachytherapy sources used until now in brachytherapy treatments. Materials/Methods: At Mother Teresa University Hospital we have a cost-effective gynecological brachytherapy unit from Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG named GyneSource® that is a five channel HDR after loader equipped with an 192IR source. The software used is HDR plus™ 2.5 that delivers an optimized treatment plan and makes the process especially fast and we use intracavitary BEBIG applicators. From April 2009 up to December 2012, we have imported nine HDR 192IR Sources. The exchange of the source and acceptance test is done by the physicist of the clinic once the source is imported. The measurements are done with a Well-type ionization chamber HDR1000 Plus and the electrometer used is MAX4000. Only seven sources are compared as we miss the dosimetry data of the first source, and the forth source was not measured and not used because the machine was not working in that time. Results/Conclusions: Eight sources were accepted for clinically use as the measurement were within the tolerance. The source number four with e deviation of -1.92% has been double checked compared with a free in-air measurement with farmer type chamber that gave a deviation to source certificate of 4% that is still inside the tolerance to accept a source for clinical use. The deviations of measured Air Kerma rate to the value of the sources certificates of all our used 192IR sources are less than 2%, which are within the tolerance. The checked value of updated source strength in

  20. Pilates and Dance to Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-12

    Breast Cancer; Quality of Life; Lymphedema; Fatigue; Depressive Symptoms; Body Image; Self Esteem; Optimism; Sexual Function Disturbances; Stress; Sleep Disturbance; Pain; Muscular Weakness; Postural Balance; Range of Motion; Cardiorespiratory Fitness

  1. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co‐detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  2. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayer, F; Rahim, H B; Kogelnik, H D; Menzel, C; Merz, F; Deutschmann, H; Kranzinger, M

    1996-03-15

    To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern afterloading techniques offer possibilities of

  3. Pretreatment Serum Testosterone and Androgen Deprivation: Effect on Disease Recurrence and Overall Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Adamovich, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Low testosterone has been implicated as a possible adverse prognostic factor in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. We evaluated the impact of pretreatment serum testosterone on survival after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From October 2001 to November 2004, 619 patients underwent brachytherapy and 546 had a pretreatment serum testosterone level measured. Pretreatment serum testosterone levels were assigned by the following criteria: below-normal (n = 105), low normal (n = 246), mid normal (n = 132), high normal (n = 50), and above normal (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Results: Six-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were 97.7%, 99.8%, and 89.2%. When comparing patients with low or low normal testosterone with those with average or higher testosterone, there was no significant difference in bPFS (97.6% vs. 98.4%; p = 0.72), CSS (99.8% vs. 100%; p = 0.72), or OS (88.9% vs. 90.8%; p = 0.73). Among patients with average and higher pretreatment testosterone, there was no significant difference in outcomes when comparing patients who did and did not receive androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). For patients with low or low normal testosterone levels, there was no significant difference in bPFS or CSS when comparing patients who did and did not receive ADT. However, there was a trend toward lower OS in patients with baseline lower testosterone levels who also received ADT (83.9% vs. 91.3%, p = 0.075). Conclusions: Low pretreatment testosterone levels alone did not affect disease recurrence or OS. Patients with baseline low testosterone who also were treated with ADT had a trend toward decreased OS.

  4. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, Felix; Rahim, Hassan B. K.; Kogelnik, H. Dieter; Menzel, Christian; Merz, Florian; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kranzinger, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. Methods and Materials: During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with r